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DIVISION NEWS

SPOTLIGHT : CLARKE COUNTY

AROUND THE STATE

GeorgIa music news Differentiation in Inclusive Choral Ensembles Christy S. Todd

In-Service Conference Clinicians // Performing Groups

Teachers of the Year Honoring our Music Teachers

SIGHT-READING TIPS FOR LGPE

2.0

VOLUME 77

NUMBER 2

WINTER 2016


march 2-4, 2017

ALL-STATE ORCHESTRA ATHENS

CLASSIC CENTER

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

GMEA BOARD OF DIRECTORS President Dr. John Odom President-Elect Evelyn Champion Vice-President for All State Events Tracy Wright Vice-President for Performance Evaluation Events Richard Prouty Past Presidents’ Representative Dr. Bernadette Scruggs

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In-Service Conference Clinics // Performing Groups

Executive Director Cecil Wilder Band Division Chair Neil Ruby Choral Division Chair Wes Stoner

Sight-Reading Tips for LGPE 2.0

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Editor, Georgia Music News Victoria Enloe For the complete list of Board Members please visit:

GMEA Staff Aleta Womack Brandie Barbee Ryan Barbee

Elementary Division Chair Vicky Knowles GMN Advertising/Exhibitors Cindy Reed Orchestra Division Chair Sarah Black Piano Division Chair Dr. Joanna Kim

-ADVERTISER INDEX-

SPOTLIGHT

Clarke County Schools

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Teacher of the Year Recognition

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ARMSTRONG STATE UNIVERSITY PAGE 3 FRANKLIN POOL CHAMBER MUSIC PAGE 20 GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY PAGE 76

Inclusive Choral Ensembles: Differentiating in Rehearsal and Performance

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GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY BACK COVER KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY PAGE 13 LEE UNIVERSITY PAGE 80

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Association News

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College Division Chair Dr. Laura Stambaugh

District Chairs 1 - Kenza Murray 2 - Andrew C. Bell 3 - Jonathan Carmack 4 - D. Alan Fowler 5 - Stephen Lawrence 6 - Samuel Miller 7 - Blair Callaway 8 - Alan Carter 9 - Pat Gallagher 10 - Gene Hundley 11 - Todd Howell 12 - Paula Krupiczewicz 13 - Erik Mason 14 - Dion Muldrow

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Division News

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Prime

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Veteran 10

LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY PAGE 3 PANAMA CITY BEACH PAGE 11 TOWNSEND SCHOOL OF MUSIC PAGE 71 UNIVERSITY OF WEST GEORGIA PAGE 17 AND 75 YAMAHA PAGE 61 YOUNG HARRIS COLLEGE PAGE 62

To advertise contact Cindy Reed cindyr@gmea.org © Copyright 2016 by the Georgia Music Educators Association

Printing by Slate Group, Lubbock, TX All pieces reproduced in this issue are under prior copyright of the creators and publisher by the contractual arrangements. Nothing shown may be reproduced in any form without obtaining the permission of the publisher and any other person or company who may have copyright ownership. Photos provided by Andy Edwards of Ace of Photos Visit aceofphotos.smugmug.com


ASSOCIATION NEWS THE PRESIDENT SPEAKS DR. JOHN ODOM, GMEA PRESIDENT

Greetings to all of GMEA. Our 2017 In-Service Conference, set for January 26-28 in Athens, is right around the corner. The theme for this year’s conference is “The Voice is Us!,” as we join together to continue to make music education a driving force in our state. If you have not made your plans to attend, push it to the top of your list of “things to do” so you will not miss out on the clinic sessions, performances, networking with colleagues, and the opportunity to broaden our skills as music educators. Looking over the record number of clinic sessions that will be available, I see opportunities for all of us to learn more about skill sets such as critical thinking, collaboration, communication, creativity and innovation, and how we can incorporate these into our teaching. The keynote speaker for our General Session is Tim Lautzenheiser, who you will not want to miss. As we come together once a year in this setting, you will have opportunities to meet and discuss what is happening in our state and nation concerning music education. We are excited about our second In-Service Conference in Athens and hope that you will make it an integral part of your growth this year as we seek to teach, motivate, and inspire our students. Now that the school year is in full swing, and your students have learned those marching drills on the playing field, proper breathing and support in the choral classroom, or bowing techniques for that new chamber music piece, how can we make the ongoing school year even better? Have you ever thought about a Tri-M chapter for your middle or high school? The Tri-M Music Honor Society has been a program of the National Association for Music Education (NAfME) since 1983. Benefits

to you include establishing another level of credibility to your music program, helping you advocate for music education, assisting you in advocating for music education, and fostering character development. Benefits for the student include building an impressive record for college, helping your students become leaders and serve the community, giving them rewards for achievements and activities and helping your students learn accountability. Tim Lautzenheiser (our conference keynote speaker), who heads the NAfME Council of Music Honor Society Chairpersons, says the, “ongoing positive growth of the Tri-M programs is proof of the priceless commitment and dedication extended by many of our nation’s finest music educators.” He adds, “The real benefactors are the budding young artists who are experiencing the personal joy of sharing their talents in special ways and demonstrating the critical importance of music in our lives.” If you do not have a Tri-M chapter in your school, consider bringing this program to your students. For information about chapter activation or renewal visit nafme.org/tri-m-music-honor-society. I want to wish everyone the best as you prepare for upcoming concerts, performances, All-State auditions, solo and ensemble festival and all the wonderful musical opportunities that your afford the students of Georgia. See you in Athens in January!

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HISTORIAN DERIK CLACKUM, GMEA HISTORIAN

BUILDING A STAFF (PART 3) In my earlier two GMN installments about how the GMEA moved from an all-volunteer organization to having a fully staffed office, we looked at the historical factors that were the driving force behind this change. As my first article pointed out, GMEA started as the Music Department within the Georgia Education Association (GEA). GMEA began life with less than 100 members. And, since we were under the shelter of GEA, organization expenses were kept to a minimum and shared by the GEA. Music stalwarts like Max Noah, Maggie Jenkins, and Ann Grace O’Callaghan were able to institute many musical events with the full blessing of the GEA.

During Don Robinson’s term as GMEA President (196769), the Board decided the most pressing organizational need was to hire someone to handle the treasurer’s job. With all the activities that GMEA sponsored, getting someone to volunteer to do the receipting of funds and writing checks was impossible, since being the treasurer had become a full time job. So, in July of 1967, our first paid GMEA employee, Edna Crusselle was hired as GMEA treasurer. Also, the Board decided to hire Robert Eakle to be the editor of the Georgia Music News, another job that had outgrown the volunteer days. Later, Robert was succeeded by Dr. Robert John, and then still later, Dr. John was succeeded by Dr. Mary Leglar. As the need for professional office staff continued to grow, during James Draper’s term as GMEA President (1971-73), the board hired Margaret Swain to be our administrative assistant and handle more of the paperwork. During the 1971 May meeting of the GMEA Board of Directors, Jack Broucheck (former GMEA Corresponding Secretary) proposed the creation of the office of Executive Director. While the Board took no action on his recommendation, the seed had been planted.

But in the 1950’s, GMEA experienced a significant growth in membership and the expanding membership demanded more activities for their students. Gradually, GMEA began to pull away from GEA oversight in order to have more control over our music activities. The first notable event of this transition came during the 1953 GEA Convention with GMEA holding their meetings in a separate facility. While still part of GEA, GMEA wanted to move ahead with having their All-State Band, All-State Chorus, and All-State Orchestra meet every year, instead of the old three year rotation that saw only one AllState group perform for each GEA Convention.

The need for a central office was becoming critical. Even with hiring an administrative assistant, treasurer, and GMN editor, the amount of paperwork for the Festival registrations (now called LGPE), All-State groups, and usual professional correspondence was exceeding the limits of the elected officers’ available time. This was prior to the computer revolution, when paper was king! The sheer bulk of the paper workload was becoming unmanageable for the elected officers to handle from their homes. The need for a central administrator in a centralized office was apparent. GMEA had just grown too big for our cardboard boxes.

In the 1960’s, GMEA President, Dr. Jerry Newman, convinced the GMEA Board to move the 1963 GMEA Convention (now called the In-Service Conference) from Atlanta to Athens and combine it with the UGA Reading Clinic. When Dr. Newman died unexpectedly, UGA Band Director, Roger Dancz was elected to finish Dr. Newman’s term and the concept of GMEA independence was verified by two years of well-attended meetings in Athens.

Addressing the problem, during Julian Creamer’s term as GMEA President (1979-81), the board acknowledged the need and created the office of Executive Director. To fill this office, we needed someone with specific knowledge of our organization. This unique person was former GMEA President, Don Robinson, who had recently retired from being the Supervisor of Music in Fulton County Schools. And, in order to implement this change of direction, the board rented our first official office space at 1252 Peachtree Street, Suite 546, in Atlanta. Finally, a resting place for all those cardboard boxes!

But, with professional independence came financial problems. Without the deep pockets of GEA to fall back on, GMEA needed a new financial format if they were to continue their annual meetings. Thankfully, this new format was discovered and implemented in 1965 by newly elected president, Boyd McKeown. Boyd not only put the GMEA In-Service Conference on sound financial footing, but also set up the format that is still in use today. The continuing success of GMEA in membership growth and additional activities created a lot of stress on a volunteer officer organization. Boyd’s second priority was replacing the organization’s secretary and treasurer, who resigned as he was taking office. Boyd’s wife Edna offered to help. They converted a bedroom in their home into the GMEA office. Edna also agreed to handle the treasurer’s duties (as no one would volunteer for the job) and to assist with the correspondence.

During this time of transition into our office space, long time treasurer, Edna Crusselle, resigned to take a position with the State Dept. of Education and was replaced by Lois Cox. But in 1981, the board decided to put our financial affairs under the duties of the Executive Director. The office of treasurer was abolished and Don Robinson was allowed to hire a bookkeeper to handle our financial affairs. With the beginning of the 80’s, GMEA had completed the transition from a small organization of elected, volunteer officers, to one of the largest MEA organizations in the U.S. with a professional staff and a central office ready to assist our elected officers and our members.

After Boyd’s term ended, however, the GMEA officers went back to “Living out of cardboard boxes,” as former president Herb Cox (1977-79) called it. Every two years, the out-going officers would hand over multiple cardboard boxes of information and forms for the in-coming officers to take home.

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DIVISION NEWS COLLEGE DIVISION Dr. Laura Stambaugh Habits sometimes get a bad rap, as in, “I need to quit my bad habit of procrastinating writing these columns.” But, habits can also be a good thing, like the beginning band method book The Habits of Musicianship: A Radical Approach to Beginning Band (Byo & Duke, available online for free at The University of Texas at Austin). The habit on my mind this fall is professional reading. How do we instill in our teacher candidates the habit of reading professional journals? Like many beginning music teachers, my first job had me traveling among several different schools. I had limited interaction with other music teachers in the district, and my undergraduate teaching friends were far away. My subscription to Music Educators Journal, through my NAfME membership, was the most consistent form of professional development to which I had access. The fact that it showed up in my mailbox every month or two helped create a habit of perusing and reading MEJ. Now that MEJ is no longer required reading (as in, you have to choose to pay an additional $20 to receive it in print form), I wonder how that will impact the reading habits of the teacher candidates I teach. I used to put the copy of MEJ on my desk or a table at home, until I made time to read it. What is the parallel in the electronic age? Often, when students receive a mass email from a professional organization, they simply skim it or delete it. If they do make the effort to look at the table of contents, they will likely only click on titles that directly interest them. There is no flipping through the other articles, and then finding some subheading or picture that unexpectedly that catches your eye. I have stockpiled a lot of MEJs that we use in our music education courses. When I distribute them in classes, the students look at them the same way I do. The physical act of flipping through a journal, examining some articles more closely than others, has not changed for this digital generation. How do we create physical habits in a digital world? Will in-class activities and assignments with MEJ cultivate a habit of reading MEJ in our next generation of teachers? I hope this topic is one you will consider in regard to your teacher candidates, as well.

ELEMENTARY DIVISION Victoria Knowles Georgia elementary music teachers are the best! My Facebook contacts have never looked better! I have spent a teaching career absorbing all I can from the fantastic teachers in this state and now I am excited to tell you about the clinicians we will have this January in Athens.

We have such a wide variety of clinicians this year that there should be several opportunities to find something amazing. I find myself singing the song from Zootopia, “Try Everything!” We have several sessions this year from James Harding of the San Francisco School. His Orff-based sessions highlight active play with the elements of music and movement. In his sessions you will have a chance to explore creative music making, composition with pom-poms and ping-pong balls and simple props become materials for composition. I am pleased to announce that Lily Feierabend will have a few sessions this year. Lily is in her fifteenth year at the University of Hartford Magnet School and her seventeenth as the director of the Connecticut Children’s Chorus. She will present on vocal development of young children, lifetime musical growth, and other fascinating subjects. And the amazing opportunities continue! Sherry Luchette will be in Athens with Freddy the Frog and the Flying Jazz Kitten and much more! Graham Hepburn will show us pedagogy and classroom management the Quaver way. Bradley Bonner will share the innovative Rhythm Band music notation and Jim Tinter has Boomwhacker fun! Margurite Wilder will present the Do it Recorder Method and Shelly Tomich has great ideas for how to start a ukulele program. Andy Beck will be here with choral reading sessions – be sure to look at the room for that one! Michael Roberts will join us from the University of Florida and will teach on composition and movement. Tracy Leslie and Nicola Mason are from Kentucky and will explore play through the music of Africa. But wait, there’s more! Our Georgia grown clinicians include Faye Boyer and Bonita Thomie with differentiated learning; Katie Carlisle, Lauren Gerber, and Megan Kendall will inspire general music composition with a school music radio show. Project based learning is the subject from Fulton county’s Megan Edicott and Susan Ahmed, and Georgia State is sending us Samuel Holmes with his ideas on center-based learning. There will be so many learning opportunities and great ideas to take home to your students that I hope you start planning now to attend.

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A few weeks after the In-Service Conference we have an opportunity to meet in Athens again for Statewide Elementary Honor Chorus. This year we have two amazing conductors! Jeff Kriske is coming to us from Las Vegas. You will recognize his name from the GamePlan curriculum. Emily Ellsworth joins him; she is from Chicago and is the leader of the award winning Anima Chorus. I encourage you to check out their bios on the GMEA website. These two experts in young voices will teach our students the finer points of 4-5 pieces and the concert will be in the amazing theater at the Classic Center. If you have never attended the Statewide Elementary Honor Chorus, this would be a great year to start! The deadline to register your 5 students in 4th or 5th grade with unchanged voices is October 25.

In addition to educational sessions, please support your colleagues and their young musicians by attending their performances. This year’s performing groups are: • Bennett’s Mill Middle School String Symphony under the direction of Kevin Anderson • Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology Honor Orchestra under the direction of David Richardson and Laurie Duke • Georgia Southern University Honors Magnolia String Quartet under the direction of Larisa Elisha • Lovinggood Middle School 8th Grade Orchestra under the direction of Barbera Secrist • Northview High School Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Tim Aucoin

Merry music making and I hope to see you in January and February!

GUITAR DIVISION Dr. Luther Enloe The guitar continues to thrive in Georgia school systems, and if you teach guitar in Georgia, I hope that you will attend the 2017 GMEA In-Service Conference. Last year, aside from a few parking issues and overcrowded restaurants, Athens proved itself to be an excellent location for the conference. This year, the offerings for guitar sessions are diverse and exciting. Session topics will include song writing, chord progressions, curriculum, technology, improvisation, and technique, as well as fingerboard theory. There will be evening performances by the St. Pius X Advanced Guitar ensemble and the North Gwinnett Middle School Eighth Grade Advanced Guitar Ensemble, along with a performance by the Georgia State University Advanced Guitar Ensemble during the General Session. Your participation matters, so please come and join the professional development and camaraderie.

ORCHESTRA DIVISION Sarah Black Greetings! I hope the first half of your school year is going well. It’s hard to believe it is already time to start thinking about our annual in-service conference, but I am so excited about this year’s offerings. Our first year in Athens was a huge success, and although we all miss the pralines and River Street, we can all agree the facilities and technology were fantastic, and the city of Athens was a vibrant, gracious host city. No matter where the in-service conference is held, it always comes back to the people. Being surrounded by educators, colleagues, and most inspiring, young musicians is certainly the re-charge we all need in the middle of the year.

It is always a pleasure to hear and see the musicianship these students are able to demonstrate and is a great reminder of why we all do what we do every day! I want to take a moment to thank all of you for what you do for string education in the state of Georgia. Any time clinicians and teachers come from other states the comment that I always hear is what a special, dedicated, and knowledgeable group of orchestra teachers we have in our state. That is not something I take for granted and am honored to teach in a state with such expertise and dedicated professionals. In addition to the conference, the other exciting event that always happens in the spring is All-State. Our conductors this year are: Steve Amundson (11/12 full orchestra), Bill Bitter (11/12 string orchestra), Allen Tinkham (9/10 full orchestra), Chris Selby (9/10 string orchestra), and our two middle school orchestra conductors are Richard Meyer and Brian Cole. I also want to send a special shout out to all the orgnanizers who make this event possible for your students. Evelyn Champion oversees data and all things Opus, Carl Rieke, Lori Gomez, Frank Folds, Teresa Hoebeke, Kinsey Edwards, and Patricia Cleaton. Thank you for your hours of tireless service. I can’t wait to see everyone in January at the In-Service Conference and again in March for All-State. As always, if there is anything I can do for you, please don’t hesitate to ask. I wish you continued success with the rest of your school year!

This year’s conference sessions and performances offer something for everyone! Whether you are looking for ways to maximize your class time, use technology in your class, collaborate with other members of your fine arts department, or use chamber music in a large class setting, you are sure to find something you can take back to your classes on Monday!

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DIVISION NEWS

PIANO DIVISION Dr. Joanna Kim Fall 2016 has begun and I hope everyone by now has settled into a new teaching schedule. Unlike other area, scheduling for piano lessons for each individual student can be a tough job! So, kudos to all the piano teachers in Georgia and thank you for your dedication to enriching the lives of music students. I am excited to announce the 2017 In-Service Conference schedule. There have been many changes and I, the piano council, and the GMEA executive board have been working tirelessly to come up with a new format for the piano division. The typically three-day event will be condensed to ONE day. We are moving away from the Classic Center and will be at the Edge Recital Hall, Hugh Hodgson School of Music at the University of Georgia. No more fighting with the Band and Percussion Ensembles when we are trying to listen to delicate pianissimo sections in the upper register! I personally thank Dr. Martha Thomas, University of Georgia Piano Professor and past GMEA Piano Division Chair, for her help in making the marvelous Edge Hall available to us. The one-day conference will have a lineup of top-teachers around Georgia. Here are some names to pique your interest: Dr. Martha Thomas from the University of Georgia, Dr. Geoffrey Haydon from Georgia State University, Dr. Alex Wasserman from the Reinhart University, Dr. Jerico Vasquez from Shorter College, Dr. Martin Jones & Dr. Clara Park from Augusta State University, and more! We will have master class winners from the 2016 All-State Piano Competition from grade six through college. To make it more beneficial to all the teachers who will be attending, each clinician will give brief lectures on the pieces to be performed. I am hoping this new conference format will attract more participation from the members of the piano division. As you might be aware, the GMEA piano division has been going through some rough patches due to low participation and a decrease in the number of members. So please, mark your calendar now and plan on attending this one-day event. Also remember, now each master class as well as the recital will be ticketed, so you must purchase a ticket. No exceptions! In 2017, the piano division will also have the Concerto Competition! Dr. Geoffrey Haydon has been working tirelessly for this competition and the selected repertoire is the first movement of George Gershwin’s Concerto in F major. What an exciting selection! Have a wonderful fall semester, everyone, and I hope to see many of you in Athens in January 2017!

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RETIRED MEMBERS Fritz Siler BEING OF SOUND MIND Retirement is a time of optimism to the great majority of us. We look forward to days of traveling, or reading good books that were put on hold as we did our best at nurturing students over a long span of years. We spend time prior to retirement deciding if moving to a new location is on the horizon. Maybe we want to be closer to family in another city, or go to a place completely new for a change in outlook on life. We check our finances and weigh our options for living in relatively sound financial comfort. There are many things to consider prior to making the plunge into a life where we are responsible for the next steps without having them scheduled for us. There is often a little detail that is overlooked or put off until absolutely necessary. When did you visit at your “Last Will and Testament”? This is probably one of the best gifts that those who love you (family and friends) can receive. There is a clause in there that is really important: “Being of sound mind…” I am sure we all know of those family members who challenge the “Will” of a deceased parent or family member based solely on that clause, thereby adding to the weight of grief experienced by the friends and other family members. There is nothing as disturbing as attending a funeral with the survivors bickering over “stuff”. It happens far too often and is unnecessary if there is a legal, binding document. If you don’t have a will, you need to make arrangements to either have one created for you, or do it yourself online. Be sure it is notarized, and if possible, have it probated. Spend some time with those who will be your immediate family survivors. Get their input. This will be your final act of love (hopefully not revenge) for them. Your life insurance company agent can probably provide assistance with creating your will. If you served in the military, this service is provided for you as a benefit. Go online and look up “Last Will and Testament”. There is an abundance of information and resources. The process of creating this legal document doesn’t take long, but the peace of mind of all concerned is worth the efforts. Do the necessary research. This article is meant to serve you as a gentle reminder. I am as guilty of not taking care of this matter as probably many of you may be. Family situations change. There are losses and gains. There is little we can do to fix decisions of our wealth distribution at the last minute. I, like some of you, also need to revisit this living document, and make updates while I am still in my questionable state of “Being of sound mind…”


EDITOR’S CORNER GMN EDITOR VICTORIA ENLOE

A couple of weeks ago on my drive home, I happened to catch an interview with Bruce Springsteen on the NPR show, Fresh Air. Springsteen, now 67, reflected on the gift of still being able to perform songs he wrote in his early 20’s. He remarked that these old songs were just as relevant to him now as they had been in his youth and that, over time, they had taken on new and more expansive meaning. Springsteen’s comments reminded me that we, as music educators, are blessed with a similar gift. Each time we prepare a selection performed at an earlier point in our career, it’s a chance to reflect on the marks in the score, what we would teach differently or the same, and, best of all, the talented, quirky, endearing students with whom we studied that piece. Each time we attend our annual in-service conference, it’s a chance to remember the past with old friends and colleagues and pick up new ideas and approaches to expand our craft.

Inside the winter GMN, you’ll find clinician and ensemble profiles for the 2017 ISC sessions as well as Josh Byrd’s article on LGPE sight-reading strategies and Christy Todd’s article discussing inclusive choral ensembles. I hope these features will be as helpful and easily applicable to your discipline as I found them to be. For our GMN “Teacher of the Year” recognition, over 100 people responded with school, district, and state level honors. Congratulations to each outstanding music educator and thank you, Lloyd McDonald, for the brilliant suggestion that we recognize teachers of the year! If you have a publication suggestion, please do not hesitate to contact me through the Georgia Music News link on the GMEA website or at victoria_enloe@gwinnett.k12.ga.us. I look forward to hearing from you and seeing you at the ISC!

march 2-4, 2017

ALL-STATE BAND ATHENS

CLASSIC CENTER

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AROUND THE STATE • The Fayette Area Middle School Band Camp was held at Harps Crossing Baptist Church on July 11-14, 2016. Fifty-four rising 7th, 8th and 9th graders participated in a four-day musical experience that broadened their musical training as well as provided an opportunity to make friends from surrounding middle school band programs. The band was conducted by Mr. Ed Davis and Ms. Jennifer Seda. Master classes were taught by Bill Melton (Tuba/Baritone), Ann Soderman (Trombone), Marcia Davis (Clarinet), Craig Owens (Percussion), Tammy Melton (Trumpet), Amy Melton (F Horn), Gena Wayne (Flute), Caroline Beson (Bassoon), Don McSwain (Saxophone), and Rusty Wilson (Oboe). Because of the large number of bassoonist attending the camp, the bassoon instructor, Eryn Oft, from Jacksonville State University conducted private lessons during the camp to encourage the bassoonist to develop their musical skills and explained how they would be rewarded with college music scholarships if they continued to play bassoon. Students had to opportunity to perform in either Woodwind Choir, Brass Choir, or Percussion Ensemble. DISTRICT 6 WELCOMES: • Jennifer Seda – new band director at Bennett’s Mill MS • Stephen Shell – new choral director at Pike County HS and Pike County MS • Brian Gunter – new band director at Spalding High School • Joan Thomas has retired from Pike County HS and will begin teaching at Gordon State College and University as Director of Vocal Ensembles

• Fayette County HS Marching Band, directed by Myra Rhoden, will march in the Hollywood Christmas Parade, November 2016. • Myra Rhoden (Fayette County HS Band) will be presenting a session titled, “Use What You’ve Got to Get What You Want,” at the GMEA ISC. • Scott King (Starr’s Mill HS Band) presenting will be presenting a session titled, “Balancing Your Band Program,” at the GMEA ISC. • Bennett’s Mill MS Orchestra, directed by Kevin Anderson, has been selected to perform at the GMEA ISC. • Woodland High School advanced choir “Le Voce,” directed by Samuel Miller, has been selected to perform at the GMEA ISC. • On December 1st, 2016, the Berry College Jazz Ensemble will be presenting, “The Jazz Soul of Christmas,” featuring special guest Wycliffe Gordon. This concert will feature Duke Ellington’s legendary arrangement of themes from Tchaikovsky’s master piece, The Nutcracker Suite. Admission is free-7:30pm-Ford Auditorium--Berry College. • The Heritage High School Wind Ensemble has been selected to perform at the 2017 Music for All National Concert Band Festival as a “featured” band. The festival is in Indianapolis, IN, during March. • Shorter University if proud to announce new faculty. Dr. Aaron Rice is our new Director of Choral Activities and Dr. Duane Warfield is our new Director of Bands.

OTHER NEWS: • Ola HS choral students, under the direction of Mindy Martin, will perform at Disney World in Candlelight Processional on Dec 21, 2016 and will perform in February under the direction of Grammy winning conductor Charles Bruffy.

HERITAGE HIGH SCHOOL WIND ENSEMBLE

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SpotlightOn

Building Sustainability Through Collaboration, Commitment, and Leadership by jay r. wucher

The Clarke County School District (CCSD) has made significant strides in improving the quality of music education in the past five years. While most school districts continue to cut budgets for music programs, CCSD has managed to increase spending. This is particularly significant in that CCSD is a Title One School District where seventy-eight percent of the students qualify for free and reduced lunch. This increase in funding has resulted in large instrument purchases, the repair and replacement of orchestra instruments in two middle schools, a new set of orchestra instruments for one high school and technology allocations for all elementary schools. New band uniforms were also purchased for each of the two high schools in the district. The CCSD Board of Education allocated $500 per elementary school to be used at each Elementary General Music teacher’s discretion and an allotment of over $230,000 to upgrade and replace band instruments at the two high schools. Additional funds from a 21st Century Grant were used to support the purchase of percussion and string instruments for after school programs housed at two Boys and Girls Clubs of Athens. In the 2013-14 year, all programs were allocated funding where needed. In addition, the district allocated $180,000 to replace band and orchestra instruments at one high school and four middle schools. The teachers from each program were asked to prioritize their needs. In order to ensure quality of purchases, the district’s instrumental music teachers, the Director of Teaching and Learning and the Fine Arts Consultant met together to agree on brands, model numbers and specifications for each in-

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georgia music news // winter 2016

strument purchased. Funds we again allocated in the past two years based on budget requests from teachers. In addition, in 2016 the district paid for registration and substitutes and awarded Professional Learning Units for any music teacher who wished to attend the GMEA Conference held at the Classic Center in Athens. CCSD thrives on partnerships with the University of Georgia’s Instrumental Music Department, the University’s Performing Arts Center and AthFest Educates, our community-based arts organization. The University of Georgia (UGA) Department of Music Education, headed by Dr. Clinton (Skip) Taylor, coordinates and supervises the after school orchestra and percussion classes at the Boys and Girls Clubs of Athens, the after school elementary band program at four elementary schools and the UGA String Project. These programs are offered at little or no cost to students and their families. Every family that qualifies for free and reduced lunch is provided a scholarship from AthFest Educates or from the University’s Department of Instrumental Music. While the programs are administered by Dr. Taylor and his staff, all the teaching is done by undergraduate and graduate students who are majoring in Music Education at the University of Georgia. The community has praised these programs not only for the quality of teaching and learning that takes place, but also for the focus and commitment they see in their children as a result of studying a musical instrument. In many cases, parents have commented that the children look forward to going to school just so that they are able to participate in the music programs held after school. AthFest Educates is an invaluable asset in promoting music education with their philosophical and financial support. The organization raises money to purchase instruments and equipment for the Clarke County Schools, provides scholarships for students to participate in after school music programs, awards grants to teachers seeking funding for instruments or equipment in their schools and provides local musicians and artists to participate in concerts and residencies in the Clarke County Schools. The Board of Directors voted to exclusively support the Clarke County Schools. In the past, they had awarded funding to schools outside of the school district and private schools within the district. The leadership of Athfest Educates indicated that the tangible results the board sees from its collaboration with the district had a great deal to do with the decision. From the Spring of 2013 through the Fall 2013 AthFest Educates provided over $70,000 to our school music programs. Another $25,000 was allocated in the Winter of 2014. Each semester AthFest Educates awards $25,000 for teacher grants. In

addition, AthFest Educates wrote a grant proposal to the Riverview Foundation and received $20,000. This grant was used for the district’s Elementary General Music programs. Purchases ranged from IMAC computers and software, to upper end electronic keyboards, Orff instruments and world music percussion instruments. Each Elementary General Music Teacher, the Director of Teaching and Learning and the Fine Arts Consultant met to determine the needs for each school. When the total budget exceeded the $20,000 awarded by the grant, the district did not hesitate to provide $5,000 in additional funding so that each school could receive exactly what they requested. In 2015 and 2016, Athfest Educates has continued award grants in similar amounts but has expanded to criteria to include teacher training. In May of 2013 the district held its first Fine Arts Day celebration and has continued this tradition in the ensuing years. It is now a bi-annual event. The two main stages are the school auditorium and the high school band room. Over 30 separate performances take place during the day. In addition, the lobby of the auditorium displays artwork by students K-12. Performances ranged from middle and high school choirs and orchestra and concert bands, and jazz ensembles, piano soloists, elementary choirs and soloists, percussionists, winds and strings, step teams, a high school dance ensemble, world drumming and dance ensembles. The community is highly supportive of music as well as all the arts. Athens has become a viable location for recording and performing for professionals and amateur musicians. There is a large population of musicians that live and work in the Athens area. Such renowned rock groups as the B52s, Widespread Panic and REM have their origins in Athens. The Athens Youth Symphony and the Athens Choral Society have been in existence for over thirty years. The Classic Center and UGA Performing Arts Center are recognized as two of the finest performance venues in the country. Each summer Athfest Educates promotes a fine arts street festival. Part of the event included two music stages that featured local and regional bands. The Athens-Clarke County area continues to attract attention from the public and from the Georgia Music Educators Association. he University of Georgia Middle and High School honor events are attended by over a thousand students from across the state. During the summer students attend numerous music camps hosted by faculty and master teachers in our state. During the 2015-16 school year, the Georgia All-State Band, Orchestra, and Chorus event took place in the Athens-Clarke County area and the commu-


nity will again host the GMEA In-Service Convention in 2017. This will have a strong positive impact on the school district and will provide an opportunity for the district to provide human and physical resources as needed by GMEA. In 2013, the Clarke County School District was recognized as one of the Best Communities for Music Education in America and has been named to the list in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The state has never had more than five districts named in any year. Gwinnett, Fulton and Cobb Counties, as well as Clarke, are the only ones that have been named for at least for four consecutive years. This year, Baldwin County also appeared on the list. When one reviews Cobb, Fulton and Gwinnett’s sizes, tax bases, and historical musical excellence demonstrated over the years, it is humbling for CCSD to be considered in the same league. It is not by accident that we have worked to achieve that status. For the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) to cite our efforts reaffirms CCSDs commitment. The intentional efforts put forth by teachers, schools, Board of Education, district administrators and community partners show what can happen when everyone works continuously and cooperatively to achieve the same goals. CCSD has a ded-

icated, qualified and experienced staff of superb music teachers. The retention rates are high and the teachers hold a valued position in their schools and in the community. Superintendent, Dr. Philip Lanoue, Associate Superintendent, Dr. Mark Tavernier, and Fine Arts Consultant Mr. Jay Wucher have provided unwavering guidance and support. This commitment coupled with the collaborative efforts of Jill Helme, Athfest Educates Executive Director, and Dr. Skip Taylor, UGA Associate Professor of Music Education, creates a synergy that results in positive and sustainable growth in the music education for our young people. The collective efforts of district personnel, the Board of Education, staff, and the district’s partners has resulted in additional positions being added to the district’s music faculty, the continuation of large budget allocations for the purchase, repair, and replacement of musical instruments, after school band, orchestra and percussion classes offered at little or no cost to students, and outstanding recital and concert experiences for students. With the hiring of a part-time fine arts consultant, teachers now have ongoing support and consultation in the areas of budget planning, professional development, creation and implementation of

curriculum and hands on assistance in preparation for statewide performance evaluation. When one considers the severe budget cuts experienced across the country, the lack of state funding for the arts that is a fact of life in Georgia and that the district is qualifies as a Title One school system, the level of commitment to music education in Clarke County shows an obvious willingness to do the right things for the right reasons. With the progress made over the past three years, CCSD can now look to the future. Plans over the next several years include adding a full time board certified music therapist to work with special needs children. It is also a goal that the middle school choral programs grow in numbers so that there can be a full time choral teacher in each middle school. Plans are currently underway with Spivey Hall, a world renowned recital venue in the metropolitan Atlanta area, to do live and taped broadcasts of their Young Peoples’ concert series to be podcast to our schools, K-12. The Fine Arts have become and will remain a priority in CCSD. Sustainability through collaboration, commitment, and leadership are a priority, as well.

about JAY R. WUCHER Jay R. Wucher currently works as a Fine Arts Consultant for Clarke County Schools in Athens, Georgia and Baldwin County Schools in Milledgeville, Georgia. In addition, he is on the faculty of Clayton State University and has a private studio as a teacher of Saxophone and Clarinet. Mr. Wucher chairs the Education Committee of Spivey Hall on the campus of Clayton State University and is a past governor with the Atlanta Chapter of the National Academy of the Recording Arts and Sciences. He is a certified adjudicator for Large Group Performance Evaluations and serves as the Ethics and Professional Standards Chair for the Georgia Music Educators Association. He is past president of the Georgia Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development and has been published in the MENC Journal, the Georgia Music News and authored Fly With The Eagles: Don’t Gobble With The Turkeys. Mr. Wucher retired in 2004 as the Coordinator of Music Education for the Fulton County School System in Atlanta, Georgia. In Fulton County he also held positions as a teacher, department chair and Executive Director of Curriculum. He holds Bachelors and Masters of Music Education degrees from the University of Southern Mississippi and Specialist degree in Educational Leadership with an emphasis in Curriculum from State University of West Georgia. Mr. Wucher was selected as Georgia Music Educator of the Year in 1995, and The American Music Therapy Association’s Advocate of the Year in 2002. He has performed at Midwest with the Tara Winds Community Band twice and co-presented Leadership On and Off the Podium. He holds membership in Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Kappa Lambda, Phi Beta Mu, Kappa Kappa Psi, Phi Mu Alpha and Sigma Nu.

