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LINEAR SHOWER DRAINS

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WAYS TO BUILD YOUR BUSINESS

THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF R-22 CONVERSION

REJUVENATING GEOTHERMAL

LOWDOWN ON LOW LEAD

How to achieve

HYDRAULIC SEPARATION DECEMBER 2013

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December 2013

Vol. 87 No. 7

tents

47 H VAC/R

OGA Conference Focuses On Rejuvenating Geothermal Industry By Patrick Callan

48 hy  dronics

Radiant Loop Layout Patterns By Mike Miller

51 MANAGEMENT 

Beating Growth Gridlock By Hank Bulmash

52 R ENEWABLES

Glancing Blow By John Siegenthaler

56 BUSINESS  DEVELOPMENT

Worth A Closer Look Opportunities in home inspection.

Cover image: thinkstock photo

By Patrick Callan

62 MA  RKETING

Harnessing The Power Of The Internet Three ways to help build your business online.

14 Hydronics

By Brad Edwards

The Wide World of Hydraulic Separation

By John Siegenthaler

20

plumbing The Lowdown On Low Lead By Patrick Callan

22

30 36 40 46

PLUMBING GIZMOS & GADGETS HVAC/R HYDRONIC

Refrigeration For Better Or For Worse…R-22 RIP (Part II) By Dave Demma

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PRODUCTS

Plumbing Discover New Opportunities With Linear Shower Drains By Eric Carson

34 M  CAC CONFERENCE REPORT Winds Of Change

By Kerry Turner

DEPARTMENTS

4 Upfront – A Gift Worth Giving 6 Industry News 42 Mechanical Supply News 44 People 59 Training 60 Calendar 61 The Source

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38 P HILANTHROPY Building Blocks By Patrick Callan hpacmag.com

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< UPFRONT A gift Worth Giving with Toronto's recent notoriety it stands to reason that those west and east of Ontario's capital have been paying more attention than usual to news from the heartland province. It is likely that most of HPAC's readers are aware that Ontario has passed the Hawkins-Gignac Act (Bill 77) – legislation requiring owners of residential buildings with a fuel-burning appliance or an attached garage to install carbon monoxide (CO) detectors and maintain them. Also, intentionally disabling a carbon monoxide detector is prohibited. The Bill, which is included in the Fire Prevention and Protection Act, requires that a battery-operated or plugged in detector be used in homes or apartments built before August 6, 2011. The driving force behind the move to require CO detectors in Ontario homes is the uncle of Laurie Hawkins (www.endthesilence.ca). An OPP constable, Laurie died of carbon monoxide poisoning along with her husband and two children in December 2008. They did not have a CO detector in their home. The bill was initially brought forth in 2009 by Oxford MPP Ernie Hardeman. Fast forward to November 27, 2013 (and try not to ponder the delay) when the Act is passed. Ontario joins the Yukon in addressing this critical issue. In May 2012 Yukon became the first jurisdiction in Canada to make CO detectors mandatory in all residences in the Territory. This followed the well-publicized CO poisonings in January 2012 of three adults and two children in a home in Whitehorse. After the Hawkins tragedy, North Bay and Sault Ste. Marie, ON, officially declared that CO alarms are mandatory. While certainly moving in the right direction, these halting baby steps around this public safety issue are baffling. Clearly Provincial and National Codes are not doing the trick. The 2005 National Building Code, on which Provincial Codes are based, states: CO alarms are required for any building that has a fuel burning appliance or attached garage. During this holiday season consider how fortunate we are to be armed with the knowledge to protect ourselves. When you enter customers' homes, be diligent, ask them about CO detectors (remember that, according to a recent national Home Safety Poll, 60 per cent of Canadian homes do not have a CO detector and of those who do 26 per cent do not think they have to replace them every five to 10 years). If they need detectors, sell and install them at cost, or direct them to a supplier. You are in the ideal position to provide an immediate means to reduce the risk, particularly since governments seem painfully slow in doing so.

Editor

Seasons Greetings Wishing you good health and happiness this Holiday Season and throughout the coming year.

HPAC Magazine 80 Valleybrook Drive, Toronto, ON M3B 2S9 TEL: 416.442.5600 FAX: 416.510.5140 www.hpacmag.com Editor Kerry Turner (416) 510-5218 KTurner@hpacmag.com Assistant Patrick Callan (416) 442-5600, ext. 3524 Editor PCallan@hpacmag.com Sales & Marketing Kim Rossiter (416) 510-6794 Coordinator KRossiter@hpacmag.com Associate David Skene (416) 510-6884 publisher DSkene@hpacmag.com Account David McGee (416) 510-6791 Manager DMcgee@hpacmag.com Art Director Sandy MacIsaac (416) 442-5600, ext. 3242 SMacisaac@bizinfogroup.ca Market Production Barb Vowles (416) 510-5103 Manager 800-268-7742, ext. 5103 BVowles@bizinfogroup.ca Circulation Manager Selina Rahaman (416) 442-5600, ext. 3528 SRahaman@bizinfogroup.ca PUBLISHER Peter Leonard (416) 510-6847 PLeonard@hpacmag.com

BIG Magazines LP Corinne Lynds, Editorial Director Tim Dimopoulos, Executive publisher Alex Papanou, Vice-president of canadian publishing Bruce Creighton, President of Business Information Group

Publications Mail Agreement No. 40069240, Registration No. 10815 Heating Plumbing Air Conditioning (established 1925) is published 7 times per year by BIG Magazines LP, a division of Glacier BIG Holdings Company Ltd. HPAC Magazine is the leading Canadian business publication for the owner/manager of mechanical contracting businesses and their supply partners. ISSN: 0017-9418 Contents Copyright © 2013 by BIG Magazines LP, a division of Glacier BIG Holdings Company Ltd., may not be reprinted without permission. Subscriber Services: To subscribe, renew your subscription or to change your address or information please visit us at www.hpacmag.com. Subscription Price per year: $40.00 CDN; Outside Canada per year: $80.00 US; Single copy Canada: $5.00 CDN. Heating Plumbing Air Conditioning is published 7 times per year except for occasional combined, expanded or premium issues, which count as two subscription issues. Mail Preferences: From time to time we make our subscription list available to select companies and organizations whose product or service may interest you. If you do not wish your contact information to be made available, please contact us via one of the following methods: Tel: 800.387.0273, Fax: 416.442.2191; E-mail: jhunter@ businessinformationgroup.ca; or by mail: Privacy Office, 80 Valleybrook Dr., Toronto, ON M3B 2S9. HPAC Magazine receives unsolicited materials (including letters to the editor, press releases, promotional items and images) from time to time. HPAC Magazine, its affiliates and assignees may use, reproduce, publish, re-publish, distribute, store and archive such unsolicited submissions in whole or in part in any form or medium whatsoever, without compensation of any sort. Notice: HPAC Magazine, BIG Magazines LP, a division of Glacier BIG Holdings Company Ltd., their staff, officers, directors and shareholders (hence known as the “Publisher”) assume no liability, obligations, or responsibility for claims arising from advertised products. The Publisher also reserves the right to limit liability for editorial errors, omissions and oversights to a printed correction in a subsequent issue. HPAC Magazine’s editorial is written for management level mechanical industry personnel who have documented training in the mechanical fields in which they work. Manufacturers’ printed instructions, datasheets and notices always take precedence to published editorial statements.

We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund (CPF) for our publishing activities.

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from the HPAC Team 4

HPAC | december 2013

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Industry News

SEE THE LATEST HPAC e-newsletter @ hpacmag.com U.S. publication recognizes Manitoba trainer Brian Baker (right), poses with graduates from the 88-hour Fifth Class Power Engineers course earlier this year. (Back row l - r) Grant Holst, Andriy Bokhankovych, Mykhailo Stepanenko, Jordan Manchulenko, Trevor Day; (Middle row l to r) Lorne Turner, John Zelinsky, Brent Taylor, Brian Baker; (Front row l to r) Richie Punla, Zhaohui Yang, Spencer Mackie (Missing Brandon Cohoe)

Alain Boisvert, president of Recyclage ÉcoSolutions Inc. addresses attendees at RMC’s annual meeting.

Refrigerant Management Canada tightens its belt, broadens reach

Refrigerant Management Canada (RMC) held its 13th annual meeting in Mississauga, ON, on November 12, 2013. RMC discussed a number of initiatives undertaken in the past year to counter the impact of declining revenues. Marie Li-Ying of Honeywell Fluorine Products RMC secretary/treasurer reported that the organization is in a better financial position than it has been in previous years. Aside from cost cutting, the corporation is successfully taking its expertise in refrigerant disposal to those outside of the HVAC/R industry. RMC has also entered into an agreement with Recyclage EcoSolutions Inc. to accept refrigerant at its plasma-arc destruction facility in Quebec. Robert Flipse, general manager of Gordon Latham in Vancouver, BC, was re-appointed chair of the not-for-profit corporation. Visit www.youtube.com/user/hrai channel to see the annual report. www.refrigerantmanagement.ca

major changes to ASHRAE/IES 2013 energy standard The recently published NSI/ASHRAE/ IES Standard 90.1-2013 Energy Standard for Buildings Except LowRise Residential Buildings by ASHRAE and IES contains major changes 6

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

The NEWS, in conjunction with hilmor and the Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), has announced the winners of this year’s Best Instructor and Best Trainer contests. Brian Baker, CMS, founder of Westech Energy Training Centre, and president of Custom Vac Ltd. in Winnipeg, MB, has been named the Best Instructor. Sonny Hampton, director of training, WaterFurnace Intl. Inc., is this year’s Best Trainer award winner. The Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration NEWS is a weekly newsmagazine headquartered in Michigan. regarding building envelope, lighting, mechanical and the energy cost budget. For the building envelope, opaque elements and fenestration requirements have been revised to increase stringency while maintaining a reasonable level of cost-effectiveness. Changes to lighting include improvements to daylighting and daylighting controls, space-by-space lighting power density limits, thresholds for toplighting and revised controls requirements and format. As for mechanical, equipment efficiencies are increased for heat pumps, packaged terminal air conditioners, single package vertical heat pumps and air conditioners evaporative condensers, while fan efficiency requirements are introduced for the first time. Additional provisions address commercial refrigeration equipment, improved controls on heat rejection and boiler equipment, requirements for expanded use of energy recovery, small motor efficiencies, fan power control and credits. For the energy cost budget, improvements were made to clarify the use of

the prescriptive provisions when performing building energy use modeling. Another important change to the standard is the first alternate compliance path, which uses the power usage effectiveness metric to provide a framework that could be considered for other energy using facets of buildings. Also new to the standard are requirements for operating escalators and moving walkways at minimum speed per ASME A17.1 when not conveying passengers. For more information tel. 800.527.4723. www.ashrae.org

Water efficiency experts take note Professionals and other experts working in the field of water efficiency are invited to submit abstracts for the 7th Annual WaterSmart Innovations Conference and Exposition, slated for October 8-10, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV. Abstracts may be submitted by January 17, 2014 via an on-line form, and a complete list of topics and submittal guidelines are available on the conference website. www.watersmartinnovations.com continued on p8 hpacmag.com


< Industry News

continued from p6

Toronto-area executive wins top SMACNA award

Wayne Peterson (left) receives the Chapter Executive of the Year Award from SMACNA president Howard Stine at the association’s 70th Annual Convention in Maui, HI.

Refrigeration and a/c apprentice program now accepting applications The Ontario Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Contractors Association (ORAC) and the UA Local 787 Joint Training and Apprenticeship Committee (JTAC) are accepting applications for the first-year apprenticeship program until February 28, 2014. Seventy-six applicants were selected in 2013 and 80 were accepted in 2012. Contractors can access the accepted candidates listing at www.hvacrapprentice.ca and non-ORAC member companies can contact the communications and program manager to get a copy of the list. For more information e-mail info@hvaccareeer.ca or visit www. hvacr.ca.

CAF report finds more youth considering careers in skilled trades An increasing number of students are open to a career in the skilled trades and are placing a higher value on the contribution of tradespeople than they did in the past, according to the Canadian Apprenticeship Forum – Forum canadien sur l’apprentissage (CAF-FCA). The CAF-FCA polled more 8

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

Wayne Peterson, chapter executive for the Toronto Sheet Metal Contractors Association of Richmond Hill, ON, is the winner of the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association’s Chapter Executive of the Year Award. He was presented the Petersen-Dunn Award, which is given to the chapter executive who has made a substantive contribution to their local association. “Wayne was the first person in Ontario to see the value of affiliation with SMACNA,” said 2013 SMACNA president Howard Stine. “His efforts have so far led to four additional chapters from Canada joining SMACNA.” www.smacna.org than 800 Canada students in the spring of 2013 to compile the report Apprenticeship Analysis: Youth Perceptions of Careers in the Skilled Trades. It then compared this year’s results to those from a similar survey done in 2004. Based on its findings, combined with the current and anticipated skill shortages as more and more baby boomers retire, the CAF-FCA has high expectations about attracting the next generation of skilled trades workers. “We can definitely see improvement in youth awareness and attitudes,” said Sarah Watts-Rynard, executive director of CAF-FCA. “At the same time, we’re seeing the need for stronger messages around opportunities for women and better outreach to parents and others who provide career direction to students.” Read the full report at www.caf-fca.org.

Changes to Ontario Building Code to take effect in 2014 Most of the 2012 Ontario Building Code will come into effect on January 1, 2014, providing an update to the 2006 version. The 2012 code has an environmental focus and puts in place measures to reduce greenhouse

gases, protect air, water and soil quality, and conserve energy. It features new standards for residential wastewater treatment, on-site sewage dispersal beds, as well as changes to technical, maintenance and monitoring requirements for sewage systems. The revised code is more consistent with the model national codes for building and plumbing. Requirements such as efficient toilets and showerheads for new homes and rain water harvesting for all new buildings, will put Ontario among North America’s leaders in water conservation. It also increases Ontario’s consistency with other codes across Canada so businesses can sell products and services nationwide. www.mah.gov.on.ca.

Calgary contractor three-time winner Lochinvar has announced the first winners in its VIP Contractor Program for the 2013-2014 heating season. Jamie Whitehead of Cooper Plumbing & Heating in Calgary, AB, was named the October winner of the VIP Installation Showcase. Charles Felt of Buddy’s Plumbing Service in Winthrop, MA, was selected in the first monthly VIP drawing. In June they will join other winners of the 2014 Nashville Experience for an all-expenses-paid trip for two that includes tickets to the world’s largest country music festival. This award marks Whitehead’s third win in the annual contest. “I’m thrilled that Lochinvar has once again recognized my work in its VIP Installation Showcase,” said Whitehead. “We take great pride in delivering the highest quality service and solutions to our clients, and it means a lot when a top industry leader takes notice of what we’re doing in the field.” Through April 2014, contractors can continued on p10 hpacmag.com


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< Industry News

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upload a photograph and brief description of any qualified boiler or boiler/Squire combination installation for a chance to be named the monthly winner of the VIP Installation Showcase. Contractors may also register qualified Lochinvar products to receive an entry into a drawing for the Nashville Experience, as well as a gift card. www.knightheatingboiler.com

College calls for increased industry participation

Guest speaker Bob Onyschuk, director, compliance and enforcement division, Ontario College of Trades.

