Issuu on Google+

St. George's College Subject: 8th CHEMISTRY

Teacher's notes

Objectives

Class: Inorganic Compounds

Vocabulary Link and Learn

Date:

In‐Class Survey

November 2nd

Prepared by

2009 1


___ C5H10 + ___ O2          ___ CO2 + ___ H2O

2


8th Milton A ‐ Inorganic Compounds Name

Oral Intervention

 Blackmark

Sergio  María Fernanda  Alejandra  Almendra  Anna Paula  Sandra E‐C  Maia  María Belén  Alfredo  Kinley  Arianne  Sandra M.   Fiorella  Cristina Giulia  Jaime  Stefano  Bruno 

3


8th Milton Alpha ‐ Inorganic Compounds Name

Oral Intervention

Blackmark 

Marcelo  Antonella  Paulo  Alejandro  Brenda  Diego  Gabriel  Valeria  Giuliana  Joshua  María Gracia  Gonzalo N.  Rodrigo  Paolo  Gonzalo R.  Giorgio  Nicolás  María Claudia 

4


Let's remember previous  learned concepts...

5


What are two main types of Chemistry?

6


New knowledge beginning......

7


Classification I • Inorganic compounds can be classified in different ways. • A common method is based on the constant presence of certain  specific elements. For example: • Oxides, always contain one or more Oxygen atoms. • Hydrides, contain one or more atoms of Hydrogen. • Halogens, contain one or more Halogen atoms (group VIIA).

http://bit.ly/4xs9of

8


Classification II • Another way to classify inorganic compounds is based on the types  of chemical bonds that are present in the compound. • Ionic compounds contain ions are bonded by the electrostatic forces  of opposite charges in the compound's ions. For example: Table Salt  (Na+Cl‐). • Molecular compounds, contain elements formed by sharing  electrons. For example: Water (H20).

http://bit.ly/2jUqsK

http://bit.ly/FEKdp

9


Classification III • A third type of classification considers the possible specific reactivity of  inorganic compounds depending on the type of chemical reactions they  can go through.  • Acids are compounds that produce H+ ions (protons) when dissolved in  aqueous solutions. Example: HCl (Chlorhydric Acid), H2SO4 (Sulphuric  Acid). • Bases, on the other side, are proton acceptors. Example: NaOH  (Sodium hydroxide).

10


Chemical Functions • This type of classification referring to an atom, or group of  atoms called functional group. They're common for a group of  chemical compounds. • The functional group determines the chemical properties  common to the group of compounds.

11


INORGANIC COMPOUNDS

12


Inorganic Compounds • Inorganic compounds can be: Binary, when they're made up of two  different elements: CuO, NaO; Ternary, if they're formed by three  different elements: Ba(OH)2; Cuaternary, if they're formed by four  different elements: NaHSO4.

13


NOMENCLATURE

SYSTEMATIC NOMENCLATURE • To name chemical compounds using this technique,  you must use number prefixes: MONO_ (1), DI_ (2),  TRI_ (3), TETRA_ (4), PENTA_ (5), HEXA_ (6), HEPTA_  (7), OCTA‐ (8), NONA_ (9), DECA_ (10), etc... Examples: Cl2O3     Dichloric trioxide I2O        Diiodine monoxide       CO2       Carbon dioxide

14


15


NOMENCLATURE

STOCK NOMENCLATURE • In this type of nomenclature, when the element  forming the compound has more than one valence, it is  indicated at the end of the name with roman numbers  in parenthesis. Examples: Fe(OH)2     Iron hydroxide (II) Fe(OH)3    Iron hydroxide (III)

16


NOMENCLATURE

TRADITIONAL NOMENCLATURE • In this nomenclature, prefixes and suffixes must be  used to distinguish the valence the chemical compound  is using: Examples:  

ENGLISH

SPANISH 

3 Valences  4 Valences  hypo‐     ‐ous  hipo‐     ‐oso  2 Valences 

1 Valence 

               ‐ous                ‐oso                    ‐ic                 ‐ico  (hy)per‐    ‐ic  (hi)per‐   ‐ico 

17


18


OXIDES

http://bit.ly/2u8kcV

19


OXIDES • These are the compounds where Oxygen is combined with  other element. • Almost all elements form oxides (except noble gases and  halogens), and their properties vary from the place in the  periodic table of the element combined with Oxygen. • Oxides are classified in: Basic or Metallic Oxides, and Acid  Oxides.

20


http://bit.ly/AOCta

21


OXIDES • These are the compounds where Oxygen is combined with  other element. • Almost all elements form oxides (except noble gases and  halogens), and their properties vary from the place in the  periodic table of the element combined with Oxygen. • Oxides are classified in: Basic or Metallic Oxides, and Acid  Oxides.

