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DEPARTMENTS PAGE 52

THE NEXT WAVE New Mexico has a vibrant and long-standing music scene. Our city has produced acclaimed acts such as Al Hurricane, Sparx, and The Shins. Heck, Jim Morrison (yes, that Jim Morrison) even grew up in Albuquerque. But the talent doesn’t end there. This month we take a look at 13 artists with ABQ ties who are on the rise, both here and nationally. Artists like sultry singer Delphia, whose music and origin story are both amazing; or Chill House, a group of longtime Albuquerque musicians who have meshed their skills. Longtime ATM music editor Mel Minter introduces you to this select group.

Page 95

OUR “HOME OFFICE” CONTEST In the stay-safe age of the coronavirus, much of the American (and ABQ) workforce switched to remote work from home. So we thought it might be fun to see what your work spaces look like. You responded to our Facebook message with photos, all vying to win ‘Best Messy Space,’ or ‘Best Organized Space,’ and even ‘Best Creative Use of Space.’ Here are the winners—plus some advice for dealing with your new co-workers (you know, pets and kids).

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DEPARTMENTS 28 Editor’s Note 31 Tapas

P. 31 P. 115

Two local photography students win big; One Albuquerque awards those who help seniors; Education Excellence Scholarships from the Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce; weird and wacky holidays; and some advice on how to get your ABQ streaming binge on.

40 Faces and Places 71 Datebook

107 People

109 Albuquerque the Interview As head of New Mexico’s largest state agency, with over 3,000 employees, Kathyleen Kunkel is faced with a near insurmountable task, and yet she is forging ahead with confidence, strength, and knowledge.

P.119

115 Personality

The unexpected star of Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham’s daily news conferences is Nixo Lanning, her sign language translator. Known for her emotive facial expressions and quick hands, Lanning is gaining popularity throughout the state and even getting noticed nationally.

119 Behind the Scenes

New Mexico is one of the leading states for COVID-19 testing, due in large part to the centralized site created at Balloon Fiesta Park. The men and women on the front lines there are working through erratic weather, long lines, and uncertain times to help fellow New Mexicans.

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NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINE’S

PEACE OF MIND JUNE 2020 Volume 18 Number 2 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Taylor Hood taylor@abqthemag.com PRODUCTION MANAGER

Sheridan Young sheridan@abqthemag.com PHOTO DIRECTOR

Don James don@abqthemag.com STAFF WRITER

Zane Beal zane@abqthemag.com STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Michael Jacobs michael@abqthemag.com TIEMPO EDITOR

Mel Minter mel@melminter.com CONTRIBUTORS

Book your dream cruise with freedom and flexibility. Change plans as needed and feel confident knowing that we’re looking out for your health and safety. Flexible Cancellation Policy • For all cruises through and including Nov 30, cancel up to 48 hours prior to your start date and receive a Future Cruise Credit through Dec 2022. • For all cruises beyond Dec 1 you can cancel for a full refund up to 120 days before your cruise. Your Safety is Our Priority To ensure your health and safety, we’ve implemented some of the strictest measures in the industry including: • Rigorous pre-embarkation screenings • Non-touch temperature checks for guests and crew • Disinfection and sanitization protocols on all ships

Kate Rodriguez Duran Kelli Trapnell

Albuquerque The Magazine (ISSN 1936-4350) is published monthly except January by Albuquerque The Media Corporation, 1550 Mercantile Ave. NE, Top Floor, Albuquerque, NM 87107. Periodicals Postage Paid at Albuquerque, NM 87101, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Albuquerque The Magazine, 1550 Mercantile Ave. NE, Top Floor, Albuquerque, NM 87107.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR We welcome letters to the Editor. You may e-mail yours to editor@abqthemag.com, or submit it directly from our website, or via snail mail. EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS Our editorial calendar is available online at www.abqthemag.com/MediaKit.pdf. No phone calls, please. Unsolicited manuscripts require a SASE.

Book your dream cruise today. Call 505.294.5031 or email info@awtravel.com.

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DEPARTMENTS P. 146

P. 121

121 Culture 122 Creatives

P. 134

A lifetime of experience with work, family, kids and art helped Joanne Douglas craft a successful jewelry business.

P. 136

124 Shelflife

Secret Albuquerque: A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful and Obscure, by Ashley M. Biggers; and The King of Taos, by Max Evans.

126 Tiempo

With equal parts nostalgia and humor, Mel Minter serves up a look back at his 16 years (and counting) as this magazine’s music editor.

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131 Dish

134 From the Vine

With ABQ’s bartenders and servers largely in a state of furlough, local liquor distribution employees find donations to grant them care packages of food and spirits; Boxing Bear forges ahead (coronavirus be damned) with a new taproom in a large re-purposed building on the city’s far Northeast Heights; a new focus and a new logo are only part of the changes afoot at the New Mexico Brewers Guild.

138 My Favorite Recipe

Music is the calling for Norlynn Blocker Price, from her middle school orchestra days, to heading up the Albuquerque Youth Symphony Program. Food is also a passion for her, as evidenced by her recipe for comfort-food brown rice.

141 Chef’s Kitchen

A peek into the workspaces of top local chefs, with Jonathan Perno of Campo (P. 139); J Martin Torrez of Artichoke Café (P. 142); David Ruiz of Paako Ridge (P. 144); and Frank Holloway, owner of Hollow Spirits Distillery (P. 151).

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DEPARTMENTS 167 Fun

168 ‘Til You Drop

With the monotony of working from home (and, let’s face it, endless Netflix viewing), it’s become mentally challenging for many in ABQ to stay focused. We asked a few local experts to help us find some collective sanity; (P. 168) Staying physically fit is another challenge, but several local groups and businesses are offering online workouts, including the Duke City Gladiators; NDI New Mexico; and Rebel Workout.

172 Photo Contest

Because they’re so quick, it’s often hard to capture the true beauty of our State Bird. But this month’s pic winner was able to do just that.

174 Pet of the Month

This month’s winner: Stella, a mix breed of Cattle Dog and beagle.

176 Passenger Window

P. 168

Yes, we’re in the desert. But the geological wonder known as a volcano has been waiting 200,000 years for you to come and explore its peaks that dot the city’s West Mesa.

179 25 Things You Didn’t Know About Me Our city’s vibrant live-theater scene is made better by the presence of Doug Montoya, a comedian and improv expert who got into the stage game because of a love of children’s theater.

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Th a n k s f o r N o th i ng JUNE 2020 Volume 18 Number 2 PUBLISHER

Larryl Lynch larryl@abqthemag.com

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Gena Goodson gena@abqthemag.com

SENIOR ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES

Philip Kjelland philip@abqthemag.com Megan Life megan@abqthemag.com PROJECT COORDINATOR

Kelli Trapnell kelli@abqthemag.com BUSINESS MANAGER

Renee Martinez business@abqthemag.com PROJECT SPECIALIST

Nic Martinez nic@abqthemag.com

So me t ime s , n o t h in g is a g o o d t hi ng . ® W it h a S an d ia A r e a M a s t e r c a r d g et :

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Albuquerque The Magazine 1550 Mercantile Ave. NE, Top Floor Albuquerque, NM 87107 phone: 505-842-1110 • fax: 505-842-1119 www.abqthemag.com

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Sandia Area is Federally insured by NCUA and is an Equal Opportunity Lender. Accounts subject to credit approval. See sandia.org or an MSO for rate, fee, and other cost information.

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EDITOR'S NOTE

W

e are another month into the quarantine and things are starting to get a little weird. Speaking with people around the city and relatives around the country, it seems boredom, loopiness, and a general loss of the concept of time are starting to take hold. I am one of the lucky ones who gets to come into work every day (with some pretty aggressive safety measures, I might add) so I am getting back to a little bit of a sense of normalcy. My poor wife has trouble remembering what day it is, so yes, I am one of the lucky ones. And so in the midst of all the masks (and all the moths!), we’re here to give you some positive vibes in our second-ever digital-only edition. First off, check out page 52 for our cover story, “The Next Wave”. You’ll find 13 Albuquerque singers, songwriters, and musical groups who are poised to follow in the footsteps of famed New Mexico artists like Al Hurricane and Sparx. Some of those featured, like Shane Wallin and Kyle Martin, are New Mexico natives who have grown up with New Mexico music— and infuse that sound into their own work. Others, like Delphia, and Engine, are transplants who came to Albuquerque and fell in love with the place (totally understandable.) And don’t forget to check out our little gift to you: a custom Spotify playlist, which includes songs from each of the Next Wave artists, as well as a couple of classics from New Mexico legends. We particularly love this feature story because it was written by Mel Minter, our longtime music columnist whose section, Tiempo, has been a staple of Albuquerque The Magazine since the year we launched, 2004. Flip to page 126 where his column this month is far more personal for Mel. In fact, it’s a first-person story of Mel’s journey. Speaking of personal things, our other feature this month concerns home offices. Obviously, these nooks have become a much more commonplace thing these days. I find that I am just as productive at my home office. Others, like our publisher Larryl Lynch, say working from home is too distracting. What we can all agree upon is this: in this shelter-at-home

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era, the home office has taken on a bigger role. To see the variety of home spaces you’ve created to carry on your job, we announced a contest on Facebook. We asked to see photos of your workspaces, and the response included dozens of fun, creative, and sometimes untidy home offices. We chose a winner and runner-up in each of three categories—Best Messy Space, Best Organized Space, and Best Creative Space—but we also have plenty of Honorable Mentions. Flip to page 95 to check them out! This issue is also has plenty of content from the coronavirus front. But in true ATM style, only the positive and upbeat stuff is here, like advice from experts on maintaining sanity in quarantine (page 168), to a look at the COVID-19 testing site at Balloon Fiesta Park (page 119), to an interview with Secretary of Health Kathy Kunkel (page109). And if you’ve ever seen any of the governor’s daily briefings, you know exactly who Nixo Lanning is. Maybe not by name, but Lanning is the charismatic sign language interpreter for Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham. Check out our interview on page 115. Thank you for reading this issue of Albuquerque The Magazine. We love it here, and we know you do, too.

Sincerely,

Taylor Hood Editor-In-Chief

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


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TINY BITES OF EVERYTHING TO SEE, DO AND BUY IN ALBUQUERQUE

MEDIA ARTS STUDENTS TAKE TOP PRIZES Each year since 2010, Future Voices of New Mexico has handed out awards for artistic achievement by New Mexico students in the world of film and photography. A collaborative effort, the group strives to highlight the work and voices of indigenous and under-represented individuals. This year, they’ve given first place photography awards to two students from Media Arts Collaborative Charter School (MACCS), an Albuquerque-based tuition-free charter school serving students in grades 6-12. Gray Garcia took first place for portrait photography (with the mesmerizing image above), and Aidan Brown took first place in landJUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

scape photography. Launched in 2008, MACCS provides a place for creative youths to thrive in pursuit of photography, film making, web design, robots, computer animation, and other media arts domains. The charter school’s students have a history of bringing home awards. They’ve earned nine Rocky Mountain Emmy Awards, a third place spot in Microsoft’s Robo-Rave, third place in the National Stock Market Game Competition, and a top spot at the Laugh Out Loud Comedy Fest. —ZB

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In June of 1953, Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were convicted of espinoage. The two “spies” conducted some of their activities at a small home in Albuquerque’s historic Forrester district.

START BR A GGING

ABQ

PHOTO Bob Murphy You might not know it from the news clips of adults dressed up in Call of Duty cosplay to protest the cruel tyranny of not being able to visit their favorite ice cream shop, but a lot of people are stepping up during the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout the community, folks are rising to the occasion, working hard to help one another through an undeniably tough time. These people deserve some recognition—a reality for which the One Albuquerque Awards seem ready made. The One Albuquerque Award is specifically designed as a way to shine a light on City workers and community members who go that extra mile to serve their fellow citizens. “This is something we wanted to do more of during these tough times,

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because there are so many people stepping up,” Mayor Tim Keller said in a press conference announcing the most recent batch of awards on May 5. This time around, the One Albuquerque recipients came from the North Valley Senior Center. Missy Cochero, Daphne Flores, Fermin Gallegos, Joel Mahone, Angie Marentas, and Patrick Maestes received awards in recognition of their service to Albuquerque seniors. “We’re one of the few cities in the country that has a robust senior affairs department that really provides an alternative to nursing homes and so forth and assisted living,” Mayor Keller explained. “This has long been a tradition. It’s part of our culture in New Mexico.” —ZB

Executive Director Economic Forum of Albuquerque

“Over the years, my wife and I go to the Tram in the early morning and hike over to the Crest House for coffee. Then we head to the Rock House and have an early lunch, like a green chile cheeseburger. And Albuquerque has seven to eight months a year when that’s just a really nice hike.” Start Bragging ABQ is a campaign to tell everyone what you love about our city. Got a brag about ABQ? Send it to us at editor@abqthemag.com. WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


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HOLIDAY HIJINX JUNE

A look at some of the strange, fun, and seldom-celebrated holidays coming our way this month.

JUNE 6

JUNE 3

NATIONAL DONUT DAY

Doughnut? Donut? However you spell it, this is a day to worship the blessed doughnut. Most local shops are still available for take-out. So, grab as many donuts as you can carry, because you will be showing your holiday spirit and helping out a local business.

NATIONAL YO-YO DAY

This holiday is a little up and down. But try as you might to get away, you just keep getting pulled back in. Celebrate by walking the dog, rocking the baby, or going around the world.

JUNE 19

WORLD SAUNTERING DAY

JUNE 16

The leisurely stroll known as a “saunter” was given its own holiday sometime in the 1970s by publicist W.T. Rabe and now it is paying off. These days, many people are going on near-daily walks and this holiday gives us all a way to switch up the routine a little.

INTERNATIONAL PICNIC DAY

It’s a pretty great holiday to celebrate during the age of social distancing. No need to go all out, just grab a blanket, some cheese and crackers, and spread out under a shady tree in your backyard.

ATM DEFINITION OF THE MONTH 34

Quarantarty (n.)

an abbreviation of the words “quarantine” and “party,” this is the new normal for partying. Neighbors and friends grab fold-out chairs and gather, at the appropriate social distance and wearing proper PPE, in an agreed upon front yard. Needless-to-say, these are BYOB events.

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DUKE CITY DISTRIBUTES 1 MILLION

$

TO SUPPORT NON-PROFITS

$

$

$

$

In early April, Albuquerque City Councilors Pat Davis and Lan Sena put forth a resolution to create a 1 million dollar non-profit relief fund in response to COVID-19. The fund helps fill gaps in federal aid, supporting local non-profits continue to fulfill their civic-minded endeavors. “We know this pandemic has been deeply painful for our residents, and we’ve stepped up to help small businesses and provide critical services for the most vulnerable,” Mayor Tim Keller said in a press release. “But we can’t do it alone. This funding will help Albuquerque’s network of non-profits continue to be there for folks who need it most.” The City of Albuquerque will award funds as emergency contracts aimed at covering the sudden loss of income and services stemming from COVID-19. These awards will benefit organizations and projects that address community health and safety, housing, food security, and behavioral health, and provide support for victims of abuse, neglect, sexual assault, and domestic violence. —ZB

AHCC SUPPORTS A NEW

BATCH OF SCHOLARS This past April, the Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce (AHCC) announced a new crop of recipients for their Education Excellence Scholarships. In collaboration with sponsors like Allstate Insurance, COMPA Industries, and the New Mexico Oil and Gas Association, the AHCC distributed $85,500 to 64 New Mexico students. “This year we saw a huge number of high-caliber students applying for scholarships,” AHCC President Ernie C’deBaca said in a press release. “Thankfully, our members stepped up to help fund these scholarships at a higher rate than we have ever seen.” The AHCC Scholarships, each totalling $1,000 dollars and awarded to high school seniors, the AHCC also distributed Opportunity and Thrive Scholarships. The former are $1,000 awards tailored for non-traditional or returning students over the age of 19, while the latter are $5,500 multiyear scholarships distributed to a select group of 5 high school seniors.

Awardees are geared-up for tenures at a variety of institutions, including University of New Mexico, Central New Mexico Community College, New Mexico Tech, and Santa Fe Community College. At these institutions, they’ll be studying a diverse set of disciplines, including biology, engineering, criminology, business administration, prelaw, film production, and nursing. —ZB

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WORD ON THE

Street

PASEO DEL NORTE A high-speed artery of northern Albuquerque, Paseo del Norte is the life blood of several sections of the Duke City. Though it does not meet most people’s typical idea of a “freeway”—as it contains stoplights and intersections—this main road is in fact classified by the Department of Transportation as the city’s only “non-Interstate freeway.” The Paseo route stretches over 16 miles across north-

ern Albuquerque. Its eastern terminus is Tramway Boulevard. In the west, Paseo ends when it takes a sharp southerly turn on the west mesa and becomes Atrisco Vista Boulevard. Because of its importance in traffic flow, both north-south and east-west, Paseo del Norte is seemingly in a constant state of improvement. In 2014, the state spent $93 million on a new interchange Here is a list of some of our favorite shows and films, shot in and around Albuquerque (though often set in other places like Nevada, Texas, or Afghanistan), that can be binged from quarantine using your favorite streaming services: —TH

With all of us still quarantining at home, it isn’t unusual to start to get a little stir crazy. We miss restaurants and ballgames, but we also just miss our city. Tiger King and The Last Dance are all well and good, but it would be nice to get back out there and enjoy the Duke City a little bit. With that in mind, we’ve found a good compromise.

Better Call Saul – Netflix Breaking Bad – Netflix The Goldfinch – Amazon Prime Logan – Amazon Prime Hell or High Water – Netflix Sicario – Hulu Lone Survivor – Amazon Prime The Avengers – Disney Plus Longmire – Netflix Daybreak – Netflix No Country for Old Men – Hulu The Book of Eli – Netflix Terminator: Salvation – Netflix The Missing – Amazon Prime MacGruber - Hulu

Since 1990, the hottest temperatures recorded at the Sunport were on June 25 and June 29, 1990. The temperature hit 104 degrees. The Sunport recorded more than nine days of temperatures exceeding 100 degrees that June.

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between Paseo and Interstate 25, greatly improving traffic flow and allowing Albuquerque to continue expansion. —TH

START BR A GGING

ABQ

Kelli Cooper

Vice President Albuquerque Community Foundation

“I like taking a break from my Saturday morning bike ride to stop at Old Town Bike in Coffee. I have a hot cup of coffee, a burrito or scone while enjoying their beautiful grounds and miles of flowers. If you’re lucky, they’re selling vine ripe tomatoes to take with you.” Start Bragging ABQ is a campaign to tell everyone what you love about our city. Got a brag about ABQ? Send it to us at editor@abqthemag.com. WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


START BR A GGING

ABQ

Stacy Sacco

Director, Small Business Institute UNM Anderson School of Management

“More than most cities, Albuquerque supports a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem. We have hundreds of co-working facilities, incubators, funding sources, and small business mentorship programs. New Mexico is truly the State of Entrepreneurship.� Start Bragging ABQ is a campaign to tell everyone what you love about our city. Got a brag about ABQ? Send it to us at editor@abqthemag.com.

June is the cloudiest month of the year in ABQ (historically) with the percentage of the time that the sky is overcast or mostly cloudy sitting at about 22 percent.

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Putting others first is what heroes do. Thank you to all nurses throughout New Mexico for their dedication to the patients and communities they serve. To learn more about nursing careers at Presbyterian Healthcare Services, visit www.phs.org/careers. AA/EEO/VET/DISABLED/NMHRA. PHS is committed to ensuring a drug-free workplace.

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WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


TWEET BEAT What the Twittersphere is saying about Albuquerque, 280 characters at a time.

Mayor Tim Keller @MayorKeller We are flattening the curve together as #OneAlbuquerque. Stay home to save lives.

LOOKING TO GROW YOUR CAREER? We’ve got what you need on tap. Fill up on must-read business news and exclusive interviews crafted by expert reporters in our free daily newsletters.

SUBSCRIBE AND TOAST TO YOUR FUTURE SUCCESS! Go to bizjournals.com/register/albuquerque to sign up today!

Raphael Clancy @raphaelclancy The sky really delivered tonight! #NewMexico

Albuquerque Fire @abqfire AFR would like to thank @AHCNM @ DCGladiators for providing meals to several of our Fire Stations. #feedthefrontlines @iafflocal244

What do you have to say about #abq? Follow us at twitter.com/abqthemag

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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WHERE

TAKING CARE OF YOU IS OUR SPECIALTY

Robert W. Walters, M.D. - David Davis, M.D. - Matthew Thompson, M.D. - Michael B. Chang, M.D. Daniel A. Davis, M.D. - Natalie Mills, PA-C - Monica M. Romero, M.D. - Megan Pribyl, PA-C Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center of NM stands with New Mexico as we join in the fight against COVID-19 that is spreading widely in the U.S. and endangers the lives of many New Mexican’s. Our certified Dermatologists and Dermatology PA’s have implemented telemedicine to treat our patients without putting their health at risk. Telemedicine may be of particular use for patients at higher risk of infection (the elderly and those with other health issues) and for non-urgent appointments. We are available to you, always, for your dermatologic concerns.

For a virtual or telephone call visit, call our office at 505-243-7546. Monday through Friday from 8 AM until 4 PM Visit us online at nmdermcenter.com • 505-243-SKIN (7546) • 6200 Uptown Blvd. NE Ste. 410

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1

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4

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2020 Pancake Breakfast Mmmmmm‌ pancakes. Albuquerqueans turned up in droves for the 2020 Annual Pancake Breakfast at the Fraternal Order of Police (Lodge #1). Rita’s pancakes were the star of the show, but the proceeds went to support the Officer Street Survival Training program, which provides specialized training for police officers. The benefit helps cover the costs of the extra training. 1. Alice Miller, Ida Tinguely, Jim McGrane, Rita McGrane 2. Toby Gallegos, Ruth Lowe, Earl Lowe (back row), Joshua Armijo (front row) 3. Matt Morales, Ed Rodarte, Gina Torres, David Salazar 4. Troy Baldonado, Alicia Kassa, Joe Kassa, Jose Brionez 5. Ronnie Miera, Randy Armijo, Melinda Rodgers, Buddy Rodgers 6. Pam Highum, MaryHelen Kugler, Elizabeth Chavez, Stephanie Herrera 7. Pete Rodriguez, Michael Chavez

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Funds for Love Fundraiser Uptown jewelry store, Kendra Scott, hosted the Funds for Love Fundraiser inside their shop on February 8. The event didn’t just feature Kendra Scott’s popular and unique jewelry items, it also included a pet adoption van, a doggie kissing booth, drinks and snacks. Proceeds went to benefit Funds for Love, which helps provide shelter for pets with special needs. 1. Tabatha King, Coco, Kelly Casaus 2. Annah Jensen, Bella, Tram Le 3. Steven Blacksmith, Angelina Ortiz 4. Noel Davis, Ainsley Westlake 5. Matt Bromley, Mary Alice Balderrama, Ramie Kow, Rafael Alvarez 6. Kate Lamothe, Betty, Rufus, Courtnee Bennett 7. Stacey George, Carmela, Stephanie Espinosa

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Thank you for voting

Albuquerque!

WINNER

ORDER ONLINE | CASA-TACO.COM ALBUQUERQUE: 5801 ACADEMY RD NE & 111 COORS BLVD NW | ELEPHANT BUTTE: 704 HWY 195

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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Alzheimer’s Association Open House On December 12, 2019, the Alzheimer’s Association opened the doors of its new office building at 6731 Academy Road NE and invited Albuquerque to help them celebrate. The afternoon was filled with food, fun, and plenty of purple (the official color of Alzheimer’s awareness.) 1. Amber Jaramillo, Tim Sheahan, Nicolette Garcia 2. Cheryl Sheahan, Mary Galvez, Rebecca Ponder 3. Denise Parras, Donna Jaramillo, Carol Birks 4. Ann Breen, Pat Meyer 5. Tina De La Luz, Paula Schwartz 6. Andrew Cavalier, Kathy Ferguson, Jim Garcia 7. Laura Bain, Tommy Hernandez, Onastine Jaramillo

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Hops and Dreams It was a fun, festive (and frightening) event at Tractor Brewing on December 13 when The Desert Darlings returned to perform their rendition of Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas. All proceeds went to benefit Albuquerque Area Firefighters Random Acts. 1. Maria D’Angelo, Patrick McKinney 2. Mike Legendre, Alejandro Naranjo, Ryan Rood, Eric Diehl 3. Shannon Sweet, Tatiana Garcia, Lorena Martinez-Burr 4. Destiny Jones, Sheila Smith 5. Stephanie Cordova, Caroline Baker 6. Hannah Stephens, Sadie Adair, Anna Peralta 7. Jason DeVereaux, Zia Martinez, J. Nicole DeVereaux

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Ready to expand your opportunities?