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TEACHER YEAR OF THE

Did you know that Georgia is made up of some of the greatest music teachers in the country? Here are just some of our fellow GMEA Members that have been recognized by their school systems for their outstanding work. YEAR

14

NAME

DIVISION

LEVEL AND COUNTY

David Gregory

Band

Hardaway High School TOTY and Muscogee County School District TOTY

1986

Carol Taylor

General and Choral Music

1986 Duluth Middle School TOTY (Gwinnett County)

1990

James E. Thompson, Sr.

Band

1990 Savannah High School TOTY (Savannah-Chatham County)

1990

Sheila Smith

Band

1990, 2000, and 2009 South Central Middle School TOTY (Bartow County)

1993

Wanda Moates

Band

1993, 2002 Fannin County Middle School TOTY

1994

Mary Anna Allison

Elementary Music

1994 J.P. Nix Elementary School TOTY (White County)

1995

Sharon M. Anderson

Orchestra

1995 Sandy Springs Middle School TOTY and County Finalist (Fulton County)

1996

Dina C. Watts

General Music

1996 George Washington Carver Elementary School TOTY (Duval County, FL)

1996

Bonita Thomie

General Music

1996 Westside Elementary School TOTY; 2000 Parkwood Elementary School TOTY (Houston County)

1997

Edward McQuade

Chorus

1997 Clayton County TOTY; 2003 Buford Middle School TOTY; 2017 Buford Middle School TOTY and Buford City Schools TOTY

1999

Lori L. Walker

General Music

1999 McDonough Primary School TOTY; 2007 New Hope Elementary School TOTY and Henry County TOTY Finalist

2001

Katie Bennett

Band

2001 Columbia Middle School TOTY (DeKalb County)

2001

Cathie Hudnall

Orchestra

2001 Norcross High School TOTY and 2001 Gwinnett County Top Six Finalist

2002

Sarkino Walker

Band

2002 Creekside High School TOTY, 2011 Sandtown Middle School TOTY (Fulton County)

2002

Julie McCoy

Chorus

2002 Tabor Middle School TOTY; 2005 Feagin Middle School TOTY; 2017 Bonaire Middle School TOTY

2003

Tim Anderson

Orchestra

2003 Pinckeyville Middle School TOTY (Gwinnett County)

2003

Susan Messer

Chorus

2003 Ridgeview Charter School TOTY, Fulton County Middle School TOTY, and Fulton County TOTY

2003

Johnny Edwards

Chorus

2003 Richmond Hills Middle School TOTY (Bryan County)

2003

Lawanda Allen

Chorus

2003 Ebenezer Middle School TOTY (Effingham County); 2014 Langston Chapel Middle School TOTY (Bulloch County); 2015 Bulloch County School District TOTY

2004

Faye Boyer

General Music

2004 Lake Joy Elementary School TOTY (Houston County)

2004

Sara Payne

Orchestra

2004 Crabapple Middle School TOTY (Fulton County)

2005

Susan Davis

General Music

2005 West Central Elementary School TOTY (Rome City Schools)

2005

Bruno Paige

Orchestra

2005 Tri-Cities High School TOTY (Fulton County); 2015 Langston Hughes High School TOTY (Fulton County)

2006

Robert Burton

Band

2006 JC Booth Middle School TOTY (Fayette County)

2006

Gary Lenz

General Music

2006 Buford Academy TOTY (Buford City)

2007

Seth Gamba

Orchestra

2007 Elkins Pointe Middle School TOTY (Fulton County)

2008

Sam Simon

Band

2008 Excel Christian Academy TOTY

2009

Christine Kraemer

Band

2009 Cousins Middle School Teacher of the Year and Newton County TOTY

2009

Anthony M. Jones

Band

2009 Martha Puckett Middle School (Wayne County)

2009

Julia Wiley

Elementary Music

2009 Pearl Stephens Elementary TOTY and Houston County District Top 10 TOTY

2009

Emily Threlkeld

General Music

2009 and 2015 Garden Lakes Elementary School TOTY (Floyd County)

2009

Terri Wiley

Band

2009 and 2014 Dacula Middle School TOTY (Gwinnett County)

2010

Brett Duncan

Chorus

2010 Lamar County Middle School TOTY, 2015 Spalding High School TOTY (Griffin-Spalding County)

2010

Karen Davis

Chorus

2010 Appling County High School TOTY and Appling County School District TOTY

2010

Christopher L. Willis

Band

2010, 2017 Turner Middle School (Douglas County) TOTY

2011

Michelle Rickard

Band

2011 Durham Middle School TOTY (Cobb County)

georgia music news // winter 2016


TEACHER YEAR OF THE

YEAR

NAME

DIVISION

LEVEL AND COUNTY

2011

Young Kim

Orchestra

2011 Johns Creek High School TOTY (Fulton County)

2011

Dr. Daniel Kiene

Band

2011 Richmond Hill High School TOTY and 2011 Bryan County School District TOTY

2011

Anthony Goss

Chorus

2011 and 2016 Ridgeland High School TOTY and Walker County School District TOTY

2011

Sandra Wilson

General Music

2011 Music Teacher of the Year (Bibb County)

2012

Carl Rieke

Orchestra

2012 Ola Middle School TOTY (Henry County)

2012

Fonda Riley

General Music

2012 Baker Elementary School TOTY (Cobb County)

2012

Curt Frederick

Music Instructor

2012 Outstanding Upper School Faculty Member of the Year, Tallulah Falls School

2012

Laura Moates Stanley

Band

2012 Brookwood High School TOTY and Gwinnett County Top 25 Semifinalist

2013

Kinsey Edwards

Orchestra

2013 Lanier Middle School TOTY and Gwinnett County Top 25 Semifinalist

2013

Kelly Clifford

General Music

2013 Lake Park Elementary School TOTY (Lowndes County)

2013

J. Michael Cahal

Band

2013 A.S. Staley Middle School TOTY (Sumter County)

2013

Christopher M. Carr

Band

2013 Paulding County Schools TOTY

2013

Amy Huff

General and Choral Music

2013 North Harlem Elementary School TOTY (Columbia County)

2013

Chris Savage

Band

2013 Jasper County High School Teacher of the Year

2013

Kreg Biffle

Band

2013 Locust Grove Middle School TOTY (Henry County)

2014

Trey Carroll

Chorus

2014 Washington County Public Schools TOTY

2014

Zachary White

General and Choral Music

2014 Warren T. Jackson Elementary School TOTY (Atlanta Public Schools)

2014

Myra Rhoden

Band

2014 Fayette County High School TOTY (Fayette County)

2014

Shanna Johnson

Band and General Music

2014 Morgan Road Middle School TOTY (Richmond County)

2014

Marla Baldwin

Chorus

2014 Palmer Middle School TOTY (Cobb County)

2014

Leslie Jackson

Chorus

2014 Risley Middle School Teacher of the Year (Glynn County)

2014

Gina Royal

General Music

2014 Ben Hill Primary School TOTY (Ben Hill County)

2014

Teresa Hoebeke

Orchestra

2014 Hopewell Middle School TOTY (Fulton County)

2014

David DuBose

Band

2014 Marietta High School TOTY (Marietta City) and State Runner-up

2015

Julia Lotti

Chorus

2015 East Coweta Middle School (Coweta County) TOTY

2015

Laramie Rodriguez

Band

2015 Ashworth Middle School TOTY (Gordon County)

2015

Wendy Wilson

Band

2015 Autrey Mill Middle School TOTY and Northeast Learning Community Finalist for Fulton County TOTY

2015

Cynthia Richmond

Chorus

2015 Crisp County Middle School TOTY

2015

Jack Jean

Band

2015 Whitewater High School TOTY (Fayette County)

2015

Nicole Thompson

Orchestra

2015 Taylor Road Middle School TOTY (Fulton County)

2015

Porter Haskew

Band

2015 Mercer Middle School TOTY (Savannah Chatham County)

2015

Gabriel Woods

Band

2015 Myers Middle School TOTY (Savannah Chatham County)

2015

Eric Turner

Band

2015 Oglethorpe Charter School TOTY (Savannah Chatham County)

2016

Sue McDonald

General Music

2016 Miller Elementary School (Houston County) TOTY and District Level Top 10 Finalist

2016

Lloyd McDonald

Band

2016 Feagin Mill Middle School (Houston County) TOTY and District Level Top 10 Finalist

2016

Justin Duff

General Music

2016 Due West Elementary TOTY (Cobb County)

2016

Alan Carter

Band

2016 Ware County Middle School TOTY

2016

Jennifer Derringer

Orchestra

2016 Charles R. Drew High School TOTY (Clayton County Schools)

2016

Brandi Crider

Band

2016 Model Middle School TOTY (Floyd County)

2016

Alisha Bowden

Band

2016 Richmond Hill Middle School TOTY (Bryan County)

2016

Zachary Bradley

Elementary Music

2016 Riverside Elementary School TOTY (Columbia County)

winter 2016 // georgia music news

15


TEACHER YEAR OF THE

YEAR

16

NAME

DIVISION

LEVEL AND COUNTY

2016

April Saxton

Elementary Music

2016 J.W. Arnold Elementary School TOTY (Clayton County)

2016

Megan Endicott

General Music

2016 Dolvin Elementary School TOTY (Fulton County)

2016

Mathew Graham

Band

2016 Georgetown K-8 School TOTY (Savannah-Chatham County)

2016

Christy Todd

Chorus

2016 Georgia Middle School Association TOTY

2016

Dr. Kerry Bryant

Band

2016 GMEA Music Educator of the Year

2016

Lori Johnson

Band

2016 Clifton Ridge Middle School TOTY (Jones County)

2016

Alicia Covington

Chorus

2016 Union County High School TOTY and Union County School District TOTY

2016

Jammie Phillips

Band

2016 Eddie J. White K-8 Academy TOTY (Clayton County)

2016

Angelia Davis

Orchestra

2016 Hardaway High Schoo TOTY (Muscogee County)

2016

Tony Murray

Band

2016 Effingham County Middle School TOTY

2016

Tim Aucoin

Orchestra

2016 American String Teachers Association Music Educator of the Year

2016

Lyn Pharris

Band

2016 Veterans Memorial Middle School TOTY (Muscogee County)

2016

Victoria Knowles

General and Choral Music

2106 Cloverleaf Elementary School TOTY (Bartow County)

2017

Scott Barnstead

Band

2017 Fannin County High School and Fannin County School District TOTY

2017

Jessie Ahuama-Jonas

Orchestra

2017 Ridgeview Charter Middle School (Fulton County)

2017

Deborah Cartee

General Music

2017 Portal Elementary School (Bulloch County) TOTY

2017

Myra Lynn McCurry

General Music

2017 Walnut Grove Elementary School TOTY (Gwinnett County)

2017

John Tisbert

Chorus and Vocal Music

2017 Esther F. Garrison School for the Arts TOTY (Savannah/Chatham County Schools)

2017

Sarah Harbin

Chorus

2017 Gilmer High School TOTY (Gilmer County)

2017

Dr. Bernadette Scruggs

Orchestra

2017 Peachtree Ridge High School TOTY and Gwinnett County Top 25 Semifinalist

2017

Aaron-James Young

Chorus

2017 Fort Valley Middle School TOTY (Peach County)

2017

Erin McGraw

Music and Drama

2017 Pinecrest Academy Middle and High School TOTY (Archdicese of Atlanta)

2017

Lydia Grant

Elementary General Music

2017 West Side Elementary School TOTY (Marietta City Schools)

2017

Emily Graham

Band

2017 Islands High School TOTY (Savannah-Chatham County)

2017

Jeff Shaw

Chorus

2017 Putnam County Middle School TOTY

2017

Jennifer Wilson

Chorus

2017 Martha Ellen School of the Arts TOTY (Clayton County)

2017

Erin Cole

Band

2017 Tapp Middle School TOTY (Cobb County)

2017

Katie Hurley

General and Choral Music

2017 Hamilton Crossing Elementary School TOTY (Bartow County)

2017

Rebekah Castner

Chorus

2017 Couch Middle School TOTY (Gwinnett County)

2017

Jennifer Wolfe

General and Choral Music

2017 Charles Ellis Montesorri Academy TOTY (Savannah-Chatham County)

2017

Andrew Poor

Band

2017 South Forsyth Middle School TOTY and 2017 Forsyth County School District TOTY

2017

Kelly Jackson

General Music

2017 Fayette County School District TOTY

2017

Tarneshala Simmons

Chorus

2017 Camp Creek Middle School TOTY (Fulton County)

2017

Jason A. Smith

Band

2017 Newton High School TOTY (Newton County)

2017

Sarah Rabun

Chorus

2017 Griffin Middle School TOTY (Cobb County)

2017

Craig Hurley

General Music

2017 Ford Elementary School TOTY (Cobb County)

2017

Kenza Murray

Band

2017 Ebenezer Middle School TOTY (Effingham County)

2017

Lauren Bowen

Chorus

2017 Hutto Middle School TOTY (Decatur County)

2017

Dr. Carolyn King-Stephens

General and Choral Music

2017 DeKalb Elementary School of the Arts TOTY (DeKalb County)

2017

Sarah Thorne

General Music

2017 Mountain View Elementary School TOTY (Gilmer County Charter Schools)

2017

Tiffany Rackley

Elementary Music

2017 Rockbridge Elementary School TOTY (Gwinnett County)

georgia music news // winter 2016


winter 2016 // georgia music news

17


January 26-28, 2017

ALL-STATE

reading chorus ATHENS

first united methodist church

17

in-service conference

General Session music provided by

Georgia state university advanced guitar ensemble dr. Luther enloe, director mercer university flute choir kelly via, director young harris college compulsive lyres jeff bauman, director

january 26th // 10:30am the classic center theatre

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georgia music news // winter 2016


view the

schedule online HOSTED BY

winter 2016 // georgia music news

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20


THE VOICE IS US. CLINICIANS // PERFORMING GROUPS

20 17 winter 2016 // georgia music news

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20 CLINICIANS 17 in-service conference

SUSAN AHMAD

• PROJECT-BASED LEARNING FOR THE MUSIC CLASSROOM

Susan Ahmad is a graduate of Shorter University. She has taught elementary and middle school general music, keyboard, guitar, electronic music, and chorus. Susan has been teaching elementary general music at Lake Windward Elementary School and has been a Teacher Support Specialist for 28 years in the Fulton County school system. She is a co-author of the book “Music á la Cart”, has served as a member of the curriculum writing team for Fulton County, the McGraw/Hill Advisory Committee, the SLO writing team for the Ga Board of Education, the Fulton County Fine Arts Support Team and the Lake Windward School Governance Council. Susan has presented at music conferences in Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee….including TKES readiness, choral techniques, differentiated instruction, teaching music from a cart, and rigor in the music classroom. She holds certificates for Expert Teacher, Master Teacher, and Teacher Support Specialist.

DR. MATTHEW ANDERSON • ANSWERS FOR THE CLASS GUITAR TEACHER (ESPECIALLY THE NON-GUITARIST) • WITH PLUCK: TONE PRODUCTION FOR GUITAR ORCHESTRA Active as both a chamber player and a soloist, Dr. Matthew Anderson has embarked on a distinguished musical career. He is a founding member of the internationally acclaimed chamber group, the Athens Guitar Duo, and he has performed throughout the world for such distinguished individuals as former President of the United States, Jimmy Carter; Simone Fontanelli of the Mozarteum University; and world-renowned guitarist, Christopher Parkening. Matthew Anderson was a guest performer at the UGA Study Abroad 2001 Art Exhibit in Cortona, Italy and was chosen by fellow students to be a final recitalist for the 2003 Christopher Parkening Masterclass, appearing again, in 2005, with the Athens Guitar Trio. He was the featured guitarist on the 2005 documentary film, “Alvar Sunol: His Vision and His Art” and on Sam Hagan’s album, “His Eye is on the Sparrow” and he has given the Georgia premier of several works, including Chiel Meijering’s “Autobahnkrieg,” Yamil Berguener’s “Ranvicnaxanaxac Lsoxoic,” and Federico Ghedini’s “Studio da Concerto.” As a competitor, Matthew won First Prize and Convention Recitalist in the 2003 Georgia Music Teachers Association Spring Competition and was a semi-finalist in the 2007 Columbus State University Guitar Symposium International Competition. Dr. Anderson’s recent recording activities include the first two AG2 albums, Magellan’s Playlist, Vols. 1 & 2 (Claudio Records UK). As a clinician, Matthew Anderson has given master classes throughout the world, and he currently serves as the Director of Education and Outreach for the Atlanta Guitar Guild. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Music at Reinhardt University where he teaches guitar and music theory.

ALAN ARMSTRONG

• FOR LOVE OR REWARD: MEANINGFUL MOTIVATION FOR CONTINUED STUDENT SUCCESS A graduate of Jacksonville State University, Alan Armstrong is in his 29th year of teaching in public schools, and his 21st year at Northgate High School. His bands have consistently received superior ratings in marching, concert and jazz events. The Northgate Symphonic Band has played for the Georgia State Leadership Convention and as a guest ensemble at the University of Alabama Honor Band Clinic. The Northgate program was one of the first three recipients of the GMEA “Exemplary Performance Award” for high school bands. His 34 year career in the drum and bugle corps activity spans all levels of responsibility. Currently, he serves as the Staff and Program Coordinator for Atlanta CV, a brass technician for the Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps and a consultant with the Spirit of Atlanta. He has presented clinics on multiple occasions at the GMEA State Convention and has served as a clinician and consultant in musical events and leadership sessions with bands and drum and corps in both Japan and the United States. He is active as an arranger and composer for all levels of ensembles. aHe has been named the Northgate HS Teacher of the Year, was honored as both Northgate HS and Coweta County’s “Star Teacher” and was honored by the State Legislature of Georgia with a resolution recognizing his accomplishments in his time at Northgate. He is a member of GMEA, the National Association for Music Education, the National Band Association, Phi Mu Alpha Fraternity and Phi Beta Mu.

CHRISTINA BAILEY • EDTPA SOS

Christina Bailey graduated magna cum laude with a Bachelor of Music Education degree in December 2015 and will complete her Master of Music Education degree at Georgia College in July 2016. During her undergraduate and graduate studies, she served as a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, SAI, and was the 2014-2015 president of the Georgia College collegiate chapter of NAfME. She was the recipient of the national NAfME Professional Achievement Award and a recipient of the Shannon Kelly Kane scholarship. Mrs. Bailey spent twenty-four years living around the United States and abroad as a military spouse and raising four sons. She has conducted children’s choirs for over ten years, adapted a music program for Mother’s Day Out, and served as a Worship Assistant.

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georgia music news // winter 2016


17 20 in-service

CLINICIANS

conference

KENNETH BEARD

• FROM STUDENT TO TEACHER-TIPS TO SUCCEED IN YOUR FIRST YEARS IN THE FIELD

Mr. Beard is the Director of Bands at Woodward Academy in College Park, Georgia. Mr. Beard taught in the Georgia Public Schools before teaching at Woodward, at the elementary, junior high, middle school and high school levels. A native of Georgia, Mr. Beard earned his Bachelor of Music Education at Georgia State University and a Master of Performance and Literature at the Eastman School of Music, with Clarinet as his primary instrument. Mr. Beard has received the “Citation of Excellence” from the NBA on eight occasions and listed several times in Who’s Who Among American Teachers. His bands have performed at Georgia Music Educators’ State Conventions, Southern Division MENC Conventions, the Bands of America National Concert Band Festival, the Southern Division of the National Band Association Conference, the Lord Mayor of London’s New Years Day Parade, the Tournament of Roses Parade, and in the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games Opening Ceremony.Kenneth Beard is a member of GMEA, NBA, NAfME, Phi Beta Mu and Omicron Delta Kappa Honor Society and has served as the GMEA State Band Chair, the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl Band Chairman and as a High School Representative for the NBA Board of Directors.

ANDY BECK

• ASK ME TO SING: A READING SESSION FOR MIXED CHOIRS • MUSIC FUN 101! NEW ELEMENTARY MUSIC AND MATERIALS (REPEAT) • ONE SONG: CHART TOPPERS AND FAMILIAR CLASSICS FOR CHOIRS • “MUSIC FUN 101! NEW ELEMENTARY MUSIC AND MATERIALS Andy Beck received a bachelor’s degree in music education from Ithaca College and a master’s degree in music education from Northwest Missouri State University. Andy currently serves as Director of School Choral, Classroom, and Vocal Publications for Alfred Music. A successful composer and arranger, he has authored several top-selling chorals and children’s musicals for Alfred, as well as co-written the highly regarded method book, Sing at First Sight: Foundations in Choral Sight-Singing. Andy is in demand as a guest conductor, choreographer, and clinician for music educators and students throughout the country.

DR. RICHARD BELL

• READY TO TEACH: TIME MANAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT IN THE ORCHESTRA CLASSROOM Dr. Richard Bell is currently in his fourth year as associate professor of music at Clayton State University. His teaching areas include orchestra, double bass, music education and music theory. He is also the conductor of the Southern Crescent Symphony. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from Florida State and a doctorate from the University of Georgia. He taught orchestra in the Clayton and Henry County schools for 29 years and has served on the faculty of Reinhardt University and as president of the Georgia Music Educators Association and the Georgia Chapter of the American String Teachers Association. Dr. Bell has presented sessions at the GMEA In-Service Conference, the American String Teachers Association National Conference, the Music Educators National Conference and the National Association for Music Education in Ireland. As a composer he has numerous published and commissioned works for school orchestra. His double bass teachers included Ralph Jones, Lucas Drew and Pamela Andrews. Awards received during his career include the Georgia String Teachers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation Award, the Walmart Foundation Teacher of the Year Award and the STAR Teacher Award.Richard

DR. ZANDRA BELL-McROY

• MULTICULTURAL MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE MUSIC TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS OF NASM-ACCREDITED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

A native of Monroe, Georgia, Zandra Bell-McRoy has been a music educator since 2002. Upon graduating from the University of Georgia in 2001 with degrees in music and music education, Dr. Bell-McRoy began her career. Middle and high school bands under her direction have consistently received superior and excellent ratings. Her most recent appointment is as Assistant Director of Bands at Cedar Shoals High School, in which she is involved in all aspects of the comprehensive band program as well as serving as a teacher leader. Dr. Bell-McRoy received her Doctor of Education in Music Education from the University of Georgia under the direction of Dr. Roy Legette in 2014. While studying at the University of Georgia, Dr. Bell-McRoy served as a Graduate Teaching Assistant earning awards for teaching and being selected to participate in the Future Faculty Program. She was honored to serve as the Tau Beta Sigma Women in Music Series speaker for the Southeastern Division Conference in 2011. Her research interests include multicultural music education, gender and music education, music teacher preparation, and music teacher evaluation and supervision. Professional affiliations include the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA), National Band Association (NBA), American Educational Research Association (AERA), Pi Kappa Lambda, Kappa Delta Pi, Tau Beta Sigma (Honorary), Sigma Alpha Iota, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, McRoy serves as a flutist with Tara Winds Symphonic Band as well as a freelance performer around the Atlanta area. Dr. Bell-McRoy is an active clinician and adjudicator in the state of Georgia.

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BRADLEY BONNER

• EXPLORING AND READING MUSIC NOTATION IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES

Bradley L. Bonner graduated from the Universtiy of South Florida in 1973 with a B.A. degree. In 1983 he received an M.Ed. degree from the University of Central Florida where he served as an adjunct instructor for twenty-five years. He taught elementary music in Florida Public Schools for thirty-four years. He holds a Level Three certification in Orff Schulwerk. Brad is an active church musician working with various congregations for over four decades as a director of music. He currently holds the position of Elementary Music Specialist for Rhythm Band Instruments. Brad has published hundreds of compostitions and is the President of BLB Studios.

JOEL BOSS

• DEVELOPING AND MAINTAINING A COMPREHENSIVE PERCUSSION PROGRAM

Joel Boss is currently an active performer and instructor in the greater Atlanta area and is currently teaching percussion at Lassiter High School. He has also held instruction positions at Emory University, the Westminster Schools, Alpharetta High School, High Tower Trail Middle School, and the High Meadows School. While at Lassiter High School, theJ percussion ensemble has performed at the 2016 Georgia Music Educators Association In-Service Conference, the 2015 Music For All Sandy Feldstein National Percussion Festival, and the 2011 Midwest Clinic. The band has also performed in the 2013 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. As a performer, Mr. Boss has played with groups such as the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, the Tallahassee Symphony Orchestra, The Warren Symphony Orchestra, The Macon Symphony Orchestra, The Gulf Coast Symphony Orchestra, and tours with his own percussion trio, North Star Percussion. Mr. Boss received a Master of Music degree from in University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Music degree from the Florida State University. His instructors include Dr. John Parks, Joe Gramley, Michael Gould, Carey Kocher, Brian Jones, Ian Ding, John Lawless, Beth Gotlieb, and Bill Wilder.

FAYE BOYER

• MAXIMIZING TIME IN MUSIC THROUGH DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING CENTERS Faye Boyer is a teacher who has taught twenty years from grades K-College and is an Alumni of Columbus State University. She is known and respected Statewide as a singer, church choir director, teacher, and pageant coach. Faye was formerly a Grammy Quarter Finalist after being nominated by a former student. In addition, she has served as the teacher of the year at her school and mentors New Music teachers in the school system. She presently teaches at Lake Joy Primary school in Warner Robins, GA. She presently teaches General Music and Percussion Band. After twenty years of teaching she has learned how to maximize her time through Differentiated Learning Centers. It’s this strategy of developing budding musicians and consumers that has become a real passion for this Columbus State University Alumni. “Once a student has mastered a standard, why continue to simply review the notes on the treble clef, when their potential

VANESSA BRADLEY

• HIP-HOP YA’ DON’T STOP: A JOURNEY THROUGH CURRENT GENRES AND ITS APPLICATIONS IN THE CLASSROOM • INCREASING APP-TITUDE: TECH-TIME IN THE ELEMENTARY MUSIC CLASS

I have been teaching in the Fulton County School system over 20 years and have previously served as Choral Director on the high school as well as elementary school levels. I have a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Therapy and prior to joining the education profession, I served as music therapist with varying populations including in & out patient psych, geriatrics and with ADD/ADHD teens and youth. I have also earned a Master’s Degree in Music Education as well as an Specialist Degree in Curriculum & Instruction. My additional experiences include playing for and directing church choirs and serving as a private instructor of piano and voice, of which I currently teach at the South West Arts Center as well! My current teaching experience includes serving as an adjunct professor for General Music & AP Music Theory courses with Georgia Virtual Schools. I most significantly enjoy guiding and instructing young people and watching them grow and develop!

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DR. JOE BRASHIER

• AROUND THE WORLD IN 60 MINUTES: MULTIPLE STOPS TO EXPLORE INTERNATIONAL BAND MUSIC

Joe H. Brashier has been Director of Bands at Valdosta State University since 1998. Prior to this he was Associate Director of Bands at Rutgers University, Director of the Marching Band and conductor of the Symphonic Band at Appalachian State University. His previous experience includes thirteen years of public school teaching. Brashier is a native of Clinton, Mississippi. He attended the University of Southern Mississippi, where he earned Bachelor of Music Education and Master of Music Education degrees. In 1987 Brashier earned a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Conducting from the University of Kansas. At Kansas he studied conducting with Zuohuang Chen and has since studied with Mohiro Okabe of the Toho Gakwen School. Dr. Brashier has served as a clinician or adjudicator throughout the United States, Guam, Canada, Australia, Europe, and China. He has served as a faculty member of the University System of Georgia Asian Studies Program at Zhengzhou University in China. He holds membership in the World Association of Symphonic Bands and Ensembles, College Band Directors National Association, National Band Association, National Association for Music Educators, Pi Kappa Lambda, Kappa Kappa Psi, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Phi Beta Mu, and the Grainger Library Society. His wife and daughters are all double reeds players, while Brashier’s instrument of choice is a Babolat Pure Drive tennis racket.