At the HRAI Greater Toronto Area meeting on October 30, 2013, chapter chair Dick Thomas invited former chair David Weishuhn to the podium to discuss the Ontario Power Authority (OPA) Heating & Cooling Incentives (HCI) program. HRAI, on behalf of the Ontario Power Authority (OPA), is offering the one-day

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mandatory training course to participating contractors of the HCI program. "As of January 1, 2014, only contractors who have completed the mandatory one-day training on AC Installation Optimization Training will be eligible to participate in the saveONenergy Heating & Cooling Incentives program," said Weishuhn. "There is no course scheduled for 2014 and about 50 per cent of contractor members have not been trained." He strongly urged members to "get at least one person through [the course] before the end of 2013." Guest speaker Bob Onyschuk, director, compliance and enforcement division of the Ontario College of Trades, provided an overview of the College, its role and progress to date. He pinpointed training as an issue and assured attendees that the College will be modernizing training so tradespeople are prepared for the technologies they will see in the field. In terms of driving the College mandate, Onyschuk noted that there were vacant positions on the trade boards. He invited contractors to participate on the boards. "You guys have the power," said Onyschuk. He also provided an update on the state of enforcement. "The shaking hands and kissing babies is coming to an end," noted Onyschuk. "You will see us getting more rigorous." He reported that three mailings have been sent out regarding membership, an additional two months was given for compliance, and 18 000 letters have gone out for non-payment. He noted that there were 20 enforcement officers in the field and 22 in training. Of those, 38 are tradespersons, according to Onyschuk. Attendees were receptive to the College's message, but expressed concerns regarding the professional misconduct level of enforcement, apprentice ratios, and the split in regulation with Technical Standards & Safety Authority. "In addition to cheapening what you do, they are stealing your business," said Onyschuk as he encouraged attendees to report non-compliant companies and individuals. For information on the chapter meetings, e-mail k.stark@ industrialadmin.ca. https://saveonenergy.ca/Consumer/Programs/HVACRebates/Contractor-Participation.aspx

BC adopts National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings

Visit hrai.ca/manuals Your ‘go-to’ source for best practices.

British Columbia has adopted the National Energy Code of Canada for Buildings (NECB 2011), which took effect in December 2013. Although BC is the first to adopt the code, the adoption process is underway in other jurisdictions. NECB 2011 provides minimum requirements for the design and construction of energy efficient buildings, excluding those that are covered in Part 9 of the National Building Code of Canada. continued on p12

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HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

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the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest hvac r

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< Industry News

continued from p 10

It is a model code intended for provinces and territories to adopt and adapt for their needs. The 2011 version is an update of Canada’s first building energy code, introduced in 1997. The original code was modeled after the U.S. ASHRAE regulations, which some provinces such as British Columbia and Ontario had already incorporated into their building codes. Canada-wide adoption of the NECB 2011 would bring uniformity to building energy performance and its measurement. The adoption process is lengthy, starting with research on issues such as industry readiness, followed by public consultations, adaptation of the code, and a final public review prior to adoption. Ten provinces and three territories have been involved in the adoption process, with all but one territory indicating their intent to adopt the NECB. Manitoba expects to adopt it shortly and Ontario has an equivalent standard that is as stringent as the NECB 2011. www.nationalcodes.nrc.gc.ca/eng/index.html

CMPX 2014 registration underway The 2014 CMPX show is expected to attract over 14 000 mechanical industry professionals to the Metro Toronto Convention Centre. Space sales have now passed the 500-exhibitor mark for the three-day show starting Wednesday, March 19 through to Friday, March 21. A full schedule of Learning Forum sessions is posted on the http://cmpxshow.com website. Registration for the show is now underway at www.cmpxshow.com. For more information, contact the show management company Shield and Associates at tel. 800.282.0003 or e-mail sal@salshow.com.

ASHRAE, IAQA sign memorandum of understanding ASHRAE and the Indoor Air Quality Association (IAQA) have joined forces to promote better indoor air quality in the built environment. The two associations signed the memorandum of understanding agreement on October 15 during ASHRAE’s IAQ 2013 Conference in Vancouver, BC. The agreement commits ASHRAE and IAQA to work together in the areas of consistent leadership communication, chapter collaboration, advocacy, technical activities coordination and research. www.ashrae.org www.iaqa.org

Passive House hosts conference dedicated to reducing building energy in cool climates North America’s largest Passive House conference took place at the Westin Bayshore in Vancouver, BC from September 27 to 28 with more than 250 building profession12

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

als from Canada, China, Europe and the U.S. in attendance. The “Passive House North 2013: Affordable Energy-Efficiency For a Changing Climate” conference featured a strong cast of presenters. Canadians included Harold Orr, who helped create the Saskatchewan Conservation House; Bill Rees, who originated the “ecological footprint;” Graham Finch of RDH Building Engineering, Robert Malczyk of Equilibrium, Peter Amerogen of Habitat Studios and Sadhu Johnston from the City of Vancouver. International presenters included Dr. Wolfgang Feist, a German physicist who co-developed the Passive House Standard; Henry Gifford, who The New Yorker dubbed “The Boiler Man”; Tomas O’Leary of Ireland’s Passive House Academy, Bronwyn Barry of One Sky Homes and Tim McDonald of Onion Flats. The conference hosted the world premiere of a documentary entitled “Passive House: A Building Revolution.” It also held a number of workshops, including a two-day exam preparation course for individuals looking to become certified Passive House designers. Buildings designed to the Passive House Standard use 90 per cent less energy than comparable structures while costing only 10 per cent more to build. www.passivehouse.ca

Quebec City Roadshow stop

Henri Bouchard, directeur du service technique at the Corporation des maîtres mécanicens en tuyauterie du Québec (CMMTQ), presents his backflow prevention session during the CIPHEX Roadshow stop at the Expocité Quebec Centre on October 3. The Canadian Institute of Plumbing & Heating’s (CIPH) program of one-day trade shows included four major Canadian cities from October 1 to 10. Luc Boily

Interprovincial Red Seal standards strengthened through partnerships The Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA) has partnered with the United Association of Plumbers & Pipefitters (UA) and the Mechanical Contractors Association of Canada (MCAC) to strengthen interprovincial Red Seal trade and occupational standards in all Canadian provinces hpacmag.com


and territories. A pilot project is underway to evolve the National Occupational Analysis to a standard that not only provides an analysis of the trade, but also clearly outlines the performance required by industry to be certified in a trade. The project includes learning objectives to support greater harmonization across Canada in terms of apprenticeship training and assessment, and it will test a new development process for the standard to allow for greater industry involvement. The project will also test the new standard’s features and development process with the steamfitter/pipefitter trade and results will help determine the final format and process for development of standards for all Red Seal trades. In other Red Seal news, the program has officially rebranded with a new motto: striving for excellence. As part of the rebrand, a new marketing and promotional logo has been developed for the program, and communication tools have been revised to reflect the program’s new look. The announcement was made before the opening ceremonies of the Skills Canada National Competition, which took place in Vancouver, BC, from June 5 to 8. www.red-seal.ca

ICARHMA Meeting Continues Global Discussions on Key Industry Issues The Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI) manufacturers division chair Jim Flowers, HRAI president Warren Heeley, and manager of HRAI divisional programs (manufacturers and wholesalers) Caroline Czajko, represented HRAI at the annual meeting of the International Council of Air Conditioning, Refrigeration and Heating Manufacturer’s Associations (ICARHMA) held on October 28 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Topics addressed at this year’s meeting included the proper and safe handling of refrigerants, core principles to avoid global non-tariff barriers to trade for HVAC/R products, labeling initiatives and key research programs evaluating alternative refrigerants. In a special presentation, Manoel Gameiro, who serves as the Brazilian Association for HVACR (ABRAVA), vice president for energy efficiency, president of Green Building CouncilBrasil and commercial director, Ingersoll Rand – Trane do Brasil, described steps to achieve sustainability in Brazil’s soccer arenas for the 2014 World Cup. ICARHMA is a global organization comprised of nine heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water heating manufacturers’ associations that represent a combined total of more than 1000 manufacturing companies, valued at US$225 billion and that produce approximately 85 per cent of the world’s heating and cooling equipment. Its members represent manufacturers in the Americas, Europe, Asia and the Pacific region. www.hrai.ca <> hpacmag.com

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< hydronics

The Wide World Of Hydraulic Separation Several methods for achieving the same results. BY john siEgenthaler

T

en years ago, the term hydraulic separation was very new to the vocabulary used in the North American hydronics market. Back then the contemporary topic being discussed and applied was primary/secondary piping. The idea being that several loads, each served by its own secondary circuit and associated circulator, could be connected to a common primary loop, with its own circulator. The “magic” of closely-spaced tees is what prevented the flow rate in any of these circuits from interfering with the flow rate in the others. In essence, that is what hydraulic separation is: The ability of two or more circulators within the same piping system to simultaneously operate without interfering with each other. Properly designed and installed primary/secondary pipingcan achieve hydraulic separation between all circulators. However, primary/secondary piping is not the only way to achieve hydraulic separation, as depicted in Figure 1. Think of hydraulic separation as the “broad topic,” whereas primary/secondary piping is one of several subtopics. This article will show you several other ways to achieve the same desirable results delivered by classic primary/secondary piping, in ways that often simplify the system and reduce its installation cost.

Before detailing other methods of hydraulic separation, it is important to understand the role of headers in a hydronic sys-

tem. The “ideal” header in any hydronic system would simply split up the flow entering it into the branch circuits attached to it with zero head loss. The spherical header shown in Figure 2 would be a very close approximation of this ideal concept. Imagine piping coming out of this spherical header in all directions, like a copper basketball with tubes coming out all over its surface. The water would be very “content” to flow through such a header, but imagine how this would look in a typical mechanical room. In short, it would look terrible. It would take up lots of room and be very difficult to install using standard methods. Bottom line: We do not build headers like this. Not because they would not work, but because of these other practical and aesthetic reasons. Instead, we approximate the favourable fluid mechanics offered by the copper basketball header with standard hardware that looks good and lays out neatly in a mechanical room, as depicted in Figure 3. I like to call these “short/fat” headers. Simply put, the shorter the header and the greater its diameter, the closer it comes to approximating the copper basketball header. Remember, the goal is to split up the flow into the branches with as little head loss as possible. So, here is something that every hydronic system designer can easily remember: Short/fat headers are good and long/ skinny headers are bad. It is always good to keep the headers in your systems as short as practical and to use a tube size that keeps the flow velocity when all branch circuits sup-

Figure 1 Methods To Achieve Hydraulic Separation

Figure 2 Spherical Header

GOOD AND BAD HEADERS

hydraulic separation

primary/! secondary ! piping

alternate! method! #2

14

HPAC | december 2013

alternate! method! #1

very low head loss! inside header

alternate! method! #3

hpacmag.com


plied by the header are operating at no higher than two feet per second. Figure 4 is a table that lists the flow rates corresponding to flow velocities of two feet per second for type M copper tube.

Figure 3 The Mechanical Room Reality

BEYOND THE HEADERS Short/fat headers provide hydraulic separation between the circulators connected to them. These circulators can be different sizes. Some may be variable speed circulators while others operate at fixed speeds. Hydraulic separation occurs because the head loss (and thus the pressure drop) along the length of the headers is very low. To maintain the hydraulic separation afforded by short/ fat headers it is important that the headers connect to a piping assembly that itself creates very low head loss. One arrangement that achieves this is simply connecting the headers to a low flow resistance heat source, such as a cast iron boiler, or a “tank type” hydronic heat source, as shown in Figure 5. Both of these heat sources create very little head loss. When combined with short/fat headers, the “common piping” assembly, outlined with the dashed lines, creates very continued on p.16

fat

short Figure 4 Flow Rates At Given Velocity Tubing

Flow rate to establish 2 ft/sec flow velocity

1/2" type M copper

1.6 gpm

3/4" type M copper

3.2 gpm

1" type M copper

5.5 gpm

1.25" type M copper

8.2 gpm

1.5" type M copper

11.4 gpm

2" type M copper

19.8 gpm

2.5" type M copper

30.5 gpm

3" type M copper

43.6 gpm

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december 2013 | HPAC

15


< hydronics

continued from p.15

little head loss, even when all the circulators are operating. The lack of any significant head loss in the common piping is what prevents circulators from “feeling” each other’s presence in the system. If the circulators cannot “feel” each other, they cannot interfere with each other. The piping in Figure 5 also provides the same supply water temperature to each load served by the header. This is not true with traditional primary/secondary piping where all sets of closely-spaced tees are arranged in series along a common primary loop. The latter arrangement creates decreasing supply water temperature in the downFigure 5 Headers Connected to Low Flow Resistance Heat Source

very low flow resistance! common piping!

low flow resistance heat! source

stream circuits. Furthermore, the extent of this temperature drop is not consistent. It varies depending on which secondary circuits are operating at any given time. If the heat source you want to use has higher flow resistance – as its typically created by coil-type heat exchangers in compact mod/con boilers, or coaxial heat exchangers in water-to-water heat pumps, you can merge the headers to that heat source, as shown in Figure 6. The pair of closely-spaced tees hydraulically separate the boiler circulator from the circulators on the header. Thus, the overall piping assembly within the dashed lines, (i.e., the common piping) has low head loss. Voilà: hydraulic separation between all circulators in the system. If your system needs added thermal mass to stabilize a low mass heat source against the potential demands of a highly-zoned distribution system, then let a buffer tank, continued on p.18 Figure 7 System With Added Thermal Mass high flow resistance boiler

size headers for max flow velocity of 2 ft/sec boiler! circulator

buffer! tank

size headers for max flow velocity of 2 ft/sec

very low flow resistance! common piping!

Figure 6 Headers Merged To High Flow Resistance Heat Source high flow ! resistance boiler

Figure 8 System With Hydraulic Separator high flow ! resistance boiler

closely spaced tees size headers for max flow velocity of 2 ft/sec very low flow resistance! common piping!

16

HPAC | december 2013

hydraulic separator size headers for max flow velocity of 2 ft/sec very low flow resistance! common piping! hpacmag.com


Gala Evening Join us as we celebrate 20 years of investing in our communities through support for Habitat for Humanity

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Tuesday March 18, 2014 Metro Toronto Convention Centre ciph.com/gala

YEARS


< hydronics

continued from p.16

FOURSOME There you have it: four methods of achieving the very desirable characteristic called hydraulic separation in your hydronic systems. Notice that all these methods provide the same supply water temperature to the loads and that none of them require a dedicated primary loop circulator. In that respect, the methods shown, in my view, are significant improvements over traditional primary/secondary piping. Integrate them into your designs where appropriate. <> John Siegenthaler, P.E., is a mechanical engineering graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a licensed professional engineer. He has over 34 years experience in designing modern hydronic heating systems. Siegenthaler is also an associate professor emeritus of engineering technology at Mohawk Valley Community College in Utica, NY. His online course, Mastering Hydronic System Design, will be offered February 17 to April 25, 2014. www.hydronicpros.com/events

7

2

2

(piped as shown in Figure 7, and working in combination with the short/fat headers) provide the hydraulic separation. Finally, it is possible to use a component called a “hydraulic separator” to provide – you guessed it – hydraulic separation. The piping is shown in Figure 8. Along with hydraulic separation, many hydraulic separators now contain internal screens called coalescing media. These inserts enhance the ability of the hydraulic separator to separate microbubbles of air passing through the upper portion of the separator. Using a hydraulic separator with a coalescing media eliminates the need to use a separate, high efficiency air separator in the system. A second coalescing media, built into the lower portion of the hydraulic separator, enhances its ability to trap dirt particles that might be riding along with the flow as it returns from the distribution system. With multiple passes, some coalescing media can separate out dirt particles as small as five microns. They drop out of the active flow path and into the lower portion of the separator. A periodic opening of the valve at the bottom of the hydraulic separator can flush out this dirt.

