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summer 2013 Non-Profit u.s. postage

PAID Baltimore, md permit no. 3911

gilman school 5407 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 gilman.edu

gilman bulletin

gilman

Bulletin

a teacher on the trail Gilman teacher Jen Reiter is the 2014 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail.

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basketball makes a move The Greyhounds move to the MIAA “A” Conference in 2013–2014.

November 9, 2013 Featuring the

98th Gilman-McDonogh Football Classic at McDonogh

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Thanks, Mr. Schmick

34th annual bull roast & silent auction

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march 7, 2014

Alumni Reunion Weekend April 25-26, 2014

Classes celebrating reunions: 1964 · 1969 · 1974 · 1979 · 1984 · 1989 · 1994 · 1999 · 2004 · 2009 If you would like to volunteer with your reunion class committee, contact the Development Office at 410-323-7176 or memoreland@gilman.edu

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Use your smartphone to scan the code below for an easy way to add these dates to your calendar.

Mark your calendar for Gilman’s 2013-2014 special events.

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contents

Editor Jodi Pluznik Director of Communications

Two Goals. One Gift.

Assistant Editors Karaline Jackson Graphic Designer Contributors Brooke Snyder Director of Marketing and Communications M. Kate Ratcliffe Director of Development Angie Brickhouse Director of Annual Giving Stephanie Felton Director of Development Services Mac Barrett ‘67 Alumni Special Projects Coordinator

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Alice Dearing P‘15 Director of Major Gift Operations and Stewardship Design Jeremy Hoffman

“My charitable gift annuity with Gilman enables me to donate a substantial tax-deductible charitable gift and use the income for a specific purpose while I still live.”

Establishing a charitable gift annuity with Gilman School allows Clarence S. “Butsy” Lovelace ’40, age 92, to accomplish two goals: to arrange a significant deferred gift for the School and, using his tax-free lifetime annuity payments, to help his granddaughter Leah purchase her first apartment in San Francisco. “Someday Leah may no longer need the money,” he says, “but Gilman always will.”

What are the advantages of a charitable gift annuity?

Printing Pavsner Press

• Receive dependable, fixed income for life in return for your gift.

Photography John Bowers David Cha ’13 Erik Kvalsvik ’73 Steve McDaniel ’65 Meir Pluznik David Rosenfeld Steve Ruark ’96 Cynosure Photographers

• In many cases, receive payments at a rate higher than the interest you are currently receiving from stocks, CDs, or savings accounts. • Receive an immediate income tax deduction for a portion of your gift.

Writing David Rosenfeld

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• A portion of your annuity payment will be tax-free.

The Gilman Bulletin is published by Gilman School, Baltimore, Maryland 21210. Gilman School welcomes students of any race, color, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin. gilman.edu facebook.com/GilmanSchool1897 twitter.com/GilmanSchool instagram.com/gilmanschool linkedin.com

Discover the benefits of giving wisely . . . Contact the Office of Planned Giving for more information. 410-323-7178

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Bulletin

4 Thanks, Mr. Schmick Fifty-five Years of Friendship mac barrett ‘67

In Praise of John Schmick redmond c. s. finney ‘47

Omnipresent Schmick anton vishio

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Message from the Headmaster

52 In Memoriam: Arthur W. Machen, Jr. ’38 54 In Memoriam: John “Nemo” Robinson 70 Founders Day 2013

Departments 24 School News Gilman juniors receive a special lesson in financial literacy. 36 Alumni Alumni Reunion and Family Weekend 2013 recap. 58 Athletics Gilman basketball plans to move to the MIAA “A” Conference. 66 Development Carey Hall classroom rededicated to the memory of William (Billy) D. Lynn, Jr. ’69.

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Corrections We apologize for the following errors in the Winter 2013 issue of the Gilman Bulletin: Mary Gamper was incorrectly identified in a photo caption on page 57. Allison Conner’s name was misspelled on page 47.

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“You really got me,� John Schmick told the boys after they surprised him with a grand gesture of thanks. Here he is pictured with organizers Zane MacFarlane, school president, Rishi Bedi, senior class vice president, and John Chirikjian, senior class president.

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From the Headmaster

In my 39 wonderful years at Gilman, I have been so blessed in so many ways. I have been present to witness some of the great events in Gilman’s history, and, of course, much of who I am stems directly from the influence and teaching of the men and women of Gilman. I learned at the feet of masters, and I also had the privilege of working side by side with many of them. Gilman is a great school, but it is not the excellence of the academics, athletics, arts or facilities that makes it that way. The students, teachers, alumni, staff, trustees and families create this special place, and they make it so difficult for me to leave. Each day I witnessed so many inspiring unselfish acts: Whether it was a teacher putting an arm around a tearful child, coming in early to help a student prepare for a test or quiz or attending a student’s little league game, time and time again I saw our faculty go out of their way to support their students. I saw staff members stay late to make sure that things were set up for the next event, cleaned thoroughly and ready to go. I watched crews tend our grounds immaculately, apply fresh coats of paint and line fields — all done with incredible pride and all done for the boys. I saw parents give up hours of their own time to help inside and outside the classroom, and I watched alumni and trustees do all that they could to support and further the Gilman mission. But most of all I watched the boys, and what a pleasure that was. I saw such genuine goodness demonstrated over and over again in so many ways. Inevitably, there were rascals who acted impulsively, but I saw them learn from their mistakes and share

their knowledge with their peers. I watched boys support each other at the most difficult times, had fun with them as they came up with great ways to promote spirit, and learned from them as they shared their perspectives with me. And all the while, the Gilman Five — Honor, Integrity, Respect, Humility and Excellence — thrived in this community, as I know it always will. It has been a great ride, but now it is time to hand over the reins. The School is in great shape, and it will become even better under Henry’s leadership. My wife Janet and I thank all of you for reaching out and supporting us six years ago when this Headmaster journey began, and I know that you will give that same support to Henry Smyth and his lovely wife Elizabeth. I could not be happier for Gilman, and I look forward to watching the School grow and prosper under his leadership. I know that the support he will receive from this community — faculty, staff, students, parents, trustees and alumni — will provide ballast to his efforts. I shall miss Gilman and all of you more than you will ever know. Keep the Five alive! Go Hounds! With deepest gratitude and affection,

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

Thanks, Mr. Schmick

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The entire student body, all 1,030, surprised Mr. Schmick by spelling out “THANKS” on Chandlee Field, April 23.

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Mac Barrett, left, Janet Schmick and John Schmick pose in 1977 at the Class of 1967’s 10th Reunion.

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

Fifty-five Years of Friendship mac barrett ‘67

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o the best of my knowledge, I met John Schmick in the fall of 1958. We became classmates when he entered the Fourth Form (fourth grade) in Gilman’s Lower School. It will come as a surprise to some to learn that he had previously attended Roland Park Country School. That’s right, the school for girls, which at the time was located on 40th Street nearby what is now the Rotunda. In those years, RPCS made available a few spaces for boys in the early grades. Being John’s friend had its advantages. His father, William F. Schmick, Jr., was publisher of The Baltimore Sun. The newspaper had terrific box seats for Orioles games at Memorial Stadium. When John invited me to join him for a game, it was a chance to nurture my love for baseball. We were also together during the summer of 1962 when we were among numerous Baltimoreans who attended Hyde Bay Camp in Cooperstown, N.Y. In a letter I wrote home in August of that year, I included the following report, “John Schmick put his finger inside his trunk and accidentally sat down on it. The result was

a broken finger, which will take from four to five weeks to mend. He’s fine now, though, and his parents have been notified.” By the time we were ready to graduate from Gilman as members of the Class of 1967, we had acquired different tastes. He had become an excellent goalie on the lacrosse team while I played centerfield on the baseball team. He was a debater for the Areopagus. I was a member of the Pnyx. He decided to attend Penn. I chose Dartmouth. Throughout those formative years, I can never remember one cross word being exchanged between us. And so it remains today. It’s pretty hard to find fault with a classmate we called Jolly. Our friendship really grew after college and active duty for the Maryland Army National Guard. We became roommates in a Ruxton townhouse. It was an interesting experience. You would think that an Army cook would care about nutrition. Not John. His idea of breakfast was to drink a Pepsi and smoke a cigarette . . . every morning (vices long abandoned). I hope not a single Gilman student copies this practice.

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Then there was the night that John and Bill Fisher ’68 decided to streak me in my room. The era was the early 1970s, and streaking had become the craze. I was reading in bed prior to turning out the light when they burst in naked with plenty of laughter to introduce me to the ritual that was sweeping the nation. It took me a while to recover from that moment. I may still be recovering.

For 39 years John has answered the call on Roland Avenue, and the Gilman School he now turns over to Henry Smyth is even stronger than the institution that looked to him for a steady hand six years ago. When John and I became roommates, we agreed that should one of us decide to get married, that individual could keep the townhouse. Seemed reasonable at the time, and neither of us was in a serious relationship. Within a few months, I introduced him to Janet Ruth, an attractive woman from Catonsville whose credits included time as a cheerleader for the Baltimore Colts. They began to date. Imagine my surprise when they became engaged and announced that they were going to live in the townhouse. Guess who found himself and his belongings out on the front lawn looking for a new home. Janet and John have been happily married since 1974. I served as an usher in their wedding, and they are my son’s godparents. During his Gilman career, John has served as teacher, coach, disciplinarian, administrator, mentor, and friend. Always loyal and humble, he has been a team player quick to recognize others and divert attention from himself. In August 2007, when he first addressed faculty and staff as interim head, those in attendance in the Alumni Auditorium rose to applaud his appointment. He had the confidence and

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support of his colleagues. He was one of them, and they believed in him. I was at home on a Monday evening during January 2008 when the phone rang. John had called to tell me that the trustees had just unanimously approved his selection as Headmaster. After a few months as interim head, the big job was officially his . . . finally. He had been a candidate to succeed both Reddy Finney and Arch Montgomery. Can you think of another workplace where someone’s dedicated service is rewarded with THE job he’s always wanted on the THIRD attempt? John and Janet have been the right team for this time in Gilman history. Their personal qualities have contributed not only to a successful marriage but to a complementary leadership style. Janet’s grace and enthusiasm for entertaining and accompanying John on trips to visit alumni have been hallmarks of this administration. A school benefits from such teamwork. The Schmicks are superb goodwill ambassadors for Gilman. History will look favorably on John’s years as Headmaster (2007–2013). Highlights of his leadership include the Gilman Five (Honor, Integrity, Respect, Humility and Excellence), dedicated faculty and staff, stable enrollment, fiscal health during a time of major economic uncertainty, alumni outreach, athletic success, strong school spirit, improvements to the physical plant and the absence of controversy. His personality exudes warmth and kindness. Above all, he sets an outstanding example for students. For 39 years John has answered the call on Roland Avenue, and the Gilman School he now turns over to Henry P. A. Smyth is even stronger than the institution that looked to him for a steady hand six years ago. Although the Schmicks will remain part of the Gilman scene, their pace is likely to be less hectic. There will be more time for the beach, fishing and golf. And, of course, more time for family and friends. Thanks, old friend, for the last 55 years. May there be many more.

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5 1. Class of 1967 during sixth grade, the 1960–1961 school year. John Schmick is in the second row, fourth from left, with the “G” on his sweater. Mac Barrett is second from right, in the third row.

2. The Class of 1967 carries their banner during Gilman’s Centennial celebration — and their 30th reunion.

3. John (far left, center row, with his hand stacked) sang second tenor in the Traveling Men. 4. Sporting the number 5 on his jersey, Schmick was a force in the lacrosse goal.

5. John and Janet Schmick attend a new faculty dinner at the Headmaster’s Home in 1974. They would move into the same home 34 years later when John became Gilman’s Headmaster.

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“Even during my days as a student, a dream of mine was to be Headmaster of Gilman School,” writes John Schmick is his March 14, 2012, letter to the community announcing his retirement plans. This photograph hangs in the Gilman Room among the Headmasters’ portraits.

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

In Praise of John Schmick Distinguished Teacher 1974–2013 Headmaster 2007–2013

redmond c. s. finney ’47 retired headmaster

The ceremony held in the Lumen Center on Friday evening, May 10, 2013, in honor of our retiring Headmaster, John E. Schmick, could not have been more special or appropriate! Board of Trustees President Paul McBride’s complimentary opening words set the very positive tone, followed by Isaac Boltansky ’04’s tribute to the Headmaster for his extraordinary contributions to building the school community, Anton Vishio’s indefatigable performance, and Bill Gamper ’71’s hilarious remarks; then the delightful skit performed so well by some exceptionally talented alumni: Skip Porter ’74, David Rich ’74, David Whitman ’68, Arthur Worthington ’09 and Ned Worthington ’78, and Mac Barrett ’67’s warm and personal tribute. John and his whole family, especially his devoted wife and helpmate Janet, should be very, very proud! And John’s concluding remarks and response were so gracious and humble, fittingly followed by his impressive successor-to-be Henry Smyth, who will take over the Gilman reins of leadership at the end of this academic year. I predict that this will be an especially smooth transition.

I have had the great privilege of knowing John Schmick for over 50 years. John entered the Gilman fourth grade as a student in the fall of 1958, and he subsequently graduated in the Class of 1967. From the beginning John was always an outgoing and friendly person who exuded enthusiasm and warmth. He loved to participate in the full life of the School, including athletics, extracurricular activities, as well as academics. He played soccer and lacrosse, reaching the varsity levels in both sports in his junior and senior years, and he was rated as one of the league’s most outstanding lacrosse goalies. He also served as a cheerleader, sang in the Glee Club and Traveling Men, participated in public speaking and debating, and was a leader of the Christian Association. It was my pleasure to award him the Peter Parrott Blanchard Award, given to “that boy who, by his cheerful helpfulness, in many ways has greatly contributed to the successful and pleasant life in the School.” In the early spring of 1974, I received an unexpected telephone call from John asking me if he and I could get together to

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talk. At the time John was working for Claster Television, the producer of “Romper Room.” I knew that he was enjoying this job and that he regarded highly this acclaimed children’s television program. However, it did not take him very long to tell me that he wanted to be a full-time teacher/coach and that he would like to join the Gilman faculty.

We hired him “on the spot” as a fifth grade homeroom teacher beginning with the 1974–75 academic year. He responded instantly with great enthusiasm and began immediately to spend time at the School preparing himself for the position. John was just the type of person any school would love to have, especially one like Gilman, where a premium has always

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been placed upon having teachers who demonstrate knowledge and enthusiasm for both teaching as well as coaching, and who are excellent role models for young people. It was so obvious that John loved and respected kids and that he had all the personal ingredients to be an excellent example and mentor. John was an English and education major at his college alma mater, the University of Pennsylvania. He had continued the same pattern of excellence at Penn as he had achieved at Gilman, and we hired him “on the spot” as a fifth grade homeroom teacher beginning with the 1974–75 academic year. He responded instantly with great enthusiasm and began immediately to spend time at the School preparing himself for the position. John Schmick proved to be “a real find,” and several years hence, in 1981, he moved to the English Department in the Upper School. In the process of writing this tribute to John, I took the liberty of addressing some special questions to him, and I have asked his permission to quote some of his responses. My first question had to do with books and topics that John favored most in his teaching: “I love to teach literature and poetry. Perhaps my most favorite works were ‘To Kill A Mockingbird,’ ‘Hamlet,’ ‘A Tale of Two Cities’ and ‘Death of a Salesman.’ I also loved teaching the various poems that I used in Lyric Poetry. All of these works give such insight into what it is like to be human. . . . I think that Atticus Finch is one hero that everyone can identify with, and when I think of the Gilman Five (Honor, Respect, Integrity, Humility, Excellence), he possesses all of these qualities! Also, the flaws of a Willy Loman or Sydney Carton are wonderful examples of the frailty of humanity and serve as great teaching moments, as does the hesitation of Hamlet. Just really fun works to teach! I also loved discussing poetry with the Lyric Poetry class (a senior elective which was co-ed), and watching my students pen their own poems and create their own portfolios . . . very rewarding.”

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(Opposite page) As director of promotion and publicity at Claster Television Productions, John Schmick had many duties, the least of which was to wear a bunny costume on “Romper Room.” Rumor has it that he once wore the costume into Alonso’s on Cold Spring Lane. John Schmick started at Gilman as a fifth-grade homeroom teacher.

Another question I asked John was to reflect upon his large number of important administrative responsibilities during his long career. How do these stack up in terms of his personal preference? “I loved teaching and coaching throughout! I have been so fortunate because in my career I have been a homeroom teacher, dean of students, director of financial aid, director of admission, head of the Upper School, assistant headmaster, and headmaster. Each job has been challenging and fun, and to be able to take on so many challenges has kept me fresh and interested. I think that the one job that I loved the most was dean of students because it was so ‘kid-centered.’ I knew the name of every student, would know who they were from a distance by the way they walked, knew what car they drove, with whom they hung out. . . . It was really wonderful being that close to the boys. It did finally burn me out, but that was more from the adults than the boys. Really, every challenge has been great, but the deeper you get into administration, the more difficult it is to know the boys.”

And then this final question I asked John: You have created and led some new customs and programs during your tenure as headmaster. What of these do you hope will live on and be continued? “I think I am the most proud of the Gilman Five, and I hope that they will become a permanent part of the central fabric of the School. I hope that my emphasis on ‘acting with class’ and always taking the high road will continue to be stressed, as I think that it is very important for boys to learn and to internalize. I also hope that our emphasis upon basic decency and overall kindness will continue. I have found the boys to be remarkably kind. The only ones who have any social problems are those who pretend to be something they are not. Finally, I hope we will continue to stress the importance of honor and integrity. . . . They are the bedrock of character!” Redmond Finney ’47 returned to Gilman to teach history, mathematics, and religion, and coach in 1954. From 1968 to 1992, he served as headmaster of Gilman School.

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John Schmick is an everpresent figure, in Gilman cap and sunglasses, on the athletic fields.

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

Omnipresent Schmick anton vishio retired faculty

John Schmick, Gilman School: in many ways, these two entities have become synonymous. Little did I suspect in the school year of 1965–1966 that such juxtaposition might emerge. That was my first year at the prep, and facial recognition of the students was coming rather slowly to me. One student, however, almost immediately caught my attention, a junior named Schmick, who invariably materialized whenever cheerleading was required for a school function — athletic, dramatic or otherwise. A youngster who had the reputation of “getting things done,” John had become the face of the student body. Of course, his omnipresence in school activities continued throughout his senior year, and at graduation the faculty recognized his multifarious talents by awarding him the prestigious Peter Parrott Blanchard Award and the Tyler Campbell Lacrosse Cup. Then he was gone, off to the University of Pennsylvania, and I conjectured that, as is the case with many graduates, John Schmick had now embarked on a collegiate education that would foretoken a career in business, medicine or law. At that juncture in our social history, the noble profession of teaching, I fear, ranked a tad below that of driving for the Teamsters — coincidentally, my initial full-time employment upon graduation, albeit from high school.

Regarding Schmick, I certainly was proven wrong. (Remember though, that this is the reminiscence of one who had rooted for the 1964 Philadelphia Phillies, a team that had self destructed in the month of October with a 10-game lead and only 14 games remaining to clinch the National League pennant. Consequently, incorrect predictions were not alien to me.) His true vocation was teaching, and he eventually returned to Gilman; however, the individual with the high school sobriquet of “Jolly” now had to suffer other nicknames, including “Johnny Law” (referring to his “enforcer” status as dean of students) and “Roger the Elf” (a name he himself originated to the delight of generations of students). Such monikers evoke the storied career of a teacher, coach, administrator and mentor, one that will be well documented by his many colleagues and friends who also are composing tributes to his successes in these varied roles. I can, however, mention other areas in which our retiring headmaster and I had interplay. In my capacity as chairperson of the third form,

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I had the good fortune to work with John when he became dean of students. Together, we ran study halls, tracked down errant youths and lamented those boys whose aberrant behavior led them to the disciplinary committee. In these areas, I noted the strong bond that he had with students throughout the Upper School. His empathy, compassion and support earned him the respect and trust of the student body as well as his colleagues. On occasions too numerous to catalogue, I observed John interacting with students with a grace and kindness to which many administrators and fellow teachers, including myself, could only aspire.

John was in the unique position to understand the holistic needs of the School and to form an effective and comprehensive vision for its future, including a moral compass that embraced both responsibility and compassion. Many to this day remain unaware that John has an unusual sense of humor. Indeed, behind that facade of innocence lurks a predator prepared to pounce on a colleague with a practical joke, which delights all, save the poor soul eviscerated by the antic. I myself suffered one such indignity. Many years ago, John, knowledgeable of my ethnic origin, listed in our graduation program as one of my credentials a Ph.D. from the University of Albania. This promotion to the doctoral level was not only a fallacy but also a canard, since no academic institution of this title exists. In similar fashion, once when our sainted music teacher wished to recruit members to sing at a faculty Christmas concert, John and his co-conspirator, Cary Woodward ’53, fabricated a plot to unnerve the colleague by placing a note from a supposed volunteer named Ginger in the teacher’s

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mailbox. Of course, Ginger had no last name. To the enjoyment of those aware of the deception, the teacher subsequently spent days attempting to locate the non-existent Ginger. Suffice it to state that such examples of John’s misguided humor had to cease upon his promotion in 2007 to the position of headmaster. In this capacity, John provided the entire community — students, parents, faculty, administrators and trustees — with the leadership and confidence that all those headmasters, under whose aegis he served, had previously exhibited. Indeed, John’s rise to the position of headmaster appears legendary, considering that he had previously assumed almost every conceivable role Gilman had to offer. By serving in these various capacities, John was in the unique position to understand the holistic needs of the School and to form an effective and comprehensive vision for its future, including a moral compass that embraced both responsibility and compassion. Indeed, John’s commitment to character building provided the Gilman community with an encapsulation of its goal to help each member grow in “mind, body and spirit.” He entitled this aspiration the Gilman Five: Honor, Integrity, Respect, Humility and Excellence. John will long be known for his effort to instill these virtues in the lives of all members of the Gilman community. Now, John is moving on to a welldeserved retirement; however, do not believe that Gilman has seen the last of John Schmick. In his retirement letter, John wrote that when he took the headmaster job nearly six years ago, he planned to hold the position only for three to five years; nevertheless, he said nothing about “fading away” like an old soldier. I suspect that John’s contribution to the welfare and spirit of this institution has not ended. Like a Roman ex-consul, whose continuing benefaction to Rome did not end with the completion of his term in office, John has still more service to render to his alma mater. Indeed, his legacy to Gilman School cannot yet be fully written.

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One of John Schmick’s most important contributions as headmaster is the Gilman Five, a code of ethical behavior for the School. No one lives the Gilman Five more than Mr. Schmick.

A highlight of the school year is the annual “surprise” third grade Viking raid on the Headmaster’s Office. The raiders generally keep the plundering — but not necessarily the noise level — to a minimum. John Schmick’s legacy lives in the relationships he built with countless young men. Here, he enjoys the 2102 Bull Roast with returning alumni.

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

Board of Trustees Reception april 15 “Throughout the years, John has combined his unique personal touch with an unwavering commitment to help forge the Gilman community we know today. We’re privileged that John has dedicated so much of his life to our institution,” said Board of Trustees President Paul F.

McBride, P’13, ’14 at a special reception honoring John Schmick that followed the Board’s regular spring meeting. Headmaster Schmick’s portrait was unveiled at this reception.

“John, thanks for being so handsome,” quipped McBride after Charlie Fenwick ’66 (left) and Mac Barrett ’67 removed the drape covering the portrait, a gift of the Board of Trustees. Painted by artist Dean Paules, the artwork now hangs in the Carey Hall Common Room on a wall opposite the portrait of Redmond C. S. Finney ’47. Paules also painted the portraits of Bill Carey ’48 and Bill Greene that also hang in Carey Hall.

“I had the good fortune of boarding at [the Headmaster’s home] when Henry and Henrietta Callard were there,” said Charlie Fenwick, “and I’ve known the wives of all the heads since then, and I would testify no one enjoyed the job of being the wife of the Headmaster as much as Janet Schmick.” The Board gifted the Schmicks, pictured here with son John O. Schmick ’97 and daughter Carole Schmick, with a pair of custom Gilman Adirondack chairs.

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Thanks, Mr. Schmick april 23 School President Zane McFarlane ’13 orchestrated the entire student body shouting “Thanks” in unison after an unsuspecting — and emotional — Mr. Schmick was led to the Lower School playground. The Traveling Men sang

“Oh Gilman, Oh Gilman” in his honor. Special cookies with Mr. Schmick’s likeness were distributed after the ceremony. No word on whether anyone kept his as a souvenir as opposed to eating it.

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

An Extraordinary Event for an Extraordinary Man may 10 More than 600 alumni, parents present and past, current and former colleagues, family and friends — as well as a group of intrepid Hyde Bay campers — returned to Gilman for a delightful evening of sincere praise and a bit of good-natured ribbing on May 10. (Below) In their

roast of John Schmick, former Traveling Men David Whitman ’68 (far left), David Rich ’74, Skip Porter ’74, Arthur Worthington ’09 and Ned Worthington ’78 sing “Punctuation Is Hard To Do,” a parody of Neal Sedaka’s “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do.”

Guests stroll down John’s memory lane as they enter the event space on Harris Terrace and Lawn, where they dine on some of John’s favorite foods and dance to the sounds of Jimmy Buffet and Motown created by Gilman’s own Eric Marner P’13, a member of the Middle School faculty.

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4 1. “Like Mark Antony, I and this fine group of, shall we say, youngsters, behind me, have come neither to praise nor to toast John, but with apologies to Shakespeare, we’d like to roast him. The praise of Schmick does in fact end here, ” announces Gilman iconoclast Anton Vishio as he sets up a skit set in a Gilman classroom some 50 years past, where a young John Schmick is trying to wrap his head around Punctuation Rule #1 (always place a comma between main clauses joined by: and, but, for, or, nor, or yet).

2. “Mr. Schmick taught us the importance of community, the importance of being part of something bigger than yourself,” says Isaac Boltansky ’04. “And then it was his warmth, his kindness, and his personality that made you want to be a part of this community, the Gilman community.” 3. “Am I the only one who is weary of this yearlong victory tour?” jests Mac Barrett ’67 before presenting a top ten list of the reasons why it’s time for John Schmick to retire. Number one: Soon he won’t be spending half his time at fundraisers; he’ll be fundraising full-time.

4. “John is truly a people’s headmaster. He cherishes every moment he gets with the boys; his door is always open. Through that door walk the boys, parents, faculty, staff. He makes them feel welcome in his office and that their opinion is important,” remarks Bill Gamper ’71, just before he conducts an admissions interview to see if Mr. Schmick would be admitted to Gilman today. Those present, as an admissions committee, determine to admit John into the ranks of retired Gilman masters.

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John E. Schmick ’67 • 39 years of service

Faculty and Staff Farewell june 10 The faculty and staff bid a final farewell to their beloved leader at Boordy Vineyards in Hydes, Md., owned by alumnus Rob Deford ’69 and his wife Julie, with an end-of-the-year bash and retirement party. (Below) The inscription speaks volumes: To John E. Schmick ’67

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In eternal gratitude for 39 years of leadership in shaping the culture, guiding the community and enriching the legacy of Gilman School.

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4 1. Following a vineyard theme, the evening’s decorations included decorated wine bottles with photos from John’s life.

2. Retired faculty member Bob Demeule delivers pithy advice to John about his impending retirement. He also presents him with the uniform of a retiree: an aloha shirt.

3. Incoming Headmaster Henry Smyth reads the inscription on one last gift to John Schmick, an engraved captain’s chair.

4. “I leave today confident that what makes Gilman so great — all of you — will still be on this campus to forge ahead with Henry,” writes John Schmick in a last e-mail to faculty and staff.

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School News

Ciao, Italia!

A group of 17 boys and four chaperones traveled to Italy during spring break.

It’s slightly unusual for a snow day to occur days before spring break, yet the unpredictable winter of 2013 chose to cast a frosty shadow well into March. The ultimately unfounded threat of winter weather didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the Middle School choir students and their faculty chaperones about to depart for a performance tour of Italy. Follow along, as the boys and their director, Middle School music teacher Elizabeth Sesler-Beckman, send e-mail home. 6 march 2013 Liz Sesler-Beckman: Hello Families, I hope you are home relaxing and enjoying a snow day before our travel tomorrow. I just had an e-mail from our guide, Elio Guerriero. Apparently the weather is a little uncooperative in Italy as well. The forecast calls for some mixed light rain and clouds in Sorrento and Rome. Please make sure your son has a rain jacket. He may want to bring a very small folding umbrella as well. The temperatures should be fairly moderate (52-60 F in Sorrento) and (40-61 F in Rome). Ci vediamo subito (See you soon!).

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7 march 2013 Liz Sesler-Beckman: Hello all — we are safely in Philadelphia awaiting our flight to Rome. All is well and the boys are doing beautifully. We will post another update when we arrive in Rome. Hank Bethel: So far the day has been boring. We took a long walk to a gate I’ve never even heard of. My partner and I walked to an Auntie Anne’s pretzel stand. I bought a pretzel, and we walked back. We boarded possibly the smallest plane I’ve been on. We flew for 19 minutes to Philadelphia airport. Got on a shuttle bus, and drove to gate A. My partner and I took a long journey to a McDonalds. I got McNuggets and fries, and went back to the gate. I ate my healthy dinner and typed this blog. Noah Seth: Sorry about the disappointing story from my partner. I am very excited about the upcoming flight to Italy. We are now here in Philadelphia waiting. Most of us are eating McDonald’s to enjoy the last bit of American food for the next week. Filled with anticipation.

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Barrett Crawford: This is my entry on our Italy trip so far. The American time as of now is 5 p.m., an hour and 20 minutes until our departure to Rome. So far, so good, on our venture out of the country, though my buddy Nick has already almost lost his “gold” wallet in the airport. (He lost it in a shopping bag.) Other than that, life has been good. I just had a delicious cherry danish at the Au Bon Pain bakery, and then chicken nuggets at the McDonald’s. Even if I am feeling a little homesick on the first day away from my parents on this particular trip, I am filled with the joy of going to experience the cultures of modern Italy, and those of older times. Nick Auen: We are now waiting in the airport in Philadelphia for our flight to Italy. We are anticipating a seven-and-ahalf-hour long flight mixed with a six-hour time zone change! A real traveling experience! This day has been uneventful and few of us are really expecting to fall asleep during the flight, no matter how tired we are. We are so excited! 8 march 2013 Liz Sesler-Beckman: Hello from Rome! We had a wonderfully uneventful flight and have safely arrived in Rome. The boys are in great spirits and are ready to begin their day. We will update later but please know all is well! 9 march 2013 Chris Wolfe: After eating a quick breakfast at 8 a.m., we took off on a scenic route to the Ancient Greek city of Paestum. On the way, we drove along the beautiful Amalfi Coast. The view was incredible. We took hundreds of pictures of the colorful cities built into the cliffs along the Mediterranean Sea. Afterwards, we stopped for lunch at a pizzeria before continuing on to Paestum. We were led by our wonderful tour guide Sylvia through the mesmerizing ancient city. The city included three Greek temples, dedicated to Hera and Athena, that are still standing as they were 2,500 years ago. There are also

ruins from when the Romans lived in the city, but very little remains from their civilization. Later on, we returned to the hotel for a dinner of pasta and fish. In the evening, we watched a show in the Teatro Tasso in Sorrento. The show included a combination of some of the most popular songs in sixteenth century Italy. We came home tired but happy at 11 p.m. Nick Auen: We have completed our first day in Italy! When we left the plane we gathered on a bus and rode for HOURS getting to Sorrento. The scenery passing by the bus window was beautiful! EVERYONE was taking pictures; it was surreal. After what seemed forever on the bus we arrived at the hotel and settled into our cozy rooms. At 7 p.m. we headed to dinner within the hotel. A multi-course meal! The first day’s jet lag was brutal but we stuck it out! The excitement is building! Barrett Crawford: This is the night of our first day in Italy. We are all exhausted from a day of fighting off sleep and sightseeing all the great wonders of the country. There were quite a few beautiful pictures taken of the magical Sorrento, the sun setting on the Mediterranean Sea and the hillside houses on the mountain where the city rests. I am sure we are all experiencing homesickness, especially me, who has never been out of the country, but all the enriching culture and glamour of Italy has taken our hearts over for certain. 10 march 2013 Liz Sesler-Beckman: Here is our report from Sunday — the sun has been shining these past two days, and we have another beautiful day ahead for Pompeii! Nick Auen: We have had a fun day of shopping, walking around, and trying a bunch of gelato flavors at a famous shop! The night before we went to a performance of songs from Italy and Sorrento; it was wonderful. For lunch we ate the BEST pizza ever and had delicious cake. Now, we are about to head off to our first performance even though we are very tired. EXCITING!

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6 1. An announcement for a concert by Gilman at Residence Il Poggio, a retirement center outside Rome.

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2. Visiting the Vatican, just as the new pope was elected. 3. The boys visiting with residents of Il Poggio after their performance.

4. Chaperones and Middle School faculty members Eric Marner P’13 and Liz Beckman pose with the owner of a Sorrento Gelateria.

5. Ethan Coherd ’18, left, Jack Bowmaster ’18, right, and Christopher Wolfe ‘16, behind, enjoying a post-concert visit. 6. The tour included a visit to Pompeii.

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Danny Loewenstein: Today we sang at Santa Maria Chiesa near Ercolano. The church was very nice with paintings on the ceiling. The church treated us to rum cake and soda. When we sang the song “Baba Yetu,” we got a standing ovation from the audience. Jack Bowmaster: Today was pretty nerve-racking yet relaxing. We had a free day of shopping with our small groups in which we got to see many back alleys and sights. The pizza parlor that we went to for lunch was the fanciest pizza place I have ever seen. The pizza was just as delicious as the decor was fancy. Tonight we had a performance at a beautiful Catholic Church. This was our first performance as a group and it went well. I can’t wait to see Rome!!! Liz Sesler-Beckman: There were 200 people at tonight’s concert at the breathtaking Chiesa di Santa Maria della Consolazione, built in 1613 in Ercolano at the base of Mt. Vesuvius. It really was like a dream. You would have been extremely proud of the boys’ performance — the acoustics in the church were excellent and their voices carried well through the marble sanctuary. Mr. Marner’s soulful saxophone rendition of “Amazing Grace” was also well-appreciated by the Italian audience. We were able to meet with members of the Ercolano choir, a group of high school-aged singers from the area who performed an a capella set after our 50-minute performance. The town presented us with several gifts, including color prints of local art, wine, ceramics, pictures of the altarpiece and a seal of the Campania Region. The boys gave Gilman pins and stickers to all the members of the Ercolano Choir after the unforgettable concert. Now we pack up and say good bye to Sorrento. We will tour Pompeii Monday and the boys are really looking forward to seeing this site. 11 march 2013 Matt Schaller: Today we saw a destroyed town called Pompeii. That town was once very colorful, but now it is in ruins.

A volcano erupted and ruined the town long ago, which is why it was abandoned, and then it slowly became what it is today. After seeing the town of Pompeii, we ate lunch at a fun restaurant. Because we sang so well last night at the church, the teachers bought us all gelato! Now, we are on our way to Rome, and I am extremely excited to see the nice town. Morgan Zinn: Today, as Matt said, we visited the city of Pompeii. It was buried for over 1,600 years before it was excavated from thick ash from Mt. Vesuvius. The ash preserved the wealthy city for that long period of time. After exploring Pompeii, we went to a nearby restaurant to have pizza and spaghetti. There was also a gift shop, so we bought souvenirs for our friends and family. We are currently leaving a store and are on our way to Rome. 12 march 2013 Noah Seth: Awesome day today. We visited St. Peter’s Basilica. It was amazing. Everything was beautiful; each wall and each door was ornately carved and painted while paying attention to the smallest detail. It was truly a feast for the eyes. It’s really something that you have to see to understand its awesomeness. Chris Wolfe: We began our day at the American School of Rome, where we performed for the Lower School. After a very successful performance, we traveled to the Vatican. We toured through St. Peter’s Basilica and through the museums at the Vatican. We were fortunate enough to experience the beginning of the process to select a new Pope. Finally, we went to the Pantheon and then to a nice dinner. It was a fantastic day! 13 march 2013 Liz Sesler-Beckman: It is unbelievable that we are getting ready to leave Italy! The new Pope was just elected (Francis I) and we watched on TV and saw the huge crowds at the same place we visited just yesterday. The boys enjoyed delectable homemade pies, sandwiches and sweets with residents of Residence Il Poggio

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after performing a lovely afternoon concert at the Roman retirement facility. The boys are accustomed to performing at similar venues in the States, since Middlemen and Traveling Men regularly sing at Pickersgill Retirement Center. By now, they were even able to “parlare un’ po” with the residents. We had our “farewell dinner” with Elio tonight and there were some very sweet speeches. We should arrive back at Gilman sometime close to 8 p.m. tomorrow. Here are today’s notes from the boys: Max Bethel: Today, we visited the Colosseum. Despite the fact that it was raining very, very hard outside, it was a fun experience. At 8:30 a.m., we bused over to the Colosseum. When we arrived, our tour guide, Francesca, led us through the long crowd of people blocking the entrance to get inside. Once there, she explained what the Colosseum looked like when it was new. Today at the Colosseum we got to see the most iconic structure in Rome. The size of it was amazing. The funniest part was when Jake won a bet with his brother to say the line from the movie “Gladiator” in the Colosseum. It was hilarious. After we went to the Roman Forum, we got to see Caesar’s ashes and saw the ashes on the palatine hill. After, we sang in front of the Mayor’s office for our tour guide. Bryan Huang: After a quick breakfast at 7:45 a.m., we left for the Colosseum. Before we saw the marvel, our guide for the day, Francesca, pointed to the enormous arch in front of the Colosseum called the Arco di Constantino. Francesca told us that many different pieces of different Roman monuments were placed on the arch. Finally, we arrived to what we had been waiting for, the Colosseum. A white border around the amphitheater told us where its past, grand outer wall was before it was abandoned in the sixth century A.D. and looted. During construction of the Colosseum, the architects had designed iron bands in between the marble blocks to help hold the structure from falling. (Fun fact: The Colosseum’s massive marble blocks

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were taken from a quarry 50 km away from Rome.) Anyways, when the Colosseum was looted massively in the 1800s, the iron bands were taken, leaving multiple holes in most of the columns. It looked like Swiss cheese. But earthquakes then hit Rome which caused the outer wall to collapse. Most of the artifacts were destroyed. We visited Ancient Rome’s Forum ruins which contained multiple temples worshiping past emperors and their wives and Julius Caesar’s burial site. After, we ate a quick meal near the Capitol square on the terrace showing us the entirety of Rome (best pictures!). We passed shady street vendors (pick-pockets) and came to the bus where we hopped on and drove to the Italian senior center, our last gig in Italy. We had our best performance there. You could describe the audience at the end as smiling wrinkles. Joyful as we were, we made our last delicious gelato stop. march 14, 2013 Liz Sesler-Beckman: We have arrived in Baltimore! Please meet us at 7:30 p.m. at Gilman :) Can’t wait to see you! The Semmes G. “Buck” Walsh Fund to promote a cappella, created by a bequest from former Traveling Men director Semmes G. Walsh P’71, helped support the boys’ trip. View a video produced by intrepid traveler Julian Baron ’17 on YouTube: http://www. youtube.com/watch?v=IffPB-yyY1c

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School News

A Gilman Teacher on the Trail Jen Reiter Named the 2014 ExxonMobil Iditarod Teacher on the Trail ™

Jen Reiter P’24 poses with a sled dog during her 2013 trip to Alaska. Photo by Jeff Schultz.

A healthy spirit of scientific adventure has always lived inside Gilman third-grade teacher Jennifer Reiter P’24, who once had summer jobs on an archaeological dig in Utah and at a shark research lab in the Bahamas. Reiter’s next adventure began in her Gilman classroom in April, when she received a phone call congratulating her on becoming the 2014 ExxonMobil Iditarod Teacher on the Trail. Next March, she will follow the famous 1,000-mile Alaskan sled dog race in person from Anchorage to Nome, flying in a small plane from checkpoint to checkpoint and recording and sharing her once-in-a-lifetime experience with classrooms and race fans around the world. “I hope to bring the value, joy, and energy I have found in using the Iditarod in my classroom to teachers, students, and families around the country and the world,” says Reiter, who has taught in Gilman’s Lower School since 2000. She officially began her duties as Teacher on the Trail in June in Wasilla, Alaska, introducing her 2014 Teacher on the

Trail curriculum goals while presenting at the 2013 Iditarod Summer Camp for Teachers. In addition to creating a standards-aligned curriculum, she will develop and update an online journal throughout the school year and also present at the 2014 Winter Conference for Educators in late February in Anchorage, just prior to the beginning of next year’s race. It was at the 2012 Winter Conference for Educators where Reiter first got the idea to apply for the Teacher on the Trail program. Thanks to a grant from Gilman, she was there along with Lower School science teacher Ellen Rizzuto. Prior to the conference, the duo also learned how to “mush” during a trip to Minnesota. They used both trips as ways to add excitement to the Lower School math and science curriculums. After being named a finalist in January 2013, Reiter returned to Alaska in February for final interviews, where she beat out two other candidates to become the 16th Teacher on the Trail.

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School News Members of the Class of 2014 work together to purchase a car during the financial literacy seminar.

On the Money Gilman Juniors Get a Special Lesson in Financial Literacy

For a few minutes on a February afternoon in Centennial Hall, most of the 117 members of the Gilman Class of 2014 aren’t what they appear to be. Most of the time, they are all college bound, possessed with knowledge and skills their parents could only dream of having a generation ago. But not right now. Today, more than 80 of them are standing up, holding lollipops that were placed on the tables in front of them. They’re Dum Dums, the candy, and, for the moment, the people holding them. It’s funny, but financial counselor Brian Hamilton, leading the activity, isn’t really laughing. His point is that 70 percent of the room is likely to be in financial trouble during their 20s, only a few years after finishing college. Even worse, almost 20 percent of the room will be even further in the hole, maxed out on credit cards with no savings. “Normal these days,” Hamilton told the boys, “is broke.” Hamilton, only 28 years of age himself, came to Gilman to moderate a four-hour personal finance literacy seminar for juniors, an early salvo in learning about

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money in a particularly important teenage year, the year of driver licenses, part-time jobs and thinking about colleges. Usually, he “coaches” adults, including men and women old enough to be his parents. This time, with 16- and 17-year-olds, the goal was for the boys to get the point before they would ever have the chance to make poor financial decisions. Throughout the afternoon, students learned about budgeting, including methods for creating and living on a budget; debt, including the hidden costs of credit; and investing, including risk assessment, stocks and real estate. “This is a program that I’m guessing most adults wished they had in high school,” says Sean Furlong, Gilman’s director of finance and administration, who brought Hamilton to Gilman and also teaches a “Welcome to Economics” elective course for Upper School students. Buying a car, one of life’s major purchases even for teenagers, took center stage in the lesson about debt and credit. Boys were given $1,500 and a used car sales guide and told to choose a car they

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Throughout the afternoon, students learned about budgeting, including methods for creating and living on a budget; debt, including the hidden costs of credit; and investing, including risk assessment, stocks and real estate. could buy at that price as well as ones they could buy for $5,000 and $10,000. Having a car payment, Hamilton said, is not a necessary evil for adults, or even necessary at all. Buy the $1,500 used car first, and then pay yourself the amount of money each month that you would otherwise pay the bank for the car loan. After a short period of time, you’ll have enough to buy a nicer used car, and only a couple years later, you’ll actually be able to buy the $10,000 car with cash. You’ll have the good product — the car — and not

the bad product — the debt — and you will never have paid a dime in interest while continually upgrading the car. In addition, the boys completed a written cash flow plan for a typical month (“if you don’t have a written budget, you don’t have a budget,” Hamilton said) and learned about the impact of time and interest rates on savings. Boys were encouraged to start saving immediately after a discussion of compound interest and its effect on money well into the future. Hamilton, who has previously presented for Gilman faculty and staff, is the author of a 2011 book entitled “90 Day Money Challenge: Boot Camp for Financial Fitness,” in which he details his own rebuilding of his financial life and lays out plans for financial responsibility for individuals.

