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Contents

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Lessons from the Past As a hardware and home improvement dealer, what would you tell someone who wanted to know how to survive in the business? To find the answer to that question, Aimee Feaver interviewed nine retailers running hardware and home improvement stores that have been in operation for a collective 831 years. She didn’t find a magic bullet but she did discover 11 best practices for retail longevity.

Liesemer Hardware, Mildmay, Ontario.

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Contents

Merchandising

9

hardware

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2013

AT THE BORDER

Volume 125, Number 1

hardwaremerchandising.com

Operating on the front lines.

Tel: 416-442-5600

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Fax: 416-510-5140

80 Valleybrook Drive, North York, ON, M3B 2S9 Hardware Merchandising, established in 1888, is published 6 times a year by BIG Magazines LP, a division of Glacier BIG Holdings Company Ltd.

Editor: Lori Smith 416-442-5600 x3238 lsmith@bizinfogroup.ca Art Director: Ellie Robinson 416-442-5600 x3590 erobinson@bizinfogroup.ca Production Manager: Barb Vowles 416-510-5103 vowlesb@bizinfogroup.ca Circulation Manager: Beata Olechnowicz 416-442-5600 x3543 bolechnowicz@bizinfogroup.ca Associate Publisher: Robert Koci 416-442-5600 x3203 rkoci@bizinfogroup.ca Editorial Advisory Board: Chris Curtis, Alf Curtis Home Improvement; Michel Fréchette, RONA; Chris Galer, Poco Building Supplies; Dan Hardy, Central; Bob Lockwood, Lockwood RONA; and Tyler Knight, Knights’ Home Building Centre.

TAKING CARE OF BUSINESS HM Top Ten | 12 How to Calculate Added Value

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Is Your Business on the Right Track

DEPARTMENTS ROB KOCI | 6 LORI SMITH | 7 SNAPPED

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CHIS WELCOME PARTY

+ LBMAO DINNER STOCK & SELL Decked Out | 25

WRLA PRAIRIE

The Power of Overhead

PARTY

SHOWCASE WELCOME

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Storage

+ CLOSING

NIGHT PARTY

New Products @ 2013 Prairie Showcase

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AQMAT 1ST RECONNAISSANCE

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GALA

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BIG MAGAZINES LP Corinne Lynds, Editorial Director Tim Dimopoulos, Executive Publisher Alex Papanou, Vice-President of Canadian Publishing Bruce Creighton, President of Business Information Group Subscriber Services: To subscribe, renew your subscription or to change your address or information contact us at 416 442 5600 x3543 or 3249. Subscription Rates: Canada $63 per year, Outside Canada $94US per year, Single Copy Canada $12. Privacy Notice: From time to time we make our subscription list available to select companies and organizations whose product or service may be of interest to you. If you do not wish your contact information to be made available, please contact us via one of the following methods: Tel: 1-800-668-2374 Fax: 416-442-2191 Email: privacyofficer@businessinformationgroup.ca Mail: Privacy Office, 80 Valleybrook Drive, North York, ON, M3B 2S9. Contents of this publication are protected by copyright and must not me reprinted in whole or in part without permission of the publisher. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40069240, ISSN 1199-2786 (Print) | ISSN 1929-6428 (Online) We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.

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HOME OF

A MORE

REWARDING

EXPERIENCE

To learn more, visit home-owner.ca – or talk to one of us. Dunc Wilson, National, 519.498.1302 Kevin MacDonald, Atlantic Canada, 902.368.1620 Luc Martin, Quebec, 819.357.0203 Andrew Parkhill, Alberta, British Columbia, 604.751.3853 Georgette Carriere, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, 519.501.5988

Home Hardware isn’t just the number one banner for independent dealers – it’s also one of the most awarded. This year, five out of eight of Hardware Merchandising Magazine’s 2012 Outstanding Retailer Awards went to Home Hardware Owners. Their hard work, combined with the structure and support of Home Hardware Stores Limited, allowed them to flourish and to receive the recognition they deserve. Congratulations to all our Outstanding Retailer Award winners. Next year, it could be your accomplishments we celebrate.

Best Hardware Store

Owen and Wanda Connolly

Community Leader

John Kehler and Gary Gilchrist

Dauphin Home Hardware Vernon Home Building Centre Dauphin MB Vernon BC

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Best Young Retailer

Tyler Knight

Knights’ Home Building Centre Meaford ON

Best Building Supply/Home Improvement Store Under 25,000 sq. ft.

Larry and Sylvia Yanchishyn

Kenora Home Hardware Building Centre Kenora ON

Best Building Supply/Home Improvement Store Over 25,000 sq. ft.

Rob Hauser

Hauser Home Hardware Building Centre Camrose AB

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rob koci Associate Publisher

associate

rkoci@bizinfogroup.ca

My first foray into retail was as a consultant. In 1991, I was asked by a book and video store franchisor to look into the accounts of a number of his franchisees. They were in dire straights. He was desperate to keep them alive as long as possible because he held the leases. If they went bust, he was not far behind. To assess their positions, I made a simple cash flow spreadsheet in Excel (Lotus 123, actually. I told you it was a long time ago!), visited their stores and punched in their projected sales. None of the stores I visited could be saved. In each case, it was clear the best option was to have a big sale to clear stock and pull cash, then lock the doors, walk away and never look back. That was the best option for the franchisees, anyway. My client wanted them paying rent for as long as possible while he negotiated his way out of the lease agreements. It was not a comfortable position for me. I remember one franchisee in London, Ontario—a husband and wife. The store had the down-in-the-heels vibe typical of a business locked in a financial death spiral. The little stock they had sat pathetically spaced out to hide the emptiness. The few customers that entered left quickly. The ones that lingered and talked and bought a trinket or a book did so for pity’s sake. Anyone who has done retail knows the funereal feeling I’m referring to. The wife was working 12-hour days at the store without pay while the husband worked two jobs, starting at 3:00 a.m. delivering newspapers, then as an electrician through the day. They had sunk $100,000 of their hard-earned money into the store—the ma and pa dream they couldn’t let die. My arrival had been heralded by the franchisor as the beginning of their salvation, so they looked at me with an expectation I knew I could not fulfill. I had a lovely dinner with them and their two daughters. We sat down in their tidy living room to talk. God, it was awful. The only mitigation for the grinding sadness was their character, the kind that makes me think of frontiers and settlers and the people that make countries great. The kind of people who suffer a dying dream with grace. My next encounter with retail couldn’t have been more different. Writing for Hardware Merchandising in the late ‘90s and early 2000s, I visited some of the most successful hardware stores in the country: Perth Home Hardware, Dick’s Lumber, Preston Hardware. I talked to retailers like Lansing Buildall’s John Kitchen; Executive Home Building Centre’s Jason Welikoklad; and Brad West before he left Castle to join Jeld-Wen. I met dozens of people who were full of energy, ideas and— significantly—success and money. Publishing lives on the same continuum: there is the sweaty desperation of a magazine going bad at one end and the nimble, dancing excitement of a bright future and ongoing success at the other. After a rough couple of years, we’ve redesigned and restaffed this magazine. Now we are re-energizing this 125-year-old brand into the must-have, go-to brand that the Canadian home improvement market deserves. Fresh into my new role as associate publisher of Hardware Merchandising, I attended the BMR trade show in Quebec City, then went back to attend the AQMAT awards a few months later. There was dancing. Lots of it. Who knew Castle president Ken Jenkins has moves like Jagger? And TIM-BR Mart president Tim Urquhart, too? I took note, and got up and danced. ~ R.K.