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HPAC | december 2013

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hpacmag.com


< Plumbing

The Lowdown On Low Lead CIPH’s Ontario meeting focuses on low lead changes, coordinating Canada-U.S. stand. BY Patrick Callan

W

ith major reductions to acceptable lead levels inpotable water set to take effect in North America in January 2014, the Canadian Institute of Plumbing & Heating (CIPH) provided an update and some clarity on the situation at its Ontario Region Business Meeting. Held on October 25 at the Mississauga Convention Centre, the full-day meeting consisted of a low lead industry forum panel, a workshop for CIPH’s Young Executive Society (YES) and a presentation from the CEO of the Standards Council of Canada. Ninety people attended the low lead industry forum panel, and dozens more tuned in for the online webinar, featuring Kevin Ernst, general manager at Oakville Stamping & Bending Ltd. and the chairman of CSA B125 technical committee, Joseph Rogers from the Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, Thomas Husebye, vice-president of marketing for Dahl Brothers Canada Ltd. and Al Hook from Wolseley Canada. The panel looked at the impact the Safe Drinking Water Act (coming into effect in the U.S. on January 4, 2014) and the new low lead requirements in Canada (being adopted by various provinces across Canada beginning January 1 2014)

will have on all aspects of the plumbing industry. In both countries, the changes will require lead levels to be reduced from eight to 0.25 per cent for fittings intended for use for human consumption through drinking or cooking. To meet the new low lead requirements, all manufacturers who are certified to ASME A112.18.1/CSA B125.1 or CSA B125.3 will have to be recertified by their certification body by December 31, 2013. As of January 1, 2014 manufacturers will no longer be able to produce certified products that do not meet the new low lead requirements in the two standards. Under B125.1 this will affect drinking fountain supply fitEngaging Young Executives While the low lead forum was taking place, about 25 members of CIPH’s Young Executive Society (YES) gathered for the Juggling Multiple Projects workshop led by Michael Stefanovic, senior consultant for World Class Productivity. The YES program, which represents the interests of people aged 40 and under in the plumbing, industrial PVF, waterworks and hydronic heating industry, was also recognized as CIPH’s program of the year during the meeting.

www.ciph.com

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hpacmag.com 6/4/13 12:32 PM


tings; kitchen, sink and lavatory fittings and supply stops up to one inch. Under B125.3 this will affect automatic compensating valves other than those for individual wall-mounted showering systems, supply line stops up to one inch and temperature actuated in-line mixing valves. In Ontario, a recent minister’s ruling included the low lead requirements to its 2012 Building Code, which takes effect on January 1, 2014. However, because of a transition rule any building permit applied for before January 1, 2014 still follows the 2006 Building Code but construction will have to start within six months from when the permit is issued. Building permits applied for after January 1, 2014 will have to comply with the updated 2012 code, which includes the low lead requirements. The two low lead standards are expected to be updated in the National Plumbing Code by the end of 2013 or early 2014, and the rest of the provinces and territories are in the process of working towards adopting those changes. A recent CIPH poll showed that most provinces are expected to have adopted the low lead requirements by June 2014. The poll also indicated that 30 per cent of manufacturers and wholesalers plan to carry double inventory of regular and lead free brass products during the six-month transition phase. The meeting’s main speaker – John Walter, CEO of the Standards Council of Canada (SCC) – presented on what is be-

hpacmag.com

ing done to coordinate standards between Canada and the U.S. The total cost of product testing and certification compliance for the North American plumbing and heating industry is between $3.2 to $4.5 billion per year. And since only about 10 per cent of referenced standards are currently bilaterally harmonized, duplicate testing and certification ends up costing Canadian consumers from $120 to $150 million each year. To address this issue, CIPH and Electro-Federation Canada took a leading role by developing value propositions to quantify costs of duplicative requirements, and then organized two consultation sessions earlier this year (one in the U.S., one in Canada) to raise awareness about the findings. These efforts have led to the creation of pilot projects between the SCC and the American National Standards Institute to facilitate joint Canada-U.S standards in the electro-technical and plumbing/heating sectors. The projects are expected to begin in 2014. <> COMING UP CIPH’s next Ontario Region meeting will be held on January 16, 2014. It will focus on the economic outlook for Canada, featuring a presentation from personal finance expert Preet Banerjee. Banerjee is host of the television show Million Dollar Neighbourhood on the Oprah Winfrey Network. For more information, visit www.ciph.com.

DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

21


< refrigeration

For Better Or For Worse...R-22 RIP The nuts and bolts of choosing a suitable refrigerant replacement. (Part II). BY Dave Demma

I

n Part I in HPAC October 2013, we discussed the importance of having an R-22 strategy. Now it is on to the logistics of choosing a suitable replacement for converting existing R-22 systems, and a step by step process for implementing the conversion. Table 2 shows the more common replacements for R-22, along with their chemical formulation. There is a limited supply of building blocks available to make suitable R-22 replacements. In fact, all of the common R-22 replacements are made by blending at least two of the following components: R-32, R-125, R-134A and R-143A. Some contain three of these components, and one contains all four. Along with these, there are several hydrocarbon compounds available, which when added to an HFC, will facilitate the use of mineral oil in the system (more on this later). As stated in Part I, there are several factors to look at in making that choice: • T hermodynamic properties of the conversion refrigerant •C  ooling capacity relative to R-22 • Refrigerant Mass Flow relative to R-22 •E  fficiency relative to R-22 • Discharge temperature relative to R-22 •P  ressures of the conversion refrigerant •C  onversion refrigerant oil requirements •H  as compressor manufacturer evaluated compressor performance and wear with conversion refrigerant •E  nvironmental concerns (GWP of the conversion refrigerant) •P  rice and availability of the conversion refrigerant The thermodynamic properties of the new refrigerant will determine the following: •C  OP (efficiency) of the system 22

HPAC | december 2013

Reader comment in response to Part I (see HPAC October 2013, available online at www.hpacmag.com) Reader: Dave some of your comments are in conflict. In the third paragraph you state: "...there is currently a good supply of R-22. There will be some R-22 available on January 1, 2020; however it is likely to be in limited supply. More importantly, it’s likely to be expensive." Further along you say: "...do not panic. There is a good supply..." Dave Demma: No doubt what was written in Part I appeared contradictory and confusing...so let me attempt to clarify. Being based in the U.S., my perspective on R-22 is much more influenced by what is happening here. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has revised their R-22 allocations for the importation/manufacture of new R-22 as appears in Table 1. In 2012, the allocation for new imported/manufactured R-22 was set to be at 89.8 million lb. A temporary allocation ruling was released, with the proposed allocation for 2012 to be somewhere between 55.4 million lb. and 79.7 million lb. They went with the 55.4 million lb. amount. With such a severe reduction in allocation the price responded as one would expect...it quickly skyrocketed. In January of 2013, the allocation was further reduced to 39 million lb., causing further price increases. In April of 2013 the EPA released a permanent allocation ruling, bringing the current year allocation up to 62.7 million lb. That is a 60 per cent increase in supply and once again, the price responded as one would expect–with price reductions throughout the year. In addition to the reduction in price, the increased allocation has caused a mini glut of R-22 in the U.S. While this is certainly a temporary situation, the fact is there is plenty of R-22 available right now. There will be a further reduction in allocation down to 51 million lb. in 2014, but this will still be greater than the original allocation given for the beginning of 2013. We are awaiting the EPA’s final allocation ruling for 2015–2020. This will be the determining factor as to where prices will settle out in 2014. It will also indicate what we can expect the supply of R-22 to be as we get closer to 2020. There is a good supply of R-22 now and the price is reasonable.,However, it will not last and that is true whichever side of the border you are on. Table 1 EPA R-22 Allocations Year

Original Allocation (million lb.)

2010

110

Proposed Allocation (million lb.)

Temp Allocation (million lb.)

2011

100

2012

89.8

55.4-79.7

55.4

2013

79.1

46-69.1

39

2014

68.5

36.3-57.9

Final 2013 Allocation (million lb.)

62.7 51 hpacmag.com


to eliminate the particular refrigerant as a valid choice for conversion. Note that the capacity losses become more magnified as the evaporating temperature becomes lower. For example choose a refrigerant that has a capacity loss of approximately six per cent in an air conditioning application. On systems that are barely maintaining temperature with R-22, this would not be a good choice. However, if the sys-

(Air Conditioning) show the comparative values for these four system parameters. Capacity relative to R-22 is fairly self explanatory. Assuming that the R-22 capacity is 100 per cent, a value less than that means you will be suffering a capacity loss when using the particular refrigerant that capacity loss is attached to. The numbers in red are losses that are substantial and likely

• Cooling capacity of the system • Discharge temperature • Required refrigerant mass flow rate (which will determine whether flow controls will need replacement) In most cases it would be desirable to use an R-22 replacement that will provide performance and capacity close to that of R-22. The charts in Table 3 (Low Temperature), Table 4 (Medium Temperature) and Table 5

continued on p.24 Table 2 – Chemical Composition of Common R-22 Replacements Blend Component

Refrigerant (ASHRAE Designation Number) R-407A

R-407C

R-407F

R-417A

R-421A

R-422A

R-422B

R-422D

R-424A

R-427A

R-32

20%

23%

30%

R-125

40%

25%

30%

47%

58%

85.1%

55%

65.1%

50.5%

25%

R-134A

40%

52%

40%

50%

42%

11.5%

52%

31.5%

47.0%

50%

R-428A

R-434A

R-404A

R-507

R-438A

8.5%

50%

77.5%

63.2%

44%

50%

45%

50%

16%

4%

18%

52%

15%

R-143A

10%

R-290 Propane

20%

R-410A

44.2% 50%

0.6%

R-600 N-Butane

1.0%

R-600A IsoButane

3.4%

3.4%

3%

R-601A IsoPentane

3.4%

0.9%

1.7% 1.9%

2.8%

0.9%

0.6%

Table 3 – Comparative Performance of R-22 Replacements in AC Applications Refrigerant R-404A

Trade Name

Capacity Relative to R-22

Mass Flow Relative to R-22

Efficiency (COP) Relative to R-22

Recommended Lubricant Type

HP62, FX-70

103%

142%

91%

POE

R-407A

Klea 60

106%

114%

96%

POE

R-407C

Suva 9000

102%

101%

97%

POE

R-407F

Performax LT

112%

109%

96%

POE

R-417A

MO59, NU22

86%

107%

96%

MO, AB, POE

R-421A

Choice

88%

120%

95%

MO, AB, POE

R-422A

MO79, OneShot

102%

164%

90%

MO, AB, POE

R-422B

NU22B

89%

118%

95%

MO, AB, POE

R-422C

One Shot B

100%

158%

91%

MO, AB, POE

R-422D

MO79

93%

131%

93%

MO, AB, POE

R-424A

RS-44

86%

130%

96%

MO, AB, POE

R-427A

FX-100

98%

103%

97%

POE

R-428A

RS-52

107%

170%

89%

MO, AB, POE

R-434A

RS-45

99%

144%

93%

MO, AB, POE

R-438A

MO99

94%

111%

96%

MO, AB, POE

R-507A

AZ-50

104%

148%

90%

POE

hpacmag.com

december 2013 | HPAC

23


< refrigeration

continued from p.23

tem has enough extra capacity where a six per cent loss can be absorbed without loss in maintaining adequate comfort in the middle of summer, this might be an acceptable choice. Now, take the same refrigerant in a low temperature application and you

have a 19 per cent capacity loss. It might be a little more difficult to find an application that has enough extra capacity to absorb a loss of that magnitude. The refrigerant mass flow rate will determine whether the existing flow controls (TEV and distributor nozzle) are

sufficiently sized for the new refrigerant. While there are some refrigerants listed that have mass flow rates which are very close to R-22, there are others (in red) which would require replacing existing TEVs (and distributor nozzles in continued on p.26

Table 4 – Comparative Performance of R-22 Replacements in Medium Temperature Refrigeration Applications Refrigerant

Trade Name

Capacity Relative to R-22

Mass Flow Relative to R-22

Efficiency (COP) Relative to R-22

Recommended Lubricant Type

R-404A

HP62, FX-70

102%

143%

91%

POE

R-407A

Klea 60

103%

112%

96%

POE

R-407C

Suva 9000

99%

99%

97%

POE

R-407F

Performax LT

107%

110%

96%

POE

R-417A

MO59, NU22

81%

106%

95%

MO, AB, POE

R-421A

Choice

84%

117%

94%

MO, AB, POE

R-422A

MO79, OneShot

98%

163%

89%

MO, AB, POE

R-422B

NU22B

85%

116%

94%

MO, AB, POE

R-422C

One Shot B

97%

157%

90%

MO, AB, POE

R-422D

MO79

89%

129%

92%

MO, AB, POE

R-424A

RS-44

82%

109%

95%

MO, AB, POE

R-427A

FX-100

94%

100%

97%

POE

R-428A

RS-52

104%

170%

88%

MO, AB, POE

R-434A

RS-45

96%

141%

91%

MO, AB, POE

R-438A

MO99

90%

107%

96%

MO, AB, POE

R-507A

AZ-50

103%

150%

90%

POE

Table 5 – Comparative Performance of R-22 Replacements in Low Temperature Refrigeration Applications Refrigerant R-404A

Trade Name

Capacity Relative to R-22

Mass Flow Relative to R-22

Efficiency Relative to R-22

Disch Temp Relative to R-22 (ºF)

HP62, FX-70

95%

143%

85%

-112

Recommended Lubricant Type POE

R-407A

Klea 60

95%

105%

93%

-61

POE

R-407C

Suva 9000

91%

92%

95%

-48

POE

R-407F

Performax LT

101%

101%

94%

-38

POE

R-417A

MO59, NU22

72%

99%

90%

-116

MO, AB, POE

R-421A

Choice

74%

109%

89%

-107

MO, AB, POE

R-422A

MO79, OneShot

89%

160%

82%

-126

MO, AB, POE

R-422B

NU22B

75%

108%

88%

-109

MO, AB, POE

R-422C

One Shot B

87%

152%

83%

-124

MO, AB, POE

R-422D

MO79

79%

123%

86%

-115

MO, AB, POE

R-424A

RS-44

72%

102%

89%

-75

MO, AB, POE

R-427A

FX-100

86%

94%

94%

-64

POE

R-428A

RS-52

97%

170%

81%

-125

MO, AB, POE

R-434A

RS-45

87%

137%

85%

-91

MO, AB, POE

R-438A

MO99

81%

100%

94%

-112

MO, AB, POE

R-507A

AZ-50

97%

150%

85%

-88

POE

24

HPAC | december 2013

hpacmag.com


SERVER ROOM OVERHEATING?

Protecting important data depends on maintaining a controlled environment. That’s why it is essential to install a commercial-grade server room cooling system that is consistent, efficient and reliable, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. With so much on the line, it’s surprising that there are modified residential units claiming to be sufficient for server room applications. Little wonder that these units can’t take the strain placed on them by modern server rooms. Mitsubishi Electric’s P-Series precision cooling system is different. It’s a commercial grade ductless unit that is designed for commercial applications and is tooled specifically for durability and to maintain consistent, reliable server room temperature. So whether you’re expanding your server room or designing a new one from the ground up, Mitsubishi Electric P-Series can help keep your critical systems up and running 24/7. Now that’s a cool idea!

46 BUILT FOR CANADA As part of our commitment to the Canadian market, Mitsubishi Electric’s Ultra Low Ambient System is designed to withstand extreme weather conditions, whether the outdoor temperature is +46°C or -40°C.

PseriesCooling.ca


< refrigeration

continued from p.24

Table 6 – Refrigerant Distributor & Nozzle Selection with R-22 Replacements 18 000 Btu Evaporator R-22 R-407A R-422D -20F SST / 105 SCT 50F Liquid Temp

R-438A

R-404A

R-507

Feeder Tube ODF

3/16"

3/16"

3/16"

3/16"

3/16"

3/16"

Feeder Tube ∆P

13 psi

16 psi

20 psi

19 psi

19 psi

20 psi

Feeder Tube % Loaded

124%

150%

177%

174%

170%

171%

Nozzle Size

#1

#1

#1

#1

#1

#1

Nozzle ∆P

27 psi

34 psi

35psi

34 psi

38 psi

39 psi

Nozzle % Loaded

109%

133%

141%

138%

151%

154%

Total Distributor ∆P

40 psi

50 psi

55 psi

53 psi

57 psi

59 psi

-----

No

Yes #2

Yes #1-½

Yes #2

Yes #2

Replace Nozzle?

Table 7 – TEV Selection with R-22 Replacements 18 000 Btu Evaporator -20F SST / 70F &105 SCT 50F Liquid Temp

R-22

R-407A

R-422D

R-438A

R-404A

R-507

TEV Selection (Using R-22 Dist/Nozzle)

EGVE-2

EGVE-2

EGVE-2

EGVE-2

EGSE 1-½

EGSE 1-½

Thermostatic Element Replacement Required?