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3 1. The fourth grade boys cheer the parade as it passes by their homerooms.

2. The kindergarten is the last stop on the parade. 3. Weston Boone displays his float about Pennsylvania.

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School News

Third Grade Parades the States Making vacation plans? Best consult a Gilman third grader should you wish to travel within the United States. This school year the third grade, led by teachers Ashley Dagenais, Sarah Heegan and Jen Reiter, dove into their usual study of the “Fifty Nifty United States” with an ingenious twist. The subject matter was the same — the boys learned the names and locations of all 50 states (some also accepted the challenge to learn all the capitals too) and studied national parks as a part of the overall unit. Yet the assignment was very different. As in previous years, each boy was assigned a certain state to research. However, instead of being required to write a traditional report and create a PowerPoint presentation, poster or “state in a box,” he then applied what he learned to plan a road trip through the state that included specific requirements: visits to the state capital, a national park, three geographic features, and three landmarks or attractions. The assignment also required him to design a travel brochure, create a map, calculate mileage, and find gas costs for driving an RV on his course. “In the past, the project for this unit had been very cut-and-dry — a list of

basic facts about their state,” says Reiter. “This year, they were using their knowledge to plan a road trip through their state. The project made the facts more real and meaningful.” The unit culminated with the first Gilman Lower School Parade of States, for which each boy created three-dimensional rolling floats for his assigned state. The float project challenged the boys to take what they learned and present that information in a very visual way. They also had to apply some basic engineering design; the float had to fit on a third-grade desktop, be light enough to carry up and down stairs without assistance and it had to move! The parade through the Lower School hallways to the Helen K. Stevens Room also allowed the boys to share their newfound knowledge on a much a grander scale. Each boy presented his float to his classmates and to visitors after the parade, as well as answered questions.

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School News

Closing Ceremonies

The Gilman Lower and Middle Schools held separate closing ceremonies on June 6, marking the completion of another successful school year and bidding each division’s ultimate class farewell. During Lower School ceremonies, held in the morning in the Alumni Auditorium, the fifth grade presented to the Lower School 20 updated flags for the Helen K. Stevens Room, as well a globe and stand for the upstairs lobby in Callard Hall. When Callard Hall was built in 1998, the Lower School did a survey of the country of origin of Gilman students, and each country was then represented by a flag in the Stevens Room. The survey was repeated this past school year. As is tradition, fifth-grade teachers Nick Schloeder ’85, Lisa Teeling and John Xanders ’77 read the most memorable

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moment for each of the 53 members of the class, and Middle School Head Peter Kwiterovich ’87 welcomed the class into the Middle School, noting that the Lower School teachers “wanted to keep you guys around forever.” Later in the day, Kwiterovich presided as the 93 members of the eighth grade class each received their certificates for completing the Middle School; those continuing on to the Upper School in the fall will be joined by approximately 30 new students coming to Gilman for the ninth grade. Kwiterovich, in charge of the Middle School for each of the class’s three years, urged the group to continue the heartfelt care and empathy for classmates that he had seen during that time. “I can’t give you a grade, but you’ve made the Middle School a wonderful place to work, study, and play,” he said.

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Class of 2020 Leith Herrmann, head of the Lower School, joked that he’d been waiting years for the Gilman Class

of 2020 to complete the fifth grade, just so he could comment about having “20-20 vision” about how great the class would be.

Class of 2017 With a little help from a smartphone, eighth grade speaker Matt Tomaselli said his class is about

impact, about making an impression and having an influence on others. Just to be sure, he checked the definition of “impact”

from dictionary.com, with Middle School head Peter Kwiterovich ’87 handing him the phone just in time to save the day.

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Alumni

Alumni Enjoy Happy Hour Gatherings

This past winter the Gilman Alumni Association launched a new program to give local alumni opportunities to connect socially with each other and peers from neighboring schools.

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On February 12, the Alumni Association hosted a Young Alumni Happy Hour for graduates from the Classes of 1998–2008 at Bond Street Social. Alumni reconnected with friends and classmates in a casual, after work setting. Del Schmidt ’99, Alumni Association treasurer, Louis Panos ’00, Drew DeLoskey ’02, Justin Batoff ’03, and Jeremy Batoff ’05 served as volunteer hosts for the evening. Of course everyone in Baltimore knows the correct answer to “where did you go to school?,” and this past winter, alumni from Roland Park Country School, Gilman, Bryn Mawr, and Boys’ Latin (four of the Roland Park Five) put that question to the test. The schools collectively hosted a joint “4 School Happy Hour” at The Mount Washington Tavern on February 28. Coordinate classmates and competitors from the Classes of 1970–1995 had the chance to reconnect and reminisce. Watch the alumni pages of the Gilman website for information about happy hour gatherings during the 2013–2014 school year.

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6 1. J. C. Beese ’07, Ted Hart ’07, David Weckesser ’07.

2. Jeff Hossfeld ’99, Charles Wagandt ‘99, Del Schmidt ’99. 3. Justin Redd ’01, Luke Poggi ’03.

4. Manan Shah ’03, Kyle Waters ’03, Brannan Knott ’03, Michael Brown ’04.

5. Manu Sharma ’01, Michael Rodgers ’01, Matt Willse ’01. 6. Teddy Davidson ’05, Andrew Lin ’05, Eno Umoh ’04.

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John Schmick and Henry Smyth tour Fenway Park with Dr. Charles Steinberg ’76, executive vice president and senior advisor for the Red Sox.

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Alumni

Gilman on the Road: John Schmick Farewell Tour

What does Headmaster John Schmick ’67 have in common with Cher and Tina Turner, Alabama and the Eagles? The musicians all bid farewell to their fans with a final tour, as did John Schmick in a series of Gilman Alumni Association-sponsored alumni regional events hosted by local alumni.

John Schmick and a team of Gilman representatives traveled to Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York City and Boston, giving admirers around the country the chance to celebrate and reminisce during his last regional tour as Headmaster. The December 5, 2012, Washington, D.C., event served as both a regional alumni and career networking reception. Hosted by Gail and Andy Quartner ’70 in their Bethesda, Md., home, the gathering featured these career network mentors: Mark A. Hillman ’80, president/portfolio manager; Hillman Capital Management, Inc.; Daniel L. Latshaw ’04, investment banking associate, Wells Fargo Securities; William J. Tennis ’72, EVP & general counsel, Diamondrock Hospitality Company; and John K. Whittlesey ’74, foreign service officer, United States State Department. Nicholas R.G. Baldick ’86, managing partner, Hilltop Public Solutions, and Michael D. Daneker ’83, attorney, Arnold & Porter agreed to serve as mentors but were unable to attend the event.

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Headmaster Schmick, Alumni Association President Rock Harrison ’93, Athletic Director Tim Holley ’77 and Assistant Headmaster Henry Smyth P’24 all traveled west to the Los Angeles alumni event.

Gilman headed west for alumni regional events in Los Angeles on February 4 and San Francisco on February 6, 2013. The Los Angeles event also provided career networking opportunities for guests. Along with co-hosts Rock Harrison ’93, president, Alumni Association; Clayton Apgar ’97, principal, Clayton Apgar Design LLC; Eugene Kim ’00, actor/comedian, SAF/AFTRA; and Ben Lucas ’97, founder, CEO and chairman, Lucas Acquisitions, a swath of alumni representing varied professions were on hand: Ward Bank ’99, Wild Card Entertainment; Charlie Brooks ’04, group sales executive, AEG; Jon Chapper ’03, coordinator, public relations, Los Angeles Dodgers; Brooks Marshall ’97, director, corporate development, Insight Imaging; and Ted Xanders ’81, attorney/partner, Greines, Martin & Richland. Two days later, Bay Area alumni gathered at The Concordia-Argonaut Club for a reception hosted by Sachiko and Mitch Rosenfeld ’84 and co-host Andy Barnes ’62.

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On April 4, an enthusiastic and large group of Gilman alumni and friends joined together at the Highstar Capital headquarters on Park Avenue in Manhattan for the 2013 New York Regional Alumni Event, hosted once again by current Gilman parents Christopher Lee and Susan Ginkel P’13, ’14. A week later, on April 11, more than 80 alumni and friends cheered the Orioles on to victory over the Red Sox at the Boston Regional Alumni Event, hosted by Charles Steinberg ’76 and Bob Thomas ’76. Prior to the first pitch, attendees took a special inside tour of Fenway Park and heard remarks from the Headmaster, who took the time to introduce his successor, Henry Smyth. Several alumni attending each of these regional events recorded video messages to John Schmick. View these tributes on YouTube: http://bit.ly/ZDZCDI

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6 1. San Francisco event co-hosts Andy Barnes ’62 (left) and Mitch Rosenfeld ’84 flank Headmaster Schmick.

2. Bob Pine ’64 and Tom Cassilly ’41 at the New York event. 3. Paul Wallace ’03, Lance Zimmerman ’00 and Connor Fetting-Smith ’00 in Los Angeles.

4. The L.A.-based Lucas brothers, Ben ’97 (left) and Andrew ’00 reconnect with John Schmick. 5. John and Janet Schmick pose with Ned Harwood ’68.

6. Joe Keller ’03, Mark Schuster ’77 and Andy Fine ’87 before the first pitch of the Red Sox vs. Orioles game at Fenway Park.

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Alumni

Cotton Lecture Andrew Cameron ’87, Mark Neumann ’81 Deliver 2013 Cotton Lecture Andrew Cameron ’87 and Mark Neumann ’81, P’13

Dr. Andrew Cameron pulled out a letter from a yellowed envelope, written longhand on a sheet of composition paper. The letter was dated June 4, 1987, just a few days before his graduation from Gilman, and the writer was Peter Julius, who taught and coached both him and some of the students now listening in 2013. The message, obviously, had stuck with Cameron for 26 years, important enough not only to save but also to pass on to boys who weren’t even born until years after his Gilman graduation. “You are self-made. No one else decided for you to forego the easy way. Take the credit yourself,” Julius wrote. “But to whatever extent you credit Gilman for your success,” he continued, “remember that you are one of a very lucky few. You were the beneficiary of a fundamental inequity, one that I hope you do whatever you can to reduce rather than perpetuate.” Those connections to lessons learned at Gilman, and the need to find happiness in whatever professions boys choose, colored the remarks of both Cameron and

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Mark Neumann ’81 at the 33rd annual H.K. Douglas Cotton Lecture April 10 in the Alumni Auditorium. The lecture annually features business and career lectures for students in the Upper School. Cameron certainly has a stressful and difficult job; the 1987 graduate is now the top liver transplant surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Lifelong alcoholics, tainted transfusion recipients, even children with congenital defects walk through his door, all of them needing the good fortune of a matching liver donor that might never materialize, and usually needing one fast. “You get medievally sick, and then you die,” Cameron said about liver failure. “There’s no drug that can help you at that point. No matter who you are, or how you got your liver problem, you just die. Unless someone else, a total stranger, decided to save your life. That stranger, who you will never know, has said ‘when I die, I want to donate my organs.’ So, at the last possible moment, we can put a liver into a very sick person. And then when we’re done, up all night, tired beyond belief,

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we walk out of the operating room and tell a family that their child isn’t going to die after all. “So that’s what I do every day, and it still shocks me that they pay me.” In the Q&A session following the lecture, Cameron urged the boys to make good on Julius’ request, noting the striking difference between the inside of his hospital and the East Baltimore neighborhood outside its front door. If students help when called, he said, then Gilman had taught them well no matter what profession they choose. Cameron, who went to college at Harvard and then earned both an M.D. and Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins, also runs a lab at Hopkins that studies stem cells and the development of drugs to prevent recurrence of liver failure after transplants. Neumann, a Gilman trustee, parent, and 2012–13 chair of The Gilman Fund, has had a varied career in law, business, entrepreneurship and venture capital. A graduate of Franklin & Marshall College and the University of Maryland School of Law, he currently serves as chief executive officer of 510 Ventures, which owns and operates a variety of businesses and real estate projects. He also is the chair-elect of the Board of Directors for The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore. In the 1990s, Neumann, unhappy working at a big law firm, joined with a partner to create Special Counsel, Inc., which went on to become the nation’s largest legal temporary staffing provider before he sold the business in 2000. During his remarks, he told the boys about the beginning stages of that company’s creation, when he visited with law firms throughout Baltimore to gauge their interest in hiring temporary staff to assist their full-time attorneys. “Almost universally, they told us one message: Maybe it’s a good idea, but if it was a really good idea, somebody would already being doing it,” said Neumann. “If I have a message for you to take away now, it’s to say that’s not true. You can

come up with ideas that are not being done. People do it all the time and you see it all the time.” Among Neumann’s current ventures are restaurants in Baltimore and in Bethany Beach, Delaware. During the Q&A session following the lecture, he told the boys that, while the restaurant business is by far the most difficult in which he had been involved, it also happens to be the most rewarding thanks to its more personal experience and the chance at immediate gratification. He also said that failure in business is destined to happen, but that shouldn’t stop your next project or dream from starting. “Learn what you’re good at and what you enjoy,” Neumann said. “Because, speaking for myself, I’ve never been very successful when I’m not happy. My work suffers, and it’s obvious. There’s a lot more out there than just getting a paycheck.” The H.K. Douglas Cotton Memorial Lecture was established by Baltimore businessman Henry Kyd Douglas Cotton through an endowment created shortly before his death in 1979. The objective of the yearly lecture is to acquaint Gilman students with the various careers that are available to them. Mr. Cotton developed an association with Gilman while his seven grandsons attended the School in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s.

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Alumni

Alumni Reunion and Family Weekend 2013

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The weekend was grand, indeed. A celebration befitting a beloved Headmaster, 11 classes celebrating reunions (albeit one the week before), alumni reliving the glory days of their athletic careers, music and art aplenty and the chance to dunk a teacher or student in the tank made this Alumni Reunion Weekend one to remember. The weekend began on Thursday, May 9 with the first pitch of Gilman Night at Camden Yards. The festivities moved north to Roland Park on Friday, May 10, starting with with class visits and tours

of Carey Hall and the Lumen Center, ably led by Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Bill Gamper ’71. A favorite spot: the former senior room, now the art history classroom. The Gilman: Then and Now luncheon provided an opportunity for visiting alumni, especially Old Guard members, to enjoy each other’s company. Headmaster John Schmick led a lively panel discussion where graduating seniors shared their Gilman experiences.

Good game: Displaying their Gilman-bred sportsmanship, alumni and varsity players congratulate each other after the game.

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Let the games begin! Headmaster Schmick signals the start of the Greyhound Family Fun Run.

Friday evening closed with a wonderful celebration of John Schmick. More than 600 family, friends, alumni, parents, and former colleagues gathered under a big top tent on Harris Terrace and Lawn for a delightful evening of sincere praise and a bit of good-natured roasting. The threat of storms sent the May 11 Family Day carnival indoors, but the Greyhound Family Fun Run and the Alumni-Varsity Baseball and the Alumni Lacrosse games went off without a raindrop. Throughout the day, visitors toured the art show in the Old Gym, marveling at the wonderful creations of talented Gilman artists of all ages, and enjoyed a plethora of musical offerings — bands, strings, hand bells and voice — in the Alumni Auditorium. The Class of 1963 launched its festival 50th Reunion Weekend with a dinner at Tark’s Grill Friday evening. Saturday morning began with a special campus tour and a solemn memorial service. The class posed for its official reunion photograph on the steps of Carey Hall before proceeding to the Headmaster’s home for brunch.

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An afternoon forum gave classmates the opportunity to share their experiences of the past 50 years. The class gathered once again later in the evening at home of Nan and Bill Paternotte for their reunion dinner hosted by the Paternottes and John Claster. The classmates wrapped up their weekend with a Sunday hosted by Eleanor and Bill Oster and Lance Bendann at the Osters’ home. The Classes of 1953, 1968, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1988, 1998, 2003 and 2008 marked their respective reunions at various locations around town. The Class of 1993 celebrated its reunion on May 4.

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6 1. The Drum Corps raises spirits and keeps the beat for Family Day activities. 2. Is that a check? Players take the field for the second annual Alumni Lacrosse game.

3. The Family Day carnival includes the ever-popular dunking booth. Looks like this young man has hit the water once or twice.

4. Gilman moms Caroline Jeppi P’18 and Heather Vogel P’20, ‘22 sell Family Day t-shirts. The Gilman Parents Association coordinates the carnival.

5. The Fifth Grade Chorus performs as part of the Festival of the Arts. 6. Young admirers check out the various creations at the all-school art show.

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6 1. Director of Admissions and Financial Aid Bill Gamper ’71 takes a tour group to the library reading room, formerly the dining hall until the 1970s.

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2. Chris Scarlett ’63, Ed Supplee ’63, Sally Supplee and Tom Chase ’63 review materials after the 50th Reunion Memorial Service.

3. Mary Ellen and George Thomsen ’48 check in at the Gilman: Then and Now luncheon.

5. James Smoot ’83 and Gero Verheyen ’83, P’19 hold up photos of their previous selves at the 1983 30th Reunion.

4. Steve Burns ’98 and Matt McLamb ’98 celebrate at the Class of 1998 15th Reunion.

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8 6. Headmaster Schmick visits with Peter Black ’66, one of Schmick’s oldest friends and a fellow intrepid Hyde Bay camper, and Jibri McLean ’13.

7. The Class of 1963 poses for its official 50th Reunion photograph on the front steps of Carey Hall.

8. The Class of 2003 marks 10 years post-Gilman graduation at Red Star in Fells Point. View more photographs at gilman.edu/aw2013

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Alumni

A Book for Many Genres topher russo ’79

Patrick Smithwick ’69 recently has been awarded the seventh annual Dr. Tony Ryan Book Award, for his 2012 autobiographical work “Flying Change: A Year of Racing and Family and Steeplechasing.” The work is a follow-up to the author’s 2006 volume “Racing My Father: Growing Up with a Riding Legend,” itself a finalist for the inaugural Book Award in 2006. A $10,000 winner’s check and a custom-designed Irish crystal trophy were presented to Smithwick on April 10 during an evening reception at Castleton Lyons farm in Lexington, Kentucky. Here Gilman alumnus Topher Russo ’79 offers a review of “Flying Change.” Patrick Smithwick’s “Flying Change” is a book that fits many genres. It is a must read for those who love horse racing as well as for those interested in Maryland history, as racing and the Old Line State are heavily entwined. Psychology sections in bookstores may be stocked with “Flying Change” because it is a story of a man in mid-life. Finally, those devotees of “Gilman” literature — stuff about the School — will value this book because it is quintessentially about a “Gilman everyman” in mid-life.

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“Flying Change” reads like a James Joyce novel in that there is a bit of a stream of consciousness to the book. The story flows through shifting scenes about family, friends, self — and passing thoughts while working out, on vacation, at home, mucking out a stall, at a party or just by one’s self. These scenes all illuminate a theme — of a multi-faceted man living his life change — all beautifully written with the rare gift of bringing the reader into the scene, so much so, that one will swear he or she was actually in some of the “moments” described by Pat. Pat makes a lot of things feel that real in his book. One is the dangers of racing. People get killed in that sport — and it is not a rarity. As Pat writes in “Flying Change,” “Many young men and women today go through a lifetime without ever having experienced the exhilaration of making an instantaneous decision in a life-threatening situation and the ensuing rush from having survived by skill and quickness and nerve and training handed down through generation after generation from father and mother to son and daughter.” Pat is not saying: risk one’s life. He is saying: take

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chances, push the envelope — and he is doing it with individualism and hard work— not only very brave — but very Gilman. Family relationships — for any of us — are not always easy to live or understand midst their ebbs and flows and their growths and changes. But somehow, as these relationships wend their way through the arguments, the strengths, the weaknesses, the good and bad days (and moods) — the “gestalt” of any family — they can lead to a very good and deeper place. In “Flying Change” there is much for Pat to navigate with his family — such as a wife and mother who were not thrilled about his return to racing. To Pat, all the challenge and strain to relationships is worth it, partly when his daughter (maybe age nine at the time) takes up riding with a new enthusiasm because of, “Watching you [Daddy] in the races. That is what it is.” Pat’s return to racing is also for others — not just himself — and is therefore, also, very Gilman. Pat does not talk much of faith or spirituality — but the book has enough of it for one to know it is an important dimension to him. “Flying Change” is about a return to steeplechasing at age 48 when most riders are age 24. What a leap of faith! And Pat, like the truly spiritual person, described in the Gospels and inculcated at Gilman, is one of those who goes to his “closet to pray” as opposed to one who goes to more ostentatious places. Pat writes about his prayer life as he utilizes it to wrestle with his daily challenges — especially with racing in the mix of his busy life. For Pat to include his quiet and profound faith, enmeshed in the fabric of life — is so real and so Gilman — and a good example for our modern “sophisticated” world. Pat’s book is playful. He is having fun trying to do something — physically — that men half his age normally can barely do. He is having fun going back to his “good ole’ days” having his “last hurrah” (or maybe his first last hurrah). He enjoys his family and friends, getting into shape, a cold beer, a good meal, a fun bar, a turn on the dance floor, a beautiful sunset, a great party, a tender or silly moment. To be so playful

about life — so boyish — is not just healthy it is also happy. Pat is Longfellow’s “Happy Warrior” as he juggles his busy life of work, family, and now steeple chasing — and that boyish joy thrown into the mix of one’s persona is so Gilman. So, does Pat win the big race in the end? Ultimately, Pat “wins” in “Flying Change” for reasons best put by a psychologist friend of mine who said, “The healthiest state a person can live in, or be, is one where he or she embraces and lives all that is good and healthy in him or her — instead of suppressing or denying these things.” That is what Pat does in “Flying Change” and he does so living that unique Gilman je ne c’est quoi mix of hard work, great fun, subtle spirituality, physicality and intellectual excellence.

Recent Books by Gilman Alumni Authors Frank DeFord ’57 “Over Time: My Life As a Sportswriter” (Atlantic Monthly Press, 2012) Patrick Smithwick ‘69 “Flying Change: A Year of Racing and Family and Steeplechasing” (Chesapeake Book Co., 2012) Bob Ehrlich ‘75 “Turn This Car Around: The Roadmap to Restoring America” (2011) Daniel Stuelpnagel ’83 “Help Me Kill” (Sequence3, 2012) Robert Landon ’85 Co-author, Lonely Planet Italy (Lonely Planet, 2012) Greg Carter ‘88 “The United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing” (NYU Press, 2013) Nathaniel Hoffman ‘95 “Amor & Exile” (Cordillera West Books, 2013) C. Alexander (Sandy) London ’98 “We Give a Squid a Wedgie: An Accidental Adventure #3” (Puffin, 2013), “Proxy” (Penguin Young Readers Group, 2013) Are you recently published? Please send an e-mail to alumni@gilman.edu so we can be sure to include your work in the Roy Barker Collection in the Edward R. Fenimore Memorial Library. Any original work or composition (including film and music) are collected.

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In Memoriam “The years at Gilman cemented his scholarship,” writes his son John about Arthur W. Machen, Jr., a well-known Baltimore attorney who was “guided always by an innate fundamental awareness of fairness.”

Arthur W. Machen, Jr. ’38 “Tempora mutantur, et nos mutamur in illis.” Times change and we are changed in them. john p. machen ’69

My father was born on December 16, 1920, in the same house on Monument Street that his grandfather purchased in 1879 and where his grandmother still lived. She, from Macon, Georgia, and born more than a decade before the start of the Civil War, brought to that household deep Southern traditions. My father’s father, then the patriarch of the family, was himself the product of antebellum attitudes. Into this sea of southern conservatism, characterized by Christian fundamentalism and intense reverence for books, my father began a life that would end nearly 93 years later in the age of iPhones and gay marriage. He was as different at the time of his passing as was the culture that changed around him over a lifetime. The years at Gilman cemented his scholarship. Never much of an athlete (skills stunted somewhat by a bout of polio in his youth), he found his niche in the study of history, math, Latin and Greek. Studies continued at Princeton, despite the objections of his father who had misgivings about the direction of higher education north of the Mason-Dixon Line. There he

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majored in Classics and wrote his senior thesis on the comparison of religion as seen through the epic poetry of Homer and Virgil. This training was regarded as the best preparation for a young man of his age destined to continue in the practice of law, following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. The values of the time seemed much the same as when his grandfather began his law practice in Baltimore in 1852. Industrial and electrical advances hastened the movement of people and ideas, but many of those ideas, at least those exchanged in my father’s stratum of society, were largely unaffected by progressivism and social change that pressed elsewhere. Then came World War II. Immediately upon his graduation from Princeton in 1942, my father went into the Navy to join many of his generation, and with remarkable speed emerged 90 days later with the rank of ensign and a rapid promotion to lieutenant. Our country needed smart young men to operate the complex machinery of modern warfare, and little time was wasted getting the talented

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ones trained and in position. It was during that time, which he later characterized as “four wasted years,” that my father was exposed to a world of people and things that he had never before experienced. He may have lacked perspective on the positive growth from serving on a battleship during those four years. Following the Japanese surrender, it was back to business. On to Harvard Law School, marriage, the start of a sterling legal career as a corporate and securities lawyer with Venable, Baetjer and Howard and the disorienting challenge of raising three sons in the age of sex, drugs and rock-n-roll. My father’s deep and penetrating intellect took him on a path of ideas that separated him from his forebears. His values were guided always by an innate fundamental awareness of fairness. Young associates in the law firm, at first intimidated by my father’s stern and formal bearing, soon learned of his patience and considerate caring for others. In 1968, he publicly criticized Gov. Spiro Agnew, whose scolding of black leaders after the

Baltimore riots aroused the approving attention of Richard Nixon. He pushed a program through the Maryland legislature that provided funding for The Maryland Legal Services Corporation and was cited for “outstanding service in providing legal services to the poor and handicapped in Maryland.” He was a proud liberal Democrat. Retirement in 1994 brought relaxation from the rigors of an intense law practice, but his mind never slowed down. He wrote book reviews and articles on subjects ranging from etymology to epistemology. He became an expert on incunabula (books published before 1500). Always well-read on current affairs, he had an opinion on everything, but always the open-mindedness to consider other points of view. On the rare occasion that he found himself in the wrong, he would change his mind and readily so acknowledge. Ideas and values grow with time and hard work. Over a lifetime we start with what our parents give us, both genetically and environmentally. After that we are shaped by a succession of choices, chance, hardship and achievement to a point which some would characterize as greater self-awareness. For the exceptional ones, like Arthur Machen, it is pure and beautiful wisdom. Arthur Machen, Jr. ’38 served on the Gilman School Board of Trustees from 1958–1961. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Rose Bradley Purves Machen, sons John P. “Jack” Machen ’69 and Henry L. Machen ’77 and five grandchildren. His eldest son Arthur W. “Peter” Machen died in 1970 of wounds suffered in combat in Vietnam.

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In Memoriam

John “Nemo” Robinson 1922–2013

tim baker ’60

Nemo Robinson took what was at the time an atypical path to Gilman. He grew up in Catonsville (where his older brother nicknamed him “Nemo” after a character in a comic strip). He graduated from Catonsville High School in 1938 and Western Maryland College in 1943. There he played basketball and baseball and was later inducted into the college’s Sports Hall of Fame. After fighting in World War II, he took a tip from the Evening Sun’s sports editor and applied for a job at Gilman as a math teacher and basketball coach. He began in September, 1946, left for the Korean War from 1950-1952, then returned to teach math and coach in the Lower School until 1955. He continued to coach the varsity basketball team until 1962, guiding his teams to five Maryland Scholastic Association titles. After leaving Gilman, he lived in Severna Park (near Robinson Road, named for his grandfather). He developed and sold real estate and devoted himself to Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church where for 42 years he worshipped, sang in the choir, taught Sunday school, and served as an Ordained Ruling Elder. He passed away at 90 last January, survived by his wife Lucia, his son John ’73, three daughters, Margie, Linda, and Mary, 11 grandchildren, and 14 grandchildren.

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Memories of a Man We looked up to him, admired him, and wanted to be like him, first as Lower School boys, 10 or 11 years old, back in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and later as teenagers who played on his varsity basketball teams. In college we came back to see him during Christmas vacations, to scrimmage against the varsity but mostly to sit around the coaches’ locker room listening to the stories he loved to tell. In later years we visited him at his home on the Severn River and celebrated his birthdays at large and boisterous luncheons at a nearby Italian restaurant. Then last January, we sat together in his church to mourn and honor him at his memorial service. Nemo Robinson. We loved this man for over 60 years — this fiercely competitive, warm and funny, kind and caring teacher and coach who first came into our lives when we were young and impressionable, unsure and apprehensive as we began to ask ourselves questions about life and manhood.

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John “Nemo” Robinson taught and coached at Gilman from 1946– 1962, with a two-year interruption from 1950–1952 when he left for the Korean War.

In the Lower School we watched in awe as he sank two-hand set shots from mid-court in the old gym and then even made them from the opposite foul line. In the old Cottage we studied the math problems he outlined on the blackboard. No one dared or even wanted to hack around in his classes. But he himself couldn’t resist, nor could the others in that marvelous band of Lower School teachers. He’d stop, put his hand to his ear, and listen to the coded message Mr. Goodwin was banging on the wall from his geography classroom next door. Bang. Bang. Bang-Bang-Bang. He’d go to the wall and pound out an answer. Bang-Bang-Bang. Bang. Mr. Bishop would answer from his classroom across the hall, and Mr. Callahan and Mr. Ackley would pick up the beat from their classrooms. Then Mr. Robinson would end it with one final, solemn blow. “It’s Schmick, hacking around again,” he’d inform us, shaking his head as he ran his finger across his throat. The uproar in the Cottage would cease as suddenly as it had begun. Mr. Robinson would resume the math lesson as if nothing

unusual had happened. Whatever they’d done to poor Schmick couldn’t have been as serious as it had sounded, for Billy looked okay at recess. That’s what our days were like in the Cottage — strict attention to our studies punctuated by sudden outbursts of riotous fun. Discipline was maintained by respect and force of personality rather than punishment. Demerits had no deterrent effect, for Gilman was just as much fun on Saturday mornings, and we wouldn’t have to pick up litter for very long, anyway, because Mr. Robinson and Mr. Goodwin would soon have us playing touch football. Varsity basketball was more serious, of course. Mr. Robinson hated losing and could get angry when we didn’t play well. But he was never mean or insulting, and his anger never lasted past the game itself. Soon he’d be telling stories again. Recounting the comic antics of his beloved “Coop,” Bob Cooper ’49. Or telling about the time Towson Catholic played Gilman for the 1950 city championship and froze the ball on offense, even though their team’s star was the future NBA great Gene

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Nemo Robinson’s former basketball players visit their coach at his home in 2007.

Shue. Our coach would laugh, recounting how we avenged the loss three years later when Dave Bimestefer hit a half-court shot at the buzzer. Indeed, he gloried in his players’ achievements, reliving for us George Boynton’s acrobatic drives to the basket and the deadly jump shot Frank Deford developed in his senior year. Mr. Robinson coached some great teams. Baldwin, Bergland, and Russell on that ’50 team. Boynton, Dankmeyer, Glann, and Stone in ’56. Garrett, Deford, Horst, and Yarbro in ’57. Grose, Stifler, and McPherson in ’59. (Forgive me if I have neglected your great team as well as my own.) We all watched and learned from him — how to play tenacious defense, find the open man, make your foul shots. But he also taught us lessons that have lasted long beyond our seasons on a basketball court — how to both win and lose, try your best, leave a bad game behind you, play fair, respect your opponents, care about your teammates, laugh and enjoy life, and commit yourself to something important.

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Yes, we loved and admired this man. And we didn’t even know anything about, because he never mentioned, his heroics as a 22 year-old lieutenant in the Battle of the Bulge. It wasn’t until 2000 that we first learned about his Bronze Star with a V for Valor and the Oak Leaf Cluster. Had we known then, imagine how we boys would have idolized him. Maybe we were fortunate not to know when we were young. His World War II exploits might then have made him seem mythic to us, rather than human, and accounts of his heroic deeds might have obscured the day-to-day reality of his warm and caring nature. Instead his strong and nurturing presence gave us a living example we could emulate and a lifelong model we could remember as we have tried to answer the question we had begun to ask ourselves then and still wonder about today — what does it mean to be a man? Tim Baker ’60 played for Mr. Robinson in the Lower School 1952–1954 and again on the varsity 1957–1960. He captained the 1960 team.

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In Memoriam

Gilman remembers those alumni who have died in recent months. May they rest in peace.

Mr. Richard F. Ober ’33

Mr. Daniel Baker ’48

Mr. E. Hambleton Welbourn, Jr. ’34

Mr. G. Gordon Gatchell, Jr. ’48

Mr. J. Cheston Constable ’35

Mr. William M. Brewster ’49*

Mr. Frank B. Ober ’35

Mr. Robert H. Cooper, Jr. ’49

Mr. Arthur W. Machen, Jr. ’38

Mr. Peter Gibbons-Neff ’64

Mr. Frank S. Dudley, Jr. ’39

Mr. Peter Y. Martin ’66

Mr. Henry C. Lancaster, Jr. ’41

Mr. Wesley H. S. Everett ’83

Mr. Charles H. Latrobe, III ’41

Major Andrew T. Jones ’83

The Hon. Christopher Van Hollen ’41

Mr. John D. Pfaff ’91

Dr. Paul C. Hudson ’43

Mr. Paul E. K. Mullan ’97

The Right Rev. Huntington Williams, Jr. ’43 Mr. A. Herman Stump, Jr. ’44

Faculty and Staff

Dr. Robert S. Donoho ’46

Louise Fitzell John “Nemo” Robinson Dean Weller

* Also served on Gilman's Staff Deaths reported to Gilman between January 22, 2013, and May 28, 2013.

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The basketball team moves up to the “A” Conference in 2013-2014 after reaching the “B” Conference title game in three of the last four seasons.

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Athletics

Basketball Makes a Move Greyhounds step up to the “A” Conference.

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For a generation now, the independent schools that comprise the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association’s “A” Conference have played some of the best high school basketball in the United States. Conference stars like Juan Dixon and Carmelo Anthony have gone on to lead their college teams to NCAA championships; many others have been key players for Division I teams and played in the NBA. One of the few things the “A” Conference has been missing in its 18-year history is Gilman, but that’s about to change. The Greyhound basketball program is moving up to the “A” Conference beginning with the 2013–2014 academic year after playing in the “B” Conference since the MIAA’s inception in 1995. The news was announced in March, following the MIAA Competition Committee’s approval of the School’s request to make the move. “It’s been our School’s long-term goal to have all of our athletic teams compete at the MIAA’s highest level,” says Gilman Director of Athletics Tim Holley ’77. “We felt with our wonderful young coach Owen Daly and the success of our teams

in the last few years, the time was right for us to make the move. “We feel our future is pretty bright in basketball, and we think we can compete at the highest level.” Gilman now has 15 of its 16 varsity teams competing in the “A” Conference in their respective sports; only ice hockey now remains in the “B” Conference. The varsity basketball team won three league titles in its final 10 seasons in the “B” Conference, including the 2012 championship, and reached the conference championship game three times in the last four seasons. With the addition of Gilman, the “A” Conference will have 10 teams in 2013– 2014. They include some of Gilman’s biggest athletic rivals in most sports — McDonogh, Calvert Hall, Loyola Blakefield, Mount Saint Joseph and Archbishop Spalding — as well as St. Frances, John Carroll, Glenelg Country School and Mount Carmel. The “A” Conference previously included Cardinal Gibbons and Towson Catholic, both of which unfortunately closed their doors in the past several years.

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The Gilman varsity has had plenty of experience playing “A” Conference competition in recent years. This past season, the Greyhounds played Mount Saint. Joseph, Calvert Hall, and McDonogh, earning a win over the Eagles, and Daly’s team defeated Calvert Hall during the Greyhounds’ outstanding 2011-12 season. “We are looking forward to the challenge of competing in the ‘A’ Conference and continuing to develop the basketball program at all levels,” said Daly, who has a 67-44 record in four seasons as Gilman’s head coach. Daly, who played lacrosse collegiately at Princeton, was a member of two “B” Conference championship basketball teams as a student at McDonogh, which later moved on to the “A” Conference in basketball as Gilman will do next season. Gilman’s junior varsity and freshman/ sophomore basketball teams will also move to the “A” Conference on their respective levels beginning with the 2013–2014 season. The 2012–2013 Gilman junior varsity basketball team, under head coach Chris Dawson, finished a perfect 18-0 in “B” Conference play. 2012–13 winter sports recap Gilman’s varsity ice hockey had its best season in many years on the way to a “B” Conference championship, while the powerful squash team continued its dominance of its MIAA rivals in 2012–2013. In the four-team “B” Conference, hockey’s only two regular-season losses came to neighboring Boys’ Latin. But the teams met again in the playoff championship, and this time the outcome was different. Senior Michael Schahfer and junior Brice Tucker scored two goals apiece, and senior goalie Chris Walsch had 35 saves, as the Greyhounds stunned the Lakers by a 6-2 score to win the program’s first MIAA title since the 2005-2006 season. Five Greyhounds earned All-MIAA honors following the season for head coach Zach Collins, including Schahfer and Tucker. The others were all seniors: Max Greene, Tucker Plunkert and Will Herman.

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Squash lost five of its top eight players from the year before, including a few future collegiate players, but that didn’t stop the Greyhounds from winning their sixth MIAA title in the six years the sport has been official in the league. Coach Boo Smith ’70’s team defeated Friends by a 6-1 score in this year’s championship match; the Greyhounds have never lost either a regular-season or playoff match against MIAA competition. The top four players in Gilman’s lineup: senior Michael East, sophomore Davis Owen, senior Grant Lounsbury and junior Henry Schmidt, all earned All-MIAA honors. Varsity basketball caught fire late in the season in the “B” Conference after a slow start, winning eight of nine conference games in a 25-day stretch in January and qualifying for the league playoffs. After beating St. Paul’s in the quarterfinals, Gilman then pulled an upset, defeating 17-1 Boys’ Latin on the Lakers’ home floor in the semifinals. Gilman’s run would come to an end in the championship, a rematch of the previous year, this time won by St. Vincent Pallotti by a 62-55 score. Gilman’s All-MIAA players were senior Ben Grace, who will be a walk on player on the UMBC basketball team, and sophomore Kai Locksley, one of the better players in any of the MIAA divisions in 2013–2014. As they would be in the outdoor season, Gilman was second-best to McDonogh in MIAA indoor track and field during the winter. In news after the season, it was announced that Middle School teacher Matt Tully ’02 would be taking over as head coach of the indoor track and field program beginning in 2013–2014. On the wrestling mat, the Greyhounds finished eighth of 16 teams in the MIAA championship meet. Star football quarterback Shane Cockerille ’13 also shined on the mat, winning the MIAA championship in the 220-lb. weight class, finishing second at the Maryland Independent School meet and third at the National Prep School meet. Swimming continued to improve as it adjusts to life in the “A” Conference after winning four straight “B” Conference titles from 2008 through 2011.

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5 1. Ice hockey won a conference championship for the first time in seven years.

2. The wrestling team had an MIAA champion, Shane Cockerille ’13, and finished 5-2 in MIAA dual meets.

4. The squash team continued its dominance, winning the MIAA championship for the sixth consecutive year.

5. Indoor track and field had a strong season and finished second in the MIAA championship meet.

3. Swimming continued to improve in “A” Conference competition.

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Gavin Sheets ’14, a first-team All-Metro infielder/pitcher, hit .425 and helped power the baseball team to the MIAA championship series.

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Athletics

Timing is Everything Spring Varsity Recap

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From the middle of March through the beginning of May, in 48 head-to-head meetings with their MIAA “A” Conference rivals, Gilman’s spring varsity teams won 39 times. None of those five Gilman teams finished below third place in the league regular-season standings; three of the four that have a postseason playoff tournament reached the final. Unfortunately for the Greyhounds, the good news, though there was a lot of it, would stop there. Gilman was left to watch others celebrate with this spring’s championship trophies, a bit of a bitter ending to seasons filled with both individual and team achievement. In fact, with the exception of tennis, where Mount Saint Joseph went undefeated, Gilman beat the eventual MIAA champion head-to-head during the regular season. It was the scheduling that wasn’t good for the Greyhounds, not the quality of their performance. Baseball may have dealt with the most difficult ending for this spring’s teams. At first, the timing appeared perfect. Seeded second in the postseason double-

elimination tournament, Gilman beat Archbishop Curley at home and then won at top-seeded Calvert Hall, sending the Greyhounds to the championship and the Cardinals to the loser’s bracket. Four days later, predictably, the archrivals met again, this time at Ripken Stadium in what would be the first of two finals games. Calvert Hall, needing to win two games to win the title while Gilman needed just one, accomplished the feat. The first was by a 7-0 score, while the second game was a 4-2 comeback victory; Gilman’s offense hit a slow spot at just the wrong time. The Greyhounds finished the year 24-12 overall and reached the MIAA championship final for the second time in four seasons under head coach Larry Sheets. For the third year in a row, Gilman also played in the Baltimore President’s Cup tournament final at Camden Yards. Gilman and Calvert Hall played five times in the spring, including three times in the last six days of the season, in what has become one of the top rivalries in Baltimore high school sports.

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Varsity lacrosse, under head coach Brooks Matthews ’87, waded successfully through an “A” Conference schedule that was even more difficult than usual in 2013. Around the midpoint of the season, Gilman was ranked in the top five nationally by the respected Inside Lacrosse website but ranked lower than that just in Baltimore by the equally respected Baltimore Sun poll. Still, heading into its final regular season game at McDonogh May 7, Gilman was 12-2 with just one MIAA loss, a two-goal defeat to Boys’ Latin, considered the nation’s top team in 2013. The McDonogh game, however, was the beginning of 96 minutes of lacrosse the Greyhounds would rather forget, a stretch that ended their season prematurely. On a rainy day in Owings Mills, Gilman had a poor fourth quarter and lost 10-6, giving the Eagles a quarterfinal bye instead of the Greyhounds. Three days later in the playoffs, this time at home, Gilman fell behind a red-hot Loyola offense and could not recover, falling 17-14 to a Dons team that would go on to win the MIAA title in upset fashion. Track and field actually did win a championship, though not the one it really wanted. The Greyhounds were the “A” Conference dual meet champion for the fifth straight year and the seventh time in the last eight years, winning all five of their dual meets handily. In addition, Gilman finished in first place in three invitational events in the spring. The conference championship meet is often all about depth, however, and McDonogh (176.5 points) had just enough of it to hold off Gilman (151 points) and end the Greyhounds’ four-year winning streak at that meet. The meet was tight throughout — Gilman won six events, including two relays, while McDonogh won seven events, including the other two relays. Both the Greyhounds and Eagles finished well ahead of third-place Loyola. A few weeks earlier, Gilman and head coach Johnnie Foreman once again sent representatives to the annual Penn Relays in Philadelphia. The relay team of seniors Chris

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Jackson and Jibri McLean and juniors Cameron Helm and Robert Wilhelm finished third in the Prep School 4x400 race in a time of 3:30.57. A deep varsity golf squad, under the tutelage of coach Don Rogers, rebounded from a disappointing finish in the two-round individual team championship in April to reach the championship match of the dual-meet season in May. The prize was a trip to Caves Valley Golf Club and a matchup with Calvert Hall. Twelve days earlier, at Towson Golf & Country Club, Gilman had earned a 13-8 win over the Cardinals. This time, however, the tables were turned, and Calvert Hall’s win by a score of 12.5-8.5 kept the Greyhounds from winning their first team title since 2008. Gilman finished in second place in the regular season in the standings at 6-2 and then beat Archbishop Spalding in a semifinal match at Elkridge just five days after losing to the Cavaliers. Two Greyhound golfers qualified for all three rounds of the individual stroke play championship. Junior Kevin Devine finished 10th overall, while senior John Emmett was 20th. Tennis was 9-1 overall in “A” Conference play in the regular season, and a 4-1 loss to eventual champion Mount Saint Joseph in the playoff championship match was closer than the score appeared. Overall, Gilman won 16 of its 22 matches in the spring. The Greyhounds had champions in both singles and doubles in the individual tournament. In the No. 1 singles bracket, junior Garrett Weinstein defeated McDonogh’s Jake Gober to win the title. In the No. 2 doubles bracket, the Gilman team of sophomore Jordan Brodie and senior Andrew Katz won the championship by beating a team from St. Paul’s. Earlier this season, during Spring Break, the Greyhounds traveled to Southern California to participate in the annual Corona del Mar High School National Invitational, where coach Steve Krulevitz’s team finished with a win and a tie in four matches against some of the top teams in the country.

