Page 1

Ambassador

WINTER/SPRING 2017

REPURPOSE, REUSE & REJOICE 2016 IMPACT LUNCHEON: GOODWILL HONORS CLIENTS & PARTNERS SIMPLIFY YOUR LIFE WITH THE MINIMALISM GAME DO-IT-YOURSELF: REPURPOSING WITH A PURPOSE!


3

contents

Ambassador

GOODWILL SHOPPERS SHOW US THEIR GREAT FINDS

President and CEO

I GOT IT AT GOODWILL KAMEL AND TONIA TELL THEIR

4

GOODWILL SUCCESS STORIES

WINTER/SPRING 2017

Matthew S. Bourlakas

Publisher

Karl Houston Senior Director of Marketing & Community Relations

GOODWILL HONORS OUTSTANDING CLIENTS AND PARTNERS

Writer & Editor

Art Director

10

REPURPOSE, REUSE AND REJOICE

13

DO-IT-YOURSELF: REPURPOSING WITH A PURPOSE!

14

THE GAME OF LIFE, SIMPLIFIED

16

TOP 15 THINGS PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT GOODWILL

7

18

GOODWILL EMPLOYEES MAKING A DIFFERENCE

I CHANGE LIVES ON THE COVER:

A mask made of plastic bottle caps and other materials is among works by Nashville artist Alex Lockwood. Lockwood, who participated in a recent benefit for Goodwill, finds many of his art materials at Goodwill. See story on Page 12.

Chris Fletcher PR & Communications Manager EJ Kerr Manager of Creative Services

Ambassador is a quarterly magazine published by Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc., 1015 Herman Street, Nashville, TN 37208. For the nearest retail store, donation center, or Career Solutions center, please call 800.545.9231 or visit giveit2goodwill.org/locations Ambassador provides readers with stories of the events, activities and people who support the mission of Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee. We are pleased to provide you this information and hope you will share our publication with others. Please note that the opinions expressed in Ambassador do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official position of management or employees of Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

THE AMBASSADOR IS MOVING ONLINE!

2

In an effort to be the best possible stewards of the resources provided by our generous shoppers and donors, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee will cease print publication of the Ambassador magazine with this edition.

THE GOODWILL MISSION:

However, all of the stories, photos and other content you have enjoyed in the Ambassador will now be found at: giveit2goodwill.org/news as well as on our social media channels.

Changing lives through education, training and employment.

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017


i

#

gotit at

Goodwill

Sheena wrote:

“Where else but Goodwilll (@giveit2goodwill) can you find an amazing Bebe dress for $6 & a cute cape to top off your look?”

GREAT FINDS AND DEALS FROM GOODWILL SHOPPERS Do you have some fabulous finds in your home or closet that you purchased at Goodwill? Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, and we might feature them in our next edition!

Porsche wrote: “This outfit was inspired by this amazing faux fur jacket found last month a @giveit2goodwill. Can you believe we got this piece for $12!?”

Post your great finds:

#igotitatgoodwill

Courtney wrote: “Found this cute little dress last week at the #goodwilloutlet for 99 cents and couldn't wait until spring or summer to wear it.

Lu wrote: “Fun fact. My scarf is actually a faux fur cummerbund for a men's tuxedo purchased @ giveit2goodwill. Best $2 I have ever spent.”

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

3


GOODWILL

SUCCESS STORIES

Watch a video story about Kamel at:

giveit2goodwill.org/kamel

WAYFARER FINDS HOME AT GOODWILL AFTER LONG JOURNEY Kamel

Once, Kamel presided over rows and rows of silvery fish. Now, books in their thousands swim past his discerning eye.

They are, in some ways, similar roles. But the road Kamel traversed between fish and books spanned 6,500 miles, 25 years and a lot of ups and downs. It began in late 1980s when he was working as a seafood inspector in Egypt. The middle-aged family man had a degree in agriculture from the University of Cairo, and he loved his job. But when he was replaced without notice or explanation, Kamel decided to travel to America to improve his fortunes.

