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Ambassador

FALL 2016

ON THE RISE:

GOODWILL’S SUMMER YOUTH GAIN SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE TREASURE-HUNTERS KEEP COMING BACK TO GOODWILL’S OUTLET DEALS DRAW DROVES OF SHOPPERS TO COLUMBIA STORE GRAND OPENING FALLEN SOLDIER'S STOLEN BELONGINGS RETURNED TO FAMILY


contents

Ambassador FALL 2016

President and CEO Matthew S. Bourlakas

GOODWILL SHOPPERS SHOW US THEIR GREAT FINDS

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I GOT IT AT GOODWILL DEVON AND JOSEPH TELL THEIR

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GOODWILL SUCCESS STORIES STUDENT HEARS:

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'YOU'RE HIRED' AT END OF SUMMER WORK PROGRAM ON THE RISE: GOODWILL’S SUMMER YOUTH GAIN SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE

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10

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PICKER'S PARADISE:

TREASURE-HUNTERS KEEP COMING BACK TO GOODWILL’S OUTLET FALLEN SOLDIER'S STOLEN BELONGINGS RETURNED TO FAMILY

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DEALS DRAW DROVES OF SHOPPERS TO COLUMBIA STORE GRAND OPENING

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EXPERTS OFFER ADVICE ON INTERVIEW LOOKS

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Publisher

Karl Houston Senior Director of Marketing & Community Relations

Writer & Editor

Chris Fletcher PR & Communications Manager

Art Director

EJ Kerr Manager of Creative Services

Ambassador is a quarterly magazine published by Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc., 1015 Herman Street, Nashville, TN 37208. For the nearest retail store, donation center, or Career Solutions center, please call 800.545.9231 or visit giveit2goodwill.org/locations Ambassador provides readers with stories of the events, activities and people who support the mission of Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee. We are pleased to provide you this information and hope you will share our publication with others. Please note that the opinions expressed in Ambassador do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official position of management or employees of Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

GOODWILL EMPLOYEES MAKING A DIFFERENCE

I CHANGE LIVES

THE GOODWILL MISSION: Changing lives through education, training and employment.

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Ambassador FALL 2016


i

#

gotit at

Goodwill GREAT FINDS AND DEALS FROM GOODWILL SHOPPERS Do you have some fabulous finds in your home or closet that you purchased at Goodwill? Share them with us on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter, and we might feature them in our next edition!

From Porsche Pope: “Believe it or not this entire outfit is from Goodwill, total cost $14."

From @shanann77:

“My @giveit2goodwill score #1 for this week... Perfect pumpkin dip bowl and spreader...and it was still in the box!”

Post your great finds:

#igotitatgoodwill

From Jamie: “I am so ready for fall! And I'm always ready for coffee LOL.”

Betsy styled her gameday look with a vintage Vols tank and belt from Goodwill.

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GOODWILL

SUCCESS STORIES

Watch a video story about Devon at:

giveit2goodwill.org/devon KEEP ON TRUCKIN’:

AT GOODWILL, YOUNG MAN MAKES A U-TURN ON TROUBLED LIFE Devon

As a young boy, Devon dreamed of one day becoming a police officer, but by his late teenage years, he was spending much of his time dodging police. Devon’s mother died when he was 17. Forced to live on his own, he fell into a life of drugs and guns. He got caught again and again, and the last time he spent a full year behind bars. He signed up for tough work details on garbage trucks to escape the tedium of jail.

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Ambassador FALL 2016

“I was working hard every day on those trucks for bologna sandwiches and peanut butter sandwiches when I could have been doing the same thing and getting paid $7.25 an hour,” he said. “After I got out, I told myself I was going to do whatever it took not to get back into trouble.” When he was released in 2009, a friend told Devon that Goodwill could help people with arrest histories find work. Devon signed up for job readiness classes at Goodwill Career Solutions in downtown Nashville, and eventually he was offered a job at Goodwill, unloading trucks of donations.


It was the start of a remarkable, nine-year ascent for the once-troubled young man. Devon’s supervisors recognized his strong work ethic and leadership potential, and he rose through the ranks as a forklift driver, then lead forklift operator, then dock supervisor. But Devon had other ambitions. He told Goodwill Senior Director of Operations Mike Eisenbraun and other supervisors he wanted to be a truck driver. They encouraged him, and he began studying to upgrade his driver’s license so he could drive small trucks for Goodwill. Still not satisfied, Devon began studying for a full commercial driver’s license. He received it in March.

“I didn’t ever think I would be where I’m at, doing what I am doing. I don’t think any other company would have given me chances like Goodwill has.”

“Devon called me and said, ‘Guess what, Big Mike, I got my Class A license!’” Eisenbraun recalled. “He was just so thrilled. He’s driving tractor-trailers for us now, and he’s in hog heaven.” Devon is amazed at how far he has come. “I didn’t ever think I would be where I’m at, doing what I am doing,” he said, adding “ I don’t think any other company would have given me chances like Goodwill has.” Devon loves the life of a truck driver — managing his own schedule and enjoying all the scenery that rolls past his windshield.

5,301

number of people Goodwill served in 2015 that reported having a criminal background.