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4 1. Lacrosse lost just twice during the regular season in MIAA play and finished 12-4 overall against tough competition.

2. Tennis once again reached the conference championship match.

3. The golf team had a terrific dual match season, leading to a championship match appearance at Caves Valley against Calvert Hall.

4. Outdoor track and field finished a perfect 5-0 in MIAA dual meets.

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Development

Classroom Rededicated to Billy Lynn ’69

Classmates, friends, and family of William (Billy) D. Lynn, Jr. ’69 gathered April 19 to connect the past to the present to the future with the rededication of a classroom in Lynn’s memory. Billy Lynn died of leukemia in January 1968, the winter of his junior year at Gilman. His parents dedicated a classroom in the Main Building — as Carey Hall was then known — in his memory after his death. Some 40 or so years later, when Carey Hall was renovated, the plaque was removed and the original space repurposed to a new use. Today, more than four decades after his death, a plaque memorializing Lynn once again hangs in Carey Hall, gracing a classroom generally used for math instruction.

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Even after so many years, Lynn, a 13-year man, is well-remembered for his kind and generous spirit as well as his devotion to Gilman. “He always treated me like a real person, unlike other Gilman Upper Classmen,” wrote Skip Hebb ’70 in an e-mail that Headmaster John Schmick ’67 read at the dedication. “I will always be grateful that he taught me to sail at the HBYC [Hyde Bay Youth Camp]. Everyone thought the world of Billy. It took me years to get over his death and more years before I attended another funeral. These things stick with you over the years.” The first of three irrepressible Lynn brothers to attend Gilman — Billy ’69, Tom ’71 and Jim ’74 — Billy was a scholarathlete who received the top student award from Headmaster Ludlow Baldwin at his seventh grade graduation and ranked in the top five in his class every year in Upper School. During his high school years, he was part of the JV lacrosse and football MSA championship teams coached by Graeme Menzies ’47 and Warren Magruder ’46. And he was a long-time

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Lynn’s brothers Tom Lynn ’71 (left) and Jim Lynn ’74 attend the classroom rededication. The portrait of Billy Lynn ’69 hangs in Carey Hall, in a space generally used for math instruction.

camper, UL (Unskilled Labor), and Head UL at the Hyde Bay. “I have never known a young man so universally revered as Billy. The immediate and overwhelming response of his classmates, indeed of the whole School, is confirmation of the exceedingly great affection and respect that all of us have for him,” wrote Ludlow Baldwin in a letter to Billy’s aunt, Frances Key. His brother Jim remembers that the summer Billy was in City Hospital for treatments, teacher Meredith Reese suffered a heart attack and was hospitalized as well. Billy sent Mr. Reese several letters inquiring after his well-being, and Mr. Reese was struck by Billy’s concern in the face of his own mortality at the age of 16. “The loss of so brave and so fine a young man touches every one of us with a deep sense of tragedy,” said Mr. Reese when he announced Billy’s death to the School. “Only last summer, when I was in one hospital, while Billy was in another, I marveled at his brightness and was powerfully moved by his thoughtfulness . . . that one so stricken as he could concern

himself with others was part of the miracle that was Billy; yet he could and did take thought for the troubles of another. . . . Of one thing we can be sure — we are the losers, all of us who knew Billy. He was a warm and wonderful person, and this place, and we, shall be the less without him.” Following Headmaster Schmick, Bruce Rice ’69 spoke on behalf of the Class of 1969, and Tom Lynn ’71 delivered thoughts on behalf of the family. A new plaque now hangs outside the classroom door and a photograph of Billy will be hung in the room.

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1897 Development

The Gilman Fund 2012–2013 1897

Become a Part of Something Bigger From their first school days, whether first through fifth, in the middle of the middle years or in grade eight, even in their last high school year, Gilman boys know they are a part of something bigger. This year, more than 2,500 alumni, parents, grandparents, faculty, staff and friends also became a part of something bigger when they participated in the annual giving campaign, dedicated to John Schmick ’67 in honor of his faithful service to Gilman School. Together, they raised just over the $2.3 million campaign goal. Alumni from the classes of 1998–2012, especially, earned an additional $50,000 for the Gilman Fund by meeting the Young Alumni Greyhound Challenge posed to them by Susan Ginkel and Christopher Lee P’13, ’14. Gifts to The Gilman Fund provide the flexible, immediate support that helps to attract and retain the best faculty, preserve our historic campus and sustain a talented and diverse student body. These critical dollars provide the margin of difference that defines a Gilman education. Make gifts online at gilman.edu/ onlinegiving

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The Gilman Fund 2013-2014 The 2013–2014 Gilman Fund alumni leadership team is in place and looks forward to kicking off the annual giving campaign in the fall. Annual gifts to The Gilman Fund continue a legacy of generosity that has an immediate impact on current Gilman boys. The campaign, with a goal of $2.3 million, begins July 1, 2013, and runs until June 30, 2014.

Frank A. Bonsall III ’82, P’25, Chair David H. Carroll, Jr. ’88, P’18, Vice Chair-Alumni Mark D. Neumann ’81, Vice Chair-Special Gifts

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In Honor of an Extraordinary Man The John E. Schmick ’67 Scholarships

One of John Schmick’ s most important contributions to the Gilman School is his commitment to keeping a Gilman education accessible to all boys of promise, regardless of their families’ financial situations. Recognizing John’s unwavering belief in the financial aid program’s potential to change lives, several alumni, parents, family and friends and the Class of 1963 established endowed scholarships in John’s name. To date, nearly $700,000 has been raised. Those wishing to honor John Schmick may do so by contributing. To make a gift, use the form at gilman.edu/onlinegiving and indicate “JES Scholarship” in the comment box or contact the Development Office at 410-323-7176.

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Class of 2013

Founders Day 2013 Quintessentially Gilman If you had just two words to describe Gilman School’s 116th Founders Day ceremonies, held on a picture-perfect late spring day in front of the Old Gym, they would be “quintessentially Gilman.” There was outgoing Headmaster John Schmick ’67, Gilman through and through, giving special remarks as his 39-year career came to a close and then receiving a standing ovation. There were the numerous Gilman ties that bind — Board of Trustees President Paul McBride P’13, ’14 getting to hand a diploma to his son Thomas, and Mr. Schmick paying tribute to his mentors, including former Headmaster Redmond Finney ’47, who sat close by watching one of his own grandsons graduate. There were, as usual, almost too many accolades to mention for the senior class, though Mr. Schmick did his best to mention them all.

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It was no surprise, then, that valedictory speaker Rishi Bedi chose to focus on the quintessential Gilman during his time on the podium. He did it with humor and heartfelt emotion and, also unsurprisingly for a high school senior, with a television reference. There was this one time, Bedi said, that Dr. House was in another one of his arguments with a patient, but this time the patient had the last word, about the people you come across in everyday life. “Life is a series of rooms,” she said, “and who we get stuck with in those rooms adds up to what our lives are.” “If there’s anything I’ve learned here (at Gilman), it’s to take advantage of every one of those rooms, and every random stranger that happens to walk in,” said Bedi. “I know it’s been true at Gilman, and I sure hope it’s true in the real world. If we keep walking into rooms, getting stuck in them, and embracing the people we find, things will probably go pretty well.” Bedi, who will attend Stanford in the fall, was also the winner of the William S. Thomas Scholarship Prize for the 12th

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Lorem “I’d like ipsum to thank dolor sit myamet, parents consectetur for sendingadipiscing me to Gilman elit. Sed and venenatis for understanding dignissim risus uthow aliquam. muchInteger. I care about the School,” said Peter Dewire during his valedictory.

“A school leader, he is arguably the brightest person in this entire assembled crowd today, but he tempers that intelligence with a marvelous spirit of humility and compassion,” says Headmaster Schmick as he introduces valedictorian Rishi Bedi.

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6 1. On a graduation day of sorts for Headmaster John Schmick ’67, he and Board of Trustees President Paul McBride P’13, ’14 lead the platform party to the commencement exercises.

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2. The Traveling Men sing the national anthem. 3. Timothy Holley, Jr. ’77 is named the Edward T. Russell chair.

4. Board of Trustees President Paul McBride P’13, ’14 presents a diploma to his son Thomas. 5. B. J. Wilson (left) and Aric Eddinger applaud a classmate.

6. Graduating Traveling Men Zane MacFarlane, Jibri McLean and Jordyn Hawkins-Rippie sing “The Parting Song,” an adaptation of “The Parting Glass,” a 17th century Scottish song of departure.

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School President Zane MacFarlane receives the School’s highest honor, the William A. Fisher Medallion.

grade and the Daniel Baker, Jr. Memorial Award, given to the senior who, through thoughtfulness and by reason of his character, has contributed most to the general welfare of his fellow students. A full list of student awards given on Founders Day is located on page 74. Schmick told the assembled crowd that he was personally glad to be going out with the Class of 2013, one of the closest classes he could remember and “a class of characters, filled with character.” He noted that the class and its leaders had plenty of ideas that were “brilliant, diabolical, and crazy,” but all designed to celebrate classmates and raise school spirit. Though the day was about celebrating the graduation of 115 seniors, it was also about celebrating Mr. Schmick, who first came to Gilman as a fourth-grade student in 1958 and began his 39-year career in teaching and administration in 1974. Schmick’s special remarks to the graduates focused on the lessons he's learned from his Gilman mentors and from his family, and they also focused on character — Honor, Respect, Integrity, Humility and

Excellence — The Gilman Five that will be his long-lasting legacy at the School. In introducing Mr. Schmick, Board of Trustees President McBride told the graduates to “reflect on the example set by your Headmaster, who sought out the strength of each person around him” throughout his career. Bedi, in thanking Mr. Schmick for his service to Gilman, said that “it was inspiring to be led by somebody who is so fundamentally decent.” Before the graduates received their diplomas, Schmick presented a host of faculty awards for outstanding teaching and longevity of service. The faculty awards are also listed on page 74. Once again, as has become tradition, members of the Traveling Men sang a rendition of “The Parting Song,” a 17th century Scottish tune of departure. This year’s singers were seniors Jordyn Hawkins-Rippie, Zane MacFarlane and Jibri McLean, each of whom also won a student award during the ceremony.

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Class of 2013

student awards

faculty/staff awards

William S. Thomas Scholarship Prizes 9th Grade: Christopher A. Wolfe 10th Grade: Todd C. Iodice 11th Grade: Timur D. Guler 12th Grade: Rishi Bedi

Apgar Award for Teaching Excellence Mildred McKeachie

William Cabell Bruce, Jr. Athletic Prize Matthew Glenn Tilley Samuel Christoph Zunkeler

Class of 1947 Fund for Meritorious Teaching Elizabeth Sesler-Beckman

Peter Parrott Blanchard Award John Sinjin Chirikjian John Anthony King Edward Fenimore Award Edward Finney Emala Miles Evan Norris Daniel Baker, Jr. Memorial Award Rishi Bedi

Broadus-Hubbard Award Bryan D. Powell

Edward K. Dunn Faculty Fund Lower School: Erica Hudson Middle School: Donell Thompson, Jr. ’91 Upper School: Aaron Goldman Dawson L. Farber, Jr. Award Diane Fuller Gilman Advisor Fund and Award Lower School: Claudia D. Friddell Middle School: Nicole K. Mitchell Upper School: Ismael Leon

Redmond C.S. Finney Award Jibri Aswad McLean Jordyn Malik Hawkins-Rippie

Walter Lord Middle School Teaching Prize Christopher P. Downs

William A. Fisher Medallion Zane Tucker MacFarlane

Riepe Family Sabbatical Jackie A. Knipp Edward T. Russell Chair Timothy Holley, Jr. ’77 20-Year Recognition S. Thomas Gorski 30-Year Recognition Cecilia C. Chandler James D. Morrison 40-Year Recognition Donald L. Abrams Vivian L. Sawyer Robert D. Smith

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6 1. Cameron Wade and Mikael Woods. 2. Aneta, Ivan and Boris Gramatikov.

3. Peter Cooke (left front, kneeling), Will McAvoy (right front, kneeling) and (left to right, standing) Jake Groenke, Quinn Flaks, Micah Kiser, Charlie Obrecht, Chris Cortezi,

Michael Knudsen, Andrew Liang and Calvin Garay pose for one last group photo. 4. The parent paparazzi strive to capture the best shot of their favored sons.

5. Will Herman and David Cha. 6. Proud grandparents: Jean Finney, Ned Emala, Redmond C. S. Finney ’47.

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Class of 2012

The 115 members of the Gilman School Class of 2013.

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Class of 2013 College Matriculation

The 115 graduating seniors from the Gilman Class of 2013 will attend 76 colleges, universities, and military academies around the nation. Each of the eight Ivy League institutions will welcome at least one Gilman graduate in the fall, with Princeton and Harvard each counting three among their first-year classes. Twenty-five schools have at least two freshmen from Gilman in their incoming classes.

Justin Marshall Adams UNC at Greensboro

Noah James Delwiche* Harvard College

Calvin Andrew Garay Vanderbilt University

Rafay Ahmad George Washington University

Theodore Richard Delwiche* Harvard College

Philip Anthony Giancola University of Mississippi

Theodore Martin Alexander IV Morehouse College

Riley Douglas DeSmit Johns Hopkins University

Sherlock S. Gillet III University of Maryland

Matthew Luke Barth University of Denver

Wyatt Jacob Dickerson Dickinson College

Nicholas William Goldman University of South Carolina

Rishi Bedi* Stanford University

Adam McDaniel Downing Hampton University

Benjamin Joseph Grace UMBC

Cormac Matthew Brennan University College Dublin

Jacob Benjamin Drossner* University of Pennsylvania

Ivan B. Gramatikov University of Maryland

Robert Erwin Brown III Skidmore College

Garrett Jackson Duncan Wake Forest University

Benjamin Leslie Granger The College of William and Mary

David SooBum Cha Georgetown University

John Gardner Murray Eager* Brown University

Carter Standish Gray Sewanee: University of the South

John Sinjin Chirikjian* Yale University

Michael Talbot East* Princeton University

Max Leland Greene Harvard College

James Younghee Choi* University of Pennsylvania

Aric Joseph Eddinger Frostburg State University

Steven Jacob Groenke University of South Carolina

Jeremy Sung Choi University of Maryland

Edward Finney Emala Dickinson College

James Patrick Hanley Grinnell College

David Clark UMBC

John Morehead Emmett IV Franklin and Marshall College

Jordyn Malik Hawkins-Rippie Hampton University

Shane Christopher Cockerille University of Maryland

Austin Donnelly Evans University of Wisconsin

William Albright Herman* Amherst College

Peter Vicars Cooke* UNC-Chapel Hill

Nicolas Vincent Fertitta American International College

Muhammad Kanan Hudhud Johns Hopkins University

Christopher James Cortezi Northwestern University

Benjamin Leary Fisher Kenyon College

John Prentiss Hutchins Year Abroad

Trevor Ratcliffe Davis Ohio Wesleyan University

Quinn Austin Flaks Bucknell University

Jacob Samler Dellheim Tulane University

Alexander Joseph Foertsch University of Virginia

Uchenna Nnamdi Chimaobi Ihenatu University of Maryland

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Christopher Diala Jackson Claremont McKenna College

Daniel Davis St. Clair Muhly University of Alabama

Billy Van Seibel Rhodes College

James Wheeler Johnson* Duke University

Paul Andrew Neumann George Washington University

Andrew Lindsay Shea* Dartmouth College

David Wonjune Kang* UNC-Chapel Hill

Christopher Kenneth Tien Nguyen Virginia Tech

John Colbert Simms Middlebury College

Andrew Philip Katz United States Military Academy Anuj Khandelwal* M.I.T. Joshua Khuvis* Princeton University Anthony Kim* University of Virginia John Anthony King* Middlebury College Micah Adolphus Kiser University of Virginia John Michael Knudsen Kenyon College Saran Kunaprayoon Lehigh University McHenry Houghton Lee Johns Hopkins University Ethan Taylor Levine Washington College Andrew Christopher Liang United States Air Force Academy Grant Robert Lounsbury* Wesleyan University Christian Elliot Lynch Loyola University New Orleans Zane Tucker MacFarlane* Pomona College William Campbell McAvoy University of Richmond Thomas James McBride Gettysburg College Jibri Aswad McLean Kenyon College Thomas Vincent Monahan III Wake Forest University Michael Zachary Morrill Deerfield Academy – Post Graduate Year

Jesse Raphael Nigrin University of Maryland Miles Evan Norris Cornell University Elliott Patrick O’Brien Boston College Charles Phillips Obrecht Vanderbilt University Varun Anshuman Parshad Gap Year Tucker Lewis Plunkert Gap Year Henry Leo Poggi University of Michigan William Henry Pomerantz Bucknell University David Joseph Prevas University of Maryland Daniel Mark Radov* Columbia University Daniel Pierce Reese Furman University Arthur Lee Robinson Ursinus College Benjamin Drew Rothkin Boston University Alexander Beauchamp Rouse Lynchburg College

Garrett Paul Smith University of Miami John Costa Stoller* Johns Hopkins University Conrad Charles Sutter University of Notre Dame Bradley George Tendler Franklin and Marshall College Matthew Glenn Tilley The College of William and Mary Robert Allen Vint, Jr.* Carnegie Mellon University Tanner Bric Vosvick United States Military Academy Cameron Allen Wade Amherst College Christopher Ryan Walsch USAFA Preparatory School John Taylor Wancowicz Rhodes College Connor Johnston Webb The Ohio State University Trevor Daniel Wey University of Alabama Joseph Ferreira White* Princeton University Lloyd Henry Wilson III Ursinus College

Benjamin Gordon Roytenberg Case Western Reserve University

Mikael Antonio Woods Harrisburg University of Science & Technology

Charles Morgan Russell Colorado College

Jason H. Yon University of Maryland

Edward Grafflin Sandberg Guilford College

Min S. Yoo University of Maryland

Michael William Schahfer Duke University

Samuel Christoph Zunkeler Georgia Institute of Technology

Nicholas Danford Schelberg Wake Forest University

*Cum Laude

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Follow GilmanSchool to see pictures of what happens throughout the school day. Tag your own Gilman pictures with #gilmanschoolmd.

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Class Notes Summer 2013

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1943 Sydney King syd.king9@gmail.com We begin with the sad news of Paul Hudson’s recent passing. His brother-in-law called me when he saw my recent mailing. It’s ironic that Paul had chosen to send me a personal biography just last year. Bob Bonnell reports that he and Babs are in good shape and enjoy life at Roland Park Place, where, I gather, Babs is very much involved in how things are run. The golf goes on, and Bob's most recent triumph was a putting contest at Elkridge. It started with a group of 40 some contestants and whittled down to Bob and a young man who was 70 years his junior! No mercy was shown. David Ridgely says: “Same old, same old.” Daughter Patsy is the only Ridgely still riding. She had a very successful fall time in Florida. Her father did not do as well at the racetrack! From Bill Rienhoff III: All is the same on the Eastern Shore, and he’s looking forward to springtime and fishing again. As he wrote to me, there was four inches of snow on the ground at Worton, Md.! Did you ever notice how many of our classmates have Jr. or III following their names? Good stock! Martin Millspaugh has donated his archives concerning the birth and growth of urban development in Baltimore to the Sheridan Library of Johns Hopkins University. His very brief biographical resume mentions working for the Baltimore Sun, the federal department of HUD, the Charles Center-Inner Harbor Development Corp. and the Enterprise International Development Corp. He was also intimately involved in producing the documentary film “Global Harbors.” In his spare time he reorganized the archives of the Carey School of Business at JHU! Marty may be our busiest classmate, though Charles Wagandt is still doing 9 to 5 at his office in Oella. Marty thinks it’s ironic that he and Meredith are now living at Roland Park Place, where he attended second and third grade at RPCS. Another note came to me from your former scribe Walter Dandy, with thanks to his wife and secretary, Anne Allen. Walter remembers trips to visit Paul Hudson’s family in the Miami area. He also recalls that Paul was doing some procedures of which he, Walter, had never heard. In 1949 Paul visited when Walter was interning in surgery at Duke. Paul was then a “detail man,” selling Vick medicine for colds and coughs. Personally, I offer my own bio as follows. . . . In May of 1949 I had my first and only “blind date” with Ann at Hood College. Within a couple of weeks we were engaged and life together has been more fun than I could ever have imagined. We spent years camping with our children and grandchildren. Coast-to-coast and border-to-border. Great togetherness! My 40 years at WBAL-TV were fascinating. When I started out we were inventing television as we went along. I began as a stagehand, then an announcer, director, producer and, finally, as the station’s representative in the community. This meant that I joined dozens of boards and

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committees that were having a positive impact on many aspects on life in Baltimore. Ann and I also bought and rehabbed eight failing houses in the Baltimore area. She was the architect and prime contractor, and I tore down chimneys with my bare hands. Finally, we bought a house for ourselves and built a garden all by ourselves. You attended our 50th Reunion there! Best wishes to one and all!

1945 John G. Wharton Our class had its annual luncheon on Thursday, October 25, 2012, at Tark’s restaurant at the Green Spring Station. Present were the usual crowd of Bill Neill, Dick Wolfe, Andy Thomas, John Herndon, Humpy Stump and Jack Wharton. Pinky Hoen was expected but did not turn up. The combination of poor acoustics and our own difficulties presented a hearing issue for all of us; however, we all had a good time and look forward to our next annual lunch in October 2013. As expected, our conversations revolved around health issues, Gilman football and politics, particularly in regard to the coming presidential elections. Bill Neill still has his 1931 Ford, which he has not used for a couple of years. It has a rumble seat, which is a feature none of our children or grandchildren would ever understand. Several of our classmates reflected on days of our senior Gilman year when some of our classmates would enjoy a quick smoke either on the grass or in front of the School or back along the old railroad line where there used to be a hockey rink. A show of hands indicated that one of our classmates would vote for Obama and the other five would vote for Romney. Andy Thomas’ wife passed away several months ago, and he now lives at Brightwood. John Herndon lives at Blakehurst, and Humpy Stump lives in a retirement home. Fortunately, none of us seem to have changed much from a year ago although appearance may be deceiving. Please complete the biographical updates that you will receive from Gilman as to make this column more exciting and interesting for all of us.

1947 William C. Crawford 443-895-4043 Richard Nash, Jr. died on January 11, 2012, in Naples, Fla., from complications of pneumonia and heart failure. A member of Gilman’s first Kindergarten class, Richard attended until graduating in 1947 — thereby becoming the School’s first “13-Year Man.” On the athletic fields he was a valuable member of the varsity baseball and football teams. After completing an

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engineering degree at Princeton in 1951, he served during the Korean War as a Navy Flight Deck Officer aboard the carriers U.S.S. Orinsky and U.S.S. Princeton. In 1959, he was named CEO of Maryland’s Specialty Wire Co. in Cockeysville, retiring in 1986. A respected sailing skipper for many years, logging countless nautical miles, Dick and his salty first mate, Sherrill, explored most of the rivers and harbors along the Chesapeake Bay — as well as made notable excursions to several New England watering holes. An always popular, fun-loving addition to any gathering, Richard Nash, Jr. is remembered with great affection and sincere admiration by family and many friends.

1948 Bob Rich bojohbf@verizon.net Our annual luncheon was held at the Maryland Club on Thursday, December 4, hosted by Bill Passano. Attending were Bill, Mac Cromwell, Dick Donley, Guy Hollyday, Sandy Newlin, Manning Parsons, George Thomsen and Holland Wilmer. Joining us was Sallie Worthington, who continues to assist with records and information pertaining to our class. Jim Sparkman’s naval experience, in the 1950s, placed him on a Destroyer Escort DE #416 U.S.S. Melvin R. Nawman assigned to an Atlantic-stationed squadron. Jim thought Bo Willis ’49 was on a ship in the same squadron. In an e-mail Jim reminds us that in the 1979 N.Y.C. Marathon he finished in third place among men ages 50-54 with a time of 2:53:03. “Now I can hardly walk,” he says. His walking difficulties notwithstanding, in August Jim managed the round trip from Manchester, Vt., to his son’s wedding in Hana, Maui. The wedding was fabulous, 106 family and friends attended, and the bride, an attorney, is a real sweetheart. Mac Cromwell continues his duplicate bridge, an ever challenging pursuit, and in December, Mac retired from the Mercy Hospital Board after 48 years of service. Ruthie has been involved with Paul’s Place Outreach Center for many years, in development and women’s support groups. She still plays golf and tennis and takes courses at Towson University Adult Learning Center. Their oldest child, Bessie, is head of the Ethel Walker School in Simsbury, Conn. Her husband, Tom Speers III, is a Presbyterian minister in Hartford. They have two children ages 15 and 12. Mackie Cromwell ’83, second child, a graduate of Yale, is a part-time printmaker and works at Humanim in Baltimore. Gordon ’85, their third child, lives in Chestnut Hill, Mass.; he is an investment manager for The Boston Company Assets Management. His wife Wendy is a partner at Wellington Management. They have two children ages 6 and 10. Mac and Ruthie have lived at Blakehurst Retirement Center for almost three years after living on Circle Road in Ruxton for 48 years. Easy living!

“As I cruise into the platinum years, I still dabble in journalism, writing occasional columns for www. globalpost.com and doing guest appearances on the BBC,” reports Tom Fenton. “It’s hard to break the habits of a lifetime. London remains our home. The empire is long gone, but it’s a town that never ceases to entertain and fascinate, a cornucopia of history, culture, cutting edge arts and even, as my French wife insists, better cuisine than you find in Paris. I welcome any classmates who happen to come through London (except in the summer when we are on Cap d’Antibes, although we would be happy to see you there as well). Honey and Bill Passano correspond from the Bahamas where they winter and enjoy lots of guests. They spend summers at Gibson Island and in between at Blakehurst. They also find time and opportunity to visit with their children and 10 grandchildren. Their schedule includes an annual trip to western New York state and a week at the Chautauqua Institutions Adult Education Center. Family members are included, and the daily Happy Hour Hospitality on the Passanos’ front porch is well attended. Gough Thompson is still working on a major desalination project at Rosario in Mexico. “Coming along, but slower than I would like,” he writes. “My immediate family is now 30 strong with one great grandchild having recently being born. “A family of 30 is a bit complicated but Irene and I are managing the complexities in a reasonably good shape. Irene continues to be very active in her family therapy teaching as an adjunct professor at the California School of Psychology, her private practice working with immigrant families trying to stay together on this side of the border, and tennis, which she continues to actively pursue as a member of the Rancho Santa Fe Tennis Club Team. “We have finally downsized to a small house in Del Mar, near San Diego, and are pleasantly surprised that life is less complicated than before.” Guy Hollyday continues to practice acupuncture at Baltimore’s Penn North Neighborhood Center and continues monitoring water quality in Stony Run, a tributary of the Jones Falls that flows immediately to the west of the School. Visits to his three grandsons in Bronxville, N.Y., are all too seldom. Though his daughter Jenny Iglehart teaches in Gilman’s Lower School, he seldom gets to see Jenny’s daughter in Haverford, Pa., and son at Colorado College. Guy and wife Pamela plan a trip to England, Germany and chiefly Italy in May 2013. In the fall of 2012 he attended the sad graveside ceremonies for our classmate Tom Schmidt. And he enjoys an occasional visit to our very-much alive classmate George Thomsen and wife Mary Ellen at Roland Park Place. “Since our son John attended Gilman, we have saved his blazer with its Gilman emblem on its pocket. John probably wore that when he was in first or second grade,” reports Daniel Baker. “Our grandson, Frank Bonsal IV, who is finishing the pre-first grade at Gilman later this spring, may wear that same blazer upon occasion next year. To keep me warm when relaxing in front of the TV, our son-in-law and the same grandson presented me with a Gilman blanket. It is toasty and keeps up the old Gilman spirit.” summer 2013

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Manning Parsons and his wife Cynthia have enjoyed several trips to Great Britain, Scotland and Cleveland. “Our main interests are gardens and country houses. Our most recent trips were to Cornwall and Devon,” he says. “As a grandfather I have bragging rights. My oldest granddaughter, Eliza, plays soccer for Georgetown. A grandson, Will, was selected to play on the all-Vermont ice hockey team. None of their athletic genes came from me. Cynthia and I spend the winter months in Naples, Fla.” John Strickland is still flying high, both with his wife of 43 years, Ronnie, and with his Beech Baron and T-34. He continues as CEO of Aqua Aid, Inc., out of Rocky Mount, N.C., albeit “part time, when needed or when I want to. Great position to be in.” Porter Hopkins reports that 2012 was a good crop year on Stony Ridge Farm, his Dorchester County farm. In September Porter and his wife Patti entertained a squad of U.S. Marines, wounded veterans from Walter Reed Hospital, providing lunch, dinner and, best of all, a dove shoot with all limiting out. Porter had a heart attack in December but is recovering nicely. Brief responses to requests for class notes: Dick Donley: “All ‘ok’ at Gibson Island.” Holland Wilmer: “Can’t supply anything exciting. Farm residence and summer residence unchanged. I still go to the office most days for a while.” Phil Powell: “We continue to enjoy life and our seven grandchildren.” Sad to report that the following classmates passed away during 2012: Bill Carey (January 2), Tom Schmidt (June 18), Bill Ford (June 30) and Louis Carr (September 13). In September 2012 Joan and Bob Rich visited Joan’s family on Silver Lake, outside of Grand Rapids, Mich., and in October we returned to Bermuda’s Pink Beach Club. In December we were excited and pleased by the publishing of Rob Jr.’s book “The Best of Times on the Chesapeake Bay.” George Thomsen sends the following: “I couldn’t have arranged this if I tried! In June of 2012, I celebrated my 60th Reunion from Harvard College. Our oldest grandchild graduated from Harvard College at the same time. “Mary Ellen and I enjoy taking grandchildren on overseas trips! We have seven grandchildren: Roszel ’76 three; Stewart ’79, two; and, Laurence ’85, two. We have already taken five and in June of this year we are going to Vienna and the Dalmatian Coast with the other two. “As for Gilman ’48, HAPPY 65TH TO ALL!!!”

1949 Ned Jarrett After extended cajoling and harassment by the Coopers, Jay and Bob, I have agreed to be your class correspondent. Although unrelated, they are equally tenacious and downright ornery. Jay Cooper says he was too busy. Now, I find that he has taken a leave of

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absence from his Wall Street playground to travel Europe extensively and spend more leisurely time with his and Ellie’s children in Boston and San Francisco. Last November or December, Bob called me and shamed me into taking the job — no more B.S., he said. Now, sadly I must report that Bob Cooper passed away on Valentine’s Day, February 12, 2013, of “one darn thing after another,” according to the article in the Sunpapers. The article went on to cite Coop’s tremendously successful career as a football and lacrosse referee from 1954 until 1987, primarily in the ACC —  180 major college games including two major bowl games, five Army-Navy games, 11 Navy-Maryland games. John Steadman said that he was one of the best because of his ability to get along with people. Baltimore Magazine rated him the best referee of the 1970s in lacrosse. Marty Cooper e-mailed me the afternoon that Bob died because she knew that I had been particularly disturbed by being unaware of Phil Fenton’s passing on March 2, 2012, and, therefore, unable to attend his final services. What a sweet, considerate thing for her to do. Bob just didn’t wake up, she said. Now, to be a bit upbeat. Having lost my Lynn three years ago this past April and a mild heart attack in April 2012, I have come to realize that I am not indestructible. Therefore, I am going to relocate to Blakehurst shortly, where residents of note include Lou Ditch and the widows Lynn Lafferty, Bev McCarthy and Peggy Stout. I hope I haven’t overlooked anybody, but on several visits it is apparent that there are a host of Gilman people representing many classes. There’s blue and gray all over the place! Come on, guys. Since the Coopers have cast me upon you, let’s have something to write about.

1950 Haswell M. Franklin Unfortunately Yours Truly is off to Des Moines, Iowa, and the NCAA Division I National Wrestling Tournament and dependent on Bill Jarrett for much of the information contained in these notes since our regular class luncheon at the Hopkins Club was scheduled for the same time as the wrestling tournament. Recently our good friend and former head basketball coach, Nemo Robinson, headed off to the “big basketball court in the sky.” As many of you will remember, it was our class that provided Nemo with the first private school title. I was reminded of this noteworthy accomplishment by Jack Bergland, who is enjoying retirement from his palatial Cape Cod retreat. Charlie Brown advises that classmate Furlong Baldwin was honored in a recent article in the “Princeton Alumni Weekly.” Additionally, Charlie advises that contrary to earlier reports, he and Jane did not move to Pickersgill but instead relocated to another apartment in Elkridge Estates. Charlie also advises that Dave Griswold is now the editor of Country Day Literary Magazine and is still mentoring teachers.

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The Class of 1953 celebrates 60 years since its Founders Day exercises with dinner at The Wine Market in South Baltimore.

Bruce Grove continues to take life easy now that he has returned to his old homestead in York and seems to enjoy being single again. I am disappointed not to have received any significant feedback from classmates and since I was unable to attend the class luncheon, I have little gossip. I do want to thank the many members of our class that support the School’s annual giving campaign. Our participation percentage is one of the highest of any class and I believe we can all be proud of our high level of caring. I have just been advised that Dixon Hills made the trip north to see his Princeton Tigers rally for a 29-point fourth quarter to beat the previously unbeaten Harvard Crimson 39-34. Bill Jarrett and Sam Lumpkin are about to celebrate their 55th reunion from the Johns Hopkins Medical School and Jack Bergland and Tommy Powell their 50th. John Schmick ’67 was guest of honor at our class luncheon at the Hopkins Club and advised that he just purchased a home in my neighborhood. Kirk Rogers, Walter Brewster and Charley Cromwell also attended the luncheon, and although Kirk did promise Bill Jarrett he would e-mail me some intervening news for the artists, as of today I have not received anything. Here’s hoping no news is good news especially from our many classmates living throughout the country. Yours truly continues enjoying life serving as Chairman Emeritus for both his sons’ firm The Franklin Financial Group, LLC and the Maryland State Wrestling Association. In closing I can only encourage you to let me know what is happening in your wonderful world.

1951 Robert Swindell bbncc@verizon.net Not sure we have ever disseminated information concerning our Class of 1951 Memorial Scholarship – Robert Russell Fund, but you will be happy to know that your generosity is currently helping two young men continue their education at Gilman. Rich Diffenderffer writes that he has visited his grandkids in Vermont and friends on the island of Nevis, where the sun stayed out and the rum never ran out. Tough life! Tom Offutt still enjoys his horse farm and the young ladies who use the facilities. Recently, he ran into a lady whom he had saved on a snorkeling trip many years ago. She commented about his riding stable and indicated her granddaughter wanted to ride there. Tom quoted Uncle Ed, “Tempus fugit.” After several years of traveling to Europe with their grandchildren, Sandy and Grif Morrel took their four children to the Super Bowl in New Orleans. Because of their support the Ravens produced a favorable outcome. Lucy and Rollin Otto reported on the favorable progress of their grandchildren — graduating and attending colleges and high school. They still summer “down the ocean.” Jenepher and Tom Parr wrote about his recovering from a bout with pneumonia. He bragged about the successes of their children. One is working at a halfway house outside of Pittsburgh, another is an airline

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captain for Era (Alaska’s largest regional airline), and his daughter is a massage therapist in Baltimore. He recently had lunch with the elusive Henderson Dorsey, from whom we hear too little. Lew Barker is touring the world — France last fall and China this summer. He and Eileen visit Norfolk and Houston to check on their grandchildren. He also said his son would take care of our hearts, if needed, when in Houston. Marion and Steve Knipp have moved (after umpteen years) from suburbia into a high-rise condo. Downsizing was no fun, but they are happy in their new surroundings. Bill Merrick has left his homeroom after a gazillion years of teaching our kids how to reply to the question, “Who’s there?” He’s still at Gilman, though, helping with class plays, mnemonic geography songs and other activities he loves, on a reduced schedule. He and Linda are relaxing, mowing lawns and trimming shrubbery. The good life (?). Nancy and I had a chance to visit with A.K. and Gibby Carey last summer at their beautiful house in the Adirondacks. Lots of stories (most of them true) were recounted, remembering the “good old times” and solving (?) future problems. Jen and Danny Moore have joined us at Blakehurst, increasing the Class of ’51 presence. Marion Moore and Brucie Gibbs are also here. Easy living and everything taken care of. Even though our stories seem to focus on travels, children and grandkids, please keep us informed of your whereabouts and what you are up to. You are more interesting than you think you are.

1954 Ralph L. DeGroff, Jr. rld2002@att.net Dave Andrew had a busy year. He and his wife Bonnie traveled to Turkey on vacation last September, including a four-day sail on gullets (two-masted sailing vessels) in the Mediterranean. Early in the current year he attended a medical meeting (American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry) in Los Angeles. The meeting’s focus was on Alzheimer’s, and he noted that maybe it will be pertinent to many of us. (I hope not.) On that trip he had a chance to visit his daughter Nancy “et famile” in Huntington Beach. His two Honolulu grandchildren are rapidly growing — Davey, age 16, will be off to college next year and Kimi, age 14 (going on 18), is 5'10" and finishing her freshman year at Punahou School (where our President went.) Dave is still working, albeit part-time three days a week as administrative medical director at two retirement homes, mostly doing geriatric assessments and overseeing the care of those residents in the Health Care Center (nursing home). Tennis, bridge, Garden Club and “putting up with me” keeps Bonnie busy. David notes that he is “truly blessed to have been married” to Bonnie for 49 years and is planning a 50th anniversary cruise with the entire family next year.

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On September 15, 2012, Carol and Tom Burdette’s son Charles E. (Chad) was married to a very pretty Courtney Quick in ‘Sconset, on Nantucket Island. Your Class Secretary attended the wedding ceremony at The ‘Sconset Chapel and the elegant reception at The Nantucket Golf Club. And Mother Nature crashed the occasion with almost perfect weather. Dick Fryberger is still behind the wheel of his Lotos Eleven (a racing car of the 1950s) on competitive tracks when he has the time. In the summer months he applies his competitive energy to skippering his Laser 2 on Ossipee Lake in New Hampshire. He travels to France on a regular basis to visit the children of the family with whom wife Nancy lived when she was part of an experiment in international living. While in France, Nancy taught English to the six children and others and has maintained contact with the children ever since. Katherine and Charlie O’Donovan traveled to London in June for a weeklong celebration of their sixth wedding anniversary. During the remainder of the summer I am confident that Charlie will be fine tuning his golf game. John Sherwood still owns and races two sailboats in the Chesapeake, just not as frequently or successfully as in the past. He crews as a tactician on other boats with some success both locally and in Nantucket, where he spends some time in the summer. John also serves as a coach for the Naval Academy’s offshore sailing team. He notes, “Working with young men and women less than one-third my age keeps me moving.” Under the sponsorship of the American Council of Life Insurers, Dave Woods with others traveled to Washington this winter to meet with members of Congress to educate them on the benefits of retirement savings embodied in life insurance policies. Dave can be seen weekly on The Wealth Channel (see www.thewealthchannel.org.), a website sponsored by The American College, which offers financial education for insurance and banking professionals. Bob Greenhill is currently serving as a trustee of The American Enterprise Institute, a not-for-profit institution dedicated to research and education on issues of government, politics, economics and social welfare. Harris Jones took his entire family of children and grandchildren, totaling 21, to Seaside on the Florida panhandle for a vacation last summer. (Just think he had four basketball teams plus one.) He reported that it was a very nice place and by all accounts all had a wonderful time. In his spare time he continues to work on his golf game in the hope that the Champions Tour will be calling him. From Salem, Ore., Jim Keesey reports that he is still skiing when the weather cooperates. He has also taken up playing the piano, which he demonstrated when Your Class Secretary called him to check for news. Neil Bouscaren is currently working as a biologist at Camp Pendleton, Calif., which is the home of the I Expeditionary Force of the Marine Corps. When I talked to Neil he made it clear he was not in the military but working for a subcontractor. He also wanted Your

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Class Secretary to send his very best wishes to all of our Classmates and to tell them that he misses them. “Cliff Harding and Harry Warfield (deceased), a pair of hard-working backs, spearheaded Johns Hopkins, from Baltimore, to a brace of touchdowns in the closing six minutes to spill Randolph-Macon, 13-0 today for its second victory in four outings.” The Baltimore Sun, October 28, 1956. In addition, Gus Widhelm was listed as an end on the Hopkins team. I talked to Cliff and he remembers the game well because the team later went on to win the Mason-Dixon Conference. Aren’t you impressed that Your Class Secretary retained that article for over 56 years? Last year I reported that Deedee and Larry Wagner were anticipating living on their boat for six months due to construction on their apartment building in Marathon, Fla. One year later Larry told Your Class Secretary that it will be another six or seven months before they will be able to move back into their apartment. They have been constantly moving from one place to another during this entire time. Carl Seitz’s home was named “The Azalea House of Towson” last year. Carl says that most of the credit for this award should go to his parents, who planted the azaleas years ago. However, Carl has been diligent in giving the plants the proper care through the years. Norris Lankford is still living in his parents’ house where he had graciously entertained the Class in our sixth form year. He also noted that he is still farming the land next to the house as his parents did in our Gilman years. Tom Burdette and Your Class Secretary saw John Fisher in Baltimore this past winter and both commented that he looks just like he did when we were at Gilman. John later said that he attributes that quality to the love and care provided by his wife Dolly. When Jim Cox was asked how he was, he immediately responded, “I’m here.” He still attempts to play golf hoping for a miraculous recovery to his younger year’s caliber like a lot of aging golfers. His children are thriving: his two daughters are living in Valdosta, Ga., where Juanita and Jim live. Both of them in an earlier life had been dancers, one a ballerina and the other a Broadway dancer. With families now, one is teaching chemistry to high school students and the other working for a firm specializing in retirement planning and financial advisory. Their son is the lead computer software programmer for a firm in Texas. He developed an inventory control program which is used nationally. Jim was in a Valdosta hardware store and noticed his son’s firm’s sign on the cash register. He commented to the checkout person that his son created the program that he was using. Jim is not confident that the person believed him. Last November Peggy and Scott Sullivan visited Lago Maggiore (Italy’s second largest lake, on the south side of the Alps). They had a great Mardi Gras this year. Scott hopes that they can visit Europe late this spring to visit Peggy’s old haunts in Rome and for Scott to visit his children in England and France. They would also like to spend some time in Lucca, Tuscany, for some rest and fine food. Scott is also looking forward to seeing us at our 60th Reunion next year.

This column was completed on April 3. However, Your Class Secretary is to be awarded a Gold Medal for Distinguished Achievement by The Holland Society of New York on April 8, 2013. The award is in recognition of service to The Society through the years. The Holland Society is an organization composed of direct male descendants of the original settlers of New Netherlands, whose purpose is to collect information and documents respecting the history of the Dutch colonial period in New Netherlands. The dates have not been set as yet for our 60th Reunion, but it will likely fall between mid-April and mid-May.