-----

No

No

No

Yes SZ/SZP

Yes SZ/SZP

Nominal TEV Capacity after Element Replacement

-----

2 Ton

2 Ton

2 Ton

1-½ Ton

1-½ Ton

% Rated Capacity at 105F Condensing

59%

58%

84%

67%

65%

66%

% Rated Capacity at 70F Condensing

99%

97%

149%

110%

113%

115%

Valve Replacement Required?

-----

No

Yes EGVE-3

Possible EGVE-3

Possible EGSE-2

Possible EGSE-2

some cases). This becomes a very time consuming and expensive conversion. Refer to Table 6 and 7 for examples of potential conversions, and whether existing flow controls would require replacement. The application is a typical supermarket with a -20F evaporator temperature, a liquid subcooler providing 50F liquid refrigerant, and operating at 105F condensing temperature. There are two things to consider with TEVs: Will the existing valve selection yield sufficient capacity with the new refrigerant, and will the new refrigerant use the same thermostatic element as R-22. R-404A and R-507 will require an element replacement, even if the original R-22 TEV body provides sufficient capacity after the conversion. Now, it is true that every application 26

HPAC | december 2013

is different. While the thermodynamic properties will determine how the existing R-22 selection will fare with the new refrigerant, how the original selection was made will also be a determining factor. In the above example, if the application above were 24 000 Btu instead of 18 000 Btu, the original TEV selection would have been a three-ton valve. This valve would be sufficiently sized for use with R-438A, slightly undersized for R-422D in the low ambient months, and sufficiently sized for R-404A/R-507 (but would require an element replacement). It is recommended that all distributor nozzle and TEV selections be verified prior to the conversion. This becomes additional labour to verify what is currently in the system and

then going through the exercise of determining the capacity with the new refrigerant. Certainly choosing a refrigerant, which has a minimal capacity loss and similar mass flow requirements (meaning no distributor nozzle or TEV replacements) would be desirable. There is much more to discuss and that will be done in a later issue. <> Dave Demma holds a degree in refrigeration engineering and worked as a journeyman refrigeration technician before moving into the manufacturing sector where he regularly trains contractor and engineering groups. He can be reached at ddemma@uri.com. hpacmag.com


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< plumbing

Discover New Opportunities With Linear Shower Drains BY Eric Carson

SHOWER ACCESS The drains can be used to create wheelchair accessible, ADA-compliant showers, which are required in several of the most important and profitable segments of commercial building, such as hotels and hospitals. The specification of linear drains allows a new level of freedom for designers since the drain can be placed anywhere in the shower layout. The visual appeal and faster, easier installation process has fueled the product’s rapid growth with residential contractors, as well as architectural design firms. “As soon as linear drains gained approval, or UPC listing for commercial buildings in North America, the category has continued to rapidly grow each year, or for that matter each quarter,” said Joe Phillips, president of LUXE Linear Drains. In a most unusual development, many of the several thousands of well-established, five-star hotels across the country 28

HPAC | december 2013

Photos Luxe Linear Drains

I

n the ultra-competitive world of architectural building products it is remarkable that manufacturers and designers can continue to create and develop new ones. But somehow there always seems to be another lightning-hot product or system that jolts the building design and construction industry from top to bottom. In North America, decorative linear channel drains for custom showers has been that product. The drains have been experiencing explosive growth across the board and borders. Whether it is in a single home or for the grandest of all commercial projects, the drains have several different features that appeal to decision-makers. The most obvious reason is that architects and interior designers like the look and freedom available to them in commercial building projects that include custom showers. The process of installing linear drains can be faster and simpler than the one used to set the traditional round-centre drain. The mortar bed slopes down ¼ in. per foot in one direction toward the linear drain, as opposed to the round-centre drains that require the mortar bed to be sloped equally in four different directions toward the middle. In truth, even if the only benefit of linear channel drains was faster, easier custom shower installations, they would be popular with owners, developers and general contractors for the time and labour savings alone.

have made the decision to undergo full-scale tub-to-shower conversion renovations for every guest room shower on every floor in an effort to remain current and relevant. This explosive demand for decorative linear channel drains has in some ways taken North America by storm, spreading so fast that it has caused some confusion for contractors and other interested parties in the mix. The confusion that might exist in the new category for commercial building is the result of slight differences in how the process shakes out in Canada as opposed to the U.S., specifically who installs linear channel drains for residential and/or commercial projects: the tile contractor or licensed plumber. The official answer is both. And it is different in the U.S. and Canada. In both countries, the demand and popularity of linear drains and tile tray inserts, as well as square replacement drains in both styles, is being driven by manufacturers of tile and stone surfaces. And no matter what country you are in, the installation of linear drains has everything to do with the hpacmag.com


materials and methods used by the installer. For one custom shower at a private residence, or 250 custom linear showers in a new hotel, the technical installation specifications remain the same. In the U.S., each state has adopted California plumbing codes and standards, and Canada has adopted U.S. codes. In America, and thus Canada, the specifications for installing linear drains or linear tile tray insert drains adhere to the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) details. ANSI details focus on the characteristics of the installation materials being used in accordance with the steps required for installing tile or stone in wet areas. Where it might be tripping some of us up and causing confusion between contractors is that every single code or requirement concerning the installation of linear drains in custom baths are pulled directly from the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) standard-issue handbook. This makes perfect sense in Canada since all drain installations, linear or otherwise, must be done by a plumber.

Installation calls for sloping mortar drain bed.

THE ROLE OF THE PLUMBER In Canada, plumbing contractors play a much larger, more important role than they do in America. This explains why in Canada â&#x20AC;&#x153;ticketed plumbersâ&#x20AC;? must install every linear drain, residentially or commercially, while in America the tile contractor is always in charge of every custom shower installation. So what you have here is just that certain aspects of U.S. and Canadian building codes are handled differently. That does not necessarily clear up all the confusion in North America, since things can get a bit dicey with all the codes, requirements, governing bodies and acronyms that need to be identified and then met in both countries. In addition to ANSI technical installation specifications, manufacturers of linear drains must earn UPC listing through IAPMO R & T, which is also acceptable or transferable to the Canadian marketplace and denoted as cUPC. In fact, U.S. and Canadian linear drain manufacturers in either country hoping to do business in both, must imprint or engrave their UPC/cUPC listing identification on the body of the actual product itself. In addition, U.S. manufacturers must also earn certification from the National Plumbing Code of Canada, the International Plumbing Code (IPC), International Building Code (IBC), as well as the International Residential Code (IRC). In every scenario, application or building type in the U.S., the tile contractor is always the one responsible for the installation of linear drains for modern, stylish custom showers in private homes or large-scale commercial projects. <> Eric Carson is director of Blueprint Global Media. hpacmag.com

Option works well in accessible washrooms.

Linear drains appeal to designers of custom baths. december 2013 | HPAC

29


plumbing products

Aquatherm Greenpipe’s recyclable polypropyl-

Bradley Corp. has introduced the streamlined Verge L-Series Lavatory System, designed for the

ene-random piping system for potable water

most upscale and refined commercial restroom applications. The L-Series features an attractive,

applications is now available in sizes up to 18

molded and seamless basin made from Bradley’s durable and sustainable Evero Natural Quartz

in. in diameter, and is ideal for water mains and

surface. The basin shape funnels water to the drain, minimizing standing water. The L-Series also

highrise buildings. It features a standard di-

features an optional 0.38 gpm water-conserving faucet, and comes with a textured stainless steel

mension ratio 11 (SDR 11) wall thickness,

trap cover to conceal plumbing elements. www.bradleycorp.com

which is capable of delivering 4000-6000 gpm and provides a balance of strength and flow rate. Greenpipe can be directly buried in soil,

The Gen-Eye Hot Spot locator by General Pipe Cleaners is de-

sand and other materials.

signed to make locating easier with an intuitive directional map-

www.aquatherm.com

ping and guidance system that simplifies locating of pipe inspection cameras, sondes, active power lines and buried utilities. The locator’s total field antenna array allows users to The Copper De-

locate from any direction, and the easy-to-read, high-contrast

velopment Associ-

backlit LCD display provides graphic icons that lead users di-

ation has convert-

rectly to the target. The locator’s depth range is up to 10 ft. in

ed

cast iron pipe and 20 ft. in clay or plastic pipe.

Tube

its

Copper Handbook

www.drainbrain.com

into an app for plumbers,

HVAC

technicians

and

contractors.

The

Ridgid is now offering a self-leveling camera head for its

app is a resource

SeeSnake Max rM200 Camera System to help take the

for anyone work-

guesswork out of inspections. Users can now count on a

ing with copper

clear, right-side-up image or video in even the most compli-

tube and piping

cated lines. The SeeSnake Max rM200 Camera System is

systems or seek-

capable of inspecting lines up to 200 ft. in length and 1-½ in.

ing access to technical specifications, data or

to 6 in. in diameter.

installation instructions. The app can be down-

www.ridgid.com

loaded through Apple’s App Store and Android’s Google Play. www.copper.org 30

HPAC | december 2013

continued on p.32 hpacmag.com


Plumbing PRODUCts continued from p.30

EasyHeat’s AHB residential water pipe heating cable is ready to use outof-the-box. An integral thermostat controls the cable to automatically protect water pipes from freezing by keeping water flowing down to -40F. Watts has introduced the Triton Pipe Fusion system, a plastic pipe weld-

Equipped with an energy-saving thermostat, the AHB cables automati-

ing solution that uses radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic technology to

cally switch electricity on or off based on the temperature. The cables

improve pipe joining and testing times. Triton offers faster start-up time

operate on standard 120 Volts AC and are available in lengths from three

than conventional welding techniques such as socket or butt-welding. It

to 80 ft. in wattages ranging from 21W to 560W. www.easyheat.com

includes three components – a control unit, fusers and fittings – which operate together to create durable outside diameter welds offering unobstructed flow and decreased pressure drop. The use of RF electromagnetic technology eliminates exposed heating elements, adhesives and VOCs. www.tritonpipefusion.com Aquatherm’s polypropylenerandom (PP-R) piping systems now feature a threadless transition from PP-R

The Viega SmartLoop system helps maintain water quality by reducing

pipe to fixture units and

water stagnation and is ideal for use in multi-story commercial applica-

flush valves, which allows

tions. It uses a supply riser to insulate the internal recirculation line

for installations to be fitted

tubing and keeps water hotter longer. Water within the system remains in

out entirely in PP-R. With

constant motion, which reduces the risk of waterborne pathogens, includ-

Aquatherm-to-copper stub-outs, which come in ½-in., ¾-in. and 1-in. di-

ing legionella. According to Viega, the SmartLoop system offers energy

ameters, installers can easily transition through a wall to a fixture unit or

and water consumption savings potential of up to 40 per cent.

flush valve using PP-R. www.aquatherm.com

www.viega.com

Correction to October, p.72 The T30828 from Turbo is a pre-assembled twin 1/3 HP cast iron sump

Sloan has introduced concealed models of

package that offers double the protection in a small package. The sys-

its Solis solar powered sensor-activated

tem can be installed in a 14 in. or

flush valves for water closets and urinals.

larger diameter sump basin. The

They are designed for busy restroom

pumps come pre-assembled with

facilities such as schools, stadiums and

nine ft. independent piggyback ver-

transportation centres. The flushometers

tical switches, pre-installed check

for wall-hung water closets flush at either

valves with 1 ½ in. ABS discharge

1.28 gpf/4.8 Lpf or 1.6 gpf/6.0 gpf.

pipe and they operate on two inde-

The urinal flushometers, available in

pendent 110V circuits. The system

32

HPAC | december 2013

0.5 gpf/1.9 Lpf and 1.0 gpf/3.8 Lpf

has a 78 gpm maximum capacity.

models, can use automated logic to reduce water usage in high-use

www.turbopumps.ca

applications. www.sloanvalve.com

hpacmag.com


< conference report

Winds Of Change

Winnipeg meeting geared to preparing delegates for the future. BY KERRY TURNER

D

elegates enjoyed educational programs and social events at the 2013 edition of MCA Canada's 72nd Annual National Conference in Winnipeg, Manitoba, from September 25-28. After several days of executive and board meetings, MCA Canada opened the formal part of the conference with a rollicking Welcome To Winnipeg Night. Hosted by MCAC’s Manitoba representatives, the multicultural extravaganza was fronted by the largest and longestrunning troupe of its kind, Folklorama. At the opening breakfast on the 26th attendees were treated to a humorous and down-to-earth address by author and member of the cast of CBC’s Dragons’ Den, David Chilton. Delegates then took in the educational programs focusing on Best Practices and Personality Profiling. Business was combined with pleasure as delegates headed to The Hitch N Post Ranch for an evening of music, dancing and dinner. Fundraising for MCA Canada's Charity – Operation Eyesight–involved arrests, imprisonment, and one assumes “bail,” as chairman Brad Diggens, aka the sheriff, collected more than $35,000 for the cause. Following MCA Canada's AGM, the golfers in the crowd challenged Larters At St Andrews Golf & Country Club, for

the Annual John Bradshaw Memorial Golf Tournament. At the Mechanical Contractors Network Awards Breakfast on September 28, The Gary Greig Memorial Award was presented to James Derksen of Derksen Plumbing & Heating 1984 Ltd. The award recognizes significant and meritorious contribution through long-standing participation, leadership and commitment to MCA Canada's National Conference. The Lloyd McLean Memorial Award, which is presented for outstanding commitment and volunteerism, was awarded posthumously to Jamie McNabb (ABCO Supply & Service Ltd, Winnipeg, MB). Tim Meadows of Victaulic received the Doug Crawford Memorial Award, in recognition of his significant contribution to the success of the associate members. That evening at the chairman's gala dinner and dance, outgoing chairman Brad Diggens was recognized for his outstanding contributions over the last three years. Incoming chairman, Gaetan Beaulieu has been a long-serving member on MCA Canada's Board of Directors representing New Brunswick and has sat on the executive committee for several years as vice-chairman eastern. MCAC will hold its 73rd national conference September 24 to 27, 2014, in St. John's, NL. www.mcac.ca <>

At the AGM, from left, Bob Hoare, Gaetan Beaulieu (incoming chair) and Del Pawliuk. Tim Meadows accepts a plaque in recognition of his service to the Canadian Mechanical Contracting Education Foundation (CMCEF) from Tania Johnston, CMCEF executive director.

Joe Senese, vice president operations with Groupe Deschenes, paddles along with other volunteer participants during Folklorama’s high-energy performance. The ensemble of dancers and musicians, together with the variety of artisans and dining options available at the welcome event, set a lively international tone. This year’s conference included the Supplier Innovation Showcase where the latest new products and services available to contractor members were on display.

David Chilton autographs The Wealthy Barber Returns for Tolanda Baker of Luk Plumbing & Heating Ltd. in Manitoba. 34

HPAC | December 2013

Speaker Dr. Awad Hanna of the Univeristy of Wisconsin noted that in the U.S. productivity is less than it was in 1961, in spite of technology. hpacmag.com


Gizmos and gadgets

Ridgid’s advanced lithium 18V batteries deliver improved performance and more benefits than their predecessors. Available in two sizes – 2.0 Ah and 4.0 Ah, the updated batteries provide short-circuit protection, over-current protection, over-discharge protection and Miller Electric Mfg. Co. has introduced the Multimatic 200, a portable multi-process welding

cell balancing. They work in temperatures ranging from

power source capable of performing MIG, Stick and TIG welding in one compact design. The

-20C to 70C, allowing for work to continue in demand-

auto-set elite feature allows operators to quickly and easily set weld parameters based on

ing conditions. The 2.0 Ah battery can provide more

material type and thickness, as well as fine tune those parameters to match each specific

than 200 presses per charge, while the 4.0 Ah battery

application. The Multimatic 200 is ideal for use in light fabrication, maintenance and repair,

can deliver more than 400 presses per charge.

