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TOGETHER, WE ARE CHANGING LIVES GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE

2015 COMMUNITY IMPACT REPORT

Changing lives through education, training and employment.


IMPACT REPORT 2

How You Changed Lives In 2015

3

Giving Strength To Tens of Thousands

4

Mission Helps People From All Walks of Life

6

Organization’s Benefits Ripple Through Local Economy

8

Goodwill’s 2015 Mission Services by the Numbers

10

Improving Communities Through Multifaceted Approach

12

Goodwill’s Aggressive Environmental Efforts Pay Off

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Support Goodwill in 2016: Get Involved

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Goodwill’s 2015 Financial Summary

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Goodwill’s Board Of Directors and 2015 Leadership Team

ONLINE

2

VIDEO

Look for these symbols throughout our Community Impact Report for more in-depth information

2015 Community Impact Report | Table of Contents

GOODWILL DONORS & SHOPPERS:

HOW YOU CHANGED LIVES IN 2015 YOU DONATED

Setting in motion the mechanism that makes it possible for Goodwill to give tens of thousands of people a hand up through the power of work.

2,000+ PEOPLE WERE EMPLOYED

15,412 PEOPLE GOT HIRED

at Goodwill, including more than 1,800 people with disabilities and other barriers to employment, to help run and operate our 36 stores, 70+ donations sites and 28 Career Solutions centers throughout middle & west Tennessee.

Goodwill Career Solutions worked with more than 3,000 employer partners and placed job-seekers into a diverse range of positions and companies throughout middle & west Tennessee.

 Goodwill

MATERIALS GOT RECYCLED Gently-used items given to Goodwill were sold for reuse in our retail stores. Damaged or unusable goods were salvaged or recycled, benefiting our environment and people in developing nations.

YOU SHOPPED IN OUR STORES

WHAT’S IN THIS YEAR’S:

Proceeds from donated items sold in our stores and on onlinegoodwill.org helped support our Career Solutions Centers which provided people in need of work with job training and placement services.


GOODWILL AND ITS JOB CREATORS:

GIVING STRENGTH TO TENS OF THOUSANDS W

hen Theresa, an assistant production

greener by diverting more than 27 million pounds

supervisor for Goodwill in downtown

of material that might have otherwise ended up in

Nashville, learned that she had

county landfills.

cancer, she set a personal goal. She

wanted to miss as little work as possible while

This Community Impact Report details what Goodwill

undergoing chemotherapy.

did in 2015 and how it went about achieving remarkable results. But no report can fully capture

Why, you may ask, would anyone be so focused on

the why. The why is Theresa, who we are happy to

work at a time like that? Because being at Goodwill,

say is feeling well and inspiring her co-workers daily

Theresa says, gives her strength.

through her amazing example. The why is Kamel, who traveled a rocky road from Egypt to America in search

Theresa’s explanation is simple, yet profound. Since

of a new life and finally found a home with Goodwill

1957, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee has

in Nashville. And the why is Tonia, who once needed

been giving people the opportunity to improve their

Goodwill’s help after being laid off but now works as

lives through the power of work. Goodwill is about

a Human Resources manager in Camden, hiring other

giving people a hand up rather than a handout.

Goodwill Career Solutions clients.

Put another way, Goodwill is about making people stronger.

Personally witnessing these stories of transformation as they unfold — the struggle, the tears, the joy of

These days, the impact of Goodwill extends far

finally landing that job — is one of the great privileges

beyond our 2,100 employees. In 2015, individuals

of working for Goodwill. Although that experience

and communities benefited as we assisted more than

can never fully be captured by a story, photo or video,

36,000 people with training and employment and

it’s important that we try to share it because of you.

placed more than 15,400 people into jobs. Nine out of 10 of those placed went to work for one of our 3,000-

You are the job creator. You — the Goodwill donor, you

plus employer partners.

— the Goodwill shopper, you — the Goodwill fan, you are the one who makes all of this possible. We want

Those job placements and operations had a

you to know how much your support means, because

tremendous ripple effect on the economy in middle

you give us strength.

and west Tennessee, generating $476 million in business revenues. And Goodwill made the state

Matthew Bourlakas

Fred T. McLaughlin

President & CEO

Chairman of the Board

Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

Senior Vice President Robert W. Baird & Co., Inc.