1956 F. Meriwether (Mert) Fowlkes, Jr. fmfowlkes@aol.com Our deepest sympathy is extended to Spencer Everett and his family on the recent, untimely death of his son Wesley ’83. One of the highlights for our class in 2012 was a lunch at the Maryland Club in Baltimore hosted by Bentley Offutt, Harry Lord and Dick Biggs in November. The gathering was in honor of Father Joe Healey, who was in town visiting from his Maryknoll missionary work in Kenya and Tanzania. Joe has had a 45-year career working in numerous African countries, which included serving as the church’s press officer during Pope Paul VI’s visit to Uganda. He has written numerous books on African proverbs, as well as short stories of the faith and hardships of the African people. Joe and Bentley left Gilman to attend Portsmouth Priory School in Rhode Island, before attending Princeton and Lehigh, respectively. Also present at this lunch were Dave Eaton, Cooper Graham and Julian Jones. Cooper Graham is retired after a career in the Library of Congress in Washington. He lives in Baltimore. Julian Jones is a senior director at the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth (CTY), and has been successful in expanding CTY centers throughout the world. He works with foundations, universities and other donors seeking support to provide educational opportunities for bright young people prior to their entering college. It sounds very interesting and rewarding! George Dowell is a semi-retired psychiatrist in St. Louis, Mo., where he says he is “still alive and well.” He enjoys 16 grandchildren ranging in age from less-than-a-year to out of college. And he still travels with wife Jacki as much as he can. He’s looking forward to our 60th Class Reunion in 2016! Lamont (Pete) Thomas reports from Milford, Conn., that he retired from university teaching in 2004, and is now very involved in teaching and learning Qigong (a.k.a. Tai Chi) for stress reduction. He is passionate about this mind-body practice, and serves on the board of directors of the National Qigong

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Association. He teaches Qigong in senior centers and VA hospitals in Connecticut and New York. If any classmates have questions or observations about Qigong, Pete asks that we e-mail him at ldtlamont@sbcglobal.net with subject line: After Gilman. Graham Slaughter retired from medical practice in Baltimore in 2003, and settled with his wife Judy on Church Creek south of Cambridge, Md. He lives the “life of a waterman,” and continues to enjoy his hobby of photography. He is working currently to establish a visual and performing arts center in Cambridge, which will be a 14,000-sq.ft. structure when completed. Any “loose cash” donations toward this project will be greatly appreciated, he says! Tom Claggett continues to be active in volunteer work in the Episcopal Church in Brunswick and Frederick, Md., and he is fully retired from the insurance industry. He enjoys his grandchildren, step-grandchildren and a step-great granddaughter! He keeps up with Griff Pitcher in Smyrna, Ga. Pete Folger reports from Manhattan Beach, Calif., that he continues to enjoy retirement, and he celebrated his 75th birthday with a train ride (on rubber tires!) through his neighborhood to look at Christmas lights! His travels last year included a visit to the Atlantis Resort (as seen on TV) on Paradise Island, Nassau, which he thoroughly enjoyed. His four children and families are scattered from California to New York to North Carolina, and he and his wife Marian have a great time keeping up with them. His six grandchildren range in age from a one-year-old to out of college. Quite a spread, just like George Dowell’s! Duncan Yaggy has resigned his full-time job teaching at Duke University in Durham, N.C., but continues on the faculty working with students and former colleagues. He and wife Susan are much involved in politics, “but organizing — NOT running!” His twin grandchildren were born last June. Mike Fisher reports from Black Butte Ranch, Ore., that his health continues to be good, and he and wife Sue traveled last year to such varied places as Phoenix, Abaco and Nova Scotia. His children and grandchildren are thriving, and he also has grandchildren out of college. In addition to co-hosting the above-mentioned lunch for Joe Healey, Harry Lord continues to be very active in many ways. He and wife Sarah spent time skiing, hiking, swimming, biking, and who knows what else! I doubt if he can remember all of the places he’s been recently! One of his notable trips was to Santa Barbara, Calif., in July to visit Jim Hartle. Jim returned to Maryland a few months later to lecture on astrophysics at the University of Maryland, College Park. Harry continues his involvement with the Mencken House Trust, and currently serves as its chairman. The Mencken House on Union Square in West Baltimore is undergoing renovation, and will be re-opened as a writing center. Tony Brennan says that he and his wife Susan are “supposedly retired,” but he continues to be active in legal work representing buyers and sellers of business and commercial real estate. He is recovering from a recent bout with spinal meningitis.

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George Boynton has had to give up golf because of his neuromuscular disorder, but continues to be active in many other ways. He keeps up with Roggie Dankmeyer in San Mateo, Calif. My life seems rather boring compared to some of these classmates. Sue and I enjoyed an antique car tour up and down the back roads of the Shenandoah Valley in June, and we had a great trip to Bermuda in October, but there wasn’t much else newsworthy. Most important, however, our health continues to be good, and we are very grateful for that. Thanks to everyone for their news. Let’s hear from more next year.

1957 George Barker geebark@aol.com Members of the Class of 1957 continue to report on their activities from states across the country —  California, Colorado, Florida, Tennessee, Maryland, Massachusetts and Maine — and on their travels to countries around the globe — China, Tibet, Vietnam, Kenya, Rwanda, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, France, the U.K., the Baltic, Peru and Ecuador. Mentioned prominently in the reports of several classmates is the enjoyment that they have derived from reading Frank Deford’s book “Over Time: My Life As a Sportswriter,” which was published in May of 2012 and got terrific reviews. Frank has had a remarkable life and career and his recounting of them in his latest book is extraordinarily well done from several aspects. Frank’s work is a must read. It is fascinating and it will trigger lots of memories. The climes of Florida’s east coast are treating Nick Adams well. Nick writes: “Honestly, there is nothing new to report — just enjoying the weather, people and activities of Vero Beach, Fla. — hope all is well with you all.” From Concord, Mass., Walter Birge tells us of his most recent travels: “Last September I spent 18 days in China and Tibet. I learned what it felt like to be a minority in a vast land; I learned that the Tibetans are a devout fearless people who will not give in to oppression, and I learned that true Sichuan food is really hot!” Walter sent an e-mail to me about the Super Bowl matchup between the Ravens and the 49ers that harked back to those days of yore. Its text read: “Go Colts, I mean Ravens!” And indeed the Ravens did go. One of the teams that the Ravens defeated on their march to the Super Bowl was the Denver Broncos, much to the dismay of Bruce Brian, who sent along the following news: “Linda and I are putting our Colorado home on the market soon. I am still doing locum tenens work 5-10 days a month. It was sad to hear of the death of Nemo Robinson in January. He was 90 years of age. It was very thoughtful of Eddie Brown to send me Nemo’s obituary. I attended Frank Deford’s book signing in Denver this fall. I only spoke with Frank very briefly. The book was a very enjoyable read. Linda and I

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just returned from one week at The Villages, Florida . . . the place is fantastic and must be experienced firsthand. We had brunch one morning with Alice Horst [Johnny Horst’s widow], who has lived there for eight years.” The Class of 1957 Faculty Summer Sabbaticals and Professional Development Fund that was created in conjunction with our 50th reunion has been put to good use. Eddie Brown reports that he attended, in November 2012, a Middle School assembly at which Chris Downs, a social studies teacher, gave a talk and slide presentation on the visit he and his family experienced in Greece this past summer that was enabled by the fund. Eddie observes that “[o]ur classmates may be interested to know that our funds have helped a member of the faculty stand where Agamemnon once stood.” Eddie, who continues to hold forth as a vice president of Investment Counselors of Maryland and maintain his golf game at a high level, has provided some further information on Elliott Cooper. As previously reported, Eddie had dinner with Elliott and his wife Gale in Charleston, S.C., in February 2012. Eddie elaborates that Elliott “seems to have mastered the art of retirement and is enjoying his leisure time. Gale is, too. We — Elliott and I — had a good time recollecting the ‘good old days.’” Giving deference to his wife Barbara’s desire to travel, Millard Firebaugh highlights his recent activities as follows: “Life here at Casa Barbara continues apace. Barbara still likes to travel. A highlight of this last year’s itinerary was a jaunt to Iceland with Country Walkers. For any travelers who are looking for dramatic scenery, pleasant and industrious people, something a bit different in Europe and, for that matter, a bit of new world history and a lot of very visible natural history and natural current events, Iceland would be a good choice. And, the trip there and back is not too expensive, nor too many time zones. For those who enjoy seafood and schnapps it is also a compelling choice. . . .   “The next trip on Barbara’s agenda is Lake Como this May. Happily, she takes me with her on these adventures.   “My company working at making electricity from the energy in the flow of ocean, river and tidal currents is now grid-connected in Lubec, Maine. An organization called Fast Company put our company, Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC, as #8 on a list of the most innovative energy companies in the world in 2013. And despite the new natural gas fever we are still afloat financially, although in dire need of an infusion of cash.   “My other professional activities and as much golf as I can fit in along with family events with my son Josh and his wife Karin and their two boys or my daughter Samara and her husband Will and their girl and boy keep us pretty busy here in Annapolis. If any of you find yourself in our charming bayside village, give a call and we’ll have lunch or dinner at one of the many pleasant restaurants here in the Capital City or even breakfast at the Double T Diner.”

Warren Hills, during military service.

Warren Hills ‘57 Warren Hills died in June 2012 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. Over the past several years, our classmate Hillsy had been in progressively bad health, afflicted by both Parkinson’s and the onset of dementia. The last few months were especially difficult for him, and he was fortunate to have had a great team supporting him, headed up by his wonderful wife Leslie, who was ably assisted by his brother Dixon Hills ’50 and Dixon’s wife Ellie. There was no formal memorial service, but Leslie has suggested that any gifts in honor of Hillsy be sent to Gilman or Gilchrist Hospice Care. Hillsy attended Gilman for 14 years and distinguished himself as a member of the Class of 1957 in a number of ways. He had a distinguished professional career in television, primarily as a producer at WBAL-TV. As a friend, he was tried and true. The Class of 1957 has lost yet another stalwart. — George Barker

Tom Garrett reports from Santa Rosa, Calif., in mid-March 2013 that his second son John was about to get married, “so Cappie and I will have six grandchildren instead of three, and the new ones happily are all girls. I am still working to enhance the health of Californians and fund our personal money pit home in Santa Rosa. We went to Peru last year. I got altitude sickness and had to take performance enhancing drugs. I recommend them. Speaking of performance, Frank’s book (now I can’t remember the title) is a true work of art. “We go to Eastern Turkey in May. If you don’t hear from me next year, we may have been Kurded or Syrianized. If we make it back, I will keep on working, just like you, unless dementia intervenes (see above re:

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Frank’s title). It’s amazing what a few years with Messrs. Callard, Baldwin, Finney, Downs, Reese, Tickner, Marrian, Porter and on and on can do for one’s work ethic.” Moving back to Maryland, from the Eastern Shore, Jim Gieske unfurls the following update: “My Baltimore son works for McCormick and lives off Falls Road with his banker wife and twin children. Youngest lives in Lawrenceville, N.J., with wife and daughter and teaches at The Lawrenceville School. Oldest in Columbus, Ohio, and is a computer nerd for pay. My back issues curtailed my usual travel activity, but I most recently did a stint teaching at Hanoi Medical University in September and look forward to returning. Vietnam is a very welcoming place (they inexplicably love Americans) and the food is fantastic.” Judy and Frank Gluck split their time half and half between Sandestin, Fla., and Nashville. Frank observes: “Nice lifestyle. Life after medicine remains good, and there is plenty to do. Am taking some computer courses so I can keep up with our grandchildren, and they are still letting me work with residents and medical students when we are in Nashville. As you know, I became a Ravens fan, at least during the playoffs. Still prefer the Titans, but they really need to get their act together. Looking forward to the baseball season, both the O’s and Vandy (preseason 2 or 3 pick ). . . . Assume you and everyone else have read Frank Deford’s book, “Over Time.” How great it is for someone to discover their talents and passion at such an early age and be so good at it all through life. The book certainly brought back many fond memories. Great piece of work, Frank!” Neal Haynie continues to be a “busy retiree” with volunteer stints at the Maryland Historical Society and the Museum of Industry among his activities. In addition, Neal has developed “an insatiable interest in the old buildings and history of Baltimore.” He wryly observes, “Who would have known, after a career teaching English?” Bob Hopkins provides the following in-depth recount of life on Florida’s east coast: “Ellie (Riggs) and I have now been living in Palm Coast, Fla., for 17 years. My big activity over that period of time has been involvement with the Computer Club of Flagler Palm Coast. After being a member for a couple of years, I became treasurer for several years, an appropriate position since I had had a banking career for over 30 years. My positions changed from time to time so that, over my tenure, I wound up holding every officer position up to and including president. We enjoy the warm climate and living next to a saltwater canal with 12-minute boat ride access to the Intracoastal Waterway for fishing and water skiing. Additionally, we are only 15 minutes away from the beach for sunning and ocean swimming. Our son Bob, his new wife of six months Dean and his 8-year old twin boys enjoy coming down from Glen Arm a couple of times a year to partake of our recreational activities. We see daughter Eleanor, her 11-year old twin daughters and 5-year old son on about a monthly basis because the trip between here and Savannah is only a 3 1/2 hour ride. Savannah, of course, has its own attractions that we enjoy when we

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visit. Son Bob and his uncle Dickie Riggs enjoy some shooting every fall, and Bob also enjoys visiting George Michaels for some fishing at his home in Rock Hall.” From sunny Southern California comes the following report from Ludlow Keeney: “Technically, I’m not your classmate. In reality, I attended Gilman for nine years before being cashiered to Reform School near Boston. There, Sandy Cochran, a former (Calvert) classmate of many of you, and I spent the rest of our high school years, shivering and yearning for Baltimore. Having attended college (Pomona, ’61) and law school (UCLA, ’64) in California, I married a local girl (Carol) and raised a family. We’ve lived in Rancho Santa Fe (San Diego County) since 1965, and are now in the traveling and near-retirement modes. I’m still doing expert witness work and other assignments related to real property, but the pace has definitely slowed. Occasionally I cross paths with my stepbrother, Nick Penniman ’56, but not as often as I’d wish. This is a glorious place to live, but it is isolated . . . Best wishes to all of you!” For John Lewin, 2012 was an eventful year in both good and bad respects. John provides the following details: “With the exception of one very bright spot (a Baltic cruise in July), 2012 was an unpleasant year. During the spring and summer I experienced some pulmonary infection, not diagnosed until September as BOOP (bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia), an overreacting self-immune system whereby your body infects itself with a form of pneumonia. There were several bad side effects to the disease and medication, which caused three hospitalizations with a heart condition and fluid-filled lungs . . . Not pretty, but I’m on the mend, thinking of travel plans, watercolor paintings, golf sojourns and maybe another book. I simply would not be here without the support of my incredible wife, Tolly, who sacrificed her year for me.” This year’s pithiest report comes from Hill Michaels: “No change from last year. Still with RCM&D.” Almost as pithy is this news from another RCM&Der, Frank Riggs: “Heard from Pat Mundy who did some serious boxing with son Mike. All well with Riggs family. Travel to Africa — Kenya and Rwanda. Great trip.” Speaking of Pat, he, writing from Maine, provides some thought-provoking observations about our educational system at several levels: “I have been teaching American history at the Maine State Prison for the last six years, and I have found that my students were never taught critical thinking and writing skills in high school.    “Recently I had a conversation with Professor Steven Walt about the writing skills of his students at the Harvard Kennedy School. He said the majority have no idea how to write a critical essay on a given foreign affairs topic. He spends the first week teaching them how to write using “A Rulebook for Arguments” by Anthony Weston. Professor Walt’s wife, supervisor of the public school system in Brookline, Mass., said that, since the 1970s, schools have neglected to teach

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kids how to think and write critically. At various educational institutions (teacher colleges) students are taught theories, but do not learn how to teach writing.  “This failure is evident in the political debates we are witnessing in Washington, D.C., the failure of our military leadership to punish mediocrity, and the breakdown of the American criminal justice system. “Where is Mr. Barker when we need him?” Crossie O’Donovan’s travels of a couple of years ago took him to what is now an explosive part of the world. Crossie comments: “Brenda and I still enjoy traveling as part of our retirement. Two years ago, we went to Jordan, Syria and Lebanon, largely because Brenda’s family comes from Lebanon. Timing is everything. We were in and out of Syria six months before the Arab Spring. We even visited with some remaining members of her family in a town outside of Beirut. It was very touching.” Crossie then muses: “I still work one day per week. Like H.L. Mencken reportedly said of himself, ‘As he grew older, he grew worse.’” From western Colorado, Oliver Perin reports on what he calls a “very good year”: “Nothing much has happened in the past year, Karen and I have maintained excellent health, which is perhaps the most important factor in all of our lives at this time. Actually went to more weddings in the past year than funerals. We continue to live in rural Colorado’s western slope. I think that townhouse living is sounding more appealing and we will probably move to Denver in a few years. “Will have snow on the ground here for another four or five weeks and then the good weather and house guests all summer long. Enjoy a bit of camping, fishing and hiking. Listen to Frank Deford on NPR on Wednesday mornings. We would welcome any classmates who come this way and have the Aspen Music Festival all summer. Spent some time in the U.K. and France this past October-November. Generally a very good year and please send my best to all classmates.” Bill Woodward posted the following entry in the class page of the Gilman website on December 13, 2012, so his grandchildren count should now be up to 13 (Bill certainly must be the class leader in that department): “We are up to 12 and 8/9 grandchildren. Life on the Eastern Shore (God’s Country) couldn’t be better.” Jim Young has also put his roots down as an Eastern Shore man. Jim reports as follows: “I intend to stay put on the Eastern Shore, where I am pretty well plugged into the community, with a combined business/cultural trip to Baltimore every month or two.” Jim’s “community” is The Parke at Ocean Pines, which is “very nice, with lots of great folks from everywhere. . . . ” Anne and I took a splendid trip to Peru and Ecuador in October 2012 under the auspices of an excellent travel company named Overseas Adventure Travel (OAT). We were part of a group of 14 that formed a community and had a fabulous time together. In both countries, we had a full-time native guide who was very knowledgeable and resourceful. After a

couple of days in Lima, a very dynamic city, we headed inland for the mountains where we visited Machu Picchu, a place that lived up to its reputation as one of the man-made wonders of the world in every respect. It was stunning sight and site to behold and to explore. After a week in Peru, we traveled to the Galapagos Islands off the coast of Ecuador, and during our four days of traveling about on a very comfortable small boat saw an amazing collection of birds, animals and landscapes. The trip was a wonderful land and sea adventure made even better by the fact that we were in a small and compatible group and were guided by natives who really knew their stuff, exposing us to the people, the cultures and incredible sites of Peru and Ecuador. Once again, my sincere thanks to everyone who took the time and made the effort to provide me with news about themselves, their families and their Gilman classmates. Please do get in touch with me regarding any comments or suggestions about the form and substance of the notes.

1958 Alan D. Yarbro adyarbro@venable.com Charlie Evans Jr. works in real estate development and consulting. He was the policy director for Bob Ehrlich’s 2010 campaign. He is writing a novel about the Chesapeake Bay. Jamie Cutting is enjoying work and family more than ever. “Our two golden retrievers keep us in good health and fun times. Anyone from the class of 1958 passing through Washington, D.C., is always welcome.” Dick McCauley and Alan Yarbro, and many from other classes, attended the funeral of John M. (“Nemo”) Robinson, who passed away in January. While we remember him as “Coach,” his influence on Gilman students went far beyond the basketball court. We are all better for knowing him.

Missing: Class Notes Did you complete the biographical update section of your alumni dues form, but notes for your class do not appear on these pages? The Alumni Office posts notes received with alumni dues forms — both hardcopy and electronic — to the Alumni Online Community. Visit gilman.edu/alumniconnections to access the Alumni Online Community. Click Class Notes in the left navigation to see the notes. There is a utility on the right side of the page that enables you to search by last name and/or class year.

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1960 Stan Heuisler writes, “All hail Richard Evans for organizing the regular lunches for the class of 1960! We are well. Son Alec will get married on the beach in Rehoboth in June. Daughter Kate lives with her American husband in Uganda where he directs Six Country Public Health Project and she flies all over the world doing Development Administration consultancies.” “In April 2012, I self-published my first novel ‘Sendero,’ which is partly based on my experience as a young US Peace Corps volunteer in Peru more than 40 years ago,” reports John Rouse. “The book is available on amazon.com. The reviews so far have been positive. If interested, you'll find it by tying in ‘Sendero + Rouse.’” Edgie Russell has retired, and he is spending time on volunteer charitable boards: Good Samaritan Hospital, Keswick Multicare Center, Robert Packard Center for ALS research at Johns Hopkins Medicine. “I have four grandchildren and visit them regularly. Three are in Florid, and I spend several weeks in Del Ray Beach, Fla., each winter. I also enjoy our class lunches organized by Richard Evans. Ted Knowles reports, “David has two little girls (four and one) and we enjoy being grandparents and seeing them grow up. Tommy ’96, is a curator of Jelly Fish at Monterrey Bay Aquarium in California. Sam ’90, is a lawyer in D.C. They are all married to women who love them dearly. Gretchen and I are happy in retirement. It’s great to have time to pursue our interests.” “My wife, historian Lil Fell, has accepted a new chair in early western history at the University of Colorado, so we moved to the Boulder area in May,” writes Pete Wood. It was hard to leave our house in Hillsborough, N.C., but we look forward to the adventure of settling in Longmont, Colo.

cancer in November, she died on January 4. By anyone’s definition, Anne was special, loved by all who knew her, and one of those rare people whose lives were defined by helping others and making the world better. At this point, one wonders if other classmates have lost loved ones; if so, it hasn’t been reported. Instead, nearly all that came in is most pleasing. Here are some bits and pieces: Bill Oster visited Gene Austen and secured a picture of Gene posing with a son who looks just like him. We also have a recent photo of Craig Cutter, posed in a tropical setting with his wife Suzanne along with progeny including a son, two daughters and three grandchildren. Craig looked young, trim and happy, as did Paul Dowling in a photo transmitted from Sarasota, Fla., where he mostly lives these days. Paul has made a very successful lifetime career trading in Elvis Presley memorabilia as the owner of Worldwide Elvis. The latest on Claudius Klimt is just as interesting. After constructing two kit airplanes, Claudius is now the U.S. representative of the ArrowCopter. “There is the possibility,” he writes, “of bringing key people together to create a jump takeoff gyroplane that I believe is the future of aviation — i.e., point-to-point transportation without the expense, risk and complexity of helicopters.” Bill Lamb reports that he and Jenny “sold our Vermont house, disposed of most of our possessions and disconnected our phones. We then took off to visit parts of the world we’d never seen. For seven months, we’ve been living with what we can carry — basically a few (clothes) and computer-related paraphernalia.” Ted Leach, Sonny (Tony) Marek and John Loeb have all retired: Ted from Somerset Family Health Care; Tony after 44 years at Cytek Industries; and John after 40 years at Public Health Management Corporation. George Scarlett and Bob Leonard, neither of whom we’ve seen in 50 years, have agreed to put aside professorial responsibilities (George at Tufts, Bob at Texas A&M) to attend the reunion. How pleasing it is to note that as this is written we already have enough classmates committed to assure the largest Class of ’63 Reunion gathering ever.

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Jake Slagle jake@jakeslagle.com

William Anderson wtafive@yahoo.com

The Class of 1963 50th Reunion Committee, namely Bill Paternotte, John Claster, Lance Bendann, Dave Larrabee, Terry Ellen, Bill Oster, Ed Supplee and Yours Truly, has done most of its work preparing for what will be history when this publication reaches you. My role on that committee has been to oversee the compilation of our “Reunion Yearbook,” a 50-years-later kind of “Cynosure.” As I write this column, all 66 pages of the final draft rest in my lap. They bear a lot more news than space herewith permits. Sadly, the news most impacting our regularly-intouch Baltimore contingent was the recent death of Anne Bendann. After a sudden diagnosis of pancreatic

Well, we’re back. After a hiatus of at least a decade, the Class of ’64 will again publish class notes, annually, and in so doing we will update each other, as well as our friends in adjacent classes. I’m sorry we were unable to contact everyone, but we’ve made a good start, and we now have a solid base upon which to build. Not surprisingly the Class of ’64, like many other Gilman classes, is spread far and wide in terms of interests, careers and geography. One career choice has been education and several members have chosen this field. Leith Herrmann has been Lower School head for 18 years and as much as anyone has been responsible for developing our sons into men of character. He and wife

Ted Knowles feknowles@verizon.net

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The Class of 1960 meets for lunch at Tark’s Grill in Green Spring Station, December 12, 2012. Pictured left to right, seated: Randy Cockey, Edgie Russell, King Barnes, Richard Evans. Second row, standing: Jay Griswold, Randy Wootton, Karl Mech, Peter Winkenwerder, Gene O’Brien, Stan Heuisler, Elliott Randolph, Gil Cochran. Back row: Paddy Neilson, Ken Bourne, Jim Winn, Don Hebb, Snowden Stanley, Pete Taylor, Ken Boone, Ted Knowles.

Susie just celebrated 40 years together along with son Will and daughter Jenny. Dave “Flash” Allan also stayed at Gilman for a long while as head lacrosse coach and Upper School counselor before leaving in 2006. He has two sons, Scott, a psychiatrist in Burlington, Vt., and Michael, a lacrosse coach in California. Dave’s wife Bonnie is a yoga instructor, and Dave is a student. Think about that picture — Dave Allan in a leotard. OMG!! I didn’t hear from John MacLean but his address is the Belmont Hill School in Belmont, Mass., nor Dr. Jim Beers whose address is the College of William and Mary. I’m guessing two more careers in education. I did hear from Dr. David Abrahamson who is professor of journalism and the Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, and Dr. Jeff Miller, a member of the economics department at the University of Delaware. David has had an outstanding career in both books and magazines, and has won more awards than he has wall space. Jeff, of course, in addition to his class load, also had some responsibility for the development of Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco, a Delaware graduate, and for this we thank him — especially those of us who may have invested a few dollars on the outcome of the last Super Bowl. Lawyers, lawyers, lawyers — we got them. Doug Green practices energy and antitrust law in Washington, D.C. He and wife Laurie have a son Dan, a wine maker in California, and three granddaughters, one three and twins nine months. He reports running into Art Kaplan at local antique shows. Art is one of the leading U.S. dealers in antique Victorian jewelry. Walter Childs is an attorney for a Bethesda law firm, working out of their Annapolis office. He and his wife have three children:

Emily, an architect, Jeffrey, a banker in Denver, and Sara in the securities business in San Jose, Calif. Walter is also a proud grandpa times four. He also reports retirement is looming. I didn’t hear from Josh Gillelan but his address is Longshore Claimants National Law Center in D.C. Jim Campbell checked in. He’s a lawyer, but more importantly a policy consultant on the post office and express companies (DHL, FedEx). He’s working on the Postal Service “fix” right now. He has two children, a son in Jakarta, and a daughter who is an ADA in the Bronx. Jim and Karen live in Potomac. And finally John Silverstein went to UNC Chapel Hill for his law degree and has been practicing in North Carolina since 1971. John reports one wife, two daughters, one grandchild and two joints replaced, hopefully not at Duke Medical Center. Tar Heels need to stay far away from anything Duke. He will be at next year’s reunion. I only heard from one member of the medical field — Hershey Sollod. He has an active psychiatric practice in Denver. He has five wonderful grandchildren. I didn’t hear back from anyone else in the medical field; they’re probably all busy trying to figure out Obamacare. From the business addresses I was given, Jimmy Isaacs is in medicine in Salisbury, Md., Nick Iliff is at Johns Hopkins, Hamilton Easter has a professional association in Dover, Del., and Steve Mason is a member of a professional association in Baltimore. Hopefully, we’ll have more information on these fellows by the time we go to press next year. Finally, and I guess not surprisingly, many classmates gravitated toward the business world. Tom Beck writes that life is good. He’s happily married to Cathy and has three sons Stephen, Michael and David.

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Bill Paternotte ’63, John Dunning ’63 and Jake Slagle ’63 are all smiles at their 50th Reunion dinner. Paternotte and his wife Nan hosted the class at their home. Bob Dyer ’63, John Loeb ’63. Ward Coe ’63, George Scarlett ’63, Hunt Walker ’63.

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Stephen has put Tom in the grandpa business two times with Carter and Sam. Tom has an investment, insurance and tax practice in Towson. He stays in contact with Robbie McCormick and Dave Johnson, and thus has given me the perfect segue into their careers. Robbie McCormick lives in Washington (state) with Barbara. They have four children and have entered into the wine business with their eldest, Brian. They have vineyards in Washington and Oregon and produce wine under the Memalmoose and Idiot’s Grace labels. Robbie is also a grandpa — times four. Dave Johnson married Alice three years ago, and lives in Vero Beach, Fla. He has started a small employee leasing business. He and Alice met up with Rob and Barb in Southern France last year. Doug Ober retired from The Adams Express Company on March 31. He and wife Fran bought a home in Jackson Hole, Wyo., and they are looking forward to fishing those beautiful streams in the summer and skiing in the winter. Sounds like a heck of a plan Doug. He has three children: Kenneth, an artist in LA, and Mac ’09 and Caitlin, both college students, and one grandchild, Isabelle. Bob Pine retired from North Shore LIJ Health System in September 2011, but has held a series of part-time positions since then. Pascale will retire next February; Bob will can the part-time work, and the two of them will move to France for three or four months. Steve Scott is another person confused over the word retired. Steve retired from Investment Counselors of Maryland five years ago. Currently he is treasurer of GBMC Healthcare and in April he will become chairman of Hartford Mutual Insurance Companies. All this from a man who’s retired. Steve and wife Betsy have two sons, one in Baltimore and one in Shanghai; they travel a bit and have a second home in Martha’s Vineyard. Jeff Jones rang in. He’s still in Blue Bell, Pa., (a.k.a. Pigeon Town) with Ginny. They have a son, Ben, who is an up-and-coming actuary with Aetna. Jeff is still working and is graciously supporting all of us retired or nearly retired classmates. He will attend the reunion and is looking forward to the next meeting of Sigma Epsilon Chi. Stuart McCarthy lives in Hong Kong with wife Lillian. Daughter Samantha graduated from Bryn Mawr College and works in Manhattan. They also have a son who has entered year nine at Episcopal High in Alexandria, Va. Stuart is still entrenched in the insurance brokering business. Stuart and Lillian hosted Bobby Locke and Jeff Miller and wives in January, and Bobby was kind enough to send me a picture. Unfortunately I couldn’t make out Bobby or Jeff or Stuart. The picture was just a bunch of old people, so he must have sent the wrong one. Tom Caplan has just finished his fourth novel, a thriller titled “The Spy Who Jumped Off the Screen.” He’s currently working on the sequel. Jim Hardesty also called. He’s been in the investment business since graduating from Columbia, and still lives in the same house in Ruxton. He and wife Lindsay just celebrated 34 years together along with daughter Ellen. I’ve saved Gally Warfield for last, as his career is a tough one to top. He has had careers in the law, flying fighter jets and writing books and screenplays, and his latest project is in the visual and literary arts genre. He and Judy live in the San Diego area. Like I said — a man for all seasons.

Of course, several members are retired. John McKay is in order—happily married-happily retired-and a happy grandpa. He says he’s blessed, and I would agree. I think Bob Brown is retired. He reports he is busy traveling especially to Hawaii and Key West. The children are launched, and he’s a grandpa to twin girls. That sounds retired to me. Yours truly hung up the cleats two years ago after a fun and rewarding business career in several different fields. I live in West Palm Beach, Fla., with the lovely Patti. We have five children and nine grandchildren between us. We walk, bike, shoot pool, swim and play golf; scuba lessons are in the near future. All in all, life in God’s waiting room wearing short pants and Tommy Bahama shirts is not too shabby!! I’ll keep all of you in the loop about next year’s reunion. For those who have lost count — it’s #50 —  ouch. To all those who have not been contacted, please send your e-mail address to me at wtafive@yahoo.com. I will issue all appropriate mea culpas, put you on my contact list and make sure you are kept current from here on out. Please make plans to attend the reunion. Stuart McCarthy is flying in from the Orient, and a lot of other out-of-towners will attend. If they can make it, you can too. That’s it for me. It’s time to head to the lanai, with an adult beverage in hand, and enjoy another south Florida sunset. See y’all soon.

1965 William R. Baker bill.baker@willis.com Thanks to everyone who responded to my e-mail back in January. There were quite a few responses, some lengthy, so I may have abbreviated some. Gordy Allen writes from Portland, Ore., where he retired from the practice of law in 2011. Gordy spends his time at several varied activities: reading with disadvantaged first and second graders, coaching a mock trial team at a minority high school, tutoring recent immigrants and high school drop-outs at a community college, and serving as a court-appointed advocate for teenagers in the foster-care system. I’m not sure where Gordy finds time for his last activity — working with his Labrador on her ball skills! Alvin Levi reports in from Baltimore that both of his daughters are now back in town, one working as assistant director of student services at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, campus, and the other as a senior VP and associate general counsel at One-Main Financial, a division of Citigroup. There was also a report from Tony Whitman, reporting on his two daughters. Older daughter Miles has finished her residency in emergency medicine at Georgetown and is now practicing at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Virginia. Younger daughter Hannah was admitted to the Maryland Bar in December and is practicing as a new attorney at Ron Sheff ’66’s, law firm, Adelman, Sheff and Smith, in Annapolis. Tony continues his practice of maritime law at Ober Kaler.

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I have seen Mike Menzies at several functions in Easton, and Mike did e-mail that he is still alive and monitoring the behavior of Richard Tilghman to preserve the reputation of Gilman School on the Eastern Shore. We all understand the enormity of that job! Mike continues as president of Easton Bank & Trust. Richard is the main man running Wye House and Wye Farm near Easton, doing a great job. Sandy Harris has gone by the professional name of Neal for many years, but our rapidly aging memories still think of him as Sandy. Sandy continues to teach economics at Babson College, 30 years there next year. Ann still works in development at Andover. They are looking at 2015 as the point at which they retire to their house in New London, N.H., for more fishing, biking, sailing and tennis. One of Sandy’s sons is an attorney in Boston, and the other is in private equity in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. David Winstead reports that daughter Schuyler has graduated from University of Pennsylvania vet school and is engaged to be married in August. An e-mail from George Ward, who now lives in Milton, Del., tells he has produced a short documentary for the Ft. Miles (Delaware Bay) Historical Society. George says he hopes to see George Brown and Rip Zink over the summer when they visit their homes in Bethany Beach. Geoff Leboutillier reported in from Nova Scotia, where he is heavily involved in enviro politics, fighting for an environmental bill of rights, changes in the aquaculture policy fracking, clear-cutting, fighting to protect lands! And with all that both locally and nationally, Geoff still has time to breed standard poodles, like his parents did. As Geoff says, “the poodle didn’t fall far from the tree.” Steve “Tome” Thomas is still practicing law here in Baltimore, but also serves on the healthcare board and the quality committees at GBMC. In addition Tome is a director of the Baltimore County Revenue Authority. His daughter Stasia is married and working with Tome at Thomas & Libowitz. His other daughter Alex is a healthcare attorney in Los Angeles with Manatt Phelps & Phillips. Son Steven spent a year in Southeast Asia on a fellowship from Princeton, then worked in San Francisco for an early-stage internet company, and now is pursuing a multidisciplinary master’s in creative writing and literature at NYU. Tome’s wife Audrey does volunteer work with some other past Gilman Moms at Hackerman House at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Audrey also plays a lot of golf, having been president of the Women’s 18-Hole Group at BCC, and she is one of the first two female directors of the Golfer’s Charitable Association. Lastly, Tome reports that his father, Judge Basil Thomas, is celebrating his 97th birthday this year. Judge Thomas still goes to work every day, never misses a speaking opportunity and sits on the board of Sinclair Broadcasting. Judge Thomas was honored by the Baltimore Business Journal in March for his tremendous contributions. Nelson Goldberg reports briefly that he is still operating and having lots of fun. Nelson was selected as one of Baltimore’s Top Doctors in the plastic surgery-breast category. Congratulations! Carey Swope says that after 33 years in the corporate insurance arena, he cast off the yoke and retired. Carey’s wife Ann will still be working as a sign language interpreter at

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University of Southern Maine, allowing them summers at their cottage at Boothbay Harbor and travel during school vacations. Tom Clapp reports in from Hollywood, Fla., (not to be confused with Les Rumsey’s Hollywood, Calif.) that he is now warmer but farther from his granddaughter, who has just moved from Atlanta far away to Iowa, but they will visit. Some quick tidbits to finish this off: John Helfrich reports one daughter is working at Princeton and the other is in dental school in Richmond. Jack Hull relishes in the fact that he was the first of the Class to reach 65 and is still racing sailboats on Lake Erie and winning! Robin Hudson is living in the quiet and pristine wilderness of New Hampshire. I see Robin’s mother on the Eastern Shore where she is a much-celebrated water colorist and a lovely lady! Bill Groff is a retired oil baron and loving it, two grandchildren. Fred Whalen notes his third grandchild Caroline was born in January 2013. Alex Fisher says his fourth grandchild is on the way.

1966 Rick Buck rick@ksiinc.com Dave Irwin and Kendi recently enjoyed a longanticipated trip to Paris, getting a break from their hectic routine and maintaining Dave’s litigation law practice, Irwin, Green & Dexter. They also enjoyed a quick junket to New Orleans to watch the Super Bowl. Son Jeff recently completed his degree program at Occidental College, and Mark is finishing his studies at Pitzer College, so over the past several years, the Irwins have been logging a lot of cross-country air miles! Dave’s older children are all doing well. Ellie lives in D.C., Emmett in Columbia, Md., and Annie in the Albany, N.Y., area, and the total grandchild count is now at six. Bryson Cook also managed to find his way to the Super Bowl, along with Cindy and daughters Laura and Rosie. Laura recently graduated from Southern Methodist University and now works in Baltimore, while Rosie is finishing her senior year at Roland Park Country School and plans to attend college at the University of Denver. Bryson’s son Jeb is finishing up his second year at University of Maryland School of Law School and is looking forward to a summer job at Venable, LLP. For those of you who may not have heard, Bryson’s dad, Sam Cook ’39, also a Gilman alum, and a highly-regarded former labor lawyer, passed away late last year after a period of disability and confinement. The memorial service was heavily attended by Venable attorneys, past and present, as well as numerous Gilman alumni. Mike Stanton recently touched base, stating that he is happy to report that there has been a positive turn in his architecture practice, and “there are actually buildings to be designed again.” Mike recently received news that he has been elected to the Northern California chapter of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Following his stellar career playing at Yale, Mike

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Charlie Ober ’68 in Jaipur, India, playing polo from the back of an elephant.

resumed playing five years later for the San Francisco Lacrosse Club, a team that was heavily laden with talent, including our classmate Jim Morris. The SFLC won three state championships with Mike in the goal, and he received a number of individual all-star and MVP recognitions. He was thrilled to receive news of this honor. He reports that daughter Abby graduated from UCLA two years ago and is working in San Francisco, while Brenna is nearing the completion of her degree program at DePaul University. Several years ago, Mike bought a second home near Ely in northern Minnesota, from which he continues to enjoy summer canoe trips, often with his brother Tony ’67, and his daughters. Lew Rumford is in the process of rehabilitating from his second knee replacement surgery. The first one was a complete success, and Lew is optimistic that this one will follow suit. Lew and Fran recently purchased a second home in Ligonier, Pa., and they look forward to spending increasing amounts of time there, especially in summer months. Their daughter Julia is now married, and still works and lives in China. Their daughter Julia is married, and is now attending graduate school at the Duke University Fuqua School of Business. Daughter Grace has returned from her employment in China to a stateside job in New York City, and son Will is working for Target in Minneapolis. Our former classmate Gordy Allen is now retired from his practice of law, but keeping very busy with some community service endeavors and travelling often to destinations far and wide, whenever his wife Jan’s vacation schedule will allow. Their son Ben is pursuing a Ph.D. in political science from UC-Berkeley, while daughter Rebecca is in a medical residency program in psychiatry at Harvard. Recent travel destinations for Gordy and Jan have included the Natchez Trace in Mississippi, New Orleans, hiking in the Wallowa Mountains of eastern Oregon, and Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

Charlie Fenwick continues to be about as busy as one could imagine. While his board involvements have lessened to some degree, the car business continues to be highly challenging, and he has recently completed a major expansion and renovation of the buildings at Valley Motors. Fred Sachs reports having recently gone on a cruise around Chile and Argentina. He highly recommends the terrific scenery. Bruce Michelson is also in the ranks of highly travelled classmates. Bruce advises of the birth of a granddaughter, Cora, last year, as well as travels to numerous foreign destinations, including Ecuador, the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica and Newfoundland. David Naquin says that he and Carola still reside in New Mexico, but they travel east now and then to visit “the kids,” so their “next stop always involves either sand and snow, or sand and ocean.” There is good news from Runyon Woods, who reported late last year that he had survived a heart attack and back surgery, sold his company, and went sailing through the Caribbean for a year. I recently heard that Mark Fulford and his wife have retired from their professions and enlisted in the Peace Corps with an assignment in southern Africa, for the next 18 months! Clearly, Mark has not lost his Eagle Scout commitment to serving others! I am happy to report that all is well with the Buck family. Barbara is completing her 20th year as the assistant head of Friends middle school. Son Matt is finishing his second year as head of Calvert School’s middle school, and daughter Maggie is finishing her second year as a professor in UMBC’s department of geography and environmental systems. Barbara and I are thrilled to have four healthy grandkids, ranging from age 8 to age 3, and we are very fortunate to have them all within an hour’s drive!

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The Class of 1968 marks its 45th Reunion at Cinghiale in Harbor East.

1967 F. Key Kidder keykidder@gmail.com For those who missed it, our 45th Reunion last spring was a major success. Approximately one-third of our graduating class made the trek to the Headmaster’s residence on campus occupied for the past six years by one of our own, John Schmick. After spending his entire adult life in service to Gilman, John announced he is checking out this year. We wish him luck. John and wife Janet, Gilman’s first lady, with an assist from Mac Barrett, pulled out all the stops. We convened under a tent in the backyard for supper and laissez les bon temps rouler. About the only missing were The Temptations. Also attending were Gay and Chris Legg, Steve Brooks, Jeff Levi, Mary and David Williams, Albert Williams, Steve Pollock, Jeff Quartner, George Harvey, Billy Richardson, Doc Hersperger, John Isaacs and wife Sally, Ellie and Bruce Taylor, Lori and Sherm Bristow, Bart Harvey and wife Janet Marie Smith, Chuck Gomer, Toni and Evan Krometis, Brenda and Tom Solley, Taylor Birckhead and wife Jessie, Whit Turner, Anne-Steuart and Charlie Palmer and Yours Truly and wife Margaret. The surprise guest of the evening, at least for my money, was Ray Sterling, who reappeared after an absence of more than four decades. Without his nametag, he was literally unrecognizable. Ray had the look of one who successfully reinvented himself, dividing his time between his New Jersey dental empire

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and Florida boating interests. Sorry to say, he moved too fast to stay for dinner. On another note, pardon the pun, Gilman’s composer to the world and our classmate Christopher Rouse keeps adding to his already impressive laurels. Congratulations to Chris for being named Composerin-Residence of the New York Philharmonic for the 2012–2013 season. Brad Peabody recently informed the Alumni Office that he coached his National Moot Court Competition Team from the University of Baltimore Law School to a Top 5 ranking out of 196 teams in the U.S. Congrats, Brad!