Sometimes, when he is driving, he thinks about the little kid who wanted to grow up to be a policeman. He remembers how, when a truck would pass by, he and his friends would pump their arms up and down to signal the driver to honk his horn. “Now, I’m driving down the street and little kids are doing that to me,” he says.

“I was working hard every day on those trucks for bologna sandwiches and peanut butter sandwiches when I could have been doing the same thing and getting paid $7.25 an hour. After I got out, I told myself I was going to do whatever it took not to get back into trouble.”

Devon stands next to his Goodwill big rig, ready to head out to Goodwill stores with deliveries of donated goods

Read another Goodwill success story on the next page.

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FINDING HIS VOICE:

JOB AT GOODWILL HELPS SMYRNA-AREA MAN LEARN TO INTERACT Joseph

Joseph’s mother was at the Goodwill store in Smyrna where her son had worked for several years when she saw him do something surprising: He held the door open for a female customer.

participate in paid retail training at the Smyrna Goodwill store. He said yes and quickly began working with a job coach. After just a few weeks, he mastered the necessary skills and was hired on as an employee.

For anyone else, it might have been a small gesture unworthy of mention, but for Joseph, it was evidence of a dramatic change.

He liked the work and, little by little, he began emerging from his shell.

“He didn’t used to do that kind of stuff,” his mother said. “And he used to not talk at all. You would ask him questions and get a one-word answer. Now, he’ll carry on a conversation with you. He didn’t do any of that until he went to work at Goodwill.”

“I think it was six months after I began working at this store before he began talking to me,” recalled office administrator Marianne Hunley. “He would have this shy little smile, hold up his hand and wave at me. I’m so happy to see him blossom.”

Joseph’s mild autism and dyslexia isolated him for much of his life. He was extremely shy and avoided interaction with strangers. The 40-year-old, who lives with his parents in Rutherford County, tried other jobs — including janitor and dishwasher positions at a grocery store and pizza restaurant — but they never lasted long. Another job with a nonprofit in Nashville ended because his parents couldn’t continue making the long daily drive to get him there.

Now, after seven years, Joseph is a fixture at the store — one of the longest-serving Goodwill employees at that site. Hunley and other supervisors say he is a dependable, hard worker who will gladly take on any task and pays close attention to details.

So he sat around the house, getting bored and “antsy,” his mother said. Eventually, she had enough and decided Joseph should give Goodwill a try. In January of 2007, she drove him to a Goodwill Career Solutions center, where a career counselor assessed his skills, goals and challenges.

He acknowledges his own transformation.

In September of that year, Joseph was offered a chance to

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Ambassador FALL 2016

Moreover, he communicates well with co-workers and customers. Joseph, a longtime St. Louis Cardinals fan, even chats about sports with his supervisor.

“Goodwill teaches me social skills and makes me feel more independent,” Joseph said. “It teaches me how to take better care of myself and pay for a lot of the things I need. I thank Goodwill and especially God for my job.”


STUDENT HEARS:

'YOU'RE HIRED' AT END OF SUMMER WORK PROGRAM

A

few weeks before the school year ended, 16-yearold La'Zairia began submitting job applications to local businesses, including Kroger, Smoothie King, Target and Rue 21.

But no one called her for an interview, most likely because she had no prior work experience. So La'Zairia submitted another application, this time to Goodwill’s Summer Youth Work Program. The paid, six-week summer work training program is for 16- to 22-year-olds who are still enrolled in high school or have recently graduated. About 80 Davidson County students participate each year. Most of the students train at Goodwill, while about 30 receive training at Kroger, which co-sponsors the program along with Goodwill and the Metropolitan Development Housing Agency of Nashville and Davidson County. Students learn about the responsibilities of having a job, including safety standards, and the rewards of earning a paycheck. Some students obtain permanent part-time employment through the program. La'Zairia knew about Goodwill’s program because her sister participated in it, and she was excited a few days later when she was accepted. Starting in early June, the Martin Luther King Jr. High School student worked for Goodwill’s marketing and donations departments at its downtown Nashville headquarters, performing tasks such as archiving and scanning documents and delivering mail around the campus. It was her first real job. “It gave me a sense of independence knowing I could earn my own money,” she said. “It felt good.” Five weeks later, as the Summer Youth Work Program was about to end in mid-July, La'Zairia scored an interview with Kroger. When the hiring manager asked her about her work experience, La'Zairia described her duties at Goodwill. At the conclusion of the interview, the manager offered La'Zairia a cashier position. “I was really happy,” La'Zairia said. “I’m really proud that I did it, and my parents and sister were proud that I have a permanent part-time position and will be able to buy my own things.

“I was really happy. I’m really proud that I did it, and my parents and sister were proud that I have a permanent part-time position and will be able to buy my own things. I’m also glad I won’t have to fill out any more applications.”

1,820

Approximate number of participants in Goodwill's Summer Work Program since 1989.

“I’m also glad I won’t have to fill out any more applications,” she added with a grin. Ambassador FALL 2016

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ON THE RISE:

GOODWILL’S SUMMER YOUTH GAIN SKILLS AND EXPERIENCE F

or Keosha, Goodwill’s Summer Youth Program got off to a shaky start.