Central Mexico Community College JUNE 2020 |New ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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13th Annual Pegasus Jewelry Extravaganza On December 8, O’Niells Pub was decked out in bling for Pegasus Legal Services for Children’s 13th annual jewelry sale and auction. It was a great place to find costume, heirloom, artisan, and estate jewelry but, better yet, it was a great place to have fun and help children in need. All proceeds went to help Pegasus and their mission to provide legal services to vulnerable children, youth, and their caregivers. 1. Harriette Bugel, Debra Byrd, Karen Scott, Tiana Kaula 2. Sophie Asher, Dan Shapiro, Bette Fleishman 3. Corinne Carmony, Judy Flynn-O’Brien 4. Marta Hines, Alma Olavarria Gallegos 5. Aja Brooks, Alison Paul 6. Anne McKinney, Pam Dailey, Kathie Dieterle 7. Shelley Ohnleiter, Amy Ostlie

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Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle Martin Shane Wallin Dust City Opera Engine Lucky Mays Chloë Nixon Baracutanga

Lara Manzanares

Dremón Isaac

Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia

Kyle Martin Shane Wallin Dust City Opera Engine Lucky Mays Chloë Nixon Baracutanga

Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle Martin

Shane Wallin Dust City Opera Engine Lucky Mays Chloë Nixon Baracutanga Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego

Delphia Kyle Martin Shane Wallin Dust City Opera Engine Lucky Mays

Chloë Nixon Baracutanga Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House

Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle Martin Shane Wallin Dust City Opera

E n g i n e

Lucky

Chloë

N i xo n

Baracutanga

Lara

Aragon

Kyle

Manzanares

Isaac

D r e m ó n Vicente

Mays

Chill

House

D e l p h i a

Griego

Shane

Martin

Wallin

Dust City

Opera Engine

Lucky

Chloë Nixon Baracutanga Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac

Mays

Aragon

Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle Martin Shane Wallin Dust City Opera Engine Lucky Mays Chloë

Nixon Baracutanga Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle Martin Shane Wallin Dust City Opera Engine Lucky Mays Chloë Nixon Baracutanga Lara Manzanares Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle

Martin

Shane Wallin Dust

City Opera

Engine Lucky Mays Chloë Nixon Baracutanga Lara Manzanares 52 WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020

Dremón Isaac Aragon Chill House Vicente Griego Delphia Kyle Martin


OK, so Albuquerque isn’t Nashville or New York, New Orleans or Los Angeles, but we do have our share of musical icons who have captured the hearts of listeners well beyond the city’s borders. As Albuquerque ambassadors, they have contributed to our city’s culture and elevated the image of the Duke City in places near and far. Among them are two stellar jazz greats—the late pianist John Lewis of the Modern Jazz Quartet, and trumpeter Bobby Shew, now living in Corrales—known around the world for their skill both on their instruments and as educators. Al Hurricane, the “godfather of New Mexico music,” pioneered a mestizo music that caught the ears of listeners throughout the Southwest and beyond. The four Sanchez sisters known as Sparx found pop success not only in the United States, but also in a wide swath of Latin American countries. The Martínez family, headed by paterfamilias Roberto, has carried the culture of New Mexico from coast to coast, and both Roberto and his son Lorenzo, a violinist, were honored as NEA National Heritage Fellows. Then, there’s our adopted son, Rahim AlHaj, a world-renowned oud player who settled in Albuquerque as a refugee from Iraq. If space were unlimited, the list could go on. Plainly, the history and legacy of ABQ music is colorful, engaging and all-encompassing. And that lively and diverse music scene in Albuquerque has spawned a new wave of artists ready to carry the news of Albuquerque’s musical richness to the ears of national and international audiences. As Albuquerque The Magazine’s music columnist for the past 16 years, I put my head together with the magazine’s editors to identify 13 stand-out artists whose original music, in a variety of genres, continues to burnish the city’s musical reputation. We are happy to introduce “the next wave” of Albuquerque musical ambassadors.

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arly in the year, singer/songwriter Lara Manzanares, a Tierra Amarilla native and resident of Corrales, sometimes likes to set intentions for the coming months. “For 2019, when I set that intention and I sat down and kind of let myself live in it, it was Shine,” she says. Shine she did, performing at three major festivals: Festival Nuevo Americana, Festival Eclectica, and ¡Globalquerque! The glow carried into 2020, with a March appearance at the Outpost.

warm stage presence, and her well-crafted songs— playful, poignant, personal, poetic—are ready for any audience anywhere. Equally comfortable singing the traditional northern New Mexico repertoire or her own tunes, Manzanares is well set to expand her circle of connections and her audience in 2020, and if we are lucky, she’ll begin work on her next album. (www.laramanzanares.com)

“I had lots of

OPPORTUNITIES,

Building on the attention earned with her debut album, Land Baby— winner of the New Mexico Music Award for Best Album in 2018— Manzanares took hold of her career in 2019, playing with a variety of different musicians in a variety of genres and learning how to lead a band. Being “open to uncertainty . . . wading into situations that you can’t engineer,” she says, helped fuel her growth.

PHOTO BY MIKE SANDOVAL

and I said yes to things.”

“I had lots of opportunities, and I said yes to things, even if maybe I thought, ‘I don’t know if I’m ready for this,’ ” she says. Her sweetly resonant voice, her

LARA

MAN ZAN ARES

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etting signed by Jimmy Kang, CEO of Str8up Entertainment and vice president of Wu-Tang Management, was a major coup for award-winning hip-hop artist Dremón, but after three years, Dremón realized that to make the music he wanted to make, he needed to go independent. He wanted to focus on “real life, the stuff that we’re going through here,” he says, “because the music that I fell in love with and that had the emotion, that had the passion, it was very relatable and universal versus, I guess, the lifestyle that some of the newer urban music is selling.”

“SOLIDIFYING my position as a hip-hop artist from Albuquerque...”

COURTESY PHOTO

Four years later, that independent streak is paying off. On a trip to Los Angeles, he caught the attention of Diane Teran of Hip-Hop Network, who connected him to PR pro Lisa Stewart of Ril Entertainment, and he’s also had Gretchen Slaughter of Slaughter Entertainment come on board, as well as video wizard Jetto of Ottej Records in Miami. “I have really good support now,” says Dremón. The March release of his latest album, Second Nature, and his tour on the Historically Black Colleges and Universities circuit back east had to be postponed due to COVID-19. Meanwhile, his single “Beneficial” has been rotating on Shade 45, Eminem’s XM radio station. His sudden expansion to new audiences “is unexpected to a certain extent,” says Dremón. But he’s hard at work “solidifying my position as a hiphop artist from Albuquerque, New Mexico,” and you can expect to see him hitting even more and bigger platforms in the months ahead. (@dremizzie)

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PHOTO BY BOBBY GUTIERREZ

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oulful singer/songwriter Isaac Aragon is about to explode. He lit the fuse in February 2019 when he released the single “Love Bless America.” The oldschool soul tune got terrific reviews and went to #16 on the U.K. soul chart. In November, he released “All I Got,” which charted at #4. Back home, he opened for Los Lobos and The Mavericks at Sandia Amphitheater last summer, at the invitation of local promoter John Nichols.

The explosion will likely come later this year, when Aragon hopes to release a full-length album of original tunes. “Most likely, I’m going to do the record with a major producer in L.A. His name is Jim Scott,” he says. The GRAMMY-winning producer, who connected with Aragon through Nichols, has worked with the likes of Sting, Tom Petty, and other heavy hitters. Aragon is planning to use his core local guys: Dee Brown (keyboards), Artha Meadors (bass), and Paul Palmer III (drums), with Ryan Montaño arranging the horns.

“I’ve found somebody who

BELIEVES in what I’m doing...”

He’s been “superpatient” with this record, he says, looking for the right time, place, and producer. “Production is such a huge piece because you’re essentially allowing another member into your band. I’ve found somebody who believes in what I’m doing and wants to be part of it.” Aragon is grateful to Nichols for his ongoing assistance in building his career. “He’s been such a blessing,” says Aragon, who is himself a blessing for anyone with ears to hear. (www.isaacaragon.com)

ISAAC

ARA

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hen guitarist Jim Casey, cofounder of Dallas’s famed Buster Brown Band, retired from his day job and moved to Placitas, an old buddy, the late bassist Eric Udell, invited him to play on a couple of gigs. That’s where he first met vocalist Hillary Smith and saxophonist Glenn Kostur. “I said, ‘Hillary, I want to play with you.’ I was kind of joking with her, but fortunately, it didn’t turn out to be a joke,” says Casey. Smith sat in with Casey and friends on jams at Kaktus Brewing and liked the feel, and the funky, soulful band Chill House was born. Today, the personnel includes Smith, Casey, Kostur (sax and organ), Bryan Abel (bass), and J.D. Davis (drums).

down and write some songs. Casey, with his acoustic guitar, and Davis, with his cajón, joined Smith at her dining room table. “She had all these lyrics written out, and so I started playing my guitar, and she started singing,” Casey says. “We had three or four songs written within about 30 minutes.”

“...I started PLAYING my guitar, and she started SINGING”

A Chill House album is scheduled for release in early summer, and the band will use the album to expand its reach beyond central New Mexico. Meanwhile, you can keep tabs on their local performances by visiting their Facebook page. (www.facebook.com/chillhouseband)

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big man with a big soul and a voice to match, Vicente Griego has replanted himself in Albuquerque after 18 years on the road, first as road manager for José Greco II and then as an in-demand cantaor, or flamenco vocalist. “You’ve got to have roots to be able to give fruit, man,” says Griego. Griego’s musical roots fall “entre tombé y guitarra,” he says, “My whole life experience has been between that Indian drum and that guitar.”

American traditions of northern New Mexico, his native land; rumba; and a variety of other genres. That approach has captured the ear of academia and garnered ReVóZo an invitation to perform at the seventh annual ¡Música del Corazón! concert in November, and a commission for an album to be released there.

“You’ve got to have ROOTS to be able to GIVE...”

COURTESY PHOTO

His voice, emanating from somewhere near the earth’s center, brings a deeply soulful energy to the Tablao Flamenco at Hotel Albuquerque, Santa Fe’s El Farol, and Tesuque’s El Nido. With his band, ReVóZo, he is experimenting with what he calls “mestizaje flamenco,” music that blends flamenco; the Spanish and Native

The band’s most recent release, “Arte del Camino, Andró” (found on You Tube), incorporates the poetry of New Mexico Poet Laureate Levi Romero and the Cuban-inflected trombone of Cesar Bauvallet, who has taken on the role of musical director, bringing a welcome discipline to its efforts. Just be sure that when you go to hear the band perform, you take your dancing shoes. (vicentegriego.com)

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he was finding growing success as a folk-rock-country singer/songwriter until a brutal assault in Nashville left her with deep physical and emotional trauma. The attack drove her from the music business, and led to a yearslong, well-hidden addiction to painkillers. In 2015, she got clean and started writing songs to address her experience. Reinventing herself as Delphia, in the adult contemporary/soul genre, she embarked on a new career, with a band of her own. Validation came from four-time GRAMMY-winning producer Larry Klein, who, in 2018, agreed to produce her next album. “We did as much fund-raising as we could to make sure we were going to have adequate resources to really put into this project,” says Delphia. “It was about a year or so of contact, of developing what our joint vision was.”

“ I thought that this is one of those moments that you’re either going to pack it up . . . or you’ll figure something out.”

PHOTO BY ERIKA CHAMBERS

Delphia had collected over $13,000 via the crowd-funding site PledgeMusic when she learned that the site had declared bankruptcy, and her funds were gone. “It was a pivotal moment,” she says. “I thought that this is one of those moments that you’re either going to pack it up... or you’ll figure something out.” She figured something out, last summer recording several demos with her band. She is in the process of producing them herself. Meanwhile, she continues working with the Artrageous performing troupe, which she counts as a blessing, and planning for her album’s release. Her soulful voice, the empowering message of her songs, and her tenacity will keep Delphia on track for ever greater success. (delphia.online) JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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That discovery led to a new musical love, and Martin has brought the two together in a style that he calls Westrock, which he defines as a “highly amplified Western-themed honky-tonk style music played in a hard rock format with a heavy beat.” It’s hard to resist, whether he is writing about swaggering male braggadocio (“Big Boy”) or exploring

more philosophical territory (“Good Life”), and it’s taken him to gigs from Las Vegas, Nevada, to New York City. You can get a good taste of it on his four albums, including the most recent, Raunchytonk. He’s recently recorded three new tunes. “I cut three acoustic guitar tunes live. No remix, no edit, no dub— nothing like that,” says Martin, who plans to release them later this year. Meanwhile, he’s pursuing publishing possibilities and looking forward to getting back on stage when it’s safe. (kylemartinmusic.com)

“I LOVE that MUSIC.”

KYLE

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rowing up on a ranch near Socorro that his family has been working for 150 years, singer/songwriter Kyle Martin knows hard work and the tough folks who perform it, and they people his songs. With a musical mom and dad, he was playing guitar in his father’s classic country band from age 12. “I love that music,” says Martin. “I grew up playing that music. Then, I remember when I was about 10 or 11 years old going through my mother’s vinyl—and I’ll tell you one that sticks out for me—I found Led Zeppelin’s Physical Graffiti on vinyl, and I was like Wow! It just pushed me over, man.”

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Wallin believes that philosophy and theology—he has a degree from UNM in comparative religion—have strongly influenced his songwriting. “In Buddhism and lots of other forms of religion, there’s this idea of karma. So whatever you put out comes back to you,” he says. “I’m trying to bring a certain kind of happiness to people’s lives if I can, and to my life.” He says that he’s always been drawn to a certain kind of romantic music, “whether it be country or blues or soul. I probably got that from my mom.”

“I’m trying to bring a certain kind of HAPPINESS to people’s lives...”

SHANE

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Wallin and guitarist Ryan Martino have a new project in the works. “It’s a little divergent,” he says. “I wanted it to be a little different than what I’m working on with The Flood. I try some different things. I stretch myself vocally more.” Look for the EP later this year. (shanewallin.com)

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orn in Albuquerque and raised in the East Mountains, singer/songwriter Shane Wallin is happy to sing the praises of New Mexico when he’s on the road—and he’s on the road a lot, touring all over the Southwest and as far away as Montana and Chicago, Illinois. His calling card is a clutch of insightful songs drawn from personal experience, delivered in a soulful voice that elicits a listener’s trust. On his most recent album, The Flood, as on previous releases, many of his songs focus on love—in particular its redemptive quality—and they have found an appreciative audience that keeps Wallin on stage 250 or more nights a year.

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The songs, for the most part, deal with dark subjects, which, Hunton says, reflect his twisted sense of humor: “Violence and sadness and humor— wherever they intersect,” he says. The band’s most recent single—the toe-tapper “An OK Way to Go” (released, of course, on Friday the 13th), carries that focus forward. “The song is about coughing and dying in the winter cold,” says Hunton with a dry chuckle, a topic that he took to “very naturally.”

“Our online presence really

DRAMATICALLY increased...”

Although Hunton finds songwriting to be “never pleasant,” he’s been “chipping away” at several new songs, he says. So fans can expect more morbidly ironic (or is it ironically morbid?) singles to roll out over the year and likely an EP or full-length album in the fall. The band’s 2020 spring NM/OK/ TX tour had to be bumped to the fall, so stay tuned for updates on that. (patreon.com/dustcityopera, dustcityopera.com, @dustcityopera).

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n 2019, Dust City Opera—fronted by Paul Hunton (vocals, guitar), who handles most of the songwriting, and including Jared Putnam (lead guitar), Travis Roark (trombone and euphonium), Clara Byom (accordion and clarinets), Justin McLauchlin (bass), and Greg Williams (drums)—released its first album, Heaven, and the band has been enjoying a growing fan base ever since. “Our online presence really dramatically increased. I think we went from probably a few hundred followers, and now we’re approaching 10,000,” says Sydney Counce, the band’s manager. She notes that since the release, the band has been playing larger venues and festivals, such as Summerfest, SomosAbq, and the International UFO Festival.

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hen the continent-hopping trio Engine—Alejandro Tomás Rodriguez (vocals, acoustic guitar) from Argentina, and Robin Gentien (vocals, electric guitar, percussion) and Pierre Lauth-Karson (vocals, harmonica, percussion) from France—arrived in Albuquerque as part of the 2017 Revolutions Festival, they had no sense that this city would become their adoptive home. But then came electrifying performances at ¡Globalquerque! that fall, followed by an invitation to Rodriguez to teach as a visiting professor in the Theater and Dance Department at UNM during the spring 2018 semester. At that point, the trio settled in Albuquerque to write new material. “We were in need of settling down,” says Rodriguez. “We were traveling too much.”

and both ancient and original songs, the performances drew on the extensive theatrical training of both Rodriguez and Gentien and the exceptional musicianship of the trio. “It looks like the proposal we bring with us—this musical proposition and also performative proposition—had a good ground here to be perceived. People really liked what we were doing.” The trio functioned as a vessel through which transformative energies were shared with the audience.

“PEOPLE really LIKED what we were doing.”

That spring, the trio performed seven Encuentros Íntimos, Intimate Encounters, on successive Wednesday nights at Dialogue Brewery that became standing-room-only events. Including poetry

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

Engine recorded two albums in Albuquerque and returned in 2019 for another series of encounters. Now, with Rodriguez a newly minted tenure-track professor at UNM and an Albuquerque resident, the trio is likely to be a more regular presence in the city. (@theengineproject, theengineproject.com, theenginesongs@gmail.com)

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the record, and it seemed like we were getting some pretty good momentum,” says Mays. “Now that I’m in this coronavirus quarantine thing, I’ve been writing and recording a lot,” he says. Five new songs are about ready for release, and Mays foresees some new single releases later this year and possibly a new album in 2021. Meanwhile, he is looking to do some live performances from his studio until the band—with Travis Darrah and Bryan Davis (guitars); John Eichleay (pedal steel); Wesley Patton, Jr. (bass); and Dustin Hoag (drums)—is able to get back on stage. Mays is ready to help other musicians looking for material. “Because I write songs in so many different genres, I feel like it’s important to try and get those out there. I know there’s a lot of folks who are great singers and amazing instrumentalists, but they don’t write music or they don’t know how to produce it once they’ve got a song they believe in. That’s something that I hope to be involved in for a long time.” (luckymays.com)

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inger/songwriter/band leader Lucky Mays has been writing songs for decades—since the age of three—but it was only last November that the Albuquerque native produced and released his eponymously titled debut album of original music, along with a killer single, “Already Gone,” that features his cousin, Kayleigh Maes, on vocals. It was worth the wait: the first run of CDs sold out in a week. “We played a bunch of shows to promote

“Now that I’m in this

coronavirus quarantine thing, I’ve been WRITING and RECORDING a lot.”

MAYS

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n 2019, singer/songwriter Chloë Nixon won Best Pop Album at the New Mexico Music Awards for her debut album Anomalous Soul, which features nine original songs. What makes the accomplishment even more remarkable is that when she released the album, the Albuquerque native was just 14 years old—with an amazingly mature voice and with lyrics that reflected a wisdom beyond her years. As she says in one song, “Sometimes I forget that I am still young.” She started early with music. “I was really influenced by kids’ shows that had to do with music,” says Nixon, to the point that at age five, she informed her parents, Aana and Eric, that she wanted to be a musician. “It was awesome. They supported me right away.” Voice lessons soon followed, and Nixon picked up the guitar, violin, piano, and ukulele along the way.

“It was AWESOME.

They SUPPORTED me right away.”

Nixon employs all her talent and training to deliver a positive message. While her first album was aimed more at a young audience, she’s expanding her scope on her next album, which she hopes to release within the next year. “I’m talking about more things that I think just really matter in the world, from how societal systems affect us to relationships—different things like that,” she says.

As unpretentious as she is talented, Nixon is quick to recognize her passionate, hardworking parents as a primary influence, along with Alicia Keys and Lauren Hill, and she give thanks to her fans and supporters. (chloenixonmusic.com)

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“Our concept is

moving to the FUTURE with the past in front of you.”

Its members hail from North and South America—Nicholas Baker, Paul Gonzales, and Micah Hood (USA); Carlos Noboa and Joseph Altamirano (Ecuador); Kilko Paz (Bolivia); and Jackie Zamora (Perú)—but the band is uniquely Burqueña, having composed the city’s official song, “Rumba de Burque,” and New Mexico United’s anthem. Baracutanga addresses issues such as immigration, the environment, the contributions of undocumented and other marginalized people, and violence, but it does so in a positive and oh-so-danceable way

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that captured multiple awards for its first album, Importados. Its recent award-winning single, “Cuida Tus Espaldas” (“Watch Your Back”), delivers “the powerful message of keeping families united always,” says Zamora, and it offers a foretaste of the next album, Volver Atrás (Going Back), which the band hopes to release this fall.

“We’re looking back to the past for what it is we should do for the future,” says Hood, who notes that the album’s music more deeply explores the band’s South American and Andean roots. “Volver Atrás means we have gone too far, and we need to go back to see what we have done wrong,” says Paz. “Our concept is moving to the future with the past in front of you.” (baracutanga.org)

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lending multicultural influences, modern and folkloric instruments, and irresistible rhythms from across the Americas, the award-winning band Baracutanga has dedicated itself to cultural pluralism—and making people dance. (The band’s name comes from an Afrikaans voicing that means “people dancing.”)


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TH

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June 1, 2020 ABQTHEMAG.COM

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THE BUZZ AROUND ALBUQUERQUE: YOUR GUIDE TO EVERYTHING HAPPENING THIS MONTH

Editor’s Note: The events listed may have adjustments to days and or times, or may be canceled or postponed altogether, due to COVID-19 concerns, stay-at-home directives, and the outline by state officials to avoid large gatherings. We recommend contacting the event in advance for the latest scheduling information.

TOP PICK monday 1 | 8 am–1 pm Sophia’s Foundation for Autism Golf Tournament. This tournament offers a great game of golf while helping raise funds to raise awareness of autism, and to recognize and assist in the efforts by teachers. Info: Tanoan Country Club, 10801 Academy Road NE, sophiasfoundation.com for details and to register.

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saturday 6 | 7:30 pm

Hear Here Festival. The City of Albuquerque “Tipping Points for Creatives” initiative, the Hear Here Festival partners choreographers with musicians or spoken word artists; teams created this collaborative new work in 2 weeks. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts. org, 224-9808. Tickets: keshetarts.org, 2278583.

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sunday 7 | 1–5 pm

Art Gallery Open House. This gallery has been voted in the top three “Best in the City” for the last several years. A visit will explain what all the excitement is about. Info: Corrales Bosque Gallery, 4685 Corrales Road, corralesbosquegallery. com, 898-7203. Open to the public.

monday 8 | 8–10 pm

5

LP. This pop/rock singer is known for an unmistakable and unbelievably powerful voice along with straightforward, fromthe-heart songwriting. Info: El Rey Theater, 620 Central Ave. NW, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: $38-$43.

thursday 10 and 11 | June 10 - 6–7 pm, June 11 - 12 noon–1 pm

Claude Bourbon. Bourbon is known throughout Europe for amazing guitar performances that take blues, Spanish, and Middle Eastern stylings into uncharted territories. Info for 6/10: Taylor Ranch Library, 5700 Bogart Street NW. Info for 6/11: Tony Hillerman Library, 8205 Apache Ave. NE, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: free.

saturday 13 | tbd

Virtual Albuquerque Folk Festival. Participate in workshops and view live performances online with our scheduled performers and presenters. Support the arts by making donations or leave tips through online tip jars. We look forward to seeing everyone in person next year. Enjoy the virtual festival. Info: abqfolkfest.org, 7109641, erika@unm.edu.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


Trust us, these are but a few ABQ events YOU CAN'T MISS. 8

sunday 14 | 7:30–9:30 pm

Kardemimmit. This is a band of four awesome women singing and playing the Finnish national instrument, the kantele. Their original pieces have a modern approach with a strong foundation in Finnish, Eastern European and Scandinavian traditions. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale Blvd. SE, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: $22-$27.

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saturday 20 | all day

The Longest Day. The Alzheimer’s Association, NM Chapter’s DIY fundraiser is to honor loved ones and raise funds for much needed Alzheimer’s research. Teams should start planning their own activity today. Info: Nicolette Garcia, 266-4473, nsgarcia@ alz.org. Sign up online: alz.org/ tld.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

saturday 20 | 7:30 pm

Movie Under the Wings. Experience an iconic movie under the airplanes in the outdoor exhibit area, Heritage Park. There will be entertainment, local food trucks and Museum access before the movie begins at dark. Info: National Museum of Nuclear Science & History, 601 Eubank Blvd. SE, nuclearmuseum.org, 2452137. Included with Museum admission, no member discounts.

sunday 21 | 3 pm

Season Finale Opera Concert. The music offered by this concert will be excerpts from the beautiful operas by Bellini, Bizet, Puccini, Romberg, R. Strauss and Verdi. Metropolitan Opera conductor emeritus Franz Vote leads the ensemble. Info: St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church, 601 Montaño Road NW, nmpas.org. Tickets: $21-$43, Hold My Ticket, 877466-3404.

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please note

At the time this listing was produced, many events were being canceled due to the COVID-19 virus. Please be sure to check the status of any event and venue to ensure that the event is still being held as scheduled.

monday 1 | 8 am–1 pm

Sophia’s Foundation for Autism Golf Tournament. Enjoy a great game of golf while helping raise funds to raise awareness of autism, and to recognize and assist in the efforts by teachers. Info: Tanoan Country Club, 10801 Academy Road NE, sophiasfoundation.com for details and to register.

monday 1 | 1–2:30 pm

Introduction to Support Groups. Explore the importance of support groups for families who are facing Alzheimer’s disease. This information is presented by Barbara Michels, author of “The Alzheimer’s Journey.” Info: Alzheimer’s Association, NM Chapter, 6731 Academy Road NE, 266-4473. Free.

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tuesday 2–saturday, august 1 | various times

Keshet Dance Classes: Summer Session. Classes for ages 2-adult offered in ballet, contemporary, hip hop, jazz and creative movement. All abilities, Mixed Ability/Adaptive dance classes available. Scholarships to youth under 18 years and Work/Study program for adults 18 years and over available. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts. org, 224-9808.

tuesday 2–tuesday, July 28 | 9–10:30 am

Fine Wine Dance Classes: Moving FWD. These weekly classes specifically for ages 55 and over, exploring movement and choreography as a community. No experience necessary. Registration is ongoing. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts.org, 2249808. Drop-in class $7.50 with discount; Session package discounts available.

wednesday 3 | 1–2:30 pm

Communications and Behaviors. Don’t miss this presentation by Barbara Michels, author of “The Alzheimer’s Journey.” This enlightening presentation emphasizes the importance of communication in caring for people with Alzheimer’s. Info: Alzheimer’s Association, NM Chapter, 6731 Academy Road NE, 266-4473. Free.

saturday 6 | 7:30 pm

Hear Here Festival. The City of Albuquerque “Tipping Points for Creatives” initiative, the Hear Here Festival partners choreographers with musicians or spoken word artists; teams created this collaborative new work in 2 weeks. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts.org, 2249808. Tickets: keshetarts.org, 227-8583.

sunday 7 | 1–5 pm

Art Gallery Open House. Our gallery has been voted in the top three “Best in the City” for the last several years. Come see what all the excitement is about. Info: Corrales Bosque Gallery, 4685 Corrales Road, corralesbosquegallery.com, 8987203. Open to the public.

monday 8–friday 12 | 8:45 am–4 pm

Dance Camp Sampler, ages 6-14. During this fast-paced camp, dancers will learn a bit of a lot of dance styles including ballet, contemporary, jazz, hip hop and musical theater. Campers perform short pieces at the conclusion of camp. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts.org, 224-9808. $295 full week.

monday 8 | 8–10 pm

LP. This pop/rock singer is known for an unmistakable and unbelievably powerful voice along with straightforward, from-

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


the-heart songwriting. Info: El Rey Theater, 620 Central Ave. NW, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: $38-$43.