hello, My name is rob It's snowing. Should you raise the price of your store's limited sup­ ply of shovels? This question was posed in a recent post by Rafi Mohammed on Harvard Business Review's Blog Network. An un­ scientific survey of his friends re­ vealed that "most felt it was okay to raise prices... enough to earn a tidy extra profit." He was sur­ prised by the result and not sure he agreed. He explained that the question brings up a whole "array of fairness questions." He writes: "Is it worth it to potentially alien­ ate customers for a quick profit windfall? Or, to take another view of the situation, if store­ owners take the risk of pur­ chasing a large inventory of shovels for the winter sea­ son, don't they deserve to profit?" What would you do? ~ L.S.

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Lori Smith EDITOR lsmithi@bizinfogroup.ca

This year Hardware Merchandising is 125 years old. Founded in 1888 as Hardware & Metal magazine, it has ridden the changing tides of commerce and consumer behaviour, and weathered the Great Depression and World Wars I and II as well as myriad recessions. Five years ago to mark the magazine's 120th birthday, Steve Payne, the magazine's former editor and publisher (and current editor of HM's sister publication, Canadian Contractor), wrote a retrospective on the magazine. Having visited the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto to read the earliest editions of the magazine, he was able to chronicle not only the magazine's history but the Canadian hardware and home improvement industry's history. And leafing through those early editions, he made a discovery: the issues facing dealers (competition, fair pricing, consolidation, consumer needs, cash flow, inventory management, marketing, etc.) have changed little over the decades. Making it to a 125th anniversary is a remarkable achievement for any business. To celebrate, we decided not to revisit our history but to see what we could learn from stores that had also made it to, and past, the 125-year mark—stores that could have been on the original subscriber list. In "Lessons from the Past," Aimee Feaver interviewed nine hardware and home improvement retailers running businesses that have been operating for a collective 831 years. From those conversations, she was able to distill 11 tips for surviving in retail. Leading the list are knowing and serving your customer and being able to change with the times. Today, dealers are facing a barrage of challenges in the form of e-commerce, consolidation, pricing, and competition. Your store's success (and longevity) will depend on how well you meet those challenges. But they are no more daunting than the challenges dealers have faced over the last 125 years. They can be survived. We know this from experience. A magazine has to evolve with its customers and the times too. In the year ahead, you'll find more changes in our print and online products. We want to make sure Hardware Merchandising is around for another 125 years.~ L.S.

Hardware Merchandising's

Happy 125th anniversary!

founder John Bayne Maclean offered a list of eerily-familiar retailer sins in the January 10, 1889 edition. This list (with apologies for the "he") included: W  hen he does not understand his business. W  hen he is too honest, giving more than he gets for his money. W  hen he is too anxious for trade, giving credit indiscriminately. W  hen he is cranky, crusty or ill-tempered. W  hen he depends on others to buy his goods for him. W  hen he or his help are untidy or unclean. W  hen he is too busy to read trade journals...

I am a baseball fan so it's no surprise that a post by the St. Louis Cardinals' mental trainer on SmartBlog on Leadership caught my eye. Writing about "coaching optimism," Jason Selk outlines "four easy-to-learn and highly effective ways to culti­ vate an optimistic outlook." They are: 1. Coach your staff to develop a relentless solution focus (RSP). 2. Teach them to find one improvement to the situation. 3. Train them to acknowledge any improvement in the current situation. 4. Encour­ age them to recognize "done wells." Using these techniques, Selk helped the Cardinals end a 20-year drought and win two World Series (2006 and 2011). Would spring training in optimism help your team? ~ L.S. ©iStockphoto/Thinkstock

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IS YOUR StORE

OUtStAnDInG? EntER HARDWARE MERCHAnDISInG’S 2013 OUtStAnDInG REtAILER AWARDS (ORAs) The ORAs are the home improvement industry’s premiere independent awards program. All Canadian home improvement retailers that have operated under the current ownership for at least two years are eligible to enter. CAtEGORIES • Best Hardware Store • Best Building Supply/Home Centre (under 25,000 square feet) • Best Building Supply/Home Centre (over 25,000 square feet)

• Best Large Surface Retailer • Best Contractor-Specialist Dealer • Best Young Retailer • Community Leader • Local Hero

Visit www.hardwaremerchandising.com/ORAs/ for up-to-date information The ORAs are owned and produced by

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The ORAs are supported by

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Calculating Value Added p14

Your Business on Right Track p16

Lessons from the Past p 18

CB

Taking Care of Business ADVICE | Insight | Inspiration

At the Border

Greg Drouillard knows more t h a n a l i ttl e about running

Operating on the front lines BY LORI SMITH

a business in close proximity to the Canada/US border. Target Building Materials has been operating for 46 years in Windsor, Ontario, a city of just over 317,000 that sits on our side of the 49th parallel, directly across from Detroit, Michigan. Competition from the US has always been a challenge. But, says Drouillard, the back and forth of building supplies across the border is increasing. Sales representatives from U.S. retailers are staking out territories in southwestern Ontario and visiting job sites. Menards, a major building supply and home centre retailer from the U.S. Midwest, has spread eastward and is opening new stores in the Detroit area. And, with the dollar at par, Canadian DIYers, contractors and builders are making the easy trek southward in search of lower prices and greater product selection. The problem, says Drouillard, is that not everything available in the States meets Canadian regulations and building codes. The lines are getting blurry. “Clarification,” he says, “is needed.” ‹ Photography by Dax Melmer

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At the Border

Photography by Dax Melmer

Drouillard’s father, Moe, opened Target Building Material’s doors in 1967. At that time and throughout the ‘70s and ‘80s, it was primarily a contractor resource. In the ‘90s, the growth of the DIY market brought consumers to the store and now they account for 35 percent of its business, while contractor and institutional sales make up 55 percent and 10 percent respectively. However, Drouillard says that though they’re grateful for the retail business and are working everyday to learn about and improve services and products for DIYers, the core of the store’s business will always be contractors.