1968 Christopher West cwest@semmes.com It was great to see so many classmates at our 45th Reunion reception at Cinghiale. Many believe that Cinghiale is the best restaurant in Baltimore, and the staff certainly treated us very well, with excellent wine and delicious hors d’oeuvres. Charlie Ober arrived with a present for our resident Wagnerian, John Ingalls — several historic recordings of Wagner operas. Charlie retired from T. Rowe Price several years ago and has been taking the sort of vacations that most of us just dream about. He described one trip as consisting of his ultimate bucket list. It involved a private jet whisking Charlie and others around the world, stopping along the way at Machu

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Picchu, Easter Island, Ayres Rock, Australia (to observe the total eclipse of the sun), an exotic Indonesian ruined temple complex, the pronunciation of which is too complex for me to accurately recall, London, Petra, Jordan (where the climax of “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” was filmed) and a memorable stop in Jaipur, India, where Charlie played polo on the back of an elephant. Other guests included Jamie Snead, Tim Chriss and Dennis Malone, who retired from W. C. Pinkard and Company several years ago. Paul Bennett came down from New York for the occasion. He is now teaching economics to M.B.A. candidates at Fordham. Listening to this conversation, Andy Hirsch grumbled that he is teaching physics to incoming freshmen at Purdue, a far less interesting assignment. Andy retired as department head in 2007, but has recently been tapped to resume his former responsibilities, at least for an interim period. Andy won the award for being in the best physical shape, due undoubtedly to his herculean bicycling expeditions. The awards for the longest distance traveler and the most hair went to Larry Kenny, who flew up from Gainesville, Fla., for the occasion. Pierce Dunn, David Owens and Bob Proutt also attended the reception. Bob enjoyed an extended conversation with Leigh and Bob Erlandson. Bob Morton delivered the interesting news that he is the owner of Bob Green’s former childhood home in Roland Park. Amidst the various retirees, Al Burk reported that, although he retired from WBAL, he is now working for WYPR, one of Baltimore’s public radio stations. Instead of selling advertisements as he did at WBAL, Al is now selling sponsorships for WYPR. Al’s discussion of the difference between ads and sponsorships was one of those highly technical explanations that only a talented lawyer could fully comprehend. Speaking of talented lawyers, Mark Iwry is still a key player in the Obama Administration, working on Obamacare and other initiatives involving pension policies. He told of chairing a meeting in the White House’s Roosevelt Room (better known as the Cabinet Room) and sitting briefly in the President’s chair until strange looks from the other attendees convinced him that he should leave that chair unoccupied. On another, more recent, occasion, Mark was again in the Roosevelt Room for a briefing for the President (this time sitting in a chair along the wall). An anxious aide came into the room and handed the President a printed e-mail, and the President looked up and informed everyone that two bombs had gone off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. Mark agreed with me that Obama was fortunate that, unlike George W. Bush on 9/11, Obama was not live on camera in a kindergarten reading “The Pet Goat” when this news arrived. Finally, after many decades supporting Maryland Republicans behind the scenes, I have announced my candidacy for the House of Delegates in next year’s election. My district is an intensely Republican two-Delegate district in north central Baltimore County and includes Ruxton, Lutherville, Timonium, Cockeysville, Sparks, Monkton, Hereford, Butler, Parkton and Maryland Line. So, at a time that so many others are retired, retiring, or at least contemplating

retirement, I am working so hard that I feel as though I have two jobs. One benefit of all this activity is that, if I keep walking door to door at present rates, I will end up with Andy Hirsch’s physique.

1971 Tom Lynn tklynn@earthlink.net Tom Lynn, here, reporting for duty as Class Secretary once again — after a three-plus decade hiatus. Thanks (?) to Nigel Ogilvie for handing off the writing baton to me and for his excellent run. Depending on how the editor treats what is below, I have decided to let each of the responding classmates “catch us up” in his own words — hence, the quotation marks! Some editing/ shortening might need to have been done. If so, my apologies if anyone’s nose gets bent outta joint! Also, this means that some of the “will,” “will be” and “recently” modifiers/descriptors in the original e-mails might have become “is,” “was” and “a while back!” And, so, onward . . . Peter Andrews: “I am retired from the Foreign Service and living in Luxembourg. Along the way, I got married and have two children ages 14 and 18. We are in the midst of the college application madness, but that should end soon with decisions pending in April. As a diplomat, I have worked variously in political and in economic affairs at Embassies in Africa and India, although I served as a consular (visas) officer in Dakar. I also had the opportunity to serve in Kabul in 2002, shortly after the government collapsed and the U.S. coalition took control. I retired in 2007 after completing a tour in Mumbai, India, and subsequently followed my wife to Korea where she served at the Embassy in Seoul. We depart Embassy Luxembourg this summer (2013) and are looking forward to returning to Washington, where we will be reunited with family and friends and will have the chance to rediscover the many wonders of life in the Motherland.” Randy Beehler: “I am currently an independent consultant in Washington, D.C., on environmental and energy policy matters with focus on the Department of Defense. My wife Stephanie has now completed 10 years of successfully managing her own fine arts auction gallery, Sloans & Kenyon, in Bethesda, Md. I am enjoying watching my two daughters be ‘launched’: Alexandra, 23, in Manhattan working for Webtrade, an online brokerage platform provider, and Abigail, 22, graduated in May from Davidson College. In January 2013, I became chairman of the board of the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, www.allianceforthebay.org, a 501(c) (3) organization for the improvement/restoration of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. It concentrates on building collaborative solutions by connecting people to the bay and their local tributaries; it does not lobby or litigate. Thanks to the number of classmates who have contributed in the past. Other classmates can check out the website and, hopefully, might consider supporting either financially and/or volunteering.”

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Michael Blum: “I continue to balance my life with my lives — advertising; farming; car shows; good deeds; public relations; hunting and fishing (management!); overworked; underpaid; etc. I was at both Orioles home playoff games last fall; I exulted in our President’s re-election; I survived being jealous of Benjy Dubois going to the Super Bowl; I even joined Tom Casey on a trek to model train layouts in Harford County in March 2013! I joined the board of the Young Victorian Theatre Company in January, being already on the board of the Bel Air Independence Day Committee and the Clarks Creek Watershed Preservation Association. Oh, and I am also (at this writing) on the board of the Camp Hill Light Opera Experience, for which company I will, we hope, by the time this is published, have directed and conducted Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Patience!” At least, that’s my story, and I’m sticking to it. I’m still president of MartinoBlum and still manager of Flemish Down, LLC. My and Annette’s far-flung children (Petaluma, Calif.; Bel Air, Md.; New Haven, Conn.; London, U.K.) are a continuing communications challenge, and the vicissitudes of having a house on the beach off Long Island where Hurricane Sandy swept by made this past year even more trying than usual — anyone want to chant ‘Flood Insurance Sucks!’? At this point, I have run 28 parades in Bel Air, so if you see a marching band tootling down the street, you might look to see if ol’ Mulbo is behind it!” Mark Bond: “Some Noah news: he’s spending the semester in Rome and spent yesterday with the new Pope.” Tom Casey: “Not much to say about me. Our youngest, Maggie, spent the fall at the University of Ghana in Accra; she’s now back in the U.S. at Beloit. Beth is the new RPCS Lower School principal starting July 1. I’m still at Hord Coplan Macht and playing second violin in the Greenspring Valley Orchestra at Stevenson University. (I’ve been playing for nine years now. When I was 50, I figured I'd better do it or I never would!)” Dick Councill: “Did attend Super Bowl and had a great time. Celebrated 30 years at Roanoke Trade Services, Inc. Son Matthew ’05: working for Travelers Insurance; son Christopher ’08: working for Tom O’Donnell Honda; son Timothy: student at CCBC; wife Nancy: very active with golf and Catawba College and her own business. . . .” John Danzer: “Married January 2, 2012, in Spain to partner Chip vonArks Allemann, as we have a small farm there in Xabia, near Valencia. Marriage in Spain is federal and recognized by the State of New York. Moved garden furniture company to a refurbished nursery in Garrison, N.Y., where we live now. Garrison is a rural town situated on the Hudson River, one hour to N.Y.C. That’s the big stuff. The day-to-day is a rat.” Dwight “Tad” Douglass: “So with the introspection that 60 years brings, here is my brief bio. I am currently on my second stint working at Bechtel (world’s largest engineering and construction company, at least according to the ‘Engineering News Record’) after alternating with two stints in architecture (scuttled by economic crashes). This time it has stuck for over 22 years, so I guess I have stopped job hopping. I have had

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the opportunity to work and live in Mississippi, Florida (twice) and England, and have spent a lot of time in Turkey. I have also gotten to visit Mexico, Chile, France, Portugal, Scotland and probably some others in the line of duty, so it has been an interesting experience. Also on my second marriage — and second family to boot. Does anyone else in the class have 3-, 6- and 8-year-old kids? By my higher math, I will be 78 when the youngest gets out of college. There is great comfort in knowing what you will be doing for the rest of your life . . . working to support the kids. We are currently living in the Hagerstown area, and the office is in Frederick. Hagerstown is great — we have both a Lowe’s and a Home Depot, and a Best Buy as well! Everything you could need . . . and none of the traffic. So that is 40 years worth of news, I hope it holds you for the next 40!” Ben Dubois: “News, hmmm. Took my kids to the Super Bowl. Was in and out of New Orleans in less than 24 hours. Just me, the wife and the two Portuguese water dogs in Mt. Washington. In a six-person practice, Woodholme Cardiovascular Associates, seeing patients and doing angioplasties. Already turned 60.” Frank Fiske: “Not so much new . . . rather a status report. I’m in the second year of running my own company, T. Franklin Marketing, and enjoying success and freedom. My wife Brienne is in her 37th year teaching young ladies the finer aspects of figure skating, and her time is fully booked. Amazing in this economy. First son, Tommy ’05, received his master’s degree in applied psychology and works in College Park. Shortly after receiving his government clearance, he will probably land a new position in his field. My daughter, Kelly, teaches at St. Paul’s Lutheran pre-school in Lutherville. She also dog- and house-sits regularly for neighbors and friends. Second son, Patrick ’08, is a relationship banker with M&T Bank at the Chartley Branch in Reisterstown. So far he is enjoying it and doing well. I must say, it is especially rewarding to me to have all three of my children not only fully employed, but in fields that relate to their respective majors in school. The memories of the tuition payments fade away more easily because of that! Warmer weather means work for me. I’ll start going down to my Cape May house on weekends to attempt to undo what the winter months did to it. It never ends. Other than that, still going to O’s games, still playing tennis, still hunting ducks, still listening to rock music and still drinking Manhattans!” Jim Fusting: “Not much to report from So Cal . . . have lived here for the last 25 years, and it’s hard to imagine ever leaving the left coast . . . however I do miss the spell of brisk October afternoons with Gilman turf in my facemask . . . collected a lot of money from my SF friends on the Super Bowl.” Bill Gamper: “My life has actually been somewhat out of the ordinary this past year. To detail: In October, Mary and I travelled to Korea to try to establish some contacts for a ‘brother’ school in Korea. We spent time in Seoul and Daejeon visiting schools and then did some sightseeing in Gyeongju and on Jeju Island. It was a fascinating look at another culture and a very different educational system. In December, the whole family spent the holiday in Switzerland and Italy. Jackie spent

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1973 take a hypothetically nautical turn by gathering for its 40th Reunion at Heavy Seas Alehouse.

the fall semester in Lugano, Switzerland, so the rest of us went over to pick her up after her term ended. We were able to visit our Swiss cousins, stayed in the town of Stettfurt, where my grandparents emigrated from (and where we toured the house that had been in the family since 1600), skied the Italian Alps (it is cheaper), spent Christmas Eve and Christmas in Florence and finished the trip in Rome. (Made stops in Bern, Zurich, Innsbruck, Verona and Pisa. Not bad for someone who has never been outside North America!) The best news is that I have only one more year of tuition. And, if Jackie gets a job, then all three girls will be employed with benefits. Liz works in Baltimore City as a preand post-natal care nurse for low-income, high-risk pregnancies. Carrie is in charge of marketing women’s lacrosse at STX, and Jackie is an advertising major at SMU — so we are hoping that she finds a job.” Ned Grassi: “Life on the farm is good, with lots of wildlife: fin, fur and feathers. And our pair of springer spaniels. Judy toils away at Sallie Mae, and I do marketing for Princeton Portfolio Strategies Group. Google us anytime!” Kirk Levedahl: “Let’s see. Barbara and I remain in good health. Sadly, just celebrated my 60th, but don’t feel any different. Our son Alexander graduated from Cooper Union in June 2011 in electrical engineering specializing in digital signal processing and is working for Boeing in Virginia. I remain the program manager for the National Ignition Facility at LLNL, which is the world’s largest laser (https://lasers.llnl.gov/about/nif/ about.php). To escape the daily rat race in D.C., we have become part-time Texans and purchased an 80 acre ‘ranch’ on the border of Big Bend National Park in Terlingua, Texas. We have been doing a lot of hiking.

It is high desert, with lots of beautiful cactus, beautiful views and few people. When we walk into a local establishment and they find out where we are from, the usual response is ‘I’m so sorry’ — which is Texan for ‘You are so sorry. . .’” Chip Manekin: “I am in my second year of directing the Jewish Studies program at the University of Maryland, College Park. Wife Rachel and I continue to fly back and forth between D.C. and Jerusalem, where our four children and eight grandchildren live. This February I reached the big 60. Was I depressed? Nah! My post midlife crisis ended last summer when I went on a fitness kick, knocking off programs like Insanity, P90X, etc. I went out and bought dumbbells, a pull-up bar, a kettle bell, fitness bands — and a heartbeat monitor. I now weigh around what I weighed at Gilman. I feel good, went down from size large to medium, and I look like a very fit 85 year-old geezer. Well, it’s never too late to be a jock, especially when you don’t have to win at anything. Let’s see how long the fitness craze — or I — last.” Edwin Merryman: “I actually had a very exciting year. I have a really nice homebred filly, Jazzy Idea. She won five stakes, and was named best Maryland-based horse by the Maryland Racing Media Assocation. I hope she has a lot of good races ahead. Louis, my oldest, is the manager of Northview Stallion Station, probably the largest stallion operation outside of Kentucky. A lot of pressure — and no thanks. He has a little boy, Liam, who turned five on the Ides of March. Jane is a large-animal vet, based in northern New Jersey. She is about to marry her long-time boyfriend, a classmate at University of Pennsylvania vet school. The 60 bit is a little scary. Technically still married.”

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Greg Davis ’73 and Evans Hubbard ’73 catch up at the reunion. John Robinson ’73 is in the background. Patrick “Shemp” Lohrey ’73 and Dave Senft ’73. Ned Rosenberg ’73, P’18 chats with Luis Gonzalez ’73.

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Marvin Miller: “Not really a lot to report. I continue to travel a lot with the job. I serve/have served on many industry boards and committees (president of the Board of America in Bloom, Board of Trustees for the American Floral Endowment, Board of OFA/ Association of Horticulture Professionals, Cornell’s Seeley Conference Board of Directors, chair of the Society of American Florists’ Government Relations Committee, chair of OFA’s Industry Advocacy Committee, etc.). Still very involved with photography as a hobby and have been to Alaska to photograph at least once or more almost every year since 2005. Also biking, mostly for exercise, but currently gearing up for a June fundraiser (Bike MS: Tour de Farms) for the Multiple Sclerosis Society; not exactly like selling Gilman Circus tickets — but using some of the same principles!” Nigel Ogilvie: “Have spent last four months dealing with medical issues while continuing to work, until recently when I underwent prostate surgery on 3/18. Glad to see it gone — but I miss some of the functions it used to perform! Diagnosis was prostate cancer so, going forward, I am asking my guardian angels, who have been working overtime since November 2012, to help clear the next two-to-five years, which is the time horizon we all look forward to for ‘in the clear’ reassurance. If any classmates find themselves similarly diagnosed, now or in the future, I welcome e-mails or calls to share the knowledge that was kindly shared with me, and which saved me two months of research. And, I know two nationally leading practitioners of robotic prostatectomy surgery, in Philly and New York, in whom I have complete confidence. Separately, I suffered a detached retina in September 2012 which was quickly reattached but which generated an unusually large and dynamic epiretinal membrane (on the surface of the retina) that distorted my right eye vision. Subsequent ‘bad medical advice’ led to delays in treatment which damaged the retina. Life did not take a turn for the better until I got to Wilmer at Johns Hopkins. I still have distortion, but the situation is better, and I have the highest regard for my team at Wilmer.” Jeff Rice: “Recovering from cancer and cancer surgery. Took up painting and try and do this an hour+ each day — with no phones!” Mark Wilson: “News: Janine and I are still having a great time, with a new granddaughter having arrived! We are also still traveling — planning on going to Italy this fall.” And, finally, your scribe, Tom Lynn: “After a dozen or more years of teaching, I decided to try my hand at owning/managing several rental properties. Not sure I’m cut out for that! Perhaps these class notes will find me back in the classroom where I belong. . . Each summer I try to get up to Lake Otsego near Cooperstown for a week or so, and, in addition, this summer I hope to have safely enjoyed a 60th birthday Alaskan June cruise, during which I will have visited a cousin in Talkeetna. Certainly, one of the recent ‘adventures’ of my life was appearing on a ‘Jeopardy!’ broadcast which aired in March. Enjoyed watching it with a group of 50+ friends and family at a local

restaurant. Looking forward to the late fall, a bunch of us are hoping to have a ‘group 60th birth year’ dance party. Everyone in the class will be getting information on that project! And, as we head toward our 45th Reunion in 2016, I’m hoping that a group of us will come together beforehand to write a ‘lively class history’ which will tell the story of our class —  accomplishments, hijinks and all — during our time together, from the late 1950s to the beginning of the 1970s. Ultimately, when we reconvene even later for our 50th in 2021 (wow!), I’m hoping we can produce another ‘volume’ which will be a compilation of our individual bios telling what became of us each after June 1971 — and where we ‘find’ ourselves in 2021. Now THAT’S some advance planning! In the next class notes (if I’m allowed to continue!), I will mention a bit about old Gilman Circus memories that some classmates have discussed with me of late, as well as include some of the class/school trivia questions we had at our 40th Reunion. Until then, take care and drop me a line whenever you can. You KNOW that I’ll be in touch.”

1974 Dave Seiler dseiler4@yahoo.com A.C. George and Jamie Murray organized a Class of ’74 December Holiday Lunch downtown at the Gordon Biersch Brewery. Seated around a long table telling stories for a few hours were Courtenay Jenkins, Henry Blue, Ross Pearce, Skip Pearre, Tom Gamper, Bill Fritz, A.C. George, Kimball Byron, Doug Nelson, Dave Seiler, John Rice, Jamie Murray and Bill Baker. This was the fifth annual gathering, and they would be happy for it to include more classmates next year. Ross Pearce’s apparent quest for the World’s Best Father mug continues, as evidenced with photos on Facebook of son Parker shooting, skating, riding, playing polo at Garrison Forest School, golf and guitar. A few people in the Monkton countryside have volunteered to be adopted by Ross just to have that much fun. Parker is in sixth grade at Gilman, as is Chase Baker, son of Bill Baker, and the boys have had ski trips together. This has to be unique — former classmates whose sons are classmates. Bill’s second son Ian is in fifth grade at Gilman, and the family enjoyed skiing black diamond mogul runs at Snowbird in Utah over spring break. Bill Fritz had one of his 15 seconds of fame moments as he was interviewed in print and on TV about a bizarre power outage in the Annapolis area year end 2012. Mac Finney, experienced cameraman for WBAL-TV, made sure to shoot Bill’s “good side.” Henry Blue enjoys living on the farm in Butler, and is actively competing in national and state golf tournaments, a mix of both senior events and open draws. He was recently among the lucky to play Augusta National, but we won’t be seeing him in the Masters, at least not this year. Of Henry’s children, Henry Jr., is

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teaching at Boys’ Latin and starting an Ed/Tech company Alchemy Learning Project. Peter ’05 is in New York working for Guggenheim Partners, and Liza is a junior at University of Virginia playing lacrosse. Jamie Murray also continues to enjoy the farm life, a few miles away from the Blues as the crow flies, and he is happy to see classmates and their children out at his farm to cut Christmas trees. Tom Gamper ran his third Boston Marathon this year, and when not designing buildings, he has been volunteering with the Trout in the Classroom program, which focuses on environmental awareness by involving students on stream restocking and other activities. Turns out, Tom has been fishing much of his life, a love of which came from his father, the Mr. Gamper. “The Legend of Kimball Byron” is a quote from one of the numerous articles about Kim running in the JFK 50 Mile Memorial ultra-marathon for 44 years. Not a typo (44 or legend!), he first ran it in 1968 at age 12 with his father, and is considered by most (including Pressbox, Runner’s World, Frederick News-Post, Baltimore Sun, Washington Post) as this race’s expert. The Post has a course map with Kim’s hints and collective wisdom for completing the race. I recommend you Google the articles, because it’s really an amazing accomplishment. When not running, Kim continues to pilot for US Airways, is a fan of locally grown heirloom apples and, with wife Hannah, restored and creatively expanded a cabin backing up to Catoctin Mountain State Park. While recovering from a surgery after a hip fracture, Dave Seiler had time to read Chris White’s captivating book “SKIPJACK: The Story of America’s Last Sailing Oystermen,” courtesy of the library of the father of Dave Rich. No running or tennis for me while I continue physical therapy. However, Jim Heysel has been doing enough running to cover my injured reserve status. He’s been competing in 10-mile races and half marathons, and completed two marathons last fall. He was proud to earn the 26.2 sticker for his car. Mike Cromwell changed the name of his investment banking boutique to Outcome Capital last year in connection with opening an office in the Boston area. He has also been traveling with wife Tish over the past few years to Patagonia, the Canadian Rockies, Kenya, Arizona and Santorini, and has developed an interest in photography. You can see some of his photos at www.mjcromwelliiiphotos.com. He is proud that his son was accepted by Wharton Business School to start this fall. Steve Secor completed a RN degree and works for Genesis HealthCare. Jim Vandenberg traveled to China in April to visit his daughter, who has been teaching in Shanghai for the past three years. Andy Brooks testified at the Senate Committee on Banking hearing about the negative factors associated with high frequency trading, trading system glitches causing order mishaps and other consequences of a short term focus on speed. He has also found time to serve on the Board of Directors of WYPR-FM, our Baltimore NPR radio station.

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Congratulations to David Liu for being awarded tenure at the Harrisburg Area Community College, where he is chair of the department of sociology and involved in establishing new programs there. Carlos Olaquer is now a musician full time, and you can listen to his band Norm & Carlos playing in local Baltimore nightspots. Hal Stockbridge, M.D., continues as the associate medical director of the Department of Labor & Industries for the State of Washington, based in Olympia. Travis Emory moved to Palm Springs, although he’s back and forth to visit family. Marty Himeles writes that daughter Charlotte started her freshman year at Carnegie Mellon, and that older daughter Elizabeth will graduate from Kenyon College this spring. Determined to save the world, she will be working for U.S.A. PIRG, a national federation of state public interest research groups that advocates on behalf of the environment, public health and tax/ budget reform. Marty continues to enjoy a diverse litigation practice as managing partner of the Baltimore office of Zuckerman Spaeder. Steve Richards continues as supervisor of psychological and pupil personnel services for the Harford County School System, and supports the efforts of his wife Lyndi at the Center for the Arts in the Belair area of Harford County. George Murnaghan reports life is good in Lexington, Mass. His daughter Grace is a freshman at Lexington High School, active in the school’s debate program and playing basketball and softball, and five-year-old twins Luke and Jamie will be going to kindergarten in the fall. Where in the world is Jock Whittlesey? He writes he has been happy in Washington, D.C., riding his bike to work at the State Department where he works on the Mexico Desk following environment and science issues for the past two years. He is learning Spanish to add yet another language to his arsenal.  His son Philip is in eighth grade and doing both Boy Scouts and Sea Scouts, and Monique continues to be a strong supporter of Phil’s scouting activties. Apparently, he “bids” on his next assignment, and expects to go to distant shores in the summer of 2013. Stay tuned.

1976 John Wharton jw213@yahoo.com Ornithologists must be plentiful in our class, especially in the study of unoccupied habitats. So many have started describing themselves as “empty nesters.” John Purnell and his wife Claire still live in downtown Annapolis with their youngest Lizzie, a sophomore at Severn. Mary, their oldest, is enjoying the University of Delaware and made her debut at the Cotillion in November. The Purnells enjoy going to the Adirondacks every summer, where they see Lynn and John Colston ’75 and Corby and Jonathan Pine ’75. “Camp is lovely, with no electricity or road access,”

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The Class of 1974 gathers for a holiday lunch at Gordon Biersch Brewery in downtown Baltimore.

John writes. Claire’s business, Claire Purnell Graphic Design, and John’s business, Inspired Data Solutions, continue on. “Someday, a return to theater will be in the cards,” he adds. Eb Finney proudly reports that he is a parent of two Gilman grads, Classes of 2007 and 2008, “both of whom are out in the workforce.” He also has a daughter who is a junior at Roland Park Country School, and who is very involved in many sports and other activities there. “For me,” Eb writes, “Sara and I are looking forward to being empty nesters . . . as others already are.” He also counted his 19 years at Brown Advisory, “which has been a blessing. We are fortunate to have many Greyhounds at Brown — in our lineup as well.” Eb also is winding down his second term on the board at Gilman, and wrote that he is “really pleased at the direction of the school.” Frank Rosenberg acquired “two new puppies, Rum and Reggae, rescued from extinction recently from Anguilla. I feel good that I am paying, nearly directly, the remaining college tuitions for the Volks, with some incremental money for their kids’ graduate school kitty, as well. Many thanks to Chris Hutchins’ wife Cathy for bringing the puppies back from the islands, as United Airlines would not allow Ann or I to bring them back, but US Airways did. I am still apologizing for Reggae’s itty, bitty liquid-y No. 2 accident on Cathy’s beautiful sweater.” Henry Thomas and his wife Tina “are doing great and still living on Roland Avenue. Our oldest daughter Victoria is in her fourth year working for Chronicle Books in San Francisco. Our middle daughter Rebecca was working for LivingSocial in Washington, D.C., and now will be working for Overland as a guide on some

of their overseas trips. Our youngest daughter, Annie, is in her last year at UVA and hopes to live in either  New York or San Francisco after graduation.” Dixon Harvey writes that “life is good” for he and Janet, who is the director of development at Irvine “and loving it.” Dixon’s Black Oak firm “is in its 22nd year, and I am working on building the team around my younger partner so I can be on a glide path for a ride into the sunset in 10 years, [which] will never happen — but still need to plan.” Their children are in New York and San Francisco, with Annie working in finance and Bob working with green modular housing, “and the highlight of our lives is visiting them.” Ben Cripps continues the pace at the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation, working in marketing, while Susan is still doing well in her practice. They are in the final stretch of the college process for their older daughter Maddie, who got an early acceptance to both Michigan and Tulane. “Michigan is one of her top choices,” Ben writes, “so she is happy with that. Tulane gave her a boat load of money, so Susan and I are happier with that. We are waiting for the regular decisions to be handed down. Those will be a little tougher: Brown, Penn, Cornell, Duke and Vanderbilt.” Either way, Ben and Susan are very proud of her, and her sister Ali. Andy deMuth writes, “I, like many others, live my life vicariously through our children. Our kids give us plenty of reason to cross paths with our classmates.” He and Lynne have been traveling the college circuit trying to find a suitable fit for Katie, their daughter, who is a junior at RPCS and “plays a pretty good defense on the lacrosse team, with Eben’s daughter, Cece, who can rip the net on the attack half of the field.” On an

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The Class of 1978 reminisces about the past 35 years at the Mt. Washington Tavern.

early spring tour weekend, they ran into Tina and Henry Thomas at UNC, catching the UNC/UVA women’s lacrosse game. Andy also saw Dave Heubeck at a Princeton/JHU lacrosse game, “and for those that are aging, we have to find out what he is drinking to look like he could have just come off the lacrosse field.” Andy, Lynne and Katie finished the weekend in Charlottesville, where their son Robbie ’12 is a first year in engineering. “I know the smart gene must skip a generation,” Andy writes. The four of them watched the Wahoos snatch an overtime victory from the Terps. Andy added, “As for me, I am still at the same desk doing the same job as I have been since 1981, only the name has changed on the door a few times. It now reads Morgan Stanley. Clients are finally making some nice money again. If this keeps up, maybe we all will be able to retire. I must be the most optimistic guy in the class, as I am getting ready to take Ken [Volk] on in tennis for about the 25th consecutive year, and despite not getting a win for the past several years, every week I think I have a shot to beat him. If anybody knows of any weakness he has, please pass it on, as I can use some tips.” Bill Matthai and Jill “finally tied the knot after seven years on August 25, with just a few friends and family,” and they went to Hawaii in January to celebrate. They recently bought a duplex in Ocean City, N.J. “Seeing that we will be empty nesters come the fall,” Bill writes, “we thought it would be nice to have some place that might lure the kids home! Like many of you, we are in the waiting phase for colleges, with Charlotte. I don’t think she has a first choice — or at least she is not telling me.” Bill’s daughter Alice is a junior at Washington and Lee, and took her spring term abroad. “She is taking a

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course in global health,” Bill writes, including “two weeks in New Orleans followed by five weeks in India, [riding] both an elephant and a camel.” She went on to Argentina for a month, finishing up with five weeks in Cape Town. “And, oh, by the way,” Bill wrote, “her flight home passes through Paris where one of her high school friends is taking a May-mester, so she can take a few days with free lodging in Paris before coming back to Philly. I want to be reborn as my daughter.” Bill was waiting to see what the changes in healthcare will bring. “Right now, I think all the hysteria is overshadowing any real changes,” he wrote. “Somehow, I don’t think it will translate into fewer hours at work, however!” Suber Huang writes from Ohio that he and Cindy “are finally empty nesters. The three kids are all in Baltimore and . . . enjoying the fruits of our labor. Miss them, but we are enjoying our busy lives — dating with money! Those of you with kids in high school, you’ll get there soon enough.” All three decided to attend Hopkins, Suber writes, “which makes the $69 fare on Southwest an efficient way to visit. Dan is a freshman, Jennifer a sophomore, and David, who graduated in 2011, is at the Bloomberg School finishing a master’s in health science, in molecular biochemistry and biophysics or some nonsense we don’t understand. They play club tennis — doubles and mixed doubles — which is really, really cool for us to watch. David is currently on the circuit for medical schools, and Junger’s sequel to ‘The Perfect Storm’ will be when all three will be in medical school at once. Ah, my heart . . . er, wallet!” Cindy continues in full-time dermatology practice, while Suber continues doing academic medicine at

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CWRU, primarily doing clinical medicine as a retina specialist and as vice chair. “I just stepped down as president of the American Society of Retina Specialists,” Suber writes, “but have a zillion other cool projects including founding the Retina Image Bank, starting a new company with a NASA-designed blood flow sensor, designing a vision optimization iPad app, starting a stem cell program, and being one of the country’s first surgeons to implant the Argus 2 retina prosthesis. Being considered for chair and director of the Eye Institute, but we’ll have to see about that.” Suber adds that he had a great doubles match last fall with Andy, Ken and a friend at Elkridge. In November, Suber had the chess highlight of his life by getting a draw in a 20 board simultaneous exhibition at the Cosmos Club in D.C. against international GM Lubomir Kavalek, a three-time U.S. champion and two-time world finalist, “losing both times to some potzer named Bobby Fischer.” Suber writes, “I was unbelievably lucky,” and was told “You haf a gret senz of positional pley.” Suber also informs that “Garrett Waters contacted me out-of-the-blue after 20 years to let me know he is now an ordained minister in California, speaks and writes fluent Chinese and lives in a seminary. He’s well, and sends his best to all.” Bobby Thomas’ daughter Emma, 22, graduated from Swarthmore in June, and Eliza, 17, attended the Mountain School in Vermont for a semester, before returning to Concord Academy for her senior year in the fall. “Both are thriving, which is a major source of happiness to us,” Bobby writes. “Polly and I continue the ‘same old, same old’ with work, public health and law and creaky joints. We both are dealing with aging parent issues — I am now the primary caregiver for my mother, who approaches 90 and now lives close by here in Jamaica Plain.” Bobby adds, “Emma and I are both writing blogs these days, but hers is much more interesting!” Charlie Moore and Laura “have become empty nesters this past year,” he writes, “with Bryan ’12 now a freshman at Harvard. By all reports, he loves the place, his teammates, his roommates, everything. The only downer is that he need[ed] surgery for a torn hip labrum and bone impingement, an injury which he suffered early in last year’s Gilman lacrosse season. He played in a lot of pain, though performed well, with some particularly fun wins in which he was one of the MVPs. Originally diagnosed as a strained hip flexor, we did not know of the tear and need for surgery until this year. Surgery went great at Children’s Hospital in Boston. Apparently, his doc is the top hip guy in New England for this type of surgery.” Charlie wrote that he was hopeful that Bryan’s rehab would go well, and that he’d take a medical redshirt at Harvard, and get ready for next year. “Meanwhile,” Charlie continues, “Laura and I have been incredibly busy ‘birthing our new baby’ —  DinnerTime, a free to consumer website which makes it amazingly easy and quick for ‘hectic moms and dads’ to plan ahead, shop ahead, prepare and enjoy delicious meals made at home. We raised a little angel capital last year and will do so again this year. We’re now up to 15

incredible team members, many of whom left major gigs to join DinnerTime.” Charlie keeps up with quite a few classmates. “Laura is on the vestry at St. Thomas [Church near] Garrison Forest, where we often see Dixon and Janet Harvey and Annie and Henry Jenkins. I continue to be active with the Institute for Christian & Jewish Studies, as is Dixon. Speaking of the spiritual, Dudley Parr came for coffee a few weeks back, on a swing through Baltimore. Dudley’s doing quite important work helping people who are dispossessed, addicted or otherwise down on their luck, get back on their feet. We recently had fun with Debbie and Dave Campbell and Frank Rosenberg for one of Frank’s wine tasting soirées. Frank and Dave are both accomplished oenophiles, while I am most definitely not, though I do enjoy tagging along. Though I’ll never be able to take Doug Rice, I’m very pleased to be back on the squash court frequently, as my new hip appears to be holding up well. I see Whit Harvey and Henry Thomas also sweating down at the Maryland Club, not such a pretty sight, but good to know that we’re still kicking!” On the judicial front, Circuit Judge Sylvester Cox writes that “a couple of classmates had jury duty and stopped by the office last year. Dave Heubeck had to sit through half a day of jury selection in my courtroom, AND to the chagrin of my court clerk, was not selected. Andy deMuth kindly stopped by the office, but I was in another court. As for the family, all is well. My oldest daughter Lindsey is pursuing postgraduate studies and is a scribe at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington, D.C. Erin will graduate from Morgan State University in May 2013. And Judy and I await true empty nesting.” Lee Gerstley writes that his two “super kids” are in school in California, Chico State and Berkeley, and he invites one and all to check out his website at philosophylee.com, an undeniably inviting collection of poignant and inspiring thoughts. Mark Strohsacker writes from Philadelphia that he celebrated his 30th anniversary working with GSK pharmaceutical company last summer, “having survived many mergers and several career changes from research scientist, to bio pharm manufacturing development, to R&D project management.” His wife Lorrie still works as a private tutor, mostly with home-schooled children, and both sons are gainfully employed as well. “We have finally finished paying tuition bills and loans!” Mark adds. “Our oldest is now married and living close by, and both he and his wife work in the front office of the Eagles. We are all still Ravens fans, and very much enjoyed the big Super Bowl win this year. In fact, the Finn made the trip up to Philly for the first playoff game and watched it with us and a small number of other displaced Ravens fans from our neighborhood.” Randy Kiefer and Lynn “became empty nesters at the end of September,” he writes, “when our youngest Bethany got married in a very lovely ceremony. Our oldest Matt had moved out last June and is on duty as a librarian at BCPL Cockeysville. Bethany has been involved in the opening of the new library at Owings Mills. Rob continues his Ph.D. work at Princeton and is off to Google for an internship this summer.”

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Randy’s work keeps him on the road, and in the air, too. “I finished my second year running the CLOCKSS Archive,” he writes, “and continue to travel a good bit to meet publishers and librarians to encourage their support around the globe. With the kids gone, Lynn has been willing to go on some of the trips. We spent eleven days in Florence and Siena last May, and are headed to the U.K. for a visit in April. At home, our two-year old Lab Charlie has been joined by a Cardigan Welsh corgi named London. The two are in a constant struggle for lead dog.” “Watching our children’s lives unfold before us,” Randy adds, “is truly amazing and is always interesting.” Henry Jenkins and his wife Annie were getting ready early in the spring to set off on a road trip to Carlisle, Pa., to watch their younger son Timmy ’12 and his Colorado College team play Dickinson in lacrosse. Their eldest son Ben ’10 is a junior at Dartmouth. “Both love where they are,” Henry writes. “Annie and I are busy as ever, taking care of ourselves, trying to stay in shape and really enjoying life here in Maryland.” Bill Spragins offers his thoughts on football rivalries and frosty recreation. “Being the lone Denver class rep, I would like to offer up my congrats to all Ravens fans for a well-earned Super Bowl win,” Bill writes. “As I told my brother Jamie ’73, who is now acting head of the English Department at Gilman, I will root for the Ravens as long as they do not conflict with the interest of the Broncos. Wow, what a conflict! Just before the playoffs started, a bunch of friends of mine all agreed that the one team we did not want to see in the playoffs was the Ravens, healthy and motivated. The good news is I did not go to that game and freeze my [expletive deleted] off for four-plus hours to watch that outcome — I was watching from a beach bar in Mazatlan, Mexico. I do vaguely remember between margaritas screaming at the TV.” Bill adds, “With a steady string of storms since early February, the ski season out west has been saved with a lot of good snow, epic at times, and the bigger good is this late snow should help fend off the early season forest fires that afflicted us last year.” Bill still has projects in Washington, D.C., that afford him the opportunity to swing through Baltimore from time to time. “Hopefully,” he writes, “we will cross paths during one of those trips.” Your Southern Maryland correspondent still enjoys a short commute to work, the opportunities to sneak home for lunch and a quick nap after deadline, and memorable trips with Linda to visit family and favorite places, mostly along the Eastern Seaboard. The nephews and nieces who once played in the pool and fished off the pier each summer have become busy young adults and less frequent visitors. But they’ve also spawned the first members of a new generation, who also love to swim and fish and hopefully will continue to come down to Kingston Creek to do so. Oh, and be sure to check out Richard Mulligan’s restaurant reviews on tripadvisor.com, detailing the culinary pleasures and perils that he, Lindalee and their daughter Haley enjoy and endure in Richmond and Virginia Beach.

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1979 Has Franklin Has@franklin-group.com I did not hear from many classmates. Here is what I know has happened recently. Carville Collins still practices law in Baltimore and Annapolis at DLA Piper (formerly Piper & Marbury). He has moved from Gilman’s playing fields to the sidelines as a parent of two Gilman boys. His youngest Michael ’15 is a Gilman sophomore playing volleyball and ice hockey. His older son Matt is now a freshman at Tulane, after graduating from Gilman in 2012. Matt played football, captained the ice hockey and baseball teams his senior year, and was a member of Gilman’s MIAA A Conference Championship baseball team in 2010. Carville and his wife Mary Lou, a pediatric ophthalmologist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, also have a daughter, Stacey, who graduates from the University of Notre Dame this year after a high school and college ice hockey career. He happily admits that the family sports calendar is a complicated document. I have heard through some happy clients that Adam Hitt runs the best SAT/ACT Test Preparation Service in the area. He is extremely demanding of his students and gets great results.   I saw Topher Russo and Scott Schelle at the Gilman Alumni/Parent Bull Roast supporting the School. Scott is in the process of finding his next opportunity in the communications/cell technology world while Topher is still helping to collect tuition dollars for schools through automatic deductions.   According to the article in the local paper written by Ann Hillers, Sam Hillers is enjoying life in Mexico as an English teacher. His family enjoys the slower pace of life in their San Miguel surroundings.   Kevin Conner and Jim Wilkerson both were seen playing squash locally. Kevin is still in the mortgage business. Jim’s family has grown recently. His mom married Coach Sotir. Wilky says that he is not as intimidated by Coach now because he has mellowed. Jim’s two sons attend Cathedral.   George Kelly has had a second son graduate from Gilman last year, and Henry is attending college in Denver. George’s youngest boy Woody ’17 is playing lacrosse for me this spring. Bill Senft’s son Archer is also playing lacrosse for me this spring. However, he has decided to follow his older brother to McDonogh for his high school years. John O’Donovan’s son Jenks ’17 should be able to keep Archer from scoring when Gilman plays McDonogh when both boys are in high school to keep the Greyhounds ahead of the Eagles. Jenks plays lacrosse for me too.   Our classmate Tom Booker is the proud father of a Princeton graduate. His daughter Sydney is as impressive as her mom. She speaks several languages fluently and is well on her way to establishing a successful career in international business. Tom’s namesake is in the seventh grade at Gilman. He is an outstanding basketball player for his age. He is going to be bigger than his father.

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David DeMuth ’80, P’15, ’18 and Donell Thompson ’91, P’25. Thompson is Gilman’s director of community service.

  Dave Willis had a second son graduate from Gilman this past year, and Connor ’12 is a freshman at Notre Dame. Dave still runs CRW Parts. He is very active in the Wheel and Rim Association nationally.   I had lunch with Carter Buxbaum and Guy Davis on separate trips to Richmond. They both are doing well in the Richmond business community. Their children go to different schools. From what I have been told, Guy’s boys go to Richmond’s version of Gilman while Carter’s children attend Richmond’s McDonogh.   Sean Darby is preparing for 150-mile bike ride to benefit MS. He is going to ride from Boston to the tip of Cape Cod (Provincetown). His son Charlie ’17 is in eighth grade at Gilman where he is an outstanding student/athlete.   If you follow the sports world, you might have noticed that Marc Dubick’s son Louis was an early commit to play lacrosse for the University of Maryland. He is considered a top high school attackman with good speed, quickness and vision.   Biff Poggi coached the football team to another championship season. The team’s biggest win was stopping two-time National Champion Don Bosco’s 46-game win streak. His third son Henry ’13 has accepted a scholarship to play football for Michigan. This is Biff’s third boy to graduate from Gilman. He also won the Ned Finney sighting contest. Ned was seen at the football team’s semifinal playoff game against McDonogh. He was there to watch his nephew play a game.   I have had the pleasure of coaching several classmates’ sons in either football or lacrosse this past year. Ellen and I are enjoying life with our four children as it goes by so fast. Our daughter Leslie is a freshman at VCU School of Arts. All three of our boys attend Gilman where Mac ’14 will graduate next year. He was on the football team this year. I had the pleasure of

helping to coach the JV football team to a championship with my second son Luke ’15 starting at middle linebacker. My youngest son Drew ’17 will start high school next year. He is friends and teammates with several of our classmates’ sons.   I want us all to commit to doing a better job of catching up with each other as we approach our 35th Reunion of graduating from Gilman. Please send updates for our next class notes and plan on coming back to Gilman for our reunion next year.

1980 James Franklin jim@franklin-group.com I spoke to our good friend and classmate Paul “Boog” Lohrey the other day. He has moved to the “other” coast and is now working for BlackRock. We had a nice chat reminiscing about our old late night eatery, Maria’s. Unfortunately it has closed its doors, and Paul leaving may be one of the reasons. And also the fact that Paul is now running marathons and is smaller than he was at Gilman would hurt them as well. Keep it up Paul. One of our Maria’s accomplices, Paul Hazlehurst, has gone back to work for the federal public defender. He is also coaching a variety of rec lacrosse teams in Jacksonville with his clan. I am sure Paul’s easy-going temperament is a blessing to the refs there. Mark Hillman was just getting back from a ski vacation when we touched base. He is also still sailing boats of all shapes and sizes. In addition to growing Hillman Capital Management, Mark plans on hitting the links again soon. To our golfing classmates . . . FORE!!!!