THE ETHAN ALLEN COMMITMENT

tuesday 9–sunday 14 | various times

Come From Away. This musical is based on the remarkable true story of the 7000 stranded airline passengers and the small town in Newfoundland that took them in. On 9/11, the world stopped. On 9/12, their stories moved us all. Info: Popejoy Hall, 203 Cornell Drive NE, popejoypresents. com, 277-9771. Tickets: $48-$83.

E XC E P T I O N A L SAV I N G S O N E V ERY S T Y L E, E V ERY DAY * CO M PL I M E N TA RY WO R L D CL A SS I N T ER I O R D E SI GN SER V I CE S PEC I A L FI N A N CI N G †

wednesday 10 | 6–7 pm

Claude Bourbon. Bourbon is known throughout Europe for amazing guitar performances that take blues, Spanish, and Middle Eastern stylings into uncharted territories. Info: Taylor Ranch Library, 5700 Bogart Street NW, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: free.

PR E M I E R I N - H O M E D EL I V ERY We invite you to visit our Design Center and explore ethanallen.com.

thursday 11 | 12 noon–1 pm

Claude Bourbon. See description on Wednesday, June 10. Info: Tony Hillerman Library, 8205 Apache Ave. NE, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: free.

thursday 11 | 1:30–2:30 pm

Legal Issues for Caregivers-What You Should Know. Early legal and financial planning is critical for families facing the journey of Alzheimer’s disease. This important information is presented by retired attorney, Don Pinnock, JD. Info: Alzheimer’s Association, NM Chapter, 6731 Academy Road NE, 266-4473. Free.

friday 12 | 7:30 pm

Albuquerque Science Fiction Society Meeting. Local puppeteer Michael McCormick will discuss his Muppet experiences on “Dark Crystal,” “Labyrinth,” and more. This science fiction club has author readings, science talks, films and discussions. Info: Activity Room, St. Andrew Presbyterian Church, 5301 Ponderosa Ave. NE, bubonicon.com, 2668905. Free to newcomers.

saturday 13 | tbd

Virtual Albuquerque Folk Festival. Participate in workshops and view live performances online with our scheduled performers and presenters. Support the arts by making donations or leave tips through online tip jars. We look forward to seeing you in person next year. Enjoy the virtual festival. Info: abqfolkfest.org, 710-9641, erika@unm.edu.

saturday 13 | 4 pm

Author Event at Page One Books. Author Jeffe Kennedy of Santa Fe will talk about and sign her second book in the Forgotten Empires series, “The Fiery Crown.” Info: Page One Books, 5850 Eubank Blvd. NE, Suite B-4, page1book.com, 294-2026. Free to all attendees.

ALBUQUERQUE 12521 MONTGOMERY BOULEVARD NE AT TRAMWAY 505.291.9494 Sale going on for a limited time. Exclusions apply. Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com for details. † Restrictions apply. Ask a designer or visit ethanallen.com/platinum for details. ©2020 Ethan Allen Global, Inc.

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JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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We love being available to you in digital form. The April, May, June and July, 2020 issues of Albuquerque The Magazine will be available free of charge at abqthemag.com. We will be back on newsstands with the print version in August of 2020.

sunday 14 | 7:30–9:30 pm

Kardemimmit. This is a band of four awesome women singing and playing the Finnish national instrument, the kantele. Their original pieces have a modern approach with a strong foundation in Finnish, Eastern European and Scandinavian traditions. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale Blvd. SE, ampconcerts.org. Tickets: $22-$27.

monday 15–friday 19 | 8:45 am–4 pm

Jazz and Hip Hop Dance Camp, ages 6-14. Feel the groove with the rhythmic steps and awesome music of Jazz and hip hop styles. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts.org, 2249808. $295 full week. Drop off begins at 8:30 am.

thursday 18 | 11:30 am–1:15 pm

We love it here.

Albuquerque Economic Development Quarterly Investors’ Luncheon. Don’t miss the chance to hear from new and expanding employers, get an inside look at economic development in the Albuquerque metro area, and connect with business owners, decision makers and community leaders. Info: Albuquerque Marriott Pyramid North, 5151 San Francisco Road NE, abq. org, 705-3770.

thursday 18–thursday, august 20 | various times

25th Annual Summer Thursday Jazz Nights. Outpost’s popular Summer Thursday Jazz Nights features two bands every Thursday evening through midAugust. The series is a showcase for some of New Mexico’s finest jazz musicians, as well as occasional guest artists. Info: Outpost Performance Space, 210 Yale Blvd. SE. Tickets: outpostspace.org, 2680044.

saturday 20 | all day

The Longest Day. The Alzheimer’s Association, NM Chapter’s DIY fundraiser is to honor loved ones and raise funds for much needed Alzheimer’s research. Start planning your own activity today. Info: Nicolette Garcia, 266-4473, nsgarcia@alz. org. Sign up online: alz.org/tld.

saturday 20 | 7 pm

Season Finale Opera Concert. Hear excerpts from the beautiful operas by Bellini, Bizet, Puccini, Romberg, R. Strauss and Verdi. Metropolitan Opera conductor emeritus Franz Vote leads the ensemble. Info: Immaculate Heart Chapel, 50 Mount Carmel Road, Santa Fe, nmpas.org. Tickets: $21-$43, Hold My Ticket, 877466-3404.

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saturday 20 | 7:30 pm

Movie Under the Wings. Experience an iconic movie under the airplanes in the outdoor exhibit area, Heritage Park. Enjoy entertainment, local food trucks and Museum access before the movie begins at dark. Info: National Museum of Nuclear Science & History, 601 Eubank Blvd. SE, nuclearmuseum.org, 245-2137. Included with Museum admission, no member discounts.

sunday 21 | 3 pm

Season Finale Opera Concert. See description on Saturday, June 20. Info: St. Michael & All Angels Episcopal Church, 601 Montaño Road NW, nmpas.org. Tickets: $21-$43, Hold My Ticket, 877-466-3404.

monday 22–friday 26 | 8:45 am–4 pm

Musical Theater Dance Camp, ages 6-14. Campers will build a show. Daily studio instruction in jazz dance, plus they will practice their singing and acting, design costumes and sets, and learn a bit of dance and theater history. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts.org, 224-9808. $295 full week. Drop off begins at 8:30 am.

ONGOING: daily | various times

daily |

Al-Anon Family Groups and Alateen– Meetings. An anonymous fellowship of relatives and friends of problem drinkers, meetings are held on various days, times and locations throughout Albuquerque and New Mexico. We come together to share our experience, strength and hope to recover from the effects of another person’s drinking. Info: Al-Anon Information Service, 9004 Menaul Blvd. NE, Suite #12, aisnm.org, 262-2177.

daily |

Albuquerque Apparel Center and AAC School of Fashion Design. Melissa Lea, president and founder of AAC and awardwinning fashion designer, offers a variety of industry-based fashion design classes, seminars, retreats, and more. Couture, costume, and custom clothing design services, alterations, and patternmaking services are also available. Info: abqapparelcenter.com, 803-6966.

daily |

Agora Crisis Center Volunteers. Are you a compassionate, non-judgmental person who wants to help others? Learn new skills, make friends, earn class credit, and be a part of a rewarding organization. Info: Agora Crisis Center, agoracares.org.

Animal Humane’s Free Behavioral Helpline. This free service is available to all pet owners who are experiencing behavior problems with their dogs and cats. Animal Humane New Mexico’s trained behavior coaches answer questions and provide tips on everything from housetraining to living with multiple animals. Info: 9387900.

daily |

Donate Blood. Someone needs it every day. Info: 843-6227, unitedbloodservices. org.

daily |

Epilepsy Support and Education Services— Meeting. For meeting time and place, please contact the office at 243-9119 or check the website for more details. Info: epilepsysupportnm.org.

daily |

Rattlesnakes. See different species of live rattlesnakes displayed in recreated natural landscapes. We are dedicated to conservation and preservation through education. Info: American International Rattlesnake Museum, 202 San Felipe Road NW, rattlesnakes.com. Tickets: adults, $6; seniors, military, students, teachers $5; children, $4.

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Roadrunner Food Bank. Volunteers are needed to help prep food for distribution, repack and sort items, and other activities while helping New Mexico’s hungry. The gift of your precious time helps solve hunger for so many people. Volunteers must register in advance. Shifts are available in two-hour increments, Mondays–Saturdays. Info: 5840 Office Blvd. NE, 349-5358, givetime@rrfb.org.

daily |

Ronald McDonald House. Ronald McDonald House Charities of New Mexico provides a home-away-from-home for families with ill children. Operating the 30-bedroom house and the Ronald McDonald Family Room on the sixth floor of the UNM Children’s Hospital, volunteers make a vital difference in the lives of the people they serve. Info: Traci, 842-8960, volunteer7@ comcast.net, rmhc-nm.org.

daily |

Explora. The museum brings out new activities in the “Working Together to Build a Village” exhibit area in its Rotary Pavilion, offering hands-on activities related to construction, architecture, and engineering, and Sketch Aquarium and Curious Bubbles in the Explora Theater. Info: Explora, 1701 Mountain Road NW, explora.us, 224-8300. Cost: Included in admission.

daily |

“We Are of This Place: The Pueblo Story” Art Exhibit. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center celebrates its 40th anniversary with this permanent museum exhibit that represents all 19 Pueblos and builds upon the IPCC’s 40-year history of telling the story of Pueblo people in their own voices. Hear stories in Pueblo languages from artists and elders, interact with art and artifacts, learn about the Pueblo people’s history of resilience, and experience traditions that have been passed down for generations. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, indianpueblo.org, 843-7270. Free with museum admission: adults, $8.40; seniors and NM residents, $6.40; students and children, $5.40.

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Watermelon Mountain Ranch Animal Center. New Mexico’s largest no-kill animal shelter seeks loving homes for rescued dogs and cats. Adoptions are at select Petsmart locations and Watermelon Mountain Ranch on various days from 10 am–8 pm. Donations, fosters, and volunteers are always welcome. Info: wmranch.org, 771-0140, wmranchnm@aol. com.


daily | 9 am–3 pm

Veterans Presentation. Listen to veterans tell about historical events or their personal experience in the service to our country. Speakers represent WWII, Korean, Vietnam, and War on Terror experiences. Also tour the museum, gardens and amphitheater. Info: New Mexico Veterans Memorial Park, 1100 Louisiana Blvd. SE, 256-2042. Free admission. Donations requested.

daily | 9 am–5 pm

“The Original Instructions: Pueblo Sovereignty and Governance” Exhibit. This Indian Pueblo Cultural Center exhibit reexamines the role and symbolism of the Lincoln canes in the history of Pueblo people, within a larger discussion about sovereignty, governance, and leadership from a Pueblo perspective. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, indianpueblo.org, 843-7270. Free with museum admission: adults, $8.40; seniors, military, NM residents, $6.40; students and children 5-18, $5.40.

daily | 10 am–5 pm

Adopt a Pet. Find your best pet ever. Adopt a dog, cat, puppy or kitten from Animal Humane New Mexico. Adoptions include spay/neuter, vaccinations, and a microchip. Info: 615 Virginia Street SE, 10141 Coors Blvd. NW, animalhumanenm. org.

every second monday | 6:30 pm

“The Lyin’ Dog” Interactive Game Show. Aux Dog Theatre Nob Hill, in association with Empire Board Game Library, presents “The Lyin’ Dog,” an interactive game show. Three storytellers—two are real, one’s a liar—can the audience tell the difference? Info: Empire Board Game Library, 3503 Central Ave. NE, auxdog.com, 254-7716. Admission: $5 cash, food and beverages also available.

every second monday | 6:30–8 pm

Outcomes, Inc. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Discussion/Support Groups. Info: Heights Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 8600 Academy Road NE, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free.

every third monday | 6–7:30 pm

every fourth monday | 6:30– 8:30 pm

Bead Society of New Mexico Monthly Membership Meeting. The BSNM’s purpose is to promote the members’ and the public education, appreciation, and involvement in the field of beads and bead-related subjects. No meeting in July or December. Info: North Domingo Baca Multigenerational Center, 7521 Carmel Drive NE, beadsocietynm.org.

mondays–fridays | various times

Ninja Park Obstacle Course Fitness Center. TAK Fit is Ninja Park’s fun and functional fitness style that utilizes calisthenics exercise, dynamic lifts, and obstacles to create a unique and balanced workout that you will not find anywhere else. Join and have fun getting fit. Ages 16 and older. Classes are 6:30 to 7 am, 12:30 am to 1 pm, and 6:30 to 7 pm. Info: ninjaparkabq.com, 883-9203.

Outcomes, Inc. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Discussion/Support Groups. Info: West Mesa Community Center, 5500 Glenrio NW, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free.

daily | various times

Explora’s Experiment Bar. Fruit and veggie batteries, thaumatropes, invisible writing, electromagnetics, DNA extraction or spin art? Visit Explora’s website to see which of our hands-on activities are happening. Activities change weekly. Mondays through Saturdays at 10 am and Sundays at noon. Info: Explora, 1701 Mountain Road NW, explora.us, 224-8300. Free with general admission.

mondays | 5–6 pm

Geeks Who Drink. Test your knowledge while enjoying a unique evening’s experience. Free of charge and open to anyone 21 and older. Prizes awarded to winning teams. Only one table allowed per team. Warning: this quiz contains adult themes and adult language. Info: O’Niell’s Heights, 3301 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, oniells. com, 293-1122.

mondays | 5:30 pm

The Red Bucket Book Club. Join this group and dive into Fun-tastic fiction discussing and reading a variety of fabulous books. Info: Barnes & Noble Coronado Center, 6600 Menaul Blvd. NE, bn.com, 883-8200. Free.

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mondays–saturdays | 10 am–5 pm

Exquisite Turquoise in the Castle. This extraordinary German-style castle is the museum setting, featuring rare turquoise specimens, lapidary demos, history and geology, a mine tunnel replica, hands-on activities for kids, and silver smithing. Info: The Turquoise Museum, 400 2nd Street SW, turquoisemuseum.com, 433-3684. Tickets: $16, discounts for AAA, over 55 and military.

tuesdays | 2–3 pm

Caregiver Support Group. Caregiving for a loved one can be overwhelming and isolating. This group provides a compassionate space for caregivers to gain emotional support and information. Facilitated by Erin Tarica, LMSW. Info: Jewish Community Center, 5520 Wyoming Blvd. NE. Preregistration required by calling 348-4451. Free.

tuesdays | 6 pm

ABQ Scrabble Club. We have been playing weekly for over 30 years. Come join us. Info: Chili’s, 6909 Menaul Blvd. NE.

tuesdays | 6:30–7:30 pm

Alateen Meetings. For families and friends of alcoholics, Alateen groups for ages 6 to 19 years old. Info: Corrales Senior Center, 4320 Corrales Road, Corrales, 262-2177.

tuesdays | 6:30–9:30 pm

Beginning Square Dance Lessons. Lessons are available for singles, couples, and families. Dress is casual and no experience is required; offered by the Crazy Eights Square Dance Club. Info: Albuquerque Square Dance Center, 4915 Hawkins Street NE, 881-0137, hornytoad@q.com.

tuesdays | 6:30–9:30 pm

Open Drawing with the Model. Info: Harwood Art Studio, 1029 6th Street NW, harwoodartcenter.org. Admission: $10 per session; five sessions for $35.

tuesdays | 7:30–10 pm

Tango Club of Albuquerque’s Weekly Milonga. Argentine Tango social dance party. Info: Lloyd Shaw Dance Center, 5506 Coal Ave. SE, abqtango.org. Guided Practica, 7:30 to 8 pm; Milonga 8 to 10:30 pm. Tickets: $3-$5.

tuesday and thursdays | 9–10:30 am

Fine Wine Dance Classes: Moving FWD. Classes specifically for ages 55 and over, exploring movement and choreography as a community. No experience necessary. Drop-in class $7.50 with discount; Session package discounts available. Registration is ongoing. Info: Keshet Center for the Arts, 4121 Cutler Ave. NE, keshetarts.org, 224-9808.

tuesdays–saturdays | 9 am–5 pm

Art and History Exhibitions at Albuquerque Museum. See our website for the current listing of exhibitions. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 243-7255. General Museum admission: $3-$6. $5 exhibition surcharge applies.

tuesdays–saturdays | tuesday–fridays 9:30 am, 1:30 pm, saturdays 10:30 am, 12 noon, 1:30 pm

Casa San Ysidro Tours. Take a tour of this late 19th century building in Corrales filled with an exuberant collection of New Mexico vernacular art. Info: Casa San Ysidro, 973 Old Church Road, Corrales, cabq.fov/casasanysidro, 898-3915. General admission $4-$6.

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tuesdays–sundays | 10 am–5 pm

National Hispanic Cultural Center Exhibits. See our website for the current listing of exhibitions. Info: National Hispanic Cultural Center, 1701 Fourth Street SW, 246-2261, nhccnm.org.

tuesdays, thursdays, fridays, sundays | 11 am

Historic Old Town Tours. Explore historic Old Town on foot with our informative docents who will provide insight into the people and places that shaped our early community. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 2437255. Tour included with paid Museum admission, $4-$6, Sundays free.

tuesdays–sundays | 11:30 am–8 pm, sundays 11:30 am–4 pm

Catopia Fun Events. Come to relax, have snacks and drinks, and play with our wonderful adoptable cats. We also offer events like Painting with Cats, Henna Cattoos, Cat Photography, Music Nights, and “Ask the Vet.” Info: catopiacatcafe.com, 508-4278.

tuesdays–sundays | 11:30 am–8 pm, sundays 11:30 am–4 pm

Cat adoptions. Come enjoy some drinks, snacks, and time with adorable adoptable cats at Catopia Cat Cafe. Your visit will support their foster home and keep them company until they find their permanent homes, maybe with you. Info: catopiacatcafe.com, 508-4278.

tuesdays, thursdays, and saturdays | various times

Ninja Park Obstacle Course Fitness Center. First place winner of the 2015 Women’s Area Qualifier in the Ultimate Ninja Athlete Association (UNAA) competition, Personal Trainer and Group Fitness Instructor Jessica Lucero teaches fun and challenging back-to-back classes every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday: Body Blast, 6 to 7 pm; Obstacle Technique and Efficiency, 7 to 7:30 pm; and Foam Rolling and Stretching, 7 to 7:30. Try one, two, or all three classes for free (firsttime participants only). Info: 883-9203, ninjaparkabq.com.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

every first tuesday | 1–2:30 pm

Spanish Language Alzheimer’s Support Group. This meeting is for Spanishspeaking individuals caring for a family member with dementia. Info: Alamosa Community Center, 6900 Gonzales Road SW, Suite C, 363-8499 or (800) 2723900.

every first and fourth tuesday | 10 am–2 pm

Rug Hookers Demonstration. Join the Adobe Wool Arts Guild for a monthly demonstration of rug hooking in the Heritage Farmhouse. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7180, abqbiopark.com. Tickets: Included with admission.

every second tuesday | 11 am–1 pm

Stitching Group. Knitting, crocheting, embroidering, tatting, spinning, crossstitching and more. Join in the fun, share ideas, patterns, and experiences. All ages and experience levels welcome. Info: Wyoming/Hillerman Library, 8205 Apache Ave. NE, 291-6264.

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every second tuesday | 6–7 pm

Outcomes, Inc. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Discussion/Support Groups. Info: Tijeras-East Mountains, Los Vecinos Community Center, 478 1/2 Old Highway 66, Tijeras, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free.

every fourth tuesday | 7–9 pm

Duke City Story Slam. This monthly storytelling event is where people tell true-life stories, without notes, on that month’s theme. Attendees can reserve a 5-min Open Mic slot between the featured storytellers. A friendly panel of judges scores each story; the winner takes home a prize. Info: Canteen Brewhouse, 2381 Aztec Rd. NE, storytellersofnewmexico.com, facebook. com/newmexicostorytellers.

every last tuesday | 6–7 pm

Murderinos Book Club. This free true crime book club monthly and Book Club purchases get 10% discount at Bookworks. Info: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, bkwrks.com, 344-8139. Free to attend.

wednesdays | 9:30 and 11 am

Stories in the Sky: Weekly Story Time. Activities for toddlers and parents include stories about science, flight, geography, the seasons, the environment, astronomy and more. For toddlers through age 6. Info: Balloon Museum, 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE, 768-6020. Admission is free for the children and an adult.

wednesdays | 10 and 11 am

Japanese Garden Tours. Hanami Flower Tours at the Japanese Garden. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, abqbiopark.com, 311.

wednesdays | 10:30 am

Good Morning Storytime with Ms. Dakota. Join for a story, a snack and a fun activity. For toddlers and preschoolers. Info: Barnes and Noble Coronado Center, 6600 Menaul Blvd. NE, bn.com, 883-8200. Free.

wednesdays and saturdays | 11 am

every first wednesday | 9 am–5 pm

wednesdays | 12 noon–1 pm

every second wednesday | 6:30–7:30 pm

Sculpture Garden Tours at Albuquerque Museum. Enjoy a pleasant stroll in our sculpture garden with a friendly docent who will share stories on the artists and their works. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 2437255. Tour included with paid general admission, $4-$6. Kiwanis Club of Sandia. Join in for lunch, listen to interesting speakers, and learn how you, too, can help the children of Albuquerque and surrounding communities live better lives. Info: Wecks, 3913 Louisiana Blvd. NE, facebook.com/ sandiakiwanis.

wednesdays | 12:30 and 1:30 pm

Music in the Sky: Weekly Music Time. Activities for toddlers and parents include music and movements. Info: Balloon Museum, 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE, 768-6020. Admission is free for the children and an adult.

wednesdays | 6–9 pm

Albuquerque Dance Club. ADC offers social dancing every Wednesday to a variety of music mix including swing, country, Latin, ballroom, and tango. No partner needed, over 21 only, ID required. Info: The Dirty Bourbon, 9800 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 299-3737. $5 cover.

wednesdays | 9 pm

Geeks Who Drink. Join the best Pub Quiz in town. Bring your friends and create a team of up to six people. Info: O’Niell’s Nob Hill, 4310 Central Ave. SE, 256-0564, geekswhodrink.com/blog, oniells.com.

Free First Wednesday. Start your month off right with free admission to Albuquerque Museum and sculpture garden tour. $5 additional special exhibit surcharge may apply. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NE, cabq. gov, 243-7255. Free general admission.

Bookworks Book Club. Bookworks Book Club meets monthly and Book Club purchases receive a 10% discount at Bookworks. Info: Bookworks, 4022 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, bkwrks.com, 344-8139. Free and open to the public.

every second wednesday | 6:30 pm–8:30 pm

Rio Rancho Art Association (RRAA) Monthly Membership Meeting. RRAA’s mission is the cultural and educational enrichment of the community and surrounding areas by providing opportunities for artists and the public to collectively participate in fine art events and programs. Info: Don Chalmers Ford Community Room, 2500 Rio Rancho Blvd., 301-2009, rraausa.org.

every second and fourth wednesday | 10 am–2 pm

Quilters Demonstration. The New Mexico Quilters will be working on their Botanic Garden quilt and other projects in the Heritage Farmhouse. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7180, abqbiopark.com. Tickets: Included with admission.

every fourth wednesday and thursday | 12 noon–2 pm and 6–8 pm

Polka Dot Powerhouse Albuquerque Monthly Business Connects. Polka Dot Powerhouse is a closely linked family of

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extraordinary women—a world of fun, business growth, and connection. Learn, network, and be inspired with other area professionals, business owners, entrepreneurs, and visionaries. Guests are invited to attend their first meeting for free. Info: Managing Director Barbra Portzline, bportzline@comcast.net. Register at polkadotpowerhouse.com.

thursdays | 10 am–12 noon

Prehistoric Preschool for Families. Explore the most dynamic dinosaurs that roamed New Mexico. Learn to balance like Seismosaurus, hunt like Coelophysis, and stomp like Tyrannosaurus through imaginative play. Info: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, nmnaturalhistory.org, 841-2848. Tickets: see cost information online.

thursdays | 10:30 am

Story Time at the Zoo. Info: ABQ BioPark Zoo, 903 10th Street SW, abqbiopark.com, 764-6200. Included in admission.

thursdays | 3–5 pm

Class with Explora Maker-in-Residence. Explore the science of sound and make a musical instrument with Daveed Korup. Most Thursdays 3-5 pm; call to confirm. Limited places, first-come first-served at class time. Info: Explora, 1701 Mountain Road NW, explora.us, 224-8300. Included with general admission $6-$10.

every thursday | 6 pm

Stand-up Comedy at The Stage. This is a fun date night. Enjoy great food and drinks, and the nation’s best comics. Seating is first come, first served. Doors open at 6 pm, comedy starts at 7:30 pm. 21 and over. Info: Santa Ana Star Casino Hotel, 54 Jemez Canyon Dam Road, Santa Ana Pueblo, 771-5680. Tickets: $10.

every thursday | 6–9 pm

Dance Club. Albuquerque Dance Club offers social dance classes in two-step, waltz, country western swing and a few other styles to country western music.