DR. KERRY BRYANT

• DON’T TUNE YOUR GROUP, TEACH INTONATION INSTEAD! (AN ENCORE PRESENTATION)

Dr. Kerry Bryant is currently the Director of Bands at Adairsville High School (GA) and adjunct faculty at Reinhardt University. He has been the Director of Bands at Buford HS (GA), Winder-Barrow HS (GA), Jonesboro HS (GA), Forest Park HS (GA), Irmo HS (SC), and Riverdale HS (GA). He has also taught general music at Statham Elementary (GA), and served as Coordinator of Fine Arts for the Barrow County Schools (GA). His music education experience totals 27+ years and spans all grade levels, kindergarten through graduate music education courses. Dr. Bryant’s symphonic bands have been invited to perform at many college band clinics, conventions and symposia, including: the Georgia Music Educators Association In-Service Conference, the University of Georgia Band Clinic, the University of South Carolina Band Clinic, the Florida State University Tri-state Band Clinic, the Troy State University Southeastern Band Clinic, and the University of Southern Mississippi All-South Band Clinic. Selected as a 2011 Honoree for the Woodruff Salutes Georgia Arts in Education Leaders, Dr. Bryant was instrumental in fostering many notable fine arts initiatives. He was also awarded Music Educator of the Year in 2016 by the Georgia Music Educators Association. For GMEA, he has served as First Vice President, All-State Jazz Chair, Future Music Educators Colloquium Co-Chair, and Band Division Chair. He has been President, Georgia Chapter of the National Band Association and on the editorial board for the Music Educators Journal. He has been a standards writer and reviewer for the Georgia Department of Education in instrumental music and music theory.

CHRIS BULGREN

• FACILITATING SONGWRITING AND CREATIVITY WITH GUITAR IN THE GENERAL MUSIC CLASSROOM

Chris Bulgren serves as Temporary Instructor of Music Education at Armstrong State University in Savannah, Georgia. He is currently completing his doctoral work at the University of Michigan. Before coming to Michigan, he taught in Kansas Public Schools for seven years where he taught elementary general music, beginning band, and high school band. During this time, he completed his Orff levels certification and served on the board of the Kansas Orff Chapter. He has served as Adjunct Music Instructor at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music teaching elementary music methods. In addition, he has served as Adjunct Professor of Music at Adrian College in Adrian, Michigan as well as Part-Time Lecturer at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan. His research interests include popular music, gender issues in music education, and songwriting.

DR. JOSH BYRD

• FLOAT LIKE A BUTTERFLY, STING LIKE A BEE: USING IMAGERY TO STRENGTHEN MUSICAL CONNECTIONS • LISTEN WITH YOUR EYES: IDENTIFYING PHYSICAL ROADBLOCKS BEHIND COMMON MUSICAL ISSUES Josh Byrd serves as Director of Bands and Associate Professor of Music at the University of West Georgia. His primary responsibilities include conducting the Wind Ensemble, teaching music education classes, supervising student teachers, and administrating all aspects of the UWG band program. Prior to his appointment he served as Director of Bands for Arrowhead High School in Hartland, Wisconsin and Assistant Director of Bands at Lanier Middle School and Norcross High School in Gwinnett County, Georgia. Dr. Byrd received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Conducting from the University of Georgia where he studied conducting with John Lynch and minored in Music Theory. He received his Master of Music degree in Conducting while studying with Tom Dvorak at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and his Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of Georgia where he studied saxophone with Kenneth Fischer. His professional affiliations include Georgia Music Educator’s Association, National Association for Music Education, College Band Directors National Association, the National Band Association, Pi Kappa Lambda, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Kappa Kappa Psi.

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WILL CAMPBELL

• 0-5: THE DEVELOPMENTAL YEARS OF A BAND DIRECTORWHAT I NEEDED TO KNOW BUT DIDN’T Mr. Will Campbell joined the Woodland High School Band in 2015, as Assistant Director of Bands. A native of Cleveland, Tennessee, Will received his degree from Jacksonville State University where he studied with Clint Gillespie. During his time as a member of the Marching Southerners and Spirit of Atlanta Drum and Bugle Corps, Will had the opportunity to learn from some of the best educators in the south, such as Jerryl Davis, Chris Sherman, and John Lawless. As an educator, Will has been on staff with the Spirit of Atlanta and Corpsvets drum and bugle corps. He has worked as a contract instructor and private lesson teacher for several schools in Forsyth County, Georgia. Will was the Assistant Band Director at Oxford High School in Oxford, Alabama from 2005 through 2008. He most recently served as the director of the Muscle Shoals High School Percussion ensemble and Assistant band director for the Muscle Shoals City Schools.

RICHARD CANTER

• BEGINNING BAND BASICS-DAILY WORKOUTS AND TECHNIQUES DESIGNED TO ENERGIZE AND MOTIVATE THE YOUNG BAND STUDENT

Richard Canter serves as a band director for Walnut Hills High School in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he directs beginning band, junior high and high school bands. Mr. Canter is an active composer and arranger and has served as a guest clinician and conductor in various districts in Ohio. His professional affiliations include the National Association for Music Education, the Texas Bandmasters Association, ASCAP, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Kappa Kappa Psi. Over the past three years, he has presented clinics at the Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic, the Texas Music Educators Association, the Texas Bandmasters Association, the University of Oregon Band Director Academy, and the Ohio Music Education Association Conference. Mr. Canter holds a Bachelors Degree in Music Education from Bowling Green State University and a Masters Degree in Music Education from Miami University. His beginning band teaching tool, Scale & Rhythm Chunks is endorsed by Dr. Tim Lautzenheiser as “a remarkable archetype that removes all the mystery associated with the task of becoming a proficient sight- reader... This beautifully created book is an idea whose time has come.” Scale & Rhythm Chunks is used by band directors throughout the country.

DR. KATIE CARLISLE

• THE SCHOOL MUSIC RADIO SHOW!: INSPIRATION FOR GENERAL MUSIC COMPOSITION

Katie Carlisle, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of general music education and Graduate Director at Georgia State University in Atlanta, offering programs at the baccalaureate, master’s and Ph.D. levels. Dr. Carlisle has presented research papers and pedagogy workshops at state, regional, national and international peer-reviewed music education conferences. Her peer-reviewed publications include British Journal of Music Education; Music Education Research; Arts Education Policy Review; General Music Today; Middle Grades Research Journal; and two book chapters in the Canadian Music Educators Association biennial book series, Research to Practice.

DR. STEFANIE CASH

• BAND DIRECTORS IN A CHORAL WORLD

Dr. Stefanie Cash is Director of Music Education at Berry College. Dr. Cash is responsible for teaching methods and techniques classes, conducting the Berry Women’s Choir as well as supervising student teachers. She has previous experience conducting multiple collegiate choirs and has also taught classes in conducting, choral techniques, choral pedagogy and choral methods. Dr. Cash also frequently serves as a guest clinician for various district and All-State honor choirs. Prior to joining Berry College, Dr. Cash served at the collegiate level as both Director of Music Education and Director of Choral Activities. Cash taught at the middle school level in Kentucky and both the high school and collegiate level in Georgia. Choirs under her direction have performed for KMEA and GMEA in-service conferences as well as the 2008 ACDA Southern Division Convention. Dr. Cash received her Ph.D. in Music Education with a choral conducting emphasis from Florida State University, M.M. from the University of Kentucky and B.M.E. from Morehead State University. Dr. Cash studied conducting and music education with André Thomas, Jefferson Johnson, Richard Miles, Judy Bowers, Lori Hetzel and Larry Blocher. She currently holds professional membership with the American Choral Directors Association, National Association for Music Education and the Georgia Music Educators Association. Dr. Cash resides in Rome, Georgia with her husband Courtney, daughter Caroline and cat Ryleigh.

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JAY CHAMPION

• TECHNIQUES TO LEARN MUSIC QUICKLY AND EFFICIENTLY

Mr. Champion has taught chorus, general music, and electronic music composition at Lost Mountain Middle School in Kennesaw since 1998. He regularly serves as a clinician, guest conductor, singer, music technology instructor, composer and arranger. At Lost Mountain, Mr. Champion’s choirs have performed at the GMEA Inservice Conference, the Georgia State University Mid-Sing Fest, the University of South Carolina Invitational Choral Workshop, and the Lovett School Invitational Choral Festival. He contributed to the book “Growing Musicians - Teaching Music in Middle School and Beyond” by Dr. Bridget Sweet. Recognized as a leader in the use of technology in the music classroom, Mr. Champion has taught professional courses and presented at state and national conventions. Mr. Champion has enjoyed success in a wide variety of areas of composition and music production, writing several compositions and arrangements for string quartets, choirs, and orchestras. His music was recently performed by Cantamos! and Met Opera Bass Morris Robinson, and by the Lost Mountain Middle School Chamber Orchestra at the GMEA Convention. He has performed and recorded with the LSU A Cappella Choir, the Moses Hogan Chorale, the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra Chorus and Chamber Chorus, and Coro Vocati. Mr. Champion received Bachelor Degrees in Music Education and Music Composition from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He earned his Master’s Degree in Music Education, and Education Specialist Degree at the University of Georgia. Mr. Champion serves as Associate Director of Music for Holy Spirit Catholic Church in Atlanta. He lives with his wife Evelyn, his sons David, Charlie, and Sam, and his father, Albert.

NANCY CONLEY

• STRENGTHEN YOUR PROGRAM WITH CHAMBER MUSIC

Nancy Conley is the Director of Music Education at Clayton State University, where she coordinates the music education program, teaches courses in music education, and supervises student teachers. In addition, she is the instructor of applied violin. Ms. Conley serves as the faculty advisor for the CSU Chapter of Collegiate NAfME (National Association for Music Education) and co-directs the Clayton County Honor Orchestra, an auditioned group comprised of middle and high school students. Ms. Conley received the B.M. in music education and performance from Ithaca College and the M.M. in performance from Binghamton University. She is a candidate for the Ph.D. in music education with a viola performance cognate at Michigan State University. Prior to joining the faculty at Clayton State, Ms. Conley taught at the Crane School of Music at the State University of New York at Potsdam, where she taught string technique and pedagogy classes and directed the National String Project. Before pursuing her doctoral degree, Ms. Conley was a public school music educator in upstate New York, where she taught elementary, middle, and high school instrumental music for seventeen years. Ms. Conley has presented her research at the both the state and national level. Presentations in 2016 include the Georgia Music Educators In-service Conference, the American String Teachers Association National Conference, and the NAfME Music Research and Teacher Education National Conference.

DAVE COOK • BOOSTER CLUB ESSENTIALS I: FORMATION & GOVERNANC

• BOOSTER CLUB ESSENTIALS II: INSPIRING LEADERSHIP AND VOLUNTEERISM

Dave is a Financial Advisor and Regional Leader with Edward Jones in Duluth, Georgia. He is involved in a number of civic and community organizations and has had extensive leadership and fundraising experience with non-profits. Dave served as President of the Collins Hill HS Screamin’ Eagles Band Boosters Association in Gwinnett County and recently completed his term on the Board of Directors of the Johns Creek Symphony Orchestra. Dave and his wife, Christa, have an adult son, a band director, and reside in Lawrenceville, Ga.

DR. JESSE COOK

• THE ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM: UNDERSTANDING MUSIC PERFORMANCE ANXIETY, HOW IT OPERATES AND SUCCESS STRATEGIES Dr. Jesse Cook is the Assistant Professor of Trumpet at Valdosta State University and the Principal Trumpet in the Valdosta Symphony Orchestra. He received his DMA from the University of Texas at Austin, and has held appointments at Pittsburg State University in Pittsburg, Kansas, Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, San Jacinto College in Houston, Texas, and The University of Texas at Austin. Dr. Cook has performed with the Kansas City Symphony, the Houston Symphony Orchestra, the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, the Tulsa Symphony Orchestra, the Austin Opera, and the City Limits Brass Quintet. He has also appeared as a soloist in Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto #2 with the Austin Bach Cantata Project, Bernstein’s Mass for Wind Ensemble and Brass Quintet with the Austin Symphonic Band, and L’Histoire du Soldat with the Round Top Festival Orchestra Faculty. A frequent recitalist and clinician, Dr. Cook has performed for and instructed students at universities in Georgia, Wisconsin, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Texas, Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi and Oklahoma. He has also written several articles published in the International Trumpet Guild Journal and was an invited speaker at the 2014 Texas Music Educator Association annual conference and the 2014 International Trumpet Guild conference. In addition, Dr. Cook has been an invited guest lecturer on his dissertation topic of music performance anxiety at over a dozen universities around the country. Dr. Cook’s principal instructors were Ray Sasaki, Mark Hughes, Mark Ridenour and Channing Philbrick. He is an Edwards and Getzen Performing Artist.

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CHIP CROTTS

• INSIDE OUT: CREATING A SUCCESSFUL TRANSFER OF ENSEMBLE SKILLS FROM CONCERT TO MARCHING SEASON • JAZZ READING SESSION

Dr. Chip Crotts serves as Director of Jazz Studies and Assistant Director of Bands at the Georgia Institute of Technology. A GRAMMY nominated artist, Crotts has performed and recorded for the Disney Company and has served as a first call musician for artists such as Jamie Callum, Natalie Cole, Frankie Valli, The Temptations, Ray Charles and Maynard Ferguson. Chip has been a featured soloist in some of the world’s premier musical venues, including Blues Alley, The Blue Note and Carnegie Hall. Highly involved in the marching arts, Chip has taught on the educational staff of championship drum corps and is presently Brass Caption Manager for the Santa Clara Vanguard. Dr. Crotts is an active adjudicator for organizations such as Music For All, Drum Corps International, Drum Corps Japan and Winter Guard International. As a clinician, Crotts presents topics on brass, jazz breathing for musicians, and ensemble techniques for national and international music conferences. Dr. Crotts is a fellowship recipient from the Aspen Music Festival and Music at the Banff Centre (Canada), as well as a grant recipient from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Georgia Tech Foundation. Most recently, Chip was selected as a Georgia Tech “Class of 1969 Teaching Fellow” for excellence in teaching and instruction at the Institute of Technology. Dr. Crotts received degrees from East Carolina University, Penn State, and the DMA in Trumpet Performance with a Jazz Emphasis from the University of Texas at Austin. A Yamaha Performing Artist and Clinician, Chip previously served on the faculties of Samford University and Jacksonville State University.

MELANIE DARBY

• DISTANCE LEARNING WITH THE ULTIMATE STEAM MACHINE

Education Manager Melanie Darby joined Spivey Hall in 2013 after more than a decade in education positions with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra managing the Atlanta Youth Symphony Orchestra and creating music education and community outreach programming. She draws on her personal experience with artists, teachers, and patrons to create music opportunities and performances tailor-made for children, representing different musical traditions and cultures. Melanie is also very active as a PTA member in her children’s local public schools supporting arts education in all ways possible.

JAY DAVIS

• ”NEXT, PLEASE...” BUILDING FOR A SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION IN AN ESTABLISHED PROGRAM

Jay Davis has a Bachelor’s Degree from Georgia College and a Master’s Degree from Auburn University, both in Music Education. At Auburn, he served as GTA with the marching band and the Auburn Brass, their faculty brass quintet. Jay is currently the Director of Bands at Houston County High School. Prior to coming to Houston County, he served for seven years as the Director of Bands at Eagle’s Landing Christian Academy and was also Director of Bands at Eagle’s Landing Middle School and Lovejoy High School. He has also taught applied trumpet and music education courses at Georgia College. Bands under his direction consistently receive Superior ratings at adjudicated in both the concert and marching areas. Students under his direction have placed in many honor groups, including All State Band, GHP, and the Atlanta Youth Wind Symphony. Jay serves on faculty of the GCSU Symphonic Music Camp, and has served on the staff for the Encore Music Camp and Camp ExtravaBANDza. Jay currently performs with Reunion and the Wellston Winds. He has also performed with Tara Winds, where he was on the Board of Directors. He holds or has held memberships in the ITG, Pi Kappa Lambda, Kappa Kappa Psi (honorary), GMEA, NAfME, NBA, and has served as Province Governor for Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. He was also on the Board of Directors of the Georgia College Alumni Association. Jay is married to Dr. Tina Holmes-Davis, Assistant Professor of Music Education at Georgia College and State University, and is the proud father of 11-year-old twins, Emma and Jonah.

ALEXIS DEL CASTILLO

• PROMOTING SELF-CARE IN AT-RISK STUDENTS THROUGH MUSIC

Alexis Del Castillo is a Marketing and Business Development Consultant. Alexis recently started her own consulting business offering project management, marketing, website development and social media services. A lifelong learner, Alexis focuses her academic research on real-world business and emotional cognition, emotional regulation and self-care techniques within a Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) context. She has participated in ministry travel to Central America, El Salvador and Mexico. Currently, she is involved with SEL, Emotional Regulation and Music Enrichment training for the faculty and students of the Florida United Methodist Children’s Home Society (FUMCH) in their SEL Alternative School, Legacy Scholar’s Academy.

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LESLAE DENNISON

• RIPS, RUNS, AND REALITIES - BUILDING AND MAINTAINING HORN PLAYERS AT ALL LEVELS! Leslae Dennison is a graduate of West Georgia College, now University of West Georgia. She studied French horn with Dr. David McCullough, Ed Ferguson, and the late Dr. J. Russell Laib. Mrs. Dennison is a National Board Certified Teacher. She has 28 years of teaching experience at the high school and middle school levels. She is the band director and guitar instructor at Rehoboth Road Middle School (formerly Taylor Street Middle School) where she has taught for the last 20 years. Mrs. Dennison was a member of the Tara Winds Community Band for 24 years and has had the privilege of performing in many church, college, and community concerts and productions. She is also involved in several leadership positions and ministries in her church including the student ministry and student music ministry.

GREGORY DENSON

• DIAGNOSING THE PROBLEM, FINDING THE SOULTION: TEACHING IN A TITLE 1 SCHOOL!

Gregory L. Denson is presently the Director of Bands at Sutton Middle School in Atlanta, GA. He is a graduate of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia having received a Bachelor of Arts in Music Performance. After Morehouse, Denson attended The Florida State University in Tallahassee, Florida where he received a Master of Music Education with teacher certification. Mr. Denson began his teaching career at D. M. Therrell High School in Atlanta. While at Therrell students participated in GMEA LGPE, performed in numerous college homecoming parades, the University of Georgia JanFest Clinic, and a host of community and civic events. Mr. Denson also served as the Co-Director of the Atlanta Public Schools Superintendent Jazz Ensemble. At Sutton, the band program has tripled under Mr. Denson’s tutelage. Students participate in Symphonic Band I, Symphonic Band II, Concert Band, woodwind ensemble, and brass ensemble. Students have been selected to participate in All-State, District Honor Band, All-County, UGA MidFest, Domecoming, Conn-Selmer Youth Band, and the APS Youth Symphony Orchestra. Most recently the Sutton Middle School Symphonic Band was selected to participate in the WorldStrides National Band and Orchestra Festival at Carnegie Hall. Sutton bands consistently earn superior ratings at GMEA District V LGPE and have established a tradition of musical excellence. Mr. Denson is currently completing a Ph.D. in Music Education with a focus in urban music teacher preparation at Georgia State University.

NICOLAS DEUSON

• REPERTOIRE FOR THE GUITAR CLASSROOM: TEACHING ERAS, COMPOSERS AND STYLE • WITH PLUCK: TONE PRODUCTION FOR GUITAR ORCHESTRA

First prize winner in the 2010 Pacific Guitar Competition, and semifinalist in the 2009 Tokyo International Guitar Competition, Nicolas Deuson is enjoying a burgeoning concert career both as a solo performer and chamber musician. Nic has performed for the American Guitar Society, The G.Roger Bailey Classical Scholarship Concert series, The Ventura Guitar Society, Young Harris College, Western Carolina University, Wayfarer Chapel Concerts series, CSU Bakersfield concert series, and as a soloist with the Channel Islands Chamber Orchestra, among many others.

DR. ROBERT DUNHAM

• HEARING WITH YOUR EYES - SCORE STUDY TIPS TO HELP YOU HEAR WHAT YOU SEE Dr. Robert Dunham is Director of Bands at Georgia Southern University, where he coordinates the instrumental music program, conducts the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, and teaches undergraduate and graduate instrumental conducting, and music education and literature courses. Dr. Dunham received his DMA in instrumental conducting from the University of Missouri – Kansas City Conservatory of Music, where he studied with Professor Gary Hill. He received the MM in trumpet performance and music education from the University of Wyoming, where he studied with Robert Mayse and Carlyle Weiss, and received the BM in trumpet performance, and BME in music education from the University of Northern Colorado, where he studied with Eugene Corporon, and William Pfund. Dr. Dunham has also had additional conducting training with Elizabeth A. H. Green, Larry Rachleff, Nurhan Arman, Virginia Allen, David Effron, Raffaele Ponti, and Col. Timothy Foley.

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SARA EMERY

• SUCCESSFUL ALL-STATE AUDITIONS: CULTIVATING INDEPENDENT MUSICIANSHIP

Sara Emery holds a Master of Music in Performance from the University of Georgia, where she studied with Dr. Connie Frigo. She earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Music Education and Performance from Ithaca College, in Ithaca, New York, where she studied with Dr. Steven Mauk. Sara performs with the Gwinnett Symphony Wind Orchestra and maintains a private saxophone studio in Athens, GA.

MEGAN ENDICOTT

• PROJECT-BASED LEARNING FOR THE MUSIC CLASSROOM • APP SMASHING IN THE ELEMENTARY MUSIC CLASSROOM - SPICE UP YOUR CLASSROOM! (BEGINNERS SESSION) • APP SMASHING IN THE ELEMENTARY MUSIC CLASSROOM (FOR INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED)

Megan Endicott is a graduate of the University of Georgia with a degree in Music Education. After 2 years in Forsyth County, she moved to Fulton County and has taught at Dolvin Elementary since 2004. She has been elected by her colleagues as one of the Honor Teachers of the Year in 2007, 2011, 2015, and Teacher of the Year in 2016. She earned her master’s degree in Educational Technology from Central Michigan University. Megan is a Teacher Support Specialist for Fulton County. She has presented at conferences and offered professional development all over the state of Georgia, such as GaETC, GMEA, Bear Creek Redefine Learning, FCS Summer Summit, FCS Building our Future, focusing on incorporating technology into the classroom and demonstrating what rigor in the music room. She has also presented at her first national conference at ISTE on personalized learning. Megan serves as a member of the Fulton County Vanguard Team which has enabled her to work alongside classroom teachers toward transforming their classroom into a global community and personalize student learning. She has been featured as Quaver’s Marvelous World of Music’s first ever Teacher Feature on their webinar series. Megan is the author of published book, “In the Hall of the Mountain King”. She serves an ambassador for technology companies TouchCast, Seesaw, Edmodo, and WonderBox, is a Nearpod PioNear as well as Symbaloo Certified PD trainer. She has featured blog posts with Nearpod, Quaver’s Marvelous World of Music, and Edmodo. She was selected as a winner of the Atlanta Families’ Award of Excellence in Education 2015.

DR. LUTHER ENLOE

• CHORD PROGRESSIONS EVERY GUITARIST SHOULD KNOW

Luther Enloe is an active concert artist, adjudicator, and clinician who has appeared at numerous venues and festivals across the United States, including the ASTA National Conference, the Columbus State University Guitar Symposium and International Guitar Competition, the University of Louisville Guitar Festival and Competition, the GMEA In-Service Conference, GMTA Spring Auditions, and the North Georgia Guitar Summit, among others. A dedicated teacher, Luther holds the positions of Part-Time Instructor of Guitar at Georgia State University and Artist Affiliate in Guitar at Emory University. Students from his studio were prizewinners in the 2013 International Home of the Legends Thumbpicking Competition in Muhlenberg, Kentucky, and the Finger-Style Guitar Division of the 2013 Georgia State Fair Fiddlers’ Convention Competition. Since 2012, he has served as the first Guitar Chair for the Georgia Music Educators Association. Additionally, he serves as a board member to the ASTA Guitar-in-the-Schools Taskforce, the Atlanta Guitar Guild, and as a guitar materials reviewer for the American String Teacher Journal. He lives in Lawrenceville, Georgia, with his wife, Victoria, their son, Cole, and daughter, Lillian.

VICTORIA ENLOE

• A LESSON IN TEAM WORK - PRHS PRESENTS: THE LITTLE MERMAID

Victoria Enloe has taught orchestra for 14 years and currently teaches at Peachtree Ridge High School. Mrs. Enloe earned her Bachelor of Music and Master of Music in Music Education from the University of Georgia. She has coached sectionals for Kendall Youth Orchestra and Gwinnett County Youth Symphony, has worked as a guest clinician and adjudicator in the metro-Atlanta area, and served as the 2015 All-State 9-10 String Orchestra coordinator. Mrs. Enloe is a member of the Georgia Music Educators Association and the American String Teachers Association and is the editor for Georgia Music News magazine.

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DR. ALISON FARLEY

• STUDENT DIRECTED APPROACHES TO TEACHING MUSIC • AN EXPLORATION OF TIMEKEEPING ABILITY AND PERFORMANCE OF WRITTEN NOTATION

Dr. Alison Farley is an Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Georgia where she teaches courses in instrumental music education, psychology of music and advises graduate students. Prior to her appointment at UGA, Dr. Farley was a Lecturer of Music Education at the University of Washington and a Research Coordinator at the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences (I-LABS) at UW. Her research interests include psychology of music, student directed learning, teacher education and perception and performance of written notation. Dr. Farley has presented her research at international, national and state conferences. A native of Kansas City, Missouri, Dr. Farley taught public school in Steelville, MO (near St. Louis) where she taught middle and high school band, jazz band and chorus. Dr. Farley holds a BME from the University of Kansas, an MM in Wind Conducting from the University of Louisville and a PhD from the University of Washington.

LILLIE FEIERABEND

• INTENTIONAL MOVEMENT IN THE MUSIC CLASSROOM • VOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN YOUNG CHILDREN • BRIDGES TO THE COMMUNITY: PLANTING SEEDS FOR A LIFETIME OF MUSICAL GROWTH • MANAGEMENT: THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL TEACHING Lillie is known for her work with young children and for instilling a love of music within them. This is her fifteenth year at the University of Hartford Magnet School and seventeenth as a director for the Connecticut Children’s Chorus. In 1998 she received the Teacher of the Year Award from Canton Schools for her innovative and inclusive music programs. In 2008, she again received her district’s Teacher of the Year Award and the Outstanding Elementary Music Educator Award from the Connecticut Music Educators Association. Lillie is a frequent clinician at local, state and national conferences and a guest conductor for regional honors choirs. She also teaches at Silver Lake College in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, Gordon College in Boston, Anderson University in Indiana, and The Hartt School at the University of Hartford. She is Past President of KESNE, and a member of NAfME, OAKE, CMEA and ACDA, for which she served as National Children’s Honor Choir Chair for the 2010 Conference.

DR. JENNIFER FLORY

• MYTH, MAGIC, AND MUSCALS: HEALTHY SINGING FOR DEVELOPING VOICES Dr. Jennifer Flory is Professor of Music and has been Director of Choral Activities at Georgia College in Milledgeville since August 2005. Flory has a great interest in commissioning new works from composers such as Emma Lou Diemer and David Hamilton. She has written five articles for the Research Memorandum Series, a Journal of The American Choral Foundation, published by Chorus America. Flory also serves as an adjudicator for GMEA LGPE, GMEA Solo & Ensemble, and GHSA Literary. Flory holds both a Bachelors of Arts and a Bachelor of Music Education Degrees from Otterbein College; and both a Master of Music and a Doctor of Musical Arts in Choral Conducting from the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati. Flory was also selected as a Governor’s Teaching Fellow for the 2014 Summer Symposium Program after a highly competitive application and selection process.

D. ALAN FOWLER

• “ALL NINE, ALL THE TIME” ... RESEARCH-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES IN REHEARSAL

D. Alan Fowler is Director of Bands at Eastside High School and Secondary Fine Arts Specialist for the Newton County Schools. He is the Key Club sponsor and Fine Arts Chairperson at Eastside and the Music Director of the Newton County Community Band. A native of Riverdale, Georgia, Mr. Fowler is a 1987 graduate of North Clayton High School and holds a Bachelor of Music degree from UGA, a Master of Music in Conducting from Ball State, and a Specialist degree in Educational Leadership from Georgia State. Prior to taking the helm of The Pride of Eastside Eagle Bands in 1996, Fowler taught at Stephens County Middle School in Toccoa, Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana, and Salem High School in Conyers. Having accumulated vast experience working with bands in Indiana, Kentucky, New York, South Carolina, and throughout Georgia, he is respected throughout the South as a band consultant, instructor, and adjudicator. He is also co-founder of Tuba Christmas Porterdale. Active as a low brass artist, Mr. Fowler has performed with Tara Winds since 1995. Inducted in 2016 as a member of Phi Beta Mu, Fowler is also a recipient of the NBA Citation of Excellence. A member of GMEA, NAfME, NBA, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, and the Covington Kiwanis Club, Fowler has served GMEA in numerous capacities including All-State Organizer, District Band Chair and Treasurer, and is currently the chairperson for GMEA’s 4th District. Mr. Fowler is married to the former Susan Hoit of Norcross, and they are the proud parents of two wonderful daughters, Katie Beth and Grace.

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DR. JIM FRANKEL

• HOW TO ENHANCE YOUR MUSIC PROGRAM WITH TECHNOLOGY, NOT DISRUPT IT! • TAKE YOUR PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS INTO THE 21ST CENTURY WITH PRACTICEFIRST

Dr. Jim Frankel is the Head of Digital Education for the Music Sales Group, and Director of MusicFirst. Previously, he was the Managing Director of SoundTree, and before that he was the instrumental and general music teacher for 15 years in New Jersey Public Schools. Jim is a widely published author in various state, national and international journals of music education. He is the author of The Teachers Guide to Music, Media & Copyright Law, co-author of YouTube in Music Education, contributing author for Critical Issues in Music Education and co-author of Making Music with GarageBand & Mixcraft. In addition to his writing, Jim is a highly sought-after clinician and keynote speaker in the local, national and international music education community. He is on the Board of Directors for TI:ME and is the past president of ATMI.

SHELDON FRAZIER

• “I SWEAR I’M NOT THE STUDENT TEACHER!” ESTABLISHING CREDIBILITY IN YOUR FIRST YEARS OF TEACHING

Mr. Sheldon Frazier is currently the Director of Bands at North Cobb High School in Kennesaw, GA. Prior to his appointment at North Cobb, Mr. Frazier served as Associate Director of Bands at McEachern High School in Powder Springs, GA. At McEachern, he taught the Symphonic I Band and Concert Band as well as class piano. During his tenure at McEachern, the band was a featured performer at Janfest, the GMEA state conference, as well as the University of Alabama. The marching band was a consistent Bands of America finalist at the Jacksonville, Akron, and Powder Springs regional competitions, being named the AAA class champion in 2012 in Akron, Ohio. Mr. Frazier also served as Associate Director of Bands at Plymouth-Canton Educational Park in Canton, MI. While at PCEP, Mr. Frazier led the Symphony and Concert bands while assisting with the PCEP Marching Band and Jazz Bands. During his time at Plymouth, the band program consistently received superior ratings at Michigan Band and Orchestra Festivals as well as placed in the top percentage regionally and nationally in the Bands of America Marching Band circuit. Mr. Frazier graduated from Western Carolina University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Music Education. While at WCU, Mr. Frazier performed with the Wind Ensemble, Concert Choir, Saxophone Quartet, and served as Woodwind Coordinator, Staff Coordinator and two years as Drum Major for the “Pride of the Mountains” Marching Band. Mr. Frazier is an active adjudicator, clinician, and student leadership consultant. He holds memberships in the National Association for Music Education & Georgia Music Educators Association.

DR. PATRICK FREER

• WINNING THE FIRST COLLEGE JOB: WHAT DO I DO NOW? • BEGINNING TO TEACH VOCAL TECHNIQUE TO ADOLESCENT BOYS

Patrick K. Freer is Professor of Music at Georgia State University. His degrees are from Westminster Choir College and Teachers College, Columbia University. He has guest conducted or presented in 36 states and 16 countries, and has presented at six national conventions of the American Choral Directors Association and seven national conferences of the National Association for Music Education. Dr. Freer is former Academic Editor and Chair of the Editorial Committees for Music Educators Journal. He has authored multiple book chapters and over 120 articles in most of the field’s leading national and international journals. Dr. Freer’s research focus is on the sociological and pedagogical factors impacting the singing of boys during and beyond the adolescent voice change.