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Stuart Matthai is the proud parent of a Gilman fifth grader. He is also enjoying the links and looks forward to some Gilman camaraderie this fall in the Alumni Tournament. Here’s hoping for a nice turn out by the Class of ’80. I received a nice holiday card from Bill Atkins again. I really appreciate getting his card every year. Hopefully we can hook up for lunch or something since we are only 45 minutes from each other. Bill is still in D.C. with Pillsbury. Geoff Carey was last seen on the squash courts at BCC in the doubles competition. Geoff’s team was up 9-3 in the fifth and deciding game only to lose 12 of the next 13 points to lose 15-10 to my team. Sorry buddy. I will make it up to you on the links this summer. John Zentz is as busy as ever in St. Louis. His position has him traveling all over the country and it is hard to pin him down, but he will be in Baltimore in June as my guest in the Baltimore Country Club Gentleman’s Invitational. Hopefully we can strike some of the old magic. We won our flight in his member guest at Bellerive last year so let’s keep it going. His oldest child will be a freshman at Indiana University this coming fall. If you need computer help, call Mark Licht. He helped me set up a new system at my house and my seven-year old is now an expert. Mark spends his weeks these days in Salisbury working on the Perdue Chicken computers. We had a nice mini get-together in the fall at Bill Bateman’s. Hans Wittich, Jay Hergenroeder, Mark Licht, Charlie O’Donovan and I were able to catch up and share some laughs. If any local alums want to join next time, please e-mail me. One of the hot topics was the fact that everyone has now hit that magical 50 number and should be seeing David Cromwell soon. I hear David is very gentle. I saw Roland Mackenzie at the grocery store the night before our mini reunion, but Roland was unable to change his plans. He was off to go hunting the next day. His daughter was not interested in the fact that Roland and I had not seen each other in a while so we parted ways quickly. Steph Jackson can be seen (what’s left of him) around town, but mostly at Five Farms. Steph has transformed into a fitness machine and looks great. His golf game is improving as well. Steph has enjoyed joining the crew at T. Rowe Price and is also busy helping in a variety of charitable causes. Steph, you are a good man. Randy Brown has moved to London as the co-CIO of Deutsche Asset and Wealth Management. His daughter Caroline is there with him and is a junior at the American School. His daughter Elizabeth is a senior at Cornell and will start her master’s at Georgetown in the fall. Peter is taking a year off and is enjoying the high seas. He is sailing from South Africa to Madagascar to Mauritius to Sri Lanka to Singapore. Lastly, his wife Margaret is enjoying her free time by visiting the parks and museums of Europe. Alan Livsey lives near Randy, and they are taking a weekend vacation to Spain together shortly. Here’s hoping they buy the country to get Europe headed in the right direction.

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I had a nice lunch with Charlie O’Donovan recently, and he is doing well at M&T Bank. Their real estate department is better now with Charlie than before. He has a daughter that is a freshman at UNC-Wilmington and was set for a family visit over spring break. Tim Codd can be seen golfing at BCC as well as some of the top courses in the world. As a top shoulder specialist, Tim has been invited to conferences all over the globe and is smart enough to bring his clubs with him. Has anyone seen TJ Woel? I got a call from him saying he is now in Philadelphia and is training in mixed martial arts. That’s a long way from Harvard. TJ, if you read this, please call. My oldest is going to be a freshman at NDP and is currently playing on three lacrosse teams. My middle girl just finished her basketball season as her team’s leading scorer and is now ready for her 11-12 lacrosse season to begin. My youngest, seven-year-old Garrett, and I won the nine hole Father/Son golf tournament at BCC last summer. It was a really great experience to share with him. My beautiful wife is going to be a blackjack dealer at Maryland Live when it opens. If anyone visits, please tip well as we have educations to pay for. As for me, I have been busy with my family and work and enjoying every minute. I look forward to hearing from you guys in the near future.

1981 Willy Moore willy@southwaybuilders.com Well how about those Ravens! And for that matter, how ’bout dem 2012 O’s too, Hon. Every year that I have had the honor to be your classless secretary, our notes had to be submitted well before the football playoffs had been finalized, so with the Alumni office moving closer to the digital age, and their allowing notes sooner to publication, it is wonderful to be able to report about some of our classmates’ dealings with the big game. Most of us ’81’ers have remained true to our hometown, but sadly, some have gone astray . . . And they paid the price with losses. First, there was Henry Galleher, who has called Colorado his home for clearly too long. Henry made his allegiances clear when he took a stand for the Broncos in the playoffs. In fairness, Henry was subdued with his support, in comparison to Tony Lazar, who resides in San Francisco 49’er country. About a week or two before the Super Bowl, I found the following humorous posting from Tony on Facebook: “To all my Baltimore friends: I am told that there is some sort of athletic contest shaping up between our two cities. While I know nothing about it, rest assured that our tribe’s warriors shall vanquish your tribe’s warriors with the help of our deity, allowing us to steal your cattle and enslave your women. We shall then dance around a fire yelling ‘Whoop! Whoop!’ while pumping our fists in the air, thereby assuring that our tribe’s

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genes (and not your tribe’s genes) are passed on to the next generation of the species.” Well obviously all that “Whoop Whooping” didn’t cut it, and the mighty Purple reigned. From what I have heard, we had a few classmates that were down in New Orleans to partake in all the festivities. Carl Etchison managed to take his two boys, and he found Andy Rich, who wrote, “When I finally got tickets to New Orleans to watch the Ravens rule, I found myself with Etchison and his two sons. Now you know Etch is no fun even without kids in tow, so I scrambled desperately reaching out over all social media channels that a 50 year old might frequent, and I found Dr. Robert Harrell! We had beers and told lies on Bourbon St. It was a blast! Thanks Robbie, as I mentioned, I don’t remember you being that cool way back at Gilman. It was as if 32 years had not passed; definitely a memorable time. Thanks for the beers bro!” Tommy Hoblitzell was also there with his whole family, and while I do not know with certainty, I would be very surprised if Len Frenkil was not at the game. So with the Super Bowl aside, let’s jump into the rest of the news. Back in January, I received news about Frank DeCosta from another party. Now Frank is not one to toot his own horn, so I will gladly do it for him. Seems Frank was honored by being named one of the top 100 Black Attorneys in the United States! Well done Frank! According to his bio, “Dr. DeCosta leads Finnegan’s electrical and computer technology practice group. He has significant experience in patent litigation, client counseling and providing opinions related to computers, electronics, software, medical devices and information systems. In his more than 10 years at Finnegan, Dr. DeCosta has managed patent enforcement activities for clients in the United States, Europe and Asia.” I have the pleasure of seeing classmate Dr. Peter Cho on campus every now and again, since both our boys are Upper Schoolers. Peter specializes in general surgery, thoracic surgery, vascular surgery and cardiac surgery. Peter did his medical school, residency and fellowship all at Johns Hopkins, and now he is one of the big cheeses at Sinai Hospital’s cardiac wing. In October, Tim Jackson, Sam Riley and I, along with our wives, helped Damian Lynch with the dual celebration of his 50th birthday and his and Jenny’s 20th wedding anniversary. Damian’s father threw a great party on board the Black-Eyed Susan, an authentic paddle wheel boat, for a three-hour cruise around the Baltimore harbor that included a great meal and fine vistas. Damian, now sporting a mustache, has four kids ranging in age from five to 12, three girls and a boy, the youngest. Damian and Jenny have been living in Tarpon Springs, Fla., for several years, and he has been working with Chubb Insurance, I think since coming out of college? Even being so far away in Florida, Damian still flies in town once or twice a year to catch a Ravens game. Nice, that after all those years living outside of Tampa, another NFL town, that Damian remembers where he was born; a fine example for those other out-of-town turncoats. While on board the boat, Sam Riley, who is in private practice as an attorney, shared that he was

preparing for a trial the next week, where he was representing a homeowner against a listing agent. Sam said he was enjoying his grey hair, as it gave him more credibility in the courts. Sam is also still actively serving in the Maryland Army National Guard in his spare time, and provided the following update: “I was promoted in 2012 to Colonel and am the commander of an Army Liaison Team that serves as the liaison between U.S. and foreign military forces at the corps level and above, earning me two trips to Korea in the last 12 months.” And Tim Jackson, who is a senior director at Cushman & Wakefield, a commercial real estate firm, is busy with listings on commercial properties in the Baltimore metropolitan area. For a moment of hilarity, upon readying to depart from Damian’s party vessel, Tim’s wife Maija had to return to the main deck to retrieve her purse, whereupon Tim asked her, “While you are up there, do me a favor and look for my comb.” When one realizes the reflective nature of Tim’s scalp, they can better appreciate his humor. As no surprise, also aboard ship was Damian’s brother, Chris Lynch ’78, who is U.S. Senator Ben Cardin’s chief of staff, and for an unexpected bonus, tending bar on the boat was Greg Banker, a former member of the Class of ’80. Greg noted he was living on a house boat at a marina in Canton. He worked tending bar on the paddle boat part time, and said he has seen many Gilman guys over the years. I ran into Billy Thomas’s parents several months ago, and they reported that Billy had packed up the family and moved from San Francisco to Denver, where he has taken a senior level marketing position with a new company. And in the “it’s a small world” category, I was meeting with a client I have worked with for over 10 years, and somehow the conversation wandered, and I discovered my client’s brother-in-law is former classmate Steve Russell. Apparently, Steve has a commercial boating license and he is a member of the Baltimore City Fire Department, where he captains the City’s big red fireboat. So if you are ever at the harbor for a big event, and you see the City fireboat escorting a tall ship in the harbor, with water shooting from nozzles in multiple directions, then you can impress whomever you are with, by exclaiming, “I know the guy that’s running that thing!” I don’t know if any of you pay attention to the Gilman blast e-mails, but Mark Neumann was one of the two keynote speakers at Gilman’s 33rd annual H. K. Douglas Cotton Memorial Lecture. According to the e-mail, “Mark is currently chief executive officer of 510 Ventures, a privately-owned investment holding company,” and he was speaking to,“help acquaint the Gilman young men with different career options available to them, as Mr. Cotton intended when he established the lecture.” I was unable to attend the event, but I wonder if Mark happened to tell those moldable minds how his playing craps in the back corner of the Senior Room with Joe Morelos helped guide him to the investment world? In response to my plea for notes, Mark chimed in, “Life in the Neumann household seems to consist of driving our kids to places — to practices, games, parties, friends’ houses, etc. That is until they can drive, then we barely see that son

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Andy Rich ’81 and Carl Etchison ’81 enjoy Super Bowl XLVII — certainly both for the camaraderie and the Ravens win!

anymore! Speaking of which, we have a senior at Gilman who will be working with JB Howard in the AG’s Office for his Senior Encounter. I hope JB teaches him something other than poker techniques, as that never went too well for him!” Hmmm . . . Do you all see a gambling trend here?!? Back in September, Neums also posted the following on the School’s alumni website: “I just had a great time participating in a ‘race’ called Tough Mudder last weekend. It is this crazy race with all types of military style obstacles and lots of ways for the organizers to abuse the participants. My team of gray-haired almost 50-year olds looked slightly out of place, but we held our own and most importantly, survived. Other than a broken rib, I came out not feeling too bad. Robin chalked all of this up to a midlife crisis — she may be right!” Well more than a year ago Billy Slaughter and I had lunch in Federal Hill, and since he has a wicked sense of self-deprecating humor, I suggested he was missing his calling and should do some stand-up comedy. Well darned if he didn’t give it a go, and went to an amateur night, and was asked back for several repeat appearances. Heck, he even had his own fan page. He had a new woman in his life, and next thing I know, I could have sworn I saw a status listing him as engaged! Now when we had lunch together, Billy had mentioned how he was emphatically NEVER going to get married again, so needless to say, his status update was a bit alarming. All this information is the explanatory segue for Billy’s addition to the notes: “After you told me you heard I got engaged AGAIN, I moved to Miami Beach just in case I actually did and didn’t remember it. No one followed me down so I guess it was not true, but you never can be too careful about those sorts of things. I enjoyed the winter for the first time in 49 years. I just can’t understand why I didn’t move down here when I was 20 instead of 49. If I live to see 50 in July I will

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have beat my life expectancy by 10 years.” If Billy shows up in California in the next couple of months, it probably just means he has another woman on his heels. Tom Snider (who is also turning 50 in July), Marcus Ranum, Steve Siwinski and I got together for dinner one night while Marcus was passing through town on his way to Dulles. Marcus, who gets my vote for the most brilliant mind of our class, treated us to tales from his extraordinary life. Marcus, who is the only classmate I am aware of with his own non-athletic achievement themed Wikipedia page, is credited as one of the original creators of the computer firewall, his work has been cited on 15 U.S. patents, he built the first server for the whitehouse.gov domain and, if my memory is correct, Marcus also wrote some of the programs for the operating software of the Hubble Space Telescope; as with most great minds, he has an insatiable appetite for learning, and he is not one to be found with grass growing under his feet. Marcus did drop me a note, and shared that “in 2012 I found my old first edition Dungeons and Dragons books and my copy of ‘The Anarchists’ Cookbook.’” For those of you unfamiliar with that specific cookbook, it was published in 1971 by an anti-war activist, and amongst other things, it details how to manufacture explosives with simple household items. Legend has it that purchasers of the book are automatically tagged as persons of interest by the FBI. I wonder if that topic ever came up when Marcus was going through the security clearances at the White House? Tom Snider also wrote in and noted, “I am still working in custom software architecture and engineering at Applied Information Systems out of Reston, Va. Still living in Catonsville, as I have for the past 18 years, and still have just one child, Tom, who is 16. He is an excellent drummer and guitar player. I still do not know what I want to be when I grow up,

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possibly an adult? The only television show I watch is ‘The Walking Dead.’ I continue to maintain and enjoy sobriety. A simple life as it were.” Between Marcus and Tom’s extreme understanding of programming and computer security protocols, Steve Siwinski and I left our dinner being terrified by the two experts’ testimonials of the gazillion ways that personal data is being stolen from us every day. Clarke Griffith added, “I am working as director of training for the Council on Accreditation in Lower Manhattan, and am living with my partner and two step-kids in an apartment a few blocks from the World Trade Center site. Despite being in a mandatory evacuation zone since we are a block from the Hudson, we stayed put during Hurricane Sandy and watched as the West Side Highway flooded, never losing power the entire time. I celebrated my 50th with friends in a house we rented on the island of Isla Mujeres, on the Yucatán Peninsula.” Caroline and I got to see Clarke, his partner and many of their Baltimore friends in February when a former co-worker and close friend threw him a great bash in Hunt Valley for his 50th. I am glad to report that Clarke has not changed a bit, maintaining his hysterical biting sense of humor. Jim Cavanaugh wrote, “This spring finds us in transition with mostly academic news. Ben, 22, will be graduating from Pitt at the end of April, and will be starting grad school in speech language pathology in August. We’re waiting to find out where. Kate, 19, is looking once again for a college home, having left Northeastern after the fall semester. Deb will be finishing up a clinical doctorate in July and has a new job to boot. I am awaiting notice of promotion and tenure at the University of New England; I should hear by the time this goes to print. The best news of all: Deb and I celebrate 25 years of marriage in April.” Way to go, Jimbo! Tommy Hoblitzell added, “Son Tyler ’09, is graduating from The University of South Carolina in May and heading off to law school. Thank God for his mother! Son Alec ’11 is a sophomore at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Plays tennis and was the Intercollegiate Tennis Association 2012 Rookie of the Year for the entire Northeast! The whole family traveled to the Super Bowl in New Orleans . . . four great days of fun! Still working in insurance at Willis . . . still married to Sheryl . . . still living in Ruxton.” Tommy Fusting continues to live on the outer fringes of the political far right, and enjoys trying to get my left-leaning goat. In recent discussions, Tom shared that he is greatly in need of an optorectomy (a “medical”eye procedure — Google it), but has serious reservations whether this much needed procedure will ever be covered by the new Obamacare regulations. Alex White has made a major career change. After many years in the restaurant business, Alex reports that he has just completed getting his commercial driver’s license, and soon hopes to be driving big rigs for a change. Alex is living in Frankford, Del., about five miles from Bethany Beach, and says the fact that he is a rookie driver may mean he will have to do some long interstate hauling for his first year or so before he can hope to land something with a better opportunity close to home.

Steven Levin “is married to Michelle who is an exec at T. Rowe Price. I have now been at a CareOne, a financial services company, for 11 years. We help individuals who are struggling with debt. I run the product side of our company, and have been heavily focused of late on helping people deal with their student loans. I have two kids, Ariel and Eric. Ariel is a junior at American University in D.C. She has a great internship this semester at National Geographic working on the TV channel. She will be studying this summer at the London School of Economics. Eric is a senior at McDonogh, where he plays varsity lacrosse, and will graduate cum laude. He will be going to Swarthmore College next year, where he will continue to play lacrosse. My mom, Alice Levin, who many of you know or remember, is doing well; a few medical hiccups, but she continues to stay active and has a great group of friends. The addition of our miniature dachshund, Brewer, has added a lot of joy to our lives. He is a very talented pup. He can flip biscuits off his nose, play dead and give you a high-five. Smart dog. Just saw Jeff Hettleman and celebrated his 50th. He took it well but we all agree it sucks getting old. But the beer was cold and we got to a slightly numb reality. Also saw Brian Goldman. It’s been a rough year or so for Brian. He lost his mother and father in a short period of time. Both had significant medical issues. He has a great wife and family in New York.” News from Chris Brown: “In September of 2012 I changed jobs and began working at the Allegis group as a strategic account manager. I love the company and I am having a great time developing IT strategy for them. My oldest daughter Anastasia is a junior at Tiffin University in Ohio and will graduate with a degree in forensic science in May of 2014. My younger daughter Natasha is a freshman at the Carver Center for Arts and Technology as an acting prime so we have a real drama queen in our household. And my wife Jackie and I celebrated our 25th anniversary this past February and continue going strong.” David Ritmiller, our class Pittsburgh Steeler fan, graciously offered a congratulations to our Ravens, and then added, “Everyone’s doing well in Pittsburgh. We’re getting older, our girls are 13 (7th grade) and 18 (11th grade); both serious ballers (basketball). I turned 50 this year. My beautiful wife is still putting up with me after twenty years this year. My territory working with Advance Pierre Foods has changed to Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky and Pennsylvania. I’m now working with the nice people of the Midwest; a little more traveling, but having fun working contract accounts. The Penguins are riding an 11-game win streak; big game tonight against the Flyers!” As many of you will remember, Rit was one heck of a wrestler. He, like many from the sport, was quite upset over the recent International Olympic Committee decision to drop wrestling as an Olympic sport. David had circulated a link to a petition to the IOC to reverse their decision, and has asked the class to help in the endeavor. If you would like to show your support, you can just Google “Petition IOC Wrestling” and you will be directed to a Change.org site that will log your vote. It is a simple

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thing to do, it will not cost you a nickel, and I know he will really appreciate it. Karl Boldt has some big changes in his life. Per Karl, “Maybe I’m hoping to recapture, as the Boss puts it, those glory days, but I’m heading back to the classroom, boys. Since January I’ve been a full time undergraduate student at York College of Pa., going for another bachelor’s degree, but this time from the education department. Hopefully after June, I will have some 44 credits plus a teaching semester to go. Then, off to confront the little kiddies! I’m looking for kindergarten through fourth grade — I figure anybody else will end up bullying me. I’ll send a new update as soon as someone other than Phil Gorman leaves a tack on my chair!” Karl, you get that piece of paper, and the class of ’81 can nominate you for working at Gilly Tech. I imagine they would leap at the opportunity to have a person of your caliber. Remember former classmate Richard Lebovitz? Last we heard from him was back in 2006, when he lived in San Diego and was director of a large IT firm. Richard clearly has the entrepreneurial itch, as he reports, “About two months ago I became an expat, based in Moscow, Russian Federation. I’m working for a rapidly growing bakery/restaurant group called Nash Xleb (Our Bread), and am building cafes throughout Moscow and Saint Petersburg. It’s been a real blast, and an interesting change from SoCal. People are nice, as is the scenery. Russian winter is all it’s cracked up to be, with temps getting down into the minuses. But seeing Red Square in the snow with all the officials in their fur hats is worth it! Hope all’s well with the rest of the class. If anyone gets to Russia, please ping me.” Clark MacKenzie has opted for a different tact. In response to my request for notes, Clark replied with the following message for us all: “May your heart beat stronger, And you live much longer/Because of all the love in your life! [Valentine’s Day verse, February 2013] (results unconfirmed).” Tom Finney adds, “Just completed my third year with U.S. Trust here in Baltimore . . . and business is good. My daughter Georgie is finishing up her first year of high school and will be starting driver’s education this summer. My son Tom ’18 is finishing up his seventh grade year in the Middle School at Gilman and enjoying every minute. My wife Virginia is busy with the kids after school activities and helping her parents, as we are all doing these days. My best to all for a great year.” The great and wonderful Reverend Doug Hoffman and his wife Donna tried to get Caroline and me to join them at the Gilman Bull Roast. Unfortunately we couldn’t make it, so Dougie swears we will be getting together for lunch soon. Ok, being a Reverend, maybe he didn’t really swear. Carl Etchison shares, “As for me, I’m still trying to “find” myself… My nurse wife is now entrenched in the teaching profession at the Middle School at McDonogh —teaching the sciences and acting as the sixth grade dean . . . My oldest daughter Corinne is in her freshman year playing lax at Georgetown . . . My middle son Duke is a junior attending Westminster High School, and plays football and basketball to fill his days. The youngest, Christian, in sixth grade at

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McDonogh, is a converted laxer after determining he would never be able to hit a curveball.” As noted previously, Etch was at the Super Bowl, and he forwarded a great picture of his son Christian teaching defensive Raven player Bernard Pollard how to “instagram” from the team hotel. Carl must have also reached the 50 year milestone recently, because he made a desperate plea, for all of those intelligent minds from our class, in hopes that one of us could come up with a better solution than having to drink that special fluid at your 50 year check-up that “clears you out” and allows you to be violated in a most disgusting way with what seems like a 70mm movie camera. Carl’s request was far more graphic and hysterically funny, but it would never have made its way to print. You get the picture. If one of you M.D.’s can help Carl, please give him a call. Sadly, the year was a tough one for several of us. John Highfield lost his mom, as Steven Levin had mentioned, Brian Goldman lost both his parents, and I lost my father in August, and my mother-in-law the Saturday after Thanksgiving. Thanks to the many of you for your kind remarks after those tough times. There have been lots of good things happening with the Moore clan though. Our oldest, Henry, is doing his parents proud as a freshman at Furman University in Greenville, S.C.; he is quite happy to be recently initiated into the SAE fraternity. Our young son Ben ’15 is a sophomore at Gilman, and is a jock. He was QB and captain of the JV football team, and |they won the championship against Calvert Hall. Then he was a captain of the JV basketball team, and they beat BL for the championship. In the spring he is on to baseball. Work has been great for me; among many projects, my company just finished building an affordable housing project with Jeff Hettleman and his Shelter Group, and we are soon to complete a very cool conversion of a long vacant old four-story manufacturing building made of concrete into the new and vibrant Baltimore Design School. The school will be a compliment to the City School for the Arts, and will teach grades 7-12 in all forms of design —  architecture, clothing/textile, marketing, etc. It is great fun and very rewarding to participate in the transformation of a derelict structure into what will become a major anchor on the eastern limits of the City’s Cultural Arts District. And the best for last . . . My beautiful wife Caroline and I have been most fortunate to spend the last 23 years laughing our way through a wonderful marriage and life. It is hard to imagine things being better. So, was that a good read? Are you glad to know what folks have been up to? This all only works when you take a brief moment to fill me in. We should have an abundance of 50 year old celebrations happening in 2013, so please tell me all about them. And thanks to all of you ’81’ers that have already shared with the rest of us. I genuinely feel privileged to act as the conduit of this information to you all, and I hope you continue to enjoy reading about your classmates and friends lives. Please send me a message at willy@southwaybuilders.com, and I will be sure to include it in next year’s notes. Cheers!

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Willy Moore ’81, P’15, Sam Riley ’81, Damien Lynch ’81 and Tim Jackson ’81, P’15 aboard the Black Eyed Susan in the Inner Harbor, celebrating Lynch’s 50th birthday and his and wife Jenny’s 25th wedding anniversary.

1982 A. Brian C. Doud abcdoud@bellsouth.net Our 30th Class Reunion took place on Saturday, May 12, 2012. Anna and Jim Cooke were kind enough to host the party, and the following classmates were in attendance: Chris Alevizatos, Dirk Bartlett, Bob Bone, Scott Bortz, Jay Brennan, Ned Brody, Ken Brown, Taylor Classen, John Danko, George Doub, Van Dorsey, Mitch Ford, Rick Friedman, Les Goldsborough, David Hess, Mike Jeffrey, Nick Kouwenhoven, David Knipp, Tim Krongard, Glenn Lacher, John Morrel, Tim Naylor, Wells Obrecht, Owen Perkins, David Reahl, Doug Riley, Tim Robinson, Mike Sarbanes, Ross Taylor, Jon Thaler, Ed Villamater and Alberto Zapata. Former teachers Joe Duncan and Steve Siwinski also spent some time at the party. Mike Jeffrey came all the way from Australia to attend the reunion! Chris Alevizatos writes: “My son Braeden was recently injured — he may need a hip arthroscopy and I may need to take him somewhere (Nashville, New York or Denver) where they specialize in the procedure since it is not commonly done (what can I say . . . like father like son!). He loves life as an eighth grader at Gilly Tech. My other son Ryan is having a great time in third grade. I attended the Bull Roast in 2013 and did not see many from our class except John Morrel — he was doing well. I talked to Crawford Parr’s dad, and he tells me Crawford is loving life in Alaska where he is a commercial small jet pilot. I think he has a kid or two. I will be seeing Ed Villamater soon at his daughter’s Bat

Mitzvah. I see Dave Knipp occasionally, but he is always working on some home project or his development work with Wells Obrecht. Truth is, like many of us, I don’t have nearly as much control over my life as I would like, as I am either at work or cheering for one of my kids at an athletic event.” Chris is a urologist, and he was a kind and familiar face for my family when my mother was convalescing at Good Samaritan Hospital. Dirck Bartlett continues in his role as director of business development for Ilex Construction & Woodworking, which renovates and builds architectdesigned homes for clients in the Mid-Atlantic region. With offices in Baltimore, Easton, Chevy Chase, Charlottesville, Middleburg and Hot Springs/ Homestead, Dirck stays very busy. However, Dirck’s REAL power lies in his position as president of the Talbot County Council. There is no truth to the rumor that Dirck insists on being addressed as “Your Excellency.” There is, however, a persistent rumor that Sam Rhee manages the Talbot County Secret Service. Frank Bonsal continues his work as a venture capitalist investing in education technology and services. Frank, his wife Helen and their three children live in Owings Mills. Frank is also a member of the Tech’s Board of Trustees, joining fellow classmates Taylor Classen, Mitch Ford and Wells Obrecht. Ken Brown writes: “The reunion was good. It was great catching up with everyone, having a few laughs, and touching base.” Nick Brader is vice president at Matis Warfield, a consulting engineering firm specializing in the planning and design of commercial, institutional, industrial and residential land development projects. Nick and his wife Dawn live in Cockeysville with their son Matthew and daughter Katie.

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Aaron Bryant is an Ann Wylie Fellow at the University of Maryland, College Park and a Smithsonian Fellow at the Smithsonian Institution. Further, he is on the Board of Directors for Maryland Citizens for the Arts (MCA), a statewide arts advocacy organization founded in 1977 to represent all Maryland artists and arts organizations of all disciplines. The MCA website noted that Aaron has taught history, cultural theory, and public leadership at the University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins and the U.S. Department of the Interior. His past curatorial work includes “Epoch: The Legacy and Influence of Six Morgan Alumni,” “Most Daring Dream: Robert Houston Photography and the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign,” and “William H. Johnson: An American Modern.” Additionally, he has researched and written content narratives for exhibitions at the National Electronics Museum, as well as the National Institutes of Health and Library of Medicine. Aaron’s honors include research grants and fellowships from the Lyndon Johnson Library and Foundation, the Maryland Historical Society, the Association of African-American Museum and the American Association of Museums. Aaron is also a recipient of the Chesapeake American Studies and Gertrude Johnson Williams Writing Awards. Aaron is currently completing a chapter for the two-volume text “Sounds of Resistance: The Role of Music in Multicultural Activism.” Taylor Classen writes, “I cannot remember if I sent this in last year. In March 2012, my son Taylor and I had dinner with Kurt Erlbeck when we were in San Diego. All seems to be going well with Kurt and his four kids. His oldest graduates this year, and was looking at some school on the east coast. Kurt is a successful builder and developer in southern California. He looks the same, and it does not appear he will ever move back east. In February 2013, I headed to Belize to spend a few days with Geary Stonesifer. We watched and celebrated the Ravens victory in Belizean style (lots of beers and roast pork). His boys are in school in Switzerland, so Geary heads over a few times a year to enjoy skiing and the “high life.” It appears work is going well as Geary owns the Ford and Kia franchises in Belize and can put anyone in a car with a “low down payment” and “easy payment plan.” He and Shelley really seem to enjoy it there, so I am uncertain if they will be heading back to the States anytime soon. Jim Cooke and his wife Anna were kind enough to volunteer their home to host the reunion party. Jim continues to work at Network Media Partners where he is a vice president, managing accounting, technology and information for the company. I made my annual journey in July 2012 to the Danko manse in Boondocks, Md., otherwise known as West Friendship, Md., where I joined John Danko, Bill Mathews, Alberto Zapata and Les Goldsborough for dinner and drinks by the pool. We caught up on all the class gossip we could muster and enjoyed a wonderful meal prepared by John’s wife Janine. John is CEO of Danko Arlington, a full-service manufacturing company which specializes in military and commercial aluminum and bronze sand castings. George Doub and his wife Rebecca live in Owings Mills. Their son George ’12 graduated from The Tech

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and their son Fred ’17 is a current Third Former. George is an attorney with his own private practice in Baltimore. Jay Dugan is chief optimization officer of CHP Dugan. His company provides outsourced COOlevel management expertise in business restructuring, startup, merchant consulting, e-commerce and facilities and real estate negotiation expertise. CHP Dugan is heavily involved in supporting local women’s shelters to provide relief for kids with challenging family circumstances through its “Game Room Project.” Jay and his boys, William and James, live in Rodgers Forge. Charlie Eck is a sales representative for UniFirst Corporation in Baltimore. Mitch Ford sent in the following e-mail: “My son Mitchie is now a Gilman freshman, coming in from Calvert, and he loves being at Gilman. I recently went skiing in Alta, Utah, with a bunch of guys, including Randy Wilgis, who flew in from South Carolina, and Geary Stonesifer, who flew in from Belize. The Gilman boys held up the Gilman name and were among the top shredders on the slopes, and led the troops into the après ski activities. I believe Dirck Bartlett is the first of us to turn 50. I have been playing a lot of squash with David Knipp, Wells Obrecht, Tom Waxter and Nick Kouwenhoven. Taylor Classen, Wells Obrecht and Frank Bonsal all serve on the Board of Trustees with me. Taylor headed up the search for the new headmaster, which definitely came to the right conclusion. Unfortunately, nothing juicy here, though I hope you feel free to improvise! All the best, and thanks for your tireless efforts.” Les Goldsborough and his sons Dylan, Teddy and Ben live in Roland Park. I had the pleasure, recently, of stopping by the home of Les’s parents where his mom fed me a delicious chocolate cake — seemed like 1982 all over again! Les is the director of marketing and development for the Institute of Christian and Jewish Studies, headed by our former chaplain, the Rev. Dr. Chris Leighton. Jay Goldstein is a lecturer at George Washington University, where he teaches college students how to apply psychological skills training (PST) into the broader context of “Stress Management for Life.” John Harrison and his wife Joyce live in Roland Park. John’s son Matthew ’12 graduated from The Tech last year. John is chief of internal medicine at Kernan Hospital in Baltimore. Jamey Hebb sent in the following: “All is well in my life. My daughter Lucy turns 21 in October 2013 and will be in her final year of undergraduate studies at Sewanee. She has been an exceptional student, spent a semester studying at the Sorbonne in Paris, and was inducted into Sewanee’s elite academic society as a junior. My sons, Jack and Jamey, are now six and five years old respectively, and will enter first grade and kindergarten this fall. I enjoy my volunteer service on the board of U.S. Lacrosse and continue to work as a business manager in the retail automobile business.” I was watching television one Sunday afternoon last summer, flicking through the channels, when I heard a familiar voice on a television program on the Smithsonian Channel. The program, “America Wild and Wacky,” featured kinetic artists including

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our own Dave Hess! You can check it out at http:// www.kineticbaltimore.com/KSR/2011/. Tom Hoen writes: “I am currently the chief technologist and COO of GiveCorps, a Baltimore-based web startup that hopes to redefine what it means to be a philanthropist. I am training for a 140-mile bike ride to raise funds for Moveable Feast, and freezing my ass off at my daughter’s lacrosse games and son’s spring soccer. Both of my kids are at Friends. The only time I see classmates is at funerals.” David Knipp and his wife Cindy live in Roland Park with their son Garrett and daughter Catherine. David continues his long time work as a vice president at Obrecht Commercial Real Estate and his long-time domination of Tom Waxter in every sport and activity in which they compete. Nick Kouwenhoven and his wife Christine live in Roland Park with their sons Alex and Henry and their daughter Kitty. Nick is vice president of communications for Sylvan Learning. Tim Krongard is a partner at QuestMark Partners, an expansion-stage venture firm providing growth capital to exceptional management teams across the U.S. Tim is now chairman emeritus of the Board of Trustees at Calvert School and serves on a variety of boards including the Greater Baltimore Medical Center Foundation, Discover Books, Enpirion, Overture Networks, uTest and Vidyo. Tim and his wife Frances live in Glyndon with their children Alex and Caroline. Herb May responded to my request for information with the following: “You don’t want to know the truth! And you still don’t want to play! I have joined Dakota Funds Group in Haverford, Pa. (commuting!). We do outsourced sales, marketing and client service for a handful of boutique asset managers. My son Herbie is a freshman at Ole Miss and my daughter is a junior at The Millbrook School in upstate New York. Geary Stonesifer and his two boys visited me at our summer home in Northern Michigan last summer.” Romeo McClarry is the deputy director for U.S. Senate Security in Washington, D.C. Romeo and his wife Emma live in Baltimore with their four children: Romeo, Matt, Ryan and Makayla. John Morrel and his wife Tanya live in Roland Park with daughters Alexandra and Jessica. John was recently named a principal at Marshall Craft Associates, an architecture, interior design and planning company based in Baltimore. Tim Naylor and his wife Libby live in Stevenson, Md. Tim’s son Forrest ’12 graduated from The Tech last year, joining his brother Killian ’10 as recent graduates. Tim continues in his role as president of Naylor Antiques (http://www.naylorantiques.com/), which specializes in early American furnishings. Pat O’Brien’s artistic talent continues to expand. He was recently named as an officially licensed artist for Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville! Pat lives in Lutherville with his daughter Erin. Wells Obrecht sent in the following: “Unfortunately being on the Board of Trustees means I cannot lie my way through the class notes as I have done in the past. It’s a real drawback . . . I’ll work on some material with Mr. Knipp. He’s my front man with the press.” Wells’ son Charlie ’13 graduates from the Tech this year.

My sources tell me Tim Robinson, who works for Northrup Grumman, just won the prestigious Presidential Leadership Award given annually to just a few of the 22,000 employees nationwide. Congratulations Tim! Tim later sent in the following: “I am still working for Northrop Grumman in Linthicum, Md. I was promoted to fellow engineer in 2013 (must mean I fooled enough people into thinking I’m smart and stuff!). My son Talbot ’18 is in the midst of Middle School; he’s growing taller every month, his voice is deeper than mine and he’s eating like a goat. My daughter Rebekah, over at Bryn Mawr, is about to enter high school. I won’t embarrass her, but she’s found an admirer from Gilman’s Middle School; let’s just say, I’m keeping a close eye on the situation! Our oldest boy Taylor is starting to make his way in the California Bay Area. Hopefully, he’ll keep moving forward; he keeps threatening to move back! My wife Damien and I continue to run after our kids, keeping up with appointments and social schedules, while working lots of hours. During last fall at the 2012 Gilman/McDonogh game, the family had setup our chairs with a good view of the action on the field. While the wife and kids were off getting some supplies, this guy and a little kid come walking by and he says he knows me; I recognize him as well. It was Frank Bonsal with his Gilman pre-first son! We chatted for a bit about how his journey went from Gilman and how he was back. I think Frank’s winning the race with having the youngest child from our class (sorry Jim Cooke!). A few weekends ago, my wife, daughter and I, during a chance walkthrough of Arundel Mills Mall one Saturday afternoon, were surprised to encounter Aaron Bryant, who was window shopping. We talked for a good while, catching up on each other’s lives. We did discuss our classmate Chuck Wilder, who few have heard from in recent years. Based on the few calls that have gotten through to him, we’ve discovered that he’s been taking care of his ailing mother. Chuck, if you’re reading this, know that we’re here for you if you need anything. I get the occasional text message from Ken Brown, usually inviting me to a Spoken Word Poetry night. Last fall I had him check out my daughter’s volleyball team. As for the youngster Doug Riley, I’m sure I’ll be visiting with him real soon. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it!” Doug Riley continues in his role as president at Silver Hill Technology, Inc., which provides information technology systems software design. His company specializes in sports software, business software and government software design. Doug and his wife Regina live in Randallstown. Tim Rule is the chief of the Nutrient & Bacteria TMDLs Division for the Maryland Department of the Environment. Tim, you have to give an explanation as to what Nutrient & Bacteria TMDL means! Ed Villamater is chief of anesthesiology at Kernan Hospital, and he is also an assistant professor of anesthesiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Eddie and his wife Allyson live in Timonium with their daughter Emma and their son Ethan ’22. Tom Waxter writes: “I had dinner recently with Bobby Bone, Wells Obrecht, Van Dorsey, Dave Hess, Nick Kouwenhoven and Bob Phillips (Loyola ’82). All

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the boys look good.” When I moved to Birmingham, Tom was kind enough to introduce me to an attorney with whom he had worked on a case. This attorney’s son is now one of my son’s good friends and plays on the Mountain Brook JV lacrosse team that I coach . . . small world. Rhett Waldman writes, “I wish I had big news (or at least some juicy innuendos) for you. Hmmm. . . . I’m now a great-uncle! Talk about nachas! I’ll let you try to explain ‘nachas’ to our classmates!” Sorry Rhett, I’m too goyishe to explain! Peter Wilson is a principal at the ateri group, an architecture and interiors firm serving projects focused in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Southern U.S. regions and select European locales. Peter and his wife Jeness live in Baltimore with their daughters Sydney and Anna. Rob Yarlott is manager of international business development at CSX Transportation in Baltimore. Rob and his wife Linda live in Ellicott City with their sons Jay and Will. Scott Bortz continues in his work as a partner for Tribek Properties, which focuses on retail projects for Walgreens and Harris Teeter. Scott Bowerman and his wife Tiffany live in Rome, Ga., with their sons Brenden and Will and their daughter Brielle. Scott is an orthopaedic surgeon with the Rome Orthopaedic Clinic and Sports Medicine group, the only center in Northwest Georgia dedicated solely to orthopaedic care. Check out a current picture of Scott at http:// www.romeortho.com/physicians/scott-bowerman/. Ned Brody is now CEO at AOL Networks, overseeing global businesses such as Advertising.com, ADTECH, The AOL On Video Network, goviral and Pictela. Ned is also responsible for products and formats such as the AdLearn optimization engine, AdLearn Open Platform (DSP), MARKETPLACE (SSP), Dynamic Creative and Retargeting technologies and Devil Network. Ned assumed responsibility of these businesses in March 2012. Hank Donnelly is a research analyst at The Center for Naval Analyses. Hank and his wife Julie live in Falls Church, Va. Steve Grandea and his wife Nickey reside in Fayetteville, Ga., where Steve continues his involvement with youth soccer as a member of the Board of Directors for the Fayette County Youth Soccer League. Steve is an engineer with First Data Corp. Michael Kapiloff is an associate professor, Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine and director, Cardiac Signal Transduction and Cellular Biology Laboratory at the University of Miami. Mike and his wife Judy live in Miami Beach, Fla. Greg Kidd lives in Waynesville, N.C., where he is a musician of some renown, playing bass guitar in the Lorraine Conard Band. Greg is a former regional director of the National Parks Conservation Association. Greg is also on the steering committee of the Western North Carolina Alliance, an organization which uses policy advocacy, scientific research and community collaboration to protect the natural heritage of the region so that people and the environment can thrive. Joe Maisog sent in the following: “A few tidbits of news for you. In 2012, I finished a master’s degree in biostatistics at Georgetown University. I am now employed as a contract biostatistician working for the

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National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD/NIH) in Rockville, Md. Yes, I am still playing the piano! I have become fascinated with transcriptions of classic jazz piano performances, and arrangements in that style.” Wendell Phillips is the director of government and community relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Wendell and his wife Ruth live in Greensboro, N.C., with their son Wendell and daughters Clarke and Logan. I have no confirmation of a rumor that Wendell drops his children off at school on a motorcycle. I did learn that the Human Relations Commission for the city of Greensboro named Wendell as its new chairman in March 2012. The mission of the Human Relations Commission is to improve the quality of life for Greensboro residents by encouraging fair treatment and promoting mutual understanding and respect among all people. Wendell corroborates my findings: “Nothing has really changed though . . . that could be both good and bad. I am the chair of the Human Relations Commission for the City of Greensboro (gotta grow where you’re planted man —  stay engaged in the community). The main gig, though, is right here at the university for now. Still working of getting this book of essays out . . . it will be kind of like the www.wendellswrite.com blog between two covers.” Andy Mittelman lives in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., where he is the owner of Southport Realty Associates, Inc. and Xcellence, LLC, a consulting and coaching practice. Greg Montague is the managing director, private client services at Sequoia Financial Group in Sarasota, Fla. Ransone Price and his wife Cherry live in Richmond, Va., with their son Mitchell. Ransone is still an actuary with Genworth Financial. “I don’t really have anything new to report,” he says. “My wife has semi-retired from teaching though (she still occasionally subs.) My wife is also coaching our daughter’s soccer team this year. Which means of course that I have been pressed into service as an assistant coach. My son is playing soccer as well. He’s in seventh grade now. My daughter is in first grade. “I don’t get out to the golf course or to the bridge table as much as I’d like but I can’t really complain. “Everybody in my immediate family seems to be doing pretty well. My sister and her family are still up there in Baltimore and I’m sure you might run into them sometime. My parents are still there as well.” Gary Raab writes, “Unfortunately, I do not get back to Baltimore that frequently except for the holiday season. I’m still located in Northern Kentucky — the outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio. This is ‘Bungle’ Nation Country so I took a fair amount of heat (crap) for the Ravens Super Bowl win this year. I currently hold the role as V.P. of global flavor creation for WILD Flavors, Inc., a privately held flavoring and ingredient company for the food and beverage industry. Also, this year I am the reigning president of the Society of Flavor Chemists, the group of people responsible for flavoring the things we eat and drink. My wife Dana and I spend a lot of time at our lake house at Lake Cumberland. If any Gilman alums are in the area, we welcome any visitors!”