4

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

He arrived in New Jersey in 1990, alone and struggling to understand the American accent. Kamel’s native tongue is Arabic, and though he can communicate in basic English, he found it far more difficult to do so in the U.S. than he had in Africa, where a British accent predominates. Nonetheless, he landed a job in a bakery run by an ItalianAmerican and quickly made friends. His plan was to work hard, save his money and then return to his wife and three children in Egypt, but his friends persuaded him to stay in the U.S. He resolved to gather funds to bring his family to America. Despite an outstanding work ethic, it took Kamel eight years to save enough money.Â


In 2000, the family moved to Nashville, and Kamel took a job at a bakery at Opryland. Things were going well, and in 2004, Kamel became a U.S. citizen. About the same time, he purchased a gas station. But the new business venture failed after two years because of a price war with other stations in the area. “I put all my money in this business, but business did not go up,” he says. The setback left him almost where he started when he arrived in America. He took a job at an area meat processing plant, but the man who grew up amid the desert sands found working in refrigerated warehouses intolerable. “Too much cold,” he explains. So, at the age of 63, Kamel once again had to make a new start. He visited a local government office to seek help. A worker there told him he could get free computer training from Goodwill. Kamel had never had the chance to use a computer in Africa, and he realized that computer skills might be beneficial in his job search. “I chose Goodwill, because Goodwill gave me the opportunity for training,” he says.

“He is very dedicated to performing a quality job,” she says. “He is a very hard worker and exceeds his goals. What’s more, he works very well with his fellow employees who love working with him.” - Mary Stockett, Director of Continuous Improvement & Post Market Development

32,673,705 lbs. of recyclable material diverted from landfills in 2016 thanks to the help of workers like Kamel

He participated in a basic computer class at the Goodwill Career Solutions center in downtown Nashville, and after completing the class in June of 2006 he was offered a job in Goodwill’s salvage department. Almost a decade later, he inspects and sorts books and other donated items for sale in Goodwill’s stores or for recycling. Mary Stockett, Goodwill’s director of continuous improvement and post market development, said Kamel is an outstanding employee. “He is very dedicated to performing a quality job,” she says. “He is a very hard worker and exceeds his goals. What’s more, he works very well with his fellow employees who love working with him.” Thanks to steady employment at Goodwill, Kamel has been able to provide for his family, pay for a house and even put his children through college. “I love Goodwill,” he says. Kamel sorts books in the salvage department of one of Goodwill's processing warehouses

“I chose Goodwill, because Goodwill gave me the opportunity for training.” - Kamel

Read another Goodwill success story on the next page.

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

5


WEST TENNESSEE WOMAN SHINES LIGHT OF EXPERIENCE ON GOODWILL CLIENTS After a Goodwill-hosted job fair, Tonia Brown and a Goodwill employment specialist were reviewing the event’s participants, discussing which ones Tonia might offer a position.

Tonia

She quickly found a seasonal job through a placement service, but the pay was low and she was falling further behind on her bills. She applied for several different positions, got interviews and went back to Goodwill for more career counselling.

When a particular man’s name came up, the specialist was somewhat surprised. It seemed there were at least as many reasons not to hire the man as to hire him.

Then, one day, she got a letter in the mail. She rushed to the Goodwill Career Solutions Center, with the letter gripped tightly in her shaking hands. She asked Career Solutions District Manager Sandra Hickey what she thought the letter meant.

“I loved his personality and spirit and wanted to give him an opportunity,” Tonia explained. As the human resources manager for Jones Plastics Engineering LLC in Camden since June of 2014, Tonia has relied on the same instincts and compassion while hiring dozens of Goodwill clients. In doing so, she has reduced the company’s turnover and its need for temporary labor. “I give second chances to a lot of people who might not get them from other employers,” she explained. “A lot of them really work out well for me.” The secret to Tonia’s success could be first-hand experience. In early 2014, things were not going well for the single mother of two and grandmother of one. The company where she had worked in human resources had relocated to Massachusetts, leaving her jobless and struggling to make ends meet. In April of 2014, she visited the Goodwill Career Solutions Center in Union City. From Goodwill, she got training in job-readiness, computer use, resume-building and more.

6

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

Did Jones Plastic and Engineering really intend to offer her a job as their human resources manager? They did. Life changed for Tonia that day. She now has a job she loves, and she and her children have moved into a new home in Paris. Under Tonia, Jones Plastics hires directly through Goodwill and partners with the organization for regular job fairs. “Even in that small town (Camden), she’s making a huge impact,” said Hickey. “She went from being unsure of herself and not really knowing which direction to go, to turning that completely around and hiring people who need help. It’s really amazing.” Tonia says she interviews lots of people with barriers to employment, including single moms who don’t know where their next meal is coming from. “I tell them, ‘I’m going to give you an opportunity. Don’t let me down and don’t let yourself down.’ I’ve been there, so I guess I know how it feels,” she said. “Because Goodwill helped me, I’m able to pay it forward and help others.”