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Target’s deep roots in the commercial side of the building industry mean that staff members have to have exceptional product knowledge. Thanks to careful hiring and in-depth training the technical expertise of Target’s staff is definitely one of its competitive advantages. ”We were somewhat concerned when the big boxes entered the market,” Drouillard explains. “But what’s happened is that a contractor or consumer will go into one of these stores and ask a technical question about a product or its application and the staff member

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won’t know what the customer’s talking about so they literally send people to us.” Customer care also differentiates Target from its competitors. Twelve full-time staff members make sure customers are in and out of the store and back at the job site as quickly as possible. Long-standing relationships with vendors and staff members willing to research and source prod-

ucts also contribute to the store’s success—and longevity. “It’s commonly said in Windsor that if you can’t find something, call the folks at Target,” says Drouillard. “Our staff is eager. We have young guys who’ll get on the Internet and find products for people. It’s incredible.” Drouillard adds that staff members are asked on a regular basis what products the store should consider bringing in and whether there’s something missing in terms of customer service, merchandising or marketing. “We ask staff a lot of things and they come up with a

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CB

At the Border

Boris Radavanovic takes care of technical sales

Dean Warner handles the warehouse, delivery and sales at Target.

lot of suggestions,” he says. “I’m in an office so I don’t interact [with customers] as much as I used to but my staff does so we really listen to them.” While Drouillard may work primarily in the office now, it wasn’t always the case. He joined the family business in 1974 under the self-imposed condition that he learn the business from the ground up. “I’d never intended to work for my Dad. I’d been working at Air Canada for four years and the opportunity to move to Montreal with them came up. I think my Dad said, ‘Oh-oh, the

kid’s going to leave’ and we came to an agreement,” he explains. “I did every job in the company for a good length of time. I drove the trucks. I worked in the warehouse. Inside sales. Outside sales. Purchasing. And here I am 38 years later. I have a great respect for my staff because I’ve done their jobs. And I think they have respect for me because I’ve done the work.” Drouillard also respects, and has earned respect, in the Ontario building industry. He is not only a member of the Toronto Builders

Suppliers Association (TORBSA), the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), the Specialty Tools & Fasteners Distributors Association (STAFDA), and the Lumber and Building Materials Association of Ontario (LBMAO), but has held executive positions in these associations (LBMAO director and past chairman; past director and president for STAFDA; current director—third time— and past president for TORBSA). He is also presently serving as an advisor for the Essex/ Kent County Better Business Bureau. There’s no doubt that he knows the industry’s rules and

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regulations. As a result, his concerns about the increase in building materials coming across the border are centered as much on the issues of building safety and liability as they are on competitive grounds. Drouillard points out that with some 80 percent of the Canadian population living within 200 kilometers of the border to the U.S., this flow is a cross-country concern. “Building officials are essential to making sure U.S. products conform and everybody is on a level playing field. If the products do meet Canadian codes, then we have a worthy opponent.”

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CB Most Viewed

one

HM TOP TEN

2012’stop10

www.hardwaremerchandising.com’s

CEO ROBERT DUTTON LEAVES RONA AFTER 35 YEARS OF SERVICE

most-read stories

three

Say it Ain’t So Joe!

two

On January 31st, Natural Resources Minister Joe Oliver announced that the Federal Government was cutting off the popular ecoENERGY Retrofit program two months early. It was good for consumers and home improvement retailers but bad for the government coffers.

RONA Calls Annual Meeting of Shareholders

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Photo: www.joeoliver.ca

HM celebrated the eight winners of its Outstanding Retailer Awards on October 25th with a Gala Dinner at the Toronto Sheraton Airport Hotel & Conference.

five

Invesco Canada Calls for RONA Shareholder Meeting to Oust Board of Directors

four On October 11th, Lowe’s Canada president Alan Huggins tweeted that lowes.ca’s e-commerce function was up and running and that he had placed an order.

Photo © Roger Yip

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Robert Dutton

Tool Time

No Americanization on His Watch

Milwaukee’s introduction of its “ground-breaking, cordless” M18 FUEL ½” Drill/Driver and M18 FUEL ½” Hammer Drill/Driver had visitors to the site clicking.

nine

RONA Announces New Strategic Priorities

eight Tool Time Too:

Stanley’s launch of its new line of FatMax corded tools and lithium-ion powered cordless tools also drew the attention of online readers.

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TM

35,000 5,000 185 45 7 5 1

Products in our warehouses

emPloyees

stores

years of exPerience

Private brands

hardware and building material warehouses great Purchasing

Power

For more information, contact Jean falardeau, executive vice-president, telephone: 1 800 361-0885

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CB

How to Calculate Value-Added

How to Calculate Value-Added BY Bill Lee My definition of value added is the difference between the price your company pays for a product and the price your customer pays—frequently referred to as gross profit. When you include the services you and your company offer, the value added should grow in the customer’s mind. Here’s how this concept looks as a formula: • Your Customer’s Cost less Your Company’s Cost + Services = Value Added (GPM) The definitions of gross profit margin and gross profit are: • Gross Profit Margin (GPM) = your gross profit divided by your sell price (expressed as %) • Gross Profit = your sell price less your cost of goods sold (expressed in dollars) It is the sales force’s job to justify to the customer the amount of markup or value added that the company earns over and above the company’s cost. When the sales force fails to justify as much markup or gross profit as your company adds to its cost, you often lose the order to a competitor. Here are a few of the possibilities that could cost a salesperson the sale: • For whatever reason, the salesperson was simply outsold by the com-

petition. A competitor was more persuasive, had a better relationship with the customer or presented their case more effectively. • The competition had a lower sell price because they negotiated a lower cost when they purchased or manufactured the product. • The competition had a lower price because their bid contained less value added than your company offered. • The competition had a lower price because they were willing to make the sale and earn a lower gross margin. • The competition offered a lower price and the customer perceived the competition’s value added to be greater than your company offered. Customers almost always do their best to make buying decisions based on reasons they believe to be in the best interest of their company. Many times, however, they get their emotions involved in the decision-making process or are misinformed. Therefore, it’s the salesperson’s job to make sure that the customer is armed with all of the facts. The customer must scrutinize the items that make up the quote to make sure that each bid received is comparable. If the customer is not willing to do this much analysis, the salesperson is advised to do it for them.