“On the first day, I was really nervous. I felt like an outcast,” she wrote during a journaling exercise. “But during lunch, one of my (classmates) asked me to come sit with them, and now we’re really close. I can see that this place is going to change me for the better.” The change in perspective and broadening of experience that Keosha reported is a big part of what the Summer Youth Program, a four-week job readiness program for 14- to 18-year-olds, aims to achieve, said its director, Rebecca Tarango. “We try to help these young people figure out who they are, explore that, and then be able to decide what they want to do after

high school,” she said. “Many of them are very quiet and timid on the first day, but they gain confidence as we progress. We work on giving them good communication skills, and that helps them personally and professionally.” Activities in the program range from crafting resumes, practicing job interviews and filling out job applications to ice skating, cooking a meal on a budget and volunteering at several nonprofit organizations. There are two sessions of the Summer Youth Program held at Goodwill headquarters in downtown Nashville each year. The 2016 sessions wrapped up July 24. Here’s how a few of the 18 participating students described their experiences:

“We try to help these young people figure out who they are, explore that, and then be able to decide what they want to do after high school." – Rebecca Tarango, Good Life Program 8

Ambassador FALL 2016


WHAT THE YOUTH HAD TO SAY ON GROCERY SHOPPING AT KROGER BEFORE PREPARING A MEAL:

cook, I will automatically

“The skills I learned

think it’s good for some

volunteering were how

reason.” — Janea, 15

to work in teams and be

“Yesterday changed the way that I look at money, because “Cooking is stressful / you see that the name brand Shopping is, too / But eating stuff isn’t always the best

as the name-brand stuff for a cheaper price.” — Ashley, 15 “Our budget was $50, but we only spent $38. I have shopped before, but I don’t usually have a budget. I had fun shopping on our own. I learned that staying under a budget can save you money.” — De’Asia, 15 “My grandmother has been cooking for a long time, so she knows what to add to make it taste better. I haven’t been cooking for that long, so I just go by the instructions. Whatever I

toward each other.” — Shaperia, 15

is fun / If you know what

thing to buy. You can get the to do.” — Keosha, 14 things that taste just as good

responsible and respectful

ON VOLUNTEERING AT SECOND HARVEST FOOD BANK AND OASIS CENTER:

ON PRACTICE INTERVIEWS WITH REPRESENTATIVES FROM APPLE ONE AND DELOITTE: “I think the mock interviews

“By me volunteering at

were cool. It was very

places, I have developed the

helpful for when I am ready

skills of working as a team

to get ready for a job.”

member and dealing with

— Herschel, 14

others that are different from you.”

— Alexis, 15

“I like the Oasis Center

ON ICE SKATING AT CENTENNIAL SPORTSPLEX:

because it was fun building

“Today when I was ice

and restoring bikes. I can’t

skating, I was absolutely

wait until the kids get their

scared the whole time. I was

bikes. I love volunteering. I

really scared of falling on

really feel good about myself the ice rink. But overall, it when I help people.” was pretty fun.” — JJ, 15 — Robin, 14

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PICKER'S PARADISE:

TREASURE-HUNTERS KEEP COMING BACK TO GOODWILL’S OUTLET T

o some folks, it’s an obsession — a strike-it-rich addiction like panning for gold. To others, not so much.

But anyone who has visited the Goodwill Outlet at 780 Berry Road in Nashville will agree: it’s a unique shopping experience. Consider Angie Mullins’ advice for folks who have never been there: “Go in with a thick skin, watch the videos about it on YouTube, wear comfy shoes and bring some water.” The St. Louis, Ohio, resident shops at the Outlet whenever she is in Hendersonville visiting her mother. “It helps to have a passion for this like I do — the passion for finding something great at a really affordable price,” she said.

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One of the things that differentiates the Outlet from Goodwill’s other stores is pricing. Clothes, accessories, shoes and home goods are all sold by the pound. Books and furniture are sold by the piece but also at deeply discounted rates. Shoppers fill their baskets and roll them onto a scale beside the cash register. Another difference is the merchandise. The Outlet is Goodwill’s “second chance” store for the donated, gently used items that do not to sell quickly in its 35 other retail stores or on its e-commerce site, onlinegoodwill.com. No question, there are treasures. In 2015, a young man purchased a wood and brass table at the Outlet for $10. The mid-century Harvey Probber piece, it turned out, had a retail value of more than $10,0000. That’s an extreme example, but all regular Outlet shoppers have a “big catch”


WAITING FOR THE GREEN LIGHT

TONY FISHER

CHUCK EVANS

Fisher used to run a “no-name” thrift

Evans is a reseller who drives to

shop on nearby Nolensville road, but

Nashville every few weeks just to peruse

when the Outlet opened on Berry

the Outlet. “This place is very unique as

Road in 2000, his customer base dried

far as how much good stuff you can find

up, and he eventually closed his store.

‘picking,’” he said. “If you are into that, this

He decided “If you can’t beat ’em, join

is the place for you."

’em” and has been shopping at the

FILA SNEAKERS $2.57

Outlet ever since.

story. Mullins says she found a Coach luxury handbag worth hundreds of dollars at the Outlet, and once, she thought she found a Louis Vuitton purse.