KIM FRYE

• BEING INNOCENT IS IMPORTANT. GOOD LEGAL COUNSEL IS CRITICAL

A proud Georgia native, Kim Frye grew up in Cobb county and attended the University of Georgia and received her degree in Criminal Justice. She has been an assistant district attorney in Cherokee and Forsyth counties prosecuting felony cases in juvenile and superior court. She now is a highly successful defense lawyer in those same counties and has conducted over 40 jury trials. Kim is a member of the Georgia Bar Association, The Cobb County Bar Association, National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys, DUI Defense Lawyers Association, the Georgia Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys, the Georgia Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys and the Atlanta and Marietta Lawyers Club. She has been admitted to practice in the Superior Courts of Georgia, the Georgia Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court of Georgia. She also current sits at the President of the Solo/Small Firm section of the Cobb County Bar Association. Kim opened the Frye Law Group in 2008 for the sole purpose to defend the rights of the criminally accused. Kim’s significant training and experience on both sides of the judicial aisle allowed her to emerge as a seasoned advocate for each client’s rights.

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DR. MICHAEL FUCHS

• LEANING ON THE BREATH: A ‘BEL CANTO’ APPROACH TO VOCAL SUPPORT AND BREATH MANAGEMENT

Michael Fuchs has enjoyed an active career as a conductor, educator, and singer. He is the Director of Choral Activities at Clayton State University in Morrow, GA where he conducts the Chorale, the Clayton State Community Chorus, and teaches courses in aural skills, choral methods, conducting, and music history. Choirs under his direction have performed across the United States and internationally while receiving numerous honors and awards. He has prepared choruses for performances with Joe Miller, Annunziata Tomaro, Mark Gibson, and Joseph Flummerfelt. Previous positions include the conductor of the University of Cincinnati Women’s Chorus, Artistic Director of Musica, the premier chamber choir of Dayton, Ohio, Founder and Artistic Director of the Westminster Bach Consort, and the Graduate Assistant Conductor for the Westminster Choir. He is active as a clinician and conductor throughout the country and currently serves several professional organizations, including the American Choral Director’s Association and the Atlanta Early Music Alliance. Dr. Fuchs has held public school teaching positions in Fairfax County, Virginia and church music positions in Ohio, North Dakota, Virginia, and New Jersey. Dr. Fuchs holds degrees from the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, Westminster Choir College in Princeton, New Jersey, and Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota.

LAUREN GARBER

• THE SCHOOL MUSIC RADIO SHOW!: INSPIRATION FOR GENERAL MUSIC COMPOSITION

Lauren Garber teaches elementary music in Clayton County. Ms. Garber received her B.M. from the University of South Carolina and M. Ed at Valdosta State University. Currently, she is pursuing her Masters of Music Education degree at Georgia State University.

CHRISTIAN GORDON • HIT THE GROUND SPRINTING!

Christian Gordon is Director of Bands at Lee County Middle School East Campus in Leesburg, GA. During his first year, Mr. Gordon was able to earn Straight Superior ratings at LGPE with his Concert Band while performing a grade higher than the year previous. He has also successfully recruited current middle schoolers to join the band program and perform at high levels. Mr. Gordon has doubled the amount of enrolled 6th grade band students from the year before. Mr. Gordon is a graduate of Columbus State University, where he was a Woodruff Scholar, and performed and premiered works with the Wind Ensemble, Philharmonic Orchestra, Jazz Orchestra, and Trumpet Ensemble. Mr. Gordon was also an active soloist and was twice a semi finalist for the National Trumpet Competition, where in he was in the final six during final deliberations. He has worked as staff member and guest clinician in Columbus, GA and Charleston, SC, his home town.

DR. JEFFERSON GRANT

• PERCUSSION IN THE CARIBBEAN: A CONTINUING STUDY

Dr. Jefferson Grant currently serves as the Associate Director of Bands and Director of Percussion at Lowndes High School in Valdosta, GA. Dr. Grant holds a Doctorate of Musical Arts degree in performance from The University of Southern Mississippi as well as a Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degree from Columbus State University and the University of Louisville respectively. Dr. Grant is an active arranger, adjudicator, and clinician. His articles have appeared in Percussive Notes, and he has presented clinics at the University of Louisville Percussion Symposium, National Conference of Percussion Pedagogy, the Mississippi Bandmasters State Convention, AMEA, GMEA and at the Percussive Arts Society’s International Convention (PASIC). Dr. Grant is the co-founder of the Southeastern Percussion Festival (SEPF), served on the Board of Directors for the Southeastern Color Guard Circuit as well as the Vice President/President Elect for the Alabama Chapter of the Percussive Arts Society. He is a member of Delta Chi, Phi Mu Alpha, Kappa Kappa Psi, The Percussive Arts Society, NAfME, and BMI. Dr. Grant would like to thank Innovative Percussion sticks and mallets, Sabian cymbals, and Yamaha drums for their continued support of music education.

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DR. DAVID GREGORY

• BEING INNOCENT IS IMPORTANT. GOOD LEGAL COUNSEL IS CRITICAL • IF THIS WERE MY FINAL GMEA CLINIC SESSION, WHAT WOULD I SAY TO MY PROFESSION?

David Gregory, Conductor and Musical Director of the Georgia Wind Symphony, is former Director of Bands/Coordinator of Music Education at Reinhardt University (Ret.) and Director Emeritus of Tara Winds. He has conducted elementary, junior high, high school, community college, university, and professional bands during his career. Bands under Dr. Gregory’s direction have received invitations to perform at virtually every music conference of regional and national significance. He has presented clinics/workshops at the Midwest Clinic on four occasions and at the GMEA Conference twelve times. Tara Winds was the 1996 recipient of the Sudler “Scroll of Honor,” and his Hardaway High School Band was honored by the John Philip Sousa Foundation as one of the nation’s most outstanding high school programs for the decades 1960-1980. A highlight of Dr. Gregory’s career is the distinct and singular honor of having his ensembles invited to perform at 44 conventions and conferences of state, regional and national significance. In 1998 he was inducted into the Phi Beta Mu “Georgia Bandmasters Hall of Fame” and in 2003 received the Phi Beta Mu “Outstanding Bandmaster Award” for the state of Georgia. In 2011 he was presented with the prestigious GMEA “Distinguished Career Award,” and the same year was awarded the Kappa Kappa Psi “Distinguished Service to Music Medal” for his work with bands and in the field of Music Education. He is an elected member of the American Bandmasters Association and served as a member of the Board of Directors for that organization.

ROBERT GROGAN

• PRACTICAL AND TRULY APPLICABLE WAYS OF INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN A BAND, ORCHESTRA, AND CHORUS CLASSROOM • STRATEGIES FOR USING DATA TO REACH THE INDIVIDUAL MUSICIAN IN AN INSTRUMENTAL PROGRAM

Robert Grogan is the Director of Bands at Barber MS in Cobb County, Georgia. During his current tenure, the band program has grown from initially 280 students to approximately 400. In 2016, the Barber Symphonic Band was invited to perform at the Music for All Southeastern Band Festival in Atlanta, GA. Bands under his direction have consistently received superior ratings at GMEA and festival events with students actively participating in various honor ensembles. Prior to his current position, he was the Director of Bands at Willowcreek MS and the Assistant Director at Lehi HS in Lehi, Utah. While at Willowcreek, the Wind Symphony was repeatedly invited to perform at the Utah Junior High State Band Festival, which selects only the highest achieving junior high bands from around the state. Mr. Grogan has been very active with community bands. He was the conductor of the Lehi Symphonic Band as well as a performer with the Salt Lake Symphonic Winds and the Wasatch Winds. Currently, he performs with the Tara Winds and performed at the 2015 Midwest Clinic. As a drill designer and music arranger, he has designed shows for bands throughout the Southeast, the Metropolitan D.C. area, and the Mountain West. He received his Master of Music Education from the University of Georgia and his Bachelor’s from Columbus State University. Before teaching and college, Mr. Grogan spent four years active duty in the U.S. Marines, performing with the Albany Marine Band. He currently lives with his family in Acworth, GA.

ILONA HALKIDES

• PROMOTING SELF-CARE IN AT-RISK STUDENTS THROUGH MUSIC

Ilona Halkides is a music educator and multi-instrumentalist, with credentials in positive psychology and social and emotional learning. Ilona has been performing and teaching in Central Florida, USA, and Greece over the last three years. Her research focuses on how music and various other self-care strategies can be used to regulate emotions in social and emotional learning environments and develop students’ emotional intelligence.

CASEY HALL

• THE BIG PICTURE: COMPARING CULTURAL PEDAGOGIES • APP SMASHING IN THE ELEMENTARY MUSIC CLASSROOM - SPICE UP YOUR CLASSROOM! (BEGINNERS SESSION) • APP SMASHING IN THE ELEMENTARY MUSIC CLASSROOM (FOR INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED)

Mr. Casey Hall is the Music Specialist at Wolf Creek Elementary School in South Fulton County. He is actively engaged in not only how technology can enhance the music classroom, but also how he can help improve classroom technology implementation throughout other content areas. As a member of Nolan’s iTeam and Fulton County’s Vanguard Team, he coaches other teachers in their pursuits of integrating technology into their own classrooms. He is currently pursuing a Master in Music Education degree at Georgia State University where he will be creating a curriculum for the Johnny Mercer Foundation involving American popular music (1900-1950).

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JAMES HARDING

• ELEMENTAL ADVENTURES: PLAY WITH A PROP • ELEMENTAL ADVENTURES 1: FROM WIBBLETON TO WOBBLETON • ELEMENTAL ADVENTURES: THE MUSIC OF THE SPHERES

James Harding teaches music to children ages 3 to 13 at the San Francisco School. Working with long-time colleagues Sofia López-Ibor and Doug Goodkin, James has helped to develop an Orff-Schulwerk program that has received international recognition. James is a graduate of Yale University and also studied music at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria. He has presented workshops throughout the United States and internationally in Canada, Australia, South Africa, Taiwan, China, Thailand, Scandinavia, Spain, and South America, and has been a guest teacher at the Orff Institute in Salzburg, Austria. James has been on the faculty of the San Francisco International Orff Course for over 15 years, and currently teaches the Level II training. James is the author of “From Wibbleton to Wobbleton,” (Pentatonic Press, 2013) a collection of music and movement lesson ideas focusing on creative play.

DR. JACLYN HARTENBERGER

• MARCH YOUR WAY TO A BETTER BAND... BUILDING GREAT BANDS THROUGH GREAT MARCH LITERATURE

Jaclyn Hartenberger serves as the Associate Director of Bands and Assistant Professor of Music at the University of Georgia. In addition to serving as the conductor for the Wind Symphony, she teaches undergraduate and graduate conducting. Dr. Hartenberger received a Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts in Conducting from The University of Texas at Austin, under the tutelage of Jerry F. Junkin. Prior to her graduate degree work she served as a middle school and high school band director in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex for distinguished music programs. Dr. Hartenberger received her Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of North Texas, where she performed and recorded with the prestigious UNT Wind Symphony. Jaclyn has presented many clinics nation wide including the Georgia State Music Educator’s Annual conference, Missouri State Music Educator’s Annual conference, Independent School District In-services, and for the Music Educator’s National Conference for the Southwest Division. Her topics consist of ensemble concepts for the developing performer. Her professional affiliations are College Band Directors National Association, Georgia Music Educators, and National Association for Music Education.

GRAHAM HEPBURN

• PIECING TOGETHER THE PEDAGOGY PUZZLE: KODÁLY AND ORFF MEET QUAVERMUSIC INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGY • CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT- DISCIPLINE, AUTOMATED ASSESSMENTS, LESSON PLANNING AND CUSTOMIZATION

Graham Hepburn has a passion for igniting a love of music in the hearts and minds of children. He received an honor’s degree in Piano Performance from the Colchester School of Music and his musical career has ranged from solo recitals to touring the world for six years as a musical comedy performer. He served as the Director of Music for Grindon Hall Christian School in England. While there he transformed and expanded their music program. On moving to the states he taught elementary music in Illinois. Graham and is the heart and energetic force behind Quaver’s Marvelous World of

DR. MICHELLE HERRING

• CULTURAL RELEVENT IDEAS FOR THE CHORAL CLASSROOM • BEYOND LGPE: SIGHT-SINGING AS A LIFELONG SKILL

Michelle Herring earned her Ph.D. in Music Education at the University of North Texas in Denton, Texas. Previous degrees include a bachelor’s degree in Music Studies from the University of Texas at Austin and a master’s degree in Music Education from the University of North Texas. Prior to graduate work, Dr. Herring taught middle school choir for eight years in Austin, Texas, where she was recognized as “Teacher of the Year.” While teaching in the public schools, Dr. Herring was instrumental in transforming her campus into a Fine Arts Academy, preventing the school from possible closure. Her choirs received consistent superior ratings in festivals and contests during her tenure as well as many opportunities to perform with community choruses and religious organizations. Dr. Herring continues to be an active member in the choral music community as a clinician and performer. Dr. Herring has presented research in a variety of state and national venues, including Texas Music Educators Association conference, the Florida Music Educators Association conference, the National Association for Music Education conference, the Society for Music Teacher Education conference, and the Race, Ethnicity, and Place conference. Additionally, she has published research articles in state, national, and international music journals. Dr. Herring is the assistant professor of choral/general music education at Columbus State University. She teaches courses in Elementary Music Education Methods, Conducting, Vocal Technique, and Choral Music Education Methods.

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SAMUEL HOLMES

• COLLABORATION STATION: INCORPORATING CENTER-BASED LEARNING INTO THE GENERAL MUSIC CLASSROOM

Sam Holmes is currently a graduate assistant in the Ph.D. program for Teaching and Learning at Georgia State University. Most recently, he was Music Specialist at Nina Otero Community School in Santa Fe, NM. Prior to joining the staff at Nina Otero, he was Music Specialist at The Brandeis School, San Francisco, Music Specialist at Belmont Hills Elementary in the Cobb County School District, GA, Director of Choral and Drama Activities at Pickens County Middle School, Assistant Band Director at Columbus High School, and adjunct staff at North Georgia University. Sam is the currently the pianist at the Big Canoe Chapel in Big Canoe, GA, where he accompanies and directs various ensembles. In 2006, Sam was named Teacher of the Year at Belmont Hills. Sam has also completed leadership roles, having finished the Teacher Leadership Institute and serving on the School Improvement Team. Sam has previously presented at the GMEA In-Service Conference, as well as other in-services in Georgia, Tennessee, and California, speaking on collaborative learning, as well as technology, in the general music classroom.

DR. TINA HOLMES-DAVIS

• TESTING IN THE ENSEMBLE REHEARSAL DOESN’T HAVE TO BE A PAIN IN THE ASSESSMENT

Tina Holmes-Davis is an Assistant Professor of Music Education at Georgia College where she serves as Coordinator of Music Education and Graduate Music Education. Dr. Holmes-Davis holds a DMA in Music Education from Boston University. She was accepted to participate in COPLAC’s Digital Liberal Arts Seminar for distance mentored undergraduate projects in Summer 2016. Dr. Holmes-Davis has 15 years of public teaching experience in elementary music and middle school band. She is sought after as a band clinician and woodwind technician throughout Georgia, teaches the Georgia College Middle School Band Camp, and performs in the Wellston Winds Community Band. Dr. Holmes-Davis’ professional affiliations include the National Association for Music Education (NAfME), the Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA) and the International Clarinet Association (ICA). She is a member of Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Kappa Lambda, and is a faculty advisor for CNAfME and Sigma Alpha Iota at Georgia College. She currently lives in Macon with her husband, Jay Davis, and the wonder twins, Emma and Jonah.

AMANDA IRBY

• EDUCATING THE GIFTED LEARNER IN MUSIC Amanda Hill Irby is the Director of Bands at West Forsyth High School in Cumming, GA. Amanda is a graduate of Valdosta State University with a Bachelor of Music in Music Education and is currently working on her Masters of Music Education at the University of Georgia. Amanda is an alumnus of the Interlochen Arts Program and the Atlanta Youth Wind Symphony. Previously Amanda has taught Band, Choir and General Music in McDuffie, Dekalb and Gwinnett Counties.

JACK JEAN

• RIPS, RUNS AND REALITIES - BUILDING AND MAINTAINING HORN PLAYERS AT ALL LEVELS! Jack Jean is currently the Director of Bands at Whitewater High School in Fayetteville, Georgia. Mr. Jean, a native of Des Moines, Iowa, received his Bachelor of Music Education Degree from the University of Northern Iowa. His professional experience includes Director and Associate Director of Bands at Shiloh High School (Snellville, GA), Director of Bands at Dunwoody High School (Dunwoody, GA) and Director of Bands at Saydel High School (Des Moines, IA). Mr. Jean has also served as the adjunct Percussion Instructor at Drake University (Des Moines, IA), Rehearsal Assistant with the Des Moines Youth Symphony Orchestra and the Atlanta Youth Wind Symphony. As a member of Tara Winds, Mr. Jean performed at the Midwest Clinic in 1994 and 2001 and again in 2011 with the Cobb Wind Symphony. During his tenure at Whitewater High School, the Wind Ensemble has performed at the University of Georgia January Music Festival as a featured ensemble. The ensemble performed a shared concert in 2013 with the Georgia State University Symphonic Winds. The Whitewater High School French Horn Choir also performed a Lobby Concert performance at The Georgia Music Educator’s Association In-Service Conference in Savannah, GA. Mr. Jean was named the Whitewater High School “Teacher of the Year” for the 2014-2015 school year. In 2015, he was recognized by the Georgia Music Educator’s Association for “Twenty-Five Years of Service to Music Education”. His professional memberships include the National Band Association, National Association for Music Education, Georgia Music Educators Association, Phi Beta Mu and Pi Kappa Lambda.

JOSEY JIMENEZ

• WANT TO GET EVERYBODY INVOLVED IN YOUR FINE ARTS? START A MARIACHI PROGRAM!

Ms. Josey Jazmin Jimenez is currently in her first year of teaching at Duluth Middle School in Gwinnett County. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from the University of Georgia, where she studied saxophone under Dr. Connie Frigo and conducting under Dr. Jaclyn Hartenberger. Ms. Jimenez is a member of the National Association for Music Education and a sister of Sigma Alpha Iota.

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DR. REBECCA JOHNSTON • NAVIGATING PROMOTION AND TENURE

Rebecca Johnston is Coordinator of Music Education and Associate Professor of Music at the University of North Georgia where she teaches courses in music education and pedagogy. She acts as Department of Music Assessment Coordinator, and supervises teaching interns in the field. Additionally, she advises the UNG chapter of CNAfME (Collegiate National Association for Music Education) and maintains and active rehearsal and performance schedule directing the UNG Vocal Jazz Ensemble. Dr. Johnston holds the Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of South Carolina, the M.M. in Music Education from the University of South Carolina, and the B.M. in Music Education from Georgia State University. She additionally holds early childhood music certification from GIML (The Gordon Institute of Music Learning). Her field of academic research is affective response to music, and her work is published by the internationally preeminent journal Psychology of Music. In addition to teaching and research, Dr. Johnston is an active clinician and has presented at state and national conferences across the United States. Finally, Dr. Johnston serves as Assistant Director of the C.T.L.L. (Center for Teaching, Learning and Leadership), and in that role oversees the management of leadership and teaching awards, conducts assessment of faculty programs, develops programming on a wide range of pedagogy topics, and provides leadership in carrying out the CTLL strategic plan.

HEATH JONES

• MUSIC TECHNOLOGY AND THE NATIONAL STANDARDS: DEVELOPING A MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL

Heath Jones currently teaches band and music technology at McConnell Middle School in Gwinnett County. In addition to his responsibilities at McConnell, he serves Gwinnett County Public Schools as the Lead Teacher for Middle Grades Music Technology and the Winds and Percussion Coordinator for the Gwinnett County Youth Symphony. Prior to accepting the position at McConnell, he spent 15 years teaching high school band in Tennessee, South Carolina and Georgia. Mr. Jones’ ensembles have been featured performers at the South Carolina Music Educators Association Conference, The University of Georgia JanFest, the UGA Twilight Jazz Festival, the Northwestern Discovery Jazz Festival and the Philadelphia Thanksgiving Day Parade. While serving as the Fine Arts Department Head at Sumter High School in Sumter, SC, the music department was recognized as a Grammy Signature School of Excellence by the Grammy Foundation. Ensembles under his direction have consistently received high marks in all areas of the wind band activity. In addition to presenting at the Tennessee and Georgia Music Educators Association In-service Conferences, he has served as an adjudicator and clinician for marching and concert bands in Tennessee, Virginia, South Carolina, North Carolina and Georgia. Mr. Jones has received music degrees from the University of Georgia and the University of South Carolina. He has studied conducting and wind pedagogy from Dwight Satterwhite, John Culvahouse, William Moody and James Copenhaver. In addition to being a National Board Certified Teacher, his professional affiliations include: GMEA, Phi Beta Mu, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, Tau Beta Sigma and the National Band Association.

STEPHANIE JUSTEN

• MUSIC ACROSS THE SPECTRUM: INCLUSION TIPS FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM

Miss Stephanie Justen is an autism specialist at Houston County high school in Warner Robins Georgia. She has undergraduate degrees in psychology and education and a Masters degree in special education with an emphasis in behavior. Miss Justen has been teaching special-education for over 15 years and has experience at the elementary and high school levels. Miss Justen also works part-time at a group home for adults with developmental disabilities. Miss Justen was the 2013 Teacher of the Year for her high school and the 2015 High School Special Educator of the Year for Houston County. Miss Justen is the Secretary for the local chapter of the Council for Exceptional Children. She is a Registered Behavior Technician and currently working to become a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

LEIGH KALLESTAD

• HOW TO SUCCEED WEARING THE MANY HATS OF A MUSIC DIRECTOR • FINALE 101: LEARN THE ESSENTIALS TO GET YOU GOING • GETTING STARTED WITH THE NEW SMARTMUSIC • YOU HAVE THE LATEST FINALE BUT ARE YOU USING IT LIKE FINALE 2000? Leigh Kallestad is a Music Education manager at MakeMusic. He works with K-12 and college music education programs as they implement Finale and SmartMusic in their curriculum. He develops training for school in-services, regional workshops and online events. Leigh has presented Finale and SmartMusic clinics at MEA conventions in: Texas, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Arizona, Washington, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Missouri; the Southwest Music Summer Expo (TX), NYSSMA (NY), Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic and NAfME

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MEGAN KENDALL

• THE SCHOOL MUSIC RADIO SHOW!: INSPIRATION FOR GENERAL MUSIC COMPOSITION

Megan Kendall has been a co-director of high school orchestras in Gwinnett County for three years. Her primary instrument is the viola. Megan holds her undergraduate degree from Georgia College and State University and is pursuing her Masters of Music Education degree at Georgia State University.

BRION KENNEDY

• MUSIC PRODIGY: POLYPHONIC ASSESSMENT, PRACTICE TOOL, AND SO MUCH MORE! • ELECTRIFY YOUR CLASSROOM WITH ELECTRIC GUITAR!

Brion Kennedy is the director of the guitar program and serves as the chair for the Fine Arts department at St. Pius X Catholic High School in Atlanta, GA. As director of the guitar program, Mr. Kennedy has two beginner ensembles, an intermediate ensemble, and an advanced ensemble. Mr. Kennedy has been on faculty at St. Pius X since the fall of 2010. Earning his Bachelor’s Degree in Music from the University of Georgia, Mr. Kennedy studied under the guidance of renowned guitar educator John Sutherland. During his time at UGA, Mr. Kennedy also studied music composition under the tutelage of Dr. Adrian Childs. Mr. Kennedy is currently an owner of the Athens School of Music, where he previously taught, and Vogel Audio, a commercial music production and sound design company. In addition to performing with the Atlanta Guitar Guild (AGG), Mr. Kennedy also serves on the Education and Outreach board for the AGG. Mr. Kennedy is a member of the National Association for Music Educators (NAfME) and the Guitar Foundation of America (GFA). He received his Master’s in Education in 2013.

SCOTT KING

• BALANCING YOUR BAND PROGRAM - THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING A “MASTER JUGGLER”

Scott King is in his fifteenth year as Director of Bands at Starr’s Mill High School and twenty-ninth year of teaching. Mr. King has built two marching and concert band programs from diverse situations and clientele. Since coming to Starr’s Mill, The Panther Pride Marching Band has won many grand championships and section awards; the Wind Ensemble has performed at various national (BOA Concert Band Festival), regional/collegiate, and state events (GMEA convention twice); the “Swingin’ Starrs” Jazz Band performed and presented a clinic at the GMEA convention; and Starr’s Mill students are consistently competitive in state (including the most students in Georgia in 2006) and district band events as well as GHP and college scholarships. Mr. King is also the drill writer and music composer/arranger for the Panther Pride Marching Band. Previously, Mr. King was the band director at Pepperell High School. The AA-sized band was very successful with its marching and concert programs. The marching band frequently competed in open class and won contests. The concert band performed at various invitational events. Individual musicians were also very competitive. Mr. King received music education degrees from Jacksonville State University, VanderCook College of Music and Auburn University. He is a multiple (9) recipient of the National Band Association’s “Citation of Excellence”, the 2005 “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers” award, Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society, and 2008-2011 US Army All-American Bowl Honorary Member. Mr. King is a former member and instructor for the Phantom Regiment. Mr. King lives in Senoia with his understanding wife, Shannon, and beautiful daughter, Alexis.

SARAH KITTS

• MYTH, MAGIC, AND MUSICALS: HEALTHY SINGING FOR DEVELOPING VOICES

Sarah Kitts, from Carrollton, Georgia, is currently a senior pursuing her Bachelor of Arts in Music. She is a choral librarian for the Georgia College choral ensembles, a research assistant for Trax on the Trail, and the Vice President of the Max Noah Singers. She has performed a variety of roles in opera and musical theatre scenes, including Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus, Maria in West Side Story, Rosabella in The Most Happy Fella, and Clara in The Light in the Piazza. Additionally, Sarah enjoys teaching voice lessons and plans to continue her studies in vocal pedagogy and performance. She is currently studying voice under Dr. Bonnie Von Hoff and has participated in a masterclass with singing voice specialist and voice pathologist, Wendy LeBorgne.

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STEVEN KOSMALA

• BOOSTER CLUB ESSENTIALS I: FORMATION & GOVERNANCE • BOOSTER CLUB ESSENTIALS II: INSPIRING LEADERSHIP AND VOLUNTEERISM

Steve received his degree in Industrial Management from the Georgia Institute of Technology and his Masters of Business Administration from Mercer University with a concentration in taxation and strategic management. He has thirty-seven years experience in industry with positions in finance, accounting, administration, and operations and recently retired after thirty-one years with IBM. Steve has been an active volunteer with a number of organizations and was the founding president of the Peachtree Ridge HS Band Boosters Association. Steve played clarinet and bass clarinet in his music career. He and his wife, Jeanne, have two adult sons, also clarinet players, and reside in Duluth, Ga.

CHRISTINE KRAEMER

• MARCH YOUR WAY TO A BETTER BAND... BUILDING GREAT BANDS THROUGH GREAT MARCH LITERATURE

Christine Kraemer is the Director of Bands at Cousins Middle School where she also serves in the capacity of K-12 Music Content Specialists for Newton County Schools and serves District IV as band chair. From 2007 - 2016, Ms. Kraemer’s Bands and students have earned Superior Ratings at the GMEA LGPE, have consistently been awarded positions in the District IV Middle School Honor Bands, and eighteen students have earned a place in the All State Band. Ms. Kraemer has co-authored “Power in the Progress System” a curriculum for Band and Orchestra. She has presented the Power Curriculum and related Student Achievement Tracking System Database across the state including the GMEA In Service Conference, LaGrange College Outreach Program, and the University of Georgia Woodwind Methods classes. This Database serves as a model for developing student performance portfolios in the performing arts, and is a part of a pilot study in Newton County for SLO assessments. Ms. Kraemer serves as adjudicator and clinician of Bands and Orchestras from across the United States and Canada with World Strides Performance Programs. Prior to teaching at Cousins, Ms. Kraemer earned a Masters degree in Conducting (2004) and a Masters degree in Music Education (2002) while working as a graduate assistant for the University of Georgia Bands and Ethnomusicology departments. Ms. Kraemer was the Director of Bands at Lee County Middle School in Lee County Georgia (1996 – 2000). Christine Kraemer graduated with honors Magna cum Laude from Columbus State University earning her Bachelors degree in Music Education in 1996.

ANITA KUMAR

• IT CAN BE DONE: EDTPA, PERFORMING ENSEMBLES, AND YOU! Anita Kumar is her second year in the Ph. D. program in music education at the University of Washington, and assists with the conducting of the UW Symphonic Band. Previously she served as band director at Landmark and Melvin E Sine Elementary schools in the Glendale Elementary School District in Glendale, Arizona. She also served as the district’s lead band teacher, chairing the district Honor Band program and leading the district-wide band professional learning community. Anita earned her Master of Music in Music Education from Arizona State University and her Bachelor of Music in Music Education from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where she studied conducting with Gary Speck. She has also worked with Dr. Mallory Thompson and Dr. Allan McMurray at the Northwestern Wind Conducting Symposium, and with Dr. Lawrence Golan as a fellow at the ProMusica Arizona Orchestral Conducting Masterclass. Anita is also the Enrollment Coordinator at Music Center of the Northwest, a community music school in the Greenwood neighborhood of Seattle.

DR. MARY LAND

• HOW TO APPLY AND BE INVITED TO PERFORM FOR NATIONAL AND REGIONAL CONFERENCES Mary Land is Director of Bands at Young Harris College in Young Harris, Georgia. Prior to her position at Young Harris, Dr. Land was Director of Bands at Pickens County Middle School in Jasper, Georgia, for 29 years. She received her Bachelors and Educational Doctorate in Music Education from the University of Georgia, and Masters of Music Education degree from Vandercook College. Dr. Land is on the faculty of the Interlochen Arts Camp as the conductor of the Intermediate Division Wind Symphony. She was featured in the April 2007 issue of the Instrumentalist magazine discussing her teaching techniques and her band program at Pickens County Middle School. She has received the NBA Citation of Excellence on ten separate occasions and the Women Band Directors International Scroll of Excellence four times. In 2002, Dr. Land was awarded the GMEA Music Educator of the Year Award and the John Philip Sousa Foundation Legion of Honor Award at the Midwest Clinic for her contributions to music education. Mary Land was selected by the national publication of School Band and Orchestra as one of “50 Directors Who make a Difference”. Mary Land’s band program was the recipient of the Georgia Senate Resolution 212 commending the success of the Pickens County Middle School Band Program. Professor Land and the Pickens County Middle School Band was the 2003 recipient of the Magna Cum Laude Award, a prestigious International Award for Middle School Bands. Dr. Land is a Past-President of GMEA, and is currently on the Board of Directors for the Midwest Clinic.

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KEVIN LANE

• THE LESSON ISN’T FINAL UNTIL YOU BRING OUT THE VINYL! • TURN YOUR STUDENTS INTO RECORDING ARTISTS USING GARAGEBAND FOR IOS: YOUR POWERFUL PORTABLE RECORDING STUDIO! As a musician, educator, songwriter, and recording artist, Kevin Lane brings to his work a wide variety of experiences all fueled by a passion for creativity in music and music education. His teaching experiences include elementary instrumental and general music, high school choral music, and college general music. He was a graduate teaching assistant under the tutelage of Pierce Arant at the University of Georgia, where he was awarded the Outstanding Graduate Assistant Award. For eight years he directed choral music at LaFayette High School in Walker County, Georgia, where his choruses consistently earned superior ratings. Currently Dr. Lane is the music teacher at Woodstation Elementary School in Catoosa County, Georgia. His integration of music technology and creativity was given as one of the reasons he was named as Woodstation Teacher of the Year in 2006. He has degrees from Tennessee Technological University, Atlanta Christian College, Georgia State University, and a D.M.A. from the University of Georgia. His first album of original songs, Autumn Sky, was released on CD in October 2009. He is currently working on his second album, which he hopes to release sometime in 2016.