NOVEMBER 21ST 2016

GOODWILL HONORS OUTSTANDING CLIENTS AND PARTNERS

Successes Celebrated at Annual Impact Luncheon Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee honored three Goodwill Career Solutions clients and five employer and community partners at its annual Impact Luncheon on Nov. 10 in Franklin. NewsChannel 5 Anchor Rhori Johnston emceed the event, which was sponsored by American Paper & Twine and held at the Franklin Marriott Cool Springs.

GOODWILL AMBASSADORS OF THE YEAR AWARD ELISABETH DONALDSON

BETSY APPLETON

is an artist and actress whose blog, 365 Days of Thrift,

is a Nashville contracts attorney who in her free time

expounds on the many benefits of thrift shopping and the need

writes a popular blog as the Goldwill Digger, introducing

for social and environmental responsibility. She’s been featured

others to thrift shopping and stylish dress. She has written

in Goodwill advertising and its Ambassador magazine, given

for Goodwill’s website and Ambassador magazine and is

interview style tips to Goodwill clients and modeled her

featured in Goodwill’s 2016 retail advertising campaign.

Goodwill finds on NewsChannel 5’s Talk of the Town.

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

7


EMPLOYER & COMMUNITY PARTNER AWARDS DONOR PARTNER AWARD Lifeway Christian Resources, the world’s largest provider of Christian resources such as Bibles, church music and digital services, is moving and downsizing after 125 years in one Nashville location. The nonprofit has filled more than 120 Goodwill trucks with office furniture, accessories and other donations valued at more than a half million dollars. Lifeway’s leaders are proud their donations will be sold to benefit Goodwill’s mission of changing lives through education, training and employment.

SUSTAINABILITY PARTNER AWARD Goodwill makes a promise to donors that it will squeeze the most possible value from every donated item, even those that can’t be sold in its stores. Dynamic Recycling in Nashville helps Goodwill fulfill this promise of stewardship by turning end-of-life electronics into valuable product streams of metals, plastic and glass. During the threeyear partnership, Dynamic Recycling has ensured that millions of pounds of electronics were recycled safely instead of being dumped in landfills.

EMPLOYER PARTNER AWARD As more Tennesseans need quality longterm care, more turn to National Healthcare Corporation (NHC). And as NHC has needed quality caregivers, it has been turning to Goodwill Career Solutions. For several years, Goodwill has referred clients to NHC’s certified nursing assistant classes in Franklin. A year ago, leaders from both organizations met and decided to begin holding those classes at Goodwill facilities. As of November, 300 Goodwill clients had registered for classes and 84 had been placed into jobs with NHC.

COMMUNITY PARTNER AWARD The Society of St. Vincent de Paul, operating from St. John Vianney Catholic Church in Gallatin, helps individuals and families in crisis in Gallatin and Sumner County. By providing temporary funding assistance for housing, power and water bills, gasoline for transportation and other necessities, the society helps stabilize its clients’ lives. Often, the next step is finding a job and for the last eight years, the society has referred its clients to Goodwill for career services and job fairs.

VOLUNTEER AWARD Each year, through Leadership Middle Tennessee, 30-40 business and civic leaders from 10 counties get the opportunity to learn about issues affecting the region and give back to the community through a class project. The class of 2016 chose to volunteer with Goodwill. With the help of alumni, the class fielded nearly 70 executives who fanned out one April day to Goodwill Career Solutions centers where they conducted practice interviews with dozens of Goodwill clients.

8

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017


EMPLOYEE & CLIENT AWARDS LAVOI-KATZ AWARD This award is named in honor of two women who were loyal supporters of Goodwill, Madaleine LaVoi and Elsine Katz. The award is given to a Career Solutions client who has made outstanding progress in their program at Goodwill.

ANDREW CURTIS At age 2, Andrew Curtis was struck by a car, leaving him with physical and developmental disabilities. Despite challenges, Andrew graduated high school, got married and held a job for a time. After that, he struggled to find and keep employment. He turned to Goodwill for help. By early 2014, he had been unemployed for a year. Friends encouraged Andrew to accept his lot and live on disability benefits. But Andrew prayed for God’s guidance and sent his Goodwill job coach an email to let her know he was not giving up. A few days later, Andrew’s job coach told him about an opening at Roses Department Store in Shelbyville. Though he had applied there before, he tried again and got the job. Andrew has now been working at Roses for seven months and loves his work. “Goodwill helped me be a more positive person,” he said.

EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR AWARD

DAVID B. LIFSEY SCHOLARSHIP AWARD

The recipient of this award has achieved great success since being hired by Goodwill.

This annual scholarship, named for Goodwill’s past president who served four decades, is presented to a Goodwill training program graduate who plans to enroll in post-secondary education or a credentialed certification program.