THREE TIPS FOR TREASURE HUNTING AT THE GOODWILL OUTLET •

Arrive early and plan to stay awhile: Experienced Outlet shoppers say the early bird often gets the worm when it comes to valuable finds. The real treasures, they add, are often on the bottom of the piles of merchandise, so come prepared to spend time sifting through the tables piled high with clothing, accessories, books and other goods.

Be patient and be ready for a different type of shopping experience: Regular Outlet customers say that spotting especially valuable items takes a keen eye that comes from practice and familiarity with the Outlet environment and procedures. For instance, tables full of merchandise are wheeled onto the sales floor throughout the day, but shoppers must stand behind a yellow line and are not allowed to begin going through those items until an employee gives the signal.

Make friends and have fun: Many Outlet regulars know each other by name and enjoy chatting as they look through the merchandise. One longtime shopper said, “It doesn’t take long to become a member of the Goodwill family here.” Most are more than happy to tell you what they know about treasure-hunting at the Outlet or boast about their all-time best finds.

“When I took it home it turned out to be a fake, but that was OK. It was really nice, and I was really excited about it,” she said with a laugh. Walk in the front door of the Outlet and row upon row of long, deep tables piled high with jumbled items greet the eye. As new tables full of merchandise are rolled onto the sales floor, customers huddle side-by-side behind yellow lines painted on the floor. When an Outlet employee gives the signal, they dive in like synchronized swimmers and start digging for bargains. Tony Fisher casually leaned against one of the tables on a recent Friday afternoon, looking over the Outlet like Mufasa surveying his pridelands in Disney’s “The Lion King.” He was (Continued on next page.)

“It helps to have a passion for this like I do — the passion for finding something great at a really affordable price.” – Angie Mullins, St. Louis, Mo.

As new tables full of merchandise are rolled onto the sales floor, customers lineup behind yellow lines painted on the floor. When an Outlet employee gives the signal, they dive in like synchronized swimmers and start digging for bargains.

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wearing a black Polo shirt that cost him pennies at the per-pound price. “Tony is like ‘Mr. Goodwill’ himself,” said Outlet Assistant Manager Tameka Robinson. “He knows everybody here, all the kids, everything.” Fisher used to run a “no-name” thrift shop on nearby Nolensville road, but when the Outlet opened on Berry Road in 2000, his customer base dried up, and he eventually closed his store. He decided “If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em” and has been shopping at the Outlet eight hours a day, six days a week for the last five years. Fisher now makes his living reselling the merchandise he buys at the Outlet on a variety of Internet sites and phone apps. He won’t say what he buys. “I don’t want people to know where I got it,” he said. “Loose lips sink ships.”

Fisher may be the best-known reseller at the Outlet, but he is far from alone. He said at any given time a majority of customers at the Outlet are involved in reselling.

“It’s like poker, and the most important thing about playing poker is patience,” he said. “Have a good idea what you are looking for and some knowledge. It’s a marathon.”

“It’s big business,” he said, noting that the store not only provides a source of inexpensive clothing and other necessities for families who couldn’t otherwise afford them, it also provides a means of support for resellers like himself and their families. And it returns revenue that helps funds Goodwill’s mission of changing lives through education, training and employment.

Nearby, Chuck Evans of Memphis was playing a few notes on a silver flute he discovered among the home goods. Evans is a reseller who drives to Nashville every few weeks just to peruse the Outlet.

“Goodwill does a lot of good,” Fisher said. Fisher sees plenty of first-time shoppers at the Outlet, too. His advice for them — be patient.

“It’s like poker, and the most important thing about playing poker is patience. Have a good idea what you are looking for and some knowledge. It’s a marathon.” — Tony Fisher, Nashville

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“This place is very unique as far as how much good stuff you can find ‘picking,’” he said. “If you are into that, this is the place for you. But most of the people that aren’t pickers don’t last long. I’ve got one daughter that picks and another who wouldn’t be caught dead here.” A few aisles over, Jalana Franklin of Loretta is trying to make room in her overflowing buggy for a few more items. Franklin keeps some of what she buys at the outlet, resells some and also donates some to her church which has a “store” where children can redeem “points” given for good behavior for toys and other goodies. “I come once or twice a month. It’s not quite a hobby, but it is therapy. When I find something good I’ve been wanting, it’s like 'aaaaah,'"she said, sighing contentedly.


"It’s big business,” Tony Franklin said, noting that the Outlet not only provides a source of inexpensive clothing and other necessities for families who couldn’t otherwise afford them, it also provides a means of support for resellers like himself and their families. And it returns revenue that helps funds Goodwill’s ANGIE MULLINS

JALANA FRANKLIN

from St. Louis, Mo., shops the Outlet whenever she is visiting her mother in Hendersonville.

from Loretto, tries to make room in her overflowing buggy for a few more items.

Franklin said she loves shopping the Outlet so much that she chose it as a way to celebrate her birthday on June 12. “I told my friend, ‘You can’t complain, you can’t say you’re hungry, you just have to stay with me the whole time.'” They shopped for eight hours straight. Even dedicated treasure-hunters like Franklin and Fisher can’t corner the market at the Outlet. “There’s so much out there,” Fisher said, looking over the dozens of tables of merchandise, “there is not one person who can ever know it all or get it all.”

mission of changing lives through education, training and employment.