HVAC, construction and farm/ranch applications. www.millerwelds.com

www.ridgid.com

Milwaukee Tool Corp. has added the M12 LED Stick Light to its M12 Lithium-Ion system. The light features three powerful LEDs that provide 220 lumens, a replaceable resistant lens for tough work conditions and a multi-position stainless steel hook for hands free use. An accessory magnet (48-24-2351) is available to secure the M12 LED Stick Light on metal surfaces. www.milwaukeetool.com

Bosch Power Tools has launched the company’s first 12V Max heated jacket and battery holster/controller USB power backup. The PSJ120 12V Max Heated Jacket is designed to keep contractors warm while also offering a built-in battery backup power source – the BHB120 – for USB-compatible cell phones and other electronics. The jacket features three quick warming core heat zones – two chest and one back – that provide up to six hours of heated

Buyers Products Company has introduced the newly designed Kabgard window protector to fit

run-time on low heat level with a 2.0 Ah

full-size pickup truck cabs. It is ideal for trucks that regularly carry tools and heavy equipment, and

battery. A three-level heat controller button on

the window protectors provide a barrier from items rubbing on, scratching or breaking cab windows.

the jacket’s chest lights up in red, green and

Available in standard mounting or cross-body toolbox mounting options, Kabgard window protector

blue to denote heat levels of high, medium and

supports common lighting accessories, including spotlight, beacon and several models of light

low. www.bosch.ca

bars. www.buyersproducts.com

36

HPAC | december 2013

hpacmag.com


ESAB Welding & Cutting Products has introduced a new range of TXH GTAW welding torches with welders’ needs in mind. The torches have an ergonomic design, are easy to operate, and produce high quality results in all common GTAW applications. They are designed to be used with ESAB GTAW machines that have an OKC connection, including ESAB Caddy Arc, Caddy Tig and Heliarc 281i, 283i and 353i models. Remote versions will operate with CAN-bus controlled machines. Electrode diameters range from .040 in. to ⅛ in. for the TXH 121 torch and .040 in. to 3/16 in. for the TXH 401w model. www.esabna.com MSA has developed a “green” protective hardhat manufactured using green high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sourced entirely from sugarcane ethanol. Developed by MSA in Brazil, the V-Gard GREEN hardhat meets the company’s performance standards, as well as those defined by ANSI Z89.1 and CSA Z94.1. The WorkStar 2030 floodlight by Maxxeon Inc.

Green high-density polyethylene is 100 per cent

offers a cushioned comfortable grip, camou-

recyclable in the same stream as conventional HDPE,

flage coating and many other unique features.

making it suitable for reuse in non-safety products.

These include a moveable, directional light

www.msasafety.com

head with two brightness levels, and a choice of mounting options such as powerful, integral rare earth magnets, retractable hook or tripod mount. The light has a run time of up to eight hours, it is rechargeable and it uses a single, high output 270-lumen light-emitting diode (LED) as the lighting source. The LED has a life expectancy of 50 000 hours. www.maxxeon.com

The Knipex installation pliers and the Knipex X-Cut diagonal cutters received 2013 International Forum (iF) product design awards. The iF awards are among the largest and most important international design awards. The Knipex installation pliers are ideal for electrical work come fully loaded with functions mimicking the four essential electrical installation tools: long nose pliers, wire strippers, crimping pliers and cable shears. The cutters are compact and lightweight, and also precise and powerful due to the double-supported joint axis that allows for heavy-duty cutting. www.knipex.com hpacmag.com

december 2013 | HPAC

37


< philanthropy

Building Blocks

Hydronics supplier joins effort to educate children in developing nations. BY PATRICK CALLAN

A

Surrey, BC hydronics company is reaching out to its business partners to help raise money for building schools in the developing world. Brian De Jaegher, owner of Raven Hydronic Supply Ltd., came up with a fundraising model that asks vendors to provide one discount on one order per year. His company will then match the discounted funds with its own money and donate the cash to Room to Read’s Vancouver chapter. Headquartered in San Francisco, CA, Room to Read has more than 50 chapters worldwide. The non-profit organization has opened more than 15 000 libraries and 1 600 schools – benefiting 7.8 million children in 10 developing countries. “I was reading the Vancouver Sun and there happened to be a whole page article about John Wood and the Room to Read organization,” said De Jaegher. At the time, Wood – who founded Room to Read in 2000 after a life-changing trek through Nepal – was in town promoting his most recent book. After reading it, De Jaegher raced off to the local library to read Wood’s first book Leaving Microsoft to Change the World. “It was very exciting to read, very uplifting,” he said. The book inspired De Jaegher to get involved and raise money for Room to Read. He has set a goal for his company to raise $35,000 in the first-year – enough to build a schoolhouse in a developing country like Cambodia. Going forward, he hopes to increase fundraising efforts by bringing more of Raven’s business partners on board – such as engineers and contractors – in order to open multiple schools every year. Construction of the first school is planned to start in early January 2014 and finish by mid-2015. “We realize the benefit of education, and none of us would be where we are if we weren’t well educated,” he said. “For us it’s a way to pay it forward.” Sharon Davis, chairwoman of Vancouver’s Room to Read chapter, is someone who also believes in paying it forward. And, like De Jaegher, she was also inspired after reading Wood’s book – it prompted her to launch the Vancouver chapter back in 2007. “It’s important for every kid to be educated,” she said. 38

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

Room To Read depends on corporate support, such as that of Raven Hydronic Supply.

Davis said in the developing world families often have to pay money for their children to attend school. Millions simply can’t afford it and need their children to work instead. “Families are living on $200 per year and it costs $250 per year to go to school,” she explained. Thanks to the support of one local donor, Davis said a recent report from an elementary school in southern Cambodia shows eight Cambodian teachers are educating more than 450 students in Grades 1 to 6. In the past six years, her chapter has raised more than $1.5 million for Room to Read – including $400,000 last year alone. Room to Read strives for not only equal access to education, but also gender equality, she said. A strong emphasis in their schools is placed on breaking down barriers about girls being “second-class citizens.” “It’s been proven that if you educate a girl you change a lot of things: you change her family, her community, probably her country down the road.” Having someone like De Jaegher and his company raising money plays a large part in Room to Read’s success because it eliminates the need for large departments of professional fundraisers, she added. “We were thrilled when we heard Brian wanted to do this,” she said. “It’s important for us to have people who want to really attach themselves to a project.” <> www.roomtoread.org www.ravensupply.ca hpacmag.com


“An energy audit helped us identify opportunities to save money by reducing electricity use.” Mike Bannon, Mik B VP of Production, Tempo Plastics

Saving energy makes sense – business sense. Get up to 70% off project costs, including: • Engineering studies • On-site energy manager

Energy efficiency incentives from your local electric utility are available for manufacturing operations like yours. Whether you’re in the plastics and packaging, automotive or food and beverage industry, you may be covered for up to 70% of your project costs, including engineering studies and process and systems upgrades to help lower operating costs.

• Key system upgrades • Monitoring and targeting

Big or small, every Ontario business can benefit from energy efficiency. Contact your local electric utility or visit saveonenergy.ca/industrial

Subject to additional terms and conditions found at saveonenergy.ca. Subject to change without notice. A mark of the Province of Ontario protected under Canadian trade-mark law. Used under licence. OM Official Marks of the Ontario Power Authority.


HVAC/R products  Superior Radiant Products has introduced its newest modulating infrared tube heater

– the Modulus. It features more heaters per circuit with self-

diagnostic ignition, fully modulating gas and air, and fully automatic or manual control

of burner modulation. Model rates range from 80 000 to 200 000 Btuh, and NG or LPG heaters are available in lengths from 20 to 60 ft. With no fixed points, the Modulus is self-regulating and able to adapt to the demand regardless of condition. www.superiorradiant.com UV Resources’ redesigned X-Plus UV fixture accommodates 17 to 61-in. extended base lamps, which easily mount from the exterior of any HVAC system, air handler, plenum or duct. The X-Plus series is ideal for hard-toaccess outdoor and indoor HVAC equipment up to 30 tons, including

rooftop

package

units,

Nordyne has partnered with Add2Cart to de-

through-the-wall or fan coil units.

sign an in-home sales app for HVAC contrac-

Benefits include improved heat transfer, reduced energy use, lower odour and maintenance,

tors. The ComfortConsultant app allows Home-

reduced cleaning downtime and damage, and sustained capacity of an air conditioning system

owners to get answers to questions about

while improving IAQ. www.uvresources.com

their new HVAC system. The app recommends a system based on their input and lets users

Fluke Corporation has introduced the Fluke 2638A Hydra

view the price differences between more or

Series III to the Hydra line of Data Acquisition Systems/

less efficient systems. ComfortConsultant

Digital Multimeters. It features a full colour display with an

comes pre-loaded with equipment, but contrac-

easy to use menu system, DC measurement accuracy of

tors can choose which units and IAQ products

0.0024 per cent, 6.5 digit DMM mode and CAT II safety

to display. Six different branded versions of the

ratings. The 2638A incorporates the Fluke Universal Input

app are available: Maytag, Broan, Frigidaire,

Connector that supports 15 common thermocouple types

NuTone, Tappan and Westinghouse. The app is

and delivers thermocouple accuracy of 0.5C. The connec-

available through the App Store.

tor has 22 channels of differential analog input (expand-

www.nordyne.com

able to 66 channels) for wiring multi-channel systems. www.flukecanada.ca

40

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

Tjernlund Products Inc. is offering a

EasyHeat Warm Tiles Elite floor

brochure for its AireShare line of room-

warming mats provide soothing

to-room

transfer

and energy efficient heat for

fans, which are designed to make hot

fine residential and commercial

or cool rooms more comfortable. The

floors. At less than ⅛ in. thick,

brochure illustrates ways the fans can

they help reduce installation

be installed to pull cool air from floor

costs, preparation time and do

and

level-to-level

level or warm air from ceiling level and

not increase floor height build-

distribute it high or low into an adjoin-

up. Elite mats are available in both standard rectangular sizes and

ing room. It also shows how the level-

custom layouts ranging from six to 138 sq. ft. for areas with irregu-

to-level units can transfer air from a

lar shapes. They can be installed underneath ceramic, porcelain,

lower to upper floor and vice versa.

terrazzo, glass mosaic, marble and natural stone, and under the

www.tjernlund.com

engineered wood and laminated floors. www.warmtiles.com hpacmag.com


Belimo’s New Generation Globe Valve

Big value, litte price tag.

Actuators are engineered to adapt to most globe valves regardless of make. The actuators can be used for a range of HVAC applications and the retrofit linkages are highly adaptable for easy selection and installation. They are designed with an adjustable UGVL linkage to fit on most ½ in. to two in. globe

Check with your local Lennox® PartsPlus® store about specials on Aire-Flo®.

valves. www.belimo.com

• 80%, 92% and 95% Furnace • Air Handler United CoolAir Corp. has reintroduced

the

self-con-

tained VariCool EZ-FIT modular air conditioning system

Don’t forget about your installation supplies you need to complete the job!

for use with floor-by-floor variable air volume applications. It is designed and manufactured for installation in renovation and retrofit projects for challenging HVAC applications. The VariCool EZ-Fit consists of three distinct sections (fan, evaporator coil and condensing) that mate to form a system module. Single modules are available in 12-15 ton and 2025 ton sizes. www.unitedcoolair.com

Stores are open Mon–Fri 7:30am–4:30pm and Sat 7:30am–11:30am through Dec. 21 CALGARY, AB 5350 86th Ave. S.E. 403-279-8075

EDMONTON, AB 8103 McIntyre Road 780-425-0733

BRAMPTON, ON 10 Woodslea Road 905-799-9911

BURNABY, BC 2962 Lake City Way 604-421-1767

SCARBOROUGH, ON 2010 Ellesmere Road, Units 13 & 14 416-754-4311

DARTMOUTH, NS 133 ILSLEY Ave, Unit D 902-468-5995

HAMILTON, ON 351 Nash Road North, Unit #10 905-560-4200 OTTAWA, ON 1177 Parisien Street 613-745-1528 Allied Commercial has launched the new Z-Series commercial rooftop packaged units designed for compatibility with many replacement jobs. Available in three to five ton gas/electric, electric/electric and heat pump models, the units fit most curb sizes while offering value, flexibility and long-lasting performance. At up to 20 per cent lighter than competing units, Z-Series units help reduce structural engineering costs, allowing for less

WATERLOO, ON 115 Randall Drive, Ste 10 519-886-3666 LONDON, ON 1 Adelaide Street N., Ste 5 519-439-3377

WINNIPEG, MB 1653 Saint James St 204-633-0345 VILLE SAINT LAURENT, QC 3540 Boulevard Poirier 514-336-6090 REGINA, SK 2110 7th Avenue 306-757-7678 SASKATOON, SK 3026A Faithful Avenue 306-934-4858

Visit us online at www.LennoxPartsPlus.com

time on the job and more savings. www.alliedair.com hpacmag.com

DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

41


MECHANICAL SUPPLY NEWS MANUFACTURERS • distributors • wholesalers Grundfos grows tech school initiative

Grundfos presents a cheque for $12,500 to Kwantlen Polytechnic University's plumbing apprenticeship program. (From left) KPU plumbing instructor Sven Rohde; Henry Reiser, dean of the faculty of trades and technology; Grundfos Canada president Simon Feddema; and Grundfos Canada district sales manager Rod Parker.

Grundfos Canada will contribute $12,500 over the next five years to Kwantlen Polytechnic University's (KPU) plumbing apprenticeship program. As part of its technical school initiative, Grundfos will also share real-world experience with students through in-class lectures and presentations. The pump and pumping system manufacturer launched the initiative in 2011 with the dual objective of supporting student talent and developing its potential workforce. “Grundfos Canada was impressed with Kwantlen Polytechnic University‘s innovative and professional programs,” said Simon Feddema, general manager of Grundfos Canada. “We look forward to partnering with the school in the years ahead as we together work on developing the next generation of trade professionals.” KPU Tech – the university’s Cloverdale, BC, trades and technology campus – offers three levels of plumbing apprenticeship training with a fourth level currently under development. The in-school training for each level is six weeks and includes a final exam. Since launching the Technical School Initiative in 2011 with NAIT (Northern Alberta Institute of Technology), Grundfos has expanded the program across Canada to include SAIT Polytechnic (Southern Alberta Institute of Technology), Mohawk College in Stoney Creek, ON and most recently KPU. At press time the company announced that the plumbing apprentice students at Humber College would receive an early Christmas gift of $25,000. The five-year partnership agreement makes Humber College the most recent school in the company's initiative. Watch www.hpacmag.com for more on this story. http://ca.grundfos.com 42

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

Uponor launches two new enterprises Uponor has launched a subsidiary enterprise – Uponor Innovations – targeting anyone from entrepreneurs to management teams who have innovative ideas about emerging markets or creating new products. Uponor Innovations will be able to use Uponor’s existing infrastructure of staff, funds, marketing, technical support sales, manufacturing and distribution network to explore any possible business opportunities. For more information or to submit a summary of your idea visit www.uponorinnovations.com. Uponor also recently launched LiveChat where professionals in the PEX plumbing, fire sprinkler and radiant heating and cooling industries can access Uponor Technical and Design Services online for support. Users can access LiveChat by visiting www.uponorpro.com and clicking the small blue chat now box in the lower right-hand side of the screen. Representatives from Uponor Technical and Design Services are available on LiveChat Monday to Friday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central Standard Time.