2015 Community Impact Report | Letter From The CEO

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FACES OF GOODWILL: IMPACT ON INDIVIDUALS

MISSION HELPS PEOPLE FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE

A

n Egyptian-born former seafood inspector making a new life for his family in America. A Nashville native determined to beat both the street life and cancer. And a laid-off human resources worker who now gives second chances to others. These are just a few of the faces of Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee. They are among the tens of thousands whose lives have been changed by the not-for-profit’s mission of providing education, training and employment.

WAYFARER FINDS A HOME Kamel’s journey began in late 1980s when he

venture failed because of a price war, draining

was working as a seafood inspector in Egypt.

his savings.

The middle-aged family man had a degree in agriculture and loved his job. But when he was

At 63, Kamel once again had to make another

replaced without explanation, Kamel sought a

new start. He visited a Goodwill Career Solutions

new start overseas.

center in downtown Nashville and completed a basic computer class.

He arrived in New Jersey in 1990, alone and

KAMEL 4

struggling to understand the American English

In June of 2006 he was offered a job in Goodwill’s

accent. He nonetheless landed a job in a bakery,

salvage department, sorting books and other

and after eight years of hard work was able to

donated items. His supervisor says he is an

bring his wife and children to live with him.

outstanding worker.

In 2000, the family moved to Nashville, and

Thanks to a decade of steady employment at

Kamel took a job at a bakery. Four years later, he

Goodwill, Kamel has been able to provide for his

became a U.S. citizen. About the same time, he

family, pay for a house and even put his children

purchased a gas station. But the new business

through college. “I love Goodwill,” he said.

2015 Community Impact Report | Individual Impact


NINETY DAYS TO A NEW LIFE When Theresa took her last drink in January

Slowly, she paid off her debts, got her own place

of 2013, she set a goal: remain sober for at least

to live and began helping her grown children.

90 days. Her success emboldened her to take another step

maintaining a positive attitude, no matter

— trying to find a job. She went to the Goodwill

what challenges she faced. In January 2014,

Career Solutions in downtown Nashville. After

Theresa was promoted to assistant production

working with a job coach, Theresa was offered

supervisor over grading.

a position as a part-time associate in Goodwill’s garment grading department.

Three months later, she was diagnosed with cancer. But Theresa has learned how to beat

Theresa had been out of the workforce for

the odds. She gave herself a new goal: complete

four or five years, and she was still living

surgery and chemotherapy in 90 days while

in a neighborhood where there were many

missing as little work as possible. Her co-workers

temptations to backslide on her sobriety.

said her resolve and her attitude are amazing.

So she gave herself another 90-day goal of

THERESA

At Goodwill, she gained a reputation for

keeping her position and succeeded.

“I have so much support here at work; that has helped me a lot. Being at Goodwill gives me strength," she said.

“Even when Theresa lost her hair, she stayed positive. She pulled her hat off and said, ‘Look at my hair! Sometimes when I am feeling down I look at Theresa and try to be more like her — upbeat all the time, even when things are bad.” — Dollie Lillard, Goodwill Production Supervisor

SHINING LIGHT OF EXPERIENCE As the human resources manager for Jones

job-readiness, computer use, resume-building and

Plastic and Engineering LLC in Camden, Tonia

more. Soon, Jones Plastic and Engineering offered

relies on her instincts and compassion while

her a job as their human resources manager.

hiring dozens of Goodwill clients, often giving second chances to people who might not get

Tonia now has a job she loves, and she and

them from other employers. In doing so, she has

her children have moved into a new home in

reduced the company’s turnover and its need for

Paris. Under her guidance, Jones Plastic hires

temporary labor.

directly through Goodwill and partners with the organization for regular job fairs.

