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Synopsis of the Design Process, Master Plan & Conceptual Design

G E T T L I F F E A R C H I T ECT U R E


Table of Contents:

1. Introduction

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2. Site Description

3-4

3. Programming

5-8

4. Organigram

9-10

5. Master Planning

11-15

6. Concept Design

16-25

7. Special Use Submittal

26-38

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1. Introduction

“We believe the making of art takes artists into the moment where they are held in perfect awareness providing joy and purpose to sustain them in their daily lives. We will provide the resources and educational opportunities that allow that magic to happen.� - The East Side Art Institute

This booklet is a summary of the journey that we, the team members of Gettliffe Architecture, have taken in collaboration with the board members and artists of the East Side Art Institute on our way to developing a preliminary Master Plan and Conceptual Design for this inspiring vision. What follows is mostly self-explanatory, but we would like to preface it with the mission and vision statement of the East Side Art Institute:

East Side Art Institute Mission Statement: To provide extraordinary art-based education, experiences and opportunities that encourage self-expression and inspire community through creative exploration. East Side Art Institute Vision Statement: To be a focal point for the arts, where artists, educators, community leaders, and philanthropists work together to provide unique opportunities and support for people of all ages and abilities to discover and pursue their passion for creative expression.

It has been our privilege to participate in these first steps of fleshing out the above vision.

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2. Site

10500 Isabelle Road, Lafayette CO 80026

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The East Side Art Institute site (under contract) is a 14.25 acre property on Isabelle Rd. The site is located east of Boulder and close to major highway 287, with nearby access to an RTD bus stop and bike paths, allowing easy access for residents of neighboring communities such as Longmont, Westminster, Lafayette, Gunbarrel, Erie and Louisville.

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Some Significant Site Features: 1. The north half of the site adjacent to Isabelle Road is more visible, offering the most public view of the site. A line of trees to the east and center creates a windbreak and a clear distinction between the north and south sides of the site.

3. The site has several smaller meadows defined by trees; 4. From the center of the site looking to the southeast, a metal shed and off-site trees create a visual buffer in the direction of the highway. The viewer is slightly elevated while looking over this pastoral scene;

ISABELLE ROAD

2. The segment along Botany Lane has a series of low tree hedges interspersed with openings. While the hedges provide a visual buffer and privacy from the industry and farmhouse on the other side of Botany Lane, the openings offer the primary access points to the site. From east of these hedges looking west, there are some views of the mountains filtered through the trees.

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5. There is a concrete pad on the north side of the site that will be kept and adapted as a modified feature of the project. Site constraints include a limitation on enclosed square footage of 15,000 s.f., and an elevation requirement due to the site’s location in a designated flood plain.

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BOTANY LANE

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3. Programming

The ESAI group met for a brainstorming session with the Gettliffe Architecture team to begin to bring into focus a fuller vision of the Institute. Together we imagined and explored this vision in its emotional, relational and technical aspects, giving voice as well to the hopes and concerns of ESAI representatives. Out of this process, a number of themes emerged, as well as a list of functions or spaces to be included. Following are some of the themes and functions that emerged from this and other communication processes:

ESAI Vision, Emotional, Relational, Technical, & Hopes & Concerns brainstorming board

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Some ESAI Programmatic Themes and Functions: Education as a Primary Mission: -A Multi-Faceted Educational Venue; -Art classes for adults, children, special needs and disabled persons in ceramics, sculpture, painting & drawing, woodworking, metalworking; -Visiting artists in residence, lectures and seminars, career mentoring. -Arts certificate programs, course credit offered through educational affiliations;

Community Connection and Support: -Experiential access to the Arts for the larger community…. -through education, including learning and practice opportunities; -a venue for community events and meetings; -connecting attendees with art through indoor & outdoor galleries and the Art Commons; -Supporting and Connecting the Artistic Community…. -through affordable and inspiring art creation facilities for students and new artists; -through spaces for the display of art to visiting community members; -by bringing artists from various disciplines together.

Encouraging Creativity: A central theme that emerged was the promotion of “cross-pollination” and mutual inspiration by bringing artists together from different disciplines. A vision for the Institute is that it will become a place where artists share their ideas with one another, and even collaborate on their art. At the same time it will offer artists opportunities to enrich their art by providing access to media outside their current discipline. Discussions and brainstorming with ESAI artist members brought out some dichotomies inherent in the creative process. One is the need for an open, stimulating environment to allow artistic expression to emerge organically from something akin to chaos, and at the same time, the need for clarity in the environment so that artists are not battling with or distracted by clutter or disorder. Phrased somewhat differently, this could also be seen as expansiveness and collaboration on the one hand, versus a more internal focus and peace on the other. Beyond these services to artists, a key mission of the Institute will be to encourage the creative expression of people of all ages and abilities within the surrounding communities.

