Page 1

DSA|BRANDING PRESENTATION By
Gus
Forward


1


FEBRUARY 24, 2012


OVERVIEW|

2



Overview
 1.  My
Background
 2.  Research
Insights:
DSA
Brand
Influencers
 3.  Plan
ObjecCves
&
Strategies


3



Background


UH
PorMolio

Emerging
 Network
 Media
 Keep
Houston
Red
 Campaign


Office
of
the
 President


ESPN
GameDay


Campus
 Communicators


You
Are
The
Pride
 –
Video
Series
 Legacy
of
the
 Pride
Video
 Khator
Biopic
 Choose
Houston
 TV
Spot
 Cougar
Red
Friday
 Video
Spots
 Adventures
of
 Shia
Blog


UH
Social
Media
 Alliance
 UH
Student
 Groups
 UH
Pride
 Ambassadors
 AMA
Member
 Houston
City
Hall


Award‐ winning
 2012
 Directly
 contributed
to
 15‐34
UR
award
 entries
for
2012
 (IABC,
AMA,
 PRSA)


2011
 AMA
Best
in
 Category
Crystal
I
 PRSA
Excalibur
 award
implemenCng
 UH’s
Legacy
of
the
 Pride
Exhibit,
 winning
for
Best
 Nonprofit
Event
and
 MarkeIng
Video


Branding


Ideas


UH
Brand
 Ambassador


UH
Pride
 Ambassadors


You
Are
The
Pride
 Campaign


Imagine
 Campaign


Tier
One
 Campaign


Choose
Houston
 TV

Spot


Choose
Houston
 Campaign


Cougar
Red
Friday
 Video
Spots


Imagine
 Campaign


Legacy
of
the
 Pride
Exhibit


Beveled
 Interlocking
UH


Keep
Houston
Red
 Campaign
 4



RESEARCH INSIGHTS|

5



Insights


6



Insights
 President’s
 Office


Industry
 Trends


DSA
 Leadership


DSA
 Brand
 UH
Brand


CompeItors


Higher
Ed
 Branding
 7



Insights


Dr.
George
Kuh
 8



Insights
 Employer
expectaCons
of
 employees
have
increased
 • Employees
are
taking
on
more
responsibiliIes
and
to
 use
a
broader
set
of
skills
than
in
the
past
 • Employees
are
expected
to
work
harder
to
 coordinate
with
other
departments
than
in
the
past
 • The
challenges
employees
face
are
more
complex
 today
than
they
were
in
the
past
 • To
succeed,
employees
need
higher
levels
of
learning
 and
knowledge
today
than
they
did
in
the
past


Early
College
Indicators
of
 Persistence
and
Success
 • Goal
realizaCon
 • Psycho‐social
fit
 • Credit
hours
completed
 • Academic
and
social
support
 • Involvement
in
the
“right”
kinds
of
acCviCes


Which
student
demographic
is
 more
engaged?
 • Women
 • Full‐Ime
students
 • Students
who
live
on
campus
 • Students
with
diversity
experiences
 • Students
who
start
and
stay
at
same
school
 • Students
who
have
done
“high‐impact”
pracCce


Increase
Odds
Students
Will:
 • Invest
Ime
and
effort

 • Interact
with
faculty
and
peers
about
substanCve
 majers
 • Experience
diversity
 • Get
more
frequent
feedback
 • Reflect
&
integrate
learning
 • Discover
relevance
of
learning
through
real‐world
 applicaIon
 9



Insights
 College
is
becoming
unaffordable
 • 89%
of
parents
of
prospecCve
students
said
“paying
 for
school”
was
one
of
their
biggest
concerns
during
 the
college
search
process
 • 75%

of
consumers
disagree
that
“college
costs”
are
 affordable
 • Only
40%
say
the
higher
educaCon
system
provides
 good
value
in
relaCon
to
its
cost.


Consumers
are
demanding
results
 • A
college
must
have
at
least
one
of
these
 characterisCcs:
a
bargain
price,
a
well‐known
name,
 or
proven
results
 • 47%
of
Americans
say
the
main
purpose
of
college
 should
be
to
acquire
specific
skills
and
knowledge
 that
can
be
used
in
the
workplace
 • 
39%
say
it
should
be
to
help
an
individual
grow
 personally
and
intellectually.

