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BEAUTY for the AGES LONG HAIR, don’t CARE LIFE of the PARTY MUSIC festival MYTHS FALLfashion Oct. Nov. 2019 $6.95

KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 1


NEW FALL ARTISAN CUISINE AND EXTRAVAGANT WINE MENU! Voted Best Wine Menu in Knoxville

Plan Your Holiday Office Parties, Luncheons, Intimate Family Gatherings or Request Catering for the Holidays Artisan small plates and shareable style Tapas Bistro. Craft beer, fresh juiced cocktails, select bourbons & full bar. Acoustic Jazz Saturdays & Cover Duo’s on Wednesday nights

Reservations Accepted (865) 392-1586 Weekly Social Events: Check our Facebook calendar for upcoming events. Open for Lunch, Dinner & Saturday Brunch.

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Sample Sale OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Friday 10/25 & Monday 10/28 10am-6pm

Ticketed Pre-Sale Event Thursday 10/24 4-7pm

Tickets $20. Contact the Showroom for details. 1132 N 6TH Ave | Knoxville, TN 37917 865-524-2626 | flagship@patricianashdesigns.com KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 3


IN THIS

Issue: 8 BEAUTY FOR THE AGES

17

10 ASK CARRIE M. 11 LET’S TALK ABOUT IT 12 HAIR TALK 14 FIT & FUN 17 TRINKETS & TREASURES

18

18 ART SCENE

62

20 ENTERTAINING 22 MUSIC NOTES 26 FOR THE LOVE OF HOUNDS

30 THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT 32 KNOXVILLE: LAND OF THE AMERICAN DREAM 34 FALL INTO FASHION

22

62 THE ATRE SCENE 64 BOOK NOOK 67 LOCAL SPOTLIGHT 68 WINE & DRINKS

67


Style KNOXVILLE

fashion FORWARD

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MAGAZINE

Publisher George Laurence Krieps Associate Publisher Leigh Krieps Editor-in-Chief Jama Creswell Managing Editor & Designer Chelsea Babin Designer Kevin Krieps Fashion Director Susan Bourdeau

F O R W O M E N. B Y E V E RY O N E .

Advertising Manager Sherry Long Videographer Isaac Ward

Editorial

Jama Creswell

F

all is my favorite season. After a long, hot, muggy, sunburned summer I look so forward to crisp days and cool nights. I love the need to layer – boots, sweaters,

a down vest, maybe a scarf. And best of all, it’s football season! No longer a singularly focused fan (I’m a proud University of Tennessee alumna), I’ve been re-introduced to high school football and it ticks all the boxes – cool evenings, the need to layer (one might need a jacket and a blanket) and enjoy watching the season’s best spectator sport. Besides football, there are a zillion other reasons to get outside. The changing leaves, no need to elaborate, simply incredible! See Beth Meadows’ article about her time on the Appalachian Trail – it might inspire you to take a hike and enjoy the colors up close and personal. If a hike is too much of a commitment, sit outside and enjoy a good read, see Book Nook for three outstanding suggested novels. Or, host a party outdoors. An over-the-top cheese board, with fruits and maybe charcuterie, will elevate a casual get-together. Then, break out the brown water! Surprise guests with Old-Fashioneds made with rum instead of whiskey – oh my goodness, I love this

Editorial Interns Vanessa Rodriguez Alex Jackson Contributors Susan Bourdeau Beauty for the Ages Carrie McConkey Ask Carrie M. Shane Archer Long Hair Don’t Care Raye-Anne Ayo, MD Ask the Doctor Betsy Johnson Fit & Fun Kristie Carson Treasures & Trinkets Beth Meadows Art Scene Jess Maples Music Notes Rachel Wilhelm For the Love of Hounds: A Foxhunter’s Tale Ashlea Bushman Ownbey Book Nook Vanessa Rodriguez There’s an App for That Barbara Moreira Knoxville: The land of the American Dream Chelsea Babin Theatre Scene Chelsea Babin Local Spotlight Brett Richardson The Rum Old-Fashioned Contributing Photographers Casey Perfetto Chelsea Babin Jess Maples

cocktail – and you’ll have the perfect combination for a fall porch party (if it’s Saturday, your porch best have a TV tuned to the SEC match-up of the moment or a bunch of your guests will disappear inside). See the cheese board ideas and Rum Old-Fashioned recipe in the Entertaining and Wine & Drinks sections. Fall has everything I love – cozy fashions, favorable weather, football, and endless opportunities to enjoy food and fun with family and friends. I hope you’ll enjoy the fall issue of Knoxville Style as much as we enjoy bringing it to you.

For advertising call 865.207.1437 media@knoxvillestylemag.com | www.knoxvillestylemag.com | QEDAM

COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY CASEY PERFETTO STYLING BY SUSAN BOURDEAU HAIR & MAKEUP BY GROW: A SHANE ARCHER CONCEPT CLOTHING BY ELYSE WILDE


Serving Knoxville for over 20 years Janice Ann's Fashions is a dissnccve and unique specialty bouuque, doing business in the Knoxville area for over 22 years. Janice Ann's is known for stocking everything women need for a complete look – clothing, shoes, jewelry, handbags and other accessories.

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BEAUTY FOR THE AGES FAL L 2 0 19 b y

s u s a n

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MONOCHROME MAKEUP

Monochrome makeup is huge this year and featured all over the fall fashion runways! Tom Ford featured Smokey Neutrals on the lips, cheeks, and eyes, for gorgeous understated elegance.

A FLUSH OF BLUSH

Chanel and Dolce Gabbana also embraced the Monochrome look, but in a completely different way–a full flush of blush on the cheeks to mimic a natural fall chill, and used the same color of blush on the eyelids. Lips were soft, full, and in the same hues of the blush, for that same monochromatic look.

LIGHTLY HIGHLIGHTED SKIN

NATURAL LOOKING BROWS

Unlike contouring–which has slowly but surely been disappearing from our radar–highlighting has consistently been a great route for emphasizing the points where the light hits your face. Just a touch on the bow of your lip, your cheekbones and brow arches give you skin a naturally gorgeous finish.

Even if you don’t have enviable, model-quality arches, embrace your brows! To groom, brush up brows with a brow brush; then, fill in TIP sparse spots with A bit of hairspray a brow marker usbrushed on with a brush keeps brows ing small, feathery where you want strokes.

them.

RED LIPS

I love a red lip as the centerpiece of any makeup look. Whether in a cream or matte, with a polished makeup, red lipstick is always classic. It can also be a powerhouse to awaken an otherwise lowkey makeup. Try a fresh red lip with a little smudgy eyeliner and some highlighter for a fresh modern look.

TIP

Multi-use products that can be used on your eyes, lips and cheeks work great for the monochromatic look.

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MAUVE TRANSITION

Mauve is the perfect shade for transitioning from summer’s heat and no-makeup looks, to a polished, put-together you. Flattering on most skin tones, apply a muted shade on cheeks, lips, lids and even under eyes for an allover glow.


HOW TO APPLY A

Innovative Skin Care Solutions These all-new, fresh for fall, target treatments help restore your natural radiance, and prevent collagen and elastin breakdown!

Firming Cream Concentrate for Eyes

What is it? Fights crepiness, crow’s feet and fine lines, delivering firmness and lift. Deeply hydrates and reduces puffiness and discoloration. Fragrance-free, paraben-free. What’s inside? 3D Remodeling Complex targets the skin’s support network to restore youthful contours. A natural plant extract works directly to fight the causes of elastin degradation and subsequent slackening that occurs normally with age. Matrixyl 3000™ helps prevent collagen and elastin breakdown for firmer, more resilient skin. Tetrapeptide-5 performs double duty by effectively reducing under eye puffiness caused by loss of elasticity and water accumulation. It also reduces dark circles in just 15 days. Açai Berry Oil is a rich source of antioxidants, and contains useful vitamins, minerals and phyto-nutrients which protect against environmental agressions and help nourish skin cells.

Firming Serum

What is it? Intensive, daily firming serum. Firms and brightens skin, helps smooth fine lines and improve elasticity, as it protects against free radical damage. Paraben-free. What’s inside? A powerful polypeptide blend of bioavailable minerals that helps to provide structural integrity and protection of the dermis. Skin cell respiration, function and elasticity are increased. This firming botanical complex of Centella Asiatica & Echinacea Extracts helps to firm skin, increasing its density and integrity, for a younger texture and improved resilience.

MONOCHROMATIC MAKEUP LOOK

M

onochromatic Makeup is huge right now and was all over the fall runways. Here are some tips for achieving that look on your own. Colors that work great for the monochromatic look are pink, mauve, bronze, TIP brown, nude, and orange. The colors To bring your that work best for you will depend monochromatic look on whether your skin has warm, together, dab a bit of your cool, or neutral undertones. blush into your eyeshadow Use varying shades of the “base” or add some of your color for your makeup application. eyeshadow to your If nude is your base color, use a lipstick color. medium shade on your lids, a lighter shade on your cheeks, and a deep shade on your lips. Mix it up and use a deep shade for eyes and light shade for lips, or use a single shade for lips, eyes and cheeks. Experiment! Apply your makeup as you normally would—for example, moisturizer, foundation and concealer. Use an eyeshadow brush to apply a single wash of color to your eyelid. Also apply a line of shadow along your lower lash line. To really jazz it up use a colored eye liner in the same family of colors. Dip your brush in your blush. Before you apply the blush, tap the brush to get rid of any excess powder. Then sweep the brush over the apples of your cheeks, or along your cheekbones. Apply a lipstick that is the same color or a varying shade of your “base” color. You can create a striking look for your eye with different shades or values of the same color. Get a monochromatic eyeshadow palette (all TIP shades of bronze, nudes, or browns) and blend Dark mascaras can them to create a smoky or dramatic appearoverpower a ance. Apply the lightest shade all over the lid. monochromatic look. Create a “wing” along the outer edge of the Use a lighter mascara like eye with a medium shade. Then smudge the a brown or brown black darkest shade along the top and bottom lash on your lashes. lines. Gently blend the shades with a blending brush.