DAVE LAWSON

• INSTRUMENT REPAIR: I CAN DO ALL THAT BY MYSELF? Dave Lawson is currently the Band Director at Cherokee Christian School in Woodstock, GA. Dave has been repairing for over 12 years and currently teaches and repairs at River Ridge High School in Woodstock, GA. He services local schools in and around the Cherokee county area.

DR. ROY LEGETTE

• EDTPA: WHAT DO TEACHERS REALLY THINK? • NAVIGATING PROMOTION AND TENURE

Roy Legette is Associate Professor of Music Education in the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at the University of Georgia where he specializes in Elementary Music Education, grades K-5. Dr. Legette is an active researcher and some of his work can be found in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Update: Applications of Research in Music Education, Journal of Music Teacher Education, Music Education Research, and Contributions to Music Education. He is past state chair of the research division of the Georgia Music Educators Association, past chair of the Research Advisory Review Panel of the American Orff-Schulwerk Association, a past member of the editorial committee for Update: Applications of research in Music Education, and a current member of the editorial board for Southern Music Education Research. Dr. Legette has presented his work at professional conferences and symposia in the United States, Europe, and Canada. His research interests include music instruction and student self-concept, student motivation and achievement, and factors that influence teaching effectiveness. Dr. Legette is a member of the National Association for Music Education, the Georgia Music Educators Association, the American Educational Research Association, and the International Society for Music Education.

TRACY LESLIE

• EXPLORE PLAY THROUGH THE MUSIC OF AFRICA

Tracy Leslie is the elementary music teacher at North Calloway Elementary in Murray, Ky. where she teaches general music K thru 5, manages an extracurricular violin program, percussion ensemble and choir. She received her Orff certification from the University of Kentucky and is always looking for novel ways to teach music to her students. She was Kentucky Elementary Music Teacher of the Year in 2013. She is a very active musician on piano and cello in the western Kentucky region. She received her BME and MME from Murray State University and she is a National Board Certified Teacher.

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SUZANNE LOGUE

• CHOOSING A NEW LGPE FAVORITE - CHAPTER 2

Suzanne Logue is in her 28th year of teaching middle school chorus, currently at Hightower Trail MS in the Cobb County School District. She is an avid reader (and collector) of middle school choral repertoire, always seeking new titles and new combinations of old titles for programming. She has been involved throughout her career in GMEA leadership and organization, currently assisting with the FMEC, and has recently served as State Choral Chair. Ms. Logue is active as an accompanist with local and state GMEA events, as well as accompanying for JWPepper and Son, Inc. and the Hal Leonard Corporation events. She is also the Director of Music for Young Children at Holy Innocents’ Episcopal Church, Atlanta.

DR. MATTHEW LOYD

• WHAT IS EDTPA AND HOW DO I MAKE SURE I PASS? Dr. Matthew Loyd is entering his seventh year as Director of Bands at Sonoraville High School in Calhoun, Georgia. Dr. Loyd was born and raised in North Georgia and attended Ridgeland High School in Walker County. Dr. Loyd holds a degree in Music Education from Jacksonville State University a Master of Education from Columbus State University and a Doctorate of Education from Argosy University. Research interest include distance education, fine arts education, and educational leadership. Dr. Loyd is an Adjunct Faculty member at Columbus State in Columbus, Georgia where he teaches masters level classes in educational leadership. Dr. Loyd is also a scoring specialist with Pearson in the Performing Arts edTPA division. Dr. Loyd is a member of Georgia Music Educators Association, International Trombone Association, and PAGE. Dr. Loyd is currently teaching Educational Research classes at Columbus State and is a Scoring Specialist for Pearson in the edTPA Performing Arts devision.

SHERRY LUCHETTE

• JAZZ MUSIC, BOOKS, & BLUES GAMES FOR K-6 • THE JAZZ KITTEN TREE MUSIC STORY Sherry teaches private bass lessons and young musician jazz classes for children at the Pasadena Conservatory of Music. She is also an active clinician and author on teaching jazz in elementary music to both students and teachers. Sherry previously taught Pre-K -3 music at The Buckley School for eight years, Pre-k music classes at the Sherman Oaks Nursery School for five years, and K-3 General music classes at Delphi Academy for three years. Sherry is also an an in-demand freelance jazz bassist in the Los Angeles area.

MIKE LYNCH

• DEVELOPING AND MAINTAINING A COMPREHENSIVE PERCUSSION PROGRAM

Michael Lynch’s high school percussion ensembles and drumlines have performed at The Georgia Music Educators Association In-Service Conference on 6 different occasions, 1992, 1995, 2000, 2003, 2008, 2009 and 2016. The Lassiter Percussion Ensemble has performed at the Music For All Sandy Feldstein National Percussion Festival in 2000, 2002 and 2015 the Midwest Clinic in 2005 and 2011 and the Percussive Arts Society International Convention in 2007. While Mr. Lynch has been percussion instructor at Lassiter, the Lassiter “Trojan” Marching Band has won the 1998 and 2002 Bands of America Grand National Championships and 12 Bands of America Regional Championships. The band also participated in the 1999, 2004 and 2010 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City and the 2001, 2005 and 2013 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. Mr. Lynch is also on the staff for the NFL Atlanta Falcons Drumline, which performs at home games and other public functions. He is co-author of “Field Level – The Ultimate Band Directors Guide to fielding the Ultimate Marching Percussion Section”, “Rudimental Cookbook” and “Just Desserts” all published by Row-Loff Publications. He has had articles published in the Georgia Percussive Arts Society Newsletter, Percussive Notes Magazine and Halftime Magazine. He is an educational endorser for Mapex, Majestic, Remo, Vic Firth, and Zildjian. His professional affiliations include the Music Educators National Conference, Georgia Music Educators Association, and the Percussive Arts Society with which he is the past president of the Georgia Chapter.

JOANNE MAPLES

• DISTANCE LEARNING WITH THE ULTIMATE STEAM MACHINE Spivey Hall Education Assistant Joanne Maples is a native of Clayton County and has 31 years of experience as a music specialist with Clayton County Public Schools. Joanne served as a GMEA State Elementary Chair and a GMEA District 6 Chair. She was an active member of the Spivey Hall Education Committee before joining the staff. This committee plays an active role in the planning process, curriculum development, and the creation of study guides.

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DR. NICOLA MASON

• EXPLORE PLAY THROUGH THE MUSIC OF AFRICA Dr. Nicola F. Mason is Assistant Professor of Music Education in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction at Eastern Kentucky University where she teaches courses in elementary music and African musics. A native of South Africa, she received her BMus from Stellenbosch University, her MMus from Morehead State University, and her PhD from the University of Kentucky. Dr. Mason is president of the Kentucky Orff Schulwerk Association and secretary of the Kentucky Eurhythmics Society. She is an Orff Schulwerk certified teacher, regularly presents her research at national and international conferences, and has publications in General Music Today, The Orff Echo, The Orff Beat, The Bluegrass Music News, and Orff Schulwerk: Reflections and Directions. Her research includes the use of Orff Schulwerk in beginning band and the documentation of authentic children’s songs and games from Sub-Saharan Africa.

DR. KEITH MATTHEWS

• DRAMA IN THE MUSIC CLASSROOM? NO THANKS Dr. Keith Matthews is Assistant Professor of Music and Coordinator of Music Education at Columbus State University’s Schwob School of Music in Columbus, Georgia. He teaches courses in instrumental music methods, conducting, class guitar, sociology of music education, and supervises student teachers. Prior to his current post, Dr. Matthews spent 14 years as a public school music educator in Georgia and Arizona. His studies were in Music Education (BME) at Furman University, Trumpet Performance (MM) at Arizona State University, and a PhD in Music Education & Instrumental Conducting at Florida State University. Dr. Matthews has presented research at GMEA and FMEA Conferences, the Desert Skies Research Symposium in Tucson, Arizona and the NAfME National Research conferences in St. Louis and Atlanta. He is an active clinician, adjudicator, and educational consultant throughout the southeast. He lives in Columbus with his wife: Caitriona and children: Maura and Colin.

AMANDA MCCLELLAN

• SUCCESS ON MUSICAL CLOUD NINE- INEXPENSIVE AND EASY ONLINE PROGRAMS FOR YOU AND YOUR STUDENTS

Amanda McClellan is a director of the orchestra program at Hull Middle School in Gwinnett County, Georgia, which, at one point, was the largest string ensemble in Gwinnett, peaking at nearly 800 orchestra students. She has held this position since 2003, and is happy to have established a thriving fiddle club who performs locally. After graduating Summa Cum Laude as class Valedictorian from Shenandoah University, she received her M.Med in String Pedagogy under the mentorship of Dr. Michael Allen at FSU. She also holds an EDs in Administration from Lincoln Memorial University. Amanda was awarded 2011 Teacher of the Year at Hull Middle School. In addition to being a string educator for 15 years, she is also a cellist and enjoys gigging with local orchestras and with her husband, professional violinist, Kenny Lambert.

WARREN MCCLELLAN

• BOOSTER CLUB ESSENTIALS I: FORMATION & GOVERNANCE • BOOSTER CLUB ESSENTIALS II: INSPIRING LEADERSHIP AND VOLUNTEERISM

Warren received a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting from the University of Tennessee and a Master of Business Information Systems from Georgia State University. He holds a CPA and a Series 7 license. Warren is the sole proprietor of a CPA firm and is a partner in a financial services company. He played Sousaphone in the biggest high school marching band in Southwestern Virginia. He was the founding treasurer for the Peachtree Ridge High School Band Boosters Association and is involved in a number of church, civic and community organizations. Warren has an adult son and resides with his wife, Barbara, in Duluth, Ga.

DR. DAWN MCCORD

• EDTPA: WHAT DO TEACHERS REALLY THINK? Dawn Harmon McCord, DMA and NCTM, is Professor of Music Education and Organ Studies at the University of West Georgia and has served on the boards of the Georgia Music Educators and Georgia Music Teachers Association (GMTA) including serving as President of GMTA. Dr. McCord is also Director of Music and Organist at Carrollton Presbyterian Church. She holds degrees from UGA, LSU, and FSU with studies in Music Education, Choral Conducting, and Organ Performance. She regularly adjudicates piano events and her research interests include topics related to teaching and learning, piano proficiency, teacher preparation, and all-state choral policies and practice. She has presented her research at international, national, and state conferences.

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LEBARRON N. MCWHORTER

• DIAGNOSING THE PROBLEM, FINDING THE SOLUTION: TEACHING IN A TITLE I SCHOOL! Lebarron N. Mcwhorter is a native of Mobile, Alabama where he graduated with honors from S.S Murphy High School in 2002. Mr. Mcwhorter received his Bachelor of Music Education degree from Alabama State University in Montgomery, AL and his Master of Music degree from Reinhardt University in Instrumental Conducting. After completing his undergraduate degree, he became Director of Bands at Jefferson Davis High School located in Montgomery, AL. His bands at Jefferson Davis High School consistently received superior and excellent ratings at marching and concert festivals around the state of Alabama. Mr. Mcwhorter is currently the Director of Bands and Fine Arts Department Chair at Jonesboro High School in Jonesboro, GA. He oversees all aspects of the Concert Band, Wind Ensemble, and Marching Band Programs. His Wind Ensembles and Concert bands have consistently received superior and excellent ratings at state assessments under his baton. His bands have performed across the states of Alabama, Georgia, and North Carolina bringing home more than forty awards in his five years at Jonesboro. The Wind Ensemble is also a 2014 featured ensemble for the Kennesaw State Concert Band Invitational. Mr. Mcwhorter resides in Riverdale, Georgia with his beautiful wife Faith D. Mcwhorter and is the father of three children, Lebarron M. Mcwhorter, Genesis N. Mcwhorter, and Joel U. Mcwhorter.

CORY MEALS

• IT CAN BE DONE: EDTPA, PERFORMING ENSEMBLES, AND YOU! Cory Meals is Assistant Director of Bands and Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music Education at Kennesaw State University where his duties include teaching courses in Instrumental Methods, Wind Literature, supervision of student teachers, ensemble conducting, and assistance with all aspects of the Kennesaw State University Marching Band (KSUMB) and Basketball Pep Band. A graduate of VanderCook College of Music and the University of Houston, he is currently completing his Ph.D. in Music Education at the University of Washington. Prior to graduate studies, Cory held positions at Waller High School (TX), Klein Forest High School (TX), and Indian Springs Middle School (TX). Ensembles under his direction received consistent “Superior” ratings, numerous University Interscholastic League (UIL) “Sweepstakes” awards, and advanced to the prestigious 4A Texas State Marching Contest in 2007 and 2009. Mr. Meals has presented music education research in state, national and international venues. Recent presentations have included The Midwest Clinic (2016), NAfME Research Conference in Atlanta, GA (2016) and St. Louis (2014), ICMEM in Sheffield, UK (2015), TMEA in San Antonio, TX (2015), ICMPC in Seoul, South Korea (2014), and the CMS Symposium on Music, Science and Society in Seattle, WA (2014). He maintains an active schedule as an adjudicator, clinician, and designer throughout the United States and Canada and is an active member of NAfME, CBDNA, and GMEA.

GREG MILLER

• FROM STUDENT TO TEACHER-TIPS TO SUCCEED IN YOUR FIRST YEARS IN THE FIELD Greg Miller is in his third year as the Lower School Band Director at Woodward Academy in College Park, Georgia. In this role he instructs beginning band students in the 5th and 6th Grade, and assists with all aspects of the band program including the Middle and Upper School Bands, as well as the Robert W. Woodruff Marching Band. Prior to his appointment at Woodward, Mr. Miller earned a B.M. in Music Education from the University of Georgia in 2014. While there he studied bass trombone from Dr. Joshua Bynum and performed with a variety of ensembles including the Wind Symphony, Trombone Ensemble, Men’s Glee Club, Jazz Ensemble, and Redcoat Marching Band. In this time he held several leadership positions including President of UGA’s CNAfME Chapter and Band Captain of the Redcoat Marching Band. Mr. Miller is a recipient of the Roger L. Dancz Redcoat Band Alumni Scholarship (2014), the Vince Dooley Redcoat Band Scholarship (2013), Director’s Excellence Award (2013), and the Stephen P. Mahoney Award (2012, ‘13). He was also inducted into the Blue Key National Honor Society in 2013. Mr. Miller is an active performer and clinician in the Metro Atlanta Area. His professional memberships include the National Association for Music Education, the Georgia Music Educators Association, and the International Trombone Association. Mr. Miller resides in Atlanta, GA with his beautiful wife, Elizabeth.

HEATHER MILLER

• RIPS, RUNS, AND REALITIES - BUILDING AND MAINTAINING HORN PLAYERS AT ALL LEVELS! Heather Miller is in her 12th year of teaching and had the privilege of opening Locust Grove High School, a part of Henry County Schools, in 2009. Her students have consistently participated in District and State events as well as many university honor bands. Miller was a nominee for Wildcat Teacher of the Year in 2013-2014. Miller is a graduate of Jacksonville State University where she was a member of the Marching Southerners and served as mellophone section leader and visual technician. She was principal hornist for Chamber Winds & Wind Ensemble and performed with the Chamber Winds woodwind quintet as well as JSU Community Orchestra. She performed a Mozart horn concerto as a winner of the Concerto/Aria competition. She studied conducting with Dr. Ken Bodiford and was awarded the opportunity to guest conduct Chamber Winds in concert.Her post-college performances have consisted of playing horn with the Cobb Wind Symphony, Tara Winds, and Henry Players. She enjoys playing horn with Global Missions Project and has been to Brazil three times on music missions trips. She currently performs with the First Baptist of Atlanta Celebration Orchestra & Worship Orchestra.

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JOHN MLYNCZAK

• DESIGNING A MUSIC TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM • BRING MUSIC TO LIFE

John Mlynczak offers an extensive range of experiences in music education. Mr. Mlynczak is the Adjunct Professor of Music Technology at LSU and is President-Elect of the Technology Institute for Music Educators. John is also currently VP of Sales and Marketing at Noteflight, a Hal Leonard company. He is an active performer, maintains a steady clinician schedule in music technology, and is John is also a passionate advocate for music education, serving on the NAMM Support Music and State Advocacy Coalitions, as well as the NAfME Advocacy Leadership Force. Mr. Mlynczak holds degrees in music education, music performance, and educational leadership.

BARRY E. MORGAN

• LAW 101, A LEGAL PRIMER FOR MUSIC TEACHERS Barry E. Morgan is a native of Cobb County Georgia, and received his Bachelor of Music Education degree from Georgia State University in 1976. In 1987, Barry graduated Summa Cum Laude from the John Marshall Law School in Atlanta. From 1988 until 1992, Barry served as an Assistant District Attorney. Barry was the Chief Assistant Solicitor General for Cobb State Court from 1992 until 1998. On March 4, 1998, Governor Zell Miller appointed Barry as the Solicitor General for Cobb County, and he has been elected to that position five times. Barry was a high school band director for the Cobb County Georgia School District serving Wills, North Cobb and Sprayberry High Schools. Barry presents a Legal Seminar for Teachers for various colleges and music conventions including GMEA, the Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic and Music for All.

GLENN MOORE

• RIPS, RUNS, AND REALITIES - BUILDING AND MAINTAINING HORN PLAYERS AT ALL LEVELS!

Glenn Moore is an active musician who performs as both a Horn Player and Conductor with local metro Atlanta community orchestras and churches. Mr. Moore has decades of performing experience with professional and community bands and orchestras, and has led several church orchestras and choirs. He has also numerous musical arrangements and compositions to his credit. Mr. Moore retired from active military service in 1998 after completing nearly 22 years in the United States Army, serving in progressive music leadership positions in six Army Bands and on the staff and faculty at the Armed Forces School of Music. His last assignment was with the Army Ground Forces Band (Forces Command Band) at Fort McPherson, (Atlanta) GA where he served as First Sergeant and senior Horn player. He earned a Bachelor of Music degree (Cum Laude) from Saint Leo College (now University), a Master of Information Systems Management degree (with Distinction) from Keller Graduate School of Management, and has completed post-graduate doctoral course work at Capella University. In his professional civilian career, Mr. Moore serves as the Associate Director for Informatics and Information Resources for the Center for Global Health employed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia. He resides with his wife of 38 years in south metro Atlanta.

MARTIN NORGAARD

• DOES MUSIC MAKE YOU SMARTER? - DEPENDS ON THE MUSIC

Martin Norgaard is Assistant Professor of Music Education at Georgia State University in Atlanta where he is collaborating with faculty in mathematics, computer science, linguistics, and physics to investigate the cognitive processes underlying improvisation. He received the Dean’s Early Career Award in recognition of “outstanding work” as a faculty member of Georgia State University and was just appointed associate faculty of the Neuroscience Institute. He was the guest editor of a recent theme issue of Psychomusicology, Music, Mind, and Brain based on papers from the Improvising Brain Symposium. His research appears in the Journal of Research in Music Education, The International Journal of Music Education (in press), and the interdisciplinary journal Music Perception. He is the author of ten jazz string method books for Mel Bay Publications and the composer of several string orchestra pieces for The FJH Music Company and Alfred Music Publishing.

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january 26th // 10:30am georgia music news // winter 2016

the classic center theatre


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DR. LISA OBERLANDER

• MAKE YOUR CLARINET SECTION SOUND OUTSTANDING Dr. Lisa Oberlander, Professor of clarinet at Columbus State University, has performed throughout the United States, Canada, Europe, and Japan. Her compact disc Times Like These with pianist Yien Wang was released by Potenza Music in 2014, and she is a featured soloist on the Summit Records disc Velocity. Oberlander has performed with the Phoenix Symphony and the Arizona Opera and she performs with the Columbus (GA) Symphony. She has been featured on numerous occasions as a soloist with the Columbus State University Philharmonic Orchestra and the Columbus State University Wind Ensemble, performing concertos by Nielsen, Copland, Mozart, McAllister, and Artie Shaw. Dr. Oberlander’s students have won many competitions including the national MTNA first prize and have been featured soloists with the Georgia Philharmonic, LaGrange Symphony, Sewanee Festival Orchestra, and the CSU Philharmonic Orchestra. Visit www.LisaOberlander.com for more information on Dr. Oberlander and the clarinet studio at the Schwob School of Music at Columbus State University.

COURTNEY ONDRE

• A LESSON IN TEAM WORK - PRHS PRESENTS: THE LITTLE MERMAID

Courtney Chitwood Ondre hails from Johnson City, Tennessee. She has her Masters of Arts in Story Telling Performance from ETSU and her Educational Specialist in Leadership from LMU. She teaches dance and musical theatre at Peachtree Ridge High School in Suwanee, Georgia. She has had several dance pieces adjudicated for National High School Dance Festival, her students have performed at Disney Theme Parks, Parades along with several Disney promotional videos. She enjoys working with theaters around the South East as a director and choreographer.

DR. ROBERT PETHEL

• ANSWERS FOR THE CLASS GUITAR TEACHER (ESPECIALLY THE NON-GUITARIST) • BLUE GUITAR CLASSROOM CURRICULUM

Dr. Rob Pethel is a musician, educator, and creator of the Blue Guitar curriculum. He began his formal music studies at Georgia State University (GSU), earning a B.Mus. with a concentration in classical guitar under John Sutherland in 2002. Rob received a M.Ed. from Auburn University in 2010, with research focusing on guitar pedagogy, ethnomusicology, and public education. In 2015 he successfully defended his Ph.D. dissertation at GSU, which investigated the field of guitar education. Rob is involved with guitar education on many levels. In 2008, he initiated a classroom guitar program at Sutton Middle School of the Atlanta Public Schools where he continues to teach. Rob is a clinician for the NAfME Teaching Guitar Workshop, and has also taught undergraduate courses at GSU in guitar and general music.

SALLY PETTY

• NEW KID ON THE BLOCK

Sally Petty attended Young Harris College and graduated in May 2015 with a Bachelor of Music Education. She accepted her first teaching position with Fulton County Schools, but remains an active instrumentalist teaching French Horn and Mellophone with the Lambert Highschool Band and is excited to join the Georgia Wind Symphony for the 2016-17 season. Sally currently resides in Atlanta, GA and plans to pursue her Masters in Instructional Planning.

RACHEL PLATE

• CREATING, MAINTAINING, AND SHARING CLASSROOM AND ENSEMBLE WEBSITES

Rachel Plate is studying music education at Georgia College. Her love for music has been instilled by her family. She grew up loving music, listening to many different styles and genres. Her dad is a huge classic rock fan, her brother, a pop and country fan, and her mom, also a music educator and music therapist, loves jazz and classical music, and she inspired Rachel to follow her dreams of also becoming a music educator. She started playing piano when she was 5, and was also involved in chorus from a very young age all the way through high school. She loved attending music camps, learning everything she could and drawing inspiration from the people and educators around her, so much so that she am pursuing an elementary education career. She currently teach 3 year olds in a day care, participates in the University Chorus, has sung in the GC Women’s Ensemble, and has enjoyed every minute! Additionally, she have been inspired by technology and the many ways that she can incorporate it into her future classroom, whether it be teaching a lesson on key signatures, sharing a great music video, or designing a web page where students can go to be challenged with extra activities, inspired by other artists, or just need information about my class and what she will teach. She cannot wait to get into the classroom and is excited to share some of the work she have been creating in her amazing classes at Georgia College!!

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DR. ANDREW F. POOR

• BRASS MACHINE! TIPS AND SUGGESTIONS FOR SUCCESSFULLY STARTING AND DEVELOPING YOUNG BRASS PLAYERS.

Andrew F. Poor, DME, is Director of Bands at South Forsyth Middle School in Cumming, Georgia. Previously, he served as the Assistant Director of Bands and Chair of the Fine Arts department at Fayette County High School in Fayetteville, Georgia. From 2006-2015, Dr. Poor served as a part-time music education instructor at the Columbus State University Schwob School of Music. Dr. Poor received his Doctor of Music Education and Master of Music in Trumpet Performance from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. He previously received his Bachelor of Music Education (High Honors) from the University of Florida. Dr. Poor is a member of Phi Beta Mu, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, ASCAP, NAfME, National Band Association, and the Georgia Music Educators Association. In addition, Dr. Poor is past chair of the GMEA Band Adjudication Committee, as well as, a current All-State Band Organizer for one of the 11-12 Symphonic Bands and co-organizer of the District 9 Middle School LGPE. In 2014, he began serving a three-year term as the Southern Division representative to the National Council for Music Composition. Dr. Poor is frequently invited to serve as a consultant, adjudicator, clinician, and guest conductor. He has presented at the Midwest Clinic, Ohio Music Educators Association State Conference, Florida Music Educators Association State Conference, and at five Georgia Music Educators Association State In-Service Conferences. Dr. Poor currently serves as Co-Brass Coordinator for the Spirit of Atlanta and as a consultant to the Cavaliers and Pacific Crest drum and bugle corps.

DR. HARRY E. PRICE

• NAVIGATING PROMOTION AND TENURE

Dr. Harry E. Price is Professor of Music and Music Education at Kennesaw State University’s School of Music. Previously served as Professor of Music and Head of Music Education at Universities of Oregon and Alabama. He is on the Editorial Board of Enseñar Música: Revista Panamericana de Investigación, and a guest reviewer for Psychology of Music, Journal of Research in Music Education, Musica Scientiae and was Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. Previously served as a member of the editorial boards of Revista de Psicodidáctica, International, Journal of Music Education, Research Studies in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, and Update: Applications of Research in Music Education. He edited Music Education Research: An Anthology from the Journal of Research in Music Education and has published widely more than 75 research papers in journals, including Boletín de Investigación Educativo‐Musical, the Journal of Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, Research Studies in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Update: Applications of Research in Music Education, Contributions to Music Education, International Journal of Music Education, and Journal of Band Research. He has given research presentations and keynote speeches at national and international meetings, including in Argentina, Asia, Australia, Chile, Eastern and Western Europe, Peru, and USA. Dr. Price’s current principal areas of interest are using virtual reality for rehearsing in the music classrooms and ensemble settings and research techniques used by colleagues. He is keenly interested in fostering music education research and working with people internationally.

T. DEVIN REID

• #THROWBACKTHURSDAY: WHAT RICHARD SIMMONS ACTUALLY TAUGHT US!

T. Devin Reid is currently an active musician and educator throughout the southeast. A native of Fayetteville, NC, Mr. Reid is a 2005 recipient of the North Carolina Teaching Fellows Scholarship. He holds a Master of Music from Georgia State University and a Bachelor of Music from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Mr. Reid has taught music in all grades K-12 and his ensembles have performed at numerous events including the NC Muscadine Festival, NC PAS Day of Percussion and the Virginia International Music Festival. Mr. Reid has presented clinics and masterclasses on education and percussion pedagogy in NC and GA. He is also an active adjudicator throughout Georgia and North Carolina. As a performer, Mr. Reid is an actively sought after musician. He was the percussionist for the Delos recording artist “Da Capo Brass”. Their debut album “From The Beginning” stormed the iTunes classical charts at #8 in January 2012. Currently, Mr. Reid is a freelance percussionist in the Atlanta area. He has also been a member of the regionally acclaimed bluegrass band, “T.R. and the Boys” as baritone vocalist and mandolin player. He is a member of the National Association for Music Education, the National Band Association, the Percussive Arts Society, is an endorser for Sabian Cymbals and a registered song writer with BMI. Mr. Reid is happily married to his beautiful wife Amy and they reside in Tucker, GA with their daughter Katelynn.

DR. MYRA RHODEN

• USE WHAT YOU’VE GOT TO GET WHAT YOU WANT!

A native of Tuskegee, Alabama, Myra Rhoden received the BS and MA degrees in Music Education from the University of Alabama and the DMA from the University of Southern Mississippi. After teaching nine years in Alabama, Dr. Rhoden joined the faculty of Fayette County High School in 2003. Recent Fayette Band invitational performances include the GMEA In-Service Conference (2016 & 2009) and performances at Concert and Honor Band Festivals at the University of Alabama, the University of South Carolina, the University of Georgia, and Kennesaw State University. The Marching Tigers have won numerous Grand and Class Championships and performed at the 2015 Florida Citrus Parade in Orlando, the 2014 Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Christmas Parade, the 2012 Waikiki Holiday Parade in Hawaii, the 2009 New Year’s Day Parade in London, England, and the 2007 Tournament of Roses Parade in California. Dr. Rhoden has been awarded the National Band Association’s Citation of Excellence on four occasions, has been named STAR Teacher and Teacher of the Year, and is a member of Phi Beta Mu. In 2009, she founded the Athena Music and Leadership Camp, an all-girls summer band and orchestra camp created to promote musical excellence while emphasizing self-esteem and leadership skills. Dr. Rhoden serves on the Board of Directors for the Southeastern United States (SEUS) Honor Band Clinic at Troy University, served on the Board of Directors for the Alabama Bandmasters Association, and is honored to be a clinician and

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BRADLEY RIKARD

• PRACTICAL AND TRULY APPLICABLE WAYS OF INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN A BAND, ORCHESTRA, AND CHORUS CLASSROOM • STRATEGIES FOR USING DATA TO REACH THE INDIVIDUAL MUSICIAN IN AN INSTRUMENTAL PROGRAM

Mr. Bradley Rikard is currently the Associate Director of Bands at Barber Middle School in Acworth, GA. Before working at Barber, he was the Assistant Director of Bands at Lindley Middle School in Cobb County. While at Lindley, the Band Program experienced tremendous growth in quantity and quality .In addition to his middle school responsibilities, Mr. Rikard assists with several outstanding marching bands including Hillgrove High School and North Cobb High School. In 2015, he served as a visual and music technician for the inaugural year of the Kennesaw State University Marching Owls. Mr. Rikard completed his Master’s of Music Education from Florida State University and his Bachelor of Music degrees in Music Education and Saxophone Performance from Georgia Southern University. He is an active performer as Principal Saxophone with the Tara Winds adult community band, which was recently selected to perform at the 2015 Midwest Clinic in Chicago. As a performer in both classical and jazz idioms, Mr. Rikard has shared the stage with world-renowned musicians such as Eugene Rousseau, Otis Murphy, The Zagreb Quartet, The New Century Quartet, Tom “Bones” Malone, Mark Camphouse, Steve Bryant, Harry Watters, Sam Hazo, Jamey Aebersold, and Colonel John Bourgeois. Mr. Rikard’s professional affiliations include: National Association for Music Education, Georgia Music Educators Association, and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. He currently resides in Kennesaw with his fiancée, Megan and golden retriever, Grainger.

MICHAEL ROBERTS

• ELEMENTARY MUSIC ON THE MOVE! • RHYTHM... THE ENGINE MELODY... THE DIRECTION IMPROVISATION...THE SYNTHESIS...

Michael teaches children & undergraduates elemental music, movement, improvisation & developmental pedagogy at the University of Florida. He is degreed from University of Florida and Miami University, with Master Level Orff Schulwerk and NBTS early childhood music education certifications.

