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K

through GERMANTOWN

LIFE FRIENDS

SCHOOL


K

through VIEWBOOK

LIFE


CONTENTS

3

INTRODUCTION

5

HISTORY & MISSION

9

LOWER SCHOOL

12

MIDDLE SCHOOL

16

UPPER SCHOOL

22

T H E P I L L A R S O F A Q U A K E R E D U C AT I O N

24

AT H L E T I C S & P H Y S I C A L E D U C AT I O N

28

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

33

R E L AT I O N S H I P S , E Q U A L I T Y & C O M M U N I T Y

37

COLLEGE & BEYOND


LEARNING IS FOR LIFE. This idea is at the heart of Ger mantown Friends School. We v i e w t h e y e a r s f r o m K i n d e r g a r t e n t h r o u g h t w e l f t h grade as just one chapter in a long adventure—a lear ning adventure that is one of the great foundations of life. Our sense of the power and value of education defines o u r d a i l y w o r k . We t e a c h o u r s t u d e n t s t h a t t h e w o r l d i s theirs to experience, to understand, to create—and to change. It’s a lesson they lear n well. So we invite you: Come explore.

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HISTORY & MISSION

ETHAN G R A D E 1 2 In his favorite Spanish classroom


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L E AV E

Untold NO STORY

HISTORY & MISSION

WHEN YOU BEGIN WITH THE BELIEF that each person has a unique

inner light, great things can happen. At GFS, we discover and n u r t u r e a m u l t i t u d e o f h i d d e n t a l e n t s . We t e a c h e a c h c h i l d t o s p e a k h i s o r h e r m i n d , a n d m a k e s u r e e v e r y v o i c e i s h e a r d . We b e l i e v e community is built on a foundation of mutual respect.

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HISTORY & MISSION

The Ger mantown Friends School mission begins

MISSION

with a commitment to diversity, to our neighborhood and to th e c i t y , and t o t h e be l i e f t h at ac ade m i c achievement is not in itself enough. We must guide

GERMANTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL IS

our students’ gr owth in mind, body and spirit. And we must put our ideas to work in the world.1 This i s a les s on o u r st u de nt s t ak e t o h e art — at G F S ,

D E D I C AT E D T O R E A C H I N G T H AT O F G O D IN EVERY PERSON. OUR MISSION IS TO

and long after they have graduated.

S E E K T R U T H , C H A L L E N G E T H E I N T E L L E C T, We h a v e d e e p r o o t s i n G e r m a n t o w n . F o r 3 0 0 years, Quakers have worshipped here, and since

HONOR DIFFERENCES, EMBRACE THE

1845, our school has thrived under the care of the Ger mantown Monthly Meeting.

We a r e f o r t u n a t e t o b e p a r t o f t h i s m u l t i c u l t u r a l community. Our neighborhood is fertile ground for lear ning, exchange and dialogue about history, class, race and the humanity of all people.

At GFS, our focus is on the now—and on the futur e. But centuries past do matter, and we ar e infor med by tradition. In finding our way forwar d, our long history and clear mission pr ovide a gr eat sour ce of str ength and dir ection.

1 A traditional Quaker saying expr esses this thought beautifully and succinctly: “Let your life speak!”

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C I T Y, A N D N U R T U R E E A C H S T U D E N T ’ S M I N D , B O D Y A N D S P I R I T.


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FA S T FA C T S

I D E N T I T Y : A Q U A K E R , C O E D U C A T I O N A L D AY S C H O O L , F O U N D E D I N 1 8 4 5 , L O C AT E D I N T H E H I S T O R I C G E R M A N T O W N N E I G H B O R H O O D OF NORTHWEST PHILADELPHIA

CAMPUS: SEVEN ACRES IN THE HEART OF GERMANTOWN, REFLECTING $36 MILLION IN NEW BUILDING OVER TEN YEARS, WITH 14 ACRES O F A T H L E T I C S F I E L D S A M I L E AWAY

DIVERSITY: 31 PERCENT STUDENTS OF COLOR

F I N A N C I A L A I D : AWA R D E D T O 3 0 P E R C E N T O F S T U D E N T S , INCLUDING 20 COMMUNITY SCHOLARS PER YEAR