The secret to Tonia’s success is firsthand experience. In early 2014, things were not going

Tonia says she interviews lots of people with

well for the single mother of two. The company

barriers to employment, including single moms

where she had worked in human resources had

who don’t know where their family’s next meal is

relocated to Massachusetts, leaving her jobless

coming from.

and struggling to make ends meet. “Because Goodwill helped me, I’m able to pay it

TONIA

She visited the Goodwill Career Solutions Center

forward and help others,” she said.

in Union City. From Goodwill, she got training in

“Even in that small town (Camden), Tonia’s making a huge impact. She went from being unsure of herself and not really knowing which direction to go, to turning that completely around and hiring people who need help. It’s really amazing.” — Sandra Hickey, Career Solutions District Manager 2015 Community Impact Report | Individual Impact

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THE GOODWILL EFFECT: IMPACT ON THE ECONOMY

ORGANIZATION’S BENEFITS RIPPLE THROUGH LOCAL ECONOMY The local Goodwill provides free training and employment opportunities for people struggling to find and keep jobs for a wide variety of reasons, such as disabilities, criminal records or lack of computer skills, and to others simply wanting to advance their careers. This mission is funded through the sale of donated goods in Goodwill’s retail stores. In 2015, the agency helped 15,412 people find jobs. The vast majority went to work with other

G

employers in Middle and West Tennessee. The oodwill shoppers expect bargains. To

and Goodwill Career Solutions was a real eye-

prior year, 9,558 were placed into jobs. The effect

them, purchasing an item worth three

opener for us,” said Dr. Murat Arik, director of

of those 2014 job placements — including salaries

times what they paid for it would

Middle Tennessee State University’s Business and

earned by formerly unemployed people, the

be no surprise. But many are probably unaware

Economic Research Center, But Arik, who authored

impact of their spending and resulting sales taxes

that by supporting Goodwill Industries of Middle

the study, hastened to add that Goodwill’s actual

collected by the state — were included in MTSU’s

Tennessee, they — along with Goodwill’s donors

impact on the regional economy is probably even

calculations, along with Goodwill’s direct hires

— are part of a virtuous cycle that pays a threefold

more substantial.

and salaries.

“We only scratched the surface,” he said, noting that

Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee

A 2015 university assessment of the local Goodwill

the assessment did not measure Goodwill’s role in

President and CEO Matthew Bourlakas said the

found that for every dollar the organization spends,

moving people off welfare, reducing recidivism or

study validates what Goodwill leadership has

$3.30 in benefits is created in the 48 counties it serves.

improving the environment.

long suspected about the organization’s impact

economic dividend to their community.

It also found that Goodwill accounts for $476 million in annual business revenue.

on the economy. Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee is a 59-year-old organization serving half of

“Goodwill is much more than a non-profit and

“Our research efforts clearly show that Goodwill

Tennessee’s counties in a territory stretching

social enterprise. It’s an economic engine that

Industries of Middle Tennessee is an important

from Cookeville to Union City. It is one of five

propels businesses and communities forward

player in the regional economy. A half-billion

independently operated Goodwills in the state.

while giving a hand up, rather than a handout, to

dollar economic impact through its operations

those individuals who need it most,” he said.

“Our research efforts clearly show that Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee is an important player in the regional economy. A half-billion dollar economic impact through its operations and Goodwill Career Solutions was a real eye-opener for us.” — Dr. Murat Arik, director of MTSU’s Business and Economic Research Center 6

2015 Community Impact Report | Economic Impact


GOODWILL'S ECONOMIC IMPACT BY THE NUMBERS

Annual wages and salaries associated

13,400

responsible for across its territory,

including external job placements

Total number of jobs Goodwill is

and its own employees.

$277

MILLION

with Goodwill’s jobs and external job placements. Goodwill spends about $77 million annually, meaning each dollar spent brings $3.30 in benefits to the regional economy.

MILLION

property tax and other taxes and

$21

Total amount of sales tax,

$188

MILLION

fees Goodwill generated for state and local governments.

Annual Impact of yearly spending on goods, services and property by those Goodwill placed into jobs

$476 million 11%

percentage of employment impact Goodwill accounts for in Nashville’s non-profit sector

Total annual business revenue created or stimulated by Goodwill.