 • Only
57%
of
first‐year
students
were
saIsfied
with
 the
relevance
of
their
coursework
to
everyday
life.



People
are
expressing
discontent
 in
higher
educaCon


CompeCCon
is
breeding
 commodificaCon


• Among
ages
26
to
34,
71%
of
those
with
a
high
 school
diploma
and
65%
of
those
with
a
college
 degree
agree
that
“colleges
are
like
most
businesses
 and
mainly
care
about
the
bo_om
line,”
 • 57%
of
Americans
say
the
higher
educaIon
system
in
 the
United
States
fails
to
provide
students
with
good
 value
for
the
money.


• The
number
of
high
school
graduates
will
decline
 through
2014‐15
 • Only
25%
of
all
college
students
ajend
full
Ime
at
 residenCal
colleges;
75%
of
all
college
students
are
 commuters.

 • Between
2009
and
2020,
college
enrollment
is
 projected
to
increase
9%
for
18‐
to
24‐year‐olds,
21%
 for
25‐
to
34‐year‐olds,
and
16%
for
students
35
 years
old
and
over.


*Source(s):
LAWLOR:
Intelligent
Marke;ng
Solu;ons
for
Educa;on


10



Insights
 Social
Media
is
Normalizing
Transparency
 27%
of
first‐year
students
felt
the
admissions
or
recruitment
materials
didn’t
accurately
portray
campus.
(CIRP)
 16%
will
probably
drop
the
college
from
their
consideraIon
list
if
they
don’t
find
what
they
need
on
its
website.
(Noel‐Levitz)
 57%
of
parents
of
prospecIve
students
say
a
bad
experience
on
a
college’s
website
may
have
some
negaIve
effect
on
their
percepIon
of
the
college
(Noel‐Levitz)
 49%
of
Americans
believe
online
word
of
mouth
is
highly
credible.
(Word
of
Mouth
MarkeIng
AssociaIon)
 23%
of
all
adults
use
mobile
or
social
locaIon‐based
services
to
get
direcIons
or
recommendaIons
based
on
their
current
locaIon.
(Pew
Research
Center)
 61%
of
parents
of
prospecIve
students
prefer
video
produced
by
students
on
campus
versus
video
produced
by
the
college.
(Cappex)
 53%
read
posts
about
the
college
via
social
media.
(FastWeb)
 57%
watch
videos
created
by
the
college
(FastWeb)
 44%
of
prospecIve
students
have
“liked”
a
college
on
a
social
network(FastWeb)
 76%
of
all
12‐
to
17‐year‐olds
use
social
network
sites
(Noel‐Levitz)

 64%
to
watch
a
college’s
videos
(Noel‐Levitz)
 62%
of
these
students
wanted
to
use
it
to
access
a
college’s
social
media
assets
(Noel‐Levitz)
 14%
of
prospecIve
students
have
viewed
a
college
website
via
their
mobile
device(Noel‐Levitz)
 40%
of
13‐
to
17‐year‐olds
own
a
smartphone
device.
(Nielsen)


0%


10%


20%


30%


40%


50%


60%


70%


80%


90%


11
 100%



Insights
 2012
Social
Media
PredicCons
 1.  2.  3.  4. 

Businesses
consolidate
social
media
acIviIes
 17.  Businesses
will
integrate
new
content
 Photo
and
video
social
networks
will
blossom
 consumpIon
pracIces
 Brands
embrace
real
Ime
 18.  The
“applificaCon”
of
social
media
conCnues
 Company
strategy
takes
center
stage
for
social
 19.  More
“branded”
facebook
apps
are
on
the
way
 media
 20.  More
do
it
all
services
will
become
available
 5.  New
apps
will
help
content
overload
 21.  Convergence
of
social
and
mobile