Firming Cream Concentrate

What is it? Lifts, firms and hydrates skin. Helps restore youthful contours. Leaves skin more sculpted, smooth and defined. Paraben-free. What’s inside? 3D Remodeling Complex targets the skin’s support network to restore youthful contours. A natural plant extract works directly to fight the causes of elastin degradation and subsequent slackening that occurs normally with age. A next generation hyaluronic acid dermal filler helps to restore skin volume and smooth away facial wrinkles and nasolabial folds. Shea Butter is a plant lipid that provides superior emolliency, while providing anti-inflammatory properties. It helps to prevent the degradation of collagen and elastin that occur with age. Glycerin is a humectant that holds water from the environment in its structure, to increase the amount of moisture in surface layers of the skin. Vitamin E reduces the formation of free radicals from environmental aggressors and other skin stresses. Silica consists of optical diffusers that smooth the skin and make it appear more flawless.

Susan Bourdeau is a nationally recognized makeup artist and wardrobe stylist with 20 years’ experience in television, film and print, and recently developed her own line of cosmetic and skincare products available at Laura’s Nail Salon, Janice Ann’s Fashions, Family Health Center, and Knoxville Gifts & More.

KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 9 KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 9


ask CARRIE M. “Don’t be into trends. Don’t make fashion own you, but you decide what you are, what you want to express by the way you dress and the way you live.”

A dressmaker in a former life, Knoxville Fashion Consultant Carrie McConkey is a “clothes whisperer” for her clients, taking great pleasure in helping them unlock their signature style.

- Gianni Versace

What is the difference between boyfriend jeans and girlfriend jeans? While the phrases “boyfriend” or “girlfriend” suggest cherished pieces borrowed from a swoon-worthy beau or your stylish bestie, the terms actually refer to the cut. Boyfriend jeans offer a looser shape in the leg, but still cleverly fit in the waist and seat. Along with boyfriend-cut chinos, cardigans, and blazers, these relaxed items give a casual stylish look. But, one must sport the pieces proportionally with slimmer companions, such as a boyfriend blazer with skinny jeans. Easier to style, “girlfriend” cut clothing offers a comfortable and relaxed fit with a more feminine silhouette. Girlfriend jeans are tighter in the hip and higher in the waist. The looser fitting leg is straight like the boyfriend, but slimmer. They are most often cuffed, looking great dressed up with heels or down with sneakers. Either way you choose, both trends seem to have staying power (and hopefully the relationships follow suit)! I don’t know how to let go of my clothes...I’m overwhelmed! Do you need a crowbar every morning to pry apart items in your walk-in closet? Do clothes become buried (and then forgotten) in your overcrowded drawers? Follow these tips to ease your sartorial situation. Work in groups sorted by color and type (for example, black tops), and bring the items out of your closet for closer examination. Sort by sleeve length. Are there duplicates? Are pieces older, or worn? Do they no longer fit? Did someone gift you a heartfelt but unappealing item? If the answer is “yes” to any of those questions, consider giving this closet clogger a new home! If you love the piece despite its flaws, take a photo and search for the closest replacement. (Use Google Image Search, or show the photo to a store associate.) Repeat the process with other groups of clothing, making note of your favorite pieces. They are a blueprint of your signature style! How do I not look boring in button-down cardigans? Women today have a love-hate relationship with the humble cardigan, visualizing 1950s sweater twinsets with pearls.

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Modern women may not seek that look, but shouldn’t abandon the outer partner of this timeless wardrobe duo! Style the easy-to-find staple in unconventional ways. Button the cardigan completely over a collared shirt and pull the collar out to create a faux crew- neck sweater. Or, gently remove the tags from the neck of the sweater and slip it on reversed, fastening up the back for a cute detail. Play with the silhouette by using an open, long cardigan. Fold over the two ends as if you were going to tie a knot and button the last button into its hole. Adjust to form a dropped- waist look. Or try donning a v-neck, shorter cardigan buttoned under a suit jacket to mimic a vest. There are many ways to take advantage of this hardworking classic if you think outside the box! I work from home. What should I wear to feel good and look good? For small business owners or remote company employees, working from home means no dress code. But with that often comes confusion, along with the temptation to visit Lycra Town! While you don’t need to telecommute in a suit and heels, strategically differentiate what you wear on workdays versus personal. Will you have business-related meetings? A video call? Be seen in public? If your answer is no to the first two questions but yes to the third, take heed. You never know who you will bump into, and of course you want to look like you’re neck deep in an exciting new professional endeavor! Adding a blazer to almost any outfit can create instant polish. Rothy’s shoes are colorful, chic, sustainably made and versatile enough to wear every day. And for clothes that are work-worthy but still comfortable, try crowdfunding online clothing community Betabrand for classic styles with a modern twist (bonus: they carry a wide range of sizes, including petite and long). Do you have questions for Carrie? Email her at carrie@ carriemfashionconsulting.com Subscribe to Carrie M.’s popular newsletter “Closet Talk!” by visiting https://carriemfashionconsulting.com/ Facebook: @carriemfashionconsulting Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carriemfashionconsulting


LE T’ S TA LK ABOUT IT

Ask the D O C T O R Get your health and medical related questions answered by a professional. b y

My doctor says I have IBS...now what? Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) affects 10 to 15 percent of adults and teens and is characterized by abdominal pain ~one time per week for the last three months and associated with at least two of the following – related to defecation: change in bowel habits or a change in stool formation. We have all heard about food triggers, and that is true... but what diet has the best outcome for IBS? What else can we do? A low FODMAP diet (diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and poly- ols) has been known to improve IBS symp- toms more than just avoiding the gaseous foods (beans, onions, celery, carrots, raisins, bananas, apricots, prunes, brussels sprouts, wheat germ, pretzels, and bagels), alcohol, and caffeine. There are numerous medications known to help. These range from anti-diarrheal medications, to osmotic agents (for those with constipation) and some work on different receptors in the gut. Stress is a known trigger for IBS and so I often start to address stress management with my patients. Talking with your doctor can certainly personalize these various therapies into something that works for you so that you aren’t held prisoner by your GI tract! Most sports programs ask parents to sign a concussion form. If my child gets a concussion, what do I need to look for? Concussions, no matter how mild, are brain injuries. We absolutely need to take these seriously and evaluate an individu-

R a y e - A n n e

al when we think they have suffered one. Basically, they have to prove to me that they don’t have a concussion. There are various signs of a concussion. Some of these include: •Headache •Fatigue •Dizziness •Nausea •Self-limited vomiting occurring soon after the injury •Unsteadiness with standing or walking •Feeling mentally slow or foggy •Difficulty remembering events either before or after the trauma •Trouble with concentration •Disturbance of sleep (eg, drowsiness while awake, sleeping more or less than usual, difficulty falling asleep) •Emotional changes, such as emotional lability, irritability, sadness or nervousness If these occur, then please see your physician. They will want to get a detailed history (they may or may not get imaging of your brain) and a physical exam. You will need to go slowly and have supervision as you return to playing your sport. We only have one brain...don’t push it too much and let it heal!

A y o

terventional procedure. If you have no family history and no history of polyps, then you may be eligible for other tests like: Cologuard (which detects the DNA in the stool that is characteristic of colorectal cancer), or FIT (fecal immunochemical testing) which looks for the presence of occult blood. A negative Cologuard test will give you a three year pass, as opposed to the FIT which is performed yearly. Send your health questions to askdrayo@ fhcpllc.com

Dr. Raye-Anne Ayo, MD, FAAFP, is a mother of 3 boys and a family practice physician for nearly 20 years.