– generating –

5%

business revenue impact in that same sector

NOTE: All figures based on 2014 data as reported in Middle Tennessee State University's 2015 Economic Assessment of Goodwill

“Goodwill is much more than a non-profit and social enterprise. It’s an economic engine that propels businesses and communities forward while giving a hand up, rather than a handout, to those individuals who need it most.” — Matthew Bourlakas, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee President and CEO 2015 Community Impact Report | Economic Impact

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2015 MISSION SERVICES TOTAL NUMBER OF PEOPLE GOODWILL HELPED

TOTAL NUMBER OF PEOPLE PLACED INTO COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT

36,081

15,412

7,802

28,279

BASIC SERVICES & SKILLS TRAINING

JOB PLACEMENT SERVICES

14,205

1,207

PLACED INTO JOBS OUTSIDE GOODWILL

PLACED INTO JOBS WITH GOODWILL

HOW WE HELPED

80,942

Sessions of Intensive Job Placement Services

33,391

Sessions of Job Readiness/Soft-Skill

?

19,312

Days Paid On-the-Job Training within Goodwill

145

Financial Education Class Sessions

30,440

Intake/Eligibility of an individual

A

10,202

Occupational Skills Training Sessions

45

SSI/SSDI (Referrals or Enrollments)

26,335

Occurrences of Job Fair Services

23,373

Occurrences of Job Retention Services

??

2,446

Incidents of Work Assessment Evaluation for an Individual

23

Day Camp Sessions (Summer Youth Program)

330

Volunteer Hours of Service

675

Free or Low-Cost Tax Preparation

1,243

Other Services

NOTE: The services reported above and the disabilities and barriers to employment reported on the next page may be duplicated counts. An individual may be counted as receiving more than one service or report multiple disabilities and barriers to employment. 8

2015 Community Impact Report | Mission Services


WHO WE HELPED WORK

30,729

5,301

Unemployed/ Dislocated Worker

2,456

Person with a Criminal Background

2,433

Lack of GED/High School Equivalency

1,412

Homeless

Welfare Recipient

4=o A%+x

1,148

897

Psychiatric and/or Emotional Disability

629

Older Worker

Working Poor/Incumbent Worker/Underemployed

457

408

Learning Disability other than Autism

Neurological Disability

ayuda

??

328

309

At-Risk Youth

256

Lack of/Low Literacy

Non-English Speaking/ English as Second Language

203

Developmental Disability other than Autism

145

Blindness or Other Visual Impairment

??? 125

91

Deafness or Other Hearing Impairment

79

Autism

2,219

History of Substance Abuse

1,402

Other Disabling Condition

Other Disadvantages

? 17,857 18,176 Males

Females

48

Unreported

95

44

0-11

12-15

8,332 16-24

9,261 25-34

6,687 35-44

6,076 45-54

5,444 55+

White 18,039 | Black or African-American 14,995 | Other (includes multi-racial) 1,780 | Unknown or Unreported Race Asian or Pacific Islander 291

|

American Indian, Eskimo or Aleut (Native American), First Nation 134

142

Unreported

842

2015 Community Impact Report | Mission Services 9


YOUR GOOD(WILL) NEIGHBOR NEXT DOOR: IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITIES

B

IMPROVING COMMUNITIES THROUGH MULTIFACETED APPROACH

eing a good neighbor is in Goodwill’s DNA. The organization was

“I’ve seen what Goodwill can do for families that are homeless. It shows there

founded by a minister who was moved to action by the plight of the

are organizations who really understand deeply what people need,” said Gelila

poor and downtrodden in his own community.

Feyisa, a case manager for Catholic Charities of Middle Tennessee.

More than a century later, Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee remains

Catholic Charities’ Family Empowerment Program helps homeless families

true to that spirit, beginning with its primary mission of providing free

find a place to live, and Goodwill gift cards help them furnish their new homes.

job training, education and employment assistance. Across the 48 counties

Goodwill Cares aids disaster victims through the American Red Cross and

Goodwill serves, 36,081 people took advantage of these services in 2015, of

disabled and homeless veterans by partnering with Operation Stand Down

which 15,412 were placed into jobs.

Tennessee.

But Goodwill also engages in an array of partnerships and initiatives to improve

“We strive to be a resource and friend in all ways that further our mission,”

lives in communities across middle and west Tennessee.

said Karl Houston, Goodwill’s Senior Director of Marketing and Community Relations. “Our organization is only as strong as the communities we serve, and

One such effort is Goodwill Cares, which annually provides gift cards worth

we consider it a daily privilege to extend a hand up, rather than a handout,

tens of thousands of dollars to dozens of partner nonprofits for distribution to

across middle and west Tennessee.”

needy families and individuals.