DR. SHELLEY M. SANDERSON

• OUT THERE IN THE OPEN:  A REAL WORLD DISCUSSION OF ETHICS IN THE MUSIC CLASSROOM • MUSIC ACROSS THE SPECTRUM: INCLUSION TIPS FOR STUDENTS WITH AUTISM

Dr. Shelley M. Sanderson, a native of Warner Robins, GA, joined the Young Harris College music faculty in the fall of 2015 as the Coordinator of Music Education. Dr. Sanderson received her PhD from the University of Florida (2015). While at the University of Florida she taught a freshman humanities course and assistant directed the UF Women’s Chorale. Dr. Sanderson is a graduate of Georgia College and State University (MME) and Georgia College and State University (BME). She has also had previous K-12 teaching/conducting experiences in Middle Georgia. She taught general music, chorus, piano, music appreciation, and musical theater. She has musically directed and conducted multiple musicals. She had the opportunity in 2009 to perform with her Houston County High School choir in Carnegie Hall, New York City under the direction of guest conductor John Rutter. Dr. Sanderson has run a private voice and piano studio since 2006, has been published in the Florida Music Director and The Fifth International Symposium on Assessment in Music Education, and is an active choral clinician and conference presenter. Dr. Sanderson was awarded the David Wilmot Prize for Excellence in Music Education (2014), while at the University of Florida and was the vocal winner for Georgia College and State University Aria/Concerto Competition (2010). Her major research interests include musical theater on the high school level, ethics in music education, music and the exceptional child, and music education assessment.

DR. H. DWIGHT SATTERWHITE

• MARCH YOUR WAY TO A BETTER BAND... BUILDING GREAT BANDS THROUGH GREAT MARCH LITERATURE

Dr. H. Dwight Satterwhite is a Professor of Music at the University of Georgia. This year marks Satterwhite’s 50th year of teaching, a career that includes 16 years of teaching in the public schools of Alabama, Texas, and Florida. During his 34 year tenure with UGA, he served as the Director of Bands and Associate Director of Bands for 23 years. Dr. Satterwhite is the co-author of “Power in The Progress System”, an enrichment curriculum for bands. He maintains an active schedule as a conductor, guest conductor, adjudicator, clinician, and pedagogue of band performance practices throughout the United States, Great Britain, Germany, Israel, France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Belgium, Australia, and Brazil. Under his leadership, The University of Georgia Band program received international recognition through the release of Compact Disc recordings featuring both premieré performances of commissioned works and standard concert band repertoire. The University of Georgia “Redcoat Marching Band was awarded the highest honor for Collegiate Marching Bands, the Sudler Trophy, in 2000. Dr. Satterwhite’s UGA Wind Symphony has presented several concerts at GMEA and was twice selected to perform at the College Band Directors National Association National Conference. His recordings have received outstanding reviews and were distributed internationally by Summit Records. Dr. Satterwhite has also conducted many nationally distributed recordings for music publishers including Carl Fischer, Southern Music, C. Alan Publications, and TRN, introducing new band literature to universities and secondary schools world wide. Prior to his appointment at The University of Georgia, Dr. Satterwhite was Director of Bands at Valdosta State University and for sixteen years. winter 2016 // georgia music news

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DR. BERNADETTE SCRUGGS

• A LESSON IN TEAM WORK - PRHS PRESENTS: THE LITTLE MERMAID

Dr. Bernadette Scruggs received her Bachelor of Music in Education and her Master of Music in Education from Columbus State University. She earned both an Ed.S. and a Ph.D. in music education from Georgia State University. Prior to teaching in the Gwinnett County School System, Dr. Scruggs taught for both the Floyd County and the Clayton County School Systems. While teaching in Clayton County, Dr. Scruggs was a director of the Clayton County Honor Orchestra. Under her direction, this middle school string ensemble performed at the Southern Division Music Educator’s National Conference in Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Scruggs has also been a director for the Clayton County Youth Symphony, which was invited to perform for the Georgia Music Association Educators Conference. At Pointe South Middle School, where she taught for eleven years, the orchestra performed at several festivals, receiving First Place Awards as well as consistently receiving superior ratings at yearly performance ensemble events. Over her career, five of Dr. Scruggs’s groups have been invited to perform at the Georgia Music Educators Association annual In-Service Convention. Dr. Scruggs was voted the 1995 Pointe South Teacher of the Year and the 1999 Hull Middle School Teacher of the Year. Currently, she is an orchestra director at Peachtree Ridge High School. Dr. Scruggs has served as state secretary for the Georgia chapter of the American String Teachers Association and as both the Performance Evaluation Vice President and President for the Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA). She currently serves on the GMEA Executive Board as the Past Presidents’ Representative.

RICHARD SELPH

• HOW MANY CANDY BARS DO WE HAVE TO SELL TO PAY OFF OUR $50,000 DEBT?! Rick Selph is a proud five-year band program parent and volunteer, currently serving his fourth year as the President of the Collins Hill Band Booster Program after serving as the treasurer for one year. His son Jesse graduated from Collins Hill after four years in the band program and his daughter Maggie, will be a sophomore in the program this year. As president, Rick’s primary focus has been to bring the Collins Hill Band Booster organization into alignment with the guidelines and laws that govern non-profits both at a county and federal level. He has worked to establish practices and guidelines that manage cash flow, expenses, fundraising and tax reporting requirements. In the past five years, the Collins Hill Band Boosters have been able to move from reactionary, to a proactive planning mode that affords the opportunity to forecast income, plan expenses, and streamline fundraising activity. Rick is a Finance Manager for RICOH Corporation, where he has been involved in financial analysis and reporting for the past 16 years. Prior to this, Rick worked with FedEx Corporation as a project manager for new location development. After graduating from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1988, Rick started his professional career by working with the YMCA of Greater Richmond. He spent 10 years as Executive Director of a year round recreation facility that served 1000 students each year. This marked the beginning of his lifelong work and volunteering with non-profit organizations.

PATRICK SHERIDAN

• BEGINNING BAND BASICS-DAILY WORKOUTS AND TECHNIQUES DESIGNED TO ENERGIZE AND MOTIVATE THE YOUNG BAND STUDENT Patrick Sheridan is one of the most celebrated tuba soloists in his instrument’s history. He has performed more than 3,000 concerts in over 50 countries in venues ranging from the White House to NBA half-time shows to the Hollywood Bowl. Mr. Sheridan has served on the music faculties at Arizona State University, Northern Arizona University, The Rotterdam Conservatory, The Royal Northern College of Music and The Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. He most recently served on the music faculty at the UCLA where he conducted the Wind Ensemble and Brass Ensemble and taught tuba/ euphonium. He is the co-author of the world’s best selling method for instrumental improvement, The Breathing Gym, and is the Chief Design Consultant for Jupiter Band Instruments, XO Brass and Hercules Stands. He is also the Founder of The Band Director Academy, a continuing education program for music educators.

RACHAEL SMITH

• READING, WRITING OR ROTE-TEACHING? BEGINNING INSTRUMENTAL CLASSROOM IDEAS BORROWED FROM THE ELEMENTARY MUSIC TEACHER Originally from northwest Ohio, Ms. Smith currently teaches orchestra and general music at Howard Middle School in Bibb County, Macon, Georgia. Currently in her eighth year of teaching, her students regularly receive superior ratings at Large Group Performance Evaluation. Ms. Smith received her bachelor’s degree in music education from Indiana Wesleyan University in Marion, Indiana, and master’s in music education from Georgia College and State University. Ms. Smith’s primary instrument is violin, but she also plays piano largely due to the fact that her own parents would not allow her quit in middle school. Ms. Smith began observing music classrooms at an early age in her mother’s elementary music and later middle school chorus classroom. Ms. Smith regularly plays violin at her local church and in her spare time also enjoys hiking and camping.

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SANDRA SNOW • CONDUCTING MASTERCLASS

As conductor, teacher, and scholar, Sandra Snow’s work spans a wide variety of ages, abilities, and musics. She holds appointments in conducting and music education at the MSU College of Music, where she interacts with undergraduate and graduate students in the areas of conducting, choral pedagogy, and choral singing. She is a recipient of the MSU Teacher-Scholar Award. She conducts the Michigan State University Women’s Chamber Ensemble, a group that has appeared as featured performers at American Choral Directors Association conferences (Central Division 2014; National Conference 2009; Central Division 2008; MI-ACDA 2007). As guest conductor, she travels extensively conducting all-state and honor choirs and holding residencies with singers of all ages. She recently was a principal conductor at the Festival 500 International Choral Festival in Newfoundland, Canada. Recent guest conducting appearances include all-state choirs in Colorado, Tennessee, Michigan, Maryland, and Virginia. She is the 2015 principal conductor of the Pacific International Children’s Choir and is a featured headliner of the 2015 Texas Choral Director’s Association convention. Snow will serve as principal guest conductor for the Texas Christian University Chamber Singers tour of Central Europe. She is artistic director of the 2016 ACDA National Youth Choir traveling to Prague, Salzburg, and Vienna. Prior to joining the MSU faculty, Snow served on the faculties of the University of Michigan and Northern Illinois University, and as music director of the Glen Ellyn Children’s Chorus (Anima). She is author of the DVD Conducting-Teaching: Real World Strategies for Success published by GIA (2009), a resource for conductor-teachers at all levels of teaching. She edits the choral music series In High Voice published by Boosey & Hawkes and is a member of the Choral Music Experience Choral Teacher Certification Board.

DR. LAURA A. STAMBAUGH • NAVIGATING PROMOTION AND TENURE • OBOE REFRESHER!

Laura A. Stambaugh is Associate Professor and Head of Music Education at Georgia Southern University. She teaches courses in music education and music cognition and supervises Field Experiences. Prior to joining the faculty of Georgia Southern, she taught at Western Washington University, WA, and spent eleven years teaching beginning and middle school band and chorus in New Hampshire. Dr. Stambaugh serves as College Division Chair at the state and district levels of GMEA. She has presented at local, national, and international conferences. Her publications appear in Journal of Research in Music Education, Update: Applications of Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, Music Performance Research, Music Educators Journal, and Teaching Music.

DR. ANDREA DERENZIS STRAUSS • HOW TO APPLY AND BE INVITED TO PERFORM FOR NATIONAL AND REGIONAL CONFERENCES

Andrea DeRenzis Strauss is the Conductor and Artistic Director of the Tara Winds Community Band and has taught elementary, middle, high school, and college at both public and private schools in Georgia. She is the former Director of Bands at Georgia Tech, and former Associate Professor of Music at Shorter University where she taught conducting, music education curriculum, wind pedagogy, and conducted both the Wind Ensemble and Chamber Orchestra. Her university ensembles performed in Australia, China, and Ireland, as well as Southern Division CBDNA/NBA Conventions, and GMEA In-Service Conferences. From 1992-1996, Dr. Strauss served as a Director of the Atlanta Olympic Band, a 350 member honor band participating in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in NYC, the U.S. Presidential Inauguration Parade in Washington D.C., and Opening and Closing Ceremonies for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games. In addition to adjudicating and conducting all-state and honor bands across the United States, she has conducted in Italy, adjudicated in Canada and Ireland, and presented clinics on various aspects of instrumental music education and conducting for the NAfME Division In-Service Conferences, TBA Convention, GMEA In-Service Conferences, and various universities. Articles by Dr. Strauss have been published in the MEJ and NBA journals and she has served as Rehearsal Lab Conductor for the Midwest Clinic. Professor Strauss is a charter member of Tara Winds and is the former Principal Clarinetist and Associate Conductor. Under her leadership, Tara Winds has performed for the 69th Annual Midwest Clinic, the Southern Division CBDNA/NBA Convention, the GMEA In-Service Conference, and various university band clinics.

DR. SKIP TAYLOR

• USING TECHNOLOGY FOR UNDERSTANDING AND IMPROVING BOWED TONE PRODUCTION AMONG ALL LEVELS OF STRING PLAYERS

Dr. Skip Taylor is Associate Professor of Music and Chair of Music Education at the University of Georgia. He earned his Masters and Ph.D in Music Education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and holds a Bachelors degree in Music Education from Winthrop University in Rock Hill South Carolina. Prior to his appointment at UGA, he taught middle school and high school orchestra in the Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools and Forsyth County Schools in North Carolina. He was the conductor and director of the Winston-Salem Youth Symphony from 1997-2001 and was the founding Director and conductor of the Greensboro Symphony Junior Strings from 2000-2001. At the University of Georgia he teaches undergraduate and graduate music education classes and administrates the Summer Educational Advancement for Teachers (SEAT) Program for graduate students. He also serves as director of the UGA Summer Music Camps, UGA String Project, and the 21st Century Grant Program for Strings and Band Education in the Boys and Girls Clubs in Athens Clarke County. An active clinician and adjudicator throughout the United States and Abroad, Dr. Taylor has presented workshops and performed extensively in the Folk and Bluegrass medium. Recently Dr. Taylor was invited to conduct and present workshops in Almaty Kazahkstan and Eldoret Kenya where he started an orchestra at the Moi Girls School. His research interests include the Physics of Bowed String Instruments and the Pedagogy of Instrumental Improvisation. He has performed and presented workshops and nationally and internationally related to his folk music interests. winter 2016 // georgia music news

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DR. KELLY THOMAS

• SIGHT SINGING IN THE STRING CLASSROOM

Dr. Kelly Thomas teaches high school orchestra at Kell High School in Marietta, Georgia. She previously taught high school chorus at the same high school and beginning strings in the Sharon and Braintree Public Schools in Massachusetts. Dr. Thomas has received degrees from Boston University, Boston Conservatory, and the University of Georgia. The focus of her doctoral dissertation was sight singing for instrumental students. Dr. Thomas has presented sessions on sight singing in the string classroom at the 2016 NAfME Music Research and Teacher Education National Conference and the 2016 NAfME National In-Service Conference. Beyond teaching, Dr. Thomas is an active violinist and vocalist with the Georgia Symphony Orchestra, Uncommon Practice, and Keltic Kudzu. She enjoys traveling and has been to over 100 countries.

BONITA THOMIE

• MAXIMIZING TIME IN MUSIC THROUGH DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING CENTERS Bonita Thomie received her degrees from Macon, Jr. College, Georgia College, and Georgia State University. She has been teaching Music 38 years combined in the Bibb and Houston County School Systems and served as an adjunct professor at Wesleyan College. She was District Eleven Elementary chair for eight years and served as GMEA and was teacher of the years at two schools. State Elementary chair for two years. She is a past director for the Houston County Honor Choir which under her leadership performed at the GMEA Teacher In-Service Conference. She is the Minister of Music at New Fellowship Baptist Church in Macon, GA, the MIOSM Chair for GMEA, and presently teaches music at Parkwood Elementary in Warner Robins, GA where she teaches general music, chorus, and strings. Ms. Thomie has discovered allowing students to work at their own pace with through Learning Centers is a great motivation for them. The students love it.

RUSS THOMPSON

• 0-5: THE DEVELOPMENTAL YEARS OF A BAND DIRECTOR- WHAT I NEEDED TO KNOW BUT DIDN’T

Mr. Russ Thompson is in his second year as Director of Bands at Woodland High School – Henry County. Prior to Woodland, he served two years as Assistant Director of Bands/Instructor of Music at Campbellsville University, in Campbellsville, KY. His primary responsibilities were assisting the Director of Bands in all administrative, programming, and recruiting areas of the CU Band program. Mr. Thompson’s undergraduate teaching responsibilities included; Basic Conducting, Applied Conducting, Secondary Instrumental Methods and Literature, Marching Band Techniques, and Understanding Music. In 2012, Mr. Thompson completed the Master’s of Music in Wind Band Conducting at Georgia State University. As a student of Dr. Robert Ambrose, he conducted the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, Wind Orchestra, and University Band. From 2008-2010, Mr. Thompson served as the Director of Bands at Duluth High School in Duluth, Georgia. From 2005-2007, Mr. Thompson served as band director at Lauderdale County High School in Florence, Alabama. Mr. Thompson was the primary music teacher for grades K-12, teaching elementary general music, beginning band, and 7-12th grade band. Mr. Thompson also holds a Master’s in Education degree from Auburn University where he also served as a Graduate Assistant with the Auburn University Bands. He is a 2005 graduate of the University of North Alabama, earning a Bachelor’s of Music in Music Education. In addition, he has attended conducting classes with Frank Ticheli, Mallory Thompson, H. Robert Reynolds, Alan McMurray, Jerry Junkin, Gary Green, Mark Scatterday, Kevin Sedatole, John Lynch and Jamie Nix. Mr. Thompson is a member of NAfME, GMEA, NBA, and the ASBDA.

SEAN THROWER

• TRAVERSING THE FRETBOARD: WORKING OUTSIDE THE CAGED SYSTEM

A native of middle Georgia, Sean is a performing, concert musician and teacher with experience in a variety of playing styles. He performs regularly as a solo classical guitarist, holding both a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in classical guitar performance from the University of Georgia, where he also had an assistantship and taught a course on guitar methods. Notable classical performances include master classes with David Russell, Jason Vieaux, Pepe Romero, Sheron Isbin, Eduardo Meirinhos. He has also performed as solo guitarist with the UGA Symphony Orchestra and combined choirs, as guitarist for the UGA Men’s Varsity Singers, and soloist with the Rome Symphony Orchestra. Sean is the author of a guitar method book titled Traversing the Fretboard: Utilizing the CAGED System in More Ways than One, released in May of 2016. Actively, he is singer/guitarist for modern acoustic duo, Terminus Falls. Their first album “Getting Lost” was released in March 2016 through Curvepoint Media Label. Sean is currently on staff as Adjunct Professor of Guitar at Berry College, Georgia Highlands College, and Dalton State College.

JIM TINTER

• BOOMWHACKERS — THE BIG BANG FOR THE BABY BUDGET • SONG WRITING IN THE ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL CLASSROOM • GARAGEBAND GOODIES

Jim Tinter is a composer, clinician, and retired educator from Medina, Ohio. He has presented dozens of workshops for NAfME, AOSA, ARS, and The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Jim’s dynamic and interactive clinics incorporate moving, singing, and playing instruments, in addition to entertaining and informative multi-media presentations.

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SHELLEY TOMICH

• RAINBOW UKULELE: HOW TO START AN UKULELE PROGRAM IN THE ELEMENTARY GENERAL MUSIC CLASSROOM Shelley Tomich taught elementary band, chorus, and general music in Atlanta, GA for 13 years. During this time, she won Teacher of the Year, served as the lead teacher for her grade level, and served on the county technology leadership team. She has a BME in instrumental music education from the University of Alabama, MME in vocal and general music from the University of Georgia, and the Ed.S. degree in Technology in Schools from the University of Missouri. She started her publishing company, Pitch Publications, in 2014 in order to share Pitch Hill, Rainbow Ukulele, and other teaching resources with fellow music educators.

DR. CLIFFORD N. TOWNER

• GOLF: A METAPHOR FOR CREATIVE CONCERT PROGRAMMING Dr. Clifford N. Towner is Director of Band Activities and Associate Professor of Music at Georgia College and State University. His duties include conducting the Wind Symphony and Jazz Band, as well as teaching classes in conducting and music education. Dr. Towner holds a D.M.A. degree in Wind Conducting from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he studied with Dr. Carolyn Barber. Additionally, he holds a Masters of Music degree in Music Education from Wright State University, having studied with Dr. David Booth, and a Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. Dr. Towner also taught in the public schools for ten years in Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Towner’s scholarly pursuits are in the area of wind-band literature and conducting performance practice. Recent contributions in this area include a 2011 update to the 1978 Acton Ostling, Jr. wind-band literature study; contribution to the eighth volume of Teaching Music Through Performance in Band; as well as presentations at GMEA, CBDNA and WASBE. Dr. Towner maintains an active schedule as a popular guest conductor, clinician and drill writer. He is a member of the College Band Directors National Association (CBDNA), World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensembles (WASBE), Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA), The Association of Concert Bands (ACB) and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. He is also an honorary member of Kappa Kappa Psi. Cliff resides in the Milledgeville, GA area with his wife Gina, and their daughter Laura and son Nathan.

DANIEL TREUMAN

• HOW MANY CANDY BARS DO WE HAVE TO SELL TO PAY OFF OUR $50,000 DEBT?! Daniel Treuman joined the faculty at Collins Hill as the Assistant Director of Bands in 2010 and took over as the Director of Bands in 2011. Under his direction, all programs at Collins Hill have flourished including the Concert Ensembles, Marching Band, Jazz Bands, Basketball Band, Indoor Drumline, Winter Guard and more. Recent accolades include the Collins Hill Symphonic Winds being invited to perform at the 2015 UGA January Music Festival, the 2015 MFA Southeastern Concert Festival, and the 2016 GMEA In-Service Conference. Daniel has also been a Teacher of the Year nominee each of the past five years. Daniel received his Bachelors of Music degree from The University of Georgia. While at UGA, he studied euphonium with Professor David Zerkel and performed as a member of the Wind Ensemble, Wind Symphony, Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble and Redcoat Marching Band. Daniel marched euphonium as a member of the Phantom Regiment Drum and Bugle Corps during the 2007-2009 seasons. Highlights of his tenure with the corps include being selected as a finalist for the Mark Glasscoe Member of the Year Award in 2009 and placing first at the Drum Corps International World Championships in 2008. Daniel has worked as a tour staff and brass staff member for the Phantom Regiment and is currently in his third year as a member of the brass staff for The Cavaliers. Daniel’s professional affiliations include NAFME, GMEA, and NBA. He also serves as the GMEA District 13 Band Chair. Daniel currently resides in Atlanta, Georgia with his wife Kathryn and their dog Eleanor.

BRANDON TUCKER

• GETTING HIRED AS A MUSIC EDUCATOR: YOUR STEPS TO SUCCESS

Brandon Tucker has served as Performing Arts Specialist for Savannah-Chatham Schools since 2013, managing all band, chorus, orchestra, piano, elementary music, theatre, and dance programs district-wide. He conducts teacher observations, recruits prospective teacher candidates, manages a system-wide budget, collaborates with other arts organizations, and is responsible for all curriculum and assessment documents for Savannah’s 95 Performing Arts programs. Mr. Tucker holds an Ed.S. in Educational Leadership from Valdosta State University, as well as a Georgia Level 6 Educational Leadership Certificate.

KIRA TUCKER

• DATA IS NOT A FOUR LETTER WORD!

Ms. Tucker has been teaching choir in Chatham County Public School system for the last 9 years. She received her Bachelours degree from Amstrong State University and her Masters degree from Georgia Southern University.

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JODY UNDERWOOD

• FILM SCORING AND SOUND EFFECTS IN THE MUSIC CLASSROOM • DIGITAL AUDIO BASICS FOR THE MUSIC EDUCATOR Jody has been working in the field of music education technology for over 15 years. His cutting-edge product knowledge (of music, audio, video and computer technology) is evident in his daily interactions with teachers. Because of his love of music, Jody also devotes many non-working hours to utilizing his musical gifts at church. In addition to leading the church band from the piano during weekly services, he also sings, plays keyboards and runs sound and lights for an 80’s band, MIXTAPE. Jody resides in Murfreesboro, TN with his wife, Roxanne, and 2 beautiful daughters, Ryley and Delaney. Jody earned his BA in Commercial Keyboard with a Technology Emphasis at Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee.

ROLAND VENTURA

• WANT TO GET EVERYBODY INVOLVED IN YOUR FINE ARTS? START A MARIACHI PROGRAM!

Roland Ventura is currently the Director of Bands at Pinckneyville Middle School in Peachtree Corners, Georgia. Upon his appointment in 2007, the Pinckneyville Band program has grown to include over 340 students. The students participate in numerous different ensembles including the Beginning Band, Jazz Panthers, Pep Band, Percussion Ensemble, Woodwind Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Pinckneyville POP!, PMS Concert Band, PMS Symphonic Band, and the PMS Symphonic Winds. Students in the PMS Band program participate in several GMEA band events such as District Honor Bands, AllState Band, Solo & Ensemble, and Large Group Performance Evaluation. In addition to his duties as band director, Mr. Ventura has served as the lead International Baccalaureate (IB) teacher for the Pinckneyville Fine Arts Department and has been selected as a Gwinnett County Lead Teacher for Middle School Bands. In 2013, Mr. Ventura had the honor of being selected as the Teacher of the Year for Pinckneyville Middle School. Mr. Ventura obtained both his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Music Education from Troy University (then Troy State University) in Troy, Alabama. Prior to attending college, Mr. Ventura proudly served his country as member of the United States Army Band Program. Before his appointment to Pinckneyville, Mr. Ventura was the Director of Bands and Instrumental Studies at the Virginia Beach Visual and Performing Arts Academy at Salem High School in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

JOSHUA WALKER

• WGI WINDS - THE WHAT’S, HOW’S, WHY’S & WHY NOT’S.... Mr. Walker is the former assistant director of bands at Ola High School and former director of the Ola High School Indoor Performance Ensemble. Under Mr. Walkers direction the Ola IPE received the gold (2015) and bronze (2016) medals at the Winter Guard International Winds World Championships. Mr. Walker is a graduate of the University of Alabama (2012), where he completed a Masters of Education in Curriculum Development. While at the University of Alabama, he worked extensively with the “Million Dollar” marching band, pep bands, and concert bands, as well as performing with the University Wind Ensemble and Symphonic bands. Mr. Walker received his Bachelors in Music Education in 2009 from Jacksonville State University, where he was an active student leader and served as drum major for the JSU “Marching Southerners” and principle clarinetist for the JSU Chamber Winds and Wind Ensemble. While at Jacksonville State University (2005-2009), Mr. Walker was also a member of the Spirit Drum and Bugle Corps as a brass performer (mellophone) and drum major. Mr. Walker is currently studying to attain a DMA in wind conducting from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa. And resides in Tuscaloosa, Alabama with his partner Jay Fox.

STEVEN WATSON

• FOR LOVE OR REWARD: MEANINGFUL MOTIVATION FOR CONTINUED STUDENT SUCCESS Steven Watson currently serves as the Director of Bands at Jasper Middle School, Director of Athletic Bands at Reinhardt University, high brass instructor for Spirit of Atlanta Drum and Bugle corps, and Brass Caption Supervisor for Atlanta CV Drum and Bugle corps. Previously Steven held the position of Artist in Residence at Kennesaw State University. Highly active as a freelance trumpet player, Steven performs with numerous ensembles in and around the Southeast, as well as, making many solo appearances each year. In addition to his teaching and performing responsibilities he is in frequent demand as a clinician and adjudicator.

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DR. BRIAN WESOLOWSKI

• DON’T BLAME THEM, DON’T BLAME THE ENVIRONMENT, DON’T BLAME THE CIRCUMSTANCE: KEYS TO INSPIRING STUDENTS

Dr. Brian Wesolowski is an Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Georgia, Hugh Hodgson School of Music. He earned his Ph.D. in music education from the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. He holds a Bachelor of Music in music education and jazz performance as well as a Master of Music Education from Oberlin College Conservatory of Music. In addition, he holds a Master of Music in jazz studies from the University of North Texas.

MARGUERITE WILDER

• TEACHING AND REHEARSING THE MIDDLE SCHOOL BAND • THE RECORDER: A FOUNDATION FOR A COMPREHENSIVE AND CREATIVE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC PROGRAM

Mrs. Wilder is widely recognized as a conductor and clinician, having conducted All State and Honor Bands through out the United States, Canada, Europe and Australia. Serving as a resource person for in-service sessions, she works with both local and regional school systems and universities. Her clinics on Motivational Techniques for the Beginning Band are often featured at state and national conventions. Mrs. Wilder taught middle school band at the following schools during her 30 year teaching career: The Lovett School, Woodward Academy and Tapp Middle School. Mrs. Wilder is a contributing editor for the books: Do It Band and Recorder Methods by James Froseth; Habits of a Successful Musician ; Habits of a Successful Middle School Musician. She is a contributing author for Teaching Music through Performance in Beginning Band, Vol. 1 & 2: and Teaching Music through Performance in Middle School Band; GIA Publications, Inc. Marguerite Wilder is a graduate of the University of Georgia and Georgia State University. Professional organization affiliations include MENC, GMEA, NBA, and Phi Beta Mu

TREY WRIGHT

• TECHNIQUES FOR JAZZ GUITAR IMPROVISATION

Trey Wright is a jazz guitarist, composer, and recording artist based in Roswell, Ga. In addition to performing with his trio, Trey also freelances in the Athens and Atlanta area and has performed with Yellowjackets bassist Jimmy Haslip, John Patitucci, Joe Lovano, Corey Christiansen and Darmon Meader of the New York Voices. Trey has performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Jazz A Vienne, and the World Sacred Music Festival in Bangalore, India. As a solo guitarist and with his trio, Trey has been a featured performer at the Athens Music and Arts Festival, the Lake Oconee Jazz Festival, and the Atlanta Jazz Festival. In early 2008, Trey began playing with the Georgia Symphony Jazz Orchestra. Several of Trey’s compositions with the group have received international airplay and have been featured on Sirius radio and NPR’s All Things Considered. In December of 2002, Trey completed a Master of Music degree in Jazz Studies at Georgia State University and he currently teaches Applied Jazz Guitar, Jazz Theory and Composition, Jazz Guitar Ensemble, Jazz History, Jazz Improvisation and The History of Rock at Kennesaw State University. Trey has also taught at LaGrange College, Gainesville College, the Atlanta Institute of Music and was a Jazz Artist in Residence at the University of Georgia. In addition, Trey writes a column on Jazz Harmony for the Guitar for the quarterly print magazine Just Jazz Guitar. His most recent CD Songs From Oak Avenue was released on Blue Canoe Records in the spring of 2015.

JAY WUCHER • HERE COMES THE JUDGE

Mr. Wucher has been a teacher, department chair, Coordinator of Music Education and Acting Executive Director of Curriculum with the Fulton County Schools. He retired from Fulton County in 2004 and currently works as a Fine Arts Consultant for the Clarke and Baldwin County Schools as is on the faculty of Clayton State University. In addition, he serves as the Chair of the Spivey Hall Education Committee and on the Education Committee for the National Academy for the Recording Arts and Sciences. He holds a Bachelors and Masters of Music Education degree from the University of Southern Mississippi and and Ed.S from the University of West Georgia. He has performed, presented and conducted at the Midwest International Band and Orchestra Clinic and has done numerous presentations at GMEA. Mr. Wucher has been adjudicating bands Georgia for over thirty years and has been and was in the first class of Certified Adjudicators when the program was initiated. He holds membership in Phi Beta Mu, Kappa Kappa Psi, Phi Mu Alpha, Pi Kappa Lambda and Sigma Nu. Mr. Wucher was named Georgia Music Educator of the Year in 1995. He is the father of four children and lives in McDonough with his wife Susan.

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PERFORMING GROUPS BENJAMIN E. MAYS HIGH SCHOOL

WIND SYMPHONY WILLIAM OLIVER, DIRECTOR

The Benjamin E. Mays High School Band Program was established alongside the school in September 1981 under the leadership of Mr. Sumner Smith. The vision of Mr. Smith continues today as over 200 students are enrolled in the course offerings of the band program. The band program for 26 years has received consecutive superior ratings at festival. Benjamin E. Mays High School is a comprehensive music program that serves more than 200 students in a variety of curricular and extra-curricular offerings. The concert program consists of the Wind Symphony, The Symphonic Band, and Concert Band I. In addition to the concert bands, the music program at Benjamin E. Mays High School also includes three jazz groups, chamber ensembles and the Raider Marching Band. All groups at Benjamin E. Mays High School maintain an active concert and adjudication schedule. In the recent years the program has received numerous awards alongside the the Wind Symphony performing on of the largest stages for high school band. The 2014 Music For All National Concert Band Festival. The 2015 University of Georgia Jan Fest Honor Band Clinic, and the 2016 Troy SEUS Honor Band Clinic.

COLLINS HILL HIGH SCHOOL

JAZZ BAND

JEREMY LUMPKIN & DANIEL TREUMAN, DIRECTORS

The Collins Hill High School Jazz Ensemble I is made up of some of the finest musicians the school has to offer. The ensemble is strictly extra-curricular, rehearsing after school twice a week for 90 minutes as they prepare to perform a wide repertoire of challenging and exciting music. They consistently receive superior ratings at Jazz Large Group Performance Evaluation. Each year, both Collins Hill Jazz Ensembles are invited to perform at The Suwanee Night of Jazz. This large community event features the top Jazz bands from a number of Gwinnett County Public and Private school programs. In the last two years, our jazz program has had two members make the All State Jazz Ensemble. We also encourage our students to be active in the Georgia Jazz Community by participating in the the Georgia Association of Jazz Educators Conference and other events, clinics, and concerts.