SCHOOL ENDOWMENT: $27 MILLION

N A T I O N A L M E R I T S C H O L A R S : O N AV E R A G E , 1 2 S T U D E N T S P E R Y E A R A R E R E C O G N I Z E D A S N AT I O N A L M E R I T F I N A L I S T S

C O L L E G E P L A C E M E N T : 1 0 0 P E R C E N T O F G R A D U AT E S AT T E N D FOUR-YEAR COLLEGES

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LOWER SCHOOL

LUCA, JORDAN, LEAH, JOSHUA AND SOPHIE THE BOA CONSTRICTOR G R A D E 2 Lab Experiment Day


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Little HUMAN

RESOURCES L O W E R S C H O O L – K through 5

WE THINK OF THEM AS YOUNG LEARNERS, but they’re also authors

and illustrators. And mathematical acrobats, agile and inventive. Even scientists—experts on the fossil record, or nithology and the migration of Pacific salmon. Students in our Lower School are world explorers and time travelers, transporting themselves to China or Africa, Colonial America or Medieval Europe. At GFS, the elementary years are truly wondrous, and we provide our youngest students with every opportunity to make the most of them.

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LOWER SCHOOL

Our curriculum is defined by its richness and depth. When our students explore ancient Greece, it is a yearlong experience of immersion. They study politics, commer ce and dramatic arts, and the pottery of early, middle and late periods. They make Tr ojan horses in woodshop, sew chitons for Gr eek games and travel to New York’s Metr opolitan Museum of Art to behold its H el l en i s ti c tr ea s u r es . T h e r es u l t i s a w eb o f me aningfu l connections—and a sense of mastery.

It is this same mastery childr en find in art, as they study Mondrian or Picasso; in math, as they lear n not only to solve a pr oblem thr ough a pr escribed s et of s tep s , b u t to s ee i t f r om ev er y a n g l e and

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ins ide-o u t ; o r i n l angu age art s, as t h e y b ec om e

They ar e nurturing emotional intelligence thr ough

active and critical r eaders, equipped with strategies

Feedback, 2 a pr ogram pioneer ed at GFS to pr ovide

to engage ever mor e challenging works.

a safe structure for sharing feelings. They are for ming

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s p ec i a l c on n ec ti on s th r ou g h ou r Pa r tn er s p r o gr am, GFS of f e rs an ac ade mi c pr o gram t h at i s th or ou g h l y

which pairs older students with younger ones. They

developmentally appr opriate, highly ambitious a n d

a r e m em b er s a n d a c ti v e p a r ti c i p a n ts i n w a r m,

well bal anc e d. Mu si c , art , l angu age , t e c h n ol og y ,

welcoming classroom communities—and an

library and physical education ar e also substantive

integral part of the lar ger school community as

par ts of e ac h st u de nt ’ s l i fe i n e v e ry gra d e. C oc u r r i c -

well. They ar e lear ning to be peacemakers.

ular opt i o ns o f fe r e v e n mo r e o ppo rt u ni ti es : to s tu d y Chinese after school, to take an instrument or play in

The Lower School provides an outstanding preparation

the or chestra or jazz ensemble, to car e for classr oom

for the years ahead. But befor e looking forwar d, it is

animals or join the Math Club.

an experience to be cherished in itself.

Howeve r, si mpl y i t e mi zi ng t h e se o ppo rt u n i ti es

2 D e v e l o p e d a t G F S i n t h e e a r l y ’ 9 0 s , t h e F e e d back program, which enhances social respect,

fails to captur e the essence of Lower School: the joy. While mastering academic skills, the students

kindness and community cohesion, has been adopted by many schools nationwide.

ar e also making friendships and partnerships.