 6.  Businesses
outsource
content
creaCon
 22.  Marketers
embrace
mobile
 7.  Advanced
analyCcs
are
coming
from
the
 23.  Email
and
social
call
it
a
truce
 masses
 24.  Businesses
fall
in
love
with
e‐mail
markeIng
 8.  Regularly
creaIng
unique
content
becomes
 again
 essenIals
 25.  TradiConal
markeCng
interweaves
social
media
 9.  Businesses
learn
to
choose
the
right
channels
 26.  The
blue
collar
bloggin
revoluIon
heats
up
 10.  Facebook’s
growth
inspires
unique
Facebook
 27.  Marketers
learn
to
crai
the
message
to
get
 markeCng
experiences
 above
the
noise
 11.  CompeCCon
on
Google+
rises
 28.  The
social
media
gap
widens
 12.  YouTube
provides
a
social
experience
 29.  Businesses
invest
in
quality
content
 13.  YouTube
takes
the
lead
 30.  Rise
of
the
social
media
specialist

 14.  YouTube
rises
to
top
of
mind
 15.  More
social
media
players
will
join
in
 16.  Marketers
will
adopt
smarter
social
media
 12
 tools



Insights
 Social
Media
for
Higher
EducaCon


13



Insights


Key
Takeaways
 Keys
to
Sustaining
Student
Success

 •  Student
Success
becomes
an
insItuIonal
priority
when
everyone‐‐ especially
campus
leaders‐‐make
it
so
 •  Measure
and
act
on
what
majers
to
student
success
 •  Stay
posiIvely
restless
 •  We
must
embrace
the
lineage
of
our
students
 •  Campus
cultures
do
not
change
easily
or
willingly.

 •  To
foster
more
student
success
we
must
use
promising
policies
and
 pracIces
more
consistently
throughout
the
insCtuCon
 The
Major
Tasks
 •  Reflect
–
on
their
experiences
inside
and
outside
the
classroom
 •  Integrate
–
see
the
connecIons
between
different
courses,
out‐of
class
 experiences,
and
life
beyond
the
insItuIon
 •  Apply
–
use
what
one
has
learned
in
different
selngs
presenCng
novel
 challenges
and
opportuniIes
(e.g.,
wriCng
across
the
curriculum)


14



Insights
 President’s
 Office


Industry
 Trends


DSA
 Leadership


DSA
 Brand
 UH
Brand


CompeItors


Higher
Ed
 Branding
 15



Insights


16



Insights


Student
Success
 






Freshmen
Reten;on
Rate
 
 





Tier
One
Freshmen
Recruitment
 
 
 
 
Gradua1on
Rate
 
Freshmen
Acceptance
Rate
 
 
 
 












Alumni
Giving
Rate
 
 
Annual
Enrollment


17



Insights


Measuring
Student
Success
 Freshman Retention Rate

2008 77%

2011 81%

Graduation Rate (6 Year)

43%

46%

Percentage of Freshmen in top 20% of high school class

46%

55%

Freshmen Acceptance Rate

77%

63%

34,663

39,825

5%


13%


Measure

Enrollment Alumni Giving Rate

*Source(s):
President’s
Fall
2011
Report


18



Insights


Annual
Student
PopulaIon
 8000


Texas

Campus
Residency
 Number

Harris County Adjacent Counties 6000
 Other Texas Counties Subtotal Texas 4000


22,440
 8,609
 4,422
 35,471


Percent 56.4 21.6 11.1 89.1

984


2.5

3,365
 4,349


8.5
 10.9


Out-of-State2000
 International Subtotal
Non‐Resident
 0


TOTAL

Fall
2009


Fall
2010


Fall
2011
 1


Fall
2012


39,820


*Source(s):
President’s
Fall
2011
Report


Fall
2013


100.0



Insights
 President’s
 Office


Industry
 Trends


DSA
 Leadership


DSA
 Brand
 UH
Brand


CompeItors


Higher
Ed
 Branding
 20



Insights


Top
Southwest
CompeItors
 High‐achieving
students
who
were
 admijed
but
did
not
enroll
at
UH.