LAIBAO WAN is well-known at Nashville Goodwill headquarters for his work ethic. The 81-year-old housekeeping employee was once struck by a car while making his daily, 30-minute commute to work by bicycle. The driver wanted to call an ambulance, but instead, Wan loaded his smashed bike into the man’s car and demanded a ride to Goodwill. Wan worked as a chauffeur in China for 45 years. After his wife died, he moved to the U.S. to be near family, but he struggled to find a job because he could not speak English. He came to Goodwill for help in 2013 and was trained for his current job. He used his paycheck to buy a Chinese-English dictionary and his language skills quickly improved. He is now a top-performer, beloved by his co-workers.

ANTONIO WILLIAMS As a child, Antonio Williams rarely felt confident about math or books, but he was at home building things. He dreamed of going into construction, but by his mid-20s he was still seeking a start. He needed a job to support himself and relatives with whom he lived. He searched endlessly, applying with at least 15 construction companies, but the few who responded said he lacked necessary experience. In 2014, Williams sought help from Goodwill Career Solutions. He got training in job readiness, computer basics and forklift operation. Then, he registered for Goodwill’s sixweek construction program. After graduating, Williams landed a job at Solomon Builders. He now has his own car and apartment and is working toward his dream of becoming a general contractor.

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

9


Photo Courtesy of Mayter Scott

Photo Courtesy of Mayter Scott

REPURPOSE, REUSE & REJOICE In 2016, several events and numerous individuals celebrated Goodwill’s role in promoting creativity, sustainability and community in Tennessee.

G

oodwill Stakes Claim on High-Fashion Runway at The Reclamation

A unique event featuring one-of-a-kind fashions from some of Nashville’s hottest fashion designers showed how stylish Goodwill can be. The Reclamation, a co-benefit for Goodwill and the Nashville Fashion Alliance, was held Sept. 29 at Track One in Nashville. Hundreds of people turned out for the celebration of the community’s spirit of collaboration, including Honorary Chairwoman Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, who praised those assembled as “the next wave of our great economy here in Nashville.”

10

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

Goodwill CEO Matthew Bourlakas said the genesis of The Reclamation, which also featured local gourmet food, art and live music, was recognition of shared objectives by the two nonprofit organizations. “We realized that we have much more in common than fashion,” Bourlakas said. “Both Goodwill and the Nashville Fashion Alliance are designed to make a positive impact on the community, the economy and the environment. But our most important common thread is that we help people. We train and empower them so that they can improve their lives and, in turn, improve the lives of those around them.” At the event, a dozen local designers unveiled garments and accessories they created from materials acquired at Goodwill stores. Among them was Mary Mooney, who made a beautiful pendant necklace by combining parts of a Justin Bieber CD, a clutch


MARY MOONEY

ASHLEY BALDING

Photo Courtesy of Mayter Scott purse and a vintage belt. She also made a collar necklace using a glass bead from a sconce, a basket handle and a handbag chain. “I’m wanting this project to go on forever,” Mooney said. “It’s really fun to kind of look at the materials of something and reimagine it.” Other participating designers were Diana Warner, Otis James, Annie Williams, Eric Adler, Edward Jones of Edward’s Shoes, Isabel SK, Debe Dohrer, Ashley Balding of Ona Rex, Anna Zeitlin of Fanny & June, Kate Brown of Morton & Mabel and Sandra Ney of Will & Ivey. Their pieces, which included pants, jackets, dresses and even a pair of shoes made from blue jeans, were auctioned off after the event with profits being donated to Goodwill and the Nashville Fashion Alliance. Ney created a young girl’s dress and cape straight from a fairy tale, using pieces of linens and garments she chose from Goodwill’s Charlotte Avenue store in Nashville. She said she had no trouble finding a wide variety of textures, patterns and colors for her creation.

SANDRA NEY

Honorary Chairwoman Nashville Mayor Megan Barry, praised those assembled as “the next wave of our great economy here in Nashville.” - Photo Courtesy of Mayter Scott

“It was easy. Now I’m inspired. I think I should do a whole ‘Once Upon a Time,’ line of one-of-a-kind dresses,” she said. “I think Goodwill is amazing.” Mooney, Ney and other designers said they value Goodwill’s role in providing and finding jobs for people with barriers to employment. They appreciate that dollars spent at Goodwill, like those spent with local independent fashion designers, circulate back through the community. They noted that by reselling gently used items and recycling valuable materials, Goodwill promotes environmental sustainability, just as the local fashion industry has proven to be a green alternative to mass-produced “fast fashion.” But they also dig the merchandise. “I think thrifting is sort of the universal cool thing,” Mooney said. “Having met a lot of the fashion designers in town now, I know they all shop at Goodwill.”