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MIDDLE SCHOOL

LEARNING

Fly TO

M I D D L E S C H O O L – G R A D E S 6 through 8

IT’S TIME TO STEP INTO THE WORLD of abstract thinking—connecting

ideas in new ways. It’s time to leap ahead in maturity—interacting with friends and adults in new, more meaningful ways as well. It’s time to make some of life’s most important discoveries about the kind of person you want to be. Often Middle School is characterized m e r e l y a s t h e t r a n s i t i o n b e t w e e n t h e l o w e r a n d u p p e r g r a d e s . Ye s , Middle School is transitional, but these are thrilling transitions.

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B E N , S E Q U O YA H , L E A H , C AT E A N D C O R I N N E G R A D E 6 Hanging out in a favorite reading nook


MIDDLE SCHOOL

The GFS Middle School program immerses students i n gr ades 6-8 i n a st i mu l at i ng and c h al l e ngin g intellectual envir onment. Students explor e works of literatur e connected thematically to each other, and to les s ons i n h i st o ry . Th e y t ak e o n r e se a r c h pr ojects working with primary sour ces and master new mathematical challenges, preparing for either Algebr a or A dv anc e d A l ge bra i n e i gh t h gra d e. They devise original envir onmental-based experiments for Science Night 3 or investigate marine biomes ar ound the world—and build extensive websites sharing their work. Along with English, h i s tory, m at h and sc i e nc e , t h e y no w c h o o se to study Fr ench, Spanish or Latin.

HIGHLIGHTS & TRADITIONS Outside the classr oom, opportunities expand as well. Students take on leadership roles in student gover nment,

CLUBS AND ACTIVITIES: REGULAR OFFERINGS,

in or ganizing food drives and planning dances, and

INCLUDING GRAFFITI, THE LITERARY MAGAZINE,

in a n ev er- c h a n g i n g v a r i ety of m i x ed - g r a d e clubs

A N D E N V I R O N M E N TA L A C T I O N C L U B * , P L U S S T U D E N T -

and activities—fr om MathCounts and Improv Club to

LAUNCHED GROUPS, SUCH AS JUGGLING CLUB, KNITTING GROUP AND BRITISH COMEDY CLUB

Yea r b ook a n d A C a p p el l a . M i d d l e S c h ool er s al so participate in weekly, grade-wide activities for Pr oject

MULTI-NIGHT CAMPING TRIPS: SPENDING TIME WITH

T i m e, w h i c h a l l ow th em to ex p l or e i n ter est s suc h as

C L A S S M A T E S , AWAY F R O M S C H O O L , I S T H E U L T I M A T E

woodshop, computers and drama, with one community

BONDING EXPERIENCE AND THE SOURCE OF TREASURED MEMORIES FOR YEARS TO COME

action-based pr oject and a Quakerism course r equir ed in seventh grade. Interscholastic sp o rts n ow b e c o me

EIGHTH-GRADE MUSICAL: A CHANCE FOR EVERYONE

a part of each student’s experience through a program

T O TA K E PA R T, W H E T H E R S I N G I N G , D A N C I N G , S E R V I N G

th a t i n v ol v es a n d s u p p or ts a th l etes a t ev er y l e ve l .

AS EMCEE OR WORKING BEHIND THE SCENES

EXCHANGE PROGRAMS: A MONTH-LONG EXPERIENCE WITH ST. GEORGE’S SCHOOL FOR GIRLS IN EDINBURGH; ONE-WEEK EXPERIENCES WITH SCHOOLS ACROSS THE U . S . T H R O U G H T H E N E T W O R K O F C O M P L E M E N TA R Y SCHOOLS EXCHANGE PROGRAM * This is no ordinary club—more a dynamic force for planetary change, mobilizing students in grades 4-12 in a range of ambitious projects, informed by solid science.


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Middle School is a world of variety and vitality. Every student can find a place her e to shine. At a talent show, Middle Schoolers display abilities ranging fr om Tae Kwon Do to virtuoso violin and ar e gr eeted with equal enthusiasm. Their awar dwinning publications (the literary magazine Graf fiti and online newspaper The Cor ner), the art they cr eate and the music they make—all ar e infused with ideas and ener gy.

In these years of personal discovery, Middle School at GFS is a gr eat place to find yourself.