“We strive to be a resource and friend in all ways that further our mission. Our organization is only as strong as the communities we serve, and we consider it a daily privilege to extend a hand up, rather than a handout, across middle and west Tennessee.” — Karl Houston, Goodwill’s Senior Director of Marketing and Community Relations 10 2015 Community Impact Report | Community Impact


OTHER WAYS GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF MIDDLE TENNESSEE HELPS SUPPORTING PARTNERS, EVENTS AND CAUSES Goodwill frequently donates merchandise for use in worthy community events and causes. Recent examples include clothing provided for a Dress for Success Fashion Show held by the League of Servant Leaders at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, books given for a new Boys & Girls Club Library in Pulaski and school uniforms provided to underprivileged children in several school districts. Goodwill also donates medical equipment, such as wheelchairs, hospital beds and crutches, to nonprofit partners who distribute it to people with disabilities who are in need. Goodwill donated 29 bulk boxes of medical equipment and eight hospital beds in 2015.

PROVIDING MEETING SPACES

HELPING WITH LEGAL ISSUES

Goodwill routinely provides meeting space to civic,

Goodwill facilitates meetings with county

school and church groups and government agencies

court officials and provides other assistance

whose goals align with Goodwill’s mission. Goodwill

to help eligible employees and Goodwill

recently partnered with Cable-Nashville to host a

Career Solutions clients learn how to expunge

speaker series on issues affecting working women.

a criminal record or get a driver’s licenses reinstated.

PARTNER AGENCY ASSISTANCE

PARENT PROGRAMS

Goodwill works collaboratively with other agencies

Goodwill provides a non-custodial parent

helping youth, older workers, the homeless, people

program to assist such parents in becoming

with disabilities and ex-offenders.

employed and engaged with their children.

YOUTH & YOUNG ADULT PROGRAMS Goodwill conducts several programs for youth and young adults, including:

SUMMER INTEGRATION PROGRAM

SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAM

Children ages 6-15 who have been diagnosed with

Boys and girls ages 14-18 are prepared for employment through

autism learn to socialize with other children who may

numerous engaging and educational activities, such as guest speakers;

or may not have a disability under adult supervision at

CPR certification classes; a grocery shopping trip and cooking lesson;

community day camp programs.

volunteering at other nonprofits; and touring universities, a fire station and a museum.

YOUTH BUILDING GOODWILL

SUMMER YOUTH JOB READINESS PROGRAM

A year-round program that provides educational,

Young adults ages 16-22 are paid to train at Goodwill or Kroger while

vocational and financial training to 17- to 25-year-

learning about the responsibilities of having a permanent job, safety

olds who are out of school and unemployed.

standards and the rewards of earning a paycheck.

GOOD LIFE PROGRAM Goodwill offers a Good Life Program that assists employees and clients who need access or help with community resources, such as housing, utility assistance and education.

2015 Community Impact Report | Community Impact 11


WALKING THE WALK: IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT

GOODWILL’S AGGRESSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFORTS PAY OFF

SINGLE SHOE DONATIONS A single shoe donated to Goodwill is matched closely with other shoes and sold in bulk to buyers in developing countries.

N

ancy Zion knows the environmental and economic cost of what Tennesseans throw away. Zion, who

is Williamson County’s solid waste director,

A thriving home pickup

oversees an aggressive recycling program for

program and donation drives

tin, aluminum, cardboard and other discarded

helped raise total donations to

materials. Nonetheless, her department carries about 30,000 tons of garbage per year (60 million

Goodwill in 2015 to more than

pounds) — at a cost of $30 per ton — to the West

37,500 tons — enough to fill

Camden Sanitary Landfill in Benton County.

Nissan stadium.

Fortunately, Williamson County has another landfill- and money-saving tool in its toolkit:

served by the local Goodwill. A thriving

Most donated items are sold in Goodwill’s 36

Goodwill. At six of the county’s solid waste

home pickup program and donation drives helped

stores, allowing them to find new life with

convenience centers, Goodwill Donation Express

raise total donations to Goodwill in 2015 to more

new owners, rather than being discarded. But

Centers collect clothing, household goods,

than 37,500 tons (75 million pounds) — enough to

Goodwill works hard to squeeze the maximum

furniture and more. These donations amount to

fill the Tennessee Titans’ stadium.

value out of all donated items — even those that

about 2,050 tons (4.1 million pounds) per year. “It (partnership with Goodwill) benefits citizens

can’t be sold in stores.