“I’m wanting this project to go on forever. It’s really fun to kind of look at the materials of something and reimagine it.” – Mary Mooney, Nashville Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

11


Faces made from items found at Goodwill appear on many of Nashville artist Alex Lockwood’s recent works, including pieces shown above. Those in the center are part of a permanent installation on the mini-golf course at the Nashville Sounds baseball park. Similar pieces were displayed at The Reclamation benefit for Goodwill and the Nashville Fashion Alliance on Sept. 29.

Photos Courtesy of Alex Lockwood

F

aces of Goodwill: An Artist’s Perspective

Big, colorful, clownish faces loom over Hole No. 2 of the mini-golf course at the Nashville Sounds minor league baseball park. As golfers aim up a ramp and into the mail-slot mouth of one face to start the hole, they are struck first by the expressions, which range from joyfully innocent to vaguely sinister. Then, looking closer, they are surprised to find the noses are made of plastic cups and the eyes, cheeks and mouths are composed of buckets, lids or bowls. “That’s always fun,” explains the faces’ creator, Nashville artist Alex Lockwood. “It happens with all my work. The best-case scenario is people respond to it as a work of art distinct from what it’s made of, and then they notice what it’s made of.” Lockwood, whose work was displayed at a recent co-benefit for Goodwill and the Nashville Fashion Alliance, uses found objects — ordinary materials made for a non-art function — in all of his art. Materials for the faces, which are a recurring theme in his recent work, are found at Goodwill. Some facial features even retain their Goodwill price tags.

“I can’t go buy these things anywhere new that I can get from Goodwill,” he says. “There’s a history to all of this material. It could be from the homes of rich people, poor people — people of all ethnic backgrounds. I’m just another stop on their journey.” Lockwood’s fondness for objects with a story dates back to his start as an artist in New York in the early 2000s, when he noticed scratch-off lottery tickets littering the sidewalks near corner stores. To many people, they were just trash. To Lockwood, they were a free, abundant medium for art, and he began folding them to create elaborate sculptures. “With something like a lottery ticket, there’s rich things in there — hope that this object is going to change everything, and disappointment, which comes with all the ones I get,” he said, laughing. As with the lottery tickets, there are also practical reasons Lockwood shops for art materials at Goodwill. “There’s just a color palette that’s unending,” he said. “There’s so many colors of plastic. Add to that the way people use them, or if they are sun-faded. I have access to any color I want, I’m always surprised by the shapes I find, and it’s very inexpensive.”

“With something like a lottery ticket, there’s rich things in there — hope that this object is going to change everything, and disappointment, which comes with all the ones I get." — Alex Lockwood, Nashville 12

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017


DO-IT-YOURSELF: REPURPOSING WITH A PURPOSE! G oodwill participated in the first-ever Crafty Bastards Arts & Crafts Fair in Nashville on Nov. 5. The event, an exhibition and sales of handmade goods from independent artists, included numerous repurposed, upcycled and do-it-yourself objects.

At the Goodwill booth, Goodwill Donation Specialists Jamie Goss and Suzanne Fletcher demonstrated for visitors how to make

Turn a Suitcase Into a Table 1 Remove fabric and pockets from inside of luggage. 2 Drill four holes in bottom of luggage to attach legs. 3 Make a wooden frame on inside bottom of luggage for sturdiness.

4 Use four short dowels or other equally sized wooden pieces for legs.

5 Attach legs using screws from inside of luggage. 6 Paint entire suitcase the color of your choice.

a custom chalkboard from an old baby crib and how to make a coffee table or foot stool from used luggage. More and more people are discovering that Goodwill is a terrific place to search for items and materials for upcycling or DIY projects. Not only can they enjoy a handmade, personalized item that is beautiful, useful or both, they get the satisfaction of knowing they also helped people in need of work and helped the environment by shopping for used items at Goodwill.

Turn a Baby Bed Into a Custom Chalkboard/Menu Board: 1 Remove the headboard or footboard from an old baby crib. 2 Cut off the legs to make a square. 3 Paint the perimeter the color of your choice. 4 Paint the inside with chalkboard paint. 5 Attach wire or hooks for hanging on wall.

You don’t have to be an experienced artist to enjoy these fun and inexpensive ways to repurpose merchandise found at Goodwill:

Visit giveit2goodwill.org/news for more ideas Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

13


THE GAME OF LIFE, SIMPLIFIED

Jessica Shutt and Pete Webber, right, deliver a large bag of donations to a Goodwill Donations Express Center attendant in Madison as they near the end of their month playing the 30-Day Minimalism Game. The couple began by searching through closets and donating things they hadn’t worn or used in a year or longer, Jessica said. They are now enjoying a more organized and spacious home.

he game started off easy for Jessica Shutt and Pete Webber.