No partner needed, space is limited. Info: Lloyd Shaw Dance Center, 5506 Coal Ave. SE. Pre-registration is required: glkello@ nmia.com or 299-3737.

every first thursday | 9:30 am–12 noon

Colcheras Demonstration. Learn to appreciate this Hispanic art form by watching El Arco Iris: Sociedad de Colcheras members at work in the Heritage Farmhouse. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7180, abqbiopark.com. Tickets: Included with admission.

every first thursday | 6:30– 8:30 pm

Albuquerque Modern Quilt Guild. Explore modern quilting, charity work and a working modern quilting group. Info: 7001 San Antonio Drive NE, 821-2739, hipstitchabq.com. Cost: membership, $10/ year; guests, may attend one meeting for free, then up to two more meetings for $3 per meeting.

every second thursday | 6–8 pm

Visionary Arts and Crafts Guild Membership Meeting. VACG’s mission is to develop fellowship among craftspeople and facilitate a market for crafts through exhibitions, education, promoting the development and appreciation of craftspeople and their work. Meet monthly except Oct, Nov, Dec. Info: FBCRR Adult Ed Center, 1909 Grande Ave., Rio Rancho, facebook.com/vacgnm, 948-3132.

every fourth thursday | 10 am–2 pm

Quilters Demonstration. The New Mexico Quilters will be working on their Botanic Garden quilt and other projects in the Heritage Farmhouse. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7180, abqbiopark.com. Tickets: Included with admission.

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every thursday, friday and saturday | 6–9:30 pm

Party in the Fireroom on the Patio. Pueblo Harvest Café hosts live music in its cozy Fireroom or on the patio. While you listen and dance, enjoy a taco bar, all-you-caneat horno-baked pizza, handcrafted cocktails, local craft beer, and a creative menu of appetizers from our acclaimed culinary team. Info: Pueblo Harvest Café, 2401 12th Street NW, puebloharvestcafe. com, 724-3510. No cover.

fridays | 10:30 am

Story Time at the Botanic Garden. Info: ABQ BioPark Botanic Garden, 2601 Central Ave. NW, abqbiopark.com or dial 311.

fridays | 12 noon–1:30 pm

Grief and Loss Support Group. Grief is a natural process that can often be eased through sharing with others who have experienced the loss of a loved one or any other significant loss. Info: Jewish Community Center, 5520 Wyoming Blvd. NE. Preregistration required by calling 348-4451. Free.

fridays | 1 pm

Mural Discovery Tour. The IPCC houses 19 murals by Pueblo artists. Our guided tour provides an introduction to the art, traditions, and core values of Pueblo culture, and a who’s who of Pueblo artists, such as Pablita Velarde, Helen Hardin, and Jose Rey Toledo. Reflect upon the murals and uncover layers of meaning in each, with representations of traditional Pueblo life, including dance, the seasons and our connection to animals, as well as the contemporary vision of emerging artists. Tours can be scheduled for groups in advance by calling 212-7052. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, 843-7270, indianpueblo.org. Free with museum admission: adults, $8.40; seniors and military, $6.40; New Mexico residents, $6.40; students and children, $5.40; children under 5, free.

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JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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fridays | 7–10 pm

Dance Party. Learn a new dance and meet new people each week at ABQ’s newest studio, with three beautiful ballrooms and state-of-the-art floating dance floors. Enjoy refreshments and an introductory dance class from 7–8 pm. Info: Holiday Dance Studio, 5200 Eubank Blvd. NE, 5084020, holidaydancestudio.com. $10.

fridays–sundays | fridays and saturdays 7–9 pm, sundays 1-3 pm

Summertime in Old Town. Every weekend from May through August, Old Town is the best place to be for beautiful plazas, great cuisine, unique local shops, and free, live music on the gazebo performed by local musicians. Enjoy one of Albuquerque’s most treasured locales. Info: Historic Old Town, 200 N. Plaza Street NW.

every first friday |

Free Admission Day at Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. Check out this award-winning, world-class facility highlighting the art, culture, history, science and sport of ballooning and other lighter-than-air craft. Info: 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE (North of Alameda), 768-6020, cabq.gov/ balloon.

every first friday | 1:30 pm

Tamarind Institute First Friday Tours. See the workshop facility, learn about fine art lithography, the current programs and the history of Tamarind (a division within the College of Fine Arts at UNM), a collaborative process video, and a printing demonstration. Reservations: tamarind. unm.edu. Info: Tamarind Institute, 2500 Central Ave. SE, 453-2159. Free.

every first friday | 8–10 pm

Cristel’s Variety Dance Party. Join us on this large wooden dance floor for social dancing to a variety of music - country, ballroom, Latin, and swing. Singles and couples are welcome. Great wood dance floor, music requests taken. Info: Lloyd Shaw Dance Center, 5506 Coal Ave. SE. $5 cover per person.

every other friday | 7–9 pm

Albuquerque Spanish Meetup. Practice conversational Spanish with a mix of native Spanish speakers and folks learning Spanish. Info: 553-3008, spanish.meetup. com/700/calendar.

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every third friday | 7–9 pm

Cactus and Succulent Society of New Mexico. Discuss cacti and succulents; enjoy a program presented on a particular subject relevant to these plants. Program usually involves a slideshow. Not necessary to be a member to attend. Info: Albuquerque Garden Center, 10120 Lomas Blvd. NE, 296-6020 new-mexico.cactussociety.org.

saturdays | 8 am–12 noon

Los Ranchos Growers’ Market. Fresh local produce and products, plants, arts and crafts, music, and more. Handicapped accessible, family and pet friendly. Info: 6718 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, losranchosgrowersmarket.com, 610-9591. Free admission.

saturdays | 10 am

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Downtown Walking Tour. Learn about our diverse settlers who arrived with the railroad in 1880. Hear stories about the merchants, politicians and pioneers who shaped our city. Allow 2 hours and wear comfortable shoes. Every Saturday through November. Info: Meet Trudy Merriman at the SW corner of Central and 1st Street, albuqhistsoc.org, 289-0586. Free.

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saturdays | 10:30 am

Story Time at the Aquarium. Info: ABQ BioPark Aquarium, 2601 Central Ave. NW, abqbiopark.com, 768-2000. Included in admission.

saturdays | 12 noon–2 pm

Acting for Writers. Award-winning director and Meisner acting teacher Lois Hall, teaches Acting for Writers in a supportive environment. The class is devoted to writers breathing life into their characters by learning the actors’ secrets. Info: 715-2801, actingforwritersloishall. com. RSVP required.

saturdays | 12 noon–3 pm

Class with Explora Maker-in-Residence. See description above on Thursdays 3–5 pm. Most Saturdays. Info: Explora, 1701 Mountain Road NW, explora.us, 224-8300. Included with general admission $6-$10.

saturdays | 1–2:30 pm

Family Art Workshops. Families create a work of art inspired by what they see at Albuquerque Museum. A different project every week. Try your hand working with a variety of art mediums. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, 243-7255, cabq.gov. Free with Museum admission of $4-$6.

saturdays | 2–5 pm

Art in the Afternoon. Wrap up your shopping in Historic Old Town with free admission into the museum, live local music, and great food and drink specials amid a wealth of cultural and historical artifacts and works of art. Info: Albuquerque Museum of Art and History, 2000 Mountain Road NW, call 311, cabq. gov. Free.

saturdays | 2:30–4:30 pm

Tango Club of Albuquerque’s Weekly Practica. Argentine Tango practice. No partner necessary. Info: Lloyd Shaw Dance Center, 5506 Coal Ave. SE, abqtango.org. Tickets: $2.

saturdays | 3:30 pm

Saturday Storytime. Join Miss Caitlen for new and exciting adventures. Fun for young children and those young at heart. Info: Barnes and Noble, Coronado Center, 6600 Menaul Blvd. NE, 883-8200, bn.com. Free.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

saturdays | 5–8 pm

Cooking Classes at Cinnamon Sugar and Spice Café. Try a fun and exciting handson cooking class. Enjoy a meal prepared by you in a commercial kitchen with the guidance of a chef, sip wine, and top it off with dessert. Info: 5809 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, 492-2119, cinnamoncafeabq.com.

saturdays | various times

Prehistoric Preschool for Families. See description on Thursdays 10–12 am. Info: New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, 1801 Mountain Road NW, 841-2848, nmnaturalhistory.org. Tickets: see cost information online.

every saturday and sunday | 12 noon and 2 pm

Traditional Native Dance Performances. The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is the only place in North America to offer traditional Native American dances every week year-round. Performances outdoor or indoor depending on weather. Info: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, 2401 12th Street NW, indianpueblo.org, 843-7270. Free with museum admission.

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every saturday and sunday | various times

Albuquerque Garden Center. Our events include the Cactus and Succulent Society Show and Sale, the African Violet Show and Sale, and the Annual Spring Plant Sale, and the Aril and Iris Show. The Shop features local artists all month. Info: Albuquerque Garden Center, 10120 Lomas Blvd. NE. Free.

every first saturday | 10– 11:30 am

Support Group for women with any GYN cancer plus concurrent group for families/ caregivers. The Gynecological Cancer Awareness Project holds these peerled groups at the People Living Through Cancer Office. Info: 3411 Candelaria Road NE, Suite M, theGCAP.org.

every first saturday | 10 am–12 noon

Military History Lecture. Listen to an interesting presentation of military history events and activities that affected New Mexico. Lectures include the History of the NM National Guard, Bataan Death March, WWII Army Air Corp bases in New Mexico, and others. Info: New Mexico Veterans Memorial, 1100 Louisiana Blvd.

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SE, 256-2042. Admission: Free. Donations requested.

every first saturday | 12 noon–3 pm

First Saturday of the Month Shot Clinic For Your Dogs And Cats. No appointment needed. Info: 3251 Westphalia Road SE, wmranch.org.

every second saturday | 10–11:30 am

Outcomes, Inc. Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Discussion/Support Groups. Info: St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, 2701 American Road, Rio Rancho, 243-2551 to reserve a space. Free childcare provided. Free.

every second saturday | 10 am–12 noon

Free Fishing Clinic. Instruction available on basic fly-tying methods, fly-rod casting techniques, fishing etiquette, effective catch-and-release practices and enhancement of advanced skills. Equipment and supplies are available free of charge on a first-come-first-served basis for use during the clinic, or you may bring your own. Tingley Outfitters provides basic equipment for purchase

inside the train station. Info: Tingley Beach, 1800 Tingley Drive SW, call 311 or 768-2000.

every second saturday | 1 pm

Read to the Dogs. Registered therapy dogs sit calmly and quietly for a story so children can practice reading out loud without fear of judgment. It’s a great way for children to gain confidence in their reading. Several libraries. Please register in advance. Info: Southwest Canine Corps of Volunteers, 768-5136.

second and fourth saturday | 12 noon–1 pm

Watermelon Mountain Ranch Volunteer Orientation. Come out to the main facility in Northern Rio Rancho to find out all about the volunteer program and the opportunities to work with the animals in our care. Info: Watermelon Mountain Ranch, 3251 Westphalia Blvd. SE, Rio Rancho, wmranch.org. Near V. Sue Cleveland Highschool.

every second and fourth saturday | 7–10:30 pm

ABQ Dance Club. This non-profit dance club provides dancing to a variety of music - swing, country, ballroom, Latin. Couples and singles are welcome, no partner

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or experience needed. Lessons and refreshments included. Info: Albuquerque Square Dance Center, 4915 Hawkins Street NE, asdc.org, 299-3737. Fee $8.

sundays | 1–4 pm

Saturday Night Swing. Good listening and dancing music of live tunes from the ’40s and ’50s. Remember to wear your dancing shoes. Info: New Mexico Veterans Memorial, 1100 Louisiana Blvd. SE, 256-2042. Free admission. Donations requested.

Old San Ysidro Church Tours. See the beauty and learn the history of one of Corrales’ most significant historic buildings. Historical Society Docents are on hand to welcome guests, give tours, and answer questions. Watch the Old Church video, view historical artifacts, and take home souvenirs ranging from local flavor cookbooks to church retablos, jewelry, and more. Info: 966 Old Church Road, Corrales, 890-3846, corraleshistory.org. Free.

sundays | 9 am–1 pm

sundays | 8 pm

every last saturday | 7–9 pm

Free Sunday Mornings at Albuquerque Museum. Admission is free every Sunday morning. View the latest exhibition, try out interactive displays, stroll through the sculpture garden, and stop by the cafe for brunch. Info: Albuquerque Museum, 2000 Mountain Road NW, cabq.gov, 2437255. Free. $5 exhibition surcharge applies during free days at Albuquerque Museum.

sundays | 9 am–1 pm

Free Admission Day. Anderson-Abruzzo Albuquerque International Balloon Museum. Check out this award-winning, world-class facility highlighting the art, culture, history, science and sport of ballooning and other lighter-than-air craft. Info: 9201 Balloon Museum Drive NE, 7686020, cabq.gov/balloon.

Geeks Who Drink. Join in best Pub Quiz in town. Bring your friends and create a team of up to six people. Info: O’Niell’s Nob Hill, 4310 Central Ave. SE, 256-0564, geekswhodrink.com/blog, oniells.com.

every first, third and fifth sunday | 6–9 pm

Ballroom, Latin and Swing Dancing. Join USA Ballroom Dance. Free beginner lessons start at 5:30 pm. Info: Albuquerque Square Dance Center, 4915 Hawkins Street NE, 288-0313. Cost: members, $5; non-member, $8.

every second and fourth sunday | 10–11 am

Yoga with Cats. Enjoy cats frolicking and lounging as you participate in a yoga class for all skill levels. Info: Catopia Cat Cafe, 8001 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Suite C-5, call 508-4278 to reserve your spot. $14 per class.

every second and fourth sunday | 2–4 pm

Stitching Group. Knitting, crocheting, embroidering, tatting, spinning, crossstitching and more. Join in the fun, share ideas, patterns, experiences and more. All ages and experience levels welcome. Info: Erna Fergusson Library, 3700 San Mateo Blvd. NE, 888-8100.

various days | various times

Albuquerque Dolls. We have ongoing social events for women, including dinners, dancing, movies, volunteering, crafts and trips, and we are having a blast. We encourage women to join together to support each other and learn more about New Mexico. Join: Meet Ups/Albuquerque. Also, on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

sundays | 10:30 am

Chatter Sunday. These Sunday morning concerts include readings and refreshments. Info: Las Puertas, 1512 First Street NW, chatterabq.com. Cost: regular, $15; 30 and under and students, $9; children under 13, $5.

sundays | 12 noon–5 pm

Save Lucky Paws Information Table at Lucky Paws Adoption Site. T-shirts and wristbands for sale. Info: Coronado Mall, saveluckypaws.org.

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WEEKDAYS

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4:30 - 7am

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Albuquerque The Magazine’s

Stay-At-Home “Show Us Your Home Office” Contest By Taylor Hood A few months ago, as we were all scrambling to adapt to the pandemic, ATM sent out a Facebook message looking for people who were converting to working from home. We were looking to see how Albuquerqueans were setting up their new home offices. And, as usual, the people responded beautifully, sending in photos of their own little workfrom-home environments. Some were classic studies with wood paneling, some were tucked into cozy spare closets, some were set up in messy garages. We chose winners and runners-up in three different categories—Best Messy Space, Best Organized Space, and Best Creative Use of Space—and included some Honorable Mentions. So here they are; the results of our first-ever Home Office Contest!

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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Best Creative

Space “It’s his miniature version of an old fashioned, sophisticated study...” —Danni Wartman

Danni “Kitty” and Derek “Sexy Nerd” Wartman Blogger/ABQ Pediatric Dentistry (Danni) and mechanical engineer (Derek)

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he Wartmans have gone all out to create a comfortable and productive space in their home for remote work. The pair live in their dream home—which they built from scratch—but neither ever expected to have to work remotely. So, when the pandemic hit and everyone began moving to home offices, Derek got an idea. “Derek decided to bump part of the hallway out a few feet to create an office nook,” says Danni. “It’s his miniature version of an old fashioned, sophisticated study, complete with wood paneling and a leather chair. He jokes that it’s the perfect place to sit and swirl a glass of fine brandy. The nook was just plain drywall when we moved in. Derek built

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everything himself - the bookcases, the paneling, the drawers, and even the leather drawer pulls. He has space for all of his favorite books, and he enjoys displaying family heirlooms and photos. The large window makes it easy to keep an eye on our rescue dogs, Olive, Bernadette, and Biscuit, as they cause chaos throughout the backyard.” For Danni, things are a bit more complicated. Obviously writing a popular blog—at kittydeschanel.com—is easily done from home, but her job as an administrator for ABQ Pediatric Dentistry is a bit more challenging. “Although closed for routine care, our office was still open for children who had dental emergencies. Our team had never faced

a challenge like this. I was impressed by how well we were able to work remotely, always having someone available to coordinate urgent treatment for a patient,” she says. “With 15 years of experience, I always sound professional when speaking to patients over the phone and via email. Little do they know I’m in my pajamas and fuzzy slippers.” Though they are enjoying their time together, remote work does come with challenges says Danni. “It can be difficult to give each other enough space. I’ll be on my lunch break and whip up a smoothie (one of the perks of working from home), not realizing that Derek is on a conference call that was just interrupted by my blender. Whoops!” WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


RUNNER UP

Sarah Steinberg Auditor, Gap Inc.

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arah Steinberg has figured out a way to make her home office comfortable and cozy without sacrificing productivity. How? She converted a bedroom closet into an office. Using organizational skills that would make Marie Kondo jealous, Steinberg has managed to even keep the space functioning as a closet. Steinberg’s office has all of the usual trappings of an office, but it also has a few little things to make it more personal and comfortable. She has added a foot massager, some photos, and a large sculpture that simply greets her in the mornings (It, appropriately says, “HELLO.”) Moving from office to home office was a bit of a challenge for Sarah but making her space as personalized and cozy as possible has made things much easier.

Home Office Includes: •Foot massager • Hello sign • Plenty of closet space

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Best

Organized

Space

Michele Ruehle Office Manager for Q Realty

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s an office manager for a realty company, Michele Ruehle’s office space is of utmost importance, not just for herself, but for the entire office. She has to stay organized and updated in order to keep the office running as smoothly and efficiently as possible. Luckily for Ruehle, she switched to a mostly remote position six years ago and so was prepared for the quarantine. “My home office is located in a large nook in my bedroom,” she says. “I have a large, beautiful cherry wood desk that my husband built for

me. I have a new super-fast computer with two giant monitors to help with all my marketing and design work. If you ever entered my office while working, you would hear my guilty pleasures streaming station. When I want natural lighting, I open up my patio doors and let in the breeze.” Unluckily, her family was not as prepared. That means her two small boys, who no longer go to school or daycare, are now in and out of her home office all day. “With the pandemic I no longer have school or the daycare and my chil-

• Located in her bedroom nook • Two small boys and a husband who lovingly invade her space • Doors that open to a patio for natural light and fresh air

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dren are home 100 percent of the time,” says Ruehle. “I had to become a teacher (or at least try), be the constant snack provider, the referee between the boys, all while maintaining my job responsibilities.” The pandemic has meant that Ruehle now has to stay organized despite sharing her office with her husband and a little 5-year-old boy who steals her supplies. “To help with my organization I have reverted to ‘old school’ and put my items into binders to keep my stuff separated,” she says. Overall, Ruehle says she loves working at home. She can work in her pajamas and take calls out on her patio. Plus, despite the extra work it sometimes causes, she does love getting to see her little ones throughout the day.

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RUNNER UP

Vanessa Jarratt Outpatient therapist and clinical assessor

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t first glance, it might not seem like Vanessa Jarratt’s office is all that organized. But take a closer look and keep in mind that she was in the middle of a big move when the pandemic forced her to begin working from home. Look at the way the moving boxes are stacked and organized. Jarratt’s office is a great reminder that life hasn’t stop moving during this time. Of course, Jarratt has an ace-in-the-hole where organization is concerned. “My husband Robert is in the Air Force and he loads cargo planes,” she says. “I’ll just say he is pretty good at Tetris.” Working at home has been a challenge for Jarratt. Her job requires interaction with patients, so staying organized and getting out into the community are central to her duties. But, like many of us, Jarratt is finding a way to make it work. “We work off of Zoom and video sometimes,” she says. “But working at home, I had to set up a new system. It’s easier with an L-shaped desk.”

“My husband Robert is in the Air Force and loads cargo planes. I’ll just say he is pretty good at Tetris.” —Vanessa Jarratt

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Best Messy

Odetha Hill

Space

Ice Skating Instructor, Outpost Ice Arena

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sack out on the couch and start binging Netflix. When she got laid off, that’s when Odetha Hill got to work. She converted her kitchen table into a home office, grabbed a heap of fabric and a sewing machine and started making masks for frontline workers. “I teach ice skating and quite a few of my skaters are nurses on the frontlines,” says “We’ve been able to make about Hill. “They said 450 masks in a couple of months they had trouble with PPE. So, I and get them out to workers on looked online and the frontlines of this pandemic.” found a method to make masks and —Odetha Hill then I just started doing it.”

hen the pandemic hit and the country began shutting down, one of the many things that immediately went away was sports lessons. That was bad news for Odetha Hill, an ice-skating instructor at Outpost Ice Arena. But she didn’t just

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At first, Hill was running all over her house trying to get the masks constructed. Then her husband stepped in and helped set up a sewing area for her. “I was working at the kitchen table and using an ironing board. That’s how I started, and my husband got tired, so we did set up a sewing area. I knew I could be more efficient, but I was trying to hurry!” Time has gotten a little stressful between caring for her family and doing online schooling with her kiddos, but she has still become an expert. Since Hill began making masks, she has gone from constructing roughly 20 a day to nearly 50 on a good day. “We’ve been able to make about 450 masks in a couple of months and get them out to workers on the frontlines of this pandemic.”

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RUNNER UP

Paul Fields

Owner, Two Brothers Landscaping

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hen it comes to messy home offices, it’s hard to beat Paul Fields’ garage/ shop. As the sole owner of a landscaping business, his shop at home is packed with equipment like leaf vacuums, a commercial mower, and a floor covered in grass and tree clippings. “That garage is a total disorganized mess,” says Fields. “I’m not going to lie. It never really gets better.” Though he works out in the community, Fields’ office is at home and it is just getting messier during the pandemic. “I don’t know if it’s just that people are inside looking at their nasty yards, or they are spending their stimulus checks or what, but we are busier than ever,” he says. In fact, business is booming so much that Fields has recently had to hire a second crew. He wishes them all the luck in the world finding equipment in his shop.

Home Office Contains: • Leaf vacuum • Toro Commercial mower • Racecar • Golf cart

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Your NEW “Coworkers” Have you ever seen this phrase magically appear on your computer screen when writing a work memo: “xdasfulghftlqeahfkjadsvbleufaqifh”? That means your cat has decided it was time to do a tap dance on your keyboard. Or how about the new most-commonly-used phrase in work meetings: “Hold on, honey! Mommy’s on the phone!” These are the new hazards (and pleasures) of working from home and they are becoming more and more commonplace. Because working from home doesn’t just mean you have to move all of your files to a new computer and make sure to bring home your favorite “I Hate Mondays” coffee mug, it also means you are getting a whole new set of coworkers. Many are embracing the new situation. Faye Ritter’s home office is set up specifically to allow her officemate to visit. “I have low cushions and doggy visits are frequent and appreciated,” says Ritter. Deanna Webb-Garris’ cat has taken over her office, much to Deanna’s delight. “The cat just loves trying to get things on the monitor,” she says. “It’s so much fun.”

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The process is harder on others. Meryl Chee has had to adapt to her new work situation by setting up her home office wherever her 4-year-old daughter Oktosha is playing. “She doesn’t like it when I try to go into my room alone and work, but she does allow me to work in her room when she is playing,” says Chee. “It’s definitely been challenging but as time goes on,

she understands more, and it has gotten easier.” So yes, your new coworkers come with their own set of challenges like walking on your keyboard, tipping over your water glass, or running screaming through the background of your Zoom meeting. But they also have a lovable upside.

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The Little EXTRAS Moving from a daily routine that involves a morning commute, office coffee, chatting with coworkers, and squinting into the fluorescent lights to working from home can be a little jarring. But it’s important to remember that your home office is a two part affair: the home and the office, so just like your office office with pictures of your family and that wonderful little poster of the kitten clutching a tree branch, you want to make your home office as personalized as possible, without getting too comfortable. Making it a personal space can be both calming and give the work-from-home employee a sense of routine. Krishelle Anthony, the owner of Monat, a hair care and skin care distribution company, is a great example. “I think it is important to everyone’s success to create a home office that reflects you and reminds you what is important,” she says. Her small home office has everything she needs for work: a computer, a seat, high-speed internet. But then she has gone the extra mile. “One corner has my vision board and a list of my goals,” says Anthony. “Then in another corner, my dad and I hung these beautiful wine crates to use as bookshelves.” Antho-

ny says the little touches help keep her motivated and creating a comfortable space ensures that she wants to go into her home office every day and get to work. But don’t just take Anthony’s word for it. A 2014 study by psychological scientists Gregory A. Laurence, Yitzhak Fried, and Linda H. Slowik concluded that a personalized workspace that is private and comfortable

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greatly increased worker productivity. “Individuals may consciously or subconsciously take comfort from the items with which they surround themselves at work, and these items may help employees to maintain emotional energy in the face of the stresses that come from their work,” the researchers concluded. So make your office a part of your home, not just a home-office.

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Honorable Mentions

Before

After

Kyra Nieto Small Business Owner Kyra Nieto had to start working from home when the pandemic hit, but she has adapted quickly. “I have had to make my space bigger to accommodate my work,” she says. But she also loves that her home office has a few perks. “My desk faces out a couple windows, so I get to see birds and butterflies flying by while working.”

Chelsea Begay Administrative Assistant, Indigenous Design + Planning Institute With a little hard work and determination, Chelsea was able to turn her hectic junk corner into a peaceful workspace.

Venessa Brown State Farm Insurance Venessa Brown says working from home has been a mixed bag. For one, she’s more productive. “I feel I actually get a lot more done,” she says. “I still have contact with the staff that continues to go into the office and all of our insureds via phone, email and online meetings.” But on the other hand, she does have to contend with some distractions. “Dealing with the outside noise and my dog barking has been a challenge.”

Cerease C. Aragon Facilities Operations Manager, Kirtland Air Force Base Cerease C. Aragon loves working from her home office. She says she has worked out all the kinks and figured out how to personalize her space for max productivity and comfort. “I’ve added an additional monitor and mouse because working directly off your laptop’s small screen and the touch pad for the mouse is IMPOSSIBLE,” she says. “But I’m 100 percent more productive, I have less distractions to concentrate on my tasks and deadlines. I don’t have children, so I haven’t had to be a teacher like others have.”