Connecting Artists to the Natural Environment: Providing artists with a creative venue that is in touch with the outdoors and the rhythms of nature.

Institute Design as an Articulation of Institute Principles: The Institute master planning and architectural design should reflect the vision and goals of the Institute, including through a flexible design that allows for continued creative evolution or reinvention in response to the explorations and experiences of the users.

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CERAMICS

Functional Program:

SCULPTURE

PAINTING & DRAWING

Relational Aspects:

Relational Aspects:

- Connection to Woodworking - Connection to Metalworking - Connection to Jewelery - Connection to Sculpture Garden - Connection to Ceramics

- Connection to Nature - Connection to Ceramics - Connection to Printmaking

Design Aspects:

- Indirect natural light - Natural ventilation - Dry vs. Wet space - Quiet Space

1. Classroom

- 15 Wheels and Tables - Hand Builders Table - Slip Wheels - Demonstration Space

2. Ceramics Studio

Relational Aspects:

- Wheels and Tables - Hand Builders Tables - Slip Wheels

- Interconnectivity of program - Open to collaborative spaces - Secluded focus areas - Open to the environment -Separate from dry mediums

3. Storage

Design Aspects:

4. Studio

- Indirect natural light - Natural ventilation - Protection from wind - Dry vs. Wet space - Public vs. Private

Ceramics Life-cycle: 1. Receiving Clay 2. Move/Wedge Clay 3. Throw/Hand Build 4. Wet Storage 5. Finish Piece 6. Fire 7. Glaze 8.Fire

- In Process - Finished Ware - Shelving - Tools & Equipment

- Work Table - Wheel - Storage - Private Space

5. Clay Storage - Wet Storage - Dry Storage - Recycling -Slab Roller

6. Glazes

- 8 Wheels and Tables - Chemical Storage - Glaze Making - Ware Racks

7. Kiln

(Each square represents 50 square feet)

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- Bisque Kiln - Gas Kiln - Salt Kiln - Woodfire - Raku - Stokers Cottage

- Indirect natural light - Natural ventilation - Dry vs. Wet space - Collaborative spaces

Sculpture Life-cycle: 1. Idea 2. Material Selection 3. Mock-Up 4. Carve/Model/Assemble 5. Finishes

Functional Program: 1. Classroom

- Workspace - Material Storage - Tool Storage - Flexible for Fiber Mediums - Flexible for Glass Mediums

2. Studio

- Work Table - Wheel - Storage - Private Space

Design Aspects:

Painting Life-cycle: 1. Idea 2. Medium Selection 3. Palette Selection 4. Painting/Drawing 5. Finish Touches

Functional Program: 1. Classroom

- Art Easels - Drawing/Painting Supplies - Wash Stations

2. Printmaking - Work Table - Equipment - Tools - Materials

3. Studio

- Work Space - Storage - Private Space

“A space where the artist and student can be exposed to all of the world to solve their problems, keeping in mind that there is not just one way to do something.�


METALWORKING

WOODWORKING

Functional Program:

Functional Program: 1. Machine Space

Relational Aspects: - Connected to Sculpture - Connected to Metalworking - Connected to Jewelery - Separation from “Wet” spaces - Envrionmental connection - Separate from “Quiet” mediums

Design Aspects:

2. Fabrication

- (4) 4’x8’ Work Tables - Wheel - Tool Storage - Work In-Progress Storage

- Natural light - Natural ventilation - Dust free zone - Low maintenance finishes

Metalworking Life-cycle:

- Wood Storage - Tool Storage

1. Idea 2. Material Selection 3. Machine Working 4. Assembly & Welding 5. Grinding & Sandblasting 6. Finish Coatings

5. Studio

- Work Table - Tool Storage - Material Storage - Private Space

- Connection to all aspects of the program - Core of the school - Opportunities for conversation - Connection to the environment

Design Aspects: - Natural light - Natural ventilation - Open and inviting - Opportunities for growth

- Metal Working Machinery - Welding Stations - Fabrication Table - Safety Equipment

2. Storage

- Large Material Storage - Bar Stock - Equipment Storage

3. Sandblasting

- Sand - Sandblasting Equipment

4. Studio

4. Storage

Relational Aspects:

SUPPORTING FUNCTIONS

Design Aspects:

- Spray Equipment - Ceiling Rails for Hanging - Ventilation

Woodworking Life-cycle: 1. Idea 2. Material Selection 3. Machine Working 4. Assembly 5. Sand/Finish Product 6. Finish Coatings

- Connection to Sculpture - Connection to Woodworking - Connection to Jewelery - Separate from “Quiet” mediums

3. Spray Booth

- Natural light - Natural ventilation - Clear areas for large machines - Separation of dusty areas from finished products

1. Machine Space

Relational Aspects:

- Wood Working Machinery - Dust Collection - Safety Equipment - CNC - Work Tables

“The collaborative nature of art should be encouraged by showing how various mediums can contribute to the creative process.”