Do I have to have a colonoscopy? Well, that depends...have you had polyps (abnormal tissue growth on a mucous mem- brane) in the past? Then yes – that is the gold standard because we can take them out if we see them again. So in this case, it is used as a screening and an in-

KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 11


I

love the long bob just as much as the rest of you, and fully understand that growing those luscious locks to anything past the shoulder seems like the most daunting task on the planet; but, long hair is in, baby. I want to help you get there! We’ve seen a transition in hairstyles recently. The long “Real Housewives” sweeping curls transitioned into more beachy waves on short bobs, then onto straighter mid-length hair with a slight blend and all the variations in-between. This fall and winter long hair is what’s hitting the runways, fashion magazines, and yes, even Knoxville. Protect the investment Good hair color is not cheap, and cheap hair color is not good. Summer takes a beating on your hair. We all know ‘the rules,’ but let’s be honest– who is thinking about protecting your investment on hair color when you’re busy chasing the kiddos outside or basking in the sun, freshly out of that beautiful extra chlorinated pool? At grow, we love to suggest L’ANZA Color Guard for our guests. This is a miracle spray that’s designed to protect your hair from fading and elemental stress. It basically works like Rain-X for the hair, repelling water and other elemental aggressors while protecting it against color fading by up to 107 percent. Color retention is a good thing, especially if you plan on growing your length. The healthier we can keep those ends, not constantly re-pigmenting your hair due to premature color fading, the better chances you have of reaching your long term hair goal. Treat yourself A little treatment never hurt anybody. In-salon treatments are totally customizable and allows you and your stylist to get those Crystal Gayle dreams closer to reality. Healthy hair needs three things: moisture, strength and TLC. Next time you visit your hair care professional, mention adding a treatment to your service. Treatments are always a great idea, but this time of year is vitally important in making sure your hair is in the best condition possible before we head into the cold and dry winter months. If you don’t have time for an in-salon service, try at home masques like this MOI MOI moisture masque from L’ANZA. This isn’t just any masque, it’s scientifically proven

don’t care to penetrate into the cortical layer of the hair (that’s the deepest part) and deliver weightless moisture to the inside where the hair needs it most. The tiny micro beads inside burst open upon application and add extra shine and elasticity to the outer cuticle of the hair, keeping it beautiful, bouncy and shiny. Your friends will notice the difference. Turn that thing down In the journey to long flowing locks, turn down the heat, and turn up the shine. Flat irons and styling tools get really, really hot–too hot for most of us actually. I like to remind my guests, “if you bake cookies on 350°F why is it okay to have the flat iron on 500°F?” Always use styling products that are customized for your specific hair type and needs. I promise products, as well as your stylist, are here to help. At Grow, we love L’ANZA Healing Haircare because of its added thermal protection to almost every styling product. Anything you leave in the hair should make the styling process easier and cut down the time it takes to create the finished look. Don’t be fooled by imitators over the counter, they’re generally chalked full of cheap surfactants, sulphates, parabens–and who knows what else that will coat your hair and end up causing more harm than good. Professional hair care is generally much higher quality and way more concentrated, sometimes costing less per application than even the over the counter products you see at the big box stores. Keep it fresh Regularly scheduled haircuts are vital in making sure you and your stylist keep your hair healthy enough to continue adding length. The biggest mistake we see in the salon, is when guests come for a bi-annual haircut because they are attempting to grow their hair out. When in reality, that typically means that much more needs to come off the perimeter to establish a healthy length upon the next visit. Normal healthy hair growth is about .25 inches per month. That Shane is the owner of grow, he blends a world-class being said, every eight to ten weeks resume with his unique, fresh perspective on hair design. Shane’s enthusiwould be ideal for a reshaping and asm for hairstyling is bested only by treatment service in the salon to his talent and sense of humor. Upon keep your hair in the best possible opening his salon, Shane’s emphasis condition to continue growing. If all was to personally train and foster of this sounds great, but patience is the education of his team to execute not your virtue, we also offer extena specific standard and technique. sion services. Happy growing! image: Freepik.com

KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 12


KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 13


fit&FUN

Healthy Tips for Terrific Tailgating Clothing by Alumni Hall Photo by Casey Perfetto

C

ool autumn weekends bring blankets, jeans, and football games. At colleges across the country, game day has become a ritual of sophisticated food and festivity. The perfect formula for a fun-filled day involves toting along coolers, barbecue grills, and baskets of food, then serving up a feast from the trunk of your vehicle. Tailgating has long since progressed from chips and cold sandwiches to sophisticated buffets complete with tablecloths. This all-American fall ritual can seem a little intimidating when you’re watching your weight. But, there’s no reason a tailgate picnic has to sideline your weight loss efforts. With a little planning, you can stick to your healthy eating plan while cheering on the VOLS.

Take a Tailgate Time Out Before you dive into the buffet, follow these tips to curb or calorie intake: Earn a little splurge on Saturday afternoon by saving a few food items from your eating plan during the week. Before the festivities begin, have a small snack that contains protein and fiber so you’ll be less tempted to overeat. Don’t go hungry! Survey all the offerings before you load your plate, then select plenty of fruits, vegetables, and lean dairy and

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protein. Take something to the tailgate that you know you can eat to help you stay on track. Eat from a plate instead of continually grazing from the buffet. This will help you keep track of how much you’re eating. Remember that alcohol has plenty of calories. One tactic is to alternate between alcoholic drinks with zero-calorie beverages throughout the day. Remember that too much alcohol can lead to increased hunger.

Score Points With Guests If you’re the party host, do your guests a favor by making sure your buffet includes plenty of healthy offerings such as: • Fresh fruit, sliced or in salads or kabobs • Assorted vegetables with lowfat dips and salsas • Low-fat snacks such as popcorn, pretzels, and baked chips • Lean meats and seafood and low-fat cheeses • Whole-grain breads and crackers • Salads made with light dressings • Salsas, wraps, salads, or stews made with fiber-filled and high-protein beans GO VOLS!

MOLLY BROWN-BOULAY PHOTOGRAPHY Betsy Johnson runs all over Knoxville, either training for her next event or taking her two sons to their practice or game.


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&TREASURES trinkets

with Citrine

A dose of vitamin C

b y

K r i s t i e

C a r s o n

W

hen you wear citrine jewelry, you have a little ray of sunshine wherever you go! Melt away your blues with this gorgeous stone that ranges from sunny yellow to yummy nutmeg. Cheer up a great top with rondelle beads and a citrine bracelet. Give a classic navy pallet a pop of cheer with a sparkling citrine pendant or pair citrine with off white and totally steal the limelight! Get your daily dose of vitamin C with sunny and delicious citrine.

With a home shopping industry career spanning more than 20 years, Kristie is currently a JTV trend reporter. She adores her family, french fries, and loves doing laundry.

KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 17


artSCENE

Romancing the Trail A Dreamer Learns the Reality of Hiking the Appalachian Trail By Beth Meadows

I

’m a sucker for a good view. This, among many other reasons, is why I’ve loved hiking my entire life. So, when I stood on top of Wind Rock, on mile 664 of 2,192 of the Appalachian Trail, and looked out over the gorgeous mountains, I knew I had a problem. I didn’t care about the view. Not one bit. All I wanted was cell signal so I could call my boyfriend and tell him I was done. “I know you’ve given this a lot of thought,” he said. I had. For sure. A week earlier, I laid awake inside a shelter–restless. As the men on either side of me rustled in their sleeping bags and snored in the darkness, I was accepting the reality that I wasn’t going to finish my AT thru hike, and I was actually okay with it. Thank goodness. I arose a few hours later, relieved to mentally throw away my schedule that would take me to Maine in three more months. I’d hike less miles at a slower pace, and if my feet didn’t feel better within a week, I’d stop altogether. It was time to make this difficult decision. Months prior, as my excitement grew leading up to this adventure, so did my fears. These included things like “thunderstorms” and “creepy men,” but topping my list was an intangible worry, rooted in pride: What if I get out there

Somewhere in Virginia. The trail is as good as the vistas.

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and can’t hack it? What if I have to quit? At that point, nothing worried me more. I’ve dreamed about hiking the AT ever since I was little and have romanticized the idea over the past two decades. On April 20, 2019, I finally began this dream journey of walking from Springer Mountain, Georgia, to Mt. Katahdin, Maine, full of hope, so much joy, and a nervous pressure not to fail. Three days in. Steep climbs with my pack brought me to tears several times, while gnats flew into my eyelashes or died in my face sweat. Most days, I’d hike 10 plus hours just to complete the minimum number of miles needed to stay on schedule. I’d met wonderful, but swift, people, so I often hiked alone. Despite exhaustion, I had trouble sleeping because of wilderness sounds or hikers’ snores. Of course these things were extremely challenging, but nothing compared to the excruciating pain in my calves, ankles and feet. My doctor and I had great hope for healing with shoe inserts and physical therapy. No such luck. So on Day 62, as I laid awake in that shelter, I gave myself the freedom to slow down and a deadline of one week. If my feet didn’t improve, I’d leave the trail. Within just a few days, the pain grew exponentially. I wanted to stay, but I knew it was time to stop. Why was it so hard to quit, even with all

the hardships? For one, it wasn’t easy giving up on such a huge dream. Even when it didn’t turn out like anything I had expected, it was confusing to realize maybe this wasn’t for me after all. But even once I worked through all of those emotions as best I could, I knew that, despite all of the challenges, the benefits were unparalleled, and I wanted more. My ego was being smothered, which is the same as a burden lifted. Without the distractions of everyday life, my dreams were vivid and clear. I saw a vision for my life, especially as an artist. I faced so many fears and gained a tremendous amount of confidence. The AT lavished me with these gifts, and on top of all that, provided some of the most beautiful places for me to walk on foot. These things, as you can imagine, are hard to give up. No, this isn’t the story I had hoped to tell, the one that ended with my victory photo taken on Mt. Katahdin, but I think it might be a better one. I followed a dream, stuck with it for 70 days, and gave myself the freedom and grace to let go of my pride and the ending I felt pressured to have. In light of all that I gained, my failure as an Appalachian Trail thru hiker wasn’t such a terrible thing after all, and I know I’m not done dreaming about it. This time, though, I’ll be dreaming about the real deal.

To learn more about Beth “Slowburn” Meadows, visit www.bethmeadows.com or contact her at beth@bethmeadows.com. To read more about her adventure on the Appalachian Trail, visit @slowburnat on Instagram.


artSCENE

Petting a wild pony in Grayson Highlands, VA

Azaleas blooming along the AT in Roan Mountain.