Daikin unitary brand products now available in Canada The Daikin unitary brand is now available in Canada. All products will be assembled in manufacturing plants in Texas and Tennessee. In addition, the full line of Daikin brand ducted unitary products will be supported by a brand reinforcement campaign focusing on bringing “comfort for life” for residential homeowners across North America. In other Daikin news, Daikin McQuay recently announced that it has changed its company name to Daikin Applied Americas Inc. and its product brand name to Daikin. www.daikinapplied.com www.daikincomfort.com

MERGERS, ACQUISITIONS Carrier, Bosch join forces in North American geothermal market With sales of geothermal heat pumps expected to nearly triple by 2020, Carrier and Robert Bosch North America Corp. are teaming up to develop and manufacture geothermal and water source heat pumps for the North American residential and commercial markets. Sales channels and the respective brands for each company will remain independent of one another. The two companies signed the joint venture agreement on November 11, which is pending the necessary regulatory approvals. No financial details of the partnership were released. www.carrier.com www.bbtna.com hpacmag.com


Noble deal finalized RONA inc. has completed the sale of its commercial and professional market division, known as Noble, to Talisker Plumbing Corporation–a subsidiary of EMCO Corporation. The sale was announced in June 2013 and took effect on October 21, 2013. According to Taliskar, it intends to "grow and develop Noble as a distinct subsidiary, with a separate management structure." (See People on p44 for appointment notices.) www.noble.ca www.emco.ca

Purchase expands Danfoss scope The Danfoss Group has acquired Sauer-Danfoss after more than 10 years as part-owner of the company. The move expands Danfoss’ business to include mobile hydraulic and electrohydraulic solutions. The Danfoss Group’s acquisition of SauerDanfoss adds five locations and 2000 employees in North America, and 6400 employees and 19 manufacturing and engineering facilities worldwide. As part of the acquisition process, Sauer-Danfoss changed its name to Danfoss Power Solutions, a new business segment within the Danfoss Group. www.danfoss.us www.powersolutions.danfoss.com

ON THE MOVE

Royal Building Products has moved its Surrey, BC PVC pipe fittings facility 40 km east to Langley. The new facility continues to manufacture PVC fittings measuring from ½ in. to 36 in. diameter for all product groups. It also distributes a range of moulded and fabricated products for municipal, plumbing and electrical markets directly to Royal’s customers in western Canada and fabricates custom fittings for customers across the country. The entire staff of manufacturing employees, administration, customer service and sales representatives relocated to the Langley location. www.royalbuildingproducts.com

Franklin Electric has moved to an 118 000 sq. ft. facility in Fort Wayne, IN. The provider of complete water and fueling systems will use the facility to expand its research, development, and design capabilities. Located near the Fort Wayne International Airport, the World Headquarters and Engineering Center of Excellence is equipped with a 24 000 sq. ft. testing lab and uses geothermal heating and cooling. www.franklin-electric.com hpacmag.com

DISTRIBUTION >> Hydronic Agencies Ltd. recently opened an office/ warehouse in Calgary, AB, at Bay A, 1120-44 Ave. SE. The location allows the company to provide same day availability on its lines. For more information, e-mail a.nunes@hydronicagencies.com or tel. 403.500.4400. www.hydronicagencies.com

>> Roth Industries Inc. has announced the addition of Equipco Ltd. as its manufacturing representative for Ontario. Equipco has represented Roth for six years in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Northwest Territories and Yukon Territory. Products represented include Roth’s radiant/hydronic line, double-wall oil storage tanks, solar, geothermal and plumbing products. To contact Equipco tel. 604.522.5590 or e-mail sales@equipcoltd.com. continued on p45

There isn’t one good reason to join HRAI. There are many. HRAI does more than just champion HVACR concerns. HRAI provides real, tangible benefits to member companies.

Need more convincing? Check out HRAI’s full list of services. Visit hrai.ca/becomeamember Scan the QR Code to watch video

DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

43


< PEOPLE Alexandre Laroche has been appointed vice-president, information, technology and innovation at BMI. During his 18 years at Alexandre Laroche BMI, he has overseen the development of a large technological environment while playing a key role in the optimization of busiRachel ness processes and serBouthillette vices. A member of the executive committee since 2006, he is involved in setting the corporate strategy and ensuring that IT initiatives are aligned. Rachel Bouthillette has been named BMI's vice-president of procurement. She will manage the procurement activities, as well as focus on improving the efficiency and flow between purchasing and marketing activities. Bouthillette joined BMI more than six years ago and participates in the company’s decisionmaking process through her role within its executive committee. The Canadian Institute of Plumbing & Heating (CIPH) recently welcomed Shamus Allidina to the role of technical advisor for codes and Shamus Allidina standards. Allidina began his 31-year career at the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) as a project engineer for the CSA’s international, certification and testing division before being promoted to senior engineer responsible for certification programs, standards work, training, and resolution issues.

44

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

Gerry DePalma

Mary-Anne Moretto Tom Spracklin

GTA wholesaler Next has announced its lineup of store managers for its new locations: Tom Jeff Emo Spracklin-Vaughan, Gerry DePalma-Leaside, Jeff Emo-downtown Toronto and Kenny Lebuffe for the recently opened Kenny Lebuffe Etobicoke warehouse at 82 N. Queen St. In addition, MaryAnne Moretto has joined Next as credit manager, working at the Vaughan head office. Jeremy Torra has joined E. S. Gallagher Sales Ltd. as its new representative for Eastern and Northern Ontario, including the city of Toronto. He brings more than 20 years of sales experience to the position. Gabriel Mercier recently joined Giant Factories Inc. as its new sales represenGabriel Mercier tative for Eastern Québec. Gabriel brings 17 years of experience in the plumbing industry to the position. Emco Corp. has announced that Sean Kelly, who has been with the company for 18 years in key leadership roles, is the new vice-president of procurement following Sian Smith’s appointment to

the position of senior director of strategic procurement at Noble Corporation. Kelly will continue to report to president Rick Fantham. For the past seven years Kelly held the position of division vicepresident of waterworks, and from 2000 to 2006 he was the region vicepresident of British Columbia. John Pearce has joined Miroliin as vicepresident of sales and marketing. Pearce has an extensive background in plumbing products both in North America and globally, most recently as senior vice-president of sales and marketing for Novanni Stainless Inc. As reported in HPAC October 2013, Dave Garlow is the new CEO and president of Viega LLC. He has been the Dalyn Cantrell company’s vice-president of sales and marketing for the past 14 years and takes over for the retiring Dan Schmierer. Long-time employee Dalyn Cantrell replaces Garlow. She has more than 30 years of experience in the plumbing and heating industry, beginning her career in 1983 in customer service for Vanguard. Cantrell is now a member of the Viega LLC Executive Committee, the company’s eight-member leadership team.

Let us know what is going on in your company! e-mail pcallan@hpacmag.com

hpacmag.com


continued from p43

CAUSE FOR CELEBRATION >> Jaga Climate Systems has announced the winners of its Mookum Challenge, an international design contest aimed at finding the best new innovations in heating accessories. The challenge, to produce a functional heating accessory made from natural materials that cost no more than $125, was open to anyone around the world. Studio#3:13 in Belgium was selected for the Jury Prize for Warmlight, a LED light-based accessory that displays the current temperature of a radiator. TRYangle ME by Belgian designer Kaat Verhelstin took home the Public Prize. TRYangle ME is a colourful humidifier made from stainless steel and ceramic. It includes a magnetic back to simplify installation at any height. Each winner receives about $2,500 US, inclusion in a Mookum’s marketing campaign and a royalty contract. The winning designs will be sold through Mookum’s online shop. www.jaga-canada.com

>> Owens Corning recently celebrated its 75th year in business. It is one of

< MSN

only a few hundred U.S.-based companies to have reached that milestone. The company started in October 1938 when Owens-Illinois and Corning Glass officially incorporated Owens-Corning Fiberglas, based in Toledo, OH. The now global company, which produces residential and commercial building materials, is still headquartered in Toledo. www.owenscorning.com

Potable Water Solutions for 2-8”/50-200 mm systems

>> tekmar Control Systems’ Boiler Control 284 has been presented with an Honorable Mention in the Building Automation Category of the 2014 AHR Expo Innovation Awards. The Control is designed to operate up to four boilers to accurately maintain a target water temperature and communicates directly with building automation systems through BACnet or Modbu. The new control will be on display at the AHR Expo January 21-23, 2014, in New York, NY. “We’re honored to be recognized by a panel of experts in the HVAC/R industry,” said Nathan Floyd, general manager for tekmar Control Systems. “It is because of the hard work and dedication of each person at tekmar that we are celebrating this success today, and we will continue our efforts to focus on innovative system solutions for HVAC.” www.tekmarControls.com hpacmag.com

Introducing the Victaulic Series 7A2 Butterfly Valve

NSF-61-G

u

2½ - 8”/65-200 mm sizes rated from vacuum to 300 psi

u

NSF-61-G certified

u

PPS coated for domestic water service

u

Download submittal 08.27 for information

Victaulic offers a variety of low lead solutions for potable water applications. Contact us at viccanada@victaulic.com for more information.

www.victaulic.com DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

45


HYDRONIC products

Tekmar’s Snow Melting Control 654 is dePanel

signed to operate hydronic or electric equip-

The KN Series condensing gas-fired boilers

operates as a high/high/low temperature

ment to melt snow or ice from any surface.

combine the 99 per cent efficiency of modern

distribution centre with a boiler (or other non-

With the use of in-slab or aerial mounted sen-

low mass boilers with the reliability of cast iron

DHW appliances) as a heat source. It has two

sors, the 654 can automatically start the sys-

boilers. They are designed for commercial or

high temperature branches, one for an indirect-

tem as soon as snow is detected. New fea-

large residential applications such as apart-

fired DHW tank (with priority) and one for a high

tures

communication,

ment complexes, institutional buildings with

temperature heating application such as a fan

tandem snow/ice detection, storm pre-warm-

radiant heating systems, water source heat

coil. The #31355 Compact Mixing Control with

ing, EconoMelt, zone priority and tracking.

pumps and snow melt. The KN Series boilers

the three-way mixing valve and actuator will

www.tekmarcontrols.com

are available in eight sizes with inputs ranging

HeatLink’s

CDP310RP4R2

Combi

include

tekmarNet

automatically regulate the water temperature

from 200 to 3000 MBH.

(outdoor reset) in the radiant heating circuit.

www.hydrothermkn.com

The panels have three outputs to the boiler and are designed for use in residential homes

Weil-McLain Canada has added the Eco boiler

or small commercial buildings.

to its lineup. The Eco delivers up to 95.2 per

www.heatlink.com

cent AFUE with a streamlined and durable design that is engineered to save contractors’ SharkBite’s

Push-Fit

time. It features multiple venting configura-

connection

system

tions (sidewall or through the roof direct vent),

is suited to joining

a stainless steel fire tube heat exchanger and

copper, CPVC or PEX

a large LCD display, which can be mounted on

pipe in any combination

Weil-McLain’s SlimFit condensing gas boiler is

the boiler or a wall up to two ft. away. The Eco

with no soldering, clamps,

designed for installation in commercial and in-

is able to vent with S636 PVC, CPVC, PP or SS

unions or glue. Insert the pipe

stitutional settings. It features up to 96.1 per

venting up to 100 ft. for both exhaust and air

and the stainless steel teeth will bite down

cent combustion efficiency, up to 95.8 per cent

intake. www.weil-mclain.ca

and grip tight while an O-ring compresses to

thermal efficiency, one to two million Btuh, a

create a seal. To disassemble, use the discon-

modulating burner with 6:1 turndown ratio and

nect tool so fittings and valves can be changed

CSD-1 compliant is standard.

and reused. www.sharkbite.com

www.weil-mclain.ca Creatherm radiant floor panels offer contractors a foam installation process designed to reduce installation time. Manufactured out of BASF Styropor and Neopor EPS, the panels provide high thermal insulation capacity, compressive strength, impact absorption and low weight. They are best suited for slab-on-grade, snowmelt and retrofit heating. The finished floor panel size is two ft. by four ft. and features a staggered snap-tight grid for optimal tubing spacing. On-Centre points exist every three in. Panels are available in 1.8, and 3.3 in. thicknesses. www.creatherm.com

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HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

hpacmag.com


< HVAC/R

OGA Conference Focuses On Rejuvenating Geothermal Industry BY Patrick Callan

T

he Ontario Geothermal Association’s (OGA) annual conference featured an array of speakers from Canada and the U.S. who shared ideas and strategies for revamping the geothermal industry to increase its market share in residential and commercial markets. Ninety-seven people attended the conference, which took place from November 14 to 15 at the Hockley Valley Resort, about an hour northwest of Toronto, ON. Keynote speaker Andrew Pride, vice-president of conservation with the Ontario Power Authority (OPA), said conservation of energy will be Ontario’s number one resource going forward, and the geothermal industry can be a big part of that. “It’s about influencing someone to make a different decision than they were going to do,” he said of when consumers are evaluating which type of heating/cooling systems to have installed. And much to the delight of the OGA’s top brass, Pride committed to roundtable talks between the OPA and the OGA to discuss potential geothermal opportunities in the province. The second day of the conference saw a full slate of speakers covering many different aspects of the geothermal industry, ranging from policy setting to marketing and from manufacturing to developments in codes and standards. Day two speakers included: Tim Wohlgemut, CEO of ClearSky Advisors; Will Lange, director, distributor sales and utility market development for WaterFurnace International; Steve Smith, president and CEO of Enertech Global; Paul Bony, director of residential market development and western region sales for ClimateMaster; Gary Clarkson, senior project manager of Diversicare Canada; Jack Pong from City Core Developments Inc.; Muktha Tumkur, pro-

Independent consultant David Hatherton (l) receives a lifetime achievement award from Ontario Geothermal Association (OGA) vice-president Jim Bolger (r) during the OGA annual conference. hpacmag.com

gram manager for CSA Group; Leo Luong and Warren Lusk from the Ministry of the Environment; Andrew Oding, senior building science associate for Building Knowledge Canada Inc.; and Tim Wright, eastern sales manager for Enertech Global. Jim Bolger, vice-president of the OGA, presented David Hatherton, independent consultant, with a lifetime achievement award. Hatherton’s career spans more than 30 years in the geothermal industry in North America, including several founding and senior level management roles. Hatherton also won the 2010 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award in the Cleantech category for NextEnergy – the Elmira, ON-based geothermal company he founded in 1998. The location of next year’s OGA conference is yet to be announced. http://ontariogeothermal.ca <>

administered by DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

47


< hydronics

Radiant Loop Layout Patterns

Figure A Single-wall Serpentine

A review of radiant loop layout patterns with their differences, as they best represent the heat distribution into spaces with different heat loss characteristics. BY mike miller

T

here are four most common loop layout options when dealing with an over pour installation. These are referred to as single-wall serpentine, double-wall serpentine, triple-wall serpentine and counter flow (as shown in Figures A-D). Depending on the application, any one of these should be applied in order to maximize the radiant systems efficiency and heat distribution effectiveness. The single-wall serpentine pattern is commonly applied when only a single exterior wall represents the majority of the heat loss of a room. The warmest water is sent to the perimeter of the outside wall first and returned at six in. on centre (OC) for the first four runs (two in each direction) before the spacing can be widened to nine in. or beyond. For all future references, it is my personal preference to not have greater spacing than nine in. OC in any liveable space that would be enjoyed with bare feet. Applied when two adjacent exterior walls represent the majority of the heat loss of a room, a double-wall serpentine pattern results in the warmest water being sent to the perimeter of the two outside walls first and returned at six in. OC for the first four runs (two in each direction) before the spacing can be widened to nine in. or beyond. The loop layout would continue with this pattern until completion. A triple-wall serpentine pattern is applied when three adjacent exterior walls represent the majority of the heat loss of a room. The warmest water is sent around the perimeter of the three outside walls first and returned at six in. OC for the first four runs (two in each direction) before the spacing can be widened to nine inches or beyond. The loop layout would continue with this pattern until completion. When the heat loss of the room is evenly distributed and/ or no outside walls exist counter flow is the appropriate pattern. The warmest water is sent around the perimeter of the room first and spiralled at 12 or 18 ft. OC to the centre of the room before being returned at halfway in between in parallel runs, finishing off the loop at equal spacing throughout. If the initial loop centre spacing was at 18 ft. OC prior to returning from the centre, the tubing would end up at nine in. OC when completed throughout the space. There is no such thing as having too much tubing in a slab. 48

HPAC | december 2013

Figure B Double-wall Serpentine

Figure C Triple-wall Serpentine

hpacmag.com


“There is no such thing as having too much tubing in a slab. The more tubing is installed, the lower the water temperature to heat the space.” The more tubing is installed, the lower the water temperature to heat the space. Having said that, tube spacing can be considered when designing a system in order to keep the number of mixed water temperatures required to a minimum. Should the heat load room by room end up with water temperature requirement spreads greater than 20F (-6.7C), adjusting the OC loop spacing in some areas could bring those water temperature needs within the whole system closer together. Most radiant manufacturers use this practice in order to design the most efficient systems possible, while keeping the end result most cost-effective. <>

Figure D Counter Flow

Mike Miller is national business development manager with Uponor Canada Ltd. He can be reached at mike.miller@uponor.com

Your Condensing Boiler Partner

w Ne

Introducing the new Vitodens 222-F and the new generation Vitodens 200-W – featuring advanced Viessmann technology and performance in a small footprint. *Based on a temperature rise of 70 °F (50 °F to 120 °F). Information subject to change.