- Work Table - Tool Storage - Material Storage - Private Space

5. Jewelery

- Work Tables - Soldering - Material Storage

Functional Program: 1. Reception & Admin.

3. Café & Kitchen

2. Gallery

4. Library & Shop

- Reception Desk - Administration Offices - Filing - Gallery for Student and Professional Work - Reception Area

- Kitchen & Prep Area - Seating Area - Refrigeration - Library - Art Supplies Shop - Bookstore - Storage

5. Caretaker

- Property Caretaker - Bedroom Suite - Kitchen - Storage

6. Maintenance

- Property Maintenance Equip. - School Maintenance Equip.

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4. Organigram

The development of the design continued with numerous visits to the site on Isabelle Road by members of the Gettliffe Architecture team, in order to gain a sense of place and how the natural environment could relate to and enhance the unique setting that was beginning to emerge from the program. We also began to analyze how the various functions might be distributed on the site. The northernmost opening in the Botany Lane hedgerow was identified as the entrance to the Institute. The interaction and collaboration with the ESAI members continued. Together we visited art facilities of the CU Visual Art Complex and Front Range Community College’s Longmont campus. We discussed what we saw and the possible implications for the East Side Art Institute, sharing more ideas and inspiration.

FRCC Campus

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CU Visual Art Complex

CU Visual Art Complex

Gettliffe Architecture Studio


BOTANY LANE

Creating the Organigram:

GARDENS

GARDENS STOR. FACULTY STUDIO

PARKING CARETAKER & MAINT.

S.B.

STUDIO

PARKING

METALWORKING

RECEPTION & ADMIN

STUDIO

B.R.

JEWELRY

CAFÉ & KITCHEN

EAST SIDE ART INSTITUE

ART CLASS

SPRAY

EXTERIOR WORKSPACE

GARDENS

GALLERY

B.R.

STUDIO

STUDIO

WOODWORKING

LIBRARY & SHOP

B.R.

STOR. STUDIO

FACULTY STUDIO

FACULTY STUDIO

SCULPTURE CLASS

FIBER

EXTERIOR COLLABORATIVE WORKSPACE

KILN

SAND BLASING

FACULTY STUDIO

METAL WORKING

S

CAFE

CERAMICS STUDIO

RR

S CNC

PRINT MAKING

COVERED OUTDOOR KILN

GLAZE

STOR.

EXTERIOR GALLERY/EVENTS

FACULTY STUDIO

CERAMICS CLASS

GLASS

BOTANY LANE METAL STORAGE

PAINTING DRAWING CLASS

STUDIO B.R.

FABRICATION

FS

ISABELLE ROAD

Further analysis of the program was followed by quantifying the various functions, determining appropriate square footages and overall massing. These were translated into an organizational diagram or “Organigram” showing the different functions in terms of relative size and how their respective spaces would relate to one another.

RR WOOD SHOP

FS S

STORAGE

GALLERY

BASIC SCULP

ADVANCED SCULP

S

PAINTING DRAWING

RR BASIC CERAM.

FS

S S

S ADVANCED CERAMICS

FS

GLAZE

MATERIAL STORAGE ELECTRIC KILN

FS

RR

PAINTING DRAWING

ISABELLE ROAD

S

STUDIO

STUDIO

EXTERIOR WORKSPACE

The entrance to the site is from northwest of the Institute, from Botany Lane. Here the site photo is rotated to show Botany lane at the top; Isabelle Road to the north appears on the right.

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5. Master Planning After reviewing and refining the Organigram with the ESAI team, the schematic exploration of the project was deepened through the use of “mind maps,� schematic representations of various project themes including indoor/outdoor connections, art activity characteristics, the creative process, the community/individual dichotomy, and more. From here, the Master Plan began to emerge.

community/individual dichotomy

indoor/outdoor connection

section - Art Commons

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experience: mental/feeling

characteristics of activities

masterplan development

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Central Concept: The heart of the Institute is the Art Commons, a central, unifying architectural structure from which other spaces and structures radiate. Its entrance is to the northwest, as is the main access to the site, including parking and the drop-off area. The approach to the building is adjacent to a sloped “blank canvas” rectangular space that will be used in a variety of ways to express the evolving life and experiences happening at the Institute. The Art Commons itself is also designed to be used flexibly to accommodate the needs and creative processes of its users. Creating Connection: The Art Commons is a gathering center that also houses a number of functions, including the café, shop, library, gallery, reception and administrative services. Well-defined classroom spaces are located at its periphery. As the “hub” of the Institute, the Art Commons is designed to facilitate connection and exchange between artists, students, and the community.