*Source(s):
UH
Ins;tu;onal
Research,
2011


21



Insights
 President’s
 Office


Industry
 Trends


DSA
 Leadership


DSA
 Brand
 UH
Brand


CompeItors


Higher
Ed
 Branding
 22



Insights


DSA
Leadership
 ExecuIve
 Leadership
 Strategic
Planning


MarkeIng

&
 CommunicaIons
 Commi_ee
 Innovate
|
Communicate
|
Engage
 |
DifferenCate
|
Recommit


• Provide
outstanding
programs
and
services
to
encourage
student
 engagement
and
learning
in
support
of
student
success.
 • Create
a
vision
and
direcIon
for
Student
Affairs
 • Alignment
with
UH
strategic
iniIaIves
 • Encourage
innovaIon
and
creaIvity
 • Develop
a
framework
for
allocaIon
of
resource


• Establish
and
maintain
DSA
brand
that
supports
division’s
 strategic
goals
 • Implement
markeIng
communicaIons
campaigns
that
arCculate
 how
Student
Affairs
programs
and
services
are
impacIng
student
 success
 • Devise
divisional
and
unit
annual
assessment
plans
 • Alignment
division
resources
(staff
&
funding)
for
maximum
 producCvity

 • Improve
program
content
and
customer
service
communicaIon



*Source(s):
DSA
Staff
Presenta;on,
Oct.
7,
2011


23



Insights
 President’s
 Office


Industry
 Trends


DSA
 Leadership


DSA
 Brand
 UH
Brand


CompeItors


Higher
Ed
 Branding
 24



Insights


“SupporCng
Student
Success”
 25



Insights


What
is
Higher
Ed
Branding?
 Answer
 •  Higher
Ed
Branding
is
the
market’s
expecta1on
of
an
experience
 dis1nc1ve
to
an
ins1tu1on.



DisIncIon


•  The
most
efficient
means
by
which
an
ins;tu;on
can
communicate
 that
it
cares
about
and
is
thinking
of
the
customer
(i.e.,
“Designing
 the
Experience”)



Our
Role


•  Most
notably,
branding
in
higher
educa;on
is
about
who
we
are,
 and
is
not
limited
to
what
a
par1cular
product
offers
the
 marketplace.
 26



Insights
 EDUCATIONAL
 BRAND
 
(e.g.,
division,
 college
or
university)



InsItuIon’s
 Academic
 ReputaIon


InsItuIon’s
 Personality


Congruent
w/
its
 Mission


Defined
by
its
 Values
 27



Insights


Approaches
&
Best
PracIces
 •Creed
‐
Delve
into
an
insCtuCon's
history,
culture,
and
mission
 to
discover
and
define
the
disCncCve
elements
of
the
experience
 that
can
be
the
basis
for
a
compelling
brand
or
market
posiCon
 •Research
‐

Rigorously
test
those
ideas
with
key
consCtuents
to
 determine
which
elements
will
have
the
most
powerful
impact
on
 their
decisions
and
define
a
more
compeIIve
market
posiIon.
In
 addiCon,
model
and
predict
the
ROI
impact
a
brand
or
market
 posiCon
will
have
on
Student
Success
objecCves
 •Longevity
‐
Create
a
brand
of
substance,
disCncCon,
and
 meaning
‐
based
on
this
rigorous
market
analysis
‐
that
becomes
 the
foundaCon
for
how
an
insCtuCon
defines
itself
 *Source(s):
LAWLOR:
Intelligent
Marke;ng
Solu;ons
for
Educa;on


28



Insights
 President’s
 Office


Industry
 Trends


DSA
 Leadership


DSA
 Brand
 UH
Brand


CompeItors


Higher
Ed
 Branding
 29



Insights


30



Insights


Brand
Values
 (What
does
the
University
of
Houston
stand
for?)