OUTLET PRICING

COMPARISON SHOP

Clothing, textiles, accessories (hats, belts, etc.) & home goods: 79¢ per pound

Coat: $5.99 - Goodwill retail store $1.46 - The Outlet (75% off)

Shoes: $1.39 per pound

Shirt: $4.99 - Goodwill retail store 44¢ - The Outlet (91% off)

(the price drops to $1.09¢ per pound for purchases of 100 pounds or more).

Books: Paperback - 25¢ each Hardbound - 50¢ each Furniture & other large items Sold at the outlet at deeply discounted per-unit prices.

Jeans: $7.99 - Goodwill retail store $1.46 - The Outlet (81% off) Shoes (one pair): $7.99 - Goodwill retail store $3.41 - The Outlet (57% off)

HELPING YOUR COMMUNITY As always, when you shop at Goodwill, you help us change lives through the power of work. Last year, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee placed more than 15,000 people into jobs.

“I come once or twice a month. It’s not quite a hobby, but it is therapy. When I find something good I’ve been wanting, it’s like 'aaaaah.'" — Jalana Franklin, Loretta

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FALLEN SOLDIER'S STOLEN BELONGINGS RETURNED TO FAMILY By Nancy DeGennaro/The (Murfreesboro, Tenn.) Daily News Journal SMYRNA —

“I saw the person’s name pop up and I

that belonged to her.

Late Tuesday

didn’t know the person, but I thought

He said this lady had come into the store

night following

I’d read the message and see what it’s

and had this black velvet bag. He said, ‘I

Memorial Day,

about,” said Hawn, whose husband,

think it has some of your belongings in

Angie Hawn

Army Staff Sgt. Asbury “Freddie” Hawn,

it,’ ” Hawn recalled.

got a very

was killed by a roadside bomb while

strange instant

serving in Iraq in 2005.

message on

Hubanks said the woman who brought the bag in had ordered some items online

Facebook. But it was a message that

Shane Hubanks, a Murfreesboro resident

and the bag was included, although

would return some very precious items

and the manager at a Goodwill store in

nobody is sure how it got there. He said

to her that had been stolen years before.

Mt. Juliet, believed he had something

the woman was told Goodwill "takes care

“As I was looking at the driver's license, I thought, 'This name sounds familiar.' ... And I thought, 'Oh, wouldn't it be tragic if this person had passed away ... and somebody was looking for it.' " — Shane Hubanks, Mt. Juliet Goodwill Store Manager

Personal items of the late Sgt. Asbury Hawn, who was killed in Iraq in 2005, were returned to his family after they were stolen in a burglary. (Photo: HELEN COMER/DNJ)

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Angie Hawn holds the dog tags that belonged to her late husband, Sgt. Asbury Hawn, who was killed in Iraq in 2005. The tags were stolen and returned to a Goodwill store in Mt. Juliet, and ultimately, the family. (Photo: HELEN COMER/DNJ)


of this kind of stuff" and dropped it off

photo and sent it to her. Laid out beside

system and accessories. Much of what

at the Mt. Juliet store.

the velvet bag were numerous family

the burglars took had sentimental

photographs, tattered and worn from

value, she said.

"As I was looking at the driver's license,

years of being tucked away, as well as

I thought, 'This name sounds familiar.'

a set of dog tags and a driver’s license

“They’d taken a necklace that Freddie

... And I thought, 'Oh, wouldn't it be

with her husband’s name on them.

had sent to me from Iraq that was my Christmas present that year. It was very

tragic if this person had passed away ... and somebody was looking for it,' "

At that point, Hawn said she knew

elaborate and very unique. That was in

said Hubanks, who added that he kept

these were things that had been stolen

the velvet bag. And there were a couple

thinking "that name is familiar." So he

when her home was burglarized about

of watches he’d gotten over there,”

started researching the name on the

a year after her husband’s death. Hawn

Hawn said. “Losing the necklace was the

dog tags.

and her niece had gone to Gatlinburg

hardest part. It was irreplaceable.”

one weekend. When they returned, she "I Googled his name and when I did, it

found the back door, where there was a

The necklace and watches were not

started bringing up stories and how he

pet entrance, had been compromised.

returned. But Hawn said she’s glad the woman took the time to turn over the

died. I thought, 'I remember this story.'

bag to Goodwill.

So I started looking at the obituary and

“I had the security system on, but

found (Angie Hawn's) name," Hubanks

because I had pets, I couldn’t set the

said. At one point, Hubanks realized just

motion sensors on the inside. It was on

“I want to say thank you, because she

why the name was familiar.

the doors and windows,” Hawn said.

could have easily tossed it and not given it a second thought. That was a rough

"Every day I drive (state Route) 840 to

But the sensors weren’t on the doggy

time to know that stuff was stolen, but

work and a section is named for (Sgt.

door or side lights that were busted

there are still good people out there who

Hawn)," Hubanks said.

to enter the home. Items taken were

do care,” Hawn said.