Service Factors The following are measurable service factors that may or may not be included in your competitor’s bid: • Return policy • Terms of sale • Restocking charge • Delivery capability, size and capacity of equipment, etc. • Accuracy of deliveries • Manufacturing or assembly capability • Services the respective salespeople personally perform • Quality of estimates • Quality of material • Accuracy of billing • Installed sales capability • Incidences of backorders How effective is your sales force at justifying your company’s value

It is the sales force’s job to justify to the customer the amount of markup or value added that the company earns over and above the company’s cost. added? Ways to communicate value added would be a good topic for an upcoming sales meeting. Companies that measure service are better able to answer the following questions to quantify their value added: • What are the odds the products you sell will be delivered to the customer by the time you commit that they will be delivered? • What are the odds the products you sell will be delivered complete with no back orders?

make a someday/maybe list. In an article for CBS MoneyWatch, business journalist Laura Vanderkam recommends using productivity expert David Allen’s concept of having a “Someday/Maybe List” of ideas you won’t try today but might try later. Post it prominently and let your employees add to it.

• What are the odds the products you sell will be invoiced correctly (prices on the invoice same as the prices on the purchase order)? These are very important questions for your customers to consider because when errors occur on the delivery or in the billing of the products they are depending on, your customers cannot live up to the commitments they make to their customers. Just remember, it’s the purpose of the sales force to impart upon customers and prospects the VALUE that both the sales force and the company provides. The VALUE a salesperson offers is equal to the SIZE of the problems he or she is able to help the customer solve. Added value

is not always related to products; many times it has to do with the salesperson’s ability to help the customer accomplish one or more of the following: • Make more money • Solve annoying problems • Become more successful SUGGESTION: Make sure that your sales force focuses its attention on more than product and price. Salesmanship involves a lot more than quoting. Bill Lee is a business consultant, seminar leader and author.   He has written two books: Gross Margin: 26 Factors Affecting Your Bottom Line and 30 Ways Managers Shoot Themselves in the Foot.  www.BillLeeOnLine.com

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CB

Is Your Business on the Right Track?

depend on the size/nature of

Is Your Business on the Right Track?

your company but we suggest you should be seeing at least one positive mention per month. Amp the positive stories yourself

BY MARK WARDELL

through blogs, press releases, and social media.

It’s that time of year again. Assessment time! The time when you look back at the goals you set for 2012 and assess which you achieved, which you exceeded and which you have yet to conquer. When you’re running a

you can see, measure and forecast over the coming year. Our litmus test for sales performance is your market share. Has your customer count increased each month, compared with the same month the previous year? Your “sales per

Production/Operations. Weekly reports allow you to evaluate whether your company

You should expect one great idea per month coming forward from a team member or manager.

is running efficiently. Weekly reports reflect that management is meeting often to work toward the

The more a business is driven by

pre-determined key performance

its systems, people, and the resulting culture, the less it relies on the owner for its value, and the more valuable and saleable it becomes.   Ultimately, the litmus tests we’re talking about here are key indicators of the overall value of your business, which has much to do with the culture that emerges as systems take root and your enterprise begins to runs on its own. If you don’t see staff bringing their own initiatives, ideas, and drive to your business, you probably haven’t arrived at the top of the Value Pyramid. But keep at it and you’ll get there.

business, it’s difficult to find time to assess goals on a regular basis, but nothing could be more essential. To get you off to the right start, here are litmus tests to help you evaluate whether your business in on the right track in five essential areas. Leadership. When it comes to your leadership team, the most incisive question to ask is this: Is your leadership leading? The best way to know if you have some true leaders running your business (alongside you) is by analyzing their ideas. Our litmus test for leadership? You should expect one great idea per month coming forward from a team member or manager. Sales.Your goal is sales growth

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customer” is an important number as well, but if you have a growing list of happy loyal customers, sales growth won’t be far behind.

indicators (KPIs). This litmus test should reveal that your com-

Mark is president and founder of

pany’s operations are becoming

Wardell Professional Development

healthier and stronger. If indeed

(www.wardell.biz), an advisory

Company Morale/Retention.

your company is on the right

group that helps business own-

When company morale is down,

track, you’ll be climbing what I

ers plan and execute the growth

you can feel it.  When the typical of-

call, The Value Pyramid.

of their companies. The author of

fice banter stops, that’s a major in-

In a nutshell, The Value Pyra-

seven business books, Mark also

dication that something is amiss.  If

mid, pictured here, depicts the

writes regularly for several nation-

you are feeling disconnected from

stages a business climbs as it ma-

al business publications, including

your team, check in with your social

tures into a self-sustaining, valuable

experts (the influencers within your

enterprise. What does The Value

organization, not necessarily man-

Pyramid represent? It’s a process.

Profit Magazine, The Globe & Mail, and CGA Magazine. Email him at mark@wardell.biz

agement) to learn what the mood of the team is like. They’ll be able to let you know if it has changed and

DEMYSTIFYING ONLINE SHOPPERS. PwC has

can help you come up with a plan

released a new report detailing the Canadian perspec-

to set things right. Public profile. Is your public profile getting stronger and more

www.pwc.com/ca/multi-channelshopping.

visible? The litmus test here will

www.hardwaremerchandising.com

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tive on its 2013 Multi-Channel Retailing Survey. Free at

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PASSION, TALENT, WORK IN THE QUEBEC’S HARDWARE AND BUILDING SUPPLY INDUSTRY

1 Gala st

Reconnaissance January 26 2013, Château Frontenac, Québec

Promoted by

Coast to coast, leaders attended the show with 400 guests

PARTNERS

MAIN SPONSORS

PRIZE SPONSORS

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LESSONS FROM THE PAST

BY AIMEE FEAVER Hardware Merchandising was launched in1888 and there are still stores around that would have been on its original subscriber list. To mark our birthday, we asked some the current and past owners of those businesses to share their thoughts on how to build a business that will weather the tests of time.