GEORGIA WIND SYMPHONY DR. DAVID GREGORY, DIRECTOR

The Georgia Wind Symphony finished its second season of operation with the 2015-16 season and is one of the Georgia’s newest adult concert bands The ensemble’s inaugural concert was presented in November of 2014 under the direction of Dr. David Gregory. The program featured outstanding vocal soloists, a wide variety of musical selections, and international clarinet soloist Carlo Calcagnini of the Italian Army Band of Rome, Italy. A legacy of musical excellence began with that concert. One result of the exceptional work of this ensemble was an invitation to represent the state of Georgia at the University of Alabama High School Honor Band Clinic in February 2016. Additionally, the first annual “Celebration of the Season” was premiered in December of 2015, and featured vocal soloists, two exceptional choirs, and the GWS string ensemble to a packed house of supporters and patrons. The ensemble is comprised of men and women from throughout the Atlanta metropolitan area who represent teaching, business, music, engineering, administrative, legal and other vocational professions. The Georgia Wind Symphony will bring musical enjoyment to thousands of audience members in the coming years, and the motto of the ensemble: “Music...Making Life Better,” will become synonymous with this exceptional organization. The 90-member ensemble has become recognized as one of the most outstanding musical organizations in the state of Georgia and soon will have that same reputation throughout the Southeast.

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HILLGROVE WIND SYMPHONY

PATRICK ERWIN, JEREMY TRIMMER, AND BOBBY CROSBY, DIRECTORS

Hillgrove High School was founded in 2006 in the Cobb County School District, which is nationally known for its excellence in music. Since open-ing with 84 students, the band program has grown to over 300 students making music DAILY. The Wind Symphony represents the best of the best of those students. This group has performed collegiate level repertoire consistently throughout it’s existence, receiving consistent recognition for excellence at GMEA LGPE and other events. Most recently, the wind symphony was named a “National Winner” in the Mark of Excellence Wind Band Honors recording competition (the only Georgia high school band to receive this honor in the past several years). Members of the wind symphony take pride in their musical excellence and display it as such with their participation in extra-curricular musical activities. Hillgrove students have been members of the GA All State Band, District Band, GYSO, ASYO, AYWS, GHP, Honor Band of America, and many others across america. Placing skill development at the forefront of the music curriculum has allowed our students to grow and flourish in the ensemble environment, as well as in chamber music and solo literature.

KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY

WIND ENSEMBLE

DR. DAVID KEHLER, DEBRA TRAFICANTE, AND CORY MEALS, DIRECTORS Formed in 1996, the Kennesaw State University Wind Ensemble performs a diverse repertoire encompassing large works for band, wind ensemble repertoire, and chamber music. The KSU Wind Ensemble continues to lead in supporting and creating consortiums for the development of new music, which have included new works by Steven Bryant, Paul Dooley, Michael Markowski, Joel Puckett, James Stephenson, Christopher Theofanidis, and Pulitzer Prize winner, Joseph Schwantner. In addition, leading composers including Kamran Ince, Chen Yi, and Pulitzer Prize winners David Lang and Joseph Schwantner have visited and worked directly with the KSU Wind Ensemble and its students. In 2012 the KSU Wind Ensemble hosted and was featured at the Southern Division College Band Directors / National Band Association Conference, and in 2016 was again featured at the CBDNA Conference in Charleston, South Carolina. In 2013, the KSU Wind Ensemble was the Winner of the American Prize for best wind ensemble/concert band performance in the United States, and in 2016, will be releasing its first professional recording on the Centaur label featuring the music of Chen Yi.

LOVINGGOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

8TH GRADE SYMPHONIC BAND JOSEPH HEIBERGER & SHELLEY FERRELL, DIRECTORS

The Lovinggood Band program was established in 2006 and is a proud member of the Cobb County School District. Lovinggood Middle School is located in Powder Springs, Georgia just West of Kennesaw Mountain and the Marietta Square.The Lovinggood band currently has over 450 students consisting of 175 beginner band students and 275 seventh and eighth grade band members. Every student in the 7th and 8th grade performs on Winter and Springs Concerts and LGPE. In addition to class activities, several students elect to participate in GMEA sanctioned events such as Solo and Ensemble and District and State Honor Bands. Since opening in 2006, the Lovinggood Band has consistently received Superior ratings at LGPE, and has been well represented in the District XII Honor Bands and the GMEA All State Band. The Lovinggood Band has performed for the 2010 and 2014 University of Georgia Midfest Middle School Band Clinic, the 2011 Auburn University Middle School Band Clinic and was awarded the GMEA Exemplary Performance Award in 2013. The Lovinggood Band has also performed for the 2016 CBDNA/NBA Southern Division Conference in Charleston, South Carolina, as well as the 2016 Music For All Southeastern Regional Concert Band Festival on the campus of Georgia State University. The Lovinggood Middle School Band is a proud feeder of the Hillgrove High School Bands.

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PERFORMING GROUPS MILL CREEK HIGH SCHOOL

WIND ENSEMBLE

ERIK MASON & BRIDGET WILDES, DIRECTORS Since its founding in 2004 the Mill Creek High School Winds Ensemble has earned a high level of respect around the state and region. The group has earned consistent Superior rated performances at the GMEA Large Group Performance Evaluation and has been an invited guest ensemble across the state. Since 2009, the Mill Creek Wind Ensemble has given invited, guest performances at Columbus State University, Kennesaw State University, Georgia State University, and at the 2011 University of Georgia Janfest. In addition to group achievements, MCHS band students have been chosen through competitive audition to be members of the Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Wind Ensemble, the Atlanta Youth Wind Symphony, the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra, the Georgia Governor’s Honors Program, the GMEA District Thirteen Honor Band, and the GMEA All-State Band.

ROSWELL HIGH SCHOOL

PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE BRANDON KUNKA, DIRECTOR

The Roswell High School Percussion Ensemble, established in 2009, is one of the fastest growing performance groups at the school. What started as a collection of less than fifteen percussionists being featured on other ensembles’ concerts has now evolved into a three-level, thirty-plus member ensemble that presents its own concerts twice a year, in addition to performing at the regional level. The ensemble classifications are audition-based, and repertoire is selected to challenge all levels of students who are in the program. Since its inception, the Roswell High School percussion program has been selected to perform with the Kennesaw State University Percussion Ensemble, and has hosted master classes and performed with internationally acclaimed performers and composers such as Ney Rosauro and Jim Casella. The ensemble also participates annually in the Lassiter High School Percussion Ensemble Symposium. Members of the ensemble are regularly selected for the District V Honor Band, the Fulton County Honor Band, the Governor’s Honors Program, the Georgia All-State Band, and the Georgia All-State Jazz Band. In addition, many of its members have earned scholarships to study music at various institutions such as Berklee Conservatory of Music, the University of Georgia, Georgia College and State University, and Columbus State University.

SOUTH FORSYTH MIDDLE SCHOOL

BAND

DR. ANDREW POOR & REGGIE HUMPHREY, DIRECTORS In its third year under the leadership of Dr. Andrew Poor, the South Forsyth Middle School Band program has experienced rapid and significant growth and has grown to over 380 students. In 2015, due to the growth of the program, Mr. Reggie Humphrey has joined the staff as Assistant Director of Bands. Additionally, the Symphonic Band was honored to be a featured performing ensemble at the University of Georgia Middle School Honor Band Festival. In 2014 and 2015, the South Forsyth Middle School Symphonic Band earned Straight Superior ratings at the GMEA Large Group Performance Evaluation. In 2015 and 2016, the South Forsyth Middle School Concert Band also received Straight Superior ratings along with the The Sixth-Grade Band. With a strong chamber music program, a large percentage of students successfully participate in the GMEA District 9 Solo and Ensemble Festival, as well as, provide a significant presence in the District 9 Middle School Honor Bands and GMEA All-State Bands. The Symphonic Band participated in the 2015 Walt Disney World Festival Disney program and earned a Superior rating, Gold Award and the Best in Class Award. In 2014, the South Forsyth Band was awarded the Middle School Exemplary Performance Award by the Georgia Music Educators Association. Additionally, the band performed as a featured ensemble at the 16th Annual Southeastern United States Middle School Clinic and Honor Bands at Troy University.

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VALDOSTA STATE UNIVERSITY

JAZZ ENSEMBLE

DAVID SPRINGFIELD, DIRECTOR

The Valdosta State University Jazz Ensemble is one of the oldest university sponsored jazz ensembles in the State of Georgia. Appearing first as an extracurricular activity on campus, it was offered as a curricular course of study in 1974, becoming the flagship performance group for the Jazz Studies degree program at VSU. Currently under the direction of David Springfield, the VSU Jazz Ensemble maintains a strong tradition of excellence that was established by Bob Greenhaw, Ed Barr and Cary Brague. The VSU Jazz Ensemble performs in local concerts, school programs, state conventions, jazz workshops, and nationally known festivals. Internationally-known guest artists and clinicians have included John Clayton, Dennis Mackrel, Marvin Stamm, Chris Vadala, Fred Sturm, John Fedchock and Don Braden. Our VSU jazz alumni have won national competitions and have been accepted to graduate schools such as the Juilliard School, the Cincinnati Conservatory, Florida State University, Michigan State University and the University of North Texas. Trombonist Chris Crenshaw (BM-Jazz ’05) is a member of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, saxophonist Stantawn Kendrick (BM-Jazz ’04) toured the world with legendary trumpeter Clark Terry and trumpeter James Ford (BM ’94) performs with the Clayton/Hamilton Jazz Orchestra in Los Angeles.

WJMS

8TH GRADE BLACK BAND WILLIAM KILGORE & DAVID CAMPBELL, DIRECTORS

West Jackson Middle School is located in Jefferson, Georgia, approximately sixty miles north of Atlanta. The school serves over 890 students with almost forty percent of the school population participating in the band program. The band program consists of five concert bands, a jazz band, a percussion ensemble, and various small ensembles including woodwind and brass quintets. The members of the West Jackson Middle School Band are active in many activities throughout the district, state, and surrounding states. All of the five bands have received superior ratings at festival again this year. The WJMS band always has students participate in the Georgia All-State Band. The band has consistently placed 20 or more students the District Honor Band. This year, thirty students made the district honor band. At Solo and Ensemble Festival, WJMS band students received nothing but superior and excellent ratings. The jazz program received a superior rating at the District Jazz Festival for the 20th consecutive year. Many alumni from the West Jackson Middle School Band program have continued to pursue their musical studies achieving the highest honors in their high school and college programs.

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PERFORMING GROUPS THE DAVIDSON CHORALE PHILLIP STREETMAN, DIRECTOR

The Davidson Chorale from the John S. Davidson Fine Arts Magnet School in Augusta, GA performs regularly at prestigious events and venues in their home state of Georgia, across the nation, and internationally. Founded in 1981 by the late Kitty Lamb, the Chorale achieved national notoriety under director Dr. James Dunaway, garnering invitations in 2004 and 2005 to appear at the American Choral Directors Association Divisional and National Conventions, as well as performances at the Georgia Music Educators Association conference in 2004, 2006, 2008, 2010, and 2012. In 2007,The Chorale performed at the Music Educators National Conference Southern Division Convention in Charleston, South Carolina.In 2007, and again in 2008, The Chorale became the first high school ensemble to present a concert on the National Gallery of Art Concert Series in Washington, D. C.. In 2010, the Chorale received an exclusive invitation to sing for Easter Sunday services at the historic St. Thomaskirche in Leipzig, Germany, the home church of J. S. Bach. The choir followed up this honor with a world-premiere performance at Lincoln Center in NYC in 2011, and an invitation in 2012 to appear at Historic Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, home of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. They are the 2012 Winners of the American Prize in Choral Performance and appeared at the 2014 Southern Division ACDA Conference under the direction of Dr. Timothy Powell and performed in Dublin, Kilkenny, and Belfast Ireland in 2016 also received distinguished honor to perform at the Low Sunday Mass at Christ Church under the direction of Phillip Streetman.

GEORGIA STATE UNIVERSITY

SINGERS

DR. DEANNA JOSEPH, DIRECTOR

The Georgia State University Singers is the School of Music’s premier vocal ensemble. Selected by competitive audition, the choir is comprised of music majors and non-majors, undergraduate and graduate students and represents the diverse population of Georgia State University. In May of 2013, the University Singers competed in La Florilège Vocal de Tours where they placed second overall in the mixed choir category. The ensemble’s invited performances include appearances before the Georgia Music Educators Association, American Choral Directors Association and at the Georgia Music Hall of Fame Awards. The Singers’ tours have taken them throughout much of the United States, including Carnegie Hall on two occasions, and six international tours with stops in France, Belgium, Italy, Yugoslavia, Finland, Russian, Estonia, Canada and Great Britain. Their new CD, Evening Hymn, was recently released on the Gothic Records Label.

NORTH GWINNETT MIDDLE SCHOOL

8TH GRADE TREBLE CHORUS KIMBERLY EASON, DIRECTOR

The North Gwinnett Middle School Eighth Grade Treble Chorus is composed of eighty non-auditioned singers, and has consistently received superior ratings at LGPE in both performance and sight-reading. They perform each year in a variety of venues throughout the community. Since NGMS opened in fall of 2009 the chorus has performed for audiences at the Governor’s Mansion, Turner Field, Gwinnett Gladiators games, Gwinnett Braves games, Lake Lanier Islands, and Suwanee’s Christmas in the Park. Individual singers have participated in All-State Chorus, GMEA District Honor Chorus, Spivey Hall Honor Choir, Solo/Ensemble Performance Evaluation, Gwinnett Young Singers, Tri-M music honor society, and many sing in their churches or local theatre groups as well.

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PERFORMING GROUPS

SEQUOYAH HIGH SCHOOL

MEN’S CHORUS JOSH MARKHAM, DIRECTOR

The Sequoyah High School Men’s Chorus is a non-auditioned ensemble open to all male students at Sequoyah. Most members of the choir come in with little or no musical and vocal training. The advanced men in the choral program are partnered up with the new men in a mentoring program of Big Brothers and Little Brothers. This mentoring aids in teaching the new young men in tone production, sight-reading, and appropriate behaviors and habits in rehearsal and performance. Since its inception in the fall of 2010 under Mr. Markham the Sequoyah Men’s Chorus has only received Superior ratings in performance and sight-reading at LGPE. Members of the ensemble are regularly selected for All-State Chorus, All-State Reading Chorus, and the Governor’s Honors Program in Voice.

TEASLEY MIDDLE SCHOOL

FESTIVAL VOICES FRED FORSH, DIRECTOR

Festival Voices is composed of students from the 6th through 8th grade who were selected by audition only. The group was founded in the 199192 school year and has consistently received Superior or Excellent ratings in the GMEA LGPE. The group also participates each year in the Southern Star Music Festival and has consistently earned the Gold or Silver Standard. In 2016, the group was awarded unanimous Gold and won the sweepstakes for the highest score in their category.

THE UGA

HODGSON SINGERS DR. DANIEL BARA, DIRECTOR

The UGA Hodgson Singers was formed by E. Pierce Arant Jr. as the UGA Concert Choir in the late 1970’s and serves as the ambassadorial choral ensemble of the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at the University of Georgia. Comprising some of UGA’s most gifted and talented choral artists, membership the Hodgson Singers is contingent upon excellence of musicianship, vocal artistry, and dedication. The ensemble provides vibrant, pre-professional ensemble training for the next generation of professional singers, choral music educators, and interpretive artists, and performs noteworthy choral repertoire from throughout the Western Music canon with emphasis on unaccompanied music, recently composed works, and baroque and classical masterworks. The choir has performed by invitation recently at the 2014 ACDA Southern Division Convention and was the winner of the Grand Prize at the International Competition Ave Verum in Baden Austria, in the spring 2014. Recent professional collaborations have included concerts with Kathleen Battle and an unabridged performance of Handel’s Messiah with the profession New York Chamber Orchestra, The Knights. The choir made its first professional recording on the Gothic Label in spring of 2016, and is anticipating a 2017 release date.

WOODLAND HIGH SCHOOL

LE VOCE

SAMUEL MILLER, DIRECTOR Le Voce is Woodland High School’s advanced mixed choral ensemble, coming from the larger program of over 100 students. Along with the choral program’s four concerts per year, Le Voce regularly has extra performances including singing the National Anthem at Turner Field, the Governor’s Holiday Celebration, and tours to area hospitals and other area schools. Members of Le Voce are also active outside of the classroom through participation in the Governor’s Honors Program, All-State Chorus, the WHS drama department, and numerous other venues.

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WOODSTOCK HIGH SCHOOL

CHAMBER SINGERS RYAN McKENDRICK, DIRECTOR

Woodstock High School is one of the largest high schools in the Cherokee County School District, located 30 miles northwest of Atlanta, Georgia in the City of Woodstock. Woodstock has received both the Gold and Platinum Awards for excellence in academics from the Georgia Governor’s Office of Student Achievement. The Woodstock High School choral program has maintained a tradition of excellence since the school’s opening in 1996. WHS choral ensembles consistently earn Superior and Excellent ratings in both sight-reading and performance at Large Group Performance Evaluation. The chorus has traveled to and performed in New York City, Nashville, Orlando, Savannah, Washington, D.C., London, and Italy. The Chamber Singers, the top women’s ensemble at Woodstock, is one of five ensembles in the WHS choral program. Ryan McKendrick has directed the choirs at Woodstock since 2007.

WOODSTOCK MIDDLE SCHOOL

VOICES

JUSTIN NORTON, DIRECTOR Since the inception of Woodstock Middle School Voices five years ago, the group has continued to excel as a vocal ensemble. Woodstock Middle School Voices in an audition only group of 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students. The only requirement to audition is that the student has to be currently enrolled in a chorus class. Since starting the group five years ago, the group has consistently earned Superior and Excellent ratings at 9th District Large Group Performance Evaluation. Woodstock Middle School is located in Woodstock, GA just north of Atlanta.

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in-service conference

Choral Concerts located at

Athens First United Methodist Church 327 N. Lumpkin St. Athens, GA 30601 60

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PERFORMING GROUPS NORTH GWINNETT MIDDLE SCHOOL

8TH GRADE ADVANCED GUITAR ENSEMBLE CARYN VOLK, DIRECTOR

The North Gwinnett Middle School Guitar Ensemble is one of the first middle school guitar performance ensembles in Gwinnett County. The guitar ensemble focuses on a classical playing approach, with exploration into alternative styles of blues, jazz, rock, and classical solo performance. North Gwinnett Middle School is located in Sugar Hill, Georgia. School enrollment is over 2200 students, with over two-thirds of the population involved in both traditional and non-traditional music ensembles. The guitar ensemble has over 350 students participating in six separate ensembles in grades 6-8. The guitar ensemble continues to grow thanks to active community participation as well as the on-going support of the faculty, staff, and administration of North Gwinnett Middle School.

ST. PIUS X

ADVANCED GUITAR ENSEMBLE

BRION KENNEDY, DIRECTOR

The St. Pius X Advanced Guitar Ensemble is an auditioned performance ensemble. Under Mr. Kennedy’s leadership, the ensemble has performed at venues such as the Woodruff Arts Center, Georgia State University, Reinhardt University, University of Georgia, Kennesaw State University, Young Harris College, and were featured in a televised performance on GPTV. The St. Pius X Advanced Guitar Ensemble recorded their first EP, “Breathe in the Silence...”, in 2016.

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PERFORMING GROUPS

DYER ELEMENTARY

CHORUS AND ADVANCED PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE SHERRY COULOMBE, DIRECTOR

The J.G. Dyer Chorus and Advanced Percussion Ensemble has a strong history of excellence in the Gwinnett County Public Schools. Founded in the 1970’s, the Dyer Chorus has pleased crowds throughout the northeast Metro Atlanta area. Mrs. Coulombe came to J.G. Dyer in 2007. The choir began to grow as they performed a numerous variety of shows which included both traditional choir performances and theatrical stage productions. In 2011 Mrs. Coulombe founded the Dyer Advanced Percussion Ensemble which plays a variety of repertoire from “Bach to Rock.” In 2014 the Advanced had the honor of entertaining United States Congressman Rob Woodall. Most notably, the J.G. Dyer Chorus and Advanced Percussion Ensemble were invited to perform for President and Mrs. Carter at the Carter Center Presidential Library and Museum. The J.G. Dyer Music program prides itself in sharing wonderful music-making and creating an aesthetic experience for both our performers and audiences.

FAIRVIEW ELEMENTARY

CHORUS

NORA DUKES, DIRECTOR The Fairview Elementary Panther Performers Chorus is an auditioned ensemble comprised of 4th and 5th grade students. In addition to two annual school concerts, the chorus is also active in the community. In 2011, the Panther Performers performed at Phillips Arena, where they presented a Prime Time concert before an Atlanta Hawks game. In 2014, the chorus sang the “Star Spangled Banner” to kick off a Gwinnett Braves game. In 2015, the Panther Performers attended GMEA District 14 Large Group Performance Evaluation (LGPE) for the first time and received a Superior rating for the performance. The chorus returned to LGPE in 2016 and earned their second Superior rating.

february 17-18, 2017

STATEDWIDE HONOR CHORUS ELEMENTARY

&

SIXTH GRADE

ATHENS

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PERFORMING GROUPS BENNETT’S MILL MIDDLE SCHOOL

STRING SYMPHONY KEVIN ANDERSON, DIRECTOR

The purpose of the Bennett’s Mill Middle School Orchestra is to give students a solid foundation in the basics of music, particularly the fundamentals of orchestral string instruments and provide the opportunity to enhance this knowledge through performance. Our objective is to instill principles of character, discipline, integrity, and musicianship. Students are challenged and held to a high standard to produce a sound that is better than good, but EXCELLENT. It is our desire to ignite a love of music and motivate each student to strive for the highest in the orchestra classroom and beyond.

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

HONORS MAGNOLIA STRING QUARTET DR. LARISA ELISHA, DIRECTOR

As the premier string ensemble at Georgia Southern University, the Honors Magnolia String Quartet, directed by Dr. Larisa Elisha, represents Georgia Southern University as musical ambassadors, performing for campus events, throughout Statesboro and surrounding communities. Selected by audition, members of the string quartet receive an exclusive scholarship, provided by a designated fund established in 2011. Recent appearances include performances at the Savannah Telfair Museum, Congregation Mikveh Israel, Hilton Head Symphony League Musicale and Strings at Southern Chamber Music Festival. Recently named Alternate in the Music Teachers National Association State Competition in the Young Artist Chamber Music - Strings category, the Magnolia Quartet members include: Benjamin Cork and William David Brotman, violins, Dominik Fields, viola and Na Yeon Kim, cello. They proudly continue traditions of previous groups of the Magnolia String Quartet, who won the MTNA Chamber Music Competition, representing the State of Georgia two years in a row. The Georgia Southern String Camerata, comprised of talented string players from Georgia Southern University, play repertoire ranging from the Baroque to 20th/21st –Century. The ensemble performs throughout the Southeast Coastal region and participates each year in the Strings at Southern Chamber Music Festival, and was selected to perform a featured presentation at the 2014 GMEA In-Service Conference.

GSMST

HONOR ORCHESTRA DR. DAVID RICHARDSON, DIRECTOR

The Gwinnett School of Mathematics, Science, and Technology Honor Orchestra is comprised of the top string instrumentalists at the school. The orchestra rehearses daily at 7:05am (providing their own transportation to school), and members are selected by audition each spring. Students are regularly selected to participate in area honor orchestras and the GMEA All-State Orchestras. Consistently receiving Superior ratings at LGPE, the orchestra performs mostly grade VI and some grade V literature. The ensemble’s most recent national appearances have been at the 2016 Festival Disney competition in Orlando (taking 2nd place in the orchestra division) and participating in the 2014 National Band and Orchestra Festival at Carnegie Hall.

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PERFORMING GROUPS

LOVINGGOOD MIDDLE SCHOOL

8TH GRADE ORCHESTRA

BARBERA SECRIST, DIRECTOR

The Lovinggood MS orchestra program, under the direction of Barbera Secrist since the school opened in 2006, has a record of achievement and innovation that attests to the high expectations and goals set by Mrs. Secrist. During her 10-year tenure, the orchestra program has grown to nearly 200 students and continues to expand each year. LMSO students are regularly selected for Honor Orchestra and Allstate Orchestra, and participate in Solo and Ensemble Festival annually. An example of innovative programming at LMS is the bi-annual Hawk Rock Orchestra project featuring internationally famous Mark Wood, working with our LMSO students to produce outstanding classic rock concerts. Noteworthy accomplishments for LMS Orchestras include consistent superior ratings at LGPE every year and top honors at Music In The Parks Festival, including First Place in the middle school orchestra category and Overall First Place for middle school/junior high division (2011) and the prestigious Esprit de Corp Award in 2010 for the group that the judges felt best represented the essential spirit of the competition in both performance and behavior. The LMS 8th Grade Chamber Orchestra performed at the GMEA conference in January 2013. Director Barbera Secrist holds degrees from Auburn (EdS), Florida State (MA), Kennesaw State (Educational Leadership) and Georgia State (BA). Prior to joining the faculty at LMS, Ms. Secrist performed extensively throughout the U.S. with the Pandean Players Chamber Ensemble and was a member of the Augusta Symphony for 13 seasons. She has two published books (Scarecrow) on chamber music and has taught oboe at Agnes Scott, Georgia Tech and Morris Brown.

NORTHVIEW HIGH SCHOOL

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA TIM AUCOIN, DIRECTOR

The Northview High School Chamber Orchestra, under the direction of Tim Aucoin, hails from Johns Creek, Georgia. The orchestra is an integral component of a very successful school community - opening its doors in the fall of 2002. The Northview Chamber Orchestra has been a featured performer at the Georgia Music Educators Association Conference in Savannah, Georgia in 2004, 2008, and again in 2013. They have also performed at the Midwest Clinic in Chicago in December of 2004, 2010, and 2015. In 2006, the Northview Chamber Orchestra represented the State of Georgia in Austria and the Czech Republic for “Mozart: 2006” - a 250th Celebration. In 2010, the ensemble was the featured performer for the National School Board Association Conference in Chicago. The orchestra program includes four string orchestras, a symphonic orchestra, and a chamber ensemble component which provides music for events throughout the year. In addition, a Jazz Strings group, which has performed at the Jazz Education Network Conference, was implemented to give students an opportunity to participate in an alternative styles setting. We also offer AP Music Theory to support the entire music program. Northview High School’s Chamber Orchestra includes students who participate in the ASYO, the BYO, the MYSO, the EYSO, the LSO, and the GYSO. Each year Northview Orchestra students are well-represented in the Georgia All-State Orchestras and GHP. Northview Orchestras consistently receive superior ratings at the Georgia Music Educators Association Large Group Performance Evaluations.

jANURARY 26-28, 2017

ALL-STATE JAZZ ENSEMBLE ATHENS

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DR. GEOFFREY HAYDON • PIANO MASTERCLASS

As a performer, composer, arranger, and educator, Dr. Geoffrey Haydon has successfully bridged both the classical and jazz styles. Known as a classical and jazz artist, he has received rave reviews in his solo, chamber, and concerto performances given throughout the USA, in Europe, Russia, China, Japan, South America, and Central America. He is also in demand as a clinician and adjudicator. Dr. Haydon also regularly performs with the Atlanta Ballet Orchestra, Joe Gransden Big Band and he has performed recently with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Broadway shows including The Phantom of the Opera, The Producers and Sophisticated Ladies at the Cobb Civic Center. He has numerous publications with Alfred Publishing, Warner Bros., Stipes Publishing and is co-author of Jazz History Overview, a textbook by Kendall Hunt Publishing. Dr. Haydon can be heard on Gershwin Plus – Piano Solos and Novelty Arrangements, a solo piano CD of George Gershwin’s music and on Reunion, a jazz trio CD. Both are available on the ACA Digital label. Dr. Haydon has articles published in Clavier Companion and is an artist/clinician with RolandUS. Currently, Dr. Haydon coordinates the piano faculty at Georgia State University where he teaches applied piano, jazz history, and jazz theory.

MARTIN DAVID JONES

• HIGH SCHOOL PIANO DUO/TRIO MASTERCLASS Martin David Jones, pianist, has been a featured performer in recital and with orchestra throughout the United States. His appearances at major musical centers include Lincoln Center in New York, Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., the Dame Myra Hess Recital Series in Chicago, Piccolo Spoleto in Charleston, and Gindi Auditorium in Los Angeles. Mr. Jones has performed extensively in Washington, D.C. including solo recitals at the National Gallery of Art and the Phillips Collection. He has been soloist with the Gwinnett Philharmonic Orchestra, Ludwig Symphony Orchestra, the Atlanta Philharmonic Orchestra, the Augusta Symphony Orchestra, the Central Wisconsin Symphony Orchestra, the La Crosse Symphony, the Columbia Orchestra of Maryland, and the Frederick Symphony Orchestra. The Washington Post called his “technique meticulous, his musicianship powerful and his inclinations poetic.” Mr. Jones was the recipient of the Yamaha prize at the Frinna Awerbuch International Piano Competition, and Finalist at the American Pianists Association Beethoven Fellowship Competition. His compact disc, the Piano Music of André Previn, was released on the Centaur Records label receiving critical acclaim from Classicstoday.com and Fono Forum. Increasingly active as a composer, his compositions have been performed at both Georgia Music Teachers Association and Georgia Music Educators Association conventions. Mr. Jones graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Music degree from California State University, Northridge. He also has Master and Doctoral degrees from the Peabody Conservatory of Music. His teachers include Julian Martin, Charles Fierro, Paul Schenly, and Earle Voorhies. Mr. Jones is professor at Augusta University where he teaches piano and conducts the AU Orchestra.

DR. JOANNA KIM

• MIDDLE SCHOOL PIANO DUO AND TRIO MASTERCLASS A native of Seoul, South Korea, Dr. Joanna Kim Doyle began her piano studies at age four and advanced immediately. She presented her first piano recital at age seven and won first prize for the National Young Artist’ Competition at age nine. Dr. Kim received her Master’s & Doctoral degree from University of Georgia, studying with Dr. Evgeny Rivkin, majoring in Piano Performance, minoring in Collaborative Musical Art. She attended Yale University’s summer music program while attending West Virginia University for her undergraduate degree. While at WVU, she received the prestigious Herman Godes scholarship and was named as state winner for three consecutive years and received an Honorary Performance Diploma from WVU. She attended prestigious St. Scholarstica’s College in Sydney, Australia where she studied with Elizabeth Powell at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in the University of Sydney. Throughout her study she has performed in Korea, France, Austria, Germany, Australia, and the United States, both as a soloist and a chamber musician. She has appeared with many orchestras including the Westmoreland Symphony Orchestra, UGA Symphony Orchestra, WVU Symphony Orchestra, Bucheon Philharmonic Orchestra (Korea), and North Sydney Symphony Orchestra (Australia). Dr. Kim serves as the director of Keyboard Studies at the University of North Georgia. She also maintains an active private piano studio and her students have won numerous awards on regional and state level. She is a nationally certified teacher of music and a group piano teaching specialist.

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DR. MARTHA THOMAS

• 12TH & COLLEGE SOLO PIANO MASTERCLASS Pianist, Dr. Martha Thomas has been praised for the “lyrical beauty of her playing” and “her mastery of rhythmic and textural complexities”. Dr. Thomas maintains an active career as recitalist and collaborative artist, giving concerts across the United States and in Canada, Australia, Europe, and Africa. Appearances at conferences and festivals include those of the American Liszt Society, College Music Society, World Saxophone Congress, Music Teachers National Association, World Piano Conference, Australasian Piano Pedagogy Conference, and InterHarmony International Music Festival. Busy as a recording artist, Dr. Thomas is now featured on eight compact disc recordings on the ACA Digital, Centaur, and Albany labels. Dr. Thomas holds degrees through the doctorate from the Universities of Texas (BM and DMA) and Wisconsin (MM). She is the Despy Karlas Professor of Piano and also serves as Associate Director for Undergraduate Programs at the University of Georgia Hugh Hodgson School of Music. Her students have enjoyed many successes through the years, including recent performances in Carnegie Hall and at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, as well as placing as finalists and winners at national and international competitions.