3 S c i e n c e N i g h t c o n t i n u e s i n U p p e r S c h o o l , showcasing increasingly challenging projects, including the investigation of the behavior of ferrofluids, the detection of genetic modification in food using polymerase chain reactions, and the ever-popular Physics Olympics.

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UPPER SCHOOL

Chart YOUR

COURSES

U P P E R S C H O O L – G R A D E S 9 through 1 2

A G F S E D U C AT I O N i s a b o u t e a c h p e r s o n r i s i n g t o m e e t h i s o r h e r

o w n s t a n d a r d s o f e x c e l l e n c e . We d o n ’ t c o m p u t e c l a s s r a n k s o r G PA s , a n d s t u d e n t s d o n ’ t s p e n d t i m e c o m p a r i n g S AT s c o r e s . We d o n ’ t see test scores as the primary measure of academic success. In other words, we don’t confuse achievement with competition. But make no mistake—our students do achieve.

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C A R M E N , L I V I , M AT T A N D S I L A S U P P E R S C H O O L S T U D E N T S Gathering in the Alumni Building


UPPER SCHOOL

The GFS Upper School is a world of choices. Take Bioethics or The Political and Philosophical Origins of the U.S. Constitution. Study Advanced Physics in the state-of-the-art Wade Science Center 4 , or Ancient Gr eek in a superb Classics department. In short, our high school students have the opportunity to pursue their talents, passions and goals. They make their education their own.

The Upper School experience begins with an exceptionally solid college-preparatory curriculum. All GFS students read widely and lear n to write well. All take at least three years of math, plus multiple years of science, history and a moder n or classical language. And all have the opportunity to do so much more.

In January, the entir e Upper School makes r oom for cr eative exploration, as well as a change of pace. Juniors embark on Junior Pr ojects—monthlong, of f-campus independent studies of their own design, such as exploring sports medicine, timberframe construction, envir onmental law or aer ospace engineering. Students in grades 9, 10 and 12 participate in January Ter m (or J-Ter m), a pr ogram that

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allows them to discover new passions, inter ests and collaborative ways of lear ning outside the r egular curriculum thr ough a br oad of fering of inter disciplinary “mini courses.”

In the Essentially English program, students in grades 10, 11 and 12 choose special spring electives. They might take Wilde, Joyce and Woolf or Vietnam and the Literature of Social Protest. They might study screenwriting with a professional screenwriter, or

T H E I M P O R TA N C E O F W R I T I N G AT G F S Before they can spell—before they can even for m letters on the page—GFS students begin to write, dictating their stories to their teachers. By eleventh and twelfth grades, they ar e crafting essays, novellas, poems, scripts and research papers that show r emarkable confidence and skill.

the art of the novel with a published author. In these seminar-style courses, students are joined by GFS parents and alumni—adult classmates whose voices lend a power ful and dif ferent perspective.

T h i s i s n ot m a g i c . G F S s tu d en ts i m m e r se t he mse l ve s in great writing. And they lear n and practice the art of writing themselves, as it is taught in the best research-based university writing programs. To write well is an invaluable

In Dir ected Independent Studies, students team up with a teacher to cr eate completely original,

skill. It is also a clear mark of a Ger mantown Friends School graduate.

one-credit courses—artificial intelligence, advanced music composition and neurobiology, to name just a few. Even more DIS options are available through the Global Online Academy 5 , an online educational initiative involving a circle of highly-regarded independent schools around the world that of fers outstanding semester- and year-long courses, such as Medical Problem Solving, Campaigns and Elections, and French Hip-Hop, to students at member institutions.

No two students leave GFS having traveled the same path. Not even close. What they share is an experience of intellectual challenge and curiosity. They engage in conversations you might hear in upperlevel university seminars. They don’t just lear n the process of protein synthesis; they invent their own systems for modeling that process. For those eager not only to lear n but also to invent, this is the place.

4 T h e a w a r d - w i n n i n g , L E E D - c e r t i f i e d Wa d e S c i e n c e C e n t e r, c o m p l e t e d i n 2 0 0 9 , is a model of sustainability. 5 A f o u n d i n g m e m b e r o f t h e G O A , G F S was the only Philadelphia school invited to join the consortium.