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Metalworking, Woodworking: These buildings will be modular designs and will re-utilize the 50’ steel structure that already exists on the site. Large open covered work areas on the north side face back to the Art Commons. These spaces offer opportunities for collaboration and interaction between artists using different media. The south side of the structures will admit direct sun, and will include storage areas and access for loading and unloading. The structures will be nestled within the existing trees for shade and connection to the natural setting. Ceramics Studio: To the east of the Art Commons, a large circular structure houses the Ceramics Studio. An extensive overhang surrounding the structure offers exterior workspaces and a connection to the site. A clerestory allows natural indirect light to permeate the interior. The circular interior follows the ceramics process from the receiving of clay, to the forming of the piece, to the bisque kiln, to the glaze process, and finally to the kiln yard. Event Space / Sculpture Garden: Between the Art Commons and Ceramics Studio, stair steps create a small outdoor amphitheater facing the partially planted esplanade to the north, recreated as sculpture garden, event space, and casual gathering area.

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Art Garden: South of the Art Commons, a garden-like environment is defined by the caretaker’s unit, the Metalworking Workshop at its southern end, and a covered walkway leading to the Metalworking and Woodworking spaces. Outdoor Rooms: The enclosed square footage constraint and the desire for connection to the natural environment led to an emphasis on the creation of outdoor rooms. These include many covered spaces where artists can work or students can learn in a protected open air environment. There are also multiple larger distinct outdoor areas such as the Art Garden, the southeast field, the esplanade, and the “blank canvas” area by the entry. Creative Gradient: The Institute will offer a social gradient of spaces, allowing artists to adjust their location to meet the needs of their creative process at any given moment. These will range from the community-oriented Art Commons, to classrooms, to workshop/studios, to 4 small retreat studios for quiet focused time in a more isolated natural setting.

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6. Concept Design

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0’

20’

50’

100’

The use of 3-dimensional Sketchup modeling facilitated the evolution of the Conceptual Design. It allowed the ESAI team to better visualize the spaces and see the design come to life, an important step forward in our continued refining of the design in collaboration with the ESAI team.

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Masterplan perspective

southwest view from Isabelle Road

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south view from Isabelle Road

west view from service road


Northwest birds eye view

cafe outdoor area/mezzanine/path between Art Commons and Ceramics

Art Commons - drawing studio/cafe outdoor area

Art Commons - Entrance

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Art Commons

Art Commons - lobby

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Art Commons - store

Art Commons - gallery

Art Commons - cafe


Esplanade

view from Esplanade

view of Esplanade from Ampitheater

view from Esplanade facing Ceramics and Art Commons

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Ceramics

Retreat Studio #1

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gas kilns

Ceramic’s workspace

Ceramic’s workspace

Ceramic’s classroom


Southeast Field

Art Commons view from southeast field

Art Commons view from Woodworking path

southeast field view from Art Commons

Retreat Studio #2

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Woodworking

Retreat Studio #3

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Woodworking Classroom

path/work space between Woodworking

loading area for Woodworking & Metalworking classrooms


Metalworking

exterior working space for Woodworking & Metalworking classrooms

Metalworking classroom

Retreat Studio #4

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Art Garden

Caretaker’s Unit

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Art Garden view from Art Commons

Art Garden view from Metalworking


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G E T T L I F F E A R C H I T ECT U R E East Side Art Institute P. O. Box 44 Erie, CO 80516 info@eastsideartinstitute.org (303)828-3220

3014 Bluff St., Unit 101 Boulder, Colorado 80301 Km 12.8 Carretera Masaya Managua, Nicaragua usa. 303.449.9155 nic. 505.2279.8062 www.gettliffe.com info@gettliffe.com

Š Copyright 2018 Gettliffe Architecture: All Rights Reserved

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East Side Art Institute  

The East Side Art Institute, located on the eastern side of Boulder, will support a vibrant community of artists (both emerging and establis...

East Side Art Institute  

The East Side Art Institute, located on the eastern side of Boulder, will support a vibrant community of artists (both emerging and establis...

Profile for gettliffe
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