Kerian Meyerson Owner, Les Blonde Bakery Social Media Manager, Rio Rancho True Value This is what a baker’s home office looks like. Yum!

Alan Moody Operations Manager, Presbyterian Hospital Alan Moody has a stressful job filled with meetings and decisions. “Before, it was a lot of operational meetings and decision making. But when we first went home, the meetings doubled. And it was a lot.” That’s why he has gone to great lengths to make his home office as comfortable as possible. “I added three monitors to my setup,” he says. “But my favorite thing is that I have my music and my dog.”

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Carl Sanchez Guild Mortgage The housing market in Albuquerque is so booming, Carl needs two monitors at home!

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Thank you to all the essential employees for being on the front lines. You are truly amazing.

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ABQ THE INTERVIEW P. 109 | PERSONALITY P. 115 | BEHIND THE SCENES P. 119

TESTING ALBUQUERQUE The largest COVID-19 testing site in the state is at Balloon Fiesta Park, and though wait times can be challenge, the brave frontline workers at the park are still able to test hundreds of Albuquerqeans daily (p. 119).

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PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

STORIES BEHIND INDIVIDUALS WHO MAKE ALBUQUERQUE GREAT

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH OUR LEADERS AND DIFFERENCE-MAKERS

Secretary Kathyleen Kunkel The battle to stay ahead in the fight against COVID-19 has the state’s Secretary of Health (and the department’s 3,000 team members) working around the clock.

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ny normal tenure as Secretary of the New Mexico Department of Health is filled to the brim with challenges. You’re running a department staffed by 3,000 people, spread across eight divisions, tasked with overseeing everything from basic public health concerns like vaccinations, STD testing, disabilities assistance, and veterans health to more novel initiatives, like those that fall under the umbrella of the Medical Cannabis Program. New Mexico Secretary of Health Kathyleen “Kathy” Kunkel took the reins in January 2019, working hard to implement new programs and maintain existing ones for well over a year before COVID-19 upended everything.

PHOTO BY KIM JEW

ATM: Can you start by giving us an overview of the Department of Health’s mission? SECRETARY KUNKEL: The mission

of the Department of Health is to promote wellness for all the people in New Mexico. It’s the largest state agency in New Mexico, with approximately 3,000 employees. We have eight divisions, including the Public Health Division,

which has 56 public health offices in all 33 counties. They do things like family planning, WIC (Women, Infants, and Children) outreach, testing for STDs, and vaccinations and immunizations. We have the Emergency Response Division, which is responsible for reportable conditions and flu tracking. They’ve done some important work in the past [investigating] outbreaks of different

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types. The Scientific Laboratory division is a bio science lab. In addition to what they’re doing now [with COVID-19] they’re responsible for DWI testing. They do calibration for DWI machines. We have an IT division that supports the entire Department of Health throughout the state, and Administrative Services, which you can imagine are pretty big for a department at our size. The Developmental Disability Supports Division, where I’ve spent most of my time with the Department of Health, is responsible largely for home and community based waivers. Most people think of it as the DD waiver, but there’s also a med-frag (medically fragile) waiver that they administer on behalf of the Human Services Department. They did the Family, Infant, Toddler program

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is largely a long term care facility. Sequoyah is a facility for youth in Albuquerque. We have Turquoise Lodge Hospital in Albuquerque, which offers behavioral health and detox services. The Veterans Home in Truth or Consequences is a retirement home for vets and their families. New Mexico Behavioral Health Institute in Las Vegas is a very large facility, treating people with behavioral health issues, and there’s a large, long term care facility up there as well known as Meadows. And we have the New Mexico Rehab Center in Roswell, which is dedicated to both

physical rehab and some detox. And finally, we have the Los Lunas Community Program, which is not technically a facility; it is a home and community-based program run by the State of New Mexico and managed under the facilities division.

ATM: Wow. A lot of moving parts there. KK: There are a lot of moving parts.

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until the new department was created last year. We have the division of Health Improvement, which is responsible for licensing all of the hospitals and nursing homes in the state under CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) guidelines. They also license assisted living facilities and home health [practitioners]. And we have the Medical Cannabis Program that was recently expanded last year and provides cannabis medicine to people in New Mexico. In addition to the divisions, the Department of Health has seven facilities. The Fort Bayard Medical Center


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but everybody is still working. When we could move people home we did. The Public Health Division, Emergency Response Division, which we also call Epidemiology, and the state Laboratory Division are working around the clock on COVID. The IT Division is as well, because it’s supporting all of our COVID activities. ATM: In managing all of those moving parts, can you give us a picture of what a typical week would look like for you before COVID-19 took hold? KK: I don’t even think about the old

getting the supports waiver off the ground, which I am proud to say was sent to CMS. I believe it was April 1, right in the middle of COVID. DDSD still got that off on time. And we completed the boarding home rule, which is a controversial and complicated process that was also completed during COVID. But it took the better part of the previous year to structure. ATM: Is there such a thing as a

typical day now since the COVID-19 outbreak has taken hold? KK: I work from home like everybody

else. There is a stay-at-home order. I find that very difficult. It doesn’t get any better [laughs]. I have three computers. I start on routine calls with other secretaries at 6 a.m. and 6:15 a.m. Testing is a huge part of what the Department of Health is doing in COVID. So, I meet with the testing team at 6:30 a.m. every

days anymore [laughs], but a typical week? I will say this about the Department of Health: It’s 100 years old this year. We had a very nice celebration last year for 100 years of public health, and the department is run by dedicated, highly competent professionals. They know their jobs. They know their jobs so well that when COVID struck, I am 100 percent dedicated to managing COVID issues. And yet the Public Health Division continues to do their family planning work, WIC, and STD testing. Immunizations can be obtained, all the divisions are still doing their jobs. They just shifted gears to do it in a COVID world. I’m very fortunate to have inherited such a competent department. Last year was my first year as Secretary. The Governor wanted to see a new supports waiver developed for the Developmental Disability Support Division (DDSD). That took a lot of work and a lot of meetings and coordination with the Human Services Department. I spent a lot of time working with those two divisions on that. The Governor also wanted boarding homes, which are a type of living arrangement where individuals don’t need total care. They’re not organized like a nursing home or assisted living, but still help vulnerable people who need the support of the State. That also was a significant amount of time that I spent last year, talking to the boarding home providers and the Division of Health Improvement and [the Office of General Counsel] and advocates trying to organize that. That was pretty consuming last year, JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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morning and at 4:30 p.m. every afternoon. There are meetings at 8 a.m. with all state agencies for COVID updates. There’s a meeting with senior leadership every day from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. Communication is such an important part of managing COVID and it’s one of the biggest challenges as well. So all of those meetings are every day. After that I can move around a little bit, but those are every day to make sure that everyone is informed and that we’re going in the same direction. We meet with the governor every day for two hours for senior leadership to inform her of cases and testing, as well as other issues that arise. And then there are some not every day meetings. I meet with Department of Health leadership every night at 6:30 p.m. or 7 p.m. to go over what’s going on with the department. Those are typical days and in between there are emails to answer and things that come up that you address. ATM: New Mexico has done a pretty good job of ramping up the availability of testing. Can you give some insight on what the process has been like in accomplishing that? KK: The governor made that a priority

from the very beginning, and we were fortunate to have Dr. Steve Jenison come back to the Department of Health. His position at the time was to help the Department of Health expand our testing capacity. When we started this, we had state scientific labs and Tricore Reference Labs, but neither lab was prepared to do COVID testing. So that was an early initiative by the Department of Health. We made it an urgent need to make sure we got our COVID testing up and running with cooperation between Department of Health scientific labs and Tricore Reference Labs, and we still are great partners. Initially, it was just getting the reagents and the testing set up and validated by CDC (Centers for Disease Control) and that did happen pretty quickly. After that it was developing instrumentation and validating additional instruments, and both labs have added instrumentation to increase our capacity from about 300 tests a day in February to around 5,000 today. We’re

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PHOTO BY MICHAEL JACOBS

ATM: How has your particular background informed your perspective on public health in New Mexico? KK: I didn’t have a background in pub-

lic health, but I’ve always loved public work. I was a social worker first at University Hospital and started out in pediatrics and eventually went through every clinic and division, and became a co-director of the case management division. I got interested in law through some of the experiences I had as a social worker. My real interest was in bioethics, but when I graduated from law school, I ended up at the Department of Health and I really do love public law and public work. I wouldn’t say it prepared me for a pandemic, but I’m a hard worker and a quick learner. –ZB

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looking for other partners around the state. Today we are welcoming Pathology Consultants from Roswell, who have converted a machine to do COVID testing. They’ll begin today and the search continues. Dr. Jenison was key in contacting different laboratories around the state and helping them convert their equipment or their instruments to do COVID testing. That was essential in terms of the ability to process specimens. And at the same time, the Department of Health was working on how to develop teams or to develop the ability to go out and collect specimens. It’s a two step process, but that’s oversimplifying it. There’s a team of people from the Department of Health, largely the Public Health Division, who test all around the state. And there are also private partners—like Presbyterian, Lovelace, Memorial, Holy Cross—who are also doing testing. So it’s a combined private/public effort to collect specimens, which are then funneled to the state labs to process. Managing the capacity and loading the labs is a daily challenge, which is why we meet twice a day to talk about where we need to go based on epidemiology. To know which lab can absorb how much requires constant communication.

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A LOOK AT THE LIFE & WORK OF ALBUQUERQUEANS WHO DESERVE A TOAST

Expressive Hands Our daily coronavirus video briefings have drawn attention to Nixo Lanning, who has become New Mexico’s favorite sign language interpreter with her overtly expressive and passionate style.

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t’s undoubtedly a strange and depressing time filled with anxiety and uncertainty. Many New Mexicans are looking for answers in the daily coronavirus updates from their local officials and from Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham. For those of us who tune into the governor’s daily briefings, one particular aspect has caught our attention more than anything else. Yes, the information is clear and concise. Yes, the televised briefings themselves are comforting. But really, it’s Nixo Lanning, the governor’s sign language interpreter, who has become the star. Lanning, with her quick and fluid hand movements, expressive features, and impeccable fashion sense is quickly becoming a very popular part of the New Mexico news landscape. She has even gained some national attention for her style, with an extensive story on her appearing on msn.com. “At least once a day, when I am out shopping or getting food, people will come up and give me the thumbs up and tell me I am doing a great job,” says Lanning. “I just say ‘thank you,’ but I am just doing my job, I’m not doing this for the attention.” Modesty aside, there is no doubt that

Lanning’s star is rising, something she is finding the positives in. “I joke with my partner that next time I go out, I should wear a hat and sunglasses like the tabloid celebrities.” Lanning (36) was born deaf and grew up in the Bay Area of California. She came to New Mexico to assist a friend at the New Mexico School for the Deaf and fell in love with the Land of Enchantment. She attended the University of New Mexico and got her master’s degree before becoming an ASL (American Sign Language) instructor at CNM. “I love it here. I really do,” she says. “The

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character is unique and I’m very fascinated by the culture, the diversity, and just the variety. So much of what we have going on here is so special.” Working for CNM, Lanning has anywhere from two to four classes per semester, so she signed on with Sorenson—an organization that provides sign language interpreters to the deaf community—to do freelance work. Usually, that means working in doctor’s offices and government buildings and helping individuals understand information. Then she got the call to help the governor with her coronavirus briefings. It was an exciting but daunting request. “I had never done any press conferences before this,” she says. “I took a training class for emergency broadcasts once. But I thought it would never apply to New Mexico. What kind of weather disaster could we possibly have here? Then the coronavirus hit and it’s coming in handy.”

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Before she knew it, Lanning was getting flooded with requests to help with various press conferences. She is now a constant face during Mayor Tim Keller’s briefings as well. For his part, Mayor Keller is embracing Lanning’s popularity, even trying out more and more ASL every week. “He always wants to know how to say different things. Like he asks what the sign for things like ‘ready’ is. He wants to learn, but in the end, we are just professionals trying to do a job, so there isn’t much time to chat,” says Lanning. Few outside the deaf community comprehend just how busy a popular interpreter like Lanning can be and just how difficult the job is. In order to understand what exactly she does, there are a few basic things to know. First, Lanning uses a combination of ASL and English sign language. ASL uses hand gestures to convey words, whereas English sign uses hand gestures to convey letters to spell out words. The speaker speaks and a hearing interpreter in the audience conveys the information to Lanning using ASL and English and Lanning has to distill the information and figure out a way to convey it to the deaf commu-

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nity in a way that will reach the largest segment of that population. The whole process has to happen while the speaker continues to speak. It requires incredibly quick thinking and hours of training. “Sometimes I just don’t have time, and I have to just repeat what my interpreter says,” Lanning says. Think of it like this: If you were at the United Nations, you would see a room packed with interpreters who are there to translate what is said into dozens of different languages. Deaf people around the world all speak different sign languages as well. So, Lanning needs to convey important information in a way that everyone can understand. Imagine that room at the UN filled with translators being whittled down to one person who has to somehow convey what is being said to dozens of different people, who speak dozens of different languages, using one language they can all understand. Now you are getting the picture. On top of that, in a crisis like the pandemic, there are many words that either don’t have a sign or have a very new sign. “My team gets to the conferences very early,” says Lanning. “We find out what

the talking points are and go over what some of the signs will be and how to best convey the information. It takes a lot of preparation. Then during the conference, I will, if I have time, cut away from what is being said and explain to the deaf audience what the sign for certain terms will be. Then I go back to translating.” While the whole process may seem impossibly stressful and difficult to the hearing community, for Lanning it is second nature. Born deaf, ASL is her

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first language. That is what makes her so good at her job. Lanning says that for major news, a Certified Deaf Interpreter (CDI) is often preferred over a hearing interpreter for whom ASL is a second language. But Lanning does admit that the job is very stressful and so finding ways

to relieve that stress and relax are very important. An athlete all her life, and a six-time Deaflympics medalist (she has competed in 11 different international athletic competitions in sports ranging from snowboarding to basketball and handball) Lanning has a home gym for exercise. When not working or working

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out, she is hanging out with her three kids—Randi (18), Elliot (14), and Lexi (12)—or binging Outlander on Netflix with her partner. Lanning says it’s important for all of us to try to stay positive, stay sane, and do what we can to help our community. For her that means getting information and resources to deaf New Mexicans. “It’s important for advocacy to have an interpreter,” she says. “It’s a right under the Americans with Disabilities Act to have access to information. So, my job as a CDI is to make that accessible and find a middle ground where I can meet the whole population of deaf people for their language access. Deaf culture has so many different levels of communication styles, and my job is to find that middle ground so that most everyone can understand me and get the message. Then they can turn around and be as active as possible in their communities, their cities, and the world.” —TH

Still Helping Always Caring Buddy Bear Patrol is one of eight philanthropic programs of Assistance League of Albuquerque. For 19 years, Assistance League of Albuquerque has worked with first responders to give children in crisis a friend to hold onto during their scariest moments. We give over 1000 children brand new teddy bears each year.

LEARN MORE ABOUT US AT ASSISTANCELEAGUEABQ.ORG JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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BEHIND SCENES THE

YOUR SNEAK PEEK AT JOBS THAT FLY BELOW THE RADAR

Swab City The COVID-19 testing site at Balloon Fiesta Park is seeing hundreds of patients a day, and the frontline workers have their double-gloved hands full.

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hatever else happens this year, 2020 will be known as the year of COVID-19. It has affected all of us in some way. For the frontline workers, that is especially true. While some states have struggled to gain access to testing and lack an infrastructure to get the needed testing to the public, New Mexico— especially Albuquerque—has acted quickly and aggressively.

While testing for COVID-19 is available at various locations around the city, most of the testing is being done at a centralized location at Balloon Fiesta Park. The site is operated by Presbyterian Medical Group, but according to Mechem Frashier, the PMG Urgent Care Director of Operation, the city’s response to coronavirus has been a joint effort. “We work with the Department of Health to make sure we get volumes of patients through,” says Frashier. “We are also partnered with Tricore Referance Labs to process the tests. And when the testing started, we worked with Lovelace and UNMH to attack this as a team.” The crew at Balloon Fiesta Park have worked hard to create a space that is easily accessed by the public, provides all the

medical attention necessary, and is safe for both patients and workers. A drive-up testing location, patients pass through a registration tent, a vital signs tent, a provider tent, and a testing tent, all while remaining in their vehicle. “Patients drive up to a registration tent. Then they pull forward to get vital signs taken,” says Frashier. “Then they go to a provider who can give needed care and determine if the patient should be tested. Then they go to the swabbing tent to get tested. The whole thing takes about 15 minutes depending on the volumes, and of course that doesn’t account for time waiting in line. Results come in within 48 to 72 hours.” The tests are stored in two refrigerators on site. They are then picked up by Tricore

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Labs twice a day. Testing began in early March, and the staff at Presbyterian was inundated with people wanting to get tested. So it was decided that Albuquerqueans would be better served at a centralized location that was designed to accommodate large numbers of people. “We got the first drive up testing site up and running within 24 hours of getting the directive,” says Frashier. “Within the first three days we were seeing 600 to 800 people a day. That was a difficult first weekend. We had to figure out the best way to move a number of patients.” On March 23, Presbyterian moved its services to Balloon Fiesta Park. “We decided on Balloon Fiesta Park because we work in conjunction with the Albuquerque Police Department and they suggested it because it is a place that can accommodate a large number of vehicles,” says Frasier. The park also has access to power and electricity negating the needed for generators. The testing site at Balloon Fiesta Park

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has roughly 40 staff members and half a dozen of them are what Frashier calls “swabbers”—the ones who actually administer the tests. “Within the Urgent Care Department, we have two of our clinics, their staff primarily works at Balloon Fiesta Park, but we also rotate our staff between the clinics, so they don’t get stagnant.” Part of being on the testing site team also requires going off site in a mobile testing unit. “We were asked to go into an assisted living center, and since the transmission rate of COVID-19 is very high, we decided to set up a walk-through testing facility outside where they wanted us to go.” The mobile unit has a rotating staff and it goes to nursing homes and underserved areas of the state, with assistance from Albuquerque Ambulance. Frashier says that, now that the site is set up and fully functional, it requires very little work to get it set up and shut down every day. Workers arrive roughly a half hour before opening. They then have what

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they call a “huddle” where information is shared among the team. Then everyone goes to their stations. They work from 7 a.m.-3 p.m. each day and see hundreds of Albuquerqueans during that time. “Recently we’ve been seeing an average of 450 tests a day, but it fluctuates, and we can see as many as 560 a day,” Frashier says. There are two different kinds of COVID-19 tests, according to Frashier. The first is for asymptomatic patients. It involves a large nasal swap that is inserted all the way to the back of the nasal cavity. The second is a smaller swab that only goes about an inch into the nose. That one is used for patients who are showing symptoms. It is important to note that, at this time, New Mexico testing has been opened to all workers, per Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham’s orders. That means that any workers can get tested regardless of if they are showing symptoms. The work is only part of the challenge for the Balloon Fiesta Park team. This is a time of year with constantly shifting weather.

Frashier is sure to provide plenty of water and coolers for the hot days and heaters for the cold mornings. “It is tough, and it is tiring down there,” says Frashier. “Our staff were out in the cold and we had heaters. At one point in March it was snowing. And now it’s hot so we have air conditioners. We work hard to give them the best work environment that we can.” Morale is especially important during these times and Frashier says it is important to give the staff regular breaks and provide them with everything they need to stay comfortable. Part of safety is making sure everyone is focused and the swabbers need support staff to help with that. It’s a reminder to us all that being a hero during the pandemic simply means that we all can do something, whether it’s sticking swabs in people’s noses, our just bringing a frontline worker a bottle of water. —TH

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CREATIVES P. 122 | SHELFLIFE P. 124 | TIEMPO P. 126

CULTURE

TAPPING ALL THE NOTES Mel Minter knows music. But when he was approached about writing a music column for this magazine, he admits he didn’t think it was for him. Sixteen years and 181 TIEMPO columns later have proven him quite wrong. (pg. 126)

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PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

A PULSE CHECK ON ALBUQUERQUE’S ART, MUSIC AND THEATER SCENE

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DIP INTO THE PERFECTLY MIXED PALETTE OF ABQ’S ART AND ARTISTS

Jewelry designer Joanne Douglas relies on an array of experiences to create personal pieces of art

n terms of craft and artistry, Shoofly 505 is all about one person’s passion for tasteful, high quality jewelry. But in terms of execution, much of it is about simplicity. Shoofly 505 exists in answer to the question: “what does one need to translate that passion into a self-sustaining enterprise?” Strip away all the chrome and glass and brick of the 20th century shopping experience, leave in place the desire to put people in touch with the things they want, and there you have it—a fully modern pipeline connecting a person with a serious appetite for style and creativity with like minded folks across the globe. At Shoofly 505, the person in question—the one with the passion for

full-stakes jewelry maker, curator, and business owner—started with a ring. “I started with this one ring. Everybody wants this ring,” she recalls. From there, demand expanded. “Eventually, what I did is sell a look. People might go, ‘Oh, I really want one of your Navajo pearl necklaces.’ And then they’re like, ‘Oh, I really want one of those bracelets.’” Much of Douglas’ work is sunk deep into the look and feel of the American Southwest, blending archetypal elements like cut turquoise and sterling silver Navajo pearls with vintage flavor and high fashion sensibilities. The results are both diverse and distinctive, running from elegant strings of 7 millimeter Navajo pearls accented with the glassy translucence of a

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high quality jewelry and the appetite for style and creativity—is Joanne Douglas. “My background is mostly in sales and retail, [but] I worked for this jewelry manufacturer for like 10 years,” Douglas says. She developed an interest in design, which she nurtured for a number of years while working a variety of jobs, with the core of her focus on raising kids. “I ended up going back into jewelry for a little bit, for a locally owned place. [But] it wasn’t the best fit.” Talking to Joanne, it’s clear that the ideal fit would be one she cut for herself. She had done merchandising work for Duran’s Central Pharmacy previously, so she went back there for a while. The turn around—launching Joanne from merchandiser to

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020

PHOTO BY CAMPBELL BISHOP

SOUTHWESTERN STYLE, PERSONALIZED


PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

single freshwater pearl to quirky rectangular rings, sterling silver set with a colorful image of Frida Kahlo or a Dia de los Muertos skull. “It’s been really, really good,” Douglas says. “I don’t ever intend to look back. I just tried to start small. I didn’t take out any loans or anything like that. I just really slowly grew everything.” While her work is distributed from an online shop (shoofly505.com) and a handful of shops in Downtown Albuquerque, Corrales, and Santa Fe, the core of Douglas’ work takes place in her Uptown loft at a vintage metal desk that looks like it might have rolled out of an engineer or shop foreman’s office in the middle ‘60s, full of slide-rules and number 2 pencils. While everything branded as part

of Joanne Douglas’ Shoofly 505 line is handmade by her, she enlists the help of other specialty artists and craftspeople where necessary. For instance, some of her jewelry incorporates sterling silver squash blossoms, intricate and ornate representations of squash seeds. “I’m not a silversmith,” Douglas says. “So I have Elgin Tom, a Native American silversmith. I’ll do the design and then give it to him and he’ll [make] it for me.” Visit the Shoofly 505 online shop and you’ll get a good taste of what Douglas does. But the reality is that much of what she produces is custom work, designed in consultation with clients who come to her home studio, where they develop and refine the ideas for the perfect piece necklace or earrings. “Navajo pearls come in all

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

different sizes. So someone might say, ‘I just want a six millimeter, but I want a 20 inch or 30 inch [necklace]. I do a lot of custom orders like that, and that helps, because a lot of people are looking for something really specific,” Douglas says. “The best part is that I meet so many interesting women,” she explains, noting that while much of her clientele is female, her line attracts plenty of interest from men. “[Clients] get excited and I get excited, and I try to make something special for them.” —ZB

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TURN A PAGE WITH OUR LOCAL AUTHORS

HIDDEN EATS & SECRET STREETS A

Secret Albuquerque hits bookshelves on June 5. Learn more at ashleymbiggers.com

ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: What inspired you to write this book? ASHLEY M. BIGGERS: Well, this is part

of a national series of secret histories from Reedy Publishing. But Secret Albuquerque is kind of a companion book to my first book, 100 Things to Do in Albuquerque Before You Die. That is really a book that reintroduces Albuquerque to people, and this was the next layer to that. While I was researching 100 Things to Do in Albuquerque Before You Die, I came across a number of items that were incredible, but they were just a little too quirky for that list. But they were perfect for this book because they focused on the wacky and weird. ATM: Are most of the items in the book things that you found while working on other projects? AMB: Some of them were things that peo-

ple had just mentioned to me in the course of my work. Then I just sort of pulled on those threads and one item led to another.

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SECRET ALBUQUERQUE: A GUIDE TO THE WEIRD, WONDERFUL, AND OBSCURE By Ashley M. Biggers Reedy Press 214 pages $20.95

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shley M. Biggers knows Albuquerque. A local writer, she has produced content for Albuquerque The Magazine, Heritage Magazine, and New Mexico Magazine. But, as a travel writer, she also has a national presence with her work appearing on CNN, and in USA Today 10Best, AFAR, Lonely Planet, and Fodor’s Travel. With her third book (following 100 Things to Do in Albuquerque Before You Die, and Eco-Travel New Mexico), Secret Albuquerque: A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful, and Obscure, Biggers is showing off her chops. Looking for Microsoft’s first office? How about the site of a couple of accidentally dropped nuclear weapons? Want to spend a night in the home of a spy? With plenty of fun and humor, Biggers deftly guides her readers through a hidden Albuquerque and reveals some of the quirky and unique sites and items that make the Duke City such a special place.

For example, I reached out to the Maxwell Museum at UNM and asked, “What is one of your most interesting objects?” They told me a story about this totem pole from the Pacific Northwest. It’s one of Dr. Hibben’s [a longtime UNM professor and renowned archeologist, Dr. Frank C. Hibben passed away in 2002] acquisitions. It’s a bit circumspect how he acquired it, so the Maxwell Museum has it on loan from the tribe, but the tribe still owns it.

place people might think of as just a place to grab a burger, but there is a story behind it. It is an arm of Hope Works which seeks to help people escape homelessness. They give people training and job experience and help them get on their feet again.