22


BASIC OXIDES • Also called Metallic Oxides, they are binary ionic  compounds that result from combining a metal and Oxygen. • They're crystalline solids formed by a metallic cation and an  oxide anion (O2‐). • These oxides typically react with water to form Bases or  Hydroxides. • When the metal combined is farther to the left in the  periodic table, the oxide will have a stronger ionic bond.

http://bit.ly/nObOs

23


EXERCISES Pb   +   O2   →   PbO2  Name: Na  +  O2   →   Na2O  Name: 2Fe   +  O2  →   2FeO  Name: Fe   +  O2 →  Fe2O3  Name:

24


ACID OXIDES • Also called Nonmetal Oxides. • Are binary covalent compounds resulting from the  combination of Oxygen and Non‐Metals. • These oxides are from elements located at the right side of  the periodic table, and with more covalent character for  those elements located in the upper part of the groups. • Their aqueous solutions form acids.

C  +  O2  →  CO2  Name:

S  +  O2   →   SO3  Name: 25


HYDROXIDES

http://bit.ly/41ccsa

26


HYDROXIDES • Are compounds that result from the combination of a basic  oxide and water. • The hydroxides from alkaline metals (Lithium, Sodium,  Potassium, Radius and Cesium) are the stronger and more  stable ones. • The hydroxides from metals such as: Magnesium, Iron,  Bismuth, Nickel and Copper, are less soluble in water, but can  still neutralize acids. CaO   +   H2O   →   Ca(OH)2  Name: Na2O  + H2O →   Na(OH)  Name: Fe2O3   + H2O →   Fe(OH)3  Name: 27


ACIDS

• Their characteristics are opposed to those of hydroxides. • According to Arrhenius, an acid is a substance that releases  protons in an aqueous solution (H+); and a base releases  hydroxide ions (OH‐). • According to Bronsted‐Lowry, an acid is a substance that  releases protons (H+), and a base is an acceptor of protons. ARRHENIUS: H2O(l) + H2O(l) is in equilibrium with H3O+(aq) + OH‐(aq)

BRONSTED‐LOWRY:

28


OXOACIDS • Are the substances that result from the combination of an  acid oxide and water. • It's a type of acid that contains Oxygen, hence the name.

SO2   +   H2O   →   H2SO3  Name: N2O5  + H2O →   HNO3  Name:

29


HYDRACIDS • Are binary compounds that result from the combination of  Hydrogen with a Halogen from group VIIA or from group VIA.

HF  HCl HI

30


SALTS

31


SALTS • Salts are ionic compounds, which result from the  combination of an acid and a base. • They're formed by cations from bases or anions from acids,  in these reactions water is always produced.

32


OXOACID SALTS • Are the compounds that result from the combination of an  oxoacid with a base, where the substitution can be total as in  neutral oxosalts; or partial as acid and basic oxosalts. • Are ionic compounds, that have ionic bond between cations  and radicals. • Their important  property es conducting electricity in  solutions.

33


HYDRIDES

34


HYDRIDES • They're binary compounds that result from combining  Hydrogen with other element. • Almost all elements are capable of forming hydrides. • Metals have a positive valence (+), and Hydrogen works  with a negative valence (‐1). • The combinations of hydrogen with no metals have a  predominantly covalent bond, therefore are covalent bonds. • The combinations of alkaline metals and alkaline earth  metals have predominantly an ionic bond.

35


METALES

36


NON足METALS

HYDROGEN 37


Objectives • Identify the types of Inorganic Compounds. • Identify metal and non‐metal oxides. •  Remember and apply the Valences of Elements. • Perform chemical reactions involving: Hydrogen,  Oxygen, Water, Metals, Non‐Metals, Acids and Bases.

Note: All, or most, of the objectives will be covered during class time,  however the student must be responsible for those objectives not covered or concluded.

BACK 38


Vocabulary • • • • • •

Reactant Product Reversible Decomposition Synthesis Balancing

Note: Most of the vocabulary words will be covered during class time,  however the student must be responsible for those words not covered or concluded.

BACK 39


Prepared by

Gerardo LAZARO Science Lead Teacher Email: glazaro@sanjorge.edu.pe Wiki: http://science‐learning2009.wikispaces.com Blog: http://learningandscience.blogspot.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/glazaro

BACK 40


Link and Learn You can visit the following websites to improve your  understanding on the present topic: • • • • • • •

http://bit.ly/rGJuh http://bit.ly/1FkjYu http://goldbook.iupac.org/index.html http://bit.ly/SJXue http://science‐learning2009.wikispaces.com http://learningandscience.blogspot.com http://libraryatstgeorge.blogspot.com

BACK 41


8th Chemistry - Inorganic Compounds