Both gas-fired condensing boilers feature a new easy-to-use Vitotronic control. VITODENS 200-W Extended application range with increased capacity up to 530 MBH 9 models with input ranges from 67 to 530 MBH Combine up to eight boilers in single prefabricated cascade system VITODENS 222-F Floor standing configuration and zero side clearance requirement 2 models with input ranges from 12 to 125 MBH DHW heating system comprised of plate heat exchanger and storage tank DHW 10-minute peak flow of 60 gallons with continuous draw of 3.3 GPM* (model B2TA-35 only).

www.viessmann.ca 1-800-387-7373

hpacmag.com

december 2013 | HPAC

49


Beating Growth Gridlock

< management

Understanding what your business can and cannot do. BY hank bulmash

I

n his sixteenth year, Albert Einstein conceived of a thought experiment designed to help himself understand time and space. He imagined himself riding on a beam of light and viewing the universe. That visualization led to a number of startling conclusions that 20 years later made Einstein the most famous scientist in the western world. Einstein argued that mass was convertible into energy (this resulted in the famous e=mc2 equation and from that came the development of atomic energy). He argued that time’s passage was dependent on the speed of the observer. Einstein proposed that time would pass very slowly on a spaceship travelling near the speed of light. An astronaut who flew to the edge of the galaxy in such a ship and then returned to earth would age barely at all. Meanwhile decades would have passed on earth. In other words, time was relative. Looking back, the amazing thing about Einstein’s thought experiment is how useful it was. Not long after his work was published, physical experiments began to confirm Einstein’s insights. That reminds us that insight is different from information. All the work Einstein did was mental. He had no equipment other than a pencil and a brain. The information he sought to understand was available to anyone reading the scientific magazines of his day. But by careful examination, Einstein discovered truths that eluded everyone else. All his life Einstein contended that knowledge comes from reflection, not from the simple accumulation of data. His work is a testament to that idea. And that brings us to the point of business plans. Unless demanded by a bank, the majority of business owners never create a business plan. For the most part the few who do create plans never find a use for them. That is understandable since most business plans do not provide an obvious benefit, except for documenting the obvious, which is what your bank wants it for. Plans for banks show your past and projected revenues, your expenses based on the business you are running today and the anticipated effects of whatever changes you are considering. In other words, the business plan the bank wants to see is about your current situation and whether or not the borrowing you are contemplating makes sense in your present circumstances. This is a blinkered view. That is why these bank plans are often the product of junior staff or even outsiders such as accountants or business consultants. It is obvious an owner-manager is not going to learn anything important from a plan like that. But there is another kind of plan – one that is actually a form of thought experiment. It can help you understand what your business can and cannot do. Want to increase sales? Good idea, but increasing sales costs money. You will need to provide hpacmag.com

more resources for sales staff and increase your capacity to deliver goods and services. In addition, more time will be spent on administrative functions. Worries about spending money to expand can lead to anxiety and even decision paralysis. In some cases, concerns about energy are more intimidating than financial issues. Building sales means more work and many businesses are so dependent on the energy of one or two people that they cannot figure out a way to get bigger. Those two reasons explain why the majority of businesses cease to grow. At a certain point the mental and financial impediments to growth become too difficult to overcome. Many businesses accept stasis at too low an activity level because it is more comfortable to avoid change than it is to jump into the unknown. Real business planning can help you deal with this kind of gridlock because it can allow you to visualize and work through various “what if” scenarios. What if I allowed our activity to drop by 10 per cent? What if I focused on only our 50 most important customers? What if I developed pre-planned products that our largest customers would find attractive and then used those products to seek out other large customers? A creative plan should be used to set objectives for the business. It should be a tool for opening up your priorities for discussion with your management team and professional advisors. Most of all it should be part of a process that lets you reflect on where you want to go. That means that the idea of an annual plan, and one or two meetings to review it, should go by the board. It makes more sense to develop a three or five year plan with big goals. The plan should be re-examined frequently – perhaps once a quarter to see if interim milestones are being met or to see if the plan needs amending in view of circumstances. Some people think of this kind of plan as a map for the future, but it is not. A map implies you know where you are going. But you cannot map the future – it is unknown territory. A creative plan is more like a flashlight in the darkness. It reminds you that you have big goals for the business in addition to the job of the moment. You use the flashlight to lead you in the general direction you want to go. It is there to remind you to focus, at least part of the time, on the future – instead of doing what most of us do instinctively: focus on today. <> Hank Bulmash, MBA, CPA, CA, TEP, is president of Bulmash Accounting in Toronto, ON. He can be reached at hank@bulmash.ca.

DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

51


< Renewables

Glancing Blow Working with the incident angle modifier. BY john siEgenthaler

I

f you have been working with solar collectors, chances are you have seen one of the OG-100 solar collector rating sheets put out by the Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC). An example of such a rating sheet is shown in Figure 1. These sheets are freely available for hundreds of rated solar collectors at www.solar-rating.org/ratings/index.html. Each rating sheet lists physical data for a specific collector including its dimensions, weight, area and fluid volume. It also gives the results from several types of thermal and hy-

Figure 1

draulic testing. A table near the top of the sheet lists the expected daily heat collection for the solar collector in five different operating scenarios. The latter is based on using the results of thermal performance tests in combination with computer simulation. One of the least understood performance indexes given on the OG-100 rating sheet is called the incident angle modifier, which is the topic of this column.

NORMAL CONDITIONS The test procedure used to determine the thermal efficiency values listed on the SRCC OG-100 rating sheet is ASHRAE standard 93-2010 Methods of Testing to Determine the Thermal Performance of Solar Collectors. One set of numbers generated by testing based on this standard are known as the “Y intercept” and “Slope.” Numerical values for both are listed in both Imperial and metric units near the bottom right of the SRCC OG-100 rating sheet. For example: the value listed for the Y intercept in Figure 1 is 0.706. The imperial units value listed for the slope is -0.865 Btu/(hr•ft2•ºF). These values can be used to create a graph of instantaneous thermal efficiency versus the “inlet fluid parameter” as shown in Figure 2. The instantaneous thermal efficiency of a solar collector is

Source: Solar Rating & Certification Corporation

Figure 2

52

HPAC | december 2013

hpacmag.com


determined by the current values of the inlet temperature (Ti), the air temperature surrounding the collector (Ta) and the solar radiation intensity (I). Together these three factors make up the inlet fluid parameter, which is plotted along the horizontal axis. Any operating conditions that are favourable such as low fluid inlet temperature, higher air temperature, or intense solar radiation, will decrease the value of the inlet fluid parameter and increase the thermal efficiency of the collector. The converse is also true. Any of the three values that make up the inlet fluid parameter can change quickly and as such the efficiency of the collector can vary over a wide range in a short time. Hence the word “instantaneous” should always be stressed when discussing this measurement of efficiency. It is also important to understand that, under the ASHRAE testing standard, the Y-intercept and slope values are determined when the beam solar radiation is perpendicular, or very close to perpendicular, to the plane of the collector. Under this condition, the transmissivity of the collector’s glazing is maximized (the glazing allows the maximum percentage of incident solar radiation to pass through). Likewise, the optical property absorptivity, which describes the ability of the absorber plate surface to absorb rather than reflect incoming solar radiation, is also maximized when the solar radiation is perpendicular to the plane of the collector. The Y-intercept of the collector’s efficiency rating depends on both the transmissivity of the glazing and the absorptivity of the absorber plate surface. Thus, the Y-intercept value given on the SRCC OG-100 rating sheet is technically only valid when beam solar radiation is perpendicular to the plane of the collector. Under such a condition, the angle of incidence (the an-

gle between the incoming solar radiation and a line perpendicular to the plane of the collector) is zero. When installed in a typical “fixed” mounting, a solar collector spends very little time with an angle of incidence equal to zero. Instead, incoming solar radiation strikes the glazing and absorber plate at some angle, especially during early morning and late afternoon. Under such conditions, the effective Y-intercept of the collector is less than the Y-intercept reported in the SRCC rating sheet. This happens because of the optical properties of both the glazing and the absorber plate coating. Lower Y-intercept values imply lower efficiency and reduced energy collection. The incident angle modifier was developed to correct the Y-intercept values determined by the ASHRAE testing procedure. This helps to more accurately predict instantaneous efficiency and daily energy collection. The “corrected” collector efficiency equation now becomes: Formula 1

Where: n = instantaneous thermal efficiency of the collector (decimal percentage) K = incident angle modifier (unitless) Ti =inlet fluid temperature (ºF) Ta = ambient air temperature (ºF) I= solar radiation intensity onto plane of collector (Btuh/ft2) Notice that K is a multiplier for the Y-intercept and not the slope. The maximum value of K is 1.0. This only occurs when the angle of incidence = 0.

continued on p.54

Best of Siggy – Canadian style! Order your Best of John Siegenthaler CD while supplies last. Own John’s hand-picked favourite HPAC articles from the last 10 years.  The CD also contains information on a variety of current hydronic products and links to their manufacturers’ websites. There is a limited supply so don’t delay – order today! Only $19.95 plus tax (includes postage) To place your order visit www.hpacmag.com/bestofsiggy/ 

hpacmag.com

december 2013 | HPAC

53


< renewables

continued from p.53

Figure 3

Figure 4

value of b0 in formula 2

In theory, the value of K at other angles of incidence is given by Formula 2: " 1 % K = 1! b0 $ !1 # cos! '&

Where: K = incident angle modifier (unitless) θ= angle of incidence (º) b0 = a constant determined by testing (unitless) The value of the constant (b0) is reported in the SRCC OG-100 rating sheet. For the rating sheet shown in Figure 1, the value of K is listed as 0.20 (based on a linear fit of K versus the quantity [(1/cosθ)-1]. The graph in Figure 3 shows the incident angle modifier (K) as a function of the angle of incidence based on a b0 value of 0.20. Notice that the value of K remains close to it maximum value of 1.0 until the angle of incidence reaches about 20º. K then decreases to about 0.9 when the angle of incidence reaches 50º and drops off rapidly at higher angles. In theory, the incident angle modifier is 0 when the angle of incidence is 90º. The good news is that most single glazed flat plate collectors lose very minor amounts of solar radiation input during the peak solar collection times of 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. due to the effects of the incident angle. These effects are much more pronounced in earlier morning and later afternoon, when the typical clear day solar radiation intensity is much lower. The net effect of the incident angle effect can be determined through calculations that use specific hourly values of solar radiation in the plane of the collector at a given location and orientation, as well as specific hourly values for angle of incidence. The ASHRAE 93-2010 standard shows an example of such calculations. For the flat plate collector with the rating sheet given in Figure 1, the loss in total solar energy collected between 54

HPAC | december 2013

9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., solar time, for a collector sloped at 42º and facing due south at a 32º northern latitude, is about 5.3 per cent. As far as comparisons, the smaller the value of the constant b0, listed in the SRCC rating sheet, the lower the optical losses due to solar radiation striking the collector at incident angles other than 90º. Lower optical losses imply higher thermal efficiency and great energy harvesting. Figure 4 shows the effect of the value b0 on the annual solar heating fraction for a typical two-collector domestic water heating system operating in Syracuse, NY. The data for this graph was generated using f-chart software (www.fchart.com). In theory, if the optical properties of the glazing and absorber plate coating were unaffected by the angle at which solar radiation strikes them, the value of b0) would always be zero. For the collector represented by the rating sheet in Figure 1, the value of b0) is 0.2. Thus, according to Figure 4, the optical properties of this “real” collector cause the annual solar fraction to drop about 11 per cent relative to a collector with theoretically perfect optical characteristics. No collector with fixed mounting will have a b0 value of 0. However, all other performance measures being equal, the lower the b0 value the better. So keep an eye on the incident angle modifier, as well as the other thermal performance numbers when comparing collectors on the SRCC OG-100 rating sheets. <> John Siegenthaler, P.E., is a mechanical engineering graduate of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a licensed professional engineer. He has over 34 years experience in designing modern hydronic heating systems. He is also an associate professor emeritus of engineering technology at Mohawk Valley Community College in Utica, NY. hpacmag.com


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< business development

Worth A Closer Look

Are there opportunities for mechanical contractors in home inspection? BY Patrick Callan

T

he Canadian home inspection industry is such a confusing landscape that even a seasoned cartographer might get tripped up trying to map it out. Provincial regulations vary from coast to coast and only two jurisdictions – British Columbia and Alberta – require home inspectors to be licensed, albeit with much different processes of accreditation. Ontario is moving towards licensing, but discussion is still in the early stages. In addition, the CSA is working on defining a national standard about what a home inspection is; yet it still begs the question of who can become a home inspector. With that in mind, HPAC magazine decided to ask industry experts if they see any opportunities for mechanical contractors to take up home inspection as a secondary job. Graham Clarke, vice-president of engineering at Carson Dunlop, answered with a resounding yes. “Absolutely I do. They can be quite successful,” he says. “Most outfits are just one guy working on his own and that well may be a good fit for somebody who is looking for a secondary career.”

Since many home inspectors come from trades or consulting backgrounds, Clarke says they will probably have most of the larger expenses already covered – an insured vehicle, a computer and a registered corporate name. And the remaining costs would not be too burdensome. “You could easily outfit yourself to be a home inspector, tool-wise, for under $2,000,” he says. “The tools, by and large, are not all that fancy. A home inspector is typically going to carry a ladder, a flashlight, a bunch of screwdrivers and a moisture meter.” You will also need insurance for the business – something Clarke strongly recommends, which costs about $3,000 per year. As for inspection reports, one could spend anywhere from $500 to $2,000 to get set up in the first year, according to Clarke. The last remaining major expense would be education at community college – about $5,000 – to acquire the full breadth of skills needed to inspect homes. Many community colleges offer home inspection as continuing education programs that can be done in your spare time on evenings and weekends. Toronto’s Humber College offers a

The CSA is also involved in setting a standard for the home inspection industry, however, it will define the parameters of the physical inspection itself, not who can and cannot call themselves a home inspector. At the moment, a voluntary technical committee led by the CSA and made up of a balanced mix of stakeholders is working on writing a standard for home inspections – CSA A770. “This standard would not apply to qualification or certification of individuals conducting home inspection,” said Dwayne Torrey, project manager with CSA Group. What it would do is establish consistency in how home inspections are carried out nationally. Torrey says based on preliminary discussions, it is anticipated that some provincial and territorial jurisdictions are considering adopting the standard, but it will be up to them to determine to what extent they reference the document since all CSA standards are only voluntary. The standard is targeted for completion in 2015. 56

HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

hpacmag.com

Photos: CAHPI

The CSA to develop a national standard for home inspections


three-semester, nine-course certificate program that combines classroom, online and field study. New Westminster, BC’s Douglas College, in partnership with Carson Dunlop and Associates, also offers a three-semester, 10-course home inspection program with similar learning options. These are just a couple of examples. A quick Google search and you will find dozens more across Canada. Graham says schooling is not only necessary to learn all the skills involved with home inspection, it also helps you see your own trade in a different light. “One of the things I’ve found is that even people who are used to working in a specific technical field still need some training in that particular area because there’s a slightly different mindset involved in doing inspections versus doing contracting work,” he says. Once you become a home inspector, the charge for a typical inspection starts at $400-$500 per house and it can go up from there, often based on the size and age of the house. Most full-timers will inspect about two homes per day, but you have to keep in mind the seasonal nature of the job, says Clarke. “There are a lot more houses being bought and sold in the spring real estate market than there is at Christmas time,” he says. However, not all experts are receptive to the idea of fair weather home in-

spectors. Some, such as Blaine Swan, national president of the Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors (CAHPI), say it must be a full-time job. “Part-timers and consumer protection don’t go together,” he says. “I won’t say part-timers don’t exist, because they do. They’re in and out all the time. They jump in, they go for easy certification, usually online, find out what they’re up against and they usually don’t last long.” Swan estimates that startup costs would be in the ballpark of about $40,000 and once you are in business, it will cost about $30,000 per year to run it. For Swan, learning all the tricks of the home inspection trade is not as easy as it seems. He says most home inspectors, himself included, come from some kind of background in construction, but you have to learn to be a generalist. That is something he had to learn – even in the trade he was certified in and knew more about than most people – plus he had to take additional training in the areas he did not have. “Most HVAC guys that I know of know about moving air around. That’s a very small component,” he says. He warns that part-time home inspectors may not keep up to date with things like changes and recalls in other trades. And he adds that at least in Ontario, where licensing is being kicked around, all those in the industry will eventually have to certify.