Diversity


InnovaIon


Hard‐Work


Real
World


Houston


Empowerment


Global


InquisiIve


Resourceful


Professional


Build
the
city


Success


InternaIonal


Future‐thinking
 Constant
 improvement


Inclusivity


Focused


Acceptance


Work
ethic


Knowledge
generator


AuthenIc
goals
 Community‐ oriented


Entrepreneurial
 spirit


PragmaIc


Independent


community
rejuvenator


opportunity
maker
 31



Insights


Personality
and
Voice
 Confident


Entrepreneurial
 PragmaIc


Inclusive


AmbiIous


Genuine


Bold


InquisiIve


Resourceful


Diverse


Determined


Level‐headed


Dynamic


Independent


Hard‐working


InspiraIonal


Driven


Grounded


EnergeIc


Self‐Made


Mature


Generous


Disciplined


AppreciaIve
 Modest


How
we
think
of
UH
–
raConal
traits


How
we
feel
about
UH
–
emoConal
traits


Other
ideas:
unconvenConal,
visionary,
aspiraConal,
persistent,
tribal,
endearing
 32



Insights


Brand
Promise

Imagine
Greater
 CreaCve
 Partnerships
 Powerful
Vision.
 Inspiring
Results
 Learning.
Leading.
 Choose
Houston


DSA
Cares
 Empowering
 Student
Success
 Engineering
 Student
Success
 SupporCng
 Student
Success


DSA


You
Are
the
Pride
 Inspired
Results
 Empowering
 Success
 Research
for
the
 Real
World


University
of
Miami
–
 EducaCon
Meets
the
World
 Rice
University
–
 UnconvenConal
Wisdom
 Texas
A
&
M
University
–
 CreaCng
a
Culture
of
 Excellence
 Texas
Tech
University
–
 From
here,
it’s
possible
 TSU
–
Excellence
in
 Achievement
 TCU
–
Learning
to
Change
 World
 Baylor
–
Faith
is
the
 FoundaCon
for
Forward
 Thinking


Other
UniversiIes


Houston’s
 University
 Greater
Heights


UH
Ideas


Internal
message
that
sums
up
the
brand
and
immediately
resonates
as
the
essence
of
 the
university
–
a
message
of
empowerment.


Student
Success:
 Imagine
More.
 Imagine
Greater.
 33



Insights


Ideal
PosiIoning

What
would
we
like
to
become?
 •  Centralized/one
university
 •  NaIonally
and
globally
recognized
 •  The
first
choice
school
in
Texas
 •  Tier
One
in
every
way
 •  An
exciIng
desInaIon
 •  Top‐funded
university
 •  More
selecIve
 •  Beloved
by
all
alumni
 •  Modern
and
metropolitan
 •  A
research
powerhouse
 •  Locally
respected
in
Houston


34



Insights


Points
of
DifferenIaIon

What
makes
us
different
from
our
compeCCon.
 •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  •  • 

Working
professionals
 Immediate
access
to
the
real‐world
 Wider
age‐range
of
students
 Non‐tradiConal
students
with
experience
 Diversity
leads
to
edge
in
the
workplace
 Direct
preparaIon
for
career
in
Houston
 PracCcal
wisdom
learned
here
 Students
are
own
people,
not
molds
 Upward/Forward
momentum
at
high
 speed
 Top
emerging
university
in
Texas
 Most
Value
Colleges
in
the
NaIon
 Great
Colleges
to
Work
For
TX
 Top
Green
School
in
TX
 Affordable
price


•  4th
largest
market
 •  Medical
Center,
Ship
Channel,
 Energy
Corridor
 •  Major
sports
and
cultural
offerings
 •  Unique,
ranked
programs
 •  Hotel
&
Restaurant
 •  Management
 •  CreaCve
WriCng
 •  Optometry
 •  Entrepreneurship
Program
 •  Space
Architecture
 •  Health
Law
 •  IP
Law
 35



Insights
 •  Enliven
school
spirit,
 ensure
they
are
just
as
 excited
about
where
they
 are
going
(UH),
as
what
 they
are
gelng


(an
 educaIon).


•  Give
them
permission
to
 publicly
flaunt
their
alma
 mater.


Students


Alumni


Audience
Messaging
Goals

Faculty
 •  Re‐engage
and
reward
 engagement
to
the
 school
beyond
their
 curriculum.