Hawn was, of course, skeptical of the

all small enough to fit through the pet

message at first. But Hubanks snapped a

access, including the video gaming

"Given the situation, I was totally skeptical when (Goodwill Store Manager Shane Hubanks) first wrote me. But when he sent the picture of what he had, I was like, 'Oh my gosh!' He is a great guy, and I appreciate him taking the time to locate us and make After Angie Hawn's belongings were donated to Goodwill, Shane Hubanks, a Murfreesboro resident and the manager at the Mt. Juliet Goodwill store, did some research and contacted the family to have the dog tags and other items returned.

sure it got back to where it belonged.” — Angie Hawn

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DEALS DRAW DROVES OF SHOPPERS TO COLUMBIA STORE GRAND OPENING “If you are having a bad day, you can go into Goodwill and look around and you will feel better when you come out.” — Lucinda Rouse, Spring Hill

S

ometimes, at Goodwill, the treasures are hiding in plain sight.

Maury County Commissioner Eric Previti said that was the case on July 21, when he attended the Grand Opening of Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee’s newest store in Columbia. Gracing a table near the store’s entrance was a strikingly large aquamarine pitcher and matching bowl with lobster-shaped

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Ambassador FALL 2016

handles. At the table, numerous customers were registering for Grand Opening giveaways, and Previti assumed the two-foot tall pitcher was a door prize. But he asked a sales associate and was told the pitcher and bowl set was for sale. “I immediately snatched it up and purchased it,” he said. “I thought it was fantastic and knew my wife would love it.” Previti paid about $40 for the set and took it home, where he placed it on a picnic table in his backyard and took photos of it with his grandkids to show off its size. Later, he searched the Internet to see if he could learn anything about the pitcher and bowl. It didn’t take him long to find a


match. It popped up on the website of fine ceramics maker Fortunata Inc. The same pitcher and bowl could be purchased from the website for a shade under $1,000. “I called my wife and said, ‘Get that stuff inside before the kids knock it over,’” he explained. “I thought it was just going to be outside decor. Now, instead of sitting on a picnic table out back it’s sitting on the dining room table in my house.” Previti had plenty of company in searching for treasure at the grand opening of the store and Donation Express Center at 405 S. James Campbell Blvd. The new store replaced one on Trotwood Avenue that Goodwill occupied for a decade. Prior to an 8 a.m. ribbon-cutting ceremony, the line of shoppers stretched from the front doors almost to the roadway. Lucinda Rouse of Spring Hill and her mother, Barbara Wilson of Columbia, were near the front of the line. “It’s her fault I got here at 5:30 (a.m.),” Rouse laughed, pointing to her mom, “‘cause she said there would be a line and we wouldn’t be able to get in.” Rouse said her favorite things about Goodwill are the the relaxing music and the employees. “The folks that work at Goodwill always seem happy to be doing their jobs,” she said. “If you are having a bad day, you can go into Goodwill and look around and you will feel better when you come out.” During ribbon-cutting ceremonies hosted by the Maury County Chamber & Economic Alliance, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee President and CEO Matthew Bourlakas said he could not take credit for the facility.

TREASURE HUNTERS Diane Bodeker and her daughters Quickly filling a buggy with merchandise were Mt. Pleasant residents Diane Bodeker and her daughters, Michaela Bodeker, 12, and Grace Washington, 18. Among the items they were purchasing were a blue guitar for Michaela Bodeker and a vintage doll for her sister. “We were regulars at the Goodwill on Trotwood (Avenue). When we heard this store was opening up, we had to be here this morning,” Diane Bodeker said. “We love Goodwill. We always have.”

Christine Luckett No one would blame Christine Luckett of Columbia for resting in a chair near the center of the store during the Grand Opening frenzy. She’s got a bum knee, and she stood in line in the July morning sun for about an hour before the doors opened. Then she shopped a while, finding a pair of pants to purchase at a sale price that made her happy. “I fared just fine,” she said, “and I’m enjoying it.” Not bad for a 97-year-old. Not bad at all.

Rebecca Moore Moore, a 73-year-old Columbia resident, bought a buggy-full of items during the Grand Opening, but she didn’t know where she would put them. “My car is already packed with the stuff I got at Goodwill last week,” she said. Moore is active with the Maury County Senior Center and often shares the items she finds on daily shopping trips to Goodwill with other visitors to the center. Even when she goes on excursions and trips with the senior center, she can’t resist stopping at any Goodwill she sees. “Other people will be eating lunch, and I will be shopping,” she said.

Ambassador FALL 2016

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“This decision, this beautiful building was built because of all of you over there,” he said, talking to the people waiting in line, “and this city of Columbia, that has long believed in and supported Goodwill.” Inside the store, manager Becky Kelley, a native of Columbia and a Goodwill employee for 14 years, gave a pep talk to her staff before the crowd began streaming in. “I just want to say thank you so much for all the hard work each and every one of y’all have done. Today is going to be crazy, so just wing it,” she told the employees. “Customer service is job No. 1. Be sure to treat those customers like gold!” Within the first few hours of the opening, more than 500 shoppers had come through the doors. Among them were Jeff Holman of Mt. Pleasant, who was walking down a clothing aisle with Kezzia and Rue, the youngest of his 11 children. “We’re here to check out the new store and see what kind of bargains they have,” he said. “We shop at Goodwill to save money. To be able to afford a big family like ours, it’s very important to have a store like this.”