Campsite sunset over Chattahoochee Gap in Georgia. A white blaze marks the trail on top of Unaka Mountain, which runs along the border of TN and NC.

A white blaze marks the trail on top of Unaka Mountain, which runs along the border of TN and NC. View of Fontana Lake from Shuckstack Firetower in the Great Smoky Mountains.

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Life of the T

PARTY

B y

interview photographs

he cheese board or cheese and charcuterie plate is often the centerpiece of your hors d’oeuvres table and an easy way to wow guests while offering variety. Local foodie and avid entertainer, Stephanie Smith, shares some thoughts and ideas. What’s your first step when building a cheese board or a cheese and charcuterie plate? I like to choose my serving pieces. They help set the feel of the gathering and will dictate how many foods I can mix in with the cheese – and maybe the meats. There’s a saying, “You eat with your eyes.” Would you agree? Absolutely. Presentation is so important, but taste trumps everything! How do you decide how many cheeses to include? It depends on how many people are coming – usually three. How do you pick which cheeses to serve? I like to have a theme. I’ll do cheeses from different regions or a trio made from different milks – such as cow’s, goat’s and sheep’s milk. Sometimes, I’ll build around one specific cheese. Blackberry Farm is producing their own version of camembert called Magnolia and it’s delicious. I used it as the center of the board for a recent get-together – I like that it’s locally made. Of course you always need to vary the textures – something creamy like brie or camembert, a firm

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j a m a

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stephanie

FIG

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HONEY

smith GRAZING

cheese such as cheddar or aged gouda, and a semi-soft cheese like havarti. It’s fun to add in a good stinky cheese, too – a tasty topic of conversation! After you’ve chosen the serving piece and cheeses, where to go from there? After I situate the cheeses I just start layering things in. If you do use a super stinky cheese allow some space between it and the others. This might be a good area to place the charcuterie, and it could act as a great divider amongst the various sections on the plate. This area of cured meats can include salami, capicola or prosciutto. After the positioning is complete I add things that will compliment the cheeses. I always include fresh and dried fruits and nuts. Sometimes, I add in assorted olives and gherkins – especially if I have charcuterie. Besides being delicious, these all give good color and texture when mixed in, laid over, etc. What about sauces, dips and spreads? I always include a few – something sweet and something savory. Some type of preserve, fig or quince jam, maybe honey – apple butter would be good as we go into fall for the sweet. As for the savory, I almost always have pepper jelly, bacon and onion jam on hand – Trader Joe’s Red Pepper Jelly and Blackberry Farm’s Bacon Jam and Smoked Onion Jam are three of my faves. If I have charcuterie, I’ll have an interesting mustard or harissa, too.


How do you handle serving the condiments? Have a spreader or spoon for each of the dips. This is another way to set the feel of the party. I love to use pewter spoons. Michael Peters Home, a shop in Bearden, carries pewter spoons and spreaders by Vagabond House – it’s gorgeous stuff and can be dressed up or down. Sometimes I use antique silver – a sterling baby spoon is the perfect size for a taller condiment jar and it’s so cute! If I want the get-together to be super casual I might use little bamboo or olivewood spoons. Lastly, do you have to use cheese knives? In my opinion, no. But, I usually do. There are millions of options – lots of three piece sets that will have a knife for each type of cheese (some multi-purpose). Knives with the fork at the end are great for cutting and then piercing hard cheeses like cheddar or aged (hard) gouda but they work with almost any cheese – and you can use them for charcuterie, too. The knife that looks similar to a spreader is usually used with soft cheeses like brie, camembert, goat, etc. Lastly, the knife with a wide blade – sometimes they look like a spade or a hatchet – is great for cutting through semi-hard cheeses like havarti and red wax (young) gouda. The knives help to reinforce the feel, too. I forgot to ask about breads and crackers? I like to put them on a separate dish, in a basket or on the outer edges of the cheese board if I’m using a really big platter. I don’t like the way it looks to have the cheese board overloaded with crackers. Parting thoughts? Regardless the type of get-together, whether we’re being fancy, celebrating a holiday, watching football, whatever, I want my friends and family to feel comfortable and content. And, to enjoy the food!

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F e s t i v a l m y t h s Music Notes b y

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hether streaming from your personal device on your morning commute or playing background music while winding down, it is easier than ever to experience new albums and playlists. According to an article posted in Forbes, it was recorded in 2017 the average American listens to “slightly more than 32 hours a week” with live music sets only ranging from 45 minutes to 2 hours. One major appeal of music festivals is the ability to spend all day experiencing and discovering new artists. Don’t like one? Instead of pressing next on your device, simply walk over to the next stage. After experiencing the magic of my first music festival (Bonnaroo 2018), I returned home excited to share my experience with others. I became incredibly heartbroken when sharing one of the greatest experiences of my life was met with negativity and misconceptions of what a festival looks like. Here are four of the most popular myths surrounding music festivals. Myth 1: Hot weather. Both festivals I attended took place outside in June and July. With Bonnaroo spread out on a field in Manchester, Tennessee, there are slim to no trees in the area; however, AC Entertainment carefully set up air conditioned tents, multiple clean drinking

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water stations, and even sent witty, yet effective text reminders to stay hydrated. Forecastle took place on the scenic riverwalk in Louisville, Kentucky, with the same perks, with added shade from trees, a sitting area by the river to dip your feet in, and extra shade from the interstate structure. Myth 2: Young crowd. While most media coverage focuses on capturing the younger crowd for whatever reasons, I met and experienced a beautiful variety of ages. Donna from Louisville, Kentucky, (pictured far right) met her two friends on a free shuttle to a festival entrance over ten years ago. When I mentioned I was writing this article they all exclaimed, “Take our picture as proof!” She shared that she has been going to Forecastle since it started because of someone who lived down the road as her. “Yes there is a younger community that shows up, but in general there are organically age divided areas.” Worried about taking your children? Have no fear! Natural Life set up a “Parent Comfort Station” just for you. Myth 3: Drunken drug filled experience. If ruining your sobriety is a concern, take comfort in knowing there are more options than beers to sip on. There is all the free water you can drink, energy drinks and coffee stations, a sober community

tent, and even “mocktail” options. Local Knoxville musician Kelsi Walker shared, “While some people may overdo it, the majority is there to embrace and welcome the strong sense of community that develops.” Myth 4: Too expensive. This year, general admission for 50+ performances across three days at Forecastle ranged from $149.50 to $199.50 and 150+ performances across four days at Bonnaroo $279 to $349 before shipping and fees. While it is challenging to catch every single performance, that still averages to under $10 a show. For comparison, general admission tickets at Thompson-Boling arena for Thomas Rhett range $30.25 to $90.25. The “magic” of music festivals is not founded on taking the perfect selfie with friends, safely walking around with a favorite beverage or showing off another wristband tanline. The magic is smiling at the person next to you as you both bob your head to a new song. The magic is seeing the artist whose music can instantly turn your day around. The magic is putting the device away, being present and listening the way artists’ dream of: together.


Born and raised in Knoxville, Jess Maples is a multimedia artist with a social worker’s heart. Visit www.jessmaples. photography to learn more and book.

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For The Love of Hounds: A Foxhunter’s Tale By Rachel Wilhelm

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hear the steady buzzing of the alarm at my phone, and unlike most mornings, I turn it off and roll out of bed without hitting snooze a few (or more) times. My three dogs look groggy as I quietly feed them, kiss a sleeping Russell goodbye, and lock the door behind me. As I pull out of my dark, chilly neighborhood and head towards the barn, I glance at my clock: 4 a.m. Right on time. Arriving to the stables, our team is greeted with persistent, hungry nickering and pawing at the stall doors. The barn lights glow against the black sky as horses are fed, tacked, and loaded on the trailer. They know where we’re headed. Chasing the sun to the day’s fixture, we’re met by dozens of trailers lining the misty driveway, flanked by horses and riders making last minute adjustments, polishing boots, tucking stray hairs under a hairnet or helmet. Now mounted, riders gather, toast the day with port, and chatter rolls through the group. Looking around, I spot Ryan Johnsey, our Huntsman and Master of Hounds, near the rear of the parking lot with his wife, Casey, preparing to open the hound trailer. As the door opens, 30-some-odd number of hounds leap from the trailer and scatter nearby. A blast of the horn pierces the quiet. Everyone comes to attention, and the hounds gather around Ryan. The anticipation builds as each mounted group moves out after him. Riding back, I hear the first cry a few minutes later as we head towards a treeline through the field. First one, then two, and finally the entire pack breaks out in a joyous cry – honoring the lead hound – raising the hair on my arms, making my throat tight with emotion. The hunt is on. When I see the pack move in unison and hear their cries, it awakens a spot within my soul that lies dormant during the warmer months of the year. I don’t know what it is that sparks such a response; but, the field of riders around me reflect that same feeling in their giddy expressions, misty eyes, and raw emotion in their hushed whispers as the pack moves out. A sport that first drew me in by my love for horses, foxhunting is truly an expression of the love and trust between human and hound. Far from the barbaric portrayals made by extreme groups, it is the oldest sport in America – loved by young and old alike – and, highlights a relationship often missed by many that love sporting hounds. Stewards of the land and on the forefront of conservation, foxhunters are often misunderstood and questioned on the sustainability of such an ancient sport. So where does