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Imagine for a moment that you are standing at the front of a room filled with fresh-faced, optimistic 30-year-olds who, thanks to some stroke of good luck or entrepreneurial spirit, now call themselves home improvement retailers. They are in the room to hear your answer to one question: What should I do to make sure my business is still around in 125 years ? What would you tell them? ‚

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Abbott & Haliburton, Port au Port, Newfoundland, circa 1912.

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To find out the answer to those two questions, we interviewed the owners of a handful of mostly family-owned operations located from Newfoundland to Ontario, all of which opened their doors at least 125 years ago. (Canada’s West—Manitoba and points beyond—was not as well served by home improvement retailers. Businesses that did set up shop, such as Burrows Lumber Co. in Winnipeg, focused solely on lumber manufacturing.) The founders of these stores might well have cracked open the first issue of Hardware and Metal, the name of this magazine when John Bayne Maclean published the first issue in January 1889. They definitely experienced the growth of the railways, which opened up the country. They endured more than 10 recessions of varying severity and The Great Depression. They served the country during two World Wars and other conflicts. They faced the changes brought about by the Second Industrial Revolution, the post-war population booms, and now the technological revolution. They weathered the entry of U.S. big boxes into the Canadian marketplace. And they survived all the changes in the ways Canadians shop, live, work, and buy. “How did they do it?” we asked. Here’s what we found out. To begin with, we discovered that there is no silver bullet. However, there is a collection of wisdom and time-tested approaches to business influenced by geography, economics, technology and people, learned over generations of owners, getting up early and working late six, often seven, days a week. This collection can be distilled down to 11 key business practices that lead to longevity in hardware and home improvement retailing.

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 Be willing to change

When infrastructure like roads and railways weaved their way into communities, it became easier to buy goods closer to home. Competition specializing in categories like food and clothing set up shop and prompted “hardwaremen” to adjust what they sold. It was the process of refining and retooling product offerings to carve out a niche and/or returning to what they knew best, which often came down to some version of hardware or lumber. “Every generation will put their own mark on the business and that’s good. The key for us was offering what the community needed at a particular point in time,” says Bill Abbott, fifth-generation family owner of Abbott & Haliburton Co. Ltd., which has been serving the community of Port au Port, Newfoundland since 1885. Those same roads and new services often signified a boom time and stores would look at expanding what they offered. Take today’s Liesemer Home Hardware, for instance. Originally founded in 1873 in Mildmay, Ontario as Liesemer Hardware, the Liesemer family formed a partnership and began selling and repairing Ford cars, and pumping gas sometime around 1912. Soon, they became known as Liesemer and Calflesh Hardware and Garage. Twentytwo years later, the Liesemers sold the garage and car business to concentrate on hardware. Change also came in the form of overhauling the look, layout, and size of the store with remerchandising and expansion projects. Upgrading forces a closer look at the product mix, offering an opportunity to winnow out slow movers and further refine the selection. “It sends a message to the community,” says Peter Liesemer, today’s

fourth-generation owner of the business. “It tells them ‘We’re here to stay. We’re not just hanging on.’ It creates a positive attitude.”

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 Be visible and present in your store.

Absenteeism does not equal longevity. All of our interviewees quickly noted that hard work and long hours come with the territory. Camille Robichaud, together with this wife, Marie-Colombe, is the fourth-generation owner of U.J. Robichaud TIM-BR MART in Meteghan Centre, Nova Scotia. His advice to his children was: “Get up early, work until late at night. Be there in the store and watch the business.” Being present helps build employee engagement and mutual respect as well. When staff sees the boss putting in the long hours, they are inclined to put in the extra effort and might even be more understanding when tough decisions—like cutting hours during a recession—are made. And it has an upside for customer loyalty too. Margaret Pettie, along with her husband John, was the fifth-generation family owner of Weichel’s Hardware (founded 1879, now known as Elmira Home Hardware) in Elmira, Ontario. As she tells it, the more your customers see you, the more confident they will feel about shopping in your store: “They need to see the owner. When they see you regularly, customers know you’re committed to the business and have a connection with you. ”

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OPERATE AS IF YOU ARE IN A RECESSION.

Being in the store allows owners to keep an eye on business and as Krista McBay, now the sixth-generation owner of Elmira Home Hard-

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1. Founded in 1879, Weichel’s Hardware in Elmira, Ontario, is now Elmira Home Hardware. 2. Aisle in Weichel’s Hardware. 3. Liesemer Hardware in Mildmay, Ontario, was founded in 1873. It is now Liesemer Home Hardware (4).

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ware, explains, “You have to control your costs, focus on being lean, and operate like you’re in a recession. Know where you are putting your money and keep advertising. ” There’s no doubt that when recessions hit, or big competitors move into town, retailers have to get back to basics, fine-tune what’s on offer and look at the essentials customers need. “There’s no fluff in a recession,” says McBay.

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Be competitive and buy right.

When large department stores and big box retailers entered the Canadian retail landscape, many

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independents faced the crucial decision of whether they should join a buying group. On the pro side of the decision, joining would give them access to better pricing on products and provide support in other areas. Many discovered that the benefits of being part of a group—the marketing/advertising programs, greater product selection, the elimination of admin costs and even being a sounding board for an owner weathering economic storms—outweighed the sting of relinquishing lone wolf status. “We tried to carry unique products and be the only

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store in town that did,” says Peter DELIVER th annbeing iversar Liesemer. “So, it helped in- y WHAT YOUR volved in a group since they were MARKET NEEDS. the ones sourcing new products Call it “staying competitive,” all the time.” “watching the trends” or “carryOver the coming decades, as ing what your customers want,” the competitive heat turned up, it comes down to understanda group’s programs proved their ing and meeting the product and worth: “The tools they provide are service needs of your customers invaluable. You can’t do all of that (remember that part about being [programs, buying, etc.] on your willing to change?). own and still be profitable as an “Know your market,” says Blair independent,” says Krista McBay. Douglas, fourth generation and However, if a store’s not part former owner of N.F. Douglas & of a group, Camille Robichaud adCo Ltd. (now Mary Lake Home Hardware, Caledonia, Nova Scovises building relationships with suppliers and “when you buy, get tia), the family business founded the best prices.” in 1875. “There’s no sense in bring- ‹

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2, 4 and 6. Early advertisement and customer invoices issued by U.J. Robichaud in Meteghan Centre, Nova Scotia. 1. Abbott & Haliburton has been serving the community of Port au Port, Newfoundland since 1885. 3. Today, Abbott & Haliburton flies the TIMBER MART banner. 5. Abbott & Haliburton founder Michael Francis Abbott.