ATM: How many sites are in this book and what are some of your favorites?

possible, I would use original sources and true experts in what was discussed. When that wasn’t possible, I tried using multiple sources. In a few instances I found disagreement.

AMB: There are 90 sites reviewed in Secret

Albuquerque.

One of my favorites is the very first item. It’s no mistake that it’s there. It’s the Painted Lady Bed & Brew; not “Bed & Breakfast,” but “Bed & Brew.” It’s the first of its kind in the state, so that’s kind of unique. Plus, the location has an interesting history. The Painted Lady used to be a brothel, and it operated as such for over 100 years. It was located across the street from a lumberyard, which had a high proportion of gentleman working there. It’s just a very unique place to experience. The Hope Café, at the Museum of Natural History, is also a favorite. So, this is a

ATM: Often, with things like “secret histories,” it can be difficult to separate myth from fact when researching. How did you tackle this problem? AMB: Yeah. It was difficult. As much as

For example, the write up on the East End Neighborhood—a neighborhood near Lomas and Wyoming that was one of the first African American neighborhoods in the southwest—there was a big swing in number of houses. So, I indicated those differences in the write up. Certainly, in a few instances, I said something like, “according to local legend” because people don’t always agree on facts and the people who were there or had the facts have since passed away. —TH

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SHELFLIFE

THE STORY OF A LIFETIME have even been made into films—under his belt. His latest (and he says “last”) novel, The King of Taos, took nearly 50 years to write and is his love letter to Taos and the people he has known there. While the author now makes his home in Albuquerque, there was a time when he was a staple of Taos. After returning from war—Max Evans served in the 2nd Infantry and was instrumental in the invasion of Normandy during World War II—he moved to Taos with visions of becoming rich and famous. Now, 60 years later, Max would say he is neither, but his newest book is certainly rich. The King of Taos follows a local “wino” named Zacharias Chacon through his nights of crazy adventure and deep conversation with friends. Chacon is based on a real person who Max knew and worked closely with for years. ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE: How long did it take to write this book? MAX EVANS: Oh gosh. I’ve been working

THE KING OF TAOS By Max Evans University of New Mexico Press 165 pages $9.99

COURTESY PHOTO

ax Evans is a legendary New Mexico M author with more than 30 books— some of which, like The Hi Lo Country,

es have one or two skies. But Taos always had six or seven skies. Blue sky over there; cloudy over there; Taos is just a truly magical place. But I thought, “Well, I can’t just write about magical Taos.” So I figured I’d show the other side of it

on it off and on for about 50 years I guess. I was working with Sam Peckinpah, a great director, and he was blackballed*, so in order to make a living, he started writing scripts and he would sign the scripts under a different name. So, he hired me to help him [write scripts]. And I was out there working on these under-the-table scripts with Sam, and these characters came in my mind and that’s when I first started this book. And then I just set it down and I don’t know what happened. I sort of forgot about it. Then years later, I picked it up and wrote some more of it. And then somehow or another put it away and then a few years back I found this marvelous [draft] and thought, “Well, I do believe I’ll finish this book.” I’m 95 years old and I finally finished my book.

ATM: And the book does seem like as much a love letter to Taos as anything else. Can you speak to that a bit? ME: Yeah. I had a little ranch when I was

ATM: This sounds like it was a very personal journey for you.

ATM: Does he know he inspired this book?

ME: Yes. I felt it deeply. No matter where

ME: No. He’s been dead for a number of

I’d go, I’d think about standing in the circle just a few miles outside of Taos and looking down into the valley. I lived in Taos and I used to count skies. Most plac-

just back from the invasion of Normandy. It was there in Union County and I had always wanted to be a painter. I would paint and draw but there was only one guy there in Union who had any interest in art. But I had heard about Taos, so I went up there and just fell in love with it. I sold my ranch and moved up there to Taos figuring I would be rich and famous in about a year. Of course, a year later I was broke and not famous in the least. But I still loved Taos. ATM: Your central character, Zacharias Chacon, is based on a real person? ME: Yes, that’s right.

years.

ATM: So this is kind of a nice tribute to him.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

ME: Yes, it really is. He was a marvelous man. He was three-quarters Hispanic and one-quarter German. But try to think of a guy who was a wino but was one of the best bulldozer drivers that I ever saw. I mean that’s really something. I really cared for him. ATM: What really set this book apart from your other books, in your mind? ME: Well, at 95 years old it was my 30th

book. And it had been the longest hatching.

ATM: What is the central message that you want people to take away from The King of Taos? ME: Oh, there’s no message [laughs]. People

can take away from it whatever they wish. —TH

*In the mid 20th Century, McCarthyism took hold in the United States, a systematic hunt for Americans with perceived ties to communism. In the 1950s and 60s, the wave of McCarthyism hit Hollywood and a number of notable names were blackballed, or blacklisted, and deemed un-hirable. Along with director Sam Peckinpah (The Wild Bunch, The Getaway, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid) a number of famous filmmakers and actors were on the blacklist including notables like Arthur Miller, Charlie Chaplin, and Orson Welles.

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by mel minter

ABQ’S THRIVING LOCAL MUSIC SCENE

DREAM GIG AN ONGOING LOVE OF COVERING THE ABQ

B

MUSIC SCENE ack in the late summer of 2004, Albuquerque The Magazine was in the market for a writer to compose a monthly column on the city’s music scene, and Tom Guralnick, founder and executive director of Outpost Performance Space—about whom I had written for an online music magazine—recommended me for the position. Lindsay Lancaster, the magazine’s editor in chief at the time, gave me a call and asked me to come in for an interview, which was nearly my undoing. A freelance writer for longer than I care to divulge, I hadn’t had a job interview in a very long time, and I managed to spend most of the interview reviewing why the position was not a good match. I can now recall only that I noted that I was all but completely ignorant about entire genres of music and that, as a reformed smoker, I did not much fancy spending late nights and early mornings in smoky bars to get a column. Her exasperation level rising, Lindsay finally asked me what about the job did attract me, exactly. That was easy: “I’ll get to hear music that I would otherwise never hear, and I’ll be able to talk to the musicians about how they do it,” I said. Bingo, I was assigned to write a column, despite myself. So in November 2004, my first Tiempo column appeared in the magazine. I’d had enough musical training that I could talk to musicians without sounding like a complete dunce, but not nearly enough formal musical education to

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A dedicated follower of fashion in the late ’60s in a Baltimore suburb. The glasses are a dead giveaway that I’m a Byrds fan.

speak about music in an authoritatively critical way. I was and am more an enthusiast than a critic, and that is apparently what the column needs. There have been 180 of them so far (181 if you count this one) which astonishes no one more than it does me. How musicians do it has always fascinated me: how they can, with a hollow wooden box with a few metal strings stretched across it, for example, make the tiny little hairs in your ears oscillate in just the exact way needed to bring tears to your eyes or a lift to your spirits. I had basically considered musicians to be magicians, and one thing I’ve learned is that they aren’t really. They are often gifted, for sure, but gifted or not, they

invest tens of thousands of hours of practice over the course of their lives to consistently make those little hairs move just the way they—and we— want them to. Back in 2004, my personal musical experiences in Albuquerque had largely been limited to jazz concerts at the Outpost (which expanded its efforts by developing the New Mexico Jazz Festival in 2006 and hopes to be able to present its 15th season sometime this year) and the occasional big venue superstar extravaganza. I discovered pretty quickly that the city has a remarkably diverse and accomplished population of musicians, and that many of these folks—especially those few who make their living exclusively from music— WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


who is head of jazz studies at UNM and a monster saxophone player. As it happened, Glenn and I discovered that we are both avid cyclists. For a time, we rode together on a regular basis. This offered me a chance to quiz Glenn on various musical technicalities, and he responded generously. Many of our rides included short, enlightening, and often very funny tutorials on one aspect or another of music theory, history, or performance. The column has given me a closeup view of the ever-evolving music scene in the city. In 2005, Tiempo covered the small house concerts that Neal Copperman and his colleague, Jeff Hanson, were presenting. Neal went on to create what is most likely the biggest presenting organization in the state, AMP Concerts. Today, all by itself, AMP Concerts more than likely presents more concerts and related events annually in Albuquerque than were produced by all orga-

My parents must have been out of their minds.

It’s the late ’60s near Baltimore, and I’m sporting a mod suit I designed for my role as lead singer in the band Procreation.

nizations together back in 2004. Neal also had a hand in creating ¡Globalquerque! with Tom Frouge, which Tiempo covered early on and has been keeping an eye on ever since. Today, it is the largest world music festival in the Southwest and still growing. A few other things have changed since I started writing this column. I used to have to chase musicians down to get my hands on their latest CD. Now, I believe some musicians may never have seen a CD—rare as 78s almost. Instead of CDs, now we’ve got streaming, which I still resist for reasons of poor audio fidelity and musician compensation, and downloadable files. Instead of albums, we’ve now got singles, also downloadable. One of the biggest changes over the years has been the expansion of my musical tastes. Musicians in Albuquerque have opened me up to genres that I had either actively ignored or just been plain ignorant about. Hip-hop, for example, was not up my alley until I heard Dremón and took a crash course so I could talk to him without embarrassing myself. So, thanks to all the musicians who have given their time for the column and for my education. I’d also like to thank Larryl Lynch, publisher of the magazine, for choosing to give music a special place in its pages. (It took me only 15 years to discover that Larryl has a musician daughter, though she’s not in Albuquerque.) Thanks to Lindsay for taking a chance, and to her successors for keeping me on and giving me plenty of rope. Don James has helped bring the columns alive with his superb photography, so to him and others who have contributed images to the column, I also say thanks. I’m looking forward to hearing and learning more, and to sharing it with Tiempo readers. Thanks to you, too, for keeping the column going. Be sure to check out Musically Speaking, Mel’s online music journal, at www.melminter.com. If you’d like to share something with “¡tiempo!” readers, e-mail tiempo@abqthemag.com.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MEL MINTER

usually have their fingers in several pies at once. That makes it easy for a music columnist to find new topics to write about. So, for example, in a phone interview about the John Donald Robb Trust with a charming and terrifically helpful woman named Alicia Ultan, I was happy to learn that she performed in a duo called, appropriately enough, Charmed. One person, two columns. More than two, actually, because Alicia has been in quite a few musical groups, ranging from duos to large ensembles, playing everything from original folk music to avant-garde conduction pieces. I’ve also discovered that the city’s musicians—from those just starting out, such as singer/songwriter Chloë Nixon, to the most advanced, such as internationally renowned trumpeter and educator Bobby Shew—are generously approachable and happy to talk about their work. Take Glenn Kostur, for example,

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NEW

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FROM THE VINE P. 134 | MY FAVORITE RECIPE P. 138 | BITES P. 140

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THE BEAR GETS BIGGER Boxing Bear Brewing Co., one of Albuquerque’s most popular breweries, has converted the huge former Hastings Books & Music building in the far Northeast Heights into their latest brew pub (p. 136).

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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A TASTE OF WHAT’S HAPPENING IN ABQ’S WORLD OF WINE, SPIRITS, AND CULINARY DELIGHTS

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Our non-essential clients kept their conversations going through social media during these past few months. Thanks for hanging through the tough times with us.

siarza.com 505.234.6900


FROM

THE

VINE

WHAT’S HAPPENING IN ABQ’S BEER, WINE, AND SPIRITS SCENE

Michael Trujillo from Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits helps prepare care packages for displaced bar and restaurant industry workers during a distribution on April 27.

BARTENDER RESCUE Long ago, everyone agreed to having markers represent goods and services. Small pieces of metal, at first, which later evolved into coins, then dollar bills, and eventually just ones and zeros on a computer screen. That trade-off turned out to work quite nicely, and helped create our global economies. But when a pandemic suddenly halts a huge chunk of the work-for-pay relationship, the system can fly off the rails. No place was that more evident than in the ABQ restaurant and bar industry. With these establishments closed, industry workers have been left adrift without a steady source of income. And that’s where Michael Trujillo and Shane Litt come in. Both are employees of the Albuquerque arm of Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits, and have longstand-

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ing business and personal relationships with local bartenders, servers, bar managers and other service staff. They understood that many in this industry were suddenly struggling to make ends meet, because even though they had unemployment benefits, they no longer had previously relied-upon income from tips and gratuities. Trujillo, who works as the Director of Mixology and Spirits Education for Southern, has spent a big chunk of his professional career mentoring young bartenders and beverage industry professionals. “When COVID came around the corner, it caught all of us off guard,” he says. Part of his job at Southern is to help educate bartenders about everything in the cocktail world, from trends that are developing globally (Trujillo travels internationally on behalf of Southern to learn about the industry,

as well) to basics behind making simple mixed drinks that get maximum enjoyment from paying customers. And to do that, he spends many hours at local establishments, taking the time to pass on his knowledge. It’s no exaggeration to say Trujillo, an Albuquerque native, is passionate about his relationship with his constituents. “One thing about the bar and restaurant communities is that we’re very tight knit,” he says, “and it’s very family oriented.” Seeing that family in distress, Trujillo decided to take action. Together with Litt, a Spirits Specialist at Southern, they reached out to several dozen of the industry’s biggest brand-name liquor makers to solicit donations of spirits. They then assembled care packages for the bartenders affected by COVID-19, including ingredients for cocktails (think Moscow Mules and ManhatWWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

TENDING TO BARTENDERS


FROM

THE

VINE

Bartenders and servers, furloughed by the closing of bars and restaurants due to the coronavirus, wait in line to receive care packages of food, spirits and necessities.

Donations from major liquor brands were part of packages handed out recently to displaced employees in the bar service industry.

tans), uplifting treats (think candy bars and bags of snack chips) and basic necessities, like toilet paper. “The icing on the cake was when our suppliers found out that we were doing this,” Trujillo says. “They said, ‘Well, let’s give them some food, as well.’ So the suppliers sent money, which Trujillo and Litt used to purchase meal kits from local eateries (“We also wanted to support our restaurants,” says Trujillo), which were also distributed to bar industry workers. One of their biggest efforts was April 27, when dozens of industry workers were able to receive packages during a distribution held at El Pinto restaurant in the North Valley. The program is still ongoing, bringing much needed doses of relief and support to a workforce hit hard by COVID-19. —ZB

EASTSIDE TAPS Spring is the ideal season for new ventures. It’s the time of the year when the earth’s axial tilt is just right and everything roughly 30 degrees north of the equator starts to wake up again. The whole world seems totally refreshed. Of course, the fact that Boxing Bear decided to launch a new taproom in April 2020 is largely a matter of coincidence. That’s just how things lined up. So, too, is the fact that that fresh enterprise happened to fall squarely under the shadow of a pandemic. Fortunately—as is true with all things—this too shall pass, and when it does, everyone within a two or three mile radius of the intersection between Candelaria Road and Tramway Boulevard will be in for a treat. The new Boxing Bear taproom is ideally situat-

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

ed and expertly crafted to serve as the neighborhood’s new favorite spot for a social drink. “It used to be a Hastings,” says Boxing Bear’s Kevin Davis. “I think it sat vacant for close to 10 years.” As much as we all enjoyed the now-defunct entertainment store, the spot is now being put to far better use. Sitting more or less at the foot of the Sandias, the new spot is an ideal stopover for folks just coming in off a hike or bike ride. “[And] we’ve always been dog friendly, so people are constantly coming in with their dogs. I think they just wanted a nice centralized little neighborhood place, and I think Boxing Bear accomplishes that, along with some of the tenants we share space with,” Davis says, casting a neighborly light on the outfits like the Paleta Bar and Burrow Cafe just next door.

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When allowed to open at full capacity, the taproom will feature a gaming area—think foosball and darts—and a full kitchen. They’ve also got a nice patio setup, perfectly oriented to enjoy a cold beer in a spot of evening shade while you watch the Sandias turn pink. Keep in mind that, even while you cannot enjoy a leisurely sit-down drink just yet, the taproom is still open. “Up here, we’ve been pretty busy with just the carry out, with the four pack and crowler sales. We’ve been very warmly welcomed by the neighborhood and it’s been really a very good, bright spot through all this uncertainty.” —ZB

logo. According to Black, it took about six months to create. “[Paper Plane] got it,” she says. “Sometimes with logos and stuff like that, when there is a lot going on, from far away everything sort of bleeds together and it’s not always clear what is going on. So, we wanted something that was really recognizable and simple and diverse.” The new logo is clear and concise, but Black says her favorite part of it is that it can be adapted to reflect different events hosted by the NMBG. “We have five or six different logos now that all relate to something we are doing,” says Black. The logo, which sports the Guild’s acronym, is designed so that

the “B” can be altered. Ordinarily, the “B” in the logo has the outline of a barley plant hidden inside of it. But Black says the barley can be replaced with anything from hops to a bicycle wheel, allowing for diversity but keeping the same recognizable look. But that was just Black’s first step. Her next step debuted in January. A new online merchandise store at nmbeer. org that offers items like t-shirts, coffee mugs, and even socks. “We really want to keep the merchandise fresh,” she says. “So in winter I want to have hoodies and beanies and things like that.” Surprisingly, until January, the NMBG did not have any sort of merchandise

NEW LOOK NMBG GOES ONLINE

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When Leah Black came in last year as the new Executive Director of the New Mexico Brewers Guild (NMBG) she had a clear focus: to modernize and promote the NMBG. Despite a busy schedule and a lot of balls to juggle, she got right to work. Black and the NMBG teamed up with Paper Plane Branding & Marketing to reinvent the NMBG WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


store. “I really believed that we needed to have [an online store] for branding purposes,” Black says. “I mean, what year is it?” The store is managed by RIZN INK, a local design company that is also a member of the NMBG. “They are very supportive of the beer industry,” says Black. Black says her personal favorite item is the shirt that sports the phrase, “Passion Brews Here.” Though she is adamant that she only puts things on the online store that she loves, the “Pas-

FIGHTING FOR YOUR BEST INTEREST

sion Brews Here” line has a special place in her heart. “We were having a brainstorming session and I thought, ‘What’s the one word I would use to describe the New Mexico beer industry?’ And the answer was passion.” The proceeds from the online store go to support NMBG staff and pay for lobbyists. “Most of our fundraising usually comes from events,” says Black. “Right now, obviously we aren’t able to do any events. The online store is a great way to continue helping support the NMBG.” —TH

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DISH

My

Favorite

with Norlynn Blocker Price

N

obody knows where music came from. The most accessible musical instrument—the human voice— has been with us for as long as we’ve been, well, us. It’s a strong bet that our early (and presently extinct) relatives like Homo erectus and Homo heidelbergensis could speak and likely possessed some rudimentary form of language. So, there’s a chance music even predates humanity. Regardless of when it first cropped up, one fact remains undeniable: music is a defining piece of the human puzzle. It conveys mood and meaning, captures stories, enriches minds, and incites passions. And that is what makes the work of organizations like the Albuquerque Youth Symphony Program so valuable. “Interestingly, as a child, I was a member of one of the middle school orchestras—the junior orchestra,” explains the Albuquerque Youth Symphony’s executive director, Norlynn Blocker Price. “So, when I found out about the opening for the executive director position at the Symphony program and I jumped at the opportunity.” The Albuquerque Youth Symphony Program encourages and fosters an active, participatory relationship with the aural arts for students in grades four through twelve. “All of our students are already musicians,” says Price. “They’re members of their school band or orchestra programs. We serve about 500 students from public and private schools all over the Albuquerque area, and we accept students by audition every year.” Originally launched in 1955 as a collaborative effort between Albuquerque

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Public Schools and the University of New Mexico Music Department, the program is designed to nurture students who already have special interest in and/or talent for music. “We don’t take the place of school music programs,” says Price. “We want to partner with music programs in our schools. ” As nourishing as music and music education can be, it’s no substitute for food. That’s why all those buskers you pass on the street keep an open guitar case or tip jar handy. Whatever else is going on, one must take a break to eat. Deciding on a recipe to share with ATM was apparently a matter of some debate in the Price family. “I [had] several contenders, but I’m going to share what we call brown rice. But don’t let the name fool you—it is not a healthy dish. It’s because it is braised rice that is browned in butter, and then baked. It’s been a very traditional holiday side dish in my house since I was child and my two daughters crave this dish when they come to visit.” The recipe runs back generations in Price’s family, transferred from her great grandmother to her mother and aunts as a holiday table staple. “I actually recently came across something like it on one of the cooking websites,” says Price. “But I had always known it to be just written down by hand on one of those old fashioned recipe cards. So in my little recipe card file in my kitchen is this recipe that’s been beaten up and dribbled on by grease

and you can barely even read it anyone, but it’s in my mom’s handwriting.” Like a lot of the best things in life, the Price family’s brown rice is surprisingly simple. The whole thing boils down to just five ingredients. “You saute rice and onions in butter and you transport that to a baking dish [then] pour beef consomme all over it, and mushrooms, and bake it in the oven for about an hour.” This is comfort food, through and through. In other words, it’s not the sort of thing you’re going to eat in pursuit of a trim waistline or good health. Rather, this is food you eat on special occasions to celebrate life and family or friends and good company. “It’s the dish you always make if you are invited to a potluck. At a potluck, everybody wants to know who made this rice thing and how do you make it, and it’s amazing,” says Price. For more information on the Albuquerque Youth Symphony Program, and how you can get involved, visit their website at aysmusic.org. —ZB WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

Executive Director, Albuquerque Youth Symphony Program


DISH

Comforting Brown Rice Ingredients

Directions

1 cup long-grain rice 1 onion, chopped 1 stick of butter 1 carton fresh sliced mushrooms (or medium sized can of sliced mushrooms, drained) 2 cans beef consommĂŠ

Start by preheating your oven 300 degrees. Melt that stick of butter in a large pan over medium heat until brown and nutty scented. Once the butter is melted, add your chopped onions and rice. Saute the rice and onions until the former is toasted and the latter are translucent. Next, stir in your mushrooms. Cook them for five minutes. Transfer your mix of rice, onions, and mushrooms to a large, pre-greased casserole dish. Pour the beef consomme over the rice, onions, and mushrooms. Pop the dish in the oven and cook. One hour if you cover it up, thirty minutes if you don’t. The dish is finished when all the liquid has been absorbed by the rice. Serve warm and enjoy.

JUNE 2020 MONTH 20XX | ALBUQUERQUE | ALBUQUERQUE THE THE MAGAZINE MAGAZINE

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BITES

OUR EATS ALUMNI, CONDENSED INTO PERFECTLY SIZED SNACKS TO TAKE WITH YOU ON THE GO

POLICY:

“Bites” is a guide to Albuquerque-area eating establishments compiled by Albuquerque The Magazine’s editorial staff. These restaurants have been featured previously in the “Eats” department of the magazine. Restaurants may or may not accept reservations or major credit cards, so call before visiting.

AL’S BIG DIPPER

CORRECTIONS:

Please send corrections and suggestions to bites@abqthemag.com.

5 STAR BURGERS

$

5901 Wyoming Blvd. NE, 821-1909, 5starburgers.com From bison, salmon, turkey and crab to lamb, chicken and Black Angus beef, burger addicts will love Five Star’s 100 percent natural meat. Handformed patties or vegetarian options paired with wine from St. Clair Winery or beer from Marble Brewery are a match made in heaven.

66 DINER

$$

1405 Central Ave. NE, 247-1421, 66diner.com This blast from the past specializes in burgers, chicken fried steak, liver and onions, and blue-plate specials, including the Pile Up: a mound of pan-fried potatoes, chopped bacon, green chile, two eggs, cheddar cheese, and red or green chile sauce on top.

ABC CAKE SHOP

$$

1830 San Pedro Drive NE, 255-5080, abccakeshop.com Specializing in custom cakes and cakes for all occasions, this bakery focuses on freshness and flavor. Everything is made from scratch, including the cupcakes, cookies, pies, Danishes, pastries, and other desserts.

THE ACRE

$$

4410 Wyoming Blvd NE, 299-6973, theacrerestaurant.com The Acre Restaurant specializes in comfort vegetarian cuisine with a goal to challenge meateaters and question what vegetarian food is, all while creating healthy, sustainable dishes.

ABUELITA’S NEW MEXICAN KITCHEN $

6083 Isleta Blvd. SW, 877-5700 Kathy Martinez’s brother, Chris Romero, opened Abuelita’s New Mexican Kitchen in Bernalillo 26 years ago. Since then, nothing has changed. The Huevos Rancheros are a best seller, as is the Kitchen’s signature dish, the Tacopilla.

AJIACO COLOMBIAN BISTRO

$$

3216 Silver Ave. SE, 266-2305, ajiacobistro.com Inside the intimate space, you’ll find combination plates, arroz con pollo, arepas, plantains, and of course, a great cup of Colombian coffee. The dishes at Ajiaco combine indigenous Colombian, Spanish, African, and Arab flavors for a truly thrilling experience.

ALQUDS MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & GROCERY

$

5555 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 888-2921 Owner Mohamad Abdel Jalil and his sons run this all-in-one operation—a small grocery store and Middle East restaurant—seven days a week. This family team makes fresh pita bread every day and serves platefuls of their delicious hummus. It’s a great spot for lunch on-the-go.

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$

ANNAPURNA’S WORLD VEGETARIAN CAFÉ

$

ALDO’S NEW YORK STYLE PIZZERIA $

ANNIE’S SOUP KITCHEN

$

ALICEA’S NY BAGELS & SUBS

ANTIQUITY RESTAURANT

501 Copper Ave. NW, 314-1118, alsbigdipper.com From the beginning, Al’s Big Dipper has been a family affair. Every sandwich is named after a family member, and the owners test every soup they make. Try the 505 Lunch Deal—a cup of soup, a grilled cheese sandwich and a homemade cookie for only $5.05. Two Locations, aldosalbuquerque.com With handmade lasagna and pizza dough, among other items, Aldo’s New York Style Pizzeria shares family recipes with its customers. From the buttermilk ranch dressing to the Eggplant and Chicken Parmigianas, homemade cooking is not too far away.