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Craig Rocklin is the director of development at George Mason University School of Public Policy. He is also the secretary/treasurer for the Board of Directors for the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Washington, D.C. Chapter. Check out a current photo at: http://afpdc.afpnet.org/Content.cfm?ItemNumber=5539& navItemNumber=5762. Bill Rush is vice president of payment cycle management solutions at Ingenix. Bill and his wife Darby live in Alexandria, Va., with their son Mason and daughter Liza. Bill and I had the opportunity to catch up on the phone in the summer of 2012. It was great fun reminiscing with Timex and telling Martin Smith stories again! John Sanders continues in his role as manager of international trade for David J. Joseph Company. John and his wife Kathy live in Mt. Pleasant, S.C. His son Josh is a senior at Clemson, his daughter Emily is a freshman in college and his son Thomas is a sophomore in high school. John and I are on the Southern travel lacrosse circuit during the summer months but our paths have yet to cross. Jeb Saunders is assistant attorney general for the Consumer Protection Division at the North Carolina Department of Justice. Jeb and Molly live in Durham, N.C., with their daughters Frances and Dorothy. Joe Seivold and his wife Joan live in Tampa, Fla., where Joe is the headmaster at Berkeley Preparatory School. I know I should not, but I chuckle each time I write that. All secrets are safe, Joey! Here is a current photo of the Headmaster: http://www.berkeleyprep.org/headmaster?rc=0. Geordie Walker and his wife Gray live in Charlotte, N.C., with their sons Randolph and Robert. Geordie is a managing director with Cantor Fitzgerald. Randy Wilgis and his wife Mary Royall live in Camden, S.C. with their son Shaw and daughter Mary Royall. Randy continues his role as president at Environmental Banc & Exchange, LLC, one of the nation’s leading companies in restoring our nation’s critical ecosystems through capital, experience and expertise for ecosystem mitigation and restoration challenges. Peter Williams is now director of business development of Baker Roofing in Raleigh, N.C. Peter’s son Nicholas is a defender for the nationally-ranked UNC soccer team. David Wright is an ABC News national correspondent. I reported last year that David did a fascinating piece on P90X, the work out/weight loss system. David did a follow up piece that is worth seeing — check it out on http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/ video/p90x-tony-hortons-power-90-extreme-workoutcelebrities-18823668. Alberto Zapata writes, “Les Goldsborough and I attended a ‘Get the Led Out’ concert in January 2013. They are a Led Zeppelin tribute band and we channeled our 1970s hard rock energy as we sang along to the songs of our youth. Unfortunately, neither Les nor I have enough hair to part down the middle and ‘feather’ in true 1970s fashion! Otherwise, I spend most of my time working at the SEC and attending gymnastics and ballet events for my daughters Emilia and Sophia.” Bruce Zukerberg writes: “Not much to tell other than I had a great time skiing with the boys in Utah: Jay Goldstein, Ned Brody, Jon Harrison and

Scott Bowerman. It’s a great yearly reunion we have out west although I don’t miss the snow as Florida is warm and sunny.” Chris Cebra is a professor at Oregon State University College of Veterinary Medicine where he is a department head–clinical sciences in large animal internal medicine. Chris and his wife Margaret live in Philomath, Ore., with their sons Brian and Christopher and their daughter Mary. For a current picture of Chris, go to: http://vetmed.oregonstate.edu/departments/ clinicalsciences/internal-medicine/faculty/cebra. Kurt Erlbeck is president of Elevation Architectural Studios, an award-winning international luxury architecture firm specializing in custom fine home designs and plans based in San Diego. For a current photo of Kurt, check out his website at: http:// www.homesbyelevation.com/about-custom-architecturefirms.html. Rick Friedman was so kind in placing a photograph on Facebook of a 300-pound man in a speedo which he alleged to be me. Unfortunately, through the power of Google and Search Engine Optimization technology, this picture has found its way into numerous hands, most notably my players who have had endless fun at my expense. In turn, I have discovered that Rick’s posh house in Portola Valley, Calif., is built on ancient Indian burial lands and on protected habitats of feral pigs. The San Mateo County authorities have been alerted — and notified that Rick has the capability and experience in assuming different identities. Prevarications aside, Rick sends this update: “The past year has been a blast as I get my last hurrah before turning 50. Had a bunch of guys trips, including Vegas and Alaska and Utah skiing. Skiing in Alaska was one of the highlights of, well, ever. Awe-inspiring, beautiful, challenging and occasionally terrifying. I am definitely jealous that Crawford Parr gets to live in such a wonderful place — tried to connect with him but could not make the schedules work. Daughters are all doing great with no signs of boyfriends as of yet — lots of theatre, music, volleyball and, of course, texting. Work continues at a reasonable pace. Facebook seems to keep me updated on several of the Gilman crew —  or in the case of Jamey Hebb, makes me feel like I am sitting on a couch across from him in the Senior Room hearing his chatter (very enjoyable BTW, keep it up). All in all, I am doing well for an old guy!” Hilary Gans is the facility operations contract manager with South Bayside Waste Management Authority in San Carlos, Calif., which provides cost-effective waste reduction, recycling and solid waste programs to member agencies through franchised services and other recyclers in California. Hilary and his wife Hayley live in Palo Alto with their sons Kalen, Jorden and Aidan. Will Howard still lives in Taos, N.M., where he is a medical writer and editor with ELS certification, specializing in neuroscience, immunology, endocrinology, cardiology, gynecology, obstetrics and genetics. From the “you-can-run-but-you-cannot-hide” files, Ian Liska writes, “Hello, Brian. I’ve been a bit of a wanderer in the past year or so but I’m currently living in Seattle, Wash. My sister and father both live

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in France; my father is retired and my sister has a practice as a veterinarian. I’ve come to the west coast (arriving in Seattle by way of San Diego, San Francisco and Los Angeles) looking for opportunities as well as being drawn by a sense of affinity for the region and its culture.” Stephan Miller is a senior medical writer at Amylin Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Bristol-Myers Squibb in San Diego, and lives in Solana Beach, Calif. Stephan is a scientist with more than 15 years of medical and scientific professional experience in the fields of diabetes, obesity, pain, psychiatry, neurology, neuroscience, biochemistry, pharmacology and clinical trials. Crawford Parr submitted the following: “I skied the Tour of Anchorage 50K skate ski today Sunday, March 4, 2013, in three hours and 17 minutes. The winners of the same event, who are frequently Olympians etc., typically finish in two hours and 10 minutes. This year’s winner had a time of two hours and nine minutes. It was my third 50K and my personal best. The 10 a.m. start had air posted at 10 degrees Fahrenheit. By the time we were out on the coastal trail, the air had warmed up to nearly 20 degrees Fahrenheit under sunny skies. It was super fun, and now I’m super spanked.” Charlie Price wrote, “We just returned yesterday from another one of those ‘sports’ vacations that I’m sure you’re very familiar with — we followed our girls’ team and watched a week’s worth of water polo games against various Northern California schools. Our eldest daughter graduates from college in May 2013, and our second daughter next year. So, perhaps Leta and I will be able to take some ‘real’ vacations soon. I still keep in touch with Ben Kim. He and his wife Fiona recently bought a home in the Glendale/Pasadena area outside of Los Angeles. He is still working as an in-house counsel for Disney, specializing in business transactions in the connected media, wireless and technology industries and resolving legal issues related to digital/new media and the Internet. My eldest daughter will be working in Los Angeles beginning in mid-August 2013 and I intend to meet up with him then when we go to help her find an apartment and settle in.” Here is another from the “you-can-run-but-youcannot-hide” file: Mark Sherman does, indeed, live in San Francisco, Calif. After leaving the Tech, Mark eventually graduated from the St. Louis Country Day School, earned his undergraduate degree at Penn’s Wharton School and received his M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. He worked in investment banking for many years and now is a managing director for Telstra, where he leads growth equity and venture capital investing focusing on mobile, cloud and media ventures. Wallace Simpson sent in the following e-mail: “Brian, it has been a while, so here it goes. I am still with Microsoft — 14+ years now in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. My actual job is too boring to describe (trust me on that one), so I will skip that. I have been putting a lot of effort into my artistic endeavors in photography. I have been published a few times, including twice on Bing.com’s daily photo homepage. I sell prints online through my website (http://www.wallacesimpson photography.com/), and I have sold prints at a few local

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art shows, while continuing to offer private lessons and small group workshops. It is an absolute passion and something I hope to do full time at some point in my life. In May 2013, I headed to Cuzco, Peru and Buenos Aires, Argentina for photography. In Peru I helped set up some photography programs designed to help poor street children to give them some hope and something to do other than remain on the streets. We ventured off to see the famed Machu Picchu for two sunrise photo shoots as well. I went with the Giving Lens (http:// www.thegivinglens.com/peru-scouting/) for the Peru part of my trek. After six days in Peru, I was off to Buenos Aires on my own to explore the city for five days and shoot photos of whatever there is to see there. I was very excited and a little bit nervous as the whole trip took me a bit out of my comfort zone, but that’s part of the point. I am also working on developing some online photography training and a special project that will be a unique photography web site/mobile app but I will keep that vague for now as we work out the details. Lynne, my wife of 23+ years, is very active running half and full marathons and recently began volunteering with the local fire department as a chaplain — a very tough job. She has been keeping herself very busy and is enjoying the challenges of being a fire department chaplain. On the kids front — I am old. David is in his second year at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo studying architecture and really enjoys the California lifestyle. I fully expect him to stay there when he is done with his degree and from a weather perspective, I can hardly blame him. In fact, I had a nice but brief visit with Rick Friedman on my drive back from California last fall after dropping David off at school. From the looks of it, selling fake IDs has done very well for Mr. Friedman. My daughter Kati is finishing her senior year in high school and is very active in leadership in student government, her competitive dance team, and she also teaches dance and gymnastics to tiny tots. She has decided to pursue dance in college and is enrolled as a dance major (and some undecided double major) at Chapman University in Orange, Calif., in the fall thanks to a very generous scholarship offer from the school. Her dance résumé is pretty impressive, and her strength and beauty really make her parents proud. I have lots of photos and videos to share if anyone wants to see that, but I warn you — I am a very proud parent. I always welcome visitors in the Seattle area and, sadly, I don’t make it back to the East Coast very often. Please look me up (wallace.simpson@ comcast.net and I am very active on Facebook) if anyone heads out this way. I love to show people around.” Bill Heller writes: “We’re doing well in Chicago. All three of my daughters play ice hockey. I spend a lot of time riding my bike by Lake Michigan, and occasionally run into Andy Owens on our early rides.” Andy Owens is re-starting his streak of his annual practice of sending me nothing for the Class Notes. Andy and his wife Michele continue to live in Chicago with their twins, Justin and Hayley. Andy is a senior software engineer with A. Finkl & Sons, the world’s leading supplier of forging die steels, plastic mold steels, die casting tool steels and custom open-die forgings. Owen Perkins is running for Colorado’s State House in House District 2. According to my sources,

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Owen has been planning to seek this seat for some time and he is eager to continue a tradition of service and leadership for his district. Quoting Owen, “As I begin a quest to represent House District 2 in Colorado’s General Assembly, my approach is no different. It begins with my answering a call to service. It is fueled by a passion for social justice and the ongoing effort to protect human rights, by a sense of responsibility for my community, and by a commitment to work for equal opportunity and access to all aspects of our society. From my work promoting everything from universal health care to affordable housing, from freedom from discrimination to the empowering steps towards immigration reform represented in the DREAM Act and Colorado’s ASSET bill, and from my longstanding passion for protecting our environment and providing a high quality of education equally available to all our youth to the hard realities of untangling TABOR, my pursuit of this House seat starts with a determination to be a voice for the isolated, unheard, and underrepresented in our society.” O, even though I represent the Great Right-Wing Conspiracy, I wish you well in your pursuit and look reporting your victory in our next class notes and referring to you as Representative Perkins! David Reahl is executive director, North Central region for U.S.A.A. Real Estate Company, where he has worked for 12 years. David leads the region’s involvement in acquisition/capital transactions, joint ventures and build-to-suit development opportunities. David lives in Chicago with his sons David and Matthew. “All is good here in Chicago,” he writes. “Like many of us, I am preparing to send my oldest David, Jr. off to college in the fall. He will attend the University of Alabama. I really need to start practicing ending every conversation with ‘roll tide.’ Matthew will attend high school at Loyola Academy in the fall. I am looking for spring/summer to break here soon after a pretty long winter. My best to everyone! Roll tide!”  Wolfram Zueckert is an associate professor at University of Kansas School of Medicine in the department of microbiology, molecular genetics and immunology. In particular, Wolf’s lab studies Borrelia spirochetes and the diseases they cause, Lyme disease and relapsing fever. Wolf and his wife Karin live in Kansas City, Kan., with their daughter Franziska. Terry Booker continues his work as vice president and head of business development for Independence Blue Cross. Terry, his wife Stephanie and son Corbin live in Philadelphia, Pa. Jake Callard and his wife Jenni live in Lewes, Del., with their daughters Phoebe and Zoe. Hollyday Compton writes, “How are you ABCD? It looks like Man U runs away with it this season. How’s Birmingham — I understand its home of waffles and bourbon?!” Alex Gavis is in-house counsel for Fidelity Investments. Alex and his wife Jane live in Boston with their sons Edwin and Owen. “All is well with the Gavis family,” Alex reports. “Hard to believe we’ve been New Englanders for 16 years, and we’re still trying to embrace the winters. Continuing to practice law in Boston and, this year, I am teaching a law class on privacy, which we all need a little of in this digital age!   Joel Getz is the senior associate dean for development and alumni relations at the Yale School

of Management. Joel writes, “I am sorry to have missed the 30th Reunion but duty called as I was compelled to play in a work event at Bandon Dunes in Oregon. The golfers in our class will understand that this trip was completely wasted on me as my handicap might as well be in triple digits. I have been travelling throughout South America, Asia and the States raising money for Yale.” Erstwhile classmate Bobby Greenfeld is an intellectual property attorney with Mayer Brown in New York. Bobby focuses his practice on intellectual property litigation and counseling in the areas of patent, trade secret, unfair competition, antitrust, trademark, counterfeit goods and copyright law. Ross Taylor has no life — at least that’s what he claims. With triplets Lachlan, Matthew and Nathaniel to keep them occupied, he and the lovely Kathleen have no time for fun, at least that’s what Ross continues to tell me. But since he always has “something” to do, Ross is having fun somewhere. Maybe it’s at work where he is senior vice president and senior research analyst at CL King & Associates. Ross heads up the medical technology research group. Our valedictorian Mike Liebson is the director of value chain planning product strategy at Oracle, with responsibility positioning and go-to-market strategy for Oracle Value Chain Planning applications, including Demantra, Demand Signal Repository, Sales & Operations Planning, Trade Promotion Optimization and next generation Fusion applications. Building from his valedictory days, Mike has become a speaker of some renown, getting a positive review on a recent speech on statistics — check it out at http://www.northeastern.edu/ insolution/other/2012/11/stats-goes-cool/. (Never thought I’d find that, did you Mike?) Mike and his wife Gao-Wen live in Boston with their daughter Allison and son Alexander. Ian Miller and his wife Elizabeth live in Summit, N.J. Ian continues in his role as CIO of Weil, Gotshal & Manges, a leading law firm in New York. Jon Thaler, his wife Janet and their daughter Dalia live in New York, where Jon continues to operate his business, When I’m Mobile (www.whenimmobile.com), a web consulting and mobile web strategy firm. Jared Braiterman continues to live in Tokyo, Japan, where he is a visiting lecturer at Tokyo University and a design anthropologist, taking photographs and writing about nature in the world’s biggest city. You can see his work on www.tokyogreenspace.com. Mike Jeffrey writes: “A bit of news from my end, and it is almost all true. I've quit my job as a non-profit administrator, and I am going to start writing. I am aiming to pump out books, but as my wife will be working a lot more, and the kids are still small, I may start out with shopping lists. Also, I am planning to take a holiday from Perth, Australia, to come home to Baltimore for a six-month stint, so the Australian and American branches of the family can spend some quality time together. It might drive ME crazy but all the young cousins will have a great time.” Amatsia Spigler writes from Israel: “I have been employed for the electric car venture, Better Place, for about 1 1/2 years now as treasurer. The company

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Lisa and Mark Kaufman ’83 graciously open their doors — and their patio — for the Class of 1983 30th Reunion.

is a large start-up, and I am not sure it will make it in the end, but it is very interesting. I am driving a 100% EV. The way we have overcome the limited distance hurdle is to set up Batter Swap stations throughout the country, i.e., the car has a switchable battery so you can drive through a station and switch to a new, fullycharged battery in about five minutes. Works well.   “Other than that, things are pretty much status quo. Our five kids are growing up, and keep us busy (as it should be :)) We have been in Israel for about 14 years. I came here with Citibank from New York. We live about 1/2 hour from Jerusalem.    “BTW the Alumni network seems to be working. I got an e-mail from a recent Gilman graduate who is now at Yale and is interested in the Middle East. I put him in touch with a friend of mine who is well connected politically so perhaps something may come out of it.”   Geary Stonesifer is CEO of Belize Estate Company, Ltd., which operates the Ford and Kia Motors dealerships, a shipping agency for Maersk and Hapag-Lloyd including drayage services, and the Lloyds of London representative for the ports of Belize. As for your class secretary, my wife Leigh and I enjoy life in Mountain Brook, a suburb of Birmingham, Ala. I recently left my position at Lawler Ballard Van Durand to join Synovus Bank where I manage the marketing efforts for the commercial side of the bank. We own and operate banks throughout the Southeast, and I am enjoying my new role and its responsibilities. I continue to coach youth lacrosse, coaching my son Patrick’s U15 team and my son Sean’s U13 team. My U15 team won the 2012 Alabama State Championship, finishing the season undefeated in spite of Jeb Saunders’ Facebook warnings of a generational “Gilman Choke.”

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Unfortunately, this game took place on the day of our 30th Reunion which forced me to miss the party, although Ross Taylor, Les Goldsborough, Alberto Zapata and Wells Obrecht were kind enough to provide me texts and pictures during the event. I am also proud to report my son Patrick was named a Brine Middle School All-American in 2012 and was selected to compete at the Nike/3d Blue Chip lacrosse camp. Thank you again for making this class secretary job so much fun — I always look forward to catching up with each of you. As always, if you would like to be included in next year’s notes, please feel free to send me an e-mail (abcdoud@bellsouth.net) or call me directly (205-420-1727) and I will make sure you are “published” in the next issue.

1983 Andrew Buerger andrew@bmoreorganic.com March was a very hard month for our class. We mourned the untimely passing of two classmates. Wesley Everett died of heart failure March 2, 2013, at his home in Chapel Hill, N.C. Wes had his own law firm, followed the Carolina Panthers and still loved his Orioles. Wesley leaves behind his wife Lisa Ann, twin daughters Catherine Spencer and Caroline Carson and son Wesley Houston. A memorial service was held in Chapel Hill on March 9. Andrew Jones (U.S. Army, ret.) died on March 13 at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

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at Bethesda, after an incredible 13-year battle with leiomyosarcoma, a rare smooth muscle cancer in his leg. Andrew was commissioned into the Maryland National Guard as a lieutenant. Subsequently, Andrew moved onto active duty with the U.S. Army, where he rose to the rank of major and was military intelligence officer. Andrew was medically retired from the Army in 2002, after which he joined Booz Allen Hamilton for a short time. He was a gifted leader and speaker. He recently was the recipient in 2012 of the Civilian of the Quarter and Civilian of the Year awards. Andrew left behind his wife Deborah, two children, Hayden, 10, and Juliet, 8. He loved attending their sporting events and musical performances.  Jamie Alban is the president at Alban Tractor in Baltimore. Felipe Albuquerque is a neurosurgeon in Phoenix, Ariz., where he lives with his wife. The westerly winds brought some long-time California residents closer to “home.” David Brecher and his wife recently resettled in Baltimore after a long stint in California where he worked as general counsel to a few companies and was involved with a number of start-ups. He now has a son at Gilman and two daughters at Bryn Mawr. Lee Sterne told me that he “started working at Fidelity investments in Merrimack, N.H., in November. Family is moving out this summer. We will be living in Lexington, Mass. Only five days skiing this year. In Whistler at Christmas.” Timothy Carroll was recently promoted to global director, research and technical computing at Dell. George Cassels-Smith lives in Glyndon and is president/CEO of Tobacco Technology in Eldersburg. John Clarke is one of many of our classmates that makes his home in Connecticut and commutes into N.Y.C. John is a lawyer with one of the nation’s largest law firms, DLA Piper. Both Joel Cohn and Rob DeMuth work in wealth management in Baltimore with MorganStanley SmithBarney and both remain very physically active: Joel running half marathons and Rob continuing to ski despite his aging joints. David Cosby moved to Ojai, Calif., with his wife to take a music teaching position. Despite leaving Fairfax, his band still carries the name D.C. Experience, a dynamic group that plays a wide range of grooves and styles from Stevie Wonder and Sting. He encourages his classmates to like his Facebook page. Ronald Creamer is a lawyer with Sullivan & Cromwell in N.Y.C. Mackie Cromwell, no relation to the law firm Ron works at, lives in Roland Park and works at the Forest Park Golf Course. Max Curran is still an energy lawyer and partner at Saul Ewing, a Mid-Atlantic business law firm. He successfully tried a case last year before the Maryland Public Service Commission to merge Constellation Energy and Exelon Corp. Daughter Maeve, 13, will be a freshman next year at Bryn Mawr and daughter Dacey, 12, is going into seventh grade at Calvert School. Max was recently elected to the board of directors of the Maryland Chamber of Commerce.

  Max reminded us: “And of course I’m going to be a Dancing Star at this year’s Alzheimer’s Association Memory Ball, which raises awareness and funds to fight Alzheimer’s disease. I need a lot of votes to top Tony Foreman’s win last year.” Tony Dahbura is the technical director, mobile applications at TASC in Centreville, Va. John-William DeClaris reports that he relatively recently migrated to the civil service area and is a branch chief at the Food and Drug Administration, responsible for the processing of post-market adverse event reports for medical devices and radiological devices. “I love my job and the opportunities it brings.” He also spent two weeks in Russia in October 2012 touring Moscow and St. Petersburg via a river cruise. “It was an amazing trip and I would do it again in a heartbeat.” Jose DeLeon lives in Towson and works as accountant with T. Rowe Price. Willie Deveas is the principal at Deveas Family Dentistry, living in Towson. Michael Eng is a doctor in Portland, Maine, and recently moved to a great old farm house. He continues to enjoy outdoor activities in New England, both skiing and sea kayaking. “Still working and still single,” he e-mails. “Moved to a cabin on the lake all summer, and that was awesome. So restful and good for the soul. Skiing a ton thru the long Maine winter. Raising a horde of chinchillas in my basement. Became a notary public, and I’ve married two couples in the last two years. Was teaching yoga dance for a while, and I’m hoping it’ll restart again soon. It’s all so random . . . I can’t figure out what is the common thread.” Charles “Griff” Evans is a vice president at ER&M, Ecological Restoration and Management. He makes his home in Chester, Md. Wayne Farley lives in Reisterstown, Md., and is a principal with The Roland Park Company, a real estate company. Alan Fleischmann continues to work globally and give speeches about leadership, strategy, communication, entrepreneurship and free trade. His ImagineNations Group focuses a lot in Africa and in the emerging markets and enables entrepreneurs to connect to other entrepreneurs, mentors and sources of financial capital. And as principal and managing board member of the global strategy firm Albright Stonebridge Group, he focuses a lot on Latin America, and the firm now works in over 80 countries. Through White House presidential appointments, he serves on the International Trade Advisory Commission (ITAC) and on the White House Commission on Presidential Scholars. He just recently joined the board of the Atlantic Council — and is in Baltimore often as a board member of the Cal Ripken Sr. Foundation, Shock Trauma and the University of Maryland Medical System — and to see his Dad and spend time with my kids. Alan and Dafna live in Chevy Chase with their two girls, Laura Julia, 8, and Natalia, 6. Congrats to Tony Foreman on several fronts: he was recently married, opened another restaurant in Roland Park (Johnny’s) and his Charleston restaurant was picked as one of top in the nation. Gino Freeman works in internal medicine and lives downtown.

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Richard Gatchell reports that he is “living the dream in Baltimore County. I am the proud father of two middle school girls. I hope that pride continues as they evolve through their teenage years. I work at AMX Corporation selling command and control systems to the Federal Government. I love a customer who is 17 trillion in debt and still buys new technology. I see a wide variety of our Class of ’83 mates through various activities in Baltimore; the Gilman bond grows stronger with age. As I write this I am also thinking about Wes Everett and Andrew Jones . . . gone too soon. Remember their families whenever possible.” Rob Glover works in finance at Saval Foods, lives in Rodgers Forge and is a granddad. Howard Goldman wins the award for the best mailing address in our class: Honolulu, Hawaii. Howard has served our country for over 25 years now and has achieved the rank of captain in the U.S. Navy. Jake Hendrickson commutes from Connecticut to N.Y.C. to work at Financial Security Assurance. Kevin Holy lives in Baltimore with his wife of 20 years, Melissa. They have two sons: Brandon and Dylan. Frederick Hopkins is excited to announce: “My wife Chris and I became grandparents in 2012 with the birth of my stepson Matthew’s (Gilman ’05) daughter Marian.” Skip Howe and Jerome Hughes work as teachers, Skip at Calvert School and Jerome in the Asheville City Schools. Mark Kaufman continues to do important and great work for the State of Maryland as the commissioner of financial regulation. He and his wife Lisa have two girls at Bryn Mawr. Haig Kazazian is an FVP, assistant treasurer with Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta. Roger Kim is the director of product management with Time Warner Cable in the Greater D.C. area. Michael Lewis is an associate professor of social work at Hunter College in N.Y. Keith McCants checked in with “I’m now the director of business systems at Commonfund (Wilton, Conn.) where I’ve worked for 10 years. (Previous longest stint was 11 at Aetna /ING Financial Services). My daughter made the dean’s list at Quinnipiac U. in her first semester — her freshman year’s done! And I’ve picked up running (albeit slowly) with a goal of a 20K and possibly a half marathon this fall.” Bill McDonald shot me a message via LinkedIn: “I currently live in Ashburn, Va., and work for Microsoft as a national account manager in the federal system integrator space. My wife Melissa (1988 American University grad) and I recently celebrated our 25-year wedding anniversary. Melissa works from home as a paralegal and is an aspiring writer. We have four children ages 10 through 22 (two boys and two girls), and I still spend most of my spare time either watching or playing basketball.” Ric Ritter works as vice president, capital markets for Cole Capital in Charleston, S.C. John Roe messaged me: “Staying busy doing real estate development and investment — currently building a five-unit townhouse project in Federal Hill on Randall Street and steadily looking for new projects . . .

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on the rare occasions that I have free time, I try to get down to my boat in the Canton area.” What John didn’t write was that he’s a Ravens good luck charm for road games. He was in San Diego and New Orleans — two of the season’s biggest games. Jay Schmidt tells me that he is “still at Legg Mason. Henry is a junior at Gilman and just made all conference in squash. Caroline is in fourth grade at RPCS . . . Georgia is a first grader at RPCS. Everyone is great!” Doug Scriba chimed in with “I am a regional director with Liberty Life (a sub of Liberty Mutual Insurance) working with bankers throughout the mid-Atlantic. I run into Willis Macgill at Wells Fargo from time to time in his office. Two boys, Henry Douglas III (HD), 14, and Brock, 12, and wife Trish, all good. Coaching baseball, tailgating with the Ravens and following the O’s, skiing, playing a little golf and traveling with the family keep me busy when I’m not working.” Aron Silverstone is putting his Ph.D. to good use, working in biotech as a project leader at Syngenta in Raleigh-Durham, N.C. Andrew Sinwell is a partner at Highside Capital Management in Dallas, Texas. He oversees media and telecom investments for that fund. Jimmy Smoot lives in the area, working at the Social Security Administration doing budget analysis. Daniel Stuelpnagel has some exciting updates. “I launched my first self-published novel at the 2012 Baltimore Book Festival, a racy international medical thriller titled ‘Help Me Kill,’ available in paperback on Amazon. Currently at work on my second novel, ‘Happy Hour,’ which I'll release this fall at the book festival in late September, this one is a psychological thriller set in Venezuela. Just returned from a two-week road trip out to Arizona as production assistant for an art installation project, visited Cadillac Ranch, White Sands and the Very Large Array radio-telescope, so I have lots of fresh inspiration for a new series of paintings in progress. Gero Verheyen is married to Greer. They live in Baltimore, and he is an underwriter with reinsurance syndications at Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA). David Watts writes: “I am in my 22nd year working as an architect for Marshall Craft Associates. I am one of the owners and am the principal in charge of all of our healthcare projects. My wife Holly is in her 20th year working as a sales rep. for Designtex, marketing commercial grade fabrics, wall coverings and custom digital imaging products. Our daughter is a middle schooler at RPCS who is on their tennis team and also participates in year round swimming for the Mariners.” Brett Yeager is a product manager for Walden University. He lives in the Baltimore area. David Zura had this to report: “We’re living in Ashburn, Va., these days. I’m the president of Professional Warranty in Chantilly, Va. My wife Susan is a competitive singer in Sweet Adelines (women’s barbershop) — her chorus won their regional competition so she will be singing at Internationals

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Willie DeVeas ’83, Rudiger Breitnecker ’83, Peter Ratcliffe ’83, P’14, ’18, Andrew Sinwell ’83. Haftan Eckholdt ’83 and Chris Sarnecki ’83. George Cassels-Smith ’83, P’20, ’21, Mike Syzmanski ’83, David Brecher ’83, P’25, Adam Joseph ’83.

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Eddie Rosemond ’85, Mark Agent ’85, Rory Muhammed ’85 and Tony Murray ’85.

in Honolulu this fall. Not surprisingly my kids grew up big, I gave them size but they got their athletic and musical abilities from their Mom’s side! My oldest Paul just wrapped up his stint playing football (center and right guard) for Akron and has taken a job in Cincinnati. My son Zachary, 17, is a very good bass player and has his own band, my daughter Caitlin, 14, plays lead guitar in a band and, when we are not watching their gigs, we spend much of our time in gyms and convention centers around the country watching her play volleyball, and my “little” one Tegan, 8, is already 5'3" and playing junior volleyball.” My wife Jennifer and I live in Roland Park with our almost 3-year-old twins. We recently founded an organic food company, B’more Organic. We make drinkable yogurt smoothies and have now gotten them on the shelves at 50 Wegman’s stores and over 20 regional Whole Foods. We donate 10% of the proceeds to M.S. and breast cancer research at Johns Hopkins. Richard Jacobs visited with us last fall and has this to say: “Not a whole lot has changed since last year. Same job and fortunately same wife and child. We enjoyed visiting with the Buerger family this summer and watching my son Ace attempt to break the consumption record for number of B’more Organic smoothies over a the course of a week. He managed to down 10 — take that as a challenge!” It’s a pure coincidence that his son is very accomplished in the martial arts and flag football in Orange County, Calif.

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1985 Ted Winstead tedwinstead@gmail.com “New Orleans was insane, and the game was awesome,” Tommy Horst said after returning from the Super Bowl in February. “The game has become larger than life.” Tommy and his wife Indira had hoped to turn the game into a Gilman reunion of sorts. After the Baltimore Ravens defeated the Patriots in the playoffs, Steve Ciccarone, David Rody and Jay Davidson went online to make arrangements. But after failing to get flights into New Orleans, everyone except Tommy bailed. He and Indira flew from their home in Miami to Pensacola and then drove three hours to New Orleans on Super Bowl Sunday. With tickets from StubHub, they hit the French Quarter, eating dozens of oysters and pounds of crawfish. “The game was stressful, especially after the blackout,” Tommy reported. “When it was over, we were more relieved than excited because of the scary comeback. But the whole experience was a once-in-alifetime event. For any football fan, I recommend it.” Back in Baltimore, Greg Gunning’s upscale pizza restaurant, Earth, Wood & Fire, was doing a brisk business on a recent Tuesday evening. A reviewer for The Sun praised the establishment last year, saying that its charcoal-burning oven was “blazing with promise.” For Richard Weinstein, life in Atlanta has been good. “I’ve been here 20 years now and am happily married with an 8-year-old daughter and 6-year-old son. Although we “lost” Darin Hall to Cincinnati, I still get to see fellow ’85ers Chip Dates, Jeff Grant and Bill Stratton.”

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Richard is working with two companies that have developed sustainable technologies. “Crailar Technologies has developed the first natural fiber from flax that is a complement to cotton and PodPonics is the leading company in the world producing local, pesticide-free lettuces,” he explains. Robert Landon is the co-author of a new Lonely Planet book on Italy. He also writes for some design and architecture magazines, including Dwell and Metropolis. He and his husband Thiago recently moved to New York City, but they travel back and forth to Brazil frequently. Pictures of them at the most recent Carnival in Rio emerged online recently, demonstrating that Bob doesn’t spend all his time writing. “Carnival is even better than Hunt Cup,” he noted. Rory Muhammad is the associate director and chief investigator at George Mason University. He drove up to Baltimore for the Gilman Bull Roast. Michael Mitchell, a lawyer in Baltimore, posted a picture online of Rory, Chip Dates, Tony Murray, Mark Agent and Keefe Clemons around a table at the Bull Roast. Chip said later that the Gilman Bull Roast was a great event, but he added: “It was traumatic when the beer ran out at 10 p.m.” Steven Comfort is back to his 1985 weight thanks to a daily exercise regimen. He is also vegetarian (except on weekends). In his free time, he and his three-year-old daughter rollerblade through the parks of San Francisco, where he lives down the block from David Rody’s sister. “I enjoyed visiting with David when he was in town and recently caught him commenting on cases he worked as U.S. assistant district attorney on A&E’s ‘America’s Most Evil Gangsters,’” Steven writes. Steven is also in regular touch with Chip Dates, Kurt Schultheis, Rushika Fernandopulle and Richard Ginsberg through Words with Friends. In the summer of 2011, David Rody left the U.S. Attorney’s Office and joined the law firm Sidley Austin in New York. “Working for the U.S.A.O. was the best job I have ever had and likely ever will have,” he writes. “Aside from playing nose guard, being a federal violent crimes prosecutor was probably my highest and best use, to borrow a real estate term.” He adds: “Being a partner in a gigantic law firm is not as exciting, but it pays the bills.” Dave and his wife Anna are the parents of Jake, 5, and Eva-Marie, 2, leaving them in an eternal world of Spider-Man, Dora and Sleep Deprivation. “I have come to realize that, with kids, you either pay early or you pay late,” he writes. “I enjoyed my 30s being single in N.Y.C., but now am a bitter, out-of-shape, constantlytired old man at 46.” Speaking of children, Jeff Grant recently published an article called “What Do Kids Find Funny?” He summarized the results of a research study he oversaw for the Cartoon Network. The study included 36 video clips from a variety of shows for kids across nine humor themes, including slapstick, repetitive gags and bodily functions. The results, perhaps like kids themselves, are complex and varied depending on age and gender. Jeff ended the article by revealing the punch line to a joke his own children like to tell: What do you

get when you combine a rooster, a poodle and a cockatoo? “On the verge of laughter, my kids replied ‘a cockapoodletoo!’” he writes. “Maybe it wasn’t as hilarious to me, but after undertaking this study, I can easily see why they laughed.” Bill Buchanan has been in Chevy Chase, Md., for five years with his wife Julie and their 7-year old daughter Claire. Bill runs his own investment firm and claims “to be most happy when I am either on the golf course or when my pal Ted Winstead makes the short bike ride over to my house to watch an Orioles game.” Also in Chevy Chase is Joel Price, who recently had lunch with Bernie Rhee. “Joel is married and doing well,” Bernie writes. “He is a mechanical engineer and owns his own business.” In Colorado, Paul Dickey and his wife Cindy welcomed “Baby Kate,” also known as Katherine Emma. “Everyone is doing great and we are truly blessed,” he says. Leon Sachs is putting down roots in Kentucky. “My wife and I just earned tenure at the University of Kentucky (in English and French respectively),” he writes. “Our eight-year-old daughter attends a local bilingual Spanish immersion school, and to relax we spend time with our aging black labs.” Father Raymond Harris was on medical leave from February 2011 to June 2012 due to a sudden illness that affected his blood platelets. “As of now, I have had 15 months of stability without medication,” he writes this spring. Father Raymond received his licentiate in canon law degree at The Catholic University in America in May 2012. This is ecclesiastical degree that roughly matches a master’s degree, he explained. Canon law is Roman Catholic Church law. “Since July 2012, I have been keeping busy as the associate pastor of two parishes and working in my archdiocesan headquarters once a week,” Father Raymond continued, adding: “I have to use the canon law degree that the archdiocese paid for!” Andrew Balfour is the co-owner of a small business in Montgomery County, Md. “We provide contract-based home maintenance services to homeowners,” he explains. “In short, we take care of all the maintenance, upkeep and repairs on your home so that you can spend what little spare time you have doing more important — and more enjoyable — things.” Andrew recently got a call out of the blue from Steven Brecher, who is up in the N.Y.C. area. Steven is the COO of a company called TouchTunes Interactive, according to Andrew. As the CEO of the Eastern SuperMoto Racing Association (ESMRA), Tony Murray has been promoting the sport of supermoto, a hybrid form of motorcycle racing. The courses are about 70 percent pavement and 30 percent dirt. “Racers ride in excess of 100 m.p.h. on paved straights, slide through corners and tear it up in the dirt,” explains Tony, who spent three years learning the trade from a leading supermoto race promoter. Ed Barker became the executive director of a community-based farm and conservation organization in Weston, Mass., last summer. “It’s been a wild ride and definitely a turnaround situation,” he writes. “I’m

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learning the finer points of crop rotation from my farm team and community engagement from my board. So far, so good, but it’s been long days. At least I get free veggies out of the deal!” David Levy has recently published a number of scholarly articles on such topics as the Dead Sea Scrolls, Maimonides and Talmud. David Sigman continues to lead the department of urology at Northwest Hospital Center in Randallstown, Md. Paul Mezey is a producer in residence at Cinereach, a not-for-profit production company and foundation. Paul has collaborated with the group on many films, including “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Paul is the founder of Journeyman Pictures, through which he has produced award-winning films such as “Maria Full of Grace” and “Half Nelson.” Your secretary is not a filmmaker, but in 2010 I posted a video online of my four-year-old son catching a fish in New Hampshire. In the 30-second clip, he catches a fish quickly and then gets scared when the fish wriggles off the hook and flops around the dock. Two years later, the video, “Boy Catches Fish in Record Time,” had gone viral. Jay Leno even used it in his show. Even more interesting to me were YouTube statistics showing that people in countries affected by the Arab Spring had watched the video during those turbulent months. I like to think that the video may have been brought a smile to people my son and I will never know.

Chris Brendler is a managing director at Stifel Nicolaus in Baltimore. He covers non-bank financial services companies. Chris recently gave a research presentation on Square and other mobile payment “disruptors” that was quoted on TechCrunch. Chris can also be seen on Bloomberg News, FoxBusiness and CNN. Jack Buchanan continues to enjoy living in Jackson, Wyo. Jack is an accomplished mountain climber and is very skilled with a canoe and kayak. Kevin “Bubba” Buerger is the executive vice president of sales and client services at Jellyfish Online Marketing. Jellyfish specializes in paid search marketing. Bubba lives in Baltimore with his wife Heather and three children. Bubba and Matt Wyskiel and their families enjoy getting together, and Bubba’s daughters often babysit Matt’s daughter and son. Tripp Burgunder practices law in Baltimore in his own firm. Tripp specializes in real estate and zoning matters. Tripp recently won two cases in the Maryland Court of Special Appeals — one on zoning and one involving a liquor license. Willy Calvert is the creative director and CEO of his own design firm specializing in couture day, cocktail, evening and bridal wear. Andrew Cameron is the head of liver transplants at Johns Hopkins Hospital. During Andy’s limited free time, he enjoys golfing and pool time with his family at Elkridge Club where he and Matt Wyskiel will bump into each other. Ned Carroll lives in Charlotte, N.C., and is a senior vice president at Bank of America. Ned is the information and analytics management executive and acting chief data officer. Matt Wyskiel Jack Cavanaugh is a partner and the head of Tripp Burgunder mwyskiel@gmail.com private client business at Brown Advisory in Baltimore. hb3@hb3law.com Jack and Doug Godine often work together at Juan Alvarez is based in Sao Paulo, Brazil, where he is Brown Advisory. Jack enjoys fantasy football and the the director of sales and business development for Kentucky Derby with several members of Gilman’s iCAABS, a boutique consultancy that helps ’87 and ’86 classes. International Companies enter the Brazilian and Latin David Clapp lives just north of Baltimore with his American market. wife, daughter and son. David is enjoying working with Louis Angelos is an associate with the Law Offices his father in their family businesses. He enjoys golfing, of Peter Angelos in Baltimore where his practice areas playing fantasy football and socializing with many include personal injury, product liability and pharmamembers of our class. ceutical liability. In the past year, Lou has also had an Sandy Colhoun is the director of development increased role with the Baltimore Orioles. at the New Hampton School in New Hampton, N.H. Thomas Annau is the vice president of engineerHe and his wife Selina, daughter Eloise and dog Haley ing at blekko, a new search engine company that live in Sanbornton, N.H. promises a spam-free search. Tom lives in the San Sackett Cook is presently with Cramer Rosenthal Francisco Bay area. Tom invented an algorithm to McGlynn, a leading value manager in New York City. automatically classify queries with high accuracy. Sackett is a research analyst focusing on international Andy Barker lives in Vermont with his wife Ana equities. Sackett and his family enjoy occasional visits and his daughters Emma and Tess. to Baltimore where he tries to see classmates Henry Billy Barroll is a senior vice president for Franklin, Jack Cavanaugh and others. Corporate Office Properties Trust and lives in Mark Cooper lives and works as a doctor down Annapolis, Md. in Alabama with his wife and three sons. Mark runs Micah Berul lives and works in San Francisco. He his own family practice, which is so popular that it has is an attorney for the National Labor Relations Board, as many families as he can handle. Region 20 where he works to uphold employee rights. Todd Crandell is the founder and CEO of Justin Bloom is a lawyer with his own firm in ThirdStone Ventures, LLC, a consulting firm for Sarasota, Fla. Justin’s practice includes complex toxic businesses looking to grow. Todd is also the district contamination and pharmaceutical litigation. chairman for the Chesapeake District of the Boy Scouts of America.

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Mitchell Whiteman ’94 and Matt Wyskiel ’87 pose with Jason Botel (far right), former executive director, at the KIPP Baltimore ribbon-cutting ceremony in September 2012.

Liam Culman lives with his wife and daughter in New York City’s Chelsea neighborhood above his wife’s art gallery, the Marianne Boesky Gallery. Liam is the managing partner of Bigelow Sands LLC, which is involved in the art world, and he stays active playing squash. Kevin Daniels is the owner of Northwest Résumés in Seattle, Wash. Little known fact: way back in college, Kevin won a Doritos National Comedy Competition. Van Durrer is a lawyer in Los Angeles and leads Skadden, Arps’ corporate restructuring practice in the western United States. He recently published an article on corporate restructuring and the use of Chapter 15 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. Andy Fine is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Children’s Hospital of Boston. His research specialty is bridging public health informatics with medical decision sciences. Ted Fish is the executive director of the Gardner Carey Leadership Institute where he specializes in teacher training with individual schools and school districts throughout the United States. Henry Franklin is a principal at Franklin Financial Group in Hunt Valley, Md. Henry is also an assistant coach for Gilman’s varsity wrestling team, having served as the head coach previously as well. Henry enjoyed hosting Matt Wyskiel for some TV-viewing of the Ravens beating the Patriots in the AFC Championship game. Josh Freeman is the chief executive officer of TeamVisibility, a product of Transparency Sciences, LLC. TeamVisibility’s cloud-based platform lets leaders see and hear what their work teams face each day —  and provides them with great tools to coach and

collaborate. Josh likes to come up to Baltimore for an occasional Ravens game at which he will typically see David Clapp, who has seats near Scott Kurlander and Matt Wyskiel. Joby Gardner is an assistant professor at DePaul University where he is the program director for curriculum studies education. James Gerlach is the lead systems administrator at the South Florida Water Management District. Doug Godine is a partner in the High Net Worth Group at Brown Advisory in Baltimore. He also enjoys coaching his children in various sports such as lacrosse, basketball and football. Bernardo Gonzales is a principal at Noblis, a provider of high-level technical assistance and support and management expertise to government agencies, including Health and Human Services and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Bernardo is currently serving as a State Medicaid technical advisor. Will Gould is the president of asset based lending and life sciences lending at MidCap Financial, in Bethesda, Md. Jon Guth is a strategic account manager at Cynergy Systems, a leading developer of business software. Jon and Matt Wyskiel bumped into each other at M&T Bank Stadium on the day of the Ravens Super Bowl victory parade and celebration. Eric Hamberger is the co-president and chief operating officer at Fortessa Tableware Solutions, LLC., a leading manufacturer of dinnerware, glassware and flatware in Sterling and Winchester, Va. Simon Hamilton is a director of private wealth management at Robert W. Baird & Co. in Reston, Virginia. Simon and his wife have three daughters.

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Henderson’s Wharf in Fells Point hosts the Class of 1988 25th Reunion.