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foxhunting fit into the modern world? Eyes On The Inside This past summer, I had an opportunity to catch up with our Huntsman, Ryan Johnsey, to spend some time with him and the pack of foxhounds he trains and maintains for the local Tennessee Valley Hunt Club. I was looking for an informal education on hunting with hounds and the intimate relationship we have with them, more so than I would experience while mounted. Thus, I was invited to spend the morning with him for a hound walk, which is commonly done during the warmer months to maintain the physical and mental health of the foxhounds. Jumping at the opportunity, I had no idea what was in store for me that morning. I showed up at the kennels in Mascot at 8:30 a.m., but the mercury was already steadily rising. As I got out of my car, I was rushed by the Johnsey’s pack of house dogs, and promptly licked and covered in dirty paw prints. Ryan stepped out of the stables behind the house, and the dogs promptly forgot their new victim and bounded towards him. The adoration his family dogs have for him and Casey are only the first signs of many of how closely their life revolves around hounds. I was assuming we would get right to business; however, Casey diverts me and asks if I want to meet the new foxhound puppies. My duties abandoned (who says no to puppies?) I apologize to Ryan and follow Casey to the stables to meet our newest pack members. A pretty female named Kegstand (more about the naming process later) looks up with doe eyes as we walk up to the stall door and open it to greet her. She lovingly noses Casey and happily shows off her tiny two week old pups, who have just opened their eyes and are stumbling around on wobbly legs. One of the bigger pups, wondering where his mother is, throws back his little head and emits the tiniest, squeaking, howl – a promise of his voice in the pack down the road. Casey laughs and tells me they just started “speaking” like that only the day before. We tuck the pups back in and visit a few of the bigger liters, which Ryan lets out of their stalls. Before I know it, hound puppies are racing up and down the barn aisle, tugging on hanging lead ropes, and spilling out into the grass around the barn. One horse, Blue, sticks his head out of his stall, wondering what the fuss is all about. Seeing the puppies, I can almost imagine him rolling his eyes, as he turns back to his hay after he allows me the obligatory scratch on his neck.


“You ready?” Ryan asks as we put the puppies up. As we approach the whitewashed kennel beside the barn, the hounds it houses sense their master’s presence. The cries become deafening once we step inside the cool, concrete walls. Separated into different runs, Ryan calls out hounds by name and affixes radio collars to them before letting them out into the center aisle. They dance around him and I can feel the excitement as he tucks the hunt horn into his front pocket and lays the lash of his hunt whip across his neck. They greet me with licks and jump around me, but their attention always goes back to Ryan. We take about twenty hounds out of the kennel and begin our walk as the cicadas scream and sweat rolls down our back. The hounds stick to the side of the road with Ryan, and rarely does he have to use his horn or a subtle whip crack to bring their attention back to him. It’s more like watching water run behind him as the hounds move in near unison. A few troublemakers have their names called out – particularly a big, dark cross-bred hound named Hagrid, who can’t help but sniff everything and try to pick up cans from the side of the road. I’ve already decided he’s my favorite. Walking and talking, Ryan tells me about his introduction to foxhunting as a young boy growing up in Virginia – the spiritual home of foxhunting for nearly 300 years. Always drawn to the hounds, Ryan found himself approaching his 19th birthday and was offered a position in the Loudoun County Hunt as a whipper-in, an assistant position in the hunt. This position eventually brought him to becoming their Professional Huntsman, which he kept for two seasons, and eventually brought with him to Tennessee. Currently in his seventh season with the Tennessee Valley Hunt Club, as the Hunstman and now one of the Masters, Ryan has implemented his ideas on breeding a crossbred hound more suited for our difficult territory. Additionally, he works with educating others on the ethics and preservation of the sport of

foxhunting. His concern about the ethics of the sport and how it can survive in a time when old traditions are being buried, and even looked down upon makes us ask — where does foxhunting fit in, and how will it continue to survive and flourish? Conservation and Public Relationships From the time I’ve spent with Ryan Johnsey, Casey, joint master Ryan Broyles, and my own boss, former Master of Foxhounds Carla Hawkinson, their passion for conservation, both of land and the animals we pursue, is evident. For one, I will state upfront that the hunt pursues a fox or coyote without the intention of a kill. When our quarry goes to ground, the hounds are called off. We celebrate the fox or coyote with a toast of champagne or port, praising his speed, cleverness, and agility, and ask him to give us another day of fun in the future. Without him, our sport is nothing. It’s not uncommon for a huntsman or his staff noticing a sickly looking fox within their hunting territory to stealthily fill a chicken carcass with antibiotics and leave it nearby in hopes the animal will eat it. Land conservation is close to heart and mind as well, as farms and larger tracts of open land are steadily disappearing, being replaced by commercial businesses and taking away the land these animals need to survive. Hunts regularly purchase conservation easements, not only for the enjoyment of our sport, but others as well. The serenity and peace of open land is something every American values, but often the thought of what makes that open land possible is dismissed or forgotten. Many hunt clubs strive to maintain these public lands, easements, and rural areas through donations and the labor of the club itself. Hunt clubs form relationships with local farmers that allow hunting, often maintaining the land, fixing fencelines, and helping out if the landowner needs repairs done. Our local hunt club does regular clean-up days on the public land we hunt on – often clearing trails and roads with chainsaws, if necessary.

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These efforts are often unseen by the unknowing public that cast a negative eye. From Old World To New World As an old, traditional sport, foxhunting is embracing aspects of modern technology in an effort to keep its relevance in a fast-paced world. Ryan uses GPS collars to track hounds during a hunt, making his job easier and safer. Cell phones also have their place in a hunt. If we’re hunting a big territory, it’s not uncommon for Ryan to call one of his whippers in or a field master to relay his location or share news as the hunt progresses. Safety for horses and riders has also drastically improved, mainly with helmets. Risk comes with the reward, and many hunters now ride with helmets, although not traditional, with many hunts now requiring them. This is especially important as we raise the next generation of foxhunters, leading by example. Our hunt club has a fabulous array of young riders, many under the instruction of Casey, who is a local instructor. She teaches young riders not only about proper horsemanship and safety, but also the joy of hounds, conservation, and ethics, is the bloodline of our sport. Especially with children so reliant on technology and social media, teaching them to disconnect from that world and to connect with the horses and hounds is vital. The entire goal of the hunt is to have fun. When I ask Ryan what he hopes our members, young or old, take away from a hunt, he smiles. “I feel like foxhunting is an escape for most people, and it’s not worth all the time and hard work if you’re not having fun. I hope our members and subscribers walk away from a hunt with a better understanding of hound work, pack dynamics, and scenting conditions when they’re out with me. Having a smaller club and smaller fields up close to the action makes this possible. After the hunt, hearing our members recall the events of the day, play by play, naming the hounds, who was up front and when, is really rewarding. Our subscribers notice and appreciate hound work and are very educated, for which I am grateful.” The gratefulness is returned tenfold to Ryan as I thank him as I leave that morning, filled with knowledge and appreciation for his, among others, dedication to the sport and the hounds that make up it’s life force. You can see it in their eyes too, after a long day running, tongues lolling and sprawled out on the cool floor of the kennels. Even as he passes on his horse after the hunt, a hound will ride to meet his hand for a comforting touch. Those little moments, when noticed, are all a part of the full heart feeling we take home. For years, I thought foxhunting was a horse sport, and under Ryan’s guidance as a huntsman and friend, I have become focused on hounds. Whether you are a dog lover yourself, or just want to learn more about foxhunting, information is available through The Masters of Foxhounds Association (www.mfha.com), which works tirelessly to make sure the future of our sport is protected, along with educating the general public. For our local Knoxville residents, we hope you reach out to one of our Masters, as we offer several opportunities for guests to come check us out! Visit www.tvhfox.com for more information. Rachel has now owned 6 horses, exclusively mares. She is a riding instructor and guide who loves trail riding and foxhunting.

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There’s an app for that! Namaste anywhere with your meditation apps.

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here are apps that are now available to consumers that focus on helping people clear their minds from their busy schedules through yoga, meditation and mindfulness. With technology being in the forefront of almost all aspects of our lives, it sometimes seems as if life is passing us by without us realizing it. The practice of meditation, yoga and mindfulness allow us to step back from our crazy lives and take a minute or so for ourselves. However, busy schedules sometimes do not allow us to make it to a yoga or meditation class. In today’s day and age, our devices are now known as distractions, but why not allow them to help us to reach a more relaxed state? There are several top rated yoga and meditation apps that can be found in our phone’s app stores that are designed to help relax even the busiest person with various time lengths. Some apps keep track of how consecutively you practice meditation throughout the week.

Monitoring health through apps give people a sense of comfort while caring for their loved ones.

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here comes a time in a child’s life when they start thinking about their parents’ health and how to stay updated with them. New medical advances and technology such as Virtual Home Care apps are allowing children to stay updated and monitor their loved ones’ health. For example, with the FamilyCare app by Electronic Caregiver if a parent takes their blood pressure with a home blood pressure monitor, the data is sent to their account and whoever has authorization to the account such as medical professionals and loved ones can monitor the data. Randy Carson, Mastercare partner of Electronic Caregiver, sees the various benefits that virtual home care can have for families and those in the medical field. “One is for the adult children to make sure their parents are complying, if they have chronic diseases, to make sure they are keeping track of things and if they don’t take their vitals or whatever they need to be doing,” Carson said. “I as a child would get an alert [from the app] and would say ‘hey mom, maybe you should remember to take your blood pressure or take your glucose so we can keep track of it’.” “The big benefit really is more towards the doctors and their ability to manage chronic diseases,” Carson said. “These days what we are moving towards is more of a holistic way of taking care of chronic diseases and the approach is to keep people well as opposed to treating episodic care as we always have. We are trying to keep them out of the doctor’s office and the hospitals.”