“It’s astounding,” Zion said. “Most of that would

greatly,” said Cindy Lynch, director of solid

Salvage materials are sold or recycled so they, too,

be going to a landfill if not for organizations

waste in Wilson County, where Goodwill has

can contribute to Goodwill’s mission of providing

like Goodwill.”

four donation sites at convenience centers. “It

job training and employment opportunities for

keeps things out of the landfill, and it saves the

people struggling to find work. These efforts raise

taxpayers money.”

millions of dollars annually.

Similar results are achieved at more than 70 other Donation Express Centers across the 48 counties

12 2015 Community Impact Report | Environmental Impact


“The need is great. There is a humongous market for second-hand clothing and shoes in low-income countries, because a lot of people can’t afford to buy new stuff.” — Makku Ilyas, president of Duluth, Ga.-based Infinite Rags.

“Our most important take-away is that we’ve been

Last year Goodwill sold 14.5 million pounds of

Where Goodwill’s environmental footprint cannot

good stewards of the environment and created jobs,”

salvaged clothing that was shipped to developing

be found is also important. China, for instance, is

said Mary Stockett, Goodwill’s director of continuous

nations, mostly in tropical areas. The biggest market

known as a dumping ground for e-waste, where

improvement and post market development.

is East Africa — nations such as Burundi, Kenya

primitive recycling contaminates the countryside

and Uganda.

and threatens residents’ health.

Low-cost, salvage products from the U.S. help people

But unsold home and office appliances and

Goodwill’s impact on the environment stretches far beyond its territory in Tennessee.

who might otherwise go without or have to buy

electronics from Goodwill do not end up in such

Each day, thousands of partnerless shoes are

inferior quality items, said Skip Wilson, co-owner of

places, said Jeremy Olson, director of business

donated to Goodwill. These shoes are sold to Makku

Atlanta, Ga.-based Wilson Marketing Group, which

development for Dynamic Recycling in Nashville.

Ilyas, president of Duluth, Ga.-based Infinite Rags.

represents Goodwill and other nonprofits in salvage

The La Crosse, Wis.-based firm annually recycles

His company buys partnerless shoes from Goodwill

sales. The clothing also provides jobs for people in

plastics, metals and leaded glass from more than 1.2

in shipments weighing 20,000-25,000 pounds every

many countries, allowing them to make a living and

million pounds worth of non-functioning Goodwill

two weeks. Infinite Rags sorts the shoes and works

support their families.

items, such as laptops, microwaves, handheld drill

to match them closely with other shoes. Those that

batteries and Christmas lights, returning revenue for

can’t be paired are recycled. Ilyas then sells paired

“The landfill would be the last stop, but instead, we

shoes in bulk to buyers in developing countries

are able to send it on ... to Africa where somebody

— generally Pakistan and occasionally the United

has a store or a business selling this clothing at prices

Dynamic Recycling has a “no-electronic material

Arab Emirates. Ultimately, vendors sell them from

folks can handle,” he said.

landfill policy” and ensures that its recycling is

carts and shops to villagers who might otherwise

conducted only in the U.S. or countries with similar Goodwill also recycles millions of pounds of

go without.

Goodwill’s mission.

environmental regulations.

cardboard and paper pulp every year — enough to “The need is great,” Ilyas said. “There is a humongous

save about 44,000 trees. And it employs sustainable

“Goodwill is making a significant impact on our

market for second-hand clothing and shoes in low-

business practices at its many operating locations,

environment by diverting those electronics

income countries, because a lot of people can’t afford

such as recycling light bulbs, recovering air

from landfills and supporting environmental

to buy new stuff.”

conditioning refrigerants and using donated tools,

sustainability,” Olson said.

plumbing and electrical supplies.