$

1009 Golf Course Road SE, Suite 103, 896-4555 This East Coast–style deli on ABQ’s Westside is serving up 20 different sandwiches to Rio Rancho’s hungriest diners, using fresh-baked New York–style bagels and meats prepared in house for the likes of its Philly Steak and Cheese or the Cuban. Come hungry, because Alicea’s portions are not for the faint of heart. Can’t get out? Delivery options in Rio Rancho and parts of ABQ are also available when that hunger pang strikes.

AMADEO’S PIZZA AND SUBS

$

AMERASIA/SUMO SUSHI

$

Three locations, amadeospizza.com This family-run pizza place believes that there truly are a million different ways to make a pizza. Using fresh, high quality ingredients, they specialize in pizzas, subs, pasta, and fresh salads. 800 3rd St. NW, 247.1619 / 246-1615 amerasia-sumosushi.net Dim sum—which means “small piece of your heart” in Chinese—takes on a bigger meaning at AmerAsia, where everything is made from scratch daily. Try the fried beef and garlic dumplings, pork and ginger potstickers, or scallion pancakes.

Various locations, chaishoppe.com Annapurna offers some of the most enlightened, health-conscious vegetarian and vegan plates in the city, with plenty of options for people suffering from food allergies or Celiac disease. And the menu is world-class, with options from virtually every continent. 3107 Eubank Blvd. NE, 296-8601, anniessoupkitchen.com With four homemade soups made fresh every day, and home-style favorites such as avocado and bacon omelets and piles of potatoes topped with melted cheese, chile and eggs, Annie’s specializes in comfort.

$$$$

112 Romero St. NW, 247-3545, antiquityrestaurant.com Antiquity Restaurant is located just off historic Old Town Plaza. Antiquity holds the distinction of being the only restaurant in Albuquerque to serve the Henry IV—a bacon-wrapped filet mignon placed on a bed of artichoke leaves, topped with an artichoke heart and covered with béarnaise sauce.

ARTICHOKE CAFÉ

$$$

424 Central Ave. SE, 243-0200, artichokecafe.com This EDo fine-dining spot boasts a Wine Spectator “Award of Excellence,” and for good reason. A veteran of the Duke City’s fine dining scene, Artichoke Café remains the best bet for a great evening out. Innovative dishes and European aperitifs served by staff that takes ownership of the experience, the location is also an ideal launchpad for downtown adventures.

ASIAN NOODLE BAR

$$

Two locations, amoreabq.com After relocating to Albuquerque from Naples, Italy, Gabriel and Kimberly Amador missed Neapolitan pizza. The husband and wife team, certified by the Association of Neapolitan Pizzaiuoli (APN), opened Amore, bringing a slice of Italy to Albuquerque. A Neapolitan brick oven fires delicious pizzas, such as the Margherita and the Zia, for 60 to 90 seconds at 905 degrees Fahrenheit. Local beer and wine compliment the pies perfectly.

AZUMA SUSHI & TEPPAN

$$

ANATOLIA TURKISH MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

B2B BISTRONOMY

AMORE NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA

$$

$

2132 Central Ave SE Suite C, 242-6718 The specialty is the Doner Kebab, seasoned meat in the shape of an inverted cone, slow-cooked to perfection rotisserie style, and always freshly prepared. Whether you choose the Adana Spicy Ground Lamb or the ‘Burque Kebab, try the “baklove-ah” for dessert.

AN HY QUAN VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT

$$

1450 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, 332-8565 This vegetarian Vietnamese spot is also veganfriendly. Pho fans don’t fret; Thai and wonton soup will satisfy any meat eater.

318 Central Ave. SW, 224-9119, asiannoodlebar.com Every kind of noodle awaits at this Downtown eatery, from spicy sesame udon noodles to chicken pho with cilantro, jalapeños, and lime. Slurping has never been so tasty. Two locations, azuma-sushi-teppan-abq.com From flame-flipped teppan grill items to a substantial sushi selection, the menus at Azuma Sushi & Teppan have something for everyone. The green chile-infused New Mexico Roll and Filet Mignon Steak please palates daily and are perfect when washed down with an imported Japanese sake, soda, or beer.

$

3118 Central Ave. SE, 262-2222, bistronomyb2b.com Highlighting all-local ingredients (including New Mexico beef and Hatch green chile), B2B serves up a wide variety of tasty burgers—including plenty of veggie options.

BACKSTREET GRILL

$$

1919 Old Town Road NW, 842-5434, backstreetgrillot.com/home Originally a test outlet for local palates in a tourist mecca (Old Town), word spread fast about the Baja-inspired tacos and creative New Mexicanpeppered dishes (check out the gumbo). This locale is expansive, great for families, and the patio hosts music and dancing on weekends.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


BITES CHEF JONATHAN PERNO BACON JAM

$

BARELAS COFFEE HOUSE

$

Chef of Los Poblanos’ Campo 4803 Rio Grande Blvd NW 344-9297, lospoblanos.com

2930 Candelaria Rd NE 916-0864, baconjamrestaurant.com A bacon-inspired 50s diner, Bacon Jam has a menu packed with both classic diner fare and bold, innovative takes on traditional staples—often, as the name implies, with bacon playing a pivotal supporting role. 1502 4th St. SW, 843-7577 This legendary neighborhood restaurant serves New Mexican dishes from the Gonzales family cookbook: menudo, posole, chicharrone burritos, huevos rancheros, all smothered with its famous red or green chile.

THE BARLEY ROOM

$$

PHOTO COURTESY OFCHEF DANIEL JOHN

5200 Eubank Blvd. NE, 332-0800, barleyroom.com All sorts of mouth-watering pub fare come to life here, from potato skins to mini shrimp cocktails. Check the menu for food and drink specials aplenty.

BASIL LEAF VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT $$

1225 Eubank Blvd. NE, 323-2594, basilleaf.us Sure, Albuquerque offers a variety of Vietnamese eateries, but Basil Leaf elevates the everyday with healthy and fragrant versions of traditional noodle and soup selections. They’ll even modify for any dietary desire. Celiacs and vegans, rejoice!

BEN MICHAEL’S RESTAURANT

$$

2404 Pueblo Bonito Court NW, 267-6827 The food at Ben Michael’s is fresh, preservative-free and takes its roots from the owner’s family’s New Mexican recipes. Try the salmon or the steak served with a side of calabacitas, papas, and sautéed mushrooms.

BENNY’S MEXICAN KITCHEN

$

BLACK BIRD SALOON

$

BLACK MESA COFFEE COMPANY

$

1675 Bosque Farms Blvd., Bosque Farms, 869-2210 Since 1972, Benny’s has obliged countless stomachs with delicious New Mexican treats, which include red-chile smothered enchiladas and deep-fried burritos. Don’t let the Benny Burger—a doublemeat, double-cheese beauty—intimidate you. And, don’t forget to save room for that vanilla ice-cream shake. 28 Main St., Los Cerrillos, NM 438-1821, blackbirdsaloon.com Black Bird Saloon is not just a popular Northern New Mexico eatery (located in Cerillos, NM), it’s also a time warp back through the building’s long and varied history. Items like the Miner’s Hand Warmer Breakfast Burrito or the Tumbleweed Salad stick out like a turquoise on a tourist. Albuquerque International Sunport, 220 Sunport Blvd. SE, 842-4305, With two Sunport locations, flight delays are easier when you’re close to Black Mesa. The house coffee and vanilla latte are sure to perk you up pre-flight. The made-to-order turkey sandwich will fill you up far more reliably than the bag of pretzels you’ll get on the plane. Baked goods, including the popular banana bread, are made in-house daily. Five menu items, including brownies and cookies, are glutenfree.

For 2020, the James Beard Awards have once again reached the Duke City, with Los Poblanos’ Campo Chef Jonathan Perno in the running as a finalist for Best Chef in the Southwest. Chef Perno joins the ranks of five other chefs working in southwestern cities like Las Vegas, Nevada and Phoenix, Arizona. Designed to recognize excellence throughout the world of culinary arts, the James Beard Awards are distributed annually by the James Beard Foundation, a non-profit named in honor of the renowned Chef James Beard. Like any other culinary outfit that has managed to maintain a toehold on operations during the COVID-19 lockdown, Campo has had to alter its approach a bit. But through it all, Chef Perno and his team have strived to steer consistently toward the distinctive culinary style that has come to define the restaurant. A mix of Mexican, Native American, New Mexican, and Spanish approaches to food and cooking, Chef Perno’s food is designed to capture flavors that recall the Rio Grande Valley’s agricultural heritage. The trick is blending a mix of inspirations—both global and local in flavor—with ingredients drawn from regional suppliers. A native New Mexican, Chef Perno has been honing his craft at Los Pobla-

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

nos for more than 10 years, developing his unique and innovative approach to cooking, something he has aptly dubbed “Rio Grande Valley Cuisine.” Lately, Chef Perno and his crew have been putting their talents to work piecing together family-style meals, like lavender braised lamb shoulder paired with mixed green salad and artisanal homemade bread, available for curbside pickup 4pm to 6pm, Wednesday through Sunday. That means you can still experience Campo’s signature cuisine—the chief difference being you’ll enjoy the meal in the comfort of your own home, absent the rural charms of a table in Los Ranchos. Just remember: these meals take time, so be sure to place your order a day in advance of pickup. Over the course of his career, Jonathan Perno has clocked six stints as a James Beard award semi-finalist. Due to be handed out in early May, the 2020 James Beard Awards have been postponed in response to COVID-19. That means we’re going to have to wait a bit to find out whether or not he takes home the top prize this year. For now, a new date for the ceremony is still up in the air—keep an eye on the James Beard Foundation website, jamesbeard.org, for updates.

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BITES BLADES’ BISTRO

$$$

221 NM Highway 165, Suite L, Placitas, 771-0695, bladesbistro.com Owner and chef Kevin Bladergroen’s restaurant offers a culinary journey from his 30-plus years of experience in restaurants across the country and Europe, serving up steak and seafood with a twist.

BLAKE’S LOTABURGER

$

BOCADILLOS $

200 Lomas Blvd. NW, Suite 110, 243-3995, bocadillos505.com Slow-roasted meats are the highlight of the Food Network “Chopped” winner, Marie Yniguez. Open for breakfast, lunch, or dinner on Wednesdays– Saturdays, pop in for a burrito or sandwich filled to the brim with pork, chicken, turkey or corned beef.

Various locations, lotaburger.com Blake’s became an Albuquerque establishment more than 30 years ago, and almost immediately garnered kudos for its out-of-this-world green chile cheeseburgers (the restaurant has since scored spots on National Geographic’s “top hamburgers in the nation” list and Albuquerque The Magazine’s Best of the City list). Everything is made from scratch as soon as it’s ordered—and not a second before.

BOSQUE BREWING CO.

BLEU CAFÉ

$

BRICKYARD PIZZA

BLUE GRASSHOPPER

$

BRIXENS $$$

At Del Norte Sports and Wellness, 7120 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Suite 8B This in-gym café offers fresh food from scratch— paninis, burgers, wraps, burritos, protein shakes–to both gym-goers and the general public. Healthy and tasty? Check! Two locations, bluegrasshopper.freesite.website Somewhere along the craft brew evolutionary line, beer snobs were born and hipsters took over. Not so at Blue Grasshopper. The pours are indeed solid, but the ambiance is better: welcoming, warm, and loaded with live music virtually every night of the week. Great pub food, too.

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$

Various locations, bosquebrewing.com Another favorite on the ever-growing ABQ brewery scene, Bosque Brewing Co. is the product of three NMSU grads’ love for brew. With 10-12 of Bosque’s own sudsy creations on tap every day, the brewery is teeming with options to pair with seasoned fries, daily specials, or an array of other appetizers, soups, salads, and sandwiches.

$$

2216 Central Ave. SE, 262-2216, brickyardpizza.com Three very important pizza points rule supreme here: quantity, quality, and value. Enjoy handtossed, homemade pizza with fresh sauce in a spicand-span, laid-back atmosphere. 400 Central Ave. SW 242-2400, brixens.com A creative spin on American bar fare inspired by New Mexican culture, the restaurant serves 99 bottles of beer, literally on the wall, and a range of food items. Brixens has many unique qualities, but a couple notable qualities include their all-day happy hour on Sundays and 3-6pm daily.

BUDAI GOURMET CHINESE

$$

6300 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Suite H-1, 797-7898, budaigourmet.com The menu features specialties from different regions of China and Taiwan, all painstakingly prepared by chef Hsia Fang. The Crispy Flounder Filet is sure to please diners from both the East and the West. The Mini Steamed Pork Buns shouldn’t be missed.

BURGER BOY

$

THE BURRITO LADY

$

12023 New Mexico 14, Cedar Crest, 281-3949, burgerboynm.com Everything in this tried-and-true staple is made from scratch: enchiladas, breakfast burritos, tacos and burgers (of course!). Fans are especially enamored with the green chile cheeseburger. 938 Eubank Blvd. NE, 271-2268 The Burrito Lady—otherwise known as Consuelo Flores—cooks every one of her huge burritos herself, made-to-order. That means you should be prepared to wait (the line here can often go out the door). It’s worth it—ask for your burrito smothered if you want to really heat things up.

CAFE 6855

$$

6855 4th St NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque 890-9150, cafe6855.com A sister restaurant to Vernon’s Speakeasy, Café 6855 has gourmet dishes, expertly prepared and served in an elegant atmosphere. The menu is populated with gourmet sandwiches, salads, and cafe specialties that redeploy Vernon’s ingredients to thrilling effect.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


BITES CAFÉ BELLA COFFEE

$

2115 Golf Course Road SE, Rio Rancho 306-6974, cafebellacoffee.com With made-to-order panini and tasty salads filled with the freshest seasonal ingredients, this restaurant’s farm-to-table concept is a smart—and delicious—one.

CAFÉ CUBANO

$$

At Laru Ni Hati Salon, 3413 Central Ave. NE, 255-1575, larunihati.com Who would guess that an upscale hair salon such as Laru Ni Hati would also be home to delicious Cuban food—platanos, Cuban sandwiches, dirty rice, and even espresso and hand-rolled cigars?

CAFÉ LAUREL

$$

1433 Central Ave. NW, 259-2331, cafe-laurel.weebly.com The casual American café, open for breakfast and lunch, serves soups, sandwiches, burgers, salads, New Mexican favorites, and breakfast items in a bright airy atmosphere complete with local beers on tap. Peruse the daily selection of sweets and the full coffee bar for dessert (or breakfast).

CAFÉ LUSH

$

700 Tijeras Ave. NW, 508-0164, cafelushabq.com Located on a quiet neighborhood corner, this café is perfect for a nice brunch or lunch and your wallet will not be hurt after your visit. The menu is glutenconscious, vegetarian-friendly and has some of the best gluten-free red chile in town.

LA BAREN RESTAURANT

$

CAKE FETISH

$

230 Louisiana Blvd. SE Suite A, 232-6764, labarenrestaurant.com The pho and spring rolls have a die-hard following of Kirtland Airforce Base employees. Located across the parking lot from Talin Market, experience an extensive menu of traditional Vietnamese cuisine inside this dine-in and takeout eatery. 2665 Louisiana Blvd. NE, 883-0670, cakefetish.com Cake Fetish specializes in baker’s cups filled with heaven, such as the Sleepless in Albuquerque (chocolate cake with mocha French buttercream frosting) and the Inside-Out German Chocolate Cake (coconut and pecans and crowned with chocolate French buttercream).

CAMPO AT LOS POBLANOS

$$$

4803 Rio Grande Blvd NW 344-9297, lospoblanos.com Beautifully situated in the heart of Los Ranchos, Campo is the newly renovated and reimagined fine dining establishment at Los Poblanos. A top-of-theline menu mixes with fresh ingredients from the Los Poblanos Farm and a quiet, rustic atmosphere to make for one of the city’s best dining experiences.

CANVAS ARTISTRY

$$

3120 Central Ave. SE, 639-5214, canvas-artistry.com Specializing in international street food with a local twist, expect seasonally rotating artsy fare made with local produce, daily and weekly specials, and art to boot. A great late-night spot with live spinning DJs featuring different genres each night.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

CASA DE BENAVIDEZ

$$

CASA TACO

$$

8032 4th St. NW, 898-3311, casadebenavidez.com One of the original New Mexican eateries in the North Valley, this expansive property boasts a lush patio, fabled margaritas and authentic eats, including a trademark on the sopaipilla burger. 2 locations casa-taco.com Both Casa Taco locations offer a window into owner John Pecherski’s signature take on the U.S. Southwest—a strange place where you could picture a classic John Wayne character lingering over a plate of Jamaican jerk chicken and Yucatan pork tacos. Casa Taco defies expectations.

CECILIA’S CAFÉ

$

CENTRAL GRILL & COFFEE HOUSE

$

230 6th St. SW,243-7070 Recognized on the Food Network’s “Diners, DriveIns & Dives,” and ranked No. 45 on the Travel Channel’s “101 Tastiest Places to Chow Down,” Cecilia’s Café offers tasty New Mexican treats, such as their Fireman’s Burrito or homemade chicharrones in a cozy atmosphere. 2056 Central Ave. SW, 554-1424, centralgrillandcoffeehouse.com This local favorite on Route 66, adjacent to Old Town, offers a bevy of breakfast and lunch options that will comfort your belly and your wallet. Here, you’ll find traditional New Mexican favorites, serious sammies, and solid caffeine with a staff famous for their classic Southwestern hospitality.

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BITES CERVANTES NEW MEXICAN RESTAURANT $$

CHEF J MARTIN TORREZ

5801 Gibson Blvd. SE, 262-2253, cervantesabq.com Old-world style meets traditional New Mexican fare at this family-owned restaurant. Go for the madefrom-scratch chile rellenos, tamales, and carne adovada.

CESAR’S MEXICAN & GREEK

$

CHEBA HUT

$

Executive Chef at Artichoke Café 424 Central Ave SE 243-0200, artichokecafe.com

5300 Lomas Blvd. NE, 256-8017, cesarsmexicanandgreek.com Both the drive-thru and the dining room at Cesar’s are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. On the Mexican menu, try the No. 15, a chile rellenos plate. Popular Greek items include the No. 64 Gyros sandwich and the No. 78 Chicken pita sandwich. Two locations, chebahut.com Located next to UNM, Cheba Hut serves up toasted subs made from quality ingredients. Try sandwiches loaded with everything from guacamole, olives, mushrooms, cheeses, meats and much more.

CHEESE AND COFFEE

$$

CHEZ AXEL

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

Two locations, cheeseandcoffee.com There’s more than just cheese and coffee here— think homemade soups, sandwiches, salads and specials. At lunch, the line often goes out the door, so it’s worth getting there early.

$$$

6209 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 881-8104, chezaxelrestaurant.com At Chez Axel, classical music is played at dinner Tuesday through Saturday, and the food has a decidedly French twist: cassoulet, trout amandine, chocolate mousse, and authentic French onion soup. Reservations are recommended.

CHOCGLITZ & CREAM

$

CHRISTY MAE’S RESTAURANT

$

10660 Unser Blvd. NW, 898-4589, chocglitzandcream.com Certified fair-trade chocolate and a chocolatier with 45 years of experience means you’ll find some of the best sweet-tooth satisfying offerings (including ice cream flavors such as raspberry red chile and Mexican coffee). 1400 San Pedro Drive NE, 255-4740, christymaes.com “Hearty” and “homestyle” are the key words here, a hands-down favorite of early-dinner lovers. Oldfashioned staples are the standards, so look for chicken salad, potpies, country-fried steak with homemade mashed potatoes, and beef stew.

CHURCH STREET CAFÉ

$$

2111 Church St. NW, 247-8522, churchstreetcafe.com Calling the oldest residence in Albuquerque its home, this café serves up favorites ranging from natillas to margaritas. They also sell their own bottled salsa and cookbooks with recipes from the restaurant.

CINNAMON SUGAR & SPICE CAFÉ

$

COCINA AZUL

$

Two locations, cinnamoncafeabq.com Featuring breakfast and lunch options, endless baked goodies, friendly staff and regular cooking classes, this place puts the “everything nice” in the well-worn phrase. Three locations, cocinaazul.com The newest location of the Old Town favorite serves up the same tried and true home-cooked recipes you’ve come to love. Don’t miss location specific specials and local brews amid New Mexican staples.

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Being back in the kitchen seems a little surreal for J Martin Torrez, the Executive Chef at Artichoke Café. After closing in mid-March due to the coronavirus, the fine dining spot in East Downtown reopened recently with curbside service for its menu of prime steaks and decadent desserts. “Opening back up was a little hard at first, because I’ve never been off for more than a week since I started working in kitchens 15 years ago,” says Torrez, 33. “It’s been a big transition.” The biggest challenge, he says, was keeping the integrity of the dishes after they travelled from restaurant to home. Knowing that guests are used to items coming straight from the kitchen, Torrez came up with a plan: the entrées come with instructions for a little final prep at home. “For example, we prepare our New York Strip Steak in such a way that you can take it home, and finish it in your oven at 400 degrees for 5-10

minutes,” he says. Other side dishes require similar finishing touches, and even desserts like the Giant Fudge Brownie are sent home with last-minute instructions. “You top it with chocolate chips and caramel, put it in the oven for a few minutes, and it becomes warm and gooey, just like when you eat it here,” says Torrez. The other side of being back at work that has Torrez smiling is the reuniting with co-workers. For now, a portion of the staff has been brought back to work. During the closure, Torrez says he was urged to make some phone calls by Artichoke’s longtime owners, Pat and Terry Keene. “They asked me to call each of the employees, and to keep checking on them, to make sure they’re okay,” says Torrez, who worked at Artichoke from 2007 to 2010, before coming back again last year. “Pat and Terry really care about the members of our team.” WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


BITES CODA BAKERY

$

230 Louisiana Blvd. SE Suite C, 232-0085 Wrap your hands around one of Coda Bakery’s unique, Vietnamese-inspired sandwiches. Beyond its popular lineup of sammies, Coda Bakery also puts a distinctive twist on Vietnamese street food, using from-scratch recipes, including the bread, its deli meats, and its desserts.

CONCHITA’S CAFÉ

$

400 Gold Ave. SW, Suite 119, 339-6774, conchitascafe.com What began as the food truck, Conchita’s Creations became a downtown café with breakfast, sandwiches, and salads. New Mexican favorites shine here, just like abuela made them—including tacos, Frito pie, and burritos.

CORN MAIDEN

CURRY LEAF

$

6910-C Montgomery Blvd NE 881-3663, curryleafrestaurant.us Curry Leaf is the only restaurant in New Mexico to offer both North and South India cuisine. This means that, while you can get familiar favorites like tandoori chicken, you can also explore the world of chicken chettinad and dosas—a type of crepe made with fermented lentil and rice flour, filled with stuffing like potato, spiced vegetables, or ground lamb.

THE DAILY GRIND

$

4360a Cutler Ave. NE, 883-8310, dailygrindabq.net This family-friendly restaurant serves breakfast and lunch, including huevos rancheros and a huge assortment of baked goods. On Friday and

Saturday, look for spontaneous specials, such as stuffed French toast or steak and eggs.

DELICIAS CAFÉ

$

DG’S DELI

$

6001 San Mateo Blvd. NE, 830-6561 Named after the city in Chihuahua, Mexico, Delicias delivers traditional fare of the region, like caldo de res (beef stew), gorditas, carnitas, flautas, and horchata. 1418 Dr Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. NE, 247-3354, dgsdeli.com With 31 cold sandwich options and a wide variety of grilled hot sandwiches—ranging in size from mini to jumbo—there’s something for everyone here. Try the Green Chile Philly or the Lobo Club.

$$$

1300 Tuyuna Trail, Santa Ana Pueblo, 771-6060, tamaya.hyatt.com For a special dinner or celebration, look no further. Boasting a view of the Sandia Mountains, this restaurant will leave you breathless as you enjoy three-course meals with sweet potato granny smith apple soup, lavender salted shrimp or the classic crème brulee.

CORRALES BISTRO BREWERY

$

4908 Corrales Road NW, Corrales, 897-1036, cbbistro.com Brews from all over the region make this Corrales bistro a must-visit for the affordable fare, killer atmosphere, and music seven days a week.

THE COUNTY LINE BBQ

$$

CRACKIN’ CRAB

$$

9600 Tramway Blvd. NE, 856-7477, countyline.com It doesn’t take long for the barbecue to arrive at your dinner table, whether it’s wood-burning oven cooked and slow-roasted brisket, ribs, or sausage. Throw in the Rib King Platter, green-chile stuffed pork loin, live music, and two stepping, and at The County Line, everybody wins. Three locations, crackincrababq.com Their headline seafood boils are super customizable, allowing you to choose from a trio of house combinations or mix and match your own selection of crab, lobster, mussels, scallops, clams, or shrimp by the pound.

CRAVIN’ COOKIES AND MORE

BEST CHICKEN WINGS 2 YEARS IN A ROW

$

10420 4th St. NW, 298-2597, cravincookiesandmore.com Serving up specialty cookies, muffins, breads, pies, and pretty much any dessert you can dream of, Cravin’ Cookies and More offers dine-in and to go orders to satisfy any sweet tooth, with coffee and hot tea to match.

CRAZY FISH SUSHI BAR AND RESTAURANT

$$

3015 Central Ave. NE, 232-3474, crazyfishabq.com Tasty, fresh sushi and sashimi await you in this sleek Central Avenue restaurant, along with kitchenmade favorites such as tempura and crispy chicken.

THE CROWN ROOM

$$$$

145 Louisiana Blvd. NE, 767-7171, abqdowns.com/crown-room Perhaps Albuquerque’s best-kept fine dining secret, this gem is tucked away in the newly remodeled Downs Casino. With an incredible selection of liquors and wines, gourmet dishes, tableside Bananas Foster, and Dom Pérignon palate cleansers, this special occasion hideout is hard to beat, anywhere in the 505.