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Dog walking apps give owners a sense of connection while away from their dogs.

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etting a stranger walk your little furry friend can make any dog parent uneasy, but dog walking apps are changing the landscape of the traditional walk. Alisa Hamby, owner of Royal Bark Social Club here in Knoxville, started a dog walking business in San Francisco prior to returning to East Tennessee. While in California, Hamby employed an app that gave updates during her walk with the client’s dogs. Each client had a barcode magnet assigned to them. It would alert the owner when she picked up and dropped off the dog and would keep track of how long the walk would last. The app also had GPS tracking which would allow the client to see where the dog was at all times and allowed her to upload photos that she took of the dogs to share with the owner while on their walks. “The clients really appreciate the updates and just to know what was going on, but they really loved the pictures – it’s something they looked forward to,” Hamby said. “People are so busy now but they want their pups to be extremely well cared for. Now that I’ve opened a daycare, we use the photo updates piece of the app. It makes our pet-parents so happy to get a quick pic of their dog in the middle of the day.” We are currently in an app-friendly society where people like to be updated with all aspects of their lives, and even their furry friends’ lives.

Car sharing apps now offer a new way of commuting.

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he days of going to your local car rental agency to rent a car seems like an idea of the past while being in the midst of car riding apps such as Uber and Lyft. Newly designed car sharing apps, like Turo, allow customers to share their cars while they are not using them in cities such as Miami, Washington D.C. and Atlanta. The app allows approved customers in the Turo community to locate the car they have booked before their trip with the GPS component, unlocks the doors of the vehicle with cellular or Bluetooth connection and your trip begins without the hassle of stopping at a car rental agency.

Vanessa Rodriguez is a recent graduate from the University of Tennessee with a degree in journalism and electronic media. When she’s not working, Vanessa can be found enjoying time with family and friends, traveling or spending hours on YouTube, Netflix, and Spotify. KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 31 KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 31


K N O X V I L L E : T H E

L A N D

OF THE “AMERICAN DREAM” P

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B y B a r b a r a h o t o b y J e s

he American dream is defined by endless possibilities and the promise that if you work hard you can achieve anything that you set your mind to. Opportunity, freedom, justice, honor, mercy, and hope are what the United States–Knoxville– represent to me and many other wonderful foreigners that have chosen Knoxville as home. I had the pleasure to interview several of these individuals for this article. For most foreigners, just making it to the USA is already a miracle. We leave our countries because we can’t access the same opportunities as here. Because we come from completely different cultures, “culture shock” is common. For those I interviewed, Knoxville has shown the foreign communities the typical southern hospitality and an open and friendly atmosphere to prosper. Knoxvillians are so nice! I’ve lived in California, North Carolina and New Jersey and no place made me feel so welcome like here. It’s truly the “land of the free.” You accept us for who we are. To the many Knoxvillians I’ve encountered, it doesn’t matter our different cultures, costumes, or race–they just see us as people. To Yassin Terou from Syria, owner of Yassin’s Falafel house, Knoxville was love at first sight. “I came to Knoxville in 2011 for the first time. Things got very bad in Syria and I wasn’t able to go back. I started to feel the love and the support from the great community, and I wanted to connect with the people through good food and good relationships. I love Knoxville it’s a dream to have a safe place for your kids, Knoxville

c s

u r r a n m a p l e

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is home for me.” Yassin retributes how the Knox community welcomed him by giving the best food from his restaurant to charity events. Robert Darraj, from Georgia/Palestine, owner of Alcoa Auto Center also agrees saying, “Knoxville had everything I needed to achieve success in business. It’s a very affordable city, it’s easy to get around, [has] many job opportunities and investments. [It is] very enjoyable to live [and] people here are so kind and helpful.” Robert gives back by being a reserve officer for the police department. When working with them he sees clearly that safety here is a must and that the police stay on top of things. “When something bad happens, they use very resource to get people quick, they really care about people’s safety.” Claudia Cabello from Honduras, Executive Director of Centro Hispano, loves everything about Knox Vegas. “I like being able to see the mountains from almost any part of town. I love the landscape, mild winters, and I’ve enjoyed the affordability and luxury of buying a home.” Thank you, Knoxville, for making it possible for me and many other foreigners to live the American Dream. We foreigners are forever grateful. As Yassin said, “Home is not where you are born it’s where you can find love and give love. It’s when you are in a land that takes your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, and gives a crown of Freedom and Liberty with fireworks on the 4th of July you should know you are in the Land of the American dream.”

Barbara is with Exit Real Estate Professionals Network and says, “Besides its beauty, safety, and opportunities, Knoxville is very affordable which makes it possible for us foreigners to buy a house. I am a realtor and want to help. Call me at (865) 383-3948.”

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into FASHION LOOKS FOR A SUNNY AUTUMN AFTERNOON TO A CRISP EVENING OUT AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

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FA S H I O N O P E N I N G PA G E ALUMNI HALL

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Jade is classy cool in a sleeveless green dress with cowl neck collar and leather jacket with laser cut detail from Janice Ann’s. Keith wears the Nelson, a basic slim straight fit jean made with Cone Mills stretch fabric for just enough give. From Marc Nelson Denim.

From left to right: Laura’s modern spring jacket and matching shell from Lafayette 148 pair beautifully with white linen pants by Estelle & Finn. Tyler Boe ruffle neck dotty dress keeps Andrea cool. Raye Anne’s fabulous dress in shocking pink is made by Anna Cate Collection. Anita wears a striking tulip print silk blouse over sea blue pants, along with a white denim and leather jacket, all from Ecru. Each of these ensembles were furnished by M.S.McClellan & Co. 36 KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 36 KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE


Lauren is in a white embroidered boho dress with a leather fanny pack. Chloe models a chocolate dress with gold polka dots and ruffle detail, black leather handbag, and suede booties. Alex wears a two piece boho mustard print. Clothing, jewelry, and accessories from Elyse Wilde.

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“C

RUZE FARM AT ASBURY IS HOME TO OUR PIZZA BARN AND ICE CREAM HOUSE! THIS LOCATION IS SO SPECIAL TO US BECAUSE IT BRINGS OUR DAIRY JOURNEY FULL CIRCLE. ASBURY IS THE COMMUNITY WHERE THE BURKHARTS AND CRUZES MET, MARRIED, AND DAIRY-ED UNTIL 1973 WHEN KNOX COUNTY PURCHASED MANY OF THE DAIRY FARMS LOCATED IN THE FORKS OF THE RIVER FOR THE INDUSTRIAL PARK. GRANDPA GLENN CRUZE RELOCATED TO RIVERDALE AND CONTINUED DAIRY FARMING. HIS SON, EARL CRUZE BUILT A PROCESSING PLANT AND BEGAN BOTTLING MILK IN 1980. 40 YEARS LATER, WE ARE BACK IN THE ASBURY COMMUNITY, REVIVING THE WONDERFUL MEMORIES AND SPREADING JOY WITH FRESH CHURNED ICE CREAM AND DELICIOUS PIZZA! BRING THE WHOLE FAMILY!” SINCE 2010, COLLEEN HAS OWNED AND OPERATED CRUZE FARM. -QUOTE BY COLLEEN CRUZE BHATTI FROM CRUZE FARM WEBSITE.


Beth, Carol, and Tracey show off fall looks from Janice Ann’s Fashions at Cruze Farm at Asbury. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Victorian farmhouse at 2721 Asbury Road in East Knoxville is home to the Cruze Farm Dairy ice cream shop and pizza barn.


Chloe wows in shades of sunset with this horizontally striped long cardigan sweater and denim skirt, with ribbon necklace. Alex wears a mustard colored tiered babydoll dress with denim jacket and turquoise pendant. Both looks are from Folly Boutique.

Shelbey looks playful in her light yellow dress from Folly Boutique.

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Alex is wearing a striped wrap dress in fall colors with leather leaf earrings and a hammered brass and quartz bracelet from Rush Clothing Boutique.

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Keith has flash and style in the Hollywood stretch animal print twill pant and black spread collar shirt, both from Marc Nelson Denim.

Alex wears a floral print dress with jewelry from Bliss.

Jade wears a pretty off the shoulder print dress with three-quarter bell sleeve and wood and resin pendant necklace. Clothing by Sally’s Alley and Jewelry from Knoxville Soap Candle & Gifts.

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Anita models a Johnny was butterfly winter tunic in lavender with white euro flower pant from Janice Ann’s. Chris wears an enzyme washed 100% linen sport shirt from Faherty with a pair of tonal all-over floral pattern cotton shorts from Johnnie-O. His flip-flops are from Hari Mari. Ensemble furnished by M.S. McClellan & Co.

Anita’s ready for an autumn outing in a blouse sleeve olive top with long, cashmere vest and boyfriend slouch distressed jean with cuff detail, with fun, funky jewelry and a “stadium safe” purse. Olive green bootie. Outfit and shoes from Sole in the City.

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Comfortable dresses with jewelry from Bliss look great on Ulika, Lexie and Alex.

Animal prints are back! Jade wows in a red and black dress with leopard print bodice from Joseph Ribkoff. Robin looks stylish in this leopard print duster. Anita’s black knit dress with animal print accents at neckline and cuff is on trend. Robin and Anita both model black pumps with tortoise shell heels. All from Janice Ann’s.

