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GIANFRANCO

COLANGELO


Gianfranco Colangelo Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture Preservation and Planning

Giancolangelo@gmail.com gc2456@columbia.edu 203-274-1966


Marshgate Post Olympic Urban Strategy Columbia University Advanced Studio VI Leslie Gill + Mike Jacobs Spring 2013

Seamscape Advanced Trade School Columbia University Advanced Studio V Lise Anne Couture Fall 2012

Reflexive Housing High Density Housing Solution Columbia University Core Studio III Douglas Gautier Fall 2011

Saunter Structure NYPL Branch Renovation Columbia University Core Studio II Robert Marino Spring 2011

Urban Labs Environmental Research Laboratory Columbia University Core Studio I Janette Kim Fall 2010

BK Modular Modular Pod Hotel Columbia University Arch. Technology VI David Wallance Fall 2012

Server-Farm Data-center Greenhouse Hybrid Columbia University Arch. Technology V Kevin Lichten Spring 2012

Midrise Manhattan Handbook Parametric Reuse Solution Columbia University Columbia Building Intelligence Project Scott Marble Spring 2012

Endless Project Reflections in the Form of Sketches Columbia University Personal Sketch Books Fall 2010-Spring 2013


Seamscape Advanced Trade School Project Type: Trade School Location: Queens, NYC Size: 60,000 sqft Advanced Studio VI Leslie Gill + Mike Jacobs


The program of the Advanced Trade School is based on the premise that the production and distribution of local craft is once again relevant because of its democratization by technology. In the architecture, seaming is used as a formal strategy that operates first on an urban level as the school is sited in such a way that preserves existing street walls. The diagonal seam of the park constitutes the form of the building and the two can be said to be seamed together formally. On a tectonic level the seam is expressed spatially and structurally. The use of color is treated as a seam that mediates the relation between interior and exterior by facilitating or mitigating visual continuity.


Marshgate Post Olympic Urban Strategy Project Type: Urban Reuse/ Revitalization Location: East London Size: 12.41 km2 Advanced Studio V Lise Anne Couture


Marshgate is an urban design proposal that is highly responsive to the diverse contexts to London’s 2012 Olympic site. The strategy not only integrates historical aspects of the site, such as the presence of Hackney Marsh and Industrial use, but transforms the existing Olympic venues and infrastructure rather than removing them. Urban bridges were deployed to traverse the complex of rivers and unite key nodes in the boroughs surrounding the Olympic site. These bridges undergo typological transformations as they encounter unique conditions. By using bridging as a strategy for the transformation of different urban enclaves and Olympic venues, a wide variety of disjunct elements could be joined. Additionally much of the marsh that was covered by the Olympic site could be reinstated as it is a key element in the historical character, culture and memory of the surrounding boroughs.


Blossom: Occours upoin intersection with topography and as a contextual response to the Olympic Vilage

Appendage: Merges the bridge with the doubly curved roof of the velodrome.

Cocoon: Operator: Bridges transform structures upon intersection

Occurs around structural supports to accomodate a public school program.

Alluvial Fan: The form of the fan adapts itself to the unique urban conditions of Hackney Wick.


Standard Condition:

typical spanning method Typical Span: Standard form for spanning

Cocoon:

long Span, accommodates programs Bulging occurs to accomodate larger programs

Operator:

Operator:

bridges transform structures upon intersection

Bridges transform structures upon intersection

Cocoon:

Blossom:

Blossom:

bridges orient vertically upon intersection with topography

Bridges burrow and orient vertically upon intersection wi


Appendage:

joins adjacent structures Appendage: Appendage: Appenages links bridges with adjacent structures Appenages links bridges with adjacent structures

Alluvial Fan:

fanning occurs to adapt bridges to urban fabrics

Alluvial Alluvial Fan:Fan:

tion with topography Fanning occSurs to adapt bridges unique into urban fabrics ith topography Fanning occSurs to adapt bridges unique into urban fabrics


Reflexive Housing High Density Housing Solution Project Type: Affordable Housing / Mixed Use Location: Harlem, NYC Size: 172,000 sqft Core Studio III Douglas Gautier


Reflexive Housing is a high density housing proposal that also accommodates commercial and civic programs. The primary objective was to achieve the maximum number of units while maintaining the highest standards of living for the occupants. It was imperative that each unit had at least sixty feet of light and air in the courtyards which is twice the required amount. The building’s engagement with the urban context and the relationship of the residential program with the commercial and civic programs were also key factors in the design. The comb like shape of this project was strategic as it places the spine along 125th street while the teeth point southwards. The form of the spine which is tall and wall-like is appropriate for 125th as it is an extremely wide, highly active and urban axis. The teeth and courtyards are an adaptation to 124th street which is residential neighborhood and smaller in scale. The courtyard structure is splayed to provide light and circulation for the retail and civic programs below.