They made multiple trips to their local Goodwill in Madison to donate the piles of stuff they had collected.

For the first few days, the young couple targeted closets and cupboards, gathering up long neglected shoes, pants and shirts, a Tupperware cake dish, pans and more. As the game wore on, they shifted their focus to other parts of the house, setting aside a toaster, a rubber Halloween skeleton and even a bookcase (though Jessica was not quite ready to part with her books).

“The house feels cleaner and lighter,” Jessica said. “Things have a weight to them, you know, and it’s nice to be able to let go of some of them and live as simply as possible. It feels really good.”

T

Jessica and Pete were playing the 30-Day Minimalism Game. Jessica first heard about it while listening to a podcast. The goal of the game is to declutter your home so you can enjoy the benefits Jessica described.

The rules are simple: For one month, look closely at the items in your home and identify things that no longer serve a purpose. On the first day of the month, get rid of one thing. On the second day, two things, and so on, until the 30th day when you must give away 30 things. Finding a partner to play along makes the game more fun and helps you stay on task. The one who keeps going longest is the winner. If you both make it through the month, you both win. Jessica and Pete had been looking for opportunities to help their Nashville community around the holidays, so

“The house feels cleaner and lighter. Things have a weight to them, you know, and it’s nice to be able to let go of some of them and live as simply a possible. It feels really good.” — Jessica Shutt 14

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017


they decided to play the game during November as a “monthlong community giveback.” Although the game allows participants to sell, throw away or donate clutter, they decided to focus on items that still had value and to donate everything to Goodwill. “We feel passionate about supporting Goodwill because we know our donations directly support their mission (of changing lives through education, training and employment),” Jessica said. “There are other thrift stores we could have donated to, but we’ve both seen the positive impact their career services have on our community.” Professional organizer Debbie Keller said the 30-Day Minimalism Game is an excellent strategy for decluttering. “The most difficult thing for people is figuring out where to begin. If you approach it by dealing with one thing one day, two things the next — that’s very manageable,” said Keller, president of Home and Office Transitions in Nashville. “It’s a win-win-win. It gives

you a strategy, it makes it fun and Goodwill benefits as well.”

memories they are associated with and not necessarily the items themselves.”

Jessica and Pete decided to play the game in reverse, giving away 30 things each on the first day and counting down. If they made it through the entire month, they would have given away nearly 1,000 things between them.

By Day 30, the couple’s house had taken on a completely new character. Organized. Simple. Feng shui, even. The last item Jessica donated was her CD collection from middle and high school.

By Day 18, the game was getting more complicated. Jessica and Pete found themselves having to make some decisions and even do a little soulsearching: “Have I worn this in the last year? Why am I still hanging on to that?” Pete gave up his baseball cards. Another example was a dress Jessica had worn for her college graduation. The dress no longer fit, but there it was, taking up space in her closet. “I went ahead and donated it,” Jessica explained. “It’s funny how old items you’ve toted from house to house can be so nostalgic. I had to remind myself that what’s special about them is the

“I haven’t listened to any of the CDs in years, but it was still difficult to part with,” she said. “I am going to make a playlist full of Spice Girls, Destiny’s Child and Shania Twain to remember it by!” Pete and Jessica both felt like winners in the Minimalism Game. And there was one unexpected benefit. “It brought us even closer together,” Pete said. “Over the course of a month, we tried to figure out what things we need and whether they add value to what we are doing or if someone else could use them. I’d say it would be good for anyone’s relationship if they embarked on it together.”

If you decide to play the 30-Day Minimalism Game and donate to Goodwill, please post about your progress on social media using:

#MinsGame and #GiveIt2Goodwill. “We feel passionate about supporting Goodwill because we know our donations directly support their mission (of changing lives through education, training and employment). There are other thrift stores we could have donated to, but we’ve both seen the positive impact their career services have on our community.” A large number of unneeded but still valuable kitchen items were among the possessions Jessica Shutt and Pete Webber donated to Goodwill as a result of playing the 30-Day Minimalism Game.

— Jessica Shutt

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

15


TOP 15 THINGS PEOPLE DON’T KNOW ABOUT GOODWILL 1

GOODWILL’S MISSION:

Goodwill is proud of the fact that people on limited budgets can find essentials at incredibly low prices in their stores, but that’s not the reason Goodwill exists. The mission of Goodwill, a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization operating in middle and west Tennessee for almost 60 years, is to change lives through education, training and employment.