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Alex wows in a fuchsia slip dress and black leather booties from Elyse Wilde. Josh and Jeff are classic cool in handcrafted denim pieces from Marc Nelson. The whiskey stained denim Josh wears is a great alternative to a traditional dark jean. All from Marc Nelson Denim.

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Alexis is a stunner in this cheetah print cold-shoulder blouse with lace detail and dark distressed skinny jean. Chardonai is a vision in this winter white ribbed knit blouse with bell sleeve and button cuff detail and light washed boyfriend jeans, with animal print jewelry from JaTrew and Singg. All from Folly Boutique.

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Shelbey and Lexie model Jessica Angel customizable gowns exclusive to Diana Warner Knoxville.

Anita wears a leopard print jean with a white button front shirt and black ribbed sweater for a casual cool look. Utility meets fem on Jade in this stunning matte gold jacket with metallic camo jean. Robin looks fabulous in black denim racer jeans and animal print cashmere sweater topped with a buttery soft, light leather jacket. All from Janice Ann’s.

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Shelbey models a black off the shoulder and high-waisted bathing suit from Knoxville Soap Candle & Gifts. Treyson lounges in a fun colored swim trunk from M.S. McClellan & Co.

Jeff is stylish and cool in classic black denim jeans with stretch, as is Keith in the Hollywood twill pant. Both looks are dressed up with long sleeve spread collar shirts. All from Marc Nelson Denim.

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Green is the color of fall. Jeff models selvedge denim jeans in a slim straight fit. His cotton henley is layered with a soft flannel shirt. All from Marc Nelson Denim.

Our 5 pocket white stretch denim is made of Cone Mills 99% cotton/ 1% lyocel. It is paired with our 100% linen pink shirt for a crisp spring look. Wear the shirt tucked in or out for 2 different looks.

Chloe wears a cream colored, distressed, waterfall tiered bohemian blouse with long flared jean and and necklace by Blackbird Jewelry. Alex looks amazing in the plum colored V-neck jumpsuit with tie front accent and open back, with leopard print scarf. All from Folly Boutique. KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE 49


Alex looks ready for fall in this oversized mauve-grey nubby woven sweater with cuff detail. Flare jean and gorgeous ribbon necklace by JaTrew complete the look. All from Folly Boutique.


Alex wears a charcoal grey washable silk goddess gown. Lauren wears a copper colored washable silk tunic. Chloe looks stunning in this black washable silk waterfall ruffle romper and animal print and fringe turquoise leather cross body. Clothing and purse from Janice Ann’s.


Alexis is lovely in this rust colored embroidered boho blouse with tie front detail and dark distressed skinny jean. Chardonai wears a Caramel colored chenille sweater accented with a beautiful fall scarf and light wash boyfriend jean. All from Folly Boutique.

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Rylee wears a tangerine and white short Alice dress. Alex is in a fun gray tie front dress by Gisele. Lauren is adorable in this Tennessee orange patterned dress. All from Alumni Hall.

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Stylish leather handbag and booties, suede crossbody and a unique pair of slides. All from Janice Ann’s.

On trend leather sneakers and mustard colored suede booties are all from Sole in the City.

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Menswear inspired suede loafers and a boucle with black leather pair each have soft feminine touches. All from Sole in the City.

Inspired by a vintage Parisian dress, bags from Patricia Nash’s Embossed Paisley Collection are showcased here with a metallic handbag that incorporates a romantic print from their archives.

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These shoulder bags will compliment any outfit this fall. All from Patrica Nash.

Animal print is back! These leather crossbodies are perfect for an evening out. All from Patrica Nash.

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Put a little pep in your step with any of these fun shoes from Sole in the City.


perfeeophotographs.com@gmail.com | perfeeophotographs.com | Q kcperfeeo

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INTERIORS & GIFTS

Life is a Gift..... Make it Beautiful CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE NOVEMBER 22 & 23

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Text CH to 55678 to Join our VIP list and receive news & special event discounts!

Monday - Friday 11 AM - 5 PM & Saturday 10 AM - 4 PM December Hours: Monday - Saturday 10 AM - 6 PM 12556 Kingston Pike Knoxville, TN 37934 865.288.7887 | www.chinteriorsandgiis.com

Darlene & Kristen & Sadie

A National Movement to Help End Hunger in America

Help us end hunger in America with the L.U.V.S Program Step 1. Locate a Food Pantry Step 2. Understand their Purpose Step 3. Volunteer and Support KNOXVILLE STYLE MAGAZINE P.O. 58 Box 11684 Knoxville, TN 37939 | Email: scarecrownation@gmail.com | Phone: (865) 250-3313 | xhunger.com


MARK CARSON ENGLISH Studio/Gallery | 130 West Jackson Ave Knoxville, TN 37915 | 615.479.7279 Q markcarsonenglishcontemporary | E Mark Carson English Stuido markcarsonenglish.com | markcarsonenglish@gmail.com

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COMING SOON

HOME Knoxville Style

Holiday Issue


Holiday Extravaganza Thursday, Dec. 5 5:30 – 8 pm Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame

NOW TAKING VENDOR BOOTH RESERVATIONS! For more information, email leighknoxvillestyle@gmail.com


theatreSCENE

E

nter stage right. The year is 1933. It is in the midst of the Great Depression and one man had a vision. That man was Robert Porterfield and he created a theatre that would become known as the state theatre of Virginia. Barter Theatre, located in Abingdon, Virginia, started in a time where money was tight and morale was low; however, Robert wanted everyone to be able to see a good show. So, he used the concept of bartering instead of requiring money as a form of payment. He would barter produce with the people of Southwest Virginia. The cost of admission was 40 cents or the equivalent amount of produce. Most theatregoers chose the latter. According to the theatre’s website, “At the end of the first season, the Barter Company cleared $4.35 in cash, two barrels of jelly, and a collective weight gain of over 300 pounds.” The form of payment was not the only thing that made Barter unique, but also the fact that it sat on top of a jail. Eventually, the jail cells were converted into dressing rooms for the performers. The history of the Barter buildings is almost as rich as the theatre’s history. The first theatrical occurrence known dates back to 1876. Then, in 1890, it was sold and became a city hall and a fire hall. Until 1994, there was a fire alarm on the roof of the theatre. Each time the alarm would sound, the performers would freeze and could not continue the performance until the alarm finished. Before opening the theatre, Porterfield 62 KNOXVILLE KNOXVILLE STYLE STYLE MAGAZINE MAGAZINE 62

was notified that the Empire Theatre of New York City was going to be demolished. He was given a weekend to take anything out of the building before destruction. Most of Barter’s interior was salvaged from the Empire Theatre. Robert was able to get around $75,000 worth of items for his own theatre–this included a lighting system that was designed and installed by Thomas Edison. Even though Barter Theatre is quite profitable today, it still holds onto its heritage. On select days throughout the year, the theatre holds Barter Days–where patrons can bring non-perishable food items in exchange for show tickets. All of the food collected is given to the local food bank. Additionally, the first showing of each play is a ‘pay what you can’ performance. Starting at one dollar, the audience can pay any amount to gain admission to the first showing. The theatre holds this special deal to make live entertainment as accessible as possible to all. Barter has multiple buildings, including two theatres, two administration buildings, a building for the costume shop, sound studios, and rehearsal halls, a prop shop, a scene shop, a residential building and a production building. It is truly a staple in Virginia. The Barter stage II, now called Barter’s Smith Theatre after Steve and Debbie Smith, is a more intimate setting that is preferred by performers and audience members. This theatre was originally a Methodist church that burned down and later used by Martha Washington College as a gym and storage area. Barter is known for giving actors their

start. Some popular performers who got their big break at Barter are: Gregory Peck, Knoxville’s own Academy Award-winning Patricia Neal, Ernest Borgnine, Hume Cronyn, Ned Beatty, Gary Collins, Wayne Knight, and Larry Linville. Along with the famous alumni that have come from Barter, it has housed various popular performances as well, such as: Mama Mia, Footloose, Elf, and A Christmas Story. After Robert Porterfield’s death in 1971, one of the theatre’s alumni, Rex Parington, became the chief administrator until 1992. Currently, the Producing Artistic Director is Richard Rose. “One of the joys of being a repertory company is that people can come for a weekend and see 5 different plays if they want to, so I think a powerful draw that we have is variety,” Associate Artistic Director of Barter Theatre Katy Brown said. “We do everything from Shakespeare and classics, to farce and musicals and everything in between, including a large number of world premiers. This is a theatre where you can see Hamlet and Anything Goes in the same day and marvel over the flexibility and skills of the same actors doing both.” Some of the upcoming fall shows are: The Producers (musical); Wait Until Dark (thriller); a world premier of The Loophole; an intimate two hander called Maytag Virgin; and a wonderful adaptation of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by the youth theatre. Exit stage left.