2003 Southern Blvd. SE, Suite 139 | Rio Rancho

5 0 5.994 .0363 | SLA TESTREETBILLIA RDS. C O M JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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CHEF DAVID RUIZ

Guest Chef at Zendo Coffee 413 2nd St. SW 926-1636, zendocoffee.com

D.H. LESCOMBES WINERY & BISTRO $$

901 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, 243-9916, lescombeswinery.com With generations of experience in winemaking coursing through this North Valley staple’s doors, D.H. Lescombes Winery & Bistro specializes in pairing wine with its expertly crafted and entirely house-made menu, with a local twist. Themed events and giving back to its community are big parts of this eatery’s success, not to mention popular dishes such as its Chicken Picado, Mac and Cheese Bites, and Ghirardelli Port Brownie.

DION’S $

Various locations, dionspizza.com Launched in 1978, Dion’s aims to keep your wallet and tummy full with build-your-own pizzas, gourmet pizzas, slices, salads, and subs. The ranch and Greek dressings are homemade from secret recipes, and everything on the menu is tried and true.

DOG HOUSE DRIVE IN

$

DONUT MART

$

1216 Central Ave. SW, 243-1019 An ABQ landmark since the 1940s, the eat-inyour-car Dog House serves grilled footlongs and halflongs topped with red chile, cheese, onions, and more. Enjoy your dog with a side of chili-cheese fries and a thick shake. Various locations, donutmartusa.com Multiple locations sprinkled around town means a donut lover can always get a sweet fix. Find apple strudels, piñon coffee, green chile bialys, croissants, muffins, and even a Peanut Butter and Jelly donut.

DOWN N DIRTY SEAFOOD BOIL

$$

6100 4th Street NW, 345-0595 Southern transplants who make their way to ABQ have a new spot for traditional seafood boil. From dry rub to a spicy, buttery fusion sauce, your tastebuds will dance with delight when you feast on this eatery’s collection of crawfish, rock shrimp, crab legs, and more.

DUGGAN’S $

227 Lead Ave. SE, 312-7257, dugganscoffeeshop.com This breakfast and lunch spot serves up newsthemed entrees like the Journalist Salad and Fact Checker Green Chile Chicken Soup in an intimate setting. Cups are filled with locally roasted Trifecta coffee.

DURAN’S CENTRAL PHARMACY

David Ruiz is big on collaboration. So, it’s no wonder that the local chef’s recent partnership with Zendo Coffee to serve curbside gourmet brunch has been a hit. “We put out a menu on social media, and people can pre-order or order when they arrive,” says Ruiz. “We’ve been lucky, we’ve sold out of everything on both days we did it.” The brunch is set for a third go-round on June 20 (it’s target is the third Saturday of each month), and based on the decadent menu, is destined to sell out again. Items like the Breakfast Brioche with fresh blackberries and toasted pecans; the Cinnamon Sticky Bun, topped with freshly chopped pistachios; and the Soyrizo Tacos, a meatless breakfast taco with eggs and fresh chile. The unique pop-up concept came about through Ruiz’ friendship with Zendo owner Pilar Westell. The two came up with the idea

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after discussing the need for a breakfast option in these pandemic times of takeout food. “It works out great, people order Zendo’s coffee and the brunch both to-go,” says Ruiz, who is such a fixture at the downtown coffee shop that his son, Memphis, refuses to drink any chocolate milk other than Zendo’s. Since his days as Executive Chef at Pueblo Harvest Café in the North Valley, Ruiz has been part of the team building a new restaurant at Paako Ridge Golf Course. That venture is moving forward, though with slight delays brought on by the coronavirus. He is also opening a novel concept eatery downtown, known as Curious Toast Café, where everything is a topping on toast of all varieties. The restaurant was on track to open this year, but Ruiz has instead pushed its debut back to 2021, again due to the setbacks from the pandemic.

$$

1815 Central Ave. NW, 247-4141, duransrx.com Where in the city can you get amazing huevos, kitschy printed dish towels, an emergency rubber chicken in a box, and a flu shot? There is only one answer, Duran’s Central Pharmacy.

EAST OCEAN CHINESE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT $$

3601 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 889-9315, eastoceanalbq.com East Ocean Chinese Seafood Restaurant was the first of its kind in Albuquerque. Most dishes are served family style and are made fresh to order. Those looking for traditional Chinese dishes should try the Roast Duck. Seafood eaters will enjoy the Honey Crispy Walnut Shrimp.

EL BRUNO’S RESTAURANTE Y CANTINA

$$

8806 4th St. NW, 897-0444, elbrunos.com El Bruno’s got its start in Cuba, NM, in 1975. At the Albuquerque location, the tried-and-true family recipes are still the focus of the menu. The Ceviche, Pollo Adovo, and the Deep Fried Spinach are a few items guests can look forward to.

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BITES

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BITES EL CAMINO DINING ROOM

$

EL PINTO

EL COTORRO

$

EL SABOR DE JUAREZ

EL PATIO DE ALBUQUERQUE

$

6800 4th St NW, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, 344-0448 Those with a bottomless appetite might meet their match with any of El Camino’s breakfast burrito options. These plate-sized behemoths are filled with eggs, hashbrowns or home-fries, and your choice of meat, then smothered in red or green chile. 111 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 503-6202, elcotorroabq.com Made to order gourmet tacos are on full display among classic Mexican street food like elotes and ceviche. A full salsa bar lets you spice up your meat, fish, vegetarian, or vegan tacos. Taco Tuesdays feature $2 tacos and bottled Mexican beers. 142 Harvard Drive SE, 268-4245, elpatioabq.com A UNM favorite since 1977, this family-owned restaurant uses local ingredients and makes everything fresh daily in small batches. The #10 Green Chicken Enchiladas have won rave reviews for years, as have the tasty salsa and pillow-soft sopaipillas.

EL PATRON

$$

Two locations, elpatronabq.com A customer favorite, El Patron’s menu includes dishes such as mouthwatering tacos, enchiladas, chile rellenos, and housemade chips. Wash them down with a tasty margarita.

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$$$

10500 4th St. NW, 898-1771, elpinto.com Food and atmosphere go hand-in-hand at this Duke City staple, ensuring an unforgettable experience. Enjoy fresh salsa, enchiladas, burritos, carne adovada, and many more New Mexican dishes while sipping a margarita on one of the many beautiful patios. Reservations are recommended.

$

3527 Gibson Blvd. SE, 265-3338 Its name means “the flavor of Juarez,” and since 1980, this restaurant has served just that. Try the family recipes for menudo and carne desebrada (shredded roast beef sautéed with jalapeño, tomato, and onions).

EL SARAPE

$$

Two locations, elsarapeabq.com Specializing in authentic food from all regions of Mexico, you can count on dishes such as nopalitos (cactus sautéed with onions, tomatoes, and garlic), fresh salsa, burritos, chile rellenos, and seafood specials with shrimp, oysters, calamari, and fish.

ELOY’S NEW MEXICAN RESTAURANT $

1508 Wyoming Blvd. NE, 293-6018 Opening 36 years ago, Eloy’s New Mexican Restaurant’s claim to fame is their consistent food and service, offering the same recipes that made them famous all those years ago. Try the No. 1 Eloy’s Deluxe Dinner, with a little bit of everything.

EMBER’S STEAK & SEAFOOD

$$$

11000 Broadway Blvd. SE 244-8288, isleta.com Whether you are dining inside or al fresco on the rooftop patio, Ember’s boasts some of Albuquerque’s most beautiful 180-degree views of the Bosque, making for the perfect setting to catch the sunset next to the warmth of the glowing fire pits.

FANO BREAD COMPANY

$

4605 McLeod Road NE, 884-5555, fanobread.com For more than 16 years, Fano has made the freshest bread in the city. Whether it’s the rustic loaf, the green chile cheese bread or raisin cinnamon bread, you’ll think you’re touring the streets of Italy with each bite.

FAN TANG

$$

FAREAST FUZION SUSHI BAR & LOUNGE

$$

3523 Central Ave. NE, 266-3566, fan-tang.com With authentic family recipes that include coffee chicken (rubbed in Satellite coffee, then stir-fried with flavorful sauce) and creative additions like soul dumplings (made with tofu, kimchi, and cashew pesto), this spot is sure to satisfy.

5901 Central Ave. NE, 255-2910 The sushi is served aplenty, but those who shy from raw fish can flirt with some Thai or Chinese cuisine. This might be one of the only places where a “Heart-Attack”—a sushi roll with deep-fried spicy tuna, jalapeños, mushrooms, and cream cheese—is a good thing.

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BITES FARINA ALTO PIZZERIA & WINE BAR $$

10721 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 298-0035, farinaalto.com The Northeast Heights version of Farina offers the same urban atmosphere as the East Downtown (EDo) Farina, minus the elbow-to-elbow seating. Alto offers every pizza on the EDo menu, such as the Formaggio di Capra and the Carne, but includes unique dishes—Eggplant Parmesan Napoleon and Oven-Roasted Chicken Wings. Alto’s wine room is stocked with more than 300 bottles of wine.

FARINA PIZZERIA

$$

510 Central Ave. SE, 243-0130, farinapizzeria.com Whether you like yours bianco or covered in carne, you’ll get a pie cooked to perfection at this relaxedbut-hip urban eatery.

FARM & TABLE

$$$

FIESTA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT AND CANTINA

$

FORQUE KITCHEN AND BAR

$$

4400 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 881-0478 Fiesta’s Restaurant & Cantina has been familyowned and operated since 1986, making it an Albuquerque go-to for quality New Mexican cuisine. With its family dining area, outdoor patio, lively bar and banquet room, Fiesta’s has something for everyone.

330 Tijeras Ave. NW, 842-1234, albuquerque.hyatt.com Forque’s multi-level, tastefully decorated dining room features floor-to-ceiling windows and makes it easy to forget you’re dining at a Downtown hotel. The elegant presentation extends to the regional cuisine, which is prepared in the restaurant’s open kitchen by executive chef Eli White and his staff.

FLAMEZ BISTRO

$

FORK & FIG

$$

9821 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 275-0522, flamezabq.com There’s a lot more to this burger joint than the beef. High-end, artistically inspired bistro fare, delightful appetizers, and burger bowls (with greens, sans buns) are only some of the fun finds at this neighborhood fave. Buffalo, salmon, turkey, lamb, get your protein boost here.

8917 4th St. NW, 503-7124, farmandtablenm.com This North Valley eatery’s ever-changing menu features seasonal produce, which often comes from the restaurant’s own farm. If the produce doesn’t come from the farm, it’s sourced from a slew of local vendors. Enjoy grass-and-alfalfa-fed steaks and produce-focused dishes that use local kale, chard, okra, chile, and tomatoes.

FLIX BREWHOUSE

THE FARMACY

FLYING STAR CAFÉ

$$

3718 Central Ave SE, 227-0330 The Farmacy takes the idea of organic and local ingredients, and presents them in a way that tastes like comfort. The Farmacy provides a tasty menu of eight breakfast items, as well as eight sandwiches for lunch.

$$

3258 La Orilla Rd NW B-1 445-8500, flixbrewhouse.com Flix is a one-of-a-kind concept; a movie theater that serves full meals and an in-house brewed beer menu in its stadium-seating “dining rooms.” The dream is real, Albuquerque–you can catch the latest blockbuster in theaters while knocking back a pint and having dinner brought to you.

$$

Various locations, flyingstarcafe.com With handmade desserts to die for, artisan breads, and a menu filled with everything from eggs to enchiladas, the Flying Star offers plenty of options for every meal (and snack time) of the day.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

6904 Menaul Blvd. NE, Suite C, 881-5293, forkfig.com Upscale, but surprisingly down-home, Fork & Fig dishes offer up a streamlined menu of favorites, including burgers, sandwiches, and salads, with surprising artistry along the way. Sweet potato tots, anyone?

FOURTH AND ROMA CAFÉ

$

FRANK’S FAMOUS CHICKEN AND WAFFLES

$

500 4th St. NW, #106, 245-7662 Delicious chai, coffee, sandwiches, salads, and occasional East-Indian specials conveniently located in the old Bank of America building downtown.

400 Washington St. SE, 712-5109, franksfamouschickenandwaffles.com Owner and former Lobo basketball player Frank Willis wanted to give Albuquerque the soul food he had while growing up in Los Angeles. He fiddled with flavors, making sure they were perfect, before opening his restaurant to dish out favorites like chicken and waffles, fried pickles, mac ‘n cheese, and collard greens.

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BITES

Sacred.Garden 3600 Cutler Ave NE Ste. 12, Albuquerque, NM 87110 • (505) 348-5599 616 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Ste. B, Albuquerque, NM 87108 • (505) 257-3748

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642 S. Alameda Blvd., Las Cruces, NM 88005 • (575) 300-0154 1300 Luisa St. #1, Santa Fe, NM 87505 • (505) 216-9686

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BITES FRENCH-ISH $$$

3509 Central Ave NE, 433-5911, frenchish.co Envisioned as a casual neighborhood restaurant, French-ish’s menu draws inspiration from an eclectic mix of French and Midwestern US cuisines, with an active focus on clean, simple foods.

FREIGHT HOUSE KITCHEN + TAP 200 S Camino del Pueblo, 588-2143, fr8house.com

$$

Sister restaurant to Range Café and Standard Diner, Freight House offers smoky sweet menu items from the smoker with a homemade touch. Expect pub food with a unique twist and a rotating selection of local beers.

FRIENDS COFFEE & SANDWICH SHOP $

200 3rd St. NW, 243-4801, fcass.com Every cup of coffee served at Friends Coffee & Sandwich Shop is from New Mexico Coffee Company, and a different flavor is showcased each day of the week. Local favorites such as the quesadilla and the Taco Burger are dependable lunch choices.

FRONTIER RESTAURANT

$

2400 Central Ave. SE, 266-0550, frontierrestaurant.com Famous for its legendary Frontier Rolls, hot-offthe-iron tortillas, burgers, New Mexican favorites, hash browns, fresh-squeezed orange juice, and more, the Frontier is Albuquerque’s melting pot— it’s a guarantee you’ll see someone you know there.

FU YUANG KOREAN & CHINESE RESTAURANT $

3107 Eubank Blvd. NE, Suite 16, 298-8989 Fu Yuang breaks away from tradition with its take on Korean and Chinese cuisine, but keeps it simple. Freshly made with high-quality meats, you’ll get

perfectly-portioned dishes made without MSG, less oil, and all natural ingredients.

only, no cheese at all, or plain pepperoni, you’re sure to find your pizza match.

GARCIA’S KITCHEN

GOLDEN CROWN PANADERIA

$

Various locations, garciaskitchen.com This Albuquerque institution serves up classic New Mexican dishes, from freshly made tortillas to an extensive burrito list. You’ll leave one of the multiple locations with a full belly and content heart.

GARDUÑO’S OF MEXICO RESTAURANT AND CANTINA $$

$

1103 Mountain Road NW, 243-2424, goldencrown.biz Golden Crown Panaderia is known for taking creativity in baking to the next level. Try the original biscochitos or cappuccino, chocolate and sugarfree versions. Don’t miss out on homemade green chile bread, pizza, and creative bread sculptures.

Various Locations, gardunosrestaurants.com Garduño’s consistently earns enthusiastic kudos for its mouthwatering enchiladas, burritos, salsa, and knock-your-socks-off margaritas. And, with three locations around town, you’re always near a fiesta.

GRASSBURGER $

Two locations, geckosbar.com Plenty of tasty tapas—including Southwestern Krab Taquitos and Red Molé Grilled Sirloin Tacos—and hearty salads and sandwiches, too.

12165 North Highway 14, Cedar Crest, 286-2684, greenside.cafe This Cedar Crest café offers a casual family atmosphere with large portions of gourmet-quality food: French toast made with orange and vanilla batter, Turquoise Trail Trout, rich homemade ice cream, Monte Cristo sandwich with green chile.

GECKO’S BAR AND TAPAS

GINO’S NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA

$$

$

Two locations, ginosnystylepizza.com With handmade lasagna and pizza dough, among other items, Gino’s New York Style Pizza shares family recipes with its customers. From the buttermilk ranch dressing to the Eggplant and Chicken Parmigianas, homemade cooking is not too far away.

GIOVANNI’S PIZZERIA

$

921 San Pedro Drive SE, 255-1233, giovannispizzaalbuquerque.com Giovanni’s isn’t easy to spot at first, but once you’ve had a big slice of fold-in-half New York-style pie, you’ll never miss it again. Whether you like it covered in spinach, pesto and tomatoes, cheese-

Two locations, eatgrassburger.com There’s a lot that sets the burger joint apart— including their community involvement, their vegan and gluten-free burger options, and their commitment to a no-corn syrup menu.

GREENSIDE CAFÉ

$$$

THE GRILL ON SAN MATEO

$

3300 San Mateo Blvd. NE, 872-9772 A choice of mesquite-grilled chicken, rib eye, hot dogs, and burgers (beef and garden) accompany bottomless house-made chips and salsa, complete with sides like classic fries and fried zucchini, and fresh fixings are on a build-your-own basis offering a completely customizable burger.

Celebrating 6 Years

ITALIAN Coors & Montaño

505.503.7327 MODERNO Rio Rancho

505.891.2432

@LAVA ROCK BREWERY 505.836.1022 M’TUCCIS TWENTY FIVE Now Open

w w w. m t u c c i s . c o m

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THE GROVE CAFÉ AND MARKET

$$

600 Central Ave. SE, Suite A, 248-9800, thegrovecafemarket.com The brunch and lunch favorite is well-known for its exceptional dishes made from local and organic ingredients, and it now offers a newly expanded menu, with additions such as the French Ham & Cheese with d’affinois cheese, mostarda, and caper mustard sauce.

GYROS MEDITERRANEAN

$

HADLEY’S TEA

$

HANNAH & NATE’S MARKET CAFÉ

$

HARTFORD SQUARE

$

106 Cornell Drive SE, 255-4401, egyros.com Tried-and-true Greek recipes, such as traditional Kota Reganato (oven-roasted chicken with oregano, garlic and lemon), fresh Greek salads, Patates, and, of course, sweet baklava, served in a friendly, laidback collegial atmosphere.

Kitchen Catering We treat you and your guests like family!

505•242•1199 | GarciasKitchen.com

7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 9, 821-4832 With about 200 different teas—half of them available in loose-leaf form—Hadley’s Tea is a tea lover’s oasis. Every tea that lines Hadley’s shelves is made with all-natural ingredients. A cucumber and cream cheese sandwich, otherwise known as the “tea sandwich,” is the perfect companion for your Lady Londonderry or strawberry green tea. 4512 Corrales Road, 898-2370 Offering breakfast and lunch, Hannah & Nate’s is all about flavor—whether it’s the flavor of traditional New Mexican cuisine, cuisines from throughout the world or the family recipes served. 218 Gold Ave. SW, 265-4933, hartfordsq.com Perhaps the only Albuquerque establishment that changes the menu weekly based on local produce options, this is a clean, smart, urban café that feeds suits and millennials in droves. Also serving up local coffees from Michael Thomas roasters, dine anytime and support the farm-to-table movement.

HELLO DELI

$$

HIGH POINT GRILL

$$

7600 Jefferson St. NE, 797-3354, hellodeliabq.com Home to one of the most delicious breakfast burritos around, Hello Deli serves sandwiches and even Frontier’s sweet rolls. 9780 Coors Blvd NW 312-8519, highpointgrill.com Those perpetually on the hunt for the perfect burger will find plenty to love at High Point. With a foundation of 100-percent Akaushi, American Prime Wagyu beef, the burgers at High Point Grill are some of the city’s most popular. Their Southwest burger, for instance, features a red chile crusted patty, extra hot local green chile and cheddar cheese.

HIGH NOON RESTAURANT AND SALOON

$$$

425 San Felipe St. NW, 765-1455, highnoonrestaurant.com Located in a 300-year-old house in the heart of Old Town, High Noon has a menu stocked with New Mexican fare such as burritos and enchiladas, but you can also find baked brie and buffalo burgers here. Reservations are recommended.

HOLY BURGER

$

700 Central Ave. SE, 242-2991, holyburgernm.com Originally a Route 66 diner with a carport, and later Bob’s Fish and Chips, Holy Burger now boasts some of the juiciest burgers in town, as well as one of the breeziest and most boppin’ patios in the city.

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BITES HORSE AND ANGEL TAVERN

$$

5809 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, 299-0225 Whether you want a simple sandwich for lunch, appetizers and a beer in the afternoon, or steak and enchiladas at midnight, this Heights tavern is the place to be any time of the day.

HOT PINK THAI

$$

HOT TAMALES

$

HURRICANE’S CAFE

$

I SCREAM ICE CREAM

$

2626 San Pedro Drive NE, 872-2296 For dine in or takeout, at lunchtime, you’ll get $1.50 off dishes over $10 and a free vegetable egg roll. Favorites include pumpkin curry, pad thai, and drunken noodles. Most dishes are customized with your choice of protein and spice level, from no chili at all to Thai hot. 1520 Rio Rancho Blvd. SE, 962-0123, hottamalesnmrestaurant.com This Rio Rancho restaurant serves bona fide New Mexican with hand-blended red chile and fireroasted green chile: Green Chile Stew Omelet, Hot Tamale Bowl, and Fajitas are just a few of the spicy dishes. 4330 Lomas Blvd. NE, 255-4248 With Route 66 serving as the city’s heart, it’s always good to hop over to a good ol’ fashioned diner. Pick out a classic dish, such as pancakes or omelets from the lengthy breakfast menu, or chow down on a burger, enchilada, or chicken fried steak. Of course, you can take a stab at the hearty Disaster Burrito, but you’d better make plenty of room if that’s on your agenda. 2000 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 268-0139 The cozy dessert shop is filled with toys, gadgets, board games, and—oh yeah—34 flavors of ice cream and 28 different toppings. Each scoop comes with a free mix-in, and there are fresh mini doughnuts available on weekends.

IL VICINO

$$

Various locations, ilvicino.com Using wood ovens to bake its thin-crust pizzas, Il Vicino (which means “The Neighbor”) also offers hearty calzones and award-winning brews from its own brewery.

INDIGO CROW CAFÉ

$$$

4515 Corrales Road, Corrales, 898-7000, indigocrowcafe.net This café is cozy, thanks to the fact that it’s housed in an old adobe building. When it’s cold, patrons warm up by the indoor fireplace; when it’s warm, they enjoy meals such as lobster ravioli, tarragon chicken salad, and New Mexico chicken fried steak under the stars on the outdoor patio. Reservations are recommended.

IRONWOOD KITCHEN

$$

5740 Night Whisper Road NW, Suite 250, 890-4488, ironwoodkitchen.com This family operation’s goal: to serve meals made with whole foods at affordable prices. Try the green chile cheeseburger, with freshly-ground chuck, topped with fresh vegetables and roasted green chile.

JAPANESE KITCHEN

$$$

Two Locations, japanesekitchen.com Entertainment is the main course at this teppanyaki grill restaurant. The cooks, who are at your table, can be caught tossing shrimp into their pockets and creating to-die-for dishes from the classic teriyaki chicken, to seafood or steak, and everything in between.

FRANK HOLLOWAY

Owner of Hollow Spirits Distillery 1324 1st St. NW 443-2766, hollowspirits.com

The decision to make hand sanitizer was an easy one for Hollow Spirits Distillery. After the pandemic essentially closed Albuquerque bars and restaurants in March, forcing layoffs and a steep decline in business, the Martineztown distiller went into pivot mode. “We had seen a (online) post about other distillers around the country doing it, and since hand sanitizer was scarce in stores, we decided to do it,” said Hollow Spirits owner Frank Holloway. “It’s basically a way that we can help the bigger picture by doing what we were already doing.” But while Hollow Spirits and other New Mexico distilleries had the equipment to easily transition to making sanitizer instead of vodka or whiskey, there was another challenge: the lack of small plastic dispenser bottles, which were in high demand everywhere. Holloway immediately ordered some online, but the delivery date was months away due to the backlog. So, he did the next best thing: he packaged the sanitizer in his distillery’s 750-milliliter glass spirits bottle. “We just worked with what we already had,” says Holloway, who founded his distillery in October of 2018. “Luckily, the federal government came out with special instructions and ingredients for distillers to make the sanitizer, and so we made a special label with the Surgeon General’s warning and everything.” Holloway said his crew then put about 60 percent of their production efforts into making sanitizer, which requires hydrogen peroxide and glycerin. The finished product looks from a distance like a bottle of vodka—which Holloway says is good reason to put a “do not drink” disclaimer on the label. “I think hand sanitizer is going to be a way of life, so I don’t see us stopping it anytime soon,” he says. “But we’re also thankful we can help out and have something to do. It helps keep the lights on.” Hollow Spirits is still open for walk-in sales of bottled liquor, and is open on Fridays for curbside food sales.

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JAVA JOE’S

$$

906 Park Ave. SW, 765-1514, downtownjavajoes.com You’ll find all walks of life at this relaxing Downtown joint, enjoying freshly made sandwiches, breakfast burritos, green chile chicken melts, coffee drinks and more.

JC’S NEW YORK PIZZA DEPARTMENT $$

215 Central Ave. NW, Suite B, 766-6973, jcnypd.com New York-style pizza, pasta, salads, and fully loaded pasta and calzone dishes, all in a laid-back lounge. During lunch hour, the line goes out the door.

JIMMY’S CAFÉ ON JEFFERSON

$

7007 Jefferson St. NE, 341-2546, jimmyscafeonjefferson.com The menu here lists more than 100 items, most of them mouthwatering comfort foods: sandwiches, burgers, New Mexican dishes, handmade pizza, and breakfast served all day long.

JINJA BAR AND BISTRO

$$

JOE’S PASTA HOUSE

$$

Various locations, jinjabistro.com Evoking a vintage ambiance, Jinja serves inspired and mouthwatering pan-Asian cuisine, such as Kung Pow Chicken (a Thai version of the Chinese favorite) and Home-Style Chicken Udon Wok Bowl. 3201 Southern Blvd. SE, 892-3333, joespastahouse.com A neighborhood Italian-American joint with an incredible dose of warmth and personality, Joe’s offers a terrific lunch buffet and an expansive dinner menu to please every palate in la mia famiglia: steaks, pasta, and some of the best cannelloni and tiramisu anywhere.

KABAB HOUSE