Holman said he also appreciates Goodwill’s mission of changing lives through education, training and employment. He said he typically rounds up to the next dollar on his purchases, donating the difference to Goodwill to support its mission. He also said he planned to recommend to one of his adult children who needs a job that she visit the new Goodwill Career Solutions center in Columbia, which opened on Sept. 15. The new center provides free job readiness and computer training, job fairs and other employment services for the public. Weather delays prevented the center from opening with the store, but Goodwill Career Solutions hosted an 18-employer job fair at the Maury County Library on Aug. 4. Since the store's grand opening, Previti — the lucky purchaser of the pitcher — scored yet another treasure during a return shopping trip. He bought a large Broyhill entertainment center of a type that retails for up to $3,000 for just $80. He said the secret of his success is weekly visits to Goodwill. “If you know what you’re looking for and have an eye for that stuff, you’d be surprised what turns up,” he said.

"We’re here to check out the new store and see what kind of bargains they have. We shop at Goodwill to save money. To be able to afford a big family like ours, it’s very important to have a store like this.” — Jeff Holman of Mt. Pleasant 18

Ambassador FALL 2016


ADVICE FROM EXPERTS

The Goodwill Career Solutions Center in Antioch recently hosted a Job Readiness event attended by female Goodwill clients and employees at which makeup artist Jennifer Whitus and stylist Elisabeth Donaldson demonstrated ways to make a good impression during a job interview. Here, they recap some of their advice.

JENNIFER WHITUS' TOP MAKEUP TIPS FOR JOB INTERVIEW SUCCESS

1 2

Less is always more

3 4

Invest in quality brushes

5

Invest in a good foundation. Eye shadows, blush and lipsticks can be less expensive

6

If you use a bold lip, go softer on the eyes, and vice-versa

7

If you are unsure about a product, do not use it. Stick to your products that are tried and true

8

The focus should not be on your makeup, but what you can bring to your new position

Stay away from trendy makeup: Stick to soft neutrals such as browns and taupes

Invest in skincare that is tailored to your skin type, i.e oily, dry, etc.

Getting ready for a job interview can be stressful: Deciding on what to wear, hair and makeup can be a daunting task. This is your time to make your potential new employer want to hire you, your abilities and education, and how you look can seal the deal. A new trend now is the no makeup look. A flawless complexion starts with a good skincare regimen and a quality foundation that matches your skin tone. I regularly see women wearing the wrong foundation color, with their neck and face two different colors. I always recommend one shade for the fall and winter, and one for the spring and summer. If you are unsure, go to a department store and have a beauty advisor test different shades to find your perfect shade, and ask for a sample. Your blush should be applied to the apples of your cheek. Define and fill your brows with the correct color, and add a soft lip color, neutral eye shadow, soft eyeliner and a couple of coats of mascara to complete your look. The goal is for you to feel comfortable and confident in the way you look.

Jennifer Whitus has been a freelance makeup artist in the television and film industry since 2008. Contact her via her website:

www.JenniferWhitusmakeupartist.webs.com. Ambassador FALL 2016

19


ELISABETH DONALDSON'S TOP STYLE TIPS FOR JOB INTERVIEW SUCCESS:

1

Simplicity is your friend. Don’t try too hard — you want the interviewer to see you, not your outfit. Remember, you are demonstrating your work ability, not putting on a fashion show.

2 Keep it classy and conservative. Watch hemlines and

necklines. If you wouldn’t wear it to church, you shouldn’t wear it on a job interview.

3 Watch for fit. Clothing that is too loose or is too tight

can be uncomfortable, and your attention should be on the interview, not your clothing. Ill-fitting clothing also makes you look like you don’t care about yourself or your appearance.

4 Stick to the classics. A job interview is not the time to be

5 Dress for your body type. People who own their shape

and size and dress to flatter their figure look put-together, confident and welcoming. You don’t have to look perfect to look amazing — just love yourself enough to put your best foot forward and show off the best parts of yourself.

6 Be well-groomed but avoid perfume. You don’t have to have an elaborate hairstyle — even a simple low ponytail will do as long as your hair is washed, brushed and smoothed. Smooth fly-aways with a small dab of hand lotion or grape oil. And even if you love your perfume, another might find it distasteful. Perfumes even make some people feel sick or nauseous. Don’t wear it to an interview!

7 Be yourself. Be a kind, polite and mannerly version

trendy. Pick classic styles and neutral colors that would look good in any decade.

ofyourself — but definitely yourself. This is your time to shine!

Elisabeth Donaldson is a freelance stylist, artist and actress. Check out her blog at:

www.365daysofthrift.co Follow Elisabeth on Instagram at:

instagram.com/britelightfire

20

Ambassador FALL 2016


GREAT INTERVIEW APPAREL TO LOOK FOR AT GOODWILL COLLARED SHIRTS AND BLOUSES You can find wonderful high-end blouses and collared shirts at Goodwill for just $4.49. Pair these with a sweater or blazer for a pulled-together look.

HIGH-WAISTED SKIRTS I love these because they are figure-flattering. You can find all sorts of styles at Goodwill for just $4.49.

DRESSES What a great way to keep things simple. There are many styles of professional dresses at Goodwill for just $5.99.

BLAZERS You can always find a great blazer in your size at Goodwill. This a simple way to look professional in a flash. Women's blazers are $5.99, and men's blazers are $7.99.

SWEATERS Great to pair with a blouse or slacks for just $5.99.