Written by Chelsea Babin Photos submitted by Barter Theatre

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b y

a s h l e a

b u s h m a n

book NOOK

FALLING IN LOVE WITH BOOKS H

appy Fall, fellow book lovers! This issue, I’m going to review three books that completely captivated my attention over the summer. Two are thrillers and one is a sweet love story. I’m not usually a big romance novel fan, but this book was so lovely and special, that I didn’t want to finish it...I wanted it to last forever. I’ll start with the love story. One Day in December by Josie Silver (Crown Publishing, 2018), is about Laurie who never believed in love at first sight until she sees a man through a bus window on a snowy December day. She spends a year searching bus stations and cafes throughout London but never sees him again. At a Christmas party, her best friend introduces her new boyfriend to Laurie and it’s him–the man from the bus station. Of course it is! What follows is ten years of friendship, missed chances and heartbreak; but, what a beautiful and moving ten years it is. I adored this novel. It

reminded me a bit of some of my other favorite books and movies, but is also totally original and unique. The next book I chose is There’s Something in the Water by Catherine Steadman (Ballantine Books, 2018). While scuba diving on a romantic honeymoon in Bora Bora, Erin and Mark find a locked duffel bag in

women start the hike and team building exercise but only four make it out. Alice, the missing hiker knew everything about the company, including everyones’ secrets and she has a big one of her own. The traumatized women tell a tale of fear, broken trust and even violence. But, are they telling the truth? And, can they find Alice in the Australian bushland before the elements and animals get to her? Tense, frightening and oh so believable, this novel gave me the creeps in the best way possible. Those are my must reads for fall–or really anytime. So grab a book, snuggle up on the couch and enjoy the (hopefully) cooler weather.

the water. What’s in the bag and what they do with it leads the reader on a dark and terrifying ride. It’s a “what’s the worst that could happen?” tale spiked with pure adrenaline. It captivated me immediately and gave me literal chills throughout. I could not put it down and read it in almost one sitting. My third choice is Force of Nature by Jane Harper (Flatiron Books, 2018). This tale is about a company retreat in the wilderness to teach teamwork and resilience. Five

Ashlea Bushman reads way too many books and spends the rest of her free time at HSTV finding homes for animals.

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co n E o m d n i c A G e l r o y t w s t e h f i I L n e O v i u t i r s C o o P m g m n i t unity o m rP o TRACYE JAHN, REALTOR® MOVING, ALWAYS...MOVING! 865-776-8518 MOBILE 865-444-2400 OFFICE AGENTINREDREALTY.COM TRACYEJAHN.COM WHEN IT COMES TO REAL ESTATE, EXPERIENCE DOES MATTER a CALL FOR A FREE HOME EVALUTATION AND MARKET ANALYSIS a ASK ABOUT MY CUSTOMER LOYALTY BENEFIT PROGRAMS

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jess maples professional photographer

architecture | concert | event | fine art | landscape | portrait | product | real estate | sports | street | travel

Inqueries: booking@jessmaples.photography www.jessmaples.photography @jessmaples.photography

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spotLIGHT g

Jami Howard Wr i t te n & P h otog ra p h e d by C h e l s e a Ba b i n

L

ife is all about taking chances. Sometimes those chances turn into wonderful opportunities, sometimes they do not. Young entrepreneur, Jami Howard, took a chance on starting a clothing boutique and it has turned out to be wondrous. Tightly nestled back on Kingston Street in Lenoir City, Tennessee, Rush Clothing Boutique has taken the small town by storm in recent months. Howard started the business out of her house at the beginning of 2019 and recently opened her first storefront in February. Howard’s inspiration for having her own business comes from her parents. They had their own electrical company and she learned the ins and outs of running a business from them. Working for herself has been a dream, according to Howard. She loves being able to wear whatever she wants and be her own boss. At her previous job, she was unsure of what she felt passionate about and what she wanted to pursue as a career. Then, one night as she lay in bed, she had a wake up call and it was that she was passionate about clothing. This is when she decided to open her own boutique. “I love the clothing and I love empowering women,” Howard said. “I started doing research and in two weeks, I had the business legally and it was in my house.” The whole process happened really fast for Howard. Once she figured out what she wanted to do, she went for it and accomplished it. She attributes her opportunity to God and is thankful for the blessings she has received. “With how fast it was, you couldn’t stop it,” Howard said. “It was definitely a God thing.” Howard feels as though this was meant to happen for her and has not looked back.

“I wasn’t really looking for anything, like a storefront, until I made a wrong turn...I thought that this was the dry cleaners because I had to take a couple of jackets there and I said that I was in the wrong place. So, I was on my phone googling where the dry cleaners place was and I was pulling out and there was just a ‘for rent’ sign on the door and I could afford the rent and then in a couple of days I had the lease, signed it [and] got the key and then my opening day was a week after that.” Howard learned a lot from her parents but also is still in school pursuing a degree in business management so she is learning as she goes through that program as well. Since owning her own business, Howard’s mindset has changed. She’s realized that there’s a variety of things one has to do as a business owner. “You have to stay busy,” Howard said. “You have to always be on your A-game to stay busy and your job and to maintain a good clientele and be kind...just be a genuine person and try to be as outgoing as you can be– just be authentic and unique.” Rush is truly a unique place. The minute you walk in, you feel a sense of welcomeness and calmness. Howard uses a variety of decor to make the shop feel homey – personal photos and other home decor items. She also picks clothing that is not only trendy, but wallet friendly. She wants to cater to everyone because not everyone can afford high end boutique prices. Business at the boutique has been fruitful these last few months and Howard plans to continue growing. Within the next year, she hopes to have another store up and running. Follow Rush on Facebook and Instagram @rush_clothing_boutique

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wine&DRINKS

Ron Zacapa Centenario Zacapa XO 80 proof Product of Guatemala Aging in Guatemalan highlands, cool air and high altitude allow the rum to mature more slowly in cognac casks which produces an exceptionally deep aroma, rich color and profound flavor and an absolutely amazing “new” Old-Fashioned. If you can’t find or afford a luxury rum such as Zacapa, there are plenty of quality, less expensive, readily available dark rums. Here are a few of my favorites: Bumbu Rum Company The Original 70 proof Made in Barbados Kirk and Sweeney 12 Year 80 proof Made in the Dominican Republic Prichard’s Fine Rum 80 proof Made in White’s Creek, Tennessee Zaya Gran Reserva Blend of 12 Aged Rums 80 proof Product of Trinidad

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wine& DRINKS

The Rum Old-Fashioned: Twist on a Classic

T

he quintessential cocktail, the Old-Fashioned is a classic every bartender should know and perfect. In close contention with only the Sazerac, the Old-Fashioned is thought by some historians to be the first cocktail ever mixed. Reminiscent of a beloved, all-American granddad, the Old-Fashioned is complex, refined and treasured by many. And, it’s served in a short, round, tumbler/rocks glass, also known as an old-fashioned...cocktails with dedicated glassware are typically something special. Made by muddling a Maraschino cherry and sugar or simple syrup with bitters, then adding whiskey, bourbon, rye whiskey, or sometimes brandy, and finally a twist of citrus rind, the Old-Fashioned is traditionally served on ice but can be served neat. For an interesting twist, try making this classic with quality, aged, dark rum, such as Zacapa XO or Kirk and Sweeney 12 Year (this in not your typical spiced rum kind of drink). A barrel aged rum will mimic the appeal of whiskey while adding a touch of spicy sweetness to the drink. To make at home: • • • • •

Thumb-sized orange peel (no pith, and certainly not a wedge) 1 sugar cube or a 1/2 tsp of simple syrup 2 oz. aged rum (such as Zacapa or the others shown here) 2-3 dashes orange bitters Maraschino cherry (preferably a good one, such as Luxardo)

Pour approximately one-half a teaspoon of simple syrup into a short rocks/old-fashioned glass (or add one sugar cube and a drop of water to loosen it up – most don’t keep cubed sugar on their bar and using simple syrup does not diminish the taste). Add a Luxardo cherry (you can use a bright red grocery store Maraschino cherry but trust me, it’s worth the upgrade). Muddle the sugar and cherry and add a couple dashes of bitters (I like to use Angostura Orange Bitters but there are a slew of quality bitters readily available, such as Woodford Reserve, Peychaud’s, Fee Brothers). Pour in 2 oz. of quality dark rum. Lastly, take the orange peel and “twist” it over the top of the drink to release the oils of the rind. Lightly stir. Then, drop the peel and a chunk of ice (or not) into the glass and enjoy.

Brett Richardson owns Admiral Wine and Spirits, located off Northshore Drive in west Knoxville, and carries a great selection of high-end rums, spirits, wines and craft beers.

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I wish to go to Hawaii Maksim, 6

kidney transplant

For a child with a critical illness, a wish trip is a much-needed escape from grueling medical treatments and scary doctor visits. It unites a family in a life-changing experience that helps them cope and grow stronger. Most wishes require air travel, and that’s where you can help. Give a child with a critical illness a world of hope by helping a travel wish take flight.

D O N AT E Y O U R A I R L I N E M I L E S A N D P O I N T S N O W AT W I S H . O R G / T R AV E L

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Holiday Extravaganza Thursday, Dec. 5 5:30 – 8 pm Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame

SEE LOOKS FOR WOMEN OF ALL AGES ON THE KNOXVILLE STYLE RUNWAY SHOP TO DRESS YOURSELF & YOUR HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS ENJOY LIGHT REFRESHMENTS & COCKTAILS For more information, email leighknoxvillestyle@gmail.com

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www.CreelGroupKnoxville.com

Profile for George Laurence-Krieps

Knoxville Style Magazine  

The fall issue of Knoxville Style Magazine. As you read through the pages, be sure to check out the links that are embedded. Videos are als...

Knoxville Style Magazine  

The fall issue of Knoxville Style Magazine. As you read through the pages, be sure to check out the links that are embedded. Videos are als...