Eric Harlan is a partner at the Baltimore law firm of Shapiro, Sher, Guinot & Sandler. Eric is the co-chair of the firm’s employment law group. Andrew Hawes is now the operations manager, WW technical support (Cisco WebEx) at Cisco Systems. Andrew is based in Watertown, Mass. DB Hebb is a doctor at Kent Hospital in Connecticut where he lives with his family. DB, Sandy and Brent enjoy getting together when their schedules allow it. John Hewson is a partner and equity options market maker at Alexandria Capital Partners LP in New York City. Alex Hoehn-Saric is a policy director for FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel. He has primary responsibility for media and technology issues. Jack Hoffberger is a financial planning specialist at Smith Barney in Baltimore. Hugh “Ti” House is an orthopedic surgeon at Chesapeake Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center. His special areas of interest include the hand, wrist, elbow, shoulder and knee. Ted Hull is the director of quality assurance in the Governor’s Office of Crime Control & Prevention. Matthew Kashima is an assistant professor of otolaryngology — head and neck surgery at Johns Hopkins Medicine with his principal hospital being the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Dae Up Kim is the vice president of research at the National Association of Convenience Stores in Washington, D.C. Scott Kurlander is a partner with Schochor, Federico and Staton, P.A. in Baltimore where he practices law in the fields of personal injury and medical

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malpractice. Scott was recently selected by his peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America. He is co-coaching a boys’ lacrosse team with Matt Wyskiel because their sons are on the team. Peter Kwiterovich is the head of the Middle School at Gilman. In his free time, he enjoys global travel. Hugh Marbury is a partner at DLA Piper in Baltimore. His primary areas of practice are business and intellectual property litigation. Hugh is a member of the Peabody National Advisory Council where he advocates for the Peabody Institute. Brooks Matthews is a social studies teacher in the Gilman Middle School. He is also Gilman’s head varsity lacrosse coach. Stuart McCaughey is an assistant professor in neuroanatomy at the Indiana University School of Medicine in Muncie on the campus of Ball State University. His research interests include how the sense of taste guides feeding behavior. Bruce Mehlman is a partner with the lobbying firm of Mehlman Vogel Castagnetti, Inc. in Washington, D.C. Bruce was recognized as a “top lobbyist” by Washingtonian Magazine. Andrew Meredith is a senior vice president at Merrill Lynch in Baltimore. He works with his dad at The Meredith Group. Rob Mockard is an independent financial consultant in Columbus, Ohio, providing operational finance support to a diverse client base. David Morales is now the chief of cardiovascular surgery and executive director of the Heart Institute at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Rob Patterson is an actor and a wine representative for Cameron Hughes Wine in Los Angeles, Calif.

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Brent Powell and his wife and two daughters and son live in Hopkinton, N.H. Brent is head of the Upper School at the Derryfield School in Manchester, N.H. Craig Powell is a senior vice president at Delta Associates, where he provides “cradle to grave” asset management functions for the United States Department of Labor’s Job Corps real estate portfolio, valued at more than $5 billion. The portfolio is comprised of 123 educational campuses, located on 7,200 acres of land nationwide. Gregg Riccio is the senior director, supply chain strategy for PepsiCo. Cal Rogers is the director of sales at Rand McNally in New York City. Craig Scheir is the senior electrical engineer in charge of the Electrical Engineering Group at ILC Dover, a leading designer and developer of products for government and industry, including the defense industry and the space industry. Tim Schenck is an Episcopal priest at the Episcopal Parish of St. John the Evangelist in Hingham, Mass.. He is the author of a blog, Clergy Family Confidential: Finding God in Domestic Chaos. Gary Susel is an equity research analyst at Stifel Nicolaus in Baltimore. He covers non-bank financials and specialty financial companies. Bruce Taylor is the global brand marketing director at Stanford Graduate School of Business. He leads the school’s marketing strategy and initiatives in the United States and abroad with a focus on China, India and Brazil. Bruce is also the principal of Taylor Consulting where he assists companies with product launch and operating strategy. Ken Turnbull is a partner in the Litigation and Antitrust Practice Group at King & Spalding. He focuses on representing accounting firms and their professionals in complex litigation and regulatory matters, including securities class actions, trustee and receiver actions and investigations or enforcement proceedings by the SEC, PCAOB and United States Attorneys’ Offices. Peter VanDyke is a vice president and director at TD Securities in New York City. Alex Vishio is school chaplain at Gilman where he is also a Classics teacher and an assistant coach of the JV football team. Brian Voelker is in his fifth season as the head lacrosse coach at Drexel University. He enjoys seeing several of our Gilman classmates whenever he is in Baltimore. Stefan Waters is the director of technical operations for the Baltimore City Mayor’s Office of Information Technology. Rich Weinstein is a senior vice president and group account director at The Martin Agency in Richmond, Va. No doubt you have seen their advertisements for GEICO, Pizza Hut, Walmart and many other companies. Clark Wight and his wife and two sons and daughter are living near Perth, Australia. In recent summers, Gilman classmates Liam Culman and Matt Wyskiel have enjoyed seeing Clark during the summer on Nantucket when their schedules lineup accordingly.

Stocky Williams is a principal with HR&A Advisors, which is an industry-leading real estate, economic development and energy-consulting firm. Stocky and his wife and son and daughter live in Washington, D.C. Matt Wyskiel lives near Gilman with his wife, daughter and son. Matt heads Skill Capital Management, the investment management firm that he started five years ago. In his free time, Matt helps children with their education either on a 1:1 basis or through non-profit organizations like Children’s Scholarship Fund Baltimore, which provides partial scholarships to about 230 children of low-income Baltimore families so that they can attend the school of their choice. Ken Zeitung is in real estate lending management at U.S.A.A. in San Antonio, Texas.

1988 Greg Carter letgregknow@gmail.com The Class of 1988 was excited for its 25 year reunion. Jamie Griffith, Leon Newsome and Andrew Gross (still an assistant professor at Catholic University of America, living in Baltimore, with four kids) planned a party at Clay Hurt’s house, with or without his knowledge of it. As Jamie asks, “Is . . . is that a possible problem?” At the beginning of 2013, Marc Aquino was promoted from vice president of sales to vice president of sales and customer service at Alliance Game Distributors. Justin Brown lives in Baltimore (in Cedarcroft) with his wife Kristen, son Oscar and daughter Annabel. When he’s not changing diapers, he runs a burgeoning law firm that specializes in federal criminal defense. He makes a point to get down to New Orleans almost every year for Jazzfest — and is still waiting to see if he can convince neighbor Kirby von Kessler to tag along one year! Also in contact with Kirby (and Bret Bortner), David Carroll bought a new house in Poplar Hill, close to his old one and close to Gilman. Having to do a major renovation, his family has been living at the in-laws for close to three months. Their son is now a seventh grader at Gilman (Class of 2018), and the girls are at Roland Park Country School. It’s been a very busy work year on the lobbying front, with special sessions of the Legislature to address gaming expansion and tax increases. David had the good fortune to catch up with Matt Eastwick during his holiday visit to Baltimore. Randy Brown current lives in Ellicott City with his wife Kelly, daughter Allison, 11, and son Colin, 9. Randy sells software for a small tech start-up based out of New Hampshire. Charlie Cahn and Hillary Cahn are finishing their ninth year leading Suffield Academy. Their daughter Peyton is in seventh grade and son Harrison in third. They have enjoyed making it down to Sarasota to watch the Orioles spring training games.

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Andy Fenselau is a Silicon Valley transplant, where he loves the California lifestyle with Suzanne and their three kids, Nick, 14, Rebecca, 13, and Sam, 8. They spend a lot of time at the beach, in the redwood forests, and skiing, plus the usual soccer, horseback riding and music activities with the kids. At work, he runs a $300 million storage networking business for Emulex, after several misadventures with start-ups! And in his “spare time,” Andy is board president for Sustainable Schools International, one of the most successful N.G.O. models for rural education and community empowerment in developing countries (S.S.I. focuses on Cambodia, where Nick was adopted from). Andy has big plans for the company, so let him know if you’re interested in any way! Matt Gordon was married to his sweetheart, Marianne Michallet Gordon, in Lyon, France. In attendance as groomsmen were Gilmanites Casey Gordon ’90, Justin Brown, Kirby von Kessler, George Konstantinos Dritsas Hopkins and Mike Taylor. On March 7, 2013, Matt and Marianne welcomed a son, Abel Gordon, into this world. “All three of us are healthy and mostly full of vigor. We live and work in Los Angeles.” Drit praised Matt as an “ebullient, irrepressible and recent inductee to the world of fatherhood.” He continued, “2012 was a whale of a year for me. I got married in 2011, and we had a truly remarkable year together. In the end we decided to dissolve our marriage, but we communicate often and are perhaps even closer now.” George’s previous employer, the Qatar Foundation, showed graciousness, compassion and generosity as he transitioned towards taking care of his father, who was living alone and dying of cancer. George shared, “My father passed away on October 7. I now live here in Greece with a black Labrador retriever named Zorba in the house my father built for his mother back in 1970.” George also sang the praise of Matt’s short film, “The Dynamiter,” for which he shared executive producer credits with Todd Murphy and Sue-Joe Shin. “Due in large part to my stellar performance as a soft-spoken short order cook (I had no speaking lines and was in the background for 0.7 seconds), this film became an official selection for the Berlin Film Festival in 2011. It went on to win the jury prize at the 37th American Film Festival in Deauville, France, and was awarded the Best First Feature Film by the jury of the Durban International Film Festival in South Africa. For those of you interested, it is available via Netflix and Amazon.” George plans to relocate back to the United States in the next six months or so. After eight years overseas, he’s preparing himself for “reverse culture shock, while very much looking forward to reconnecting with everyone back home.” “We welcomed a new baby girl, Hee Jin Sofia Shin, into our lives on December 21,” Sue-Joe Shin reports. “Our boy just turned two in February so we are busy, but grateful that everyone in the family is healthy.” Sue-Joe still lives in Manhattan Beach, Calif., traveling back and forth to Asia. Tom Hagigh had a year of big changes, after leaving Morgan Stanley Smith Barney to join Wells

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Fargo Advisors in March. In October his family moved to Lothian, Md. (“Hopefully our third and final move!” he says.) His boys are now 10 and eight, loving their new house and new school. “Things are great!” he says. Geoff Kinsey left a solar startup in Los Angeles last year, after having set a new world record for solar module efficiency (34%). He is now in Boston, working as director of photovoltaic technologies for The Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy. George Liebmann has been at his ranch in Vermont since giving up the apartment in New York City a year ago. He continues to consult, and also works for Longstreet Worldwide, the Los Angeles-based investment bank, doing mergers and acquisitions in energy and commercial real estate. “We are always looking for good investment opportunities for our funds from $25 million to $2 billion.” Chip Linehan finished the second of three years of his education leadership doctoral program at Harvard. He’s just loving it, having partnered with two colleagues to start a new secondary school model called Building 21. “We are seeking to open our first school in Fall 2014. “Family is great,” Chip adds. “Our son Cormac turns four this summer and is a true ‘threenager.’ Our daughter turns two in May and is going to be a handful!” Scott McMillin and I reflected on our soft spot for movies based in ancient Rome, which we attribute to Mrs. Sarbanes’ Latin class. He recommends “Vikings,” The History Channel’s first scripted series. “It’s actually pretty good. The historical inaccuracies are relatively small and the overall vibe is spot on, thanks to Michael Hirst, who wrote the ‘Elizabeth’ films and ‘The Tudors.’ Check it out!” Scott also keeps in touch with Daniel Casasanto, who has visited him in Chicago. While David Meese and his wife Leigh feel as young as ever, their two sons are getting older. The youngest, Allen, reached double digits in February, and the oldest, Robby, has had his learner’s permit for three months. “So far his driving has been incident-free!” David exhaled. Trey Muldrow and wife Dana just had a baby girl, Rory Leigh Muldrow, four months ago. Along with older sister Carlyle Nicole Muldrow, the family is doing well in Brooklyn, N.Y. After 10 years or so spent writing and paying the rent as a non-profiteer, most of it in Baltimore, John Stinson did a 180 and is now a Philadelphia lawyer, litigating commercial lawsuits as well as trust disputes and some education suits. His wife Jennifer is staying true as a writer and semi-autonomous non-profit worker. The Stinsons have two beautiful girls, 5 and 2, who are a drama queen and a hockey “enforcer,” respectively. John hopes to write fiction again, but admits to finding “opportunities to make up tales on my day job” for now. We were all saddened by the death of classmate and Twelve-Year Man William Sheldon in November 2012. He was missed as we gathered for reunion this spring. I also had a big year, successfully traversing the tenure process at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee,

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Greg Carter ’88 (left) chats with Ethan Graham ’88. Crawford Hubbard ’88, Trey Muldrow ’88, Alex Hendrickson ’88, Angela Alsobrooks and her fiancé Eric Bryant ’88. John Schmick ’67 visits with Larry Park ’88.

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The Class of 1993 gathers for its 20th Reunion at the Waterfront Hotel in Fells Point on May 4, 2013. Class of 1993 mates at the October 2012 Founders’ Society dinner: Nick Maumenee ’93, P’24, Rock Harrison ’93, Alumni Association president, and David Shapiro ’93. Shapiro was one of the evening’s featured speakers. 1993 kicks off its reunion with a golf outing at Elkridge Club. John Schmick ’67 and Tim Holley ’77 joined the players.

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Drew White ’89, Tom Biddison ’81 and Ted Wight ’89, P’19 at the 2013 Bull Roast.

where I am a professor of history. My first book, “The United States of the United Races: A Utopian History of Racial Mixing,” finally came out (in a Kindle edition, as well as hardcover and paperback!). Most exciting, my daughter, Nina Sugiyama Carter, was born in 2012, so I have joined the ranks of fathers in the Class of 1988.

1990 Ken Chan kchanster@aol.com There is a lot that can happen in 23 years to a class of approximately 70 young men. It appears with a little prodding, we managed to get 16% of that information. The following is what some of you were willing to share in order of response. Perry Offutt responded with “Cool!” Evan Davis lives in Timonium, Md. — working at Legg Mason for 15 years. He is currently national sales manager for the firm’s wholesaling business in the independent dealer channel. He is married to his wife Debbie for 11 years and has two daughters, Morgan and Molly. Ethan Ewing lives in San Carlos, Calif., a small town south of San Francisco, with his wife Ann and two daughters, Natalie, 5, and Amelia, 3. He has been managing Bills.com from its start more than six years ago, and they now have 30 team members and a fun business. He spends his spare time with his family and neighborhood friends, and gets to sneak off once a week to run local trails and once a month to brew beer. He invites anyone that has a free afternoon who happens to be in the Bay Area to drop him an e-mail.

Stephen Starr has been living in Asia now for almost eight years and is currently living in Shanghai, China. He works for Danone Baby Nutrition as a vice president, medical. He travelled this past year to his 50th country and is slowly learning Mandarin. Matthew Horwitz lives in sunny South Florida in Boca Raton with his 11 year-old son Julian and his girlfriend Lisa. He continues his career in the luxury fashion retail world. He has been with Luxottica since April 2012 as national market manager for The Dillard’s account. Andrew Cohen still lives in Manhattan and is married with two young sons, Louis, 4.5, and Edgar, 2. Eric David taught five years of high school history outside of Pittsburgh, and then worked four years at a private scholarship foundation at UNC-Chapel Hill. He then went back to school and received a master’s degree in journalism and then a law degree at UNC. Since 2008, he has been an attorney in Raleigh, N.C., doing business litigation, with a focus on representing newspaper and broadcaster clients. He married his wife Sarah in 2005 and has two highly energetic boys, Jed, 4, and Macon, 2. Sam Knowles and his wife Aida live in Northern Virginia. His wife teaches first grade and he works for DLA Piper practicing government contracts law. He recently finished an LL.M. in public procurement law in an evening program at George Washington University. He has done a handful of road races and triathlons. He and his wife travelled to Bordeaux and Paris last summer and rang in the New Year in N.Y.C. Ryan Jordan spent the last few years as the academic dean at a private school in Florida. He now lives back in Maryland in Calvert County. He is the Upper School head at the Calverton School, where his children attend: Finley, second grade, and Liam, kindergarten. He continues to coach and teach both

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Latin and History. He has been in touch with past teachers and coaches at Gilman, and also several former classmates over the holidays — Ethan Ewing, Stephen Linaweaver, Neal Smith, Jamie Schapiro, and Dan Langenthal. Peter Niemeyer lives in the Berkshires with his wife, with whom he has spent over half his life, and his children Walker, 11, and Maya, 8. He teaches world history to teenagers, and is on call 24/7 as a firefighter. He enjoys and thrives in a small community e nvironment, and enjoys his five-mile commute in nature to work. Stephen Linaweaver lives in Oakland, Calif., and works in San Francisco. He sees Ethan Ewing regularly. He takes advantage of his surroundings by kayaking across the Bay to work a few times a month. Aaron Sorenson now lives in the Greater Philly area with his new wife Susan. He has recently started a new job as director of informatics at the Temple University School of Medicine. He and Sebastian Seiguer apparently still “cause a fair amount of trouble” when they get together periodically. Richard “Kwan” Chang moved to Cleveland, Ohio, in December 2011 after practicing hematologyoncology in White Plains, N.Y., for six years. He now works for University Hospitals/Seidman Cancer Center. He has two children, Ryan, 6, and Keira, 4, and lives in Bainbridge Township. As for myself — Kent Chan — I currently live in Manhattan with my wife Eva, who is a dentist, and our children Paulina and Eric. I work as a gynecologic oncologist. I have been training in Brazilian Jiu-jitsu now for several years. For those of you that have a chance to visit N.Y.C., I would be happy to spend some time with you discussing New York real estate, medicine, food, rolling/fighting and, of course, the last 23 years. I hope that year #24 of Class Notes will bring even more news beyond the internet, social media and hearsay. May we all continue moving forward successfully in our lives separately and always together as a group.

1992 Jonathan Scott Goldman goldman-js@blankrome.com If no news is good news, the Gilman Class of 1992 is doing well. Though far from a scientific survey, the response to my annual request for class notes seems more muted this year than in others. It seems as if people have settled into their lives, and while we are working hard and having fun, there have been fewer major life changes than in years past. At least fewer changes that people are reporting. For example, Raphael Lee wrote from New York City as follows: “Dude, Nothing really new to report here. Hope all’s good with you. Raph.” Thanks, Raph. See, Class of 1992 Notes, prior editions.

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Andrew Monfried responded simply, ibid ergo sum. I was, of course, impressed with his knowledge and retention of Gilman Latin and, while I had a sense of what Andrew meant, I asked him. He responded, “it’s Latin for ‘meh’ — I think I learned that from Plutarch or Catullus. I confuse the two.” Semper ubi sub ubi, Mr. Monfried. Marty Rochlin reports that he is still working at Lansdowne High School as an assistant principal. He lives in Ellicott City with his wife Pam and great daughter Lilly. At the time of his report, Marty was still in Ravens Super Bowl euphoria and looking forward to the Orioles’ Opening Day. Davey Iglehart still lives in Owings Mills where he appraises residential real estate. When he emailed, Davey, his wife November and his kids Maddy, 7, and Scarlett, 5, had just returned from fishing in the Florida Keys. Mark Manzo lives with his Weimaraner in Canton, where he is a real estate and mobile app developer. George Hardy wrote from Rhode Island, where he is a full-time doctor focusing on primary care. He and his wife have two children, Maggie and Geddy (the “G” sounds like a “J” as in “George”). Paul R. Lee is almost finished with school. Seriously. Paul reports that he is still completing a fellowship in neuroimmunology at the National Institutes of Health. He has been publishing his scientific work but not his creative oeuvre, at least as of now. As of the time of his report, Paul was looking for a real job in the real world, “because I am finally leaving school/training at the tender age of 40.” Paul reports with his characteristic sense of humor, “I am so sub-specialized in my training that I am qualified to see 1 in a 1,000,000 — great career planning on my part, made myself obsolete before I even started.” Paul enjoyed our 20th Reunion, specifically seeing some of the people who are neither Gilman parents nor Facebook members. H. G. Chissell reports that he and his family live outside of Philadelphia near Haverford College where he is balancing growing responsibilities as co-head of sales for Viridity Energy in Philadelphia. H.G. and I catch up over lunch from time to time. He, like so many of our classmates, attended our reunion. Ben Jones is still bummed about missing our 20th Reunion! He is hoping that with John Schmick’s retirement he will finally be allowed to return to campus. In the meantime, he continues to enjoy life in Ohio with his wife Tanya and sons Emerson, 10, and Asa, 8. Aaron Jensen also apologizes for missing our reunion, but he plans to be at the next. Aaron wrote after I initially circulated these notes for comment: “I am one of the ‘no news people’ who never got back to you because I have been on a three-week work bender . . . (18 hrs/day for far too long).” He claims that Miss Alpert’s second grade class prepared him well for this work ethic. Aaron is finishing up a design for a brand new theater on Market Street in San Francisco for the American Conservatory Theater Company, the largest theater company in San Francisco. On the personal

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Cheo Hurley ’92, P’25 and Dana Underwood ’92. Tony Nguyen ’95, Rock Harrison ’93, Alex Slagle ’93 and Joshua Steinitz ’93. Dan McGill ’95 and Jason Vargas ’95 in Los Angeles.

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Adam Greef ’98, Jenny Ayd, Jack Linehan ’98, Mike Tully ’98 and Eric Parvis ’98. 1998 returns to one of the Baltimore area’s favorite sports bars, the Charles Village Pub in Towson, for its 15th Reunion. Emily Gill, Pat Gill ’98, Bart DeLuca ’98 and Sarah DeLuca.

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front, Aaron is now married with a seven year-old daughter and four year-old son. Aaron and his family recently finished renovating their home, which was arduous, even though he is supposed to be an expert! He reports that the Jensen family is now happily settled into their West Coast lifestyle — both of his kids are excellent skiers and Aaron is starting to teach them to sail as well. Aaron will see everyone at our 25th reunion! Colin Pine professed that he had “not much to update” but writes that he is still in China where he is working for the NBA in product licensing. He planned a trip to Barcelona in May for the Prima Vera Sound Festival. He also enjoyed attending our reunion (from China, Messrs. Jensen and Jones) and reported on a reunion post-party that was deep-deep-underground: after the reunion, H.G. Chissell, Cheo Hurley, Geoff Berry, Antoine Hutchinson, Wade Ware, Dana Underwood and Colin headed over to the Cheesecake Factory; Dong showed up. David Olsen just returned to the Washington, D.C., area after a one-year deployment to Afghanistan and Pakistan where he served as a liaison to the Pakistani military. David, his wife Heather and daughter Abby will be living in Alexandria for at least another year while he works on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon. David also reported that he bumped into James Guyton a few weeks ago. Paul Lee reported a Guyton-citing in the Gilman carpool line, as well. Josh Civin and his wife Katherine have a new daughter, Olivia. Olivia was born in June 2012 and joins brother Marshall in Baltimore. Based on what I know about the Civin clan and the time it takes to publish these notes, by the time you read this entry, Olivia will have successfully aced AB Calculus. Separately, Josh and I had a chance to catch up in Washington, D.C., this January when my college roommate and Josh’s friend, Derek Kilmer, was sworn in as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Josh is doing excellent work as counsel to the director of litigation at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. He also recently persuaded Cheo Hurley to join him on the board of directors of the Baltimore-based civic advocacy group, the Citizens Planning and Housing Association, Inc. Matthew Enna reports that life is great in Los Angeles. Matt opened his own orthopedic practice in 2012, and he enjoyed catching up with Messrs. Schmick and Holley at a local Gilman alumni event at the Beverly Hills Hotel. He also ran the recent Boston Marathon — and was on the “T” heading back to the airport when the bombings occurred. Matt will be back next year to show his support for the marathon and for the city of Boston. Jon Theodore is also based in L.A. While I generally do not report news that is not e-mailed to me directly, Jon’s news is a matter of public record: Jon recently joined the established band Queens of the Stone Age. Check out his first gig with the band — at Lollapalooza Brazil in Sao Paulo — and live vicariously: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/videos/queens-of-thestone-age-debut-new-song-at-lollapalooza-brazil-20130331. Insane. Jon’s own new band, Life Coach, just put out their first CD, “Alphawaves.” It’s not the Northern Lights, but you’ll dig it.

David Azad and I recently caught up in NYC when I was there on business. The (re)connection was relatively seamless, so seamless that we were both amused when we realized after talking for almost an hour that we had not seen each other in person in over 15 years. David reports that, despite living in NYC, his kids (ages 7 and 5) are thus far true to the Ravens and Orioles. David would enjoy re-connecting with classmates when they are in the area. As for me, I suppose I’m chugging along rather nicely, as well. Rachel and I, and our kids Max, 8 1/2, and Asher, 2 1/2, are working and playing hard in the suburbs of Philadelphia. I’m still helping businesses and high net worth individuals resolve disputes as a trial attorney at Blank Rome LLP. And I dig it. I’m not sure that the “Jon Goldman” who got his ear pierced the day of our high school graduation would approve, but I don’t know that he’d be surprised either. Besides, I still work on my photography when I have time (the Philadelphia City Paper recently described one of my photographs as “haunting,” which I think was a compliment) and, while my earring holes have long-ago closed-in, I’m still tie-dye/Grateful Dead-clad most weekends. And what’s so wrong with that? Twenty years out, I think we’re making our way. In retrospect, perhaps the notes are light because people adequately shared their news, in person, at our 20th Reunion—which was a blast. Kudos to Toby Bozzuto, Brian Cootauco, Justin Klein and others for organizing. See you in five years — if not sooner.

1996 Lee Kowarski kowarski@kasina.com I didn’t get a ton of direct reports this year, but several people sent in updates about fellow classmates, so hopefully everything here is accurate. I know that Evan Kreitzer is still living in Owings Mills with his wife Keren and their sons Sam and Coby. Evan, who is a mortgage banker at The Federal Savings Bank, went to the Super Bowl in February where he ran into Maakan Taghizadeh and Greg Plitt. Tag got married this past year to Dr. Jess Wertz and is about to finish his plastic surgery residency at Ohio State. I imagine that everyone is familiar with what Plitt is up to — if not, just Google his name or go to www.gregplitt.com. He is one of the top fitness models in the world and is a successful businessman, entrepreneur and actor, living in Burbank. Similarly, check out www.savingabel.com or www. tatcodesign.com for information about Scott Bartlett’s latest musical or entrepreneurial endeavors. Along with Plitt, the West Coast contingent of our class includes Gaurab Bansal, John Apostolides, Noah Gallico and Sean Kiernan. Gaurab, who had relocated to Chicago for a year to serve as an in-house counsel on President Obama’s re-election campaign, is back in Seattle and considering his next steps professionally. Between the O’s, Ravens and the President (not in that order), he feels that he has had a

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great last six months. John is a plastic surgeon in San Diego, where he lives with his wife Carolyn and their children Athena and Bijoux. Noah and his wife Sarah remain in Hollywood where Noah works at Universal Pictures in creative advertising and marketing. Their second son, Jake Charles Gallico, was born on March 21. Sean, who continues to work at Impact Sports representing NFL players and other athletes, married Alejandra in August in Laguna Beach. Classmates Brandon Croxton and Cliff Athey were in the wedding party. Brandon and his wife, who live in Baltimore, are expecting their first child in October. Yani Rosenberg lives in Mt. Washington and works with his family business, Floors Etc. He and his wife Laurie have a son and a daughter. Chris Tully lives nearby in Roland Park with his wife Jodi and one-year-old daughter Spencer. Tully is an attorney at Tydings and Rosenberg. Following a divorce, David Raynes moved back to Baltimore. He has worked on Shortmail (which was featured in a story that was syndicated to news stations all over the country) and now Mailstrom (which was recently mentioned in Time Magazine and twice on Lifehacker). Also back in Baltimore is David Anderson, who now writes for The Aegis newspaper, serving Harford County. The Aegis is part of The Baltimore Sun Media Group. John Boyle, who still lives in Columbia with his wife Tara and their son John, now works in Towson as a fundraiser for the Immune Deficiency Foundation. Think Zebra! Joe Watts and his wife Kristin are down in North Carolina with their three children: Owen, 7, Luke, 5, and Maria, 3. Joe was recently promoted to senior research scientist at Syngenta, where he is developing proteins to express in crops to make new GMO foods. Also raising three children each are Joey Lee and Jay Menton. Joey relocated to Dallas (where classmate Kevin Frank also lives) last year and works for a hedge fund. Joey’s and his wife Ellen’s young children are Sebastian, Max and Scarlett. Jay, who is happy to report the arrival of their third child, Campbell, on February 20, lives with his family in the Chicago suburbs. Jason Mersey is also in Chicago, where he finished business school at the University of Chicago and continues to work for AQR Capital Management and serve on the board of StreetWise (a non-profit providing immediate employment opportunities and social services to people in crisis). Jason and his awesome wife Rachel have been kind enough to keep me company on several eating adventures in Chicago and N.Y.C. Russ Wrenn has been in Atlanta with his wife Erin for the past six years. Russ works at The Westminster Schools, where he serves as the seventh grade boys chair, junior high English teacher, head baseball coach and offensive coordinator for the football team. Erin went back to school last year to pursue her Ph.D. in political science at Emory and their boys Ronan, 4, and Cormac, 1.5, are growing like weeds and full of energy every day. Daron Hines remains in Minneapolis, where he celebrated his fifth year married to Micah (who you

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may remember as Micah Mitchell at RPCS). Daron has worked with General Mills for 13 years and was recently promoted to sales director leading General Mills’ Customer Trade Group. Other updates include: Brett Brandau and his wife Jen welcomed their son Turner into the world on July 15 of last year. They continue to live outside of Wilmington, Del. Dave Boyd and his wife Carrie, who live in Richmond, added a set of twin daughters to their family on March 8. Eric Holloway is a bartender at Maison Premiere in Brooklyn, where he lives (and I really need to go see him and try one of his absinthe cocktails). Jake Rothwell is still with International SOS and moved from Atyrau to Almaty. Jake was also promoted to head of sales for Kazakhstan. Jason Haas finished up his master’s degree at MIT’s Media Lab this spring with a two-player iPad learning game and will be beginning his Ph.D. program there in the fall. Tony Barco is getting married in October. As for me, I continue to run my consulting firm, kasina, and enjoy living in N.Y.C. In addition to my primary job, I also serve as president of the kasina Youth Foundation for Financial Literacy (my company’s non-profit organization) and have recently joined the programming committee for the James Beard Foundation (which involves bringing world class chefs in to cook at the James Beard House in N.Y.C). My wife Melinda and I still live on the Upper West Side and look forward to seeing you when you are in New York.

1999 Bill Miller bmilleriv@gmail.com It was another busy and productive year for Gilman’s all-star Class of ’99. One of the most active Gilman community members, Charles Wagandt, who also led the hottest tri-school-area trio ever to spit rhymes, put together a verse for this year’s class notes. Charles sums up his past year by rapping, “It was no average year working on the Bull Roast; to all who helped, I have to give a toast. Done just hopped a plane to Sydney for work; now I need to travel with my wife so she don’t think me a jerk. Not only upgraded O’s seats for this season; but lots of friends be having babies, which is pleasin’. Word.” Two such baby-making friends are fellow Orko crew members Chris Anderson and Bill Miller. Chris and wife Yay moved back to Charm City last year and bought a house in Guilford. He also became an attorney, got a new job and expects a baby at the end of the summer. Bill and wife Becky still live in Fells Point and are expecting a girl in August. Their final pre-baby escapade involved two weeks exploring the bush in Botswana and Zimbabwe. For work, Bill has been helping to launch a new venture under the Legg Mason umbrella involving a high income-generating fund.

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Charles Wagandt ’99, Shaun Woodland ’99, Chris Anderson ’99 and Kwaisi France ’99 reconnect at the Bull Roast.

Other locals are also in the process of building out their nests. Del Schmidt’s daughter Rory was born last April, and the family celebrated her first birthday party with a blowout bash. Rumor has it that she’s been forming cliques with fellow classmates’ daughters, Bridget Sullivan and Campbell Bank. Fellow Rodgers Forge resident Craig Bennett married a Calvert colleague, Erin Strom, in April. Craig teaches U.S. History in Calvert’s Middle School and coaches football, basketball and lacrosse; he also runs the school’s summer programs. The couple has the occasional property-line squabble with next-door neighbor Shields Sullivan. Patrick Majewski celebrated the first birthday of his second child, Patrick Jr, this May. His daughter Brooke turned 7 in April. Patrick lives in Parkville and is the assistant manager at Ted’s Towing in Baltimore. Tim Hurley remains at Miles & Stockbridge and is enjoying life with Anne, baby Adair and dog Calvin.  Not all Baltimore-area ’99ers have had time to pop out kids. Steve Scott has spent the last year working in fixtures and rigging electric for HBO and Netflix. He has worked on the first two seasons of both “Veep” and “House of Cards.” He still lives in Bolton Hill with his wife, dogs and cats and has recently enrolled at UMUC in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree. Steve is still not sure “whether to complete the degree or to attempt a Gilman Alumni Association record for most colleges without a degree” (his words, not mine!). Bryan Preston continues to teach at Coppin State and also breaks legs on the weekends as a stand-up comedian. Skip Startzman is studying for his CPA so that he can properly account for his wins at the horse track. He makes it to almost every Derby as well as the Preakness and Belmont Stakes. Skip hasn’t yet made it to the Breeders’ Cup but plans to get there eventually. Hank Russell is one of the ’99ers closest to the Gilman community. He is the linebackers’ coach of the MIAA-champion Greyhounds. He also

recently launched a new college sports recruiting website called SigningDay (www.signingday.com). Henry traveled to every Ravens playoff game including the Super Bowl with classmate Damien Davis. Henry is also in the Navy inactive reserves as a Lieutenant Commander. Chisom Opara is currently in Baltimore, but not for long. He is advancing within the Cleveland Browns organization, and work calls. After three years as the National Scout, he’s moving to Cleveland to become their assistant director of college scouting. Many classmates are doing cool things within shouting distance of Baltimore. Will Bartz had a big year both professionally and personally. He coached Indian Creek to its first-ever MIAA championship with a 49-46 hoops victory over St John’s Catholic Prep, and he was selected to coach the north for the Anne Arundel county senior all-star game. He also bought a house in Millersville to make room for William Theodore “Teddy” Bartz, born March 13. Karan Kamboh and his wife live a little farther south in Arlington, Va. The couple welcomed a little girl in April and also have a son who is nearly three. Karan has been a dentist practicing in NoVA since 2008, and his wife practices as an attorney in D.C. In his little spare time, Karan has been performing improv with a troupe regularly at the D.C. Improv and other area locations. David Ahn is nearby in D.C., working for former Congressman Dick Gephardt on a new venture, Gephardt Medley Government Advisors, to help investors better understand politics and policy. David's been reaping the value of the Gilman community while reconnecting with classmates Mark Bower and Bill Miller on business trips. Apaar Singh will celebrate his seventh anniversary with his wife, Jasmine, this June. They live in Kensington, Md., and Apaar works for UMCP’s Department of Public Safety (police) as the director of information systems. Apaar tries to attend a few Gilman football games every year.

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Justin Batoff ’03, Gerry Brewster ’75 and Jeremy Batoff ’05.

A handful of alums are in the Big Apple. Darryl Jordan continues to live the Gilman ideal of serving others and was ordained as a Pastor of Worship at the New Song Community Church in the Christian Reformed Church. Kenny Kang lives in N.Y.C. and in March launched a new hedge fund, Clearline Capital, with his portfolio manager. Blake Morrison is now in his ninth year with Lanx Management. Fellow Gilman alum Brian Goldman ’81 runs the firm. Blake notes he has no wife, engagement or kids just yet, but he encourages classmates to stay tuned. California is another hotspot for Greyhounds. David Lerner lives in Los Angeles and just finished a Ph.D. in critical studies at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts. He is now teaching film and television classes all over the area (at USC, Chapman University and Loyola Marymount University). David is also contemplating how to turn his dissertation into a book. He also married in October 2012 in Seattle, from where his wife hails. Evan Bedford continues to do freelance photography in Los Angeles and loves SoCal life. He is planning a trip to Brazil next year for the World Cup with college buddies, which has piqued the interest of several ’99 Greyhounds. He encourages anyone from the school to get in touch with him if they want to get after it in Sao Paulo; no word yet on his photograph publication policy for the trip. Fellow L.A. resident Michael Rogers just moved back to the City of Angels after a year in San Francisco. Mike is a sales rep for the start-up Ticketfly, which is the ticketing company for a lot of venues and events in Maryland like Preakness, Merriweather, 9:30 Club and Rams Head Live. Chris Hoffberger is also in the entertainment business. He founded AgencyDJs, a national booking agency specializing in corporate events and music supervision. In addition, Hoff works on various music production projects.

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Several classmates are in unique spots in the U.S. Ryan Ariano lives in Jackson Hole, Wyo., where he crushes backcountry powder daily. When Ryan’s not snowboarding, he works as a marketing coordinator. Ryan and his wife are expecting their first rugrat in September. Brian Lewis just had his second little girl in October. When he’s not building his softer side with the girls, Brian trains the country’s soldiers as a drill sergeant at Fort Benning. Jordan Clark lives in Nashville with Megan, his wife of 2.5 years. They are in a historic neighborhood on the east side of town with Enzo, their Italian greyhound, who wears a Gilman cape on the weekends. Jordan is a partner in a small general construction firm that focuses on new construction, additions and renovations, as well as on investment properties. He served as the president for the Middle Tennessee chapter of Home Builders in 2011. Jared Kohn and his wife are expecting their first child, a boy, in June. They live in Tampa where Jared is a general manager for a car dealership. Mrs. Kohn is the director of finance and student services for the University of Phoenix’s West Florida campus. Two alums sent updates from far abroad. Wes Michel lives in the mountains of Java doing translating/ editing work and studying the local languages. Albert Lee lives in Korea and recently quit his job at LG, where he worked on smartphones and smart TVs. Albert’s plan is to recover, then study for the GMAT and apply for business school in the fall. He intends on coming back stateside with his newlywed wife (married last June), ending his eight-year stay in Korea. Albert notes that he had a blast learning about his roots and living in one of the major tech meccas of the world, but he misses the stars and stripes.

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Lee Levitas ’03, Joey Roziner ’03, Anthony Triplin ’03 and Kyle Waters ’03 at their 10th Reunion. An unidentified hand points to Stan Feldman ’03 (left) and Z. Ross Fragapane ’03. Brannan Knott ’03, Alex Mazer ’03 and Alex Forbes ’03.

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Parting Words . . . In the minutes (literally) following John Schmick’s March 14, 2012, announcement that he would step down as Headmaster in June 2013, his inbox, and later his mailbox, filled with messages from the Gilman community near and far. “It is hard to believe that it has been 37 years since I walked into your classroom in the old lower school building as a fifth grader. To this day, I still remember fondly many of the lessons learned and experiences had. They bring back a huge smile.” Steve Susel ’84

“We, the community of Gilman alums, parents, and grandparents, greatly appreciate your service. Furthermore, we will miss your sensitive guidance.”

“I remember your guided hand, gentle disposition, warm demeanor and unending passion. Having had plenty of time to reflect on my Gilman days, it brings me great joy to say that you are an inspiration and tremendous example of everything good in education. As an alumnus, and one who has tried to give back a great deal to Gilman over the years, I admire and congratulate you on your hard work and unwavering dedication to your job.” Scott Kurlander ’87 “You are a prince of a guy and great representative to all that is Gilman . . . The respect people have for you is multi-generational.” Tee Winstead ’64 “I remember that when you were named permanent headmaster, I and fellow students celebrated. This is not the normal reaction of teenage boys. Headmasters are often made out as villains, but one of the reasons that my comrades and I respected you so much was that you always seemed to have our best interests at heart. You strived to make us better men, Gilman men.” Patrick Fise ’09

“From the first time I met Eddie Brown ’57 you for lunch as a young “One of the things that always impressed me the most eighth grader your love about Mr. Schmick is that he always made you feel like and passion for Gilman he was rooting for you to succeed.  To some he was a teacher or coach, to others a mentor, and to many, a and everyone connected to friend.  And in all those capacities, he always made you feel that he genuinely wanted to see you succeed and to it was palpable and it is reach your full potential.” Mac Williams ’04 something that certainly “Does this mean that you rubbed off on me. So will be able to play golf thank you for everything with Charlie Lang and me?” that you gave to me and Tom Beck ’64 that you gave to our school because it was indeed so “You will remain my great mentor, one of the most important figures in my life whether at Gilman, very much.” Daniel Hoffman ’11 post-graduation, and for all my days ahead. I am indebted to you for all you have taught me, all that you represent, and the role model that you continue to be. You are the Gilman Five.” Jack Cavanaugh ’87 “As they’d say here in Texas ‘You’ve done yourself and your school proud.’ Not exactly Mr. Lipscomb’s English, but I’m sure you get the point. Not only were you able to do what you really wanted to do, but the school was very fortunate to have you. Good show.” Dick Cunningham ’67

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“It was a privilege having you as a teacher, an administrator, and I have always been assured that Gilman was in good hands with you at the helm. Thank you for all your hard work and everything you have done for Gilman over the years.” Jeremy Pollock ’03

“You’ll be missed.” Scott Bartlett ’96

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contents

Editor Jodi Pluznik Director of Communications

Two Goals. One Gift.

Assistant Editors Karaline Jackson Graphic Designer Contributors Brooke Snyder Director of Marketing and Communications M. Kate Ratcliffe Director of Development Angie Brickhouse Director of Annual Giving Stephanie Felton Director of Development Services Mac Barrett ‘67 Alumni Special Projects Coordinator

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Alice Dearing P‘15 Director of Major Gift Operations and Stewardship Design Jeremy Hoffman

“My charitable gift annuity with Gilman enables me to donate a substantial tax-deductible charitable gift and use the income for a specific purpose while I still live.”

Establishing a charitable gift annuity with Gilman School allows Clarence S. “Butsy” Lovelace ’40, age 92, to accomplish two goals: to arrange a significant deferred gift for the School and, using his tax-free lifetime annuity payments, to help his granddaughter Leah purchase her first apartment in San Francisco. “Someday Leah may no longer need the money,” he says, “but Gilman always will.”

What are the advantages of a charitable gift annuity?

Printing Pavsner Press

• Receive dependable, fixed income for life in return for your gift.

Photography John Bowers David Cha ’13 Erik Kvalsvik ’73 Steve McDaniel ’65 Meir Pluznik David Rosenfeld Steve Ruark ’96 Cynosure Photographers

• In many cases, receive payments at a rate higher than the interest you are currently receiving from stocks, CDs, or savings accounts. • Receive an immediate income tax deduction for a portion of your gift.

Writing David Rosenfeld

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• A portion of your annuity payment will be tax-free.

The Gilman Bulletin is published by Gilman School, Baltimore, Maryland 21210. Gilman School welcomes students of any race, color, sexual orientation, and national or ethnic origin. gilman.edu facebook.com/GilmanSchool1897 twitter.com/GilmanSchool instagram.com/gilmanschool linkedin.com

Discover the benefits of giving wisely . . . Contact the Office of Planned Giving for more information. 410-323-7178

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summer 2013 Non-Profit u.s. postage

PAID Baltimore, md permit no. 3911

gilman school 5407 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 gilman.edu

gilman bulletin

gilman

Bulletin

a teacher on the trail Gilman teacher Jen Reiter is the 2014 Iditarod Teacher on the Trail.

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basketball makes a move The Greyhounds move to the MIAA “A” Conference in 2013–2014.

November 9, 2013 Featuring the

98th Gilman-McDonogh Football Classic at McDonogh

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Thanks, Mr. Schmick

34th annual bull roast & silent auction

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march 7, 2014

Alumni Reunion Weekend April 25-26, 2014

Classes celebrating reunions: 1964 · 1969 · 1974 · 1979 · 1984 · 1989 · 1994 · 1999 · 2004 · 2009 If you would like to volunteer with your reunion class committee, contact the Development Office at 410-323-7176 or memoreland@gilman.edu

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blue & gray day

Use your smartphone to scan the code below for an easy way to add these dates to your calendar.

Mark your calendar for Gilman’s 2013-2014 special events.

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Gilman Bulletin Summer 2013