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T HE

Science

OF

SIMPLICITY

22


W E E M B R A C E T H E VA L U E S of kindness and simplicity.

We know the power of silent r eflection. We shar e a commitment to practical action: Ideas should be put to work in the world, talents dedicated to the gr eater good. These beliefs, at the heart of Ger mantown Friends, all gr ow fr om our identity as a Quaker school.


THE PILLARS OF A

QUA K E R E DUCAT ION

SPEAK THE TRUTH We s t r i v e t o d e a l f a i r l y , equally and honestly with e v e r y o n e . We a i m t o d o as we say, r eflecting our beliefs in our actions. Even when it is inconvenient or challenging, we stand by

The beliefs of the Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers, once made them unwelcome in most of Eur ope. Considering that Friends have no for mal cr eed, cler gy or chur ch hierar chy, this can seem surprising now. In the 17th century, it was danger ously radical.

o ur co n vict io n s, st rivin g to lead lives of integrity.

SHINE TOGETHER We are all blessed with

In place of orthodoxy, Quakers have a set of testimonies, or ideals, they strive to r eflect in their lives. These include Simplicity, Peace, Integrity, Community, Equality and

Stewar dship.*

They also have a unique for m of worship: the Quaker Meeting.

At GFS, students and teachers gather in Meeting for Worship once each week. This is a time for shar ed, silent contemplation. Anyone who feels moved to speak may rise and do so. It is a simple for mula, and can be a r emarkably power ful experience.

r e m a r k a b l e g i f t s . We ar e equally qualified to seek truth and to hear the voice of God. Every person d es erv es equ al r es pect. For these reasons, we work agai ns t pr eju di ce

In these days of constant connectivity, the ability and opportunity to sit in silence have special value. Meeting for Worship is a cor nerstone of the GFS cultur e that many come to cherish thr oughout their lives. * We o f t e n u s e t h e a c r o n y m “ S P I C E S � t o r e m e m b e r t h e s e t e s t i m o n i e s .

and discrimination and for equality.


S TAY CONNECTED

CARE FOR ALL

“Alone we can do little;

This planet we inhabit,

toget he r w e c a n d o so

the talents we’ve been

much.” * We know ther e

given, the community

is strength in cooperation

o f w h i c h w e a r e a p a rt—

and wisdom to be found

all hold remarkable v a l u e .

when many perspectives

We m u s t b e r e s p o n s i b l e ,

come together. We believe

imaginative and pr oactive

in the power of community.

in protecting these g i f t s a n d c a r i n g for th e

* The words of Helen Keller.

KEEP IT SIMPLE In every way we can,

u s . We m u s t e x e r c i s e

PROMOTE PEACE

good stewardship.

We believe each life is

wo rld a n d p e o p le a r o un d

we try to minimize the

pr eci ou s and u ni qu e.

d i s t r a ct i o n s t h a t ca n

We stand against war

draw our attention from

and violence and

the important things in

work to eliminate their

life. This means not

r oot causes, including

becoming ovewhelmed

i gnorance, raci s m ,

by the busyness of daily

hatred and oppression.

routine. It means seeking

We are committed to

balance. It means

cr eating peace.

embracing simplicity.


AT H L E T I C S & P H Y S I C A L E D U C AT I O N

HOME

Away OR

AT H L E T I C S & P H Y S I C A L E D U C AT I O N

HARD WORK AND TEAMWORK. These ideals are invoked at

G F S s o o f t e n t h e y ’ r e p a r t o f o u r d a i l y p r a c t i c e . Ye t e v e r y t i m e our athletes take the playing field, we breathe fresh meaning i n t o t h e m . We b r i n g t h e b e s t o f o u r s e l v e s t o t h e g a m e . We l e a r n l e s s o n s f o r l i f e . We f e e d t h e f i r e o f T i g e r P r i d e .