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ing in what customers don’t need. Be light on your feet and ready to ‘move’ with them.” Living in the heart of southern Ontario’s Mennonite country, John Pettie explains that the unique needs of that community played a significant part in his store’s longevity. For instance, Pettie made sure bolts could be bought by the pound. “Mennonites are 75 percent of our business, and that kept us going when others faltered. We could count on them coming in for certain hardware items so we made sure to stock what they needed.” For the Robichauds, delivering what the market needed meant sustaining the community’s body

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and spirit in unexpected ways. With no construction projects underway in the early 1900s and, therefore few jobs to be found, Elisée Robichaud (second generation owner) built a flourmill to serve and employ members of the community. (The store’s website features a letter from Elisée to an unknown recipient on the importance of the flourmill to the community: “I suffer greatly when I think that we must leave our country in order to make enough money and support our grandchildren...”). They also made the decision to build cedar coffins, which took pressure off mourning families who would have to turn to a family member or friend for the task.

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TRAIN YOUR STAFF.

“Customers are more knowledgeable now,” comments Peter Liesemer. “You have to stay one step ahead and make sure your staff is educated on products.” More than a few of our interviewees echoed this sentiment, noting the Internet’s influence on consumer knowledge, particularly if stores were offering a new category. Boom times brought opportunity to expand into categories like appliances and electronics. While economic busts forced some categories out the door, others were eliminated simply because owners felt they were not doing it justice on the sell-

ing floor. “You have to buy well, yes, but you have to sell th ann y well too. If you can’t do it right, iversar you’ll do more harm than good,” says Bill Abbott. Having well-trained staff moves product and helps with customer service too. Margaret Pettie says, “Back in the day our staff helped in every department, so we had to know about all of them, not just one. We could walk a customer through every item on their list, from corner to corner in the store. It made them feel like they had our undivided attention and that builds loyalty.” And if a customer’s question prompts an “I’m not sure” kind of answer, consider taking a page from Krista McBay’s book: Offer

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CALL YOUR CUSTOMERS BY NAME.

The creators of the ’90s hit sitcom Cheers had it right: We want to go where everybody knows our name. It creates a sense of belonging, people are immediately put at ease and it brings them back—often. “Because we were in a small town, you got to know everyone by

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WHEN YOUR CUSTOMERS TALK, LISTEN TO THEM.

How do you find out what your market needs? Talk with your customers, ask, and then listen to what they tell you. “Customers will determine the hours you’re open and the products you carry,” says Blair Douglas. The tool rental program at Mary Lake Home Hardware, launched in late spring 2012, was the result of customer feedback. Allan Mansfield, the current and fifth-generation owner of the Douglas family business, explains that after “toying with the idea,” they asked their customers what they thought about it and what kinds of tools they would need. “It’s now a very successful program

“If there’s something going on, be part of it whether it’s donations, or being in events, do something,” encourages Camille Robichaud. Being part of the community also means contributing to its well-being, and being sympathetic when customers fall on hard times. Common hardships of the Great Depression, for example, brought the town of Caledonia, Nova Scotia together. Blair Douglas explains, “No one had money so they paid when they could. People remembered that when times got better. Customers are generational.” In a similar vein, Bill Abbott recalls a particular customer who is shopping at his store today thanks to the kindness of his great-great uncle: “He told me that when his grandfather died years ago, the family fell on hard times. Abbott & Haliburton forgave their debt and the family never forgot that.” Interestingly, being part of a community can come back in unexpected ways and at unanticipated times. In 1976, when extensive structural damage to their store wrote off one-third of their inventory, John Pettie tells how his Mennonite customers— for whom a barn raising is part of the fabric of their culture—understood the full impact of the damage and donated money. “It was almost like a barn-raising. They knew the kind of hardship it meant to get things going again.” According to Allan Mansfield doing business in a small town affords a great opportunity to ‹

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BE PART OF THE COMMUNITY.

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In our interviews, customer service was the quickest, biggest, most common key to longevity, and it is surprising—or not—how simple the sentiments were. The way Bill Abbott sees it, good service gives you a leg up on the competition: “Treat customers as well as you possibly can. Loyalty is everything in a small community and there’ll always be a big box flogging the lowest price.” Good customer service was something sacred; something to be protected and improved upon at every turn, even when times were tough. The Petties are emphatic that good service was maintained in recessions in their store. They also point out it is important not to take for granted that staff knows and understands your particular brand of service. They say that the dividends paid from the investment of time, patience, consistency [in training staff], and leading by example are well worth it.

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PRACTICE GREAT CUSTOMER SERVICE

for us,” he says. In fact, it’s so successful that some tools that would typically take two years to pay for themselves have earned back their worth in eight or nine months.

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their first name, so that’s how we’d greet customers when they came in,” says Bill Cutting, the former fourth-generation owner of Cutting Lumber Ltd. in Simcoe, Ontario, founded in 1885 (now called Pickard Home Hardware). He adds, “You have to adopt a customeris-always-right attitude and satisfy them or they won’t come back.” Camille Robichaud tells of the grocery store 10 kilometers away he once shopped at every Sunday because of one employee, Wayne, who knew him by name and said hello. “I tell my staff, ‘Don’t call customers a number. When they walk in the store, say hello and call them by name.’ That’s what has brought our customers back.” Continuing the Pettie’s commitment to personalized service, Krista McBay says that everyone who enters the store is “coming into our home and should be welcomed that way.” Customers are greeted within 10 seconds of walking through the door. If the greeting includes the customer’s name, even better.

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free WiFi for your staff (customers too) and let them carry smart phones while at work. “Sure, there’s an element of trust there and we expect them to be responsible with it,” she explains. “But we see it as an extra customer service. Our staff can help out with something on the spot.”

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1. Flyer from Weichel’s Hardware, Elmira, Ontario. 2 and 4. Custom coffins were once a big business for U.J. Robichaud, which was founded in 1867 in Meteghan Centre, Nova Scotia. 3, 5 and 6. In 1903, the Robichauds opened a woodworking mill, which remains a vital part of its operation. Camille Robichaud is shown here (5) with some of the custom windows produced at the mill, where many of the original tools and machines (6) are still in use.

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listen: “In a small town, we can th communicate with our ycustomanniversar ers outside of the store, just by being a member of the community, like at a dart game or a baseball game for example. I get plenty of information that way.”