3

GOODWILL HELPS A HUGE NUMBER OF PEOPLE FIND WORK.

In 2016, more than 43,000 people got help from Goodwill Career Solutions in middle and west Tennessee. More than 17,000 of those people successfully landed jobs.

6

GOODWILL WILL PICK UP DONATIONS FOR YOU.

If you are moving or have had an estate sale and you have donations for Goodwill, they can schedule a truck to pick them up. Call (615) 425-0100 for more information or to schedule a pickup.

16

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

4

GOODWILL SELLS MERCHANDISE ONLINE!

You can shop Goodwill 24-7 at onlinegoodwill.com, an online auction site. All jewelry donated to Goodwill as well as thousands of unique pieces of clothing, books, shoes, furniture and household goods go to the highest bidder. You can also sign up for weekly emails highlighting some of the more intriguing and valuable finds at onlinegoodwill.com.

7

2

MOST OF THE PEOPLE GOODWILL HELPS DON’T GO TO WORK FOR GOODWILL.

Goodwill has more than 2,000 employees, about 89 percent of whom received services through its mission. But nine out of 10 of the people Goodwill Career Solutions places into jobs go to work for one of Goodwill’s 3,000 employer partners, such as Amazon, Gaylord Opryland Hotel or Popeye’s Louisiana Kitchen.

5

GOODWILL IS ONE OF THE STATE’S GREENEST COMPANIES.

Goodwill annually salvages and recycles more than 27 million pounds of material — enough to fill Nissan Stadium (home of the Tennessee Titans). Its paper recycling alone saves 44,000 trees per year.

GOODWILL GENERATES A TREMENDOUS ECONOMIC RIPPLE EFFECT.

For every dollar Goodwill spends, it creates $3.30 in benefit to the community. Also, its operations and job placements result in $476 million in total annual business revenues for companies across middle and west Tennessee, according to a recent study.


8

GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE IS ONE OF 165 INDEPENDENTLY OPERATED GOODWILL ORGANIZATIONS.

With a governing board of directors and CEO, Goodwill of Middle Tennessee serves just over half (48) of Tennessee’s counties. This assures donors that their donations benefit local people and communities. Learn more about Goodwill's promise to our donors and shoppers at giveit2goodwill.org/accountability

10

GOODWILL IS ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST TRUSTED BRANDS.

11

GOODWILL HAS A SALE EVERY DAY.

Color of the week items are 50 percent off every Goodwill was ranked No. 1 as the day. Teachers, students, military brand that does the most good and seniors 60 and older get a for the world in the 2016 Brand 10 percent discount every day World Value Index Survey. on regularly priced items. On Amazon, Google, Kellog’s and Wednesdays, seniors get 20 PayPal rounded out the top five percent off regularly priced items. of 150 companies listed. Every Friday-Sunday, color of the week clothing is 99 cents. All GOODWILL clothing in the store is 50 percent PARTNERS off first Saturday's of the month. WITH OTHER

13

NON-PROFITS.

To extend our outreach Goodwill partners with organizations like the American Red Cross, which provides Goodwill gift cards to victims of disasters such as fires, floods and tornadoes.

15

14

9

GOODWILL IS FOCUSED ON BEING A GOOD STEWARD.

Of the 165 Goodwills, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee ranks first for mission investment. Ninety-two cents of every dollar it spends is applied toward its mission. The local Goodwill also ranks in the Top 10 of all Goodwills for donor and sales support.

12

GOODWILL HAS TWO OUTLET STORES.

One Goodwill outlet at 780 Berry Road in Nashville sells clothing and other merchandise for pennies on the pound. Another outlet at 291 New Shackle Island Road in Hendersonville offers every item at 99 cents. Learn more at giveit2goodwill.org/outlets.

YOU CAN MAKE MONEY FOR YOUR GROUP WHILE HELPING GOODWILL.

Schools, athletic teams, booster clubs and nonprofit, church and civic organizations can raise funds while simultaneously supporting Goodwill’s mission by holding a Donation Fundraising Drive. The more goods that are donated, the more money raised for your group. Call (615) 346-1629 for more information or to schedule a drive.

GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE IS 60 YEARS OLD!