ONE EXAMPLE OF HOW CLOTHING SALVAGED BY GOODWILL HELPS THE PLANET AND THOSE IN NEED Last year Goodwill sold 14.5 million pounds of salvaged clothing that was shipped to developing nations

Wages are paid to the person

Rather than send clothing to

The importer resells the

Goodwill that is XL or larger

a landfill, Goodwill recycles

shirt to a wholesaler. The

who trims the shirt, the

wholesale prices

is considered a negative for

unusable clothing by selling

sides and the bottom are

person who tailors the shirt

to regional village vendors

An unusable shirt donated to

The new shirt is resold at

resale because people in

it to importers for cents per

trimmed to make it smaller.

and a third person who

for dollars per shirt. Recycled

impoverished nations won’t

shirt and creates jobs here in

The shirt is then re-sewn

washes and irons the shirt.

clothing creates jobs and

fit into larger clothing.

Tennessee with the proceeds

and hemmed. A collar

helps people in low-income

through Goodwill’s mission.

is taken from a smaller

countries make a living and

damaged shirt and sewn on.

support their families.

Two shirts become one. 2015 Community Impact Report | Environmental Impact 13


SUPPORT GOODWILL IN 2016:

GET INVOLVED!

Goodwill sells donated goods to support its mission of changing lives through education, training and employment, but becoming a donor or shopper are not the only ways to show your support for Goodwill.

BOOK A GOODWILL TOUR - giveit2goodwill.org/tours Every month, we offer free, guided tours of our operation. Dubbed, “Inside Goodwill,” these tours offer an eye-opening view into the remarkable world of this nearly 60-year-old not-for-profit and its mission. During the tour, you will learn how your donations of gently used clothing and household goods are transformed into education, training and employment for tens of thousands of Tennesseans each year. You will see items being processed in our warehouses for delivery to our retail stores and how Goodwill’s mission services are delivered. You will hear the personal testimonials of employees who have overcome hardships and challenges and found success through Goodwill.

BECOME AN EMPLOYER PARTNER

BECOME A RECURRING DONOR

giveit2goodwill.org/partnerships

info@givegw.org

Let Goodwill help staff your business! Through

Individual giving donors provide additional

programs and services provided by our 28 Career

support that assists Goodwill in running its

Solution Centers in 2015, we assisted 36,081 people with

Career Solutions centers and retail stores.

career services and helped 15,412 job-seekers find work

Consider making a recurring donation on a

with more than 3,000 business partners.

weekly, monthly or yearly basis.

HOST A CORPORATE DONATION DRIVE OR FUNDRAISING DRIVE

PARTICIPATE IN AmazonSmile

giveit2goodwill.org/drives

AmazonSmile is a website operated by Amazon

Corporations, schools, booster clubs and churches can

that lets customers enjoy the same wide selection

partner with Goodwill to host donation drives. Corporate

of products at low prices as on Amazon.com.

drives engage employees and generate positive

The difference is that when customers shop on

interaction with current and potential customers while

AmazonSmile, the AmazonSmile Foundation

benefiting Goodwill’s mission. Fundraising drives are an

will donate .5 percent of the price of eligible

easy and convenient way for nonprofit groups to raise

purchases to the charitable organizations

funds. The more goods donated, the more money you

selected by customers. Select Goodwill Industries

can raise and the more people Goodwill can help.

of Middle TN, at smile.amazon.com.

SPONSOR AN EVENT

JOIN OUR E-NEWSLETTER

giveit2goodwill.org/events

giveit2goodwill.org

Goodwill hosts several events yearly providing an

Goodwill Good News is a monthly e-newsletter

opportunity for corporate sponsorships. Sponsors are

aimed at informing and engaging the community

prominently featured before, during and after special

with valuable information about Goodwill.

smile.amazon.com

events in press releases, social media, email campaigns, etc.

GET SOCIAL WITH US - @giveit2goodwill Follow Goodwill on social media for updates on weekly job fairs, donation drives and special events. Your “likes,” “comments” and “shares” help spread the word about Goodwill’s mission of changing lives through education, training and employment.

14 2015 Community Impact Report | How To Help


GOODWILL’S 2015

FINANCIAL SUMMARY Goodwill

THE COMMUNITY GAVE TO GOODWILL (REVENUES)

Sales of goods contributed by the community

77,241,751

Fees & grants for professional rehabilitation services 405,922 United Way support and other contributions

42,395

Investment income 184,183 Market value increase (decrease) of investments

Get connected with the talent you need

-212,624

Other 943,710

78,605,337

Our team specializes in connecting middle and west Tennessee businesses with the

talent they need by working directly with HR

Goodwill

departments or staffing agencies. We place thousands of Tennesseans into jobs each year.