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G R E T A , T A R Y N , C A L V I N A N D S A T YA U P P E R S C H O O L AT H L E T E S Suited up for competition


FA C I L I T I E S

S C AT T E R G O O D G Y M : H O M E T O VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L , A C L I M B I N G WA L L A N D T R A I N I N G R O O M

SMITH GYM: HISTORIC VENUE FOR WRESTLING, ROPES COURSE AND INDOOR TRACK

F I E L D H O U S E : A N E X PA N S I V E , S TAT E - O F - T H E - A R T I N D O O R P R A C T I C E FA C I L I T Y

P L AY I N G F I E L D S : F O U R T E E N A C R E S W I T H P R A C T I C E AND COMPETITION FIELDS, SIX TENNIS COURTS, A N A L L - W E AT H E R , S I X - L A N E T R A C K A N D P O L E VA U L T , H I G H J U M P , D I S C U S A N D J AV E L I N A R E A S

S Q U A S H C O U R T S : L O C AT E D AT G E R M A N T O W N CRICKET CLUB, LESS THAN A MILE FROM CAMPUS

FA I R M O U N T PA R K : C R O S S - C O U N T R Y T E A M S R U N AT B E L M O N T P L AT E A U , S O F T B A L L P R O G R A M U S E S BLUE BELL FIELD

GFS fields approximately 70 teams at the Middle S c h o o l , JV and Varsity levels. We have a no-cut policy designed to cr eate an inclusive pr ogram and make athletics a positive part of every student’s e x p e r i e n c e . We d e m o n s t r a t e a n d d e m a n d exemplary sportsmanship. Our athletes train har d and compete to win.

In the last t e n y e ars, t h e T i ge rs h av e c l ai m ed mor e than 50 Friends League titles, and found 6

success beyond the League as well. We’ve had graduates compete at the college level in every sp ort we o f fe r, with mor e than 50 now active in Division I and III pr ograms.

The point is not that all of our athletes excel, but that every athlete has that opportunity. Just as important, every student has the chance to be an athlete, to be part of a team and to discover a love for physical activity.

Students also make this discovery thr ough our

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Physical Education program, an important part of the K-12 curriculum. In the early grades, new games


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each week intr oduce and build key motor skills. By Middle and Upper School, options include rock climbing, str ength training, ar chery, fencing and dance. At every level, the philosophy is the same: To pr epar e students for active and healthy lives.

6 G F S h a s w o n m u l t i p l e s t a t e c h a m p i o n s h i p s i n b o y s and girls cross country, and is proud to claim several nationally-ranked runners in track events. We ’ v e p l a c e d a s h i g h a s f i f t h a t U . S . N a t i o n a l s in squash, and have had one baseball pitcher honored as a Phillies #1 draft pick.

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VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

STRENGTH

Wonders IN

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

THE EVIDENCE IS EVERYWHERE: Corridors that vibrate with color

and echo with African drums. Stages brought to life almost daily with performances, whether it’s Kindergartners singing before an assembly or Upper Schoolers staging Ibsen. In these and many other ways, GFS is a school profoundly alive with the energy of the arts.

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JACKSON, GUSTON AND CALEB M I D D L E S C H O O L S T U D E N T S Jam Session


VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS

The vibrancy of our arts pr ogram is har d to miss. Spend five minutes at the annual spring All-School Ar t Show , w h e n t h e c ampu s i s t ransfo r m ed i n to one giant gal l e ry , and y o u ’ l l l e av e i nsp i r ed to paint something, sculpt something or tell a tale in claymation.

Less immediately appar ent is the substance behind this vivid display of cr eativity. In the Lower, Mi ddl e a n d U ppe r S c h o o l s, and i n

visual art, drama and music, GFS of fers a rich, rigorous c u r r i c u l u m . T h r ea d s of a r t h i s tor y a n d m usic t he o r y weave thr ough classes in the earliest grades, while in later years, students explor e advanced electives and embrace ambitious artistic challenges.

The choir tours inter nationally. GFS A Cappella hosts A Cappella Fest each February, when singing gr oups fr om peer schools come to per for m their best numbers. The theater program takes on moder n masterworks fr o m a r o u n d t h e w o r l d — a l o n g w i t h c l a s s i c m u s i c a l s like Guys and Dolls and Pirates of Penzance. Studio artists assemble portfolios of impr essive accomplishment.