Plan at street level showing grocery, retail live work, and school

Plan at courtyard level showing communal spaces, school and townhouses


Duplex Units

Typical Floor Type-2 (Duplex Upper Levels)

Typical Floor Type 1

Standard Units


Saunter Structure NYPL Branch Renovation Project Type: Library/ Renovation Location: Mid-Town Manhattan Size: 12.41 km2 Core Studio II Robert Marino


The spatial organization of this library facilitates sauntering, the free and fluid movement throughout a variegated sequences of spaces. Sauntering is a function that is particularly important in a library as it often results in chance encounters with books the user did not set out to find. The idea emerged from the need to mitigate the disruptive effect of repeated floor slabs on vertical circulation. The structural system employed consists of three structural cores that are laterally stabilized by two Vierendeel trusses. It was designed to carry the load of the new structure as the existing library could not accommodate additional weight. The lower truss carries the weight of the base portion of the addition while upper portion of the addition is hung from the highest truss. The base is thus articulated as a block or a heavy mass while the upper hanging portion is light and diaphanous. This system results in a dramatic columnless intermediate space that was used for the main reading room.


Plan at courtyard level showing communal spaces, school and townhouses


FLOOR 6

F L O O R 15

F L O O R 3-5

F L O O R 11

FLOOR 2

FLOOR 9

Lower Floors GROUND

FLOOR 7


FLOOR 6

F L O O R 15

F L O O R 3-5

F L O O R 11

FLOOR 2

FLOOR 9

Upper Floors GROUND

FLOOR 7


Worms Eye-Cutaway Plan Oblique


Urban Labs Environmental Research Laboratory Project Type: Laboratory Location: Peck Slip, Downtown NYC Size: 42,000 ft2 Core Studio 1 Janette Kim


The architecture of this environmental laboratory employs the use of visual obscurity, which is critical of the implications of truth, honesty, and rationality produced by transparency. It is based on the premise that apprehension equals apprehension, or that the fear and uncertainty produced by the effect of obscurity may lead to public inquiry into the world of science leading to a better understanding of it. Obscurity also expresses the inherent uncertainty of scientific practices, the potential danger of its discoveries, as well as its preexisting opacity to the public, it therefore provides a truthful image of the laboratory rather than hiding it behind the guise of transparency.


5th Floor dry labs

4th floor wet labs

2nd and 3rd floor data-center, computer lab and lecture area

Ground floor public plaza

Basement lab storage and cafe


BK Modular Modular Pod Hotel Project Type: Pod Hotel Location: Brooklyn, NY Size: 75,000 ft2 Architectural Technology VI David Wallance In collaboration with Steve Chou


The Brooklyn Modular pod hotel explores how modular construction can be used to produce innovative and expressive architecture. The alternation of the module is controlled in such a way that a gradient is produced on the facade that reflects the buildings proximity to the Gowanus Canal. The staggered facade pattern also produces variation and depth and is reflective of the different pods with in. A truss was build into each modular unit that accommodate and express cascading load-path created by the alternation of the units.


Axonometric of a single unit


Server-Farm Data-center Greenhouse Hybrid Project Type: Data-center and Greenhouse Location: Bronx, NYC Size: 90,000 ft2 Architectural Technology V Kevin Lichten In collaboration with Scott Barnholdt, Jeff Shiozaki and Phillip Crupi


The Server-Farm is a technical project that tests the unlikely combination of a green house and a data-center. The primary focus of this project was maintaining a reciprocity between the programs while creating a solid barrier between the two as the environmental autonomy of the data-data center is crucial. The green house uses heat generated by the data center in colder seasons and acts as a ventilation shaft for the building in warmer seasons.


Site Plan


Typical Plan + Reflected Ceiling Plan


Typical Section


Section through communal space


Greenhouse structural view


Cleavis detail view


Mechanical Line Diagram


Midrise Manhattan Handbook Parametric Reuse Solution Project Type: Parametric Resarch Location: Manhattan District 5D Size: N/A Studio IV Scott Marble, Laura Kurgan, David Benjamin In collaboration with Caroline LeBar, Jenna Miller and Robert Cox


The Midrise Manhattan Handbook was a sixty-page document produced for the Columbia Building Intelligence Project (C-BIP). It displays a parametric design tool that was created with three others that generated unique massing outputs that were suited to mid-rise residential buildings of C4-5D zoning districts. The tool was used to generate a multitude of massings based on varing inputs, and the resultant masses were scored based on a number of output parameters such as self shading, surface area to volume ratio, floor area, and a view factor. The tool represents an iterative design process where selection of a final form is based on and objective criteria and a process that is metrically oriented.


Endless Project Reflections in the Form of Sketches Columbia University Personal Sketch Books Fall 2010-Spring 2013



Colangelo Portfolio 2013