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LOVE WHAT YOU DO

Thinking back once more to that room of fresh-faced 30-year-olds, there is one more piece of advice a number of our interviewees offered, sometimes as a final, parting

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thought: Love what you do. Being a home improvement retailer isn’t for the faint of heart. Who knows what challenges—and opportunities— there’ll be in the years ahead. Camille Robichaud explained it to his children, Daniel and Lise (their son Marc, who was very involved in the business, passed away in early 2012 at the age of 36), this way: “No, it’s not going to be lucrative. You won’t get rich overnight, but you’ll be making a good living—as good

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as your neighbour—and have a few dollars left over.” To Margaret Pettie, being an entrepreneur also means living without a pension plan’s safety net, so it helps to love what you do: “You give up a big chunk of your life when you own a store. That store IS your future, what you did while you were there will determine how you live when you walk out the door for the last time.” What if given the opportunity to do it all over? Peter Liesemer is quick to answer: “I love this job.

You have to. I’d choose to do it all again.” Aimee Feaver is a freelance writer and corporate communicator with a long history in the retail and home improvement industries. She owes her love of storytelling to her Newfoundland roots and finds inspiration in volunteering for Good Shepherd Ministries in Toronto, ON and planning how she’ll put more miles on her well-worn backpack. She can be reached at afcomm@me.com

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Decked Out

A backyard would seem somewhat naked without a

Deck options are not limited to pressure treated wood

deck. It’s one of the reasons why 12x16-foot platforms of

BY JOHN G. SMITH

pressure treated lumber have become such a familiar staple across the Canadian landscape. And there are plenty of product options that can make the great outdoors even greater. “More consumers are looking for a nice outdoor living area, and they are ready to invest more and more so they will have an extension of their living rooms,” says Vince Houle, business development manager for SquareDecko, whose products can be used to cover existing decks or build new structures. “The season is quite short in summer, but when it’s there, we want to enjoy it.” For their part, hardware retailers can choose from a growing array of related

Trex Select® www.trex.com

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Decked Out

Decko™Stone www.squaredecko.ca

building products ranging from pressure-treated lumber to cedar, exotic woods or composite materials. The platforms themselves can be enhanced with railings, pergolas and accent lights. Even traditional deck screws face competition from hidden fastening systems like those offered by TigerClaw or Trex. Interest in one product or the next can be fed by surprising sources. Pergolas are now “hotter than pistols,” notes Dan Griffiths,

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director of North American sales for Fraserview Cedar Products in Surrey, BC. He credits media reports about the dangers of skin cancer, which are driving customers to look for sources of shade. “Second-growth and third-growth trees are not conducive to pergolas,” he adds. “Large logs with slow-growth characteristics, specifically tight grains, are the desired products.” Even as new building materials emerge, he suggests that most

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are looking to imitate the look of cedar, whether it is through a stain or a man-made texture. “But they can never exude the warmth and beauty.” The related prices may be a challenge for some buyers. Cedar supplies on the west coast were restricted in late 2012, and he expects that to continue during the first half of 2013. “Buying is feverish and prices have gone up 15 to 20 percent,” he said during an interview in early January. “The

U.S. economy is getting dramatically better by the day, so there is increasing demand. [But] there has also been less-appropriate, or fewer appropriate trees, coming out of the mountains.” A dramatic increase in the demand for coastal western hemlock is partly to blame, as export markets look for alternatives to beetle-infected spruce supplies. Hemlock’s price per board foot has more than doubled in recent years, and that is attracting a

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larger share of the resources that would otherwise be used to bring cedar to market. Of course, cedar is not the only option. Popular exotic species include everything from ipe to jatoba. But consumers who have warmed to these woods may be surprised by price increases of their own. These increases could lead more buyers to composite building systems. It’s one of the reasons that Trex recently added a lighter Tiki

Torch color to a pair of tropical colors that were already in the Transcend collection’s catalogue of deck systems, says Adam Zambanini, vice-president of marketing at Trex, whose composite deck systems are 95% recycled wood, sawdust and plastics. And today’s projects hardly end with the deck’s surface. Products like Trex’s RainEscape drainage system will transform a suspended deck into a roof for the space below. The space around a deck is just as important. New aluminum railings in the form of Trex Reveal come in long spans that offer clear sightlines, and they can connect to 2x2 aluminum posts or composite post sleeves. Interest in integrated lighting continues to grow with the panels and post lights that use LEDs, Zambanini adds. “They’re creating a masterpiece, and lighting is the final touch.” Maintenance-free building systems will be particularly attractive to those who are already outfitting their projects with features like a $6,000 outdoor kitchen, says SquareDecko’s Houle. His company’s products are based on a fibreglass-reinforced polypropylene. Decko Tile can be used to cover a structurally sound but tired-looking deck. Moisture circulates underneath, helping to protect the structure below. The material itself will be familiar to those who have been exposed to the edges of a backyard pool, and he says it is more dimensionally stable than other options. Decko Step can also offer a protective covering for steps, and it is available in 32-, 36and 48-inch lengths, or in special orders up to eight feet long. The company’ newest product line can be used to create the entire structure. Decko Stone is a 20x16-inch structural tile for

home builders and designers, and can be installed much more quickly than a pressure-treated product. In one trial, a pair of trained installers built a 12x12foot deck in 15 minutes. Given the growing list of options, retailers may enjoy some extra support in the showroom. SquareDecko, for example, offers a QR Code and toll-free line that customers can use to access product information. “There’s a lot of retail stores that are cutting staff,” Houle says. “They want a product that sells itself.” A sheet that can be used to sketch a project includes the shopping list for related products on the back. That can be faxed to Square Decko for an estimate. Trex, meanwhile, has introduced an iPad app that customers can use to visualize products from decking boards to fascia. More apps will be coming later in 2013. “It’s really hard for a consumer to understand railings. We have 1,203 design options,” Zambanini says, referring to the emerging software to highlight deck materials, railings, trim and lighting. Retailers and building centres should also think about educating installers about ways to take advantage of shorter lumber lengths, Griffiths adds. “Historically, manufacturers had tremendous pressure on their 12-, 16and 20-foot inventories. Since the advent of box stores, it’s proven that people can make decks with shorter lengths. “If contractors could learn to ... be more imaginative in their deck patterns, they could make use of 10-foot and 14-foot [lengths] or dog legs, and save tremendous amounts of money,” he says.

~ Vince Houle, SquareDecko

John G. Smith is the president of WordSmith Media Inc. in Ajax, Ontario. Follow him on Twitter at @wordsmithmedia.

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“More consumers are looking for a nice outdoor living area, and they are ready to invest more and more so they will have an extension of their living rooms.”