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T h e sc h o o l ’ s fac i l i t i e s su ppo rt t h i s t o p - c a l i b er pr ogram: spacious, light-filled studios, numer ous pr ac t i c e r o o ms, a mai nst age t h e at e r w i th p r of es sio n a l quality lighting and sound.

The str ength of the GFS arts pr ogram is not only th at i t al l o w s st u de nt s o f t al e nt t o go f a r, b u t that it involves all of our students in meaningful ways. Cr eativity and per for mance ar e woven into our culture. We realize that not every student will go on to be an artist. (Yet, in a sense, that is exactly what we hope will happen.)

To launch an endeavor with an unknown r esult and persist until you have made something of value—sur ely this is a life skill worth having. To think cr eatively, expr ess yourself joyously and appr eciate beautiful works by others— th ese ar e abi l i t i e s e sse nt i al t o t h e h um a n , and the GFS, experience.

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R E L AT I O N S H I P S , E Q U A L I T Y & C O M M U N I T Y

LIAM AND AIDAN, TWINS G R A D E 6 Downtime in a Middle School science room


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Friends ARE

FA M I LY

R E L AT I O N S H I P S , E Q U A L I T Y & C O M M U N I T Y

I T ’ S A S I M P L E P O I N T: G F S s t u d e n t s c a l l m o s t t e a c h e r s b y t h e i r

first names. Some new to the practice assume this signals a lack of respect, but that is not the case. In fact, the practice reflects a profound and mutual respect that shapes and enriches every aspect of life at our school.

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R E L AT I O N S H I P S , E Q U A L I T Y & C O M M U N I T Y

I f y ou a s k ou r g r a d u a tes th ei r b e st me mo r ie s o f their years her e, the most common answer is the close bonds with faculty. This is not just nostalgia: It’s a description of friendships that ar e often still vibrant many years after students have graduated.

Come play guitar in the woodshop during your fr ee period. Come join our independent study on Ulysses. Come to Canada for a month this summer w i th a d oz en oth er s i x th g r a d er s t o c ano e t he wilder ness. These and hundr eds of other unique invitations for students and faculty to shar e in activities both inside and outside school r eflect th e d eg r ee to w h i c h ou r tea c h er s k no w and car e for each student.

Ger mantown Friends School is a family—extended and inclusive. We’ve led the way among independent s c h ool s i n c r ea ti n g a c om m unit y dive r se in religion, race, sexual orientation and socioeco-

FA C U LT Y FA C T S

1:8 107 74

FA C U L T Y - T O - S T U D E N T R AT I O

N U M B E R O F F U L L - T I M E FA C U L T Y M E M B E R S

P E R C E N TA G E O F FA C U L T Y W H O H O L D A D VA N C E D D E G R E E S

20

AV E R A G E Y E A R S O F T E A C H I N G E X P E R I E N C E

17

P E R C E N TA G E O F FA C U L T Y A N D A D M I N I S T R AT O R S OF COLOR

11

P E R C E N TA G E O F FA C U L T Y A N D A D M I N I S T R AT O R S WHO ARE QUAKER

6

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N U M B E R O F A D M I N I S T R AT O R S W H O T E A C H


GFS

VIEWBOOK

nomic s ta tu s . O n e h i s tor i c c or n er s ton e of our commitment is the Community Scholars Pr ogram. Launched in 1963 in r esponse to the Bir mingham church bombing, this fund has brought low-income students fr om our neighborhood to GFS for mor e than 50 years.

Through community involvement projects, envir onmental action and institutional partnerships, GFS is connected with and committed to Ger mantown and Philadelphia. It’s a remarkable place: the site of a Revolutionary War battle and tem p or a r y W h i te H ou s e, 7 a n d h om e to unique businesses and dynamic organizations. From their first days her e, our students know they are part of a family—and that Ger mantown is our home. Seeing life thr ough the lens of the neighborhood, they gr ow in compassion and independence, a n d c om e of a g e a s ou tw a r d - l ooki n g p eop l e, eager to take their education into the world.