PerspecIve
 Students
 •  Change
percepIons
to
 make
UH
a
top
choice,
 not
a
fall
back.
 36



PLAN OBJECTIVES & STRATEGIES|

37



MarkeCng
Scope


Plan
ObjecIves
 •  • 

• 

Re‐launch
the
DSA
vision
(“suppor1ng
student
success”)
in
a
way
that
is
meaningful,
 compelling
and
moIvaIng
to
all
our
audiences.
 Put
forth
a
sustainable
markeIng
communicaIons
plan
designed
to
create
consistency
of
 both
the
insItuIonal
brand
(UH)
and
its
prominent
brand
extension
(DSA)
in
the
 marketplace.
 Unite
markeIng
communicaIons
among
our
various
audiences
and
consCtuencies
to
drive
 measurable
results.


Key
Strategies
 •  •  •  • 

ArIculate
an
overarching
posiConing
strategy
–
bigger
and
more
encompassing
than
a
single
 tagline
(“suppor1ng
student
success”).
 Demonstrate
how
this
strategy
can
be
communicated
consistently
and
regularly
among
all
UH
 audiences.
 Devise
a
brand
launch
and
maintenance
tacIcal
plan
that
includes
flexible
communicaCons
 “modules”
or
tools
that
creaIvely
express
our
overarching
strategy.
 Enable
various
markeCng
communicaCons
staff
and
non‐related
staff
members
to
smartly
align
 their
division/college/department’s
strategic
goals
with
the
DSA
brand.
 38



TacCcs
 Strengthen
 Management
 Infrastructure
 Enhance
 Emerging
 Media
Efforts
 Implement
a
mix
of
 tradiConal/ untradiConal
metrics
 strategies
&
tacCcs


39



TacCcs
 QUESTIONS
 BRAND
oversight
for
all
DSA
markeCng
communicaCons
efforts
to
enhance
their
respecCve
department’s
and
division’s
 strategic
goals
(e.g.
internal
ad
approval
process)?
 Customer
 Management
   MarkeCng,
communicaCons
and
customer
service
effecIvely
engaging
primary
target
audiences?
 Strategy
  

 

IdenCfied
which
tools
work
best
to
engage
a
parIcular
audience
segment
(e.g.,
social
media,
video,
e‐mail
markeCng,


 staff
or
student
creaCve)


 

IdenCfied
which
tacCcs
and
trends
are
producing
ROI
outcomes
(e.g.,
student
engagement
events,
e‐communicaCons,
 social
media,
video
and
photography)


Determined
best
strategic
pracCces
for
customer
retenIon
(e.g.,
markeCng
to
1‐year,
sophomore,
commuter
and



 Brand
 transfer
students)?
 OrganizaIon
 Management
 Management
 Strategy
   Brand
consistency
across
all
markeCng,
communicaCons
and
social
media
plauorms
(e.g.,
Internal/External
research)?
  

DSA


 

Brand
idenIty
helping
us
posiCon
our
markeCng
and
sales
strategies
(e.g.,
division/campus
buy‐in)?


 

InnovaIon
driving
customer
growth?
(e.g.,
social
media,
e‐communicaCon
strategies
engaging
audiences
to
engage,
 enroll)


 

Leveraging
the
latest
markeCng
tools
(e.g.,
social
media,
ad
retargeCng)
to
understand
our
customer
ethos?


 

How
are
we
profiling
our
target
audiences?
(e.g.,
purchase
behaviors,
industry
trends,
social
media,
demographic
and
 geographic
informaCon)



 

Resource/InformaIon
sharing?
(e.g.,
Social
media
only
an
external
communicaCon
tool?)


How
much
emphasis
is
placed
on
markeCng
in
the
division’s
strategic
planning
process?
 InnovaIon
 InformaIon
 Management
   MarkeCng
strategies
and
tacCcs
(e.g.
media
ad
campaign,
social
media,
special
events,
videos)
clearly
linking
to
the
 Management
 division’s
valued
outcomes?
 Strategy
  

 

Experienced,
resourceful
leadership
in
place
to
manage
these
iniCaCves
and
processes?