DR. ALEXANDER WASSERMAN • 8TH AND 9TH GRADE SOLO MASTERCLASS

Pianist Alexander Wasserman is rapidly establishing himself as one of the most engaging performers of his generation. Dr. Wasserman maintains an active concert schedule, with recent recital performances in the cities of Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Dallas, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco, Minneapolis, Santa Barbara and Washington, D.C. His performances are frequently broadcast on television and classical radio stations throughout the country. As a concerto soloist, Dr. Wasserman has appeared throughout the country in concertos by Beethoven, Liszt, Grieg, Rachmaninov, and Tchaikovsky. Equally dedicated to the education of emerging talent, Dr. Wasserman is the recently appointed Artist-in-Residence at Reinhardt University (GA). He also served as Professor of Piano at Youngstown State University (OH) shortly before his move to Atlanta. In addition, he serves as Founder and Artistic Director of the Reinhardt Piano Festival and Academy – an intensive one-week summer piano festival held at Reinhardt University. Dr. Wasserman also maintains a private piano studio; his students have been prize winners in the GMEA All-State Competition, GMTA Romantic and Impressionistic Competition, GMTA Piano Competition, MTNA Competition, Nashville International Piano Competition, Rising Stars Competition, Rome Symphony Concerto Competition, Atlanta Community Symphony Concerto Competition, and more. Dr. Wasserman holds degrees from the University of Southern California, Peabody Institute, and Cleveland Institute of Music. His primary teachers include Antonio Pompa-Baldi, Yong-Hi Moon, Daniel Shapiro, and Antoinette Perry. Additional study with Paul Schenly and Sergei Babayan has also been of primary influence. Dr. Wasserman currently resides in Marietta, GA with his wife, Jessica Oudin, a member of the Atlanta Symphony viola section.

“The piano keys are black and white but they sound like a million colors in your mind.” -Maria Cristina Mena

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SIGHT READING

TIPS

Y

WRITTEN BY DR. JOSHua BYRD

our final note is now ringing in an unfamiliar and possibly strange concert hall with the resonance of a thousand angels singing; congratulations, your LGPE on-stage performance is finished! You and your students are experiencing a wide variety of emotions (for better or for worse, depending on whether-or-not James came in correctly on beat two during his trumpet solo), but there is still one part of the process yet to occur: sight-reading. While this might seem like a small piece of the LGPE puzzle, it is often overlooked in terms of preparation. It is the goal of this article to remove as much spontaneity from the sight-reading process as possible, removing (hopefully) a few beads of sweat from your overall LGPE experience. DISCLAIMER: EVERY SITUATION MENTIONED IN THIS ARTICLE HAS ACTUALLY TAKEN PLACE, OFTEN MORE THAN ONCE! Say this out loud: “sight-reading preparation should begin months in advance.” While this is something that many of us already do conceptually with key signatures, scales, rhythm studies, etc., it is the sight-reading process that can be strange and daunting for your students. Fortunately, the sight-reading room procedure is no mystery (save when the key signatures in the Grade II piece are more difficult and numerous than the Grade IV). Teachers can replicate virtually every aspect in their own rehearsal rooms at home many days before their students play a strange piece in a strange room with a strange stranger talking into a recording device, often strangely. Though the official timer has yet to start, the sight-reading process begins immediately after the last note of your on-stage performance. First and foremost, your percussionists need to have a preset, written plan in place. It is the director’s responsibility to know who is taking the instrument(s) to the sight-reading room and where the other instruments will go in the meantime. Knowing what to bring in advance (and who can/will be responsible for it) saves a great deal of time and stress prior to entering the room. Typical needs for percussion are tambourine, triangle, suspended cymbal mallets, timpani mallets, bass drum mallets, glockenspiel/ bell mallets, xylophone mallets, and snare sticks. While this seems like a simple list, there are a few instances when instruments do not align from the concert stage to the sight-reading room. It can be frustrating and/or terrifying for a percussionist to be assigned to a triangle part while the instrument is on the truck or back at home (and all they have available is a vibraslap and a set of agogo bells).

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2.0

FOR LGPE

Personally, I do not have a problem with a group smiling as they enter the sight-reading room. Your students just accomplished something remarkable, a concert that took many weeks of preparation. Yes, entering in a conga line is inappropriate, but there is no need to add tension to the experience. When your students arrive at the sight-reading room, they need to remember that THEIR ENSEMBLE IS UNIQUE in terms of setup and numbers. The chairs will likely be placed in an “ensemble-shaped set of arcs,” but they need to be moved quickly and efficiently by your students. It can be disorienting for younger players to be located even a few feet from their normal spot. The same can be said for conductors as they go to cue the horns, only to find a clarinet player staring at them with a confused look. The more you can make the sight-reading room look like home, the better! Once your ensemble is set up correctly, “the process” needs to begin. This is something that has been addressed repeatedly for months (much like the third clarinet’s A-flat concert in measure 52 of your lyrical piece). What is said process? It is a mappedout procedure that allows you and your students to approach the sight-reading piece methodically without wasting time, effort, and time. Did I mention time? What instrument group is the key to sight-reading? In my experience, it is the percussion section. This is the only group where every student will be asked to play a solo for the entirety of the process. Your seventh chair violinist can rely on the stronger players, but this does not apply to percussionists as they are on an island. I have seen the percussion section ignored time and time again in the sight-reading room with disastrous results. Know this: no matter what a conductor does visually, students will follow the tempo of the snare/triangle/tambourine to the ends of the Earth. The percussion section needs to have pre-assigned parts: who will play snare? Who will play bass drum? Who will play the mallet parts? If you do not assign parts in advance, things can turn upside-down very quickly. The sight-reading room is not a place for Ed or Sally to experience playing a tambourine roll for the first time just because they didn’t call “dibs” on the bass drum while entering the room. Your snare player needs to be able to sight-read well; if you do not think about this ahead of time, it will end up being the most socially dominant person in your section. Make sure you have a student who can identify accent patterns easily (a common element within most sight-reading pieces) and communicates well in terms of tempo. Your timpanist needs to know how to tune and your auxiliary players need to know how to play multiple techniques on a variety of instruments. Even with these assignments, you might have a few players left over; have these students stand next to those playing


and help them count/watch the conductor while the sight-reading performance is taking place. For non-percussion instruments, keep in mind that when it comes to your winds/strings, the sight-reading judge has no idea who played first or third part on stage. Feel free to assign your second and third chair players to second and third parts. Leadership is important, and you may have the students to provide it. By mixing up the ensemble and pairing stronger musicians with younger players, you can create a “buddy system” that provides another element of stability. Sight-reading’s “silent assassins” are texture and independence. The thinner the texture, the less confidence throughout the ensemble for both those playing and counting rests. Independence rears its ugly head when pitches, rhythms, dynamics, or tessitura differs. Time and time again students back away from dissonances because they “feel” wrong. Empower your students to read confidently and strongly. Texture and independence create doubt and havoc during sight-reading, and you can distribute your strongest players differently than your LGPE programming in order to help you push through these common challenges. Now that the logistics are in order, it is time to start your six-minute preparation. What should happen first? Students need to have a system of what to address on their own as the director figures out the form, tempos, and pitfalls of the piece. Unfortunately, this is some of the most underutilized time in the process, as many students “sort of” know what to address, but are really more focused on the marching band composites hung throughout the room (some of which come from the 1950s, which is truly remarkable). Provide your students with a sight-reading checklist that they bring into the room: STEP ONE: Touch each time signature. Is there anything out of the ordinary? Does the meter ever change? Going over 4/4, 3/4, 6/8, cut time, and common time (beware the similarities—students will see the “C” and assume it is cut time!) in your at-home preparation should cover most pieces your students will see. STEP TWO: Touch each key signature. What note(s) will you likely miss? STEP THREE: Silently sing/finger through rhythms and use your sight-reading partner (again, assigned in advance) to identify any tricky spots. STEP FOUR: Look for any “roadmap” terms or symbols (D.C. al coda, repeats, etc.) as well as transition elements. DANGER, WILL ROBINSON: l’istesso tempo has claimed more than its fair share of victims! STEP FIVE: Find any words or labels that might be confusing to you. While most students should already know tempo labels (you’re going to see the standard markings in these pieces, not prestissimo con fuoco a la Caesare in sella al suo cavallo in battaglia). However, your percussionists—and yes, I am severely biased in this area—will likely see notation that is unfamiliar to them. Ties to rests and “l.v.” may ask for the same result, but inexperienced students likely have not seen both, and percussion notation is about as standard and consistent as iPhone inputs nowadays (too soon?).

As a director, what should you be doing during the first minute or so? Remember that the students will take care of time signatures, keys, and rhythms; look for areas and pitfalls that affect the entire ensemble: concepts, recurring themes/rhythms, starts, stops, and texture issues. Keep in mind that the director is the only person in the room with access to all parts. Students will skip over a multi-measure rest, but it is important that they know who has the melodic content at that point. Be prepared to identify thinly scored passages in order to put the students at ease. For instance, “trumpets, you are the only section playing with the snare at measure 17,” is a powerful statement. It is so common with young groups for the entire ensemble to shut down when a solo or soli section appears. Music for younger groups often allows the director to rehearse both woodwinds and brass at the same time when the A Theme appears in two separate phrases. Most sight-reading pieces reuse motives, rhythms, and melodies. Identifying them and addressing them as a whole (not part-by-part) can save time in the long run. After silent study comes the tipping point for most directors: are you going to answer questions and, if so, who is allowed to ask them? What is “proper discussion material?” This part of the process can get bogged down extremely quickly when Susan (who has yet to speak out loud in a rehearsal to date) decides to inform you that the title, Andante and Dance, is the same as a piano piece she played in fourth grade. You have older students who should be able to tell their section how to handle the divisi or remind the younger students that rallentando is just a fancy way to say ritard (another instance where sight-reading partners can be extremely helpful). Now that you and your students have studied the score, it’s time to silently “play” the piece. Note: THIS should be the focus of your preparation time, not silent study and certainly not questions (barring, “Did you know there is a wasp’s nest right above your head?”). Tizzling, air-playing (save that weird thing flutes can do where they make that “pew-pew” sound), or singing, all while fingering, is vital. Percussionists can flip the stick backwards, drumming on their forearms silently, or touch the mallet bars, both great ways to replicate playing the music as closely as possible while remaining silent. In terms of winds and strings, it is my opinion that counting, while it is one of the most important and necessary elements of music education, “adds a step” that can do more harm than good in this case, particularly with younger players. If there is singing from the podium, make sure it is either on a dead pitch/drone or spot on. Brass players can be easily thrown off when they hear the director singing incorrect pitches (particularly starting). If you can keep an F or B-flat in your head, it can be incredibly effective if students can hear their parts on pitch. No matter your approach, it is important to start at the beginning, hit each and every transition at least once, and make it to the end. In regards to transitions, who is important? It is most likely not the sustained pitches, so focus on the section that controls the tempo or begins the new section and ensure that you are on the same page. Find as many ways to save time as you can, and avoid running out of time before you have a chance to silently play through the entire piece. Once you are able to work through all of the music, follow it up with any rough spots that took place. Many experienced teachers go so far as to start at the ending, ensuring that the group knows how to finish the piece! Here is an example as to how to map out your six minutes: winter 2016 // georgia music news

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Prior to starting, make sure the percussion have all of their parts, instruments, and assignments. Wind/string players should have their sight-reading guides on their stands. Make sure the room setup resembles “home” as closely as possible. 0-1’: Director opens the score; students use the guide to address time/key signatures, rhythms, terms, and roadmap/transitions symbols and terms. 1-2’: Director addresses any roadmap and/or transition pitfalls, having students physically touch and silently play through these spots. 2-6’: The ensemble silently plays through the entire piece, possibly starting at the ending. Starts/ stops/transitions and their time sources (percussion, basses, etc.) are identified and reviewed. If texture and independence are the mortal enemies of the ensemble, what is the nemesis of the director? I truly believe it is tempo. Allegro is NOT presto, and andante is NOT largo. Leading your ensemble through an allegro section at 144 bpm increases the difficulty of any technical issues. Playing an andante section at 54 bpm actually creates sustain, pitch, and tone problems. Most sight-reading works are going to require basic tempos: andante (72-78), moderato (8698), and allegro (110-132). While opinions of these exact tempo ranges differ, leaning more towards 112 bpm to sight-read an allegro section is markedly easier than reading the same piece at 144 bpm. For young directors, this process is made even more difficult by the fact that their adrenal glands have been firing for the past 72 hours as they finish LGPE preparations and likely deal with transportation issues, say perhaps the engine of the lead bus catching on fire prior to their first Festival (author’s hand = RAISED… you could

actually see the fire from the front seat). While exaggerated tempos and dynamics might seem like a good idea, things can quickly get out of hand if the tone changes and/or the rhythms spin out of control. I’ve yet to find an official GMEA policy on using a metronome to study the score in the sight-reading room, but if you’re uncomfortable with that, just use a wristwatch with a second hand. The sight-reading room should hold only one surprise for your students: the manner in which certain keys, rhythms, and tempos are put together. If you are new to the process, talk to veteran teachers. If you are having trouble coming up with a procedure worksheet on your own, “borrow” one! Keep in mind that GMEA would also like to avoid any surprises; if you have a student with special needs (legally blind, for example), it is GMEA’s responsibility to provide music in advance or to have enlarged copies for your student. Let the site coordinator know about a special request well in advance of your performance in order to remove as much stress as possible from you, the students, and the volunteers in charge of the event. Sight-reading should exist well beyond the confines of LGPE preparation; it is good for you, your students, and pushes the ensemble to listen and focus. Sight-read a piece every week, yes, but do it in the exact manner of the sight-reading room. Read through pieces that do not push your ensemble technically but allow you to address musical concepts. When it comes to LGPE, go in with a plan that has already been executed ten times; WRITE IT DOWN and have your students keep it in their folders at all times. Controlling as many variables as possible can only make for a better experience for both you and your students. Good luck and… Your time starts NOW.

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JOSH BYRD serves as Director of Bands and Associate Professor of Music at the University of West Georgia. His primary responsibilities include conducting the Wind Ensemble, teaching music education classes, supervising student teachers, and administrating all aspects of the UWG band program. Prior to his appointment he served as Director of Bands for Arrowhead High School in Hartland, Wisconsin, and Assistant Director of Bands at Lanier Middle School and Norcross High School in Gwinnett County, Georgia. Dr. Byrd received the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Conducting from the University of Georgia where he studied conducting with John Lynch and minored in Music Theory. He received his Master of Music degree in Conducting while studying with Tom Dvorak at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and his Bachelor of Music Education degree from the University of Georgia where he studied saxophone with Kenneth Fischer. His professional affiliations include Georgia Music Educator’s Association, National Association for Music Education, College Band Directors National Association, the National Band Association, Pi Kappa Lambda, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Kappa Kappa Psi.

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INCLUSIVE

CHORAL ENSEMBLES: DIFFERENTIATING IN REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE by Christy S Todd From Kansas Music Review, Spring 2015, reprinted with permission

Early in my teaching career, I took my high school beginning women’s choir to the annual Large Group Performance Evaluation. We had practiced everything: the notes on the page, how to get on and off the risers, the art of not wiggling on stage, and sight-reading strategies. I thought we were prepared for everything, and it seemed like we were, until halfway through the first song. That was when Jenna found her voice. Jenna was a student with Down Syndrome that was mainstreamed into my choir class. She came to class on time everyday, sitting on the front row. She never spoke out of turn, always seemed engaged in the music classroom, and I never heard her voice stick out. That is…. until halfway through our first song at performance evaluation. Jenna found her voice – loudly – and sang off- key with gusto for the remainder of the performance. The judges’ comments on our score sheet spoke of beautiful tone of the choir, but questioned if I “was I aware of the one voice sticking out? Perhaps this isn’t the right format for this student to participate?” I was furious for days! Of course I can hear the one voice- I’m a chorus teacher! How was I supposed to control Jenna’s decision to sing off key? How dare they insinuate that a student with special needs didn’t belong in my choir? Didn’t they know that it was an achievement just to have her on stage singing with her peers? After my frustration subsided, I realized the person I needed to be mad at wasn’t the judges, and wasn’t Jenna. It was me. My expectation of this student had been to “not stick out.” What about her ability to grow musically, or what she could contribute to the choir? Should music be mainly therapeutic for students with special needs, or do we as music educators, have the obligation for it to be more? According to The National Standards of Arts Education, “All students deserve access to the rich education and understanding that the arts provide, regardless of their background, talents or disabilities” (Consortium of National Arts Education Associations, 1994). In addition, the Housewright Dec72

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laration from Vision 2020 states that “all persons, regardless of age, cultural heritage, ability, venue, or financial circumstance deserve to participate fully in the best music experiences possible” and furthermore, “music educators must identify the barriers that impede the full actualization” of this goal and “work to overcome them” (Madsen, 2000). What barriers exist in the choral classroom that impede students with disabilities from become successful music learners? After analyzing my own program, I quickly realized that the pyramid shape, one beginning choir and the progression of increasingly selective auditioned choirs, limited the students that were able to participate. Many students with special needs have a unique curriculum and schedule that would not allow them to mainstream into the one beginning chorus that was offered. There was an entire population at my school that was missing out on the opportunity of a music education. A commitment to reaching diverse learners in the choral classroom proves challenging, especially when balancing the high-risk performance environment that our field demands. It is difficult to take a “one size fits all” approach to involving students with special needs, due to the variety of impairments that a teacher may encounter in the classroom with processing, hearing loss, fine motor skills, sight, communication, paying attention, behavior, emotional regulation, and language. Choral teachers can meet the needs of all students with and without disabilities, however, by adapting an inclusive approach in selection of music, rehearsal strategies, and varying performance opportunities.

Instructional Adaptations Instructional Adaptations Offering a variety of ways for students to participate in a choral program provides more opportunities for them to contribute successfully. Schedule a meeting with the special education department chair at your school, and ask the following questions: • How many students receiving special education services currently participate in chorus? • What are the barriers that impede participation?


• How does taking a daily chorus class impact program scheduling? • How can we encourage students involved in the special education department to participate in chorus? • What funding/ resources are available in the special education budget for students with special needs that take chorus? (ex.- iPads, assistive devices, funding for modified instruments, etc.) After having a similar meeting with staff at my school, we discovered that many of the students in the self contained special education class were unable to participate in chorus, due to their unique work based program taking them off campus during the beginning chorus class. As a solution, we formed a special music class that served these students. In addition, Advanced Placement Music Theory students and veteran chorus students participated in the class too as classmates and music mentors. By providing another opportunity to teach beginning music skills, we were able to engage a new population of students, who now had the necessary choral foundation to audition for other choral ensembles if they chose to do so. Once the class format is established, take an inventory of what all students joining your program can do successfully. Can they match pitch? If so, in what range? Can they keep a steady beat? Do they have prior experience playing an instrument? What is their grasp of language and pronunciation ability? Do they have a unique skill, talent, or interest? Make a list of what students can successfully do, as this will assist with selection of music, rehearsal strategies, and performance opportunities.

Selecting selecting Music music One of the great joys of being a chorus director is that we have the flexibility of creating the curriculum- we choose the music. When working with students with special needs, the genre and familiarity of the selection can strongly impact the performance’s success. This is not a suggestion to make every song on a concert a top 40 hit-- however, it is something to think about when programming music. Do you have a student that struggles with matching pitch? Ask them what their favorite music is, and then see if an appropriate arrangement exists that your choir can perform. They may be able to match pitch more effectively, due to the repetition that has already undoubtedly happened due to them singing along at home. Visual and kinesthetic involvement in a song can create many opportunities for engagement. A student with a hearing impairment consistently behind the beat may find the situation rectified when using movement during a song. By seeing a physical representation of the music, this can improve a student’s ability to sing on the beat. In addition, a student struggling vocally can participate in music making through movement. Movement can be presented when teaching a song, assisting with word and phrase memorization. One approach that chorus directors can learn from our instrumental counterparts, is the idea of assigning skill based parts. In choral music, we find music distributed by voice parts, dictated by vocal range. In instrumental music, however, parts within a section may be assigned by skill.

Choral music can also use this approach. Find pieces with a melodic line and a simple descant. A student with a limited vocal range may be unable to sing a melodic line with a large range, but could sing a simple part that only contains 2 or 3 notes. Instrumental parts could also be assigned to accompany a piece of music. Perhaps a student is unable to sing the song on pitch, but could hold down a steady beat as one of the instrumentalists for the piece of music. When selecting music, it is important to remember that the music must be age appropriate. There is no need to revert to children’s music to accommodate middle or high school aged special learners. Much of the music on the radio today utilizes repetition, limited vocal range, and simple harmonic structure, which can easily be used to accommodate a wide variety of abilities.

Rehearsal Strategies rehearsal strategies McCord (1999, 2002, 2004) has studied various methods and techniques for students with disabilities involving music and technology, and suggests that students with learning disabilities often need innovation in music that allows them to focus on their own sensory strengths and weaknesses in regards to visual, kinesthetic, or auditory learning. Darrow (2013) encouraged music teachers to go beyond their typical subject matter approaches and incorporate visual aids, manipulatives, and technology, as well as implement musical experiences that involve the senses. When planning rehearsal, find ways to introduce material using sight, hearing, and touch simultaneously. Students can participate in the learning style that suits them best, or challenge themselves by responding using multiple senses.

Choral Teaching Strategies: Sight

• Enlarge music on a copier or projection screen • Highlight parts in music • Separate words from music • Use visual cueing throughout rehearsal • Demonstrate visual modeling of desired outcome • Hook a DJ Strobe light into your sound system that can flash a steady beat (make sure students do not have a history of seizures triggered by light sensitivity) • Use a marker to draw pictorial representations of phrasing • Use a color-coding system for solfege, www. rhythmband.com (item #LR31CS, #LRCS30); or proportionate mathematical depictions when discussing rhythm, much like the products sold by Noteknacks (http://noteknacks.com)

Choral Teaching Strategies: Hearing

• Place weak singers next to strong singers • Provide audio practice files • Utilize vocal warm-ups aimed at the changing voice and understanding the difference in vocal registers • Sing/Play examples for student to mimic • Create phones using two PVC elbow joints to allow students to listen to themselves sing • Provide an alternate simple descant line • Sing/Play only certain sections of the song • Modify words and pitches For example, when modifying words, students with language delays could be given fewer winter 2016 // georgia music news

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words to sing. Teachers could even provide alternate word sheets that only include the words the student should attempt to sing, not the entire song. In Madonna’s “Material Girl,“ listed below are 4 possible ways a student could sing with the choir that would allow them to participate successfully and simultaneously with the ensemble. • Option 1: We are living in a material world • Option 2: living material world • Option 3: living world • Option 4: world

Choral Teaching Strategies: Touch

• Utilize physical representation of beat (tap headbeat 1, tap shoulders- beat 2, tap waist- beat 3, tap shoulders- beat 4, repeat) • Audition/ Concert Preparation- have students practice entering and exiting, walking on risers, singing in front of people, etc. • Collaborate with special education department to have notes, words, and music printed in Braille • Modified instruments- attach instruments to hands by straps, larger handles to grasp. Examples can be found at www.rhythmband.com (search products for “special populations”) • iPad/ Assistive Devices- Apps that allow music participation with one touch or movement • Utilize student movement throughout rehearsal and performance

Varying Performance varying performance opportunities opportunities In chorus concerts, it is typical to see students standing on stage in their performance attire singing traditional choral music. Instrumentalists may accompany the choir on a few selections, but the majority of a concert centers around the choir singing the music and the audience hearing the performance. This may prove problematic when involving students with limited vocal ability and for audience members with hearing disabilities. To successfully include all students and audience members, the chorus director will have to adapt his or her concert expectations to include a multisensory performance. Differentiation happens not only in the classroom; it also should drive the presentation of the finished project. A student may be unable to sing on stage during a performance due to behavioral limitations, but may be able to use GarageBand to compose music that may be played in between choir performances.

Multisensory Performance Ideas

• Place a sign language interpreter at the front of the stage • Utilize choreography • Select choral music that involves opportunities for instrumentalists • Show slideshows/video footage as program notes before a song, or in tandem to a performance • Have students create artwork that reflects music selections- showcase in lobby before/ after concert or in the program • Encourage creation and performance of student compositions • Select small group lobby performances

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In order to fully involve students with disabilities in the choral ensemble, the director must approach paraprofessionals, learning specialists, and parents to find out the strengths and weaknesses of the students. What effective strategies are in place in other classes, and how can those approaches be transferred to the chorus classroom? By modifying instruction to include different learning styles, music learning becomes more attainable for not only students with disabilities, but for all students. At the end of the day, the most important thing to remember is “would this child’s participation make his or her parents proud?” If a student is singing music loudly and off pitch, it isn’t appropriate for the student, the music, or for the success of their classmates. Instead of ignoring this situation and hoping that the student will magically start blending with the choir, it is the duty of the choral director to find a way the student can successfully contribute to the overall aesthetic experience, and continue to grow as an artist.

References

References

Consortium of National Arts Education Associations. (1994). The National Standards for Arts Education. Reston, VA: MENC. Madsen, C. K. (Ed.). (2000). Vision 2020: The Housewright sympo- sium on the future of music education. Reston, VA: MENC McCord, K. A. (1999). Music composition using music technology by elementary children with learning disabilities: An exploratory case study. ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing). McCord, K.A. (2002). Children with special needs compose using mu sic technology. Journal of Technology in Music Learning, 2, 3-14. McCord, K. A. (2004). Moving beyond “that’s all I can do:” encoura ging musical creativity in children with learning disabilities. Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, (159), 23-32. Darrow, A. (2013). Applying the Principles of Universal Design for Learning to General Music Approaches. Unpublished manuscript retrieved from author.

about the author

CHRISTY TODD Christy Todd is the Director of Choral Activities at Rising Starr Middle School in Fayetteville, GA, where she teaches approximately 300 students in six non-auditioned choirs. In addition to traditional choral music, her classroom initiatives include a career based rock program with community mentors, and a special music education collaboration that engages students with special needs at the middle and high school level. She is in demand as an honor choir clinician and presenter at state and national conferences, speaking on topics of special music education, program recruitment strategies, and technology in the music classroom. In 2016 she was named the Georgia Middle School Association’s Teacher of the Year, and was also selected as a national semi-finalist for the 2013 Grammy Music Teacher of the Year Award. She holds degrees in music education from Florida State University and Shorter College, and resides in Griffin, GA with her husband Drew and son Carter.


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remembering yesterday for a better tomorrow

Do you know something amazing that happened in the history of music education? Fill out a submission form for Georgia Music News at www.gmea.org

PRIME

This is an excerpt from an article titled, “The Radio and Music,” by William Arms Fisher. From Music Supervisors Journal, February 1926, Copyright © by National Association for Music Education. Reprinted with permission.

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THE

VETERAN 10 Questions for Experienced Teachers

DR. RICHARD BELL

Dr. Richard Bell is currently in his second year as associate professor of music at Clayton State. His teaching areas include orchestra, double bass, music education and music theory. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from Florida State University and a doctorate from the University of Georgia. He taught middle and high school orchestra in the Clayton and Henry County Georgia schools for 29 years. He is the conductor of the Southern Crescent Symphony and has served on the faculty of Reinhardt University and as president of the Georgia Music Educators Association and the Georgia Chapter of the American String Teachers Association. Dr. Bell has presented sessions at the Georgia Music Educators InService Conference, the American String Teachers Association National Conference, the Music Educators National Conference and the National Association for Music Education in Ireland. As a composer he has numerous published and commissioned works for school orchestra. His double bass teachers included Ralph Jones, Lucas Drew and Pamela Andrews.

1. Please tell us a bit about your musical background and teaching experience. I began playing bass in the 5th grade in Thomaston, Georgia and went on to become a charter member of the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra. I received bachelors and masters degrees in bass performance and composition at Florida State and a DMA in music education from the University of Georgia. I began teaching in Clayton County in 1982 where I started programs in several of the junior high, middle and high schools. The last half of my 22 years in the county was spent at Lovejoy High School. In 2003 I was asked to start an orchestra program in Henry County beginning at Union Grove Middle and High School. In 2010 I retired from the school system and taught as an adjunct faculty member at Reinhardt University for 2 years. Currently I am in my fourth year as Assistant Professor at Clayton State University where I conduct the orchestra and teach bass, music theory, conducting and music education.

2. What first drew you to music education? My original career goal was to teach theory and bass at the college level. When that did not originally work out, I applied in Clayton County and was hired to teach. Even though this was a fallback plan I grew to love teaching and can not imagine a more enjoyable career path.

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3. Who has been the biggest influence on your teaching career? What lessons did that person teach you? While there have been many colleagues and students who have influenced me, I would have to choose Paul Robbins as the one to have the most influence. He was the Principal at Lovejoy High and later the Instrumental Music Coordinator for Clayton County. He demanded the best from all of his teachers and students and would provide the needed encouragement and resources to make sure your best was reached. He insured that music was an integral part of the curriculum and made sure the music faculty worked as a cohesive, supportive team. I have tried to incorporate his rigorous, nurturing and collegial style into my teaching.

4. What have been the biggest changes to music education in the course of your career? First of all the quantity and especially the quality of string programs in the state have greatly improved. Second, the culture of our students has changed. With their screen based, wired lives, teachers have had to adjust to add a level of “edutainment� to keep the students focused. Finally, we have moved to a standards based approach to our teaching. Music teachers have always had a higher level or accountability than other teachers due to our performance demands but the current standards in place help make the teachers accountable to teach a more well rounded music curriculum.


5. How has your teaching philosophy evolved throughout your career? I think I began my career, like many of my colleagues at the time, with a focus on finding talented students and teaching them to play well. Over the years I have moved from this exclusive approach. I now believe we need to provide a curriculum which provides in-depth comprehensive musical experiences to a wide variety of students.

6. What has been the proudest moment of your teaching career? I would say the first concert given by the Union Grove Middle and High School orchestras in Henry County. The program was begun with minimal financial support and has now grown into a thriving program in eight schools with hundreds of students.

7. What wisdom/experience/skills do you hope students gain from their time in your program? I want them to leave as well rounded independent thinkers who will make music an important part of their entire lives. I want them to become optimistic adults who interact with others in a nurturing manner that is not centered on self. And, of course, I hope they play well. I regret that I did not have the wisdom to have these goals for my students early in my career.

THE

VETERAN 10 Questions for Experienced Teachers

8. Is there a particular musical work or composer to which you feel all students should be exposed? Even though we are now sixteen years into the 21st century, we are not doing enough to teach our students about the harmonic and rhythmic developments of the 20th century. I think we need to make original works and arrangements of the compositions of well-known 20th century composers a standard part of our repertoire.

9. What advice would you offer teachers beginning careers in music education? I would encourage them to develop a classroom management plan that incorporates procedures and discipline in a positive manner. The procedures and rules must be taught to the students and reinforced throughout the year. I would also encourage them to connect with a mentor outside of their school.

10. What still inspires you about teaching? Two things. First, my current students at Clayton State. No matter the challenges they face, they are almost always enthusiastic, appreciative, and resilient. Second, working with teachers and orchestra students in area middle and high schools. Having the chance to interact with all of these groups lets me know that the next generation of music is in good hands.

Know an experienced teacher that should be featured in a future article of The Veteran 10? Fill out a submission form for Georgia Music News at www.gmea.org

Composition Competition Recital

JANUARY 27th 7:30PM

THE CLASSIC CENTER OCONEE RIVER ROOM


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georgia music news // winter 2016


February 23-25, 2017

ALL-STATE chorus ATHENS

CLASSIC CENTER

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2016-2017 GMN Winter Issue  
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