7 T  he Deshler-Morris House, where George Washington took refuge during the Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1793.

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COLLEGE & BEYOND

ANAIS G R A D E 4 Creek exploration


GFS V I E W B O O K

TA K E M E T O YOUR

Leaders COLLEGE & BEYOND

T H R O U G H T H E I R Y E A R S AT G F S , o u r s t u d e n t s a r e c h a l l e n g e d t o

think in original ways. They are given many opportunities to lead. They are encouraged to step outside prescribed pathways and make their own choices. It’s no surprise, then, that our graduates do so many inventive and impressive things in life. Some habits are hard to break.

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7

COLLEGE & ALUMNI

T h er e a r e w r i ter s of ev er y ki n d , i n c l u d i n g b es ts el l i n g n ov el i s ts a n d j ou r n a l i s ts p u b l i s h i n g in The New York T imes, The Atlantic, The Wall Str eet Jour nal and Slate. Ther e ar e medical and scientific r esear chers: geneticists at CHOP and Johns Hopkins, a Ya l e c om p u ter s c i en ti s t w h o w on a M a c Ar t hur Fellowship, two Nobel Prize winners in Physics.

C l ea r l y , m a n y f a c tor s c on tr i b u te to a c h i ev eme nt a t th i s l ev el , b eg i n n i n g w i th s ki l l a n d d r i v e. But i t’s m or e th a n th a t. At G F S , w e d ev el op i n d i vidual talents, and instill in our students the belief that they The GFS college matriculation list of fers good

can achieve anything. We allow them the opportunity

shorthand evidence of the school’s quality.

to gr ow, to step forwar d as leaders a n d to fin d th e ir

Our graduates ar e r epr esented in exceptional

ow n w a y . As a r es u l t, ou r graduates have the

numbers at the nation’s most selective colleges

cr eativity and confidence to write their own

and un i v e rsi t i e s. Wh e n t h e y r e t u r n t o v i s i t

definitions of success.

campus, they consistently r eport they’ve been mor e than well pr epar ed for life beyond GFS.

After c o l l e ge , o u r al u mni fo l l o w t h e ma n y avenues into business and other pr ofessions that you might expect—with some telling tr ends. For instance, a notable number of GFS alumni have pu rs u e d w o rk i n so c i al ju st i c e and e nv ir on m en ta l action: the nationally-known author and activist on bullying, the leading Civil Rights attor ney, the founder of the national advocacy gr oup for gay college athletes, the CEO of an inter national ocean conservation or ganization.

Many graduates gravitate towar ds cr eative careers: the Grammy-winning musicians, the documentary and Hollywood filmmakers and pr oducers, the inter nationally-honor ed ar chitects, the Br oadway actors.

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DESIGN BY The Heads of State


Praise FOR

A

GFS

E D U C AT I O N

“ We n e e d m o r e s c h o o l s l i k e G F S t o t e a c h t h e n e x t g e n e r a t i o n o f y o u n g people the knowledge to improve their lives and the lives of others, and the keen desire to do so.”

LEAH ROSENBERG

GFS Class of 1982

“Ger mantown Friends School is not just a campus filled with buildings. It embodies a community that inspires, supports and promotes the right ingredients for success.”

MICHELLE MARSHALL

Mother of Camila ’16

“There is a shared belief in the power and value of education that unites the school community and the families who choose GFS. At every grade level, you find teachers who are passionate about intellectual e x p l o r a t i o n . Yo u s e e a t r u e e x c i t e m e n t a b o u t l e a r n i n g . ”

FAY E S T E A C Y

Retir ed Lower School Teacher

GERMANTOWN FRIENDS SCHOOL

Visit w w w . g e r m a n t o w n f r i e n d s . o r g 2 1 5 . 9 5 1 . 2 3 4 5 | 3 1 We s t C o u l t e r S t r e e t , P h i l a d e l p h i a , PA 1 9 1 4 4

Germantown Friends School Viewbook  

A look at what makes GFS a creative, diverse and powerful learning environment.

Germantown Friends School Viewbook  

A look at what makes GFS a creative, diverse and powerful learning environment.