Our nonprofit was founded in Nashville in 1957. We are in the process of planning celebrations starting in June of 2017. The first Goodwill was founded in 1902 by the the Rev. Edgar J. Helms in Boston, Mass. Helms went door-to-door in wealthier districts, asking for donations of used clothing and household goods that could be repaired and resold to provide jobs for the needy and those considered “unemployable.” Our mission remains similar to this day. Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

17


i

CHANGE LIVES

Becky Kelly Retail Store Manager

Rebecca Kelly, 36, manages Goodwill’s newest retail store at 405 S. James Campbell Blvd. in Columbia. Leading a crew of about 40, she describes herself as a “leader, coach, mentor, teacher — and sometimes a therapist.” She is also responsible for merchandise sales, hiring, scheduling, opening and closing the store, cleaning and much more.

What are some of the challenges you face?

Why is your job important to Goodwill’s mission?

Not being able to help everyone. When

I love the mission of Goodwill, I know

someone comes to you and needs a

its importance and I strive to live

job, and you can’t give them what they

by it daily. I want the people who

care of her son. She later worked

need for whatever reason, it makes you

come through Goodwill to do great

for a local printing company until

feel bad. Everyone deserves a chance at

things, whether they stay with the

a better life.

organization for many many years

Becky had her oldest child when she was just 16. The Columbia native took a job at a department store and completed high school while taking

having her third child and deciding she wanted to stay home with her kids. “That lasted about six months,”

or use their time at Goodwill as a

What has surprised you most in your time with Goodwill?

stepping-stone to do greater things.

That I still enjoy coming to work every

How do you change lives?

day! (OK, not every day but most every

I’ve never really looked at it as I change

day). The programs Goodwill offers and

lives. I just care. I want to help people

2002, she learned Goodwill was hiring

the amount of people Goodwill helps

have a better day and succeed in their

in nearby Lewisburg, and — though

every single day are amazing!

job. I love to train and teach people

she had never been inside a Goodwill

What do you enjoy most about your job?

grow. Honestly, the people that we help

before — applied and was hired as a part-time sales associate. She was

My staff. With the diverse people

who smile no matter what life brings

Goodwill hires, it is so rewarding to

them and get up and come to work,

watch them grow, learn and become

even on the bad days. That is why I

successful in their job as well as in life.

love my job at Goodwill.

she recalls. “I needed to get out and do something — mainly for my sanity.” In

quickly promoted several times and within a year and a half was named

what I know. I love to watch them

the manager of Goodwill’s Columbia

Especially when others might never

store. She has held the position ever

give them a chance.

since. “I never thought this little parttime job would turn into an almost 15-year career,” she said.

18

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

at Goodwill change my life: the ones


2nd Avenue in downtown Nashville, current home of the Wildhorse Saloon.

C. 1970

Keeping your business running since 1926 American Paper & Twine Co. has been serving Middle Tennessee with custom-tailored business solutions for 90 years. We are proud to be a part of Nashville’s history and appreciate the loyal support of our customers and business partners through the years. Thank you for helping us reach this milestone. We look forward to serving you for years to come!

To learn more about us, visit www.ShopAPT.com JANITORIAL PRODUCTS • PACKAGING MATERIALS • OFFICE PRODUCTS • FOOD SERVICE DISPOSABLES • SAFETY SUPPLIES

Ambassador WINTER/SPRING 2017

19


THE AMBASSADOR IS MOVING ONLINE In an effort to be the best possible stewards of the resources provided by our generous shoppers and donors, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee

Board of Directors OFFICERS

will cease print publication of the Ambassador magazine with this edition.

Chairperson: Fred McLaughlin

However, all of the stories, photos and other

Vice Chairperson: Julie F. Wilson

Legal Counsel: Christopher S. Dunn, Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP

now be found at: giveit2goodwill.org/news.

Secretary: Chad M. Grout

Goodwill President and CEO: Matthew S. Bourlakas

Visit giveit2goodwill.org/news today and sign

Treasurer: Dave M. Fentress

content you have enjoyed in the Ambassador will

up for email alerts each time we release a new

Goodwill VP of Finance Mary La Haie

story. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter to be sure new stories show up in your news feed.

THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING GOODWILL

DIRECTORS Woodretta Allen

Robert McNeilly, III

J.B. Baker

Ilex Pounders **

Bryan Bean

Christine E. Skold

Steele Clayton

Todd A. Spaanstra

Andrew Davidson

John W. Stone, III

Christopher S. Dunn

Kathryn I. Thompson

Robert Duthie

John C. Tishler

Dave M. Fentress

John Van Mol

James B Foley

Julie F. Wilson

Kathryn S. Gibson

Jeff Young

Chad M. Grout, CCIM

Donna B. Yurdin

GroupRyan R. Loyd

** Intern

Fred T. McLaughlin

TRUSTEES Chairperson: Robert W. Duthie Kathryn I. Thompson Robert McNeilly, III

Ambassador Q4 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you