40



TacCcs
 Strengthen
 Management
 Infrastructure
 Enhance
 Emerging
 Media
Efforts
 Implement
a
mix
of
 tradiConal/ untradiConal
metrics
 strategies
&
tacCcs


41



TacCcs


Emerging
Media

Integrate
email
and
social
media
markeIng,
online


adverIsing,
and
the
latest
SEO
tacIcs
into
a
plan
that
 aligns
with
the
division’s
new
strategic
goals
(e.g.,
 interacCve
DSA
e‐newslejer)
 42



TacCcs
 Strengthen
 Management
 Infrastructure
 Enhance
 Emerging
 Media
Efforts
 Implement
a
mix
of
 tradiIonal/ untradiIonal
metrics
 strategies
&
tacIcs


43



Project
Management

TacCcs


Setup
MarkeIng
Audits
w/
Student
Success
Programs
 In
complex
systems
like
DSA,
SMART
objecCves
contain
the
 potenCal
to
focus
ajenCon,
work
plans
and
commitment
to
 performance
targets.

 Basic
QuesIons:
 Am
I
doing
what
I
planned?
Is
my
work
having
the
impact
I
 anCcipated?
Are
changes
needed
in
my
plan?


Tap
Mutually
Beneficial
RelaIonships


 Develop
a
resource
hub
of
influenCal
students,
faculty,
staff,
alumni
and
 community
members
to
maximize
communicaCon,
efficiency
and
content
 within
the
division


Establish
Accountability
 Stakeholder
briefings,
master
 project
Cmelines,
monthly
 reports
w/
metrics
analyCcs
 spreadsheets


Increase
Resources
via
CollaboraIon
w/
Division
and
University
Community
 Office
of
University
RelaCons,
colleges,
DSA
groups,
student
groups,
campus
 communicators,
ad‐hoc
campus
and
student
groups
 44



TacCcs


OrganizaIonal
Buy‐in
Campaign

Internal
Focus
Groups
 &
Ad‐Hoc
Commi_ees
 • Mix
of
target
 audiences,
movers/
 shakers
and
 stakeholders


MarkeIng
&
 CommunicaIons
 Strategies
 • Shape
plans
for
 enCre
division,
 emphasis
on
 branding


Report
Findings
to
 DSA
Leadership
 • Influence
campus
 buy‐in
for
future
 campaigns


45



TacCcs


IDENTIFY
BRAND
DEFINITION
 –  Two‐month
campaign
to
conduct
primary
research
on
the
image
 and
reputaIon
of
DSA
 –  Discover
new
insights
that
posiCon
DSA
as
a
posiIve
brand
 extension
of
the
university
 MarkeIng
Goals


Drives
Strategy


???


Core
Values


Drives
Focus


???


Brand
Promise


Drives
AcIons


???


PosiIoning


Drives
Messaging


???


Tone
&
Personality


Drives
relaIonships,
creaIve
strategy


???
 46



MarkeCng
Plan


1‐YEAR
PLAN


1



MarkeCng
Plan


1‐Year
Plan
 Project
 Management
 System


Review
Metrics


IdenCfy
Brand
 DefiniCon



Launch
DSA
 Plan
2.0


OrganizaConal
 Buy‐in
 Campaign



Strengthen
 Management
 Infrastructure
 1


Revise
Plan
 ObjecCves
&
 Strategies



FUTURE INITIATIVES|

49



IniCaCves
 DSA
Cares
Campaign
|
#SSS2012
 100
Days
Campaign
 • Campus
Buy‐in
 • Announce
Student
Success
Master
Plan
 Launch
Student
Success
2.0
 • InteracCve
Newslejer
 • UC
RenovaIon
|
Outdoor
Signage
 • DSA
TV
 • Founder’s
Day
Event
 • Keep
Houston
Red
 • Campus
Signage
 • Project
Success
IniCaCve
 • DSA
Community
Service
Challenge
 • SFAC
Scholarship
 • DSA
123
Challenge
 • PUMA
OrganizaIon


50



Reference
Links
 1.  DSA
PresentaCon
 2.  Professional
Poruolio
 3.  Keep
Houston
Red
Poruolio


51



QUESTIONS|

52



DSA Presentation  

DSA Presentation

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