FLATS BELTS A perfect way to pull an outfit together for $1.99 and up.

Simple flats will keep you comfortable and professional-looking, priced from $4.99 to $9.99.

SLACKS Not all women like to wear a skirt, so slacks are a great choice. You can find many styles of men's and women's slacks at Goodwill for $5.99.

Ambassador FALL 2016

21


i

CHANGE LIVES

Tim Kahn

Construction Training Manager

Tim Kahn manages Goodwill’s Construction Training program — a six-week course providing clients with a solid foundation in the trade, including hands-on experience with blueprints and a wide variety of tools. Tim’s program is among Goodwill’s most successful, graduating 94 clients last year, 85 percent of whom landed jobs.

What brought you to Goodwill?

training. All of our challenges revolve

After 2008, I continued working

additional staff and build this program

as a self-employed contractor, but

to meet its potential. We currently

the industry dried up. I knew my

turn away an average of three

crowd. After getting caught stealing

experience would open a door

potential students each day.

a car, he was sent to a home for

somewhere, and I started teaching

Tim was born in Burbank, Calif., and adopted as an infant, never knowing his birth parents. By age 13 he had fallen in with a bad

around money! It would be nice to add

School. When I found the opportunity

What has surprised you most in your time with Goodwill?

where he turned his life around.

at Goodwill, I jumped. Goodwill has

The volume of people Goodwill

At 19 he attended Tennessee

been the best thing that has happened

helps! I was blown away when I first

to me in a long time.

toured the facilities in Nashville

delinquent boys in Calhoun, Tenn.,

Temple University, where he planned to study theology. Instead, he discovered a passion for construction and real estate and graduated with a bachelor’s

construction at Springfield High

and was introduced to the many

What are the duties of your position?

programs Goodwill offers. I have also

I teach about 10 students per class.

commitment of the folks working here.

As a master trainer for the National

This is not just a job for most people

Council for Construction Education

here — it’s a mission.

degree in business administration.

and Research, I am responsible for

He made an $18,000 profit on the

its requirements in certifying my

been surprised at the dedication and

students. My days are busy and long,

What do you enjoy most about your job?

but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Seeing my students succeed! There

Our program builds many of the things

is no better feeling than a phone call

career that made him wealthy — as

Goodwill needs, like bookshelves,

from a former student telling you how

a builder completing 60 homes per

staircases and tables.

their life has been changed. I have

year — before he lost everything in

and I am still friends with most of

the real estate market crash of 2008

What are some of the challenges you face?

and had to rebuild his life.

I would love to grow our program into

I helped them. It’s awesome to have a

a complete training center also offering

job doing what you love!

welding, plumbing and automotive

(Continued on next page.)

first home he bought, repaired and sold in Nashville. It launched a

22

Ambassador FALL 2016

trained well over 200 students here, them. They have helped me more than


Why is your job important to Goodwill’s mission? This is not just a job to me. Someone cared enough about me when I was 13 years old to teach me a better way. They poured their wisdom into me and changed my entire view on life. No student will ever leave my class thinking I do this just for the

Board of Directors

money. If I truly care, they will know Goodwill cares, too.

How do you change lives? I believe people only change their lives when they decide it’s time. What I do is offer my students alternatives. I teach a message of hope — a pathway of hard work and an uphill climb. Most importantly, today is a new start. Yesterday means nothing unless you let it hinder you.

OFFICERS

Vice Chairperson: Julie F. Wilson

Legal Counsel: Christopher S. Dunn, Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP

Secretary: Chad M. Grout

Goodwill President and CEO: Matthew S. Bourlakas

Chairperson: Fred McLaughlin

Treasurer: Dave M. Fentress

New Sales Line-up

Goodwill VP of Finance Mary La Haie

DIRECTORS

STARTING OCTOBER 3RD, 2016

50% OFF

COLOR OF THE WEEK ITEMS

10% OFF

FOR TEACHERS, STUDENTS, MILITARY AND SENIORS WITH VALID ID

20% OFF WEDNESDAYS

FOR ALL SENIORS 60 AND OLDER ON ALL REGULAR PRICED ITEMS

99¢ SUNDAYS

ON SELECT CLOTHING

Woodretta Allen

Fred T. McLaughlin

J.B. Baker

Robert McNeilly, III

Bryan Bean

Ilex Pounders **

Steele Clayton

Christine E. Skold

Andrew Davidson

Todd A. Spaanstra

Christopher S. Dunn

John W. Stone, III

Robert Duthie

John C. Tishler

Dave M. Fentress

John Van Mol

James B Foley

Julie F. Wilson

Kathryn S. Gibson

Jeff Young

Chad M. Grout, CCIM

Donna B. Yurdin

Robert B. Kennedy

** Intern

Ryan R. Loyd

TRUSTEES 50% OFF CLOTHING FIRST SATURDAY OF THE MONTH

Chairperson: Robert W. Duthie Kathryn Thompson Robert McNeilly, III

Please Take Note, Changes Have Occurred Since Our Previous Schedule STORE HOURS: Mon-Fri 9am-7pm • Sat 8am-8pm • Sun 12pm-6pm

Our mission is changing lives.

Ambassador FALL 2016

23


OUR MISSION Changing lives through education, training and employment

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