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The Power of Overhead Storage

The Power of Overhead Storage BY ROB WILBRINK

Back in the ‘70s and ‘80s every building centre had a back stockroom and many had several. There just wasn’t room on the sales floor for the growing variety of products being developed for the DIY market. There were stores that had a complete replica of their showroom either in a upper level mezzanine or in a

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basement. Whatever didn’t fit on the shelf went to back stock. There were many problems with this system, including: • A lot of out-of-stocks in the showroom because staff didn’t have the time or inclination to dig product out of back stock. • Service negatively affected because sales staff was constantly off

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the sales floor looking for product in back stock while customers waited. • Inventory got out of whack because purchasers didn’t take the time to check back stock and acted on information from sales staff that product was out-of-stock. • Inventory was difficult to control because of multiple locations for the same product. Year-end counts

were difficult and time consuming. • Merchandising sets could never be maintained because it was easier to add a peg or shelf position to accommodate incoming product than to run the extra items down to the basement. The constant shuffling of products meant SKUs disappeared without anyone noticing. The box stores had a better

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The Power of Overhead Storage

The box stores had a better idea…. They used the “free” real estate above the eight-foot level to store all their overstock. ~ Rob Wilbrink

Nine-foot racking comprised of seven feet of merchandising and two feet of overhead storage has proven to be the height that works best for staff and customers.

idea. They put all the stock onto the sales floor. They used the “free” real estate above the eightfoot level to store all their overstock. This allowed them to buy more efficiently, reduce handling costs, keep the shelves full and perfect, and maintain their merchandising sets to maximize sales. The early versions of the box

store featured 16-foot racking throughout the sales floor. Sales levels at these first stores (think Aikenhead’s) justified the massive amounts of inventory needed to fill these racks. As their numbers swelled, these stores started to cannibalize each other and inventory levels had to drop to maintain turns. New stores were built with 12-foot racking. Ten years ago when we started working with independent dealers to design their stores the most common refrain was, “We don’t want to look like a box store.” At the same time they could understand the operational benefits of overhead storage. The first few stores we renovated went with 10-foot high racks. We merchandised to eight feet and then had two feet of storage. While the system worked reasonably well, the top foot of merchandising was unnecessary because customers couldn’t reach it. Accessing the overstock required rolling ladders which were cumbersome in stores with fourfoot wide aisles. We reduced the racking to seven feet plus two feet of overhead storage on interior

runs and this worked beautifully. It’s a comfortable height for customers and it’s easy for staff to access the overstock. Some stores were able to convert back stock rooms to sales floor by removing walls. Others tore out mezzanines creating an open feel that made the store seem much larger. Surveys consistently tell us that the number one reason consumers select a store is that it has what they need. Effectively using overhead storage is the simplest way to ensure that you have what your customers need and improve their perception and experience in your store. Stores that have adopted the system love it. Renovated stores look great months and years after they are complete. Everything is in its place, no boxes on the floor and shelves are full. Dealers report higher staff morale, positive customer feedback, higher sales and higher margins. Who’d have thought such a simple concept could have so much power? Rob Wilbrink is president of Burlington Merchandising & Fixtures (www.bmfonline.com).

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@WRLA 2013 Prairie new products

BEST NEW PRODUCT

BEST NEW PRODUCT

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Dektite’s new Shingle Roof Retrofit is approved for use with USA/Canadian galvanized pipe application. It can slide down the pipe without cutting, or be cut along the zipper and fastened with supplied clips. www.menzies-metal.com

| Canadian Fast 2K™ Fence Post Backfill by Chemque, Inc. is a high strength alternative to concrete. Ideal for all posts, a three-pound bag of Fast 2K replaces 100 pounds of cement. Mixes in seconds; sets posts in minutes. www.Fast2K.com

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Shercom’s new Signature Series Brick rubber pavers feature a random brick pattern and can be easily installed over sand, wood, concrete or asphalt. Made from recycled rubber, they are available in red, black, brown and grey. www.shercomindustries.com

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Azek Pavers are made with up to 95% post-consumer recycled rubber and various plastics. The 4” x 8” pavers sit in a 16” x 16” grid. Available in five colours, they are stain, impact and scratch resistant. www.mcleanlumber.com

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rairie Showcase Aspect matted peel and stick backsplash is shown here in the Squares style with a champagne finish. Also available in a stainless steel finish. The collection features three styles: Squares, mini-subway and honeycomb. www.aspectideas.com

New from RCR International, the 100% recyclable polypropylene Dune mat is reversible, UV-treated to resist fading, tearand mildew-resistant, and easily cleaned with mild detergent. The 5’ x 8’ mats are offered in a variety of designs. www.rcrint.com

Regal Ideas’ new LED lighting system adds lighting and ambience to the entire perimeter of a railing and deck. Operated by remote control, the system offers colour and brightness choices. www.regalideas.com

All Weather Window’s new V-weld technology eliminates the need for box-to-box construction with mechanical mullions and virtually stops air and water leaks from combination windows. www.allweatherwindows.com

New from Bélanger: Plumb Pak, a popular plumbing brand in the U.S., has been adapted and revamped for the Canadian market as a carded program. More than 475 products in seven categories are available. www.plumbpak.ca

Montolit’s MasterPiuma line of professional tile cutters can cut porcelain, ceramic and glass mosaic tiles up to 61”. Eliminating the need for wet saws, the cutters automatically adjust for tile thickness and have an adjustable tension handle to “dial in” tile splitting force. www.montolit.com

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Snapped EVENTS

CHIS Welcome Reception & Casino Night LBMAO Annual Dinner WHEN

November 27 & 28, 2012 WHERE

Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel & Suites

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Snapped EVENT

WRLA PRAIRIE SHOWCASE 2013 WHEN

JANUARY 23-25, 2013 WHERE

SASKATOON, SASKATCHEWAN

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Snapped EVENT

1st Gala Reconnaissance AQMAT WHEN

January 26, 2013 WHERE

Ch창teau Frontenac, Quebec City, Quebec

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Good News.

(The Mayans Were Wrong) another chance to be a part of:

Canada’s largest home improvement centre. Over 400 showrooms all under one roof. Phase One Sold. Phase Two Sold. Final Phase Now Selling. 416.417.7507 w w w.improvec anada .com Don’t let this opportunity slip away, you never know when the next apocalypse will happen.

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Hardware Merchandising Jaunuary/February 2013  

Hardware Merchandising is Canada's leading business magazine for home improvement retailers. Articles in Hardware Merchandising focus on hel...

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