CAHPI revises National Occupational Standard for home property inspectors The Canadian Association of Home Property Inspectors (CAHPI) has updated the National Occupation Standard (NOS) for home property inspectors. The 2013 version is designed to reflect current realities of the profession and provide additional guidance on performance standards, learning requirements and personal attributes. The revision came after a yearlong evaluation of the 2008 NOS by industry professionals. The 2013 NOS is the third edition of the standard, which was first published in 2001. The occupational standard describes the skill, knowledge and abilities required to perform the duties as a professional home property inspector. It forms the basis for training, curriculum development, accreditation of training programs, recruitment, performance improvement and the certification of practitioners.

www.cahpi.ca hpacmag.com

“They’re going to have to apply for a licence and do the things that licensing requires.”

THE MOVE TOWARDS LICENSING Both Swan and Clarke are part of a 15-member panel organized by the Ontario Ministry of Consumer Services which is looking at introducing licensing for home inspectors in the province. The panel for the “Home Inspector Qualifications Project” is made up of home inspectors, consumer advocates, educators and related sectors such as real estate, law and insurance. The panel met every second week from the end of August through November, and will now write a recommendations report for the government focusing on four themes: technical, professional, consumer protection and governance. continued on p59 Licensing laws in western Canada BC first introduced licensing in 2009. The Consumer Protection BC identifies four associations to assess the qualifications for home inspectors: Applied Science Technologists and Technicians of British Columbia, Canadian Association of Home & Property Inspectors (BC), Canadian National Association of Certified Home Inspectors and National Home Inspector Certification Council. Alberta followed suit in September 2011, but went in a different direction that allows for two paths to becoming a home inspector. The first requires providing proof of education – degree, diploma or certificate – from an approved educational institution and then completing a test inspection supervised by an approved educational institution or a licensed home inspector holding a Certified Master Inspector (CMI) designation or a Registered Home Inspector (RHI) designation. The second is to get an approved home inspection designation or licence from approved industry associations or regulatory bodies. (Complete lists of institutions and associations can found on Service Alberta’s website: www.servicealberta.ca.) DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

57


s ’ C A P H r o f p u t h Step Rig L O O T S U O D N E M E TR ! I I I Y A W A E K A T At the upcoming 2014 CMPX show one lucky winner* will take home thousands of dollars worth of FREE TOOLS! Visit www.hpacmag.com/tools to check out the tools and visit the suppliers’ websites at the same time. You can also print out your ballot and bring it to the HPAC booth at the top of the escalators. *For contractors and technicians only. Good luck – see you at the show! At the 2012 show, Jonathan Fisher, of Vanguard Mechanical Inc. was

HPAC’s Great Tool Take-away winner and took home more than $2000 worth of FREE tools.

For your chance to win $1000s worth of products come to CMPX in Toronto MARCH 19-21, fill out a ballot at the HPAC booth and you’re in! Visit www.cmpxshow.com for show details.


continued from p57

Clarke says right now, anybody in Ontario can call themself a home inspector. “You could conceivably go online, take a multiple choice test and in an hour you will have a certificate,” he says. “It’s an unregulated field – at the moment.” The earliest we might see licensing in Ontario is still a year away, he says, and what that will look like is not clear yet. But it probably won’t look the same as Alberta or BC, who have specific regulations yet issue licenses in much different ways, he adds.

WHAT LIES AHEAD? With so many moving parts in Canadian home inspection there really is no clear-cut answer as to what opportunities lay ahead as the industry attempts to organize itself in one way or another. Depending on who you talk to, there may or may not be a

< business development

window of opportunity for mechanical contractors to learn a few new skills and start up a secondary business on the side. Clarke says if you enjoy working with people and if you are willing to spend the time and money to learn the necessary skills, it could a very rewarding job and excellent extra source of income. “For people who have that technical aptitude, enjoy houses, and enjoy working and communicating with other people, I think it’s a good fit,” said Clarke. But then again there are many, like Swan, who strongly oppose the idea of part-timer home inspectors and argue that it is ultimately the customers who suffer. “It’s a profession,” he says. “It’s not a secondary job cutting meat at the local grocery store.” Clearly the jury is still out. In the mean time, what do you think? <>

Training

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ACROSS CANADA AC Installation Optimization Training Program This one-day training course covers the importance of best practice installation for energy-efficient equipment, based on the CSA C273.511 Standard “Installation of Air Source Heat Pumps and Air Conditioners.” The course covers six key installation factors directly affecting system efficiency. All technicians installing equipment under the Heating and Cooling Incentive (HCI) initiative will be required to complete the course by Dec. 31, 2013. Effective Jan. 1, 2014, participation in the HCI initiative will be restricted to companies whose technicians have completed the training. www.hrai.ca/PDFs/OPA_HCI_TrainingOntario.pdf CMCEF National Seminar Program The Canadian Mechanical Contracting Education Foundation’s National Seminar Program Catalogue & Calendar is available online. It contains more than 100 programs available for on-site training for companies and associations. Programs range from half-day to two days in duration. To request a seminar, contact your local association or the CMCEF office at tel. 613.232.5169. www.cmcef.org TECA Quality First Training To register for the Thermal Environmental Comfort Association’s (TECA) Quality First training courses, tel. 604.594.5956. www.teca.ca HRAI SkillTech Academy The SkillTech Academy course teaches participants the technical competence to design and install HVAC systems for residential and small commercial applications. NRCan will be providing a $200 subsidy to those attending a residential training program. For more information contact Dorothy Allen by email: dallen@hrai.ca. www.hrai.ca CSA Learning Institute CSA Learning Institute’s course calendar is available online. www.csa.ca/cm/ca/en/training hpacmag.com

Dollars to $ense Energy Management Workshops Natural Resources Canada’s Office of Energy Efficiency is offering workshops focused on improving efficiency, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and lowering operation costs. A workshop schedule is available online. www.oee.nrcan.gc.ca Canadian Hydronics Council CHC’s course descriptions and training schedules are available online. Introduction to Hydronic Heating Installations is a starting point for anyone interested in the professional installation of hydronic heating systems. The Essentials of Hydronic System Design intermediate level program is geared to helping practitioners understand key design principles, and the different options and solutions required to meet client needs. Participants must have previously completed CHC’s Introduction to Hydronic Heating Installations. www.ultimatecomfort.ca LEED Canada Training Workshops by the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) include: LEED Green Associate Exam Preparation, Introduction to Passive Housing Design and Construction, and Overview of the LEED-ND Rating System for Canada. tel. 613.241.1184. www.cagbc.org RETScreen Training Institute The RETScreen Training Institute is delivered in collaboration with the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto. The Institute offers intensive instruction on how to properly assess the viability and performance of clean energy projects using RETScreen software. A certificate is awarded on successful course completion. www.retscreen.net/ang/home.php GeoExchange Training The Canadian GeoExchange Coalition (CGC) is offering a national accreditation program for geothermal loop installers, which is valid for commercial and residential installations. An updated CGC training calendar is available. www.geoexchange.ca DECEMBER 2013 | HPAC

59


Calendar

2014

FOR THE LATEST EVENT NEWS SEE HPAC'S NEWSLETTER @ hpacmag.com ASHRAE Winter Conference January 18-22

AHR Expo January 21-23

The ASHRAE Winter Conference will be held in New York City, NY, at the New York Hilton. www.ashrae.org

The 66th International Air-Conditioning, Heating, Refrigerating Exposition will take place in New York City, NY, at the Javits Convention Center.

www.ahrexpo.com

NAHB International Builders’ Show and the Kitchen & Bath Industry Show February 4-6 The two events are taking place in Las Vegas, NV, at the Las Vegas Convention Center. They will focus on new ideas, products and technology for homes.

www.nkba.org and www.kbis.com

Chillventa February 4-6

Hearth, Patio & Barbeque Expo 2014 MCAA Annual Convention March 9-13 March 6-8

Russia’s international tradeshow for refrigeration, air conditioning and heat pumps for commercial and industrial applications will be held in Moscow at the Crocus Expo Center Pavilion 2, Hall 7.

North America’s largest indoor-outdoor living expo is being held in Salt Lake City, UT, at Salt Palace Convention Center.

www.chillventa-rossija.com

www.hpbexpo.com

The Mechanical Contractors Association of America annual convention will take place in Scottsdale, AZ.

www.mcaa.org

MCE 2014 March 18-21

CMPX March 19-21

RSES Canada 2014 AGM March 20

The 39th biennial Mostra Convegno Expocomfort exhibition, dedicated to residential and industrial installations, air conditioning and renewable energy, will be held in Milan, Italy at the Fiera Milano Rho.

The Canadian Mechanical & Plumbing Exposition (formerly CMX) at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in Toronto, ON, will include the New Product Showcase, the Learning Forum and the Emerging Technologies Centre. www.cmpxshow.com

RSES Canada will be holding its 75th annual general meeting in Toronto, ON at 6 p.m. during the CMPX Show (Room TBA).

www.mcexpocomfort.com

NEBB Annual Conference April 3-5 The National Environmental Balancing Bureau’s annual conference will be held in Fort Lauderdale, FL, at the Hyatt Regency Pier 66. This year’s theme is “Delivering Building Performance and Energy Efficiency.”

ASHRAE High Performance Buildings Conference April 7-8 The third ASHRAE HPB conference will take place in San Francisco, CA, at the Hyatt Fisherman’s Wharf. It will look to advance the industry’s efforts to accomplish a true high-performance built environment. www.ashrae.org

www.nebb.org

www.rsescanada.com

All-Energy Canada 2014 April 9-10 The exhibition and conference will be held at Exhibition Place in Toronto, ON. It will provide a forum for national and international experts in the renewable energy industry to share knowledge, expertise and experience. www.all-energy.ca

MEET Show May 7-8

11TH IEA Heat Pump Conference May 12-16

CSA Annual Conference June 15-17

The Mechanical Electrical Electronic Technology show will be held at the Moncton Coliseum Complex in Moncton, NB. It includes a trade show and speaker component. www.meetshow.ca

The International Energy Agency Heat Pump Conference will be held at the Fairmont - The Queen Elizabeth in Montreal, QC.

CSA Groups’ Annual Conference and Committee Week will take place in Charlottetown, PEI at the Delta Prince Edward. The committee meetings run until June 20. www.csa.ca

www.iea-hpc2014.org

CIPH ABC June 22-24

ASHRAE Annual Conference June 28-July 2

The 82nd CIPH annual business conference will be held in Kelowna, BC, at the Delta Grand Okanagan Resort & Conference Centre. www.ciph.com

The annual ASHRAE conference will be held in Seattle, WA. It will address topics ranging from the application of technology to practice, to new reports on research taking place worldwide. www.ashrae.org

2014 ASHRAE/IBPSA-USA Building Simulation Conference September 10-12

HRAI Annual Meeting and Conference August 20-23 The 46th annual HRAI meeting and conference will be held in Montreal, QC, at Le Westin Montreal. www.hrai.ca

CIPHEX West 2014 November 5-6

The conference, which will be taking place in Atlanta, GA, will focus on making better decisions through the application of simulation and modeling over the entire building life cycle.

Western Canada’s largest expo and conference for plumbing, HVAC/R and water treatment will take place in Calgary, AB, at the BMO Centre.

www.ashrae.org

www.ciphexwest.ca

60

HPAC | december 2013

Planning an event? Send the details to Patrick Callan Assistant Editor

pcallan@hpacmag.com hpacmag.com


Advertisers in this issue

THE SOURCE

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Well Equipped - to Deliver the Hottest News. HPAC E-xpress has been optimized for your hand-held device! Our recently commissioned survey showed a significant increase in the number of e-newsletters being opened on hand-held devices. Just like the magazine you are reading, HPAC E-xpress wants to keep you ahead of the curve – digitally. To make sure that you don’t miss a single news item, we have redesigned our e-newsletters so that you can stay up-to-date in the office and on the job site. Featuring

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the most current Canadian mechanical industry happenings HPAC E-xpress keeps you current with stakeholder news, upcoming events and more. If you are not receiving HPAC E-xpress simply visit our website at hpacmag.com and click on SUBSCRIBE – then Free e-newsletter. It is that simple!

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61


< Marketing

Harnessing the Power of the Internet Three ways to help build your business online. BY Brad edwards

T

he internet is the future. We have seen it grow by leaps and bounds over the last two decades or so and there is no sign of it slowing down. With this growth comes huge opportunities for businesses of all kinds, including plumbing and HVAC/R professionals. But it can be confusing. After all, it is changing every day. It can be a full-time job just keeping up with all the latest developments and best practices. It is a challenge when you are already occupied with the day-to-day operation of your business. Here are a few important tips to help you make the best of your online marketing efforts.

1

Build a strong website Sure, anyone can make a website for free. You can toss one online in half an hour. But will that make you look like a professional who delivers high quality service? Just having any old website will not help you; whether it is plumbing, HVAC, or something else entirely. In today’s market there are already high quality websites at the top of Google in your niche. If your website is done for free or cheaply it will not help to increase awareness of your company and build business. A website is a lot like a storefront. If it looks old, run down, or unappealing, you will be hard pressed to get people to stop by for long.

2

come up first. Statistically, people click on the top three results in Google more often than every other result combined. If you are in one of these coveted positions, you have the potential for a lot more business than your competitors.

3

Put a blog on your website In this day and age everyone has some sort of degree, diploma, or accreditation. These things are great, do not get me wrong, but if you really want to set yourself apart from your competition you will need a little more. When you have a regularly updated blog on your site with valuable and useful content, people will see you as someone who knows what they are talking about. It is a great way to build your social cred online and keep your brand in peoples’ minds. When people see that you know what you are talking about, they will be more likely to want to do business with you.

These tips just scratch the surface of what can be done online. The world of internet marketing is a wide-open field, and it is important to stake your claim now before the competition gets too hairy. With a solid, well-designed and planned web presence, you can get out there in front of more people, bring in more of the clients you are looking for, and grow your business by leaps and bounds. That is the power of the internet. <>

Pay attention to SEO SEO stands for “Search Engine Optimization.” It is the process of boosting your website in the search engines. For example, if someone searches for “plumbers in Toronto” whoever has the most optimized website will

Brad Edwards is an internet marketing professional. His business, Cloud Surfing Media, is a digital marketing agency which focuses on helping local businesses overcome marketing obstacles online. Learn more at www.cloudsurfingmedia.com.

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HPAC | DECEMBER 2013

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HPAC December 2013