GOODWILL GAVE BACK TO THE COMMUNITY (EXPENSES)

WE’RE FLEXIBLE, FOCUSED AND FREE LET US HELP YOUR COMPANY GROW

28

Career Solutions Centers in Middle and West Tennessee Call us at 1.800.545.9231

www.goodwillcareersolutions.org

Sales Program

62,149,611

Career Solutions (Mission Services)

8,794,783

General and Administrative

7,241,856

Fundraising 1,104,158

79,290,408

2015 Community Impact Report | Financials 15


2015 GOODWILL BOARD OF DIRECTORS & LEADERSHIP TEAM OFFICERS Chairperson Fred T. McLaughlin Sr. Vice President Investments Robert W. Baird & Co., Inc. Vice Chairman Julie F. Wilson Sr. Vice President Healthcare Realty Trust

Secretary Chad M. Grout Principal Broker Urban Grout Commercial Real Estate Treasurer Dave M. Fentress Vice President, Internal Audit Dollar General Corporation

Legal Counsel Christopher S. Dunn and Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP Attorneys

Matthew S. Bourlakas President and CEO Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

Mary La Haie Vice President of Finance Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

Former Chairperson Donna B. Yurdin President Credo Management Consulting

Betty J. Johnson VP & Chief People Officer Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

David Jenkins Vice President of Retail Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc.

DIRECTORS Woodretta Allen Cost Containment Manager United Parcel Service J.B. Baker CEO Sprint Logistics, LLC Bryan Bean Senior Vice President Pinnacle Financial Partners Steele Clayton Partner Bass Berry & Sims, PLC Andrew Davidson Account Executive Frank E. Neal & Co., Inc. Christopher S. Dunn Attorney Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP

John W. Stone, III Partner White & Reasor, PLC

Robert Duthie Founder Duthie Associates, Inc., dba Duthie Learnin

Ryan R. Loyd Vice President, Deputy Chief Accounting Officer Cigna - Health Spring

Dave M. Fentress Vice President, Internal Audit Dollar General Corporation, Inc.

Fred T. McLaughlin Senior Vice President, Investments Robert W. Baird & Co., Inc.

James B. Foley, CCIM Vice President CBRE, Inc. / Brokerage

Robert McNeilly, III President & CEO Suntrust Bank - Nashville

Kathryn S. Gibson CPA Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Ilex Pounders * Young Leaders Council Co-founder High Notes Gifts

Chad M. Grout, CCIM Principal Broker Urban Grout Commercial Real Estate

Christine E. Skold Vice President, Investor Relations and Corporate Communications Tractor Supply Company

Robert B. Kennedy Account Executive The Crichton Group

Todd A. Spaanstra CPA / Partner Crowe Horwatch, LLP

John C. Tishler Partner Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP John Van Mol Chairman & CEO DVL Public Relations and Advertising Julie F. Wilson Senior Vice President, Asset Management Healthcare Realty Trust Jeff Young Vice President Tennessee Bank & Trust Donna B. Yurdin President Credo Management Consulting *Ex Officio | **Intern

TRUSTEES Robert Duthie Chief Executive Officer/Founder Duthie Associates, dba Duthie Learning

Robert McNeilly, III President & CEO SunTrust Bank – Nashville

Robert Kennedy Account Executive The Crichton Group

SENIOR LEADERSHIP Matthew Bourlakas President and CEO

David Jenkins Vice President of Retail

Betty Johnson Vice President/ Chief People Officer

Mike Eisenbraun Senior Director of Operations

Matt Gloster Senior Director of Career Solutions Karl Houston Senior Director of Marketing & Community Relations

Mary La Haie Vice President of Finance Ed O’Kelley Senior Director of Information Technology

Karen Samuel Senior Director of Human Resources

Goodwill Industries of Middle Tennessee, Inc. 1015 Herman Street Nashville, Tennessee 37208

P: 615.742.4151 F: 615.254.3901

Our mission is changing lives.

www.giveit2goodwill.org

Goodwill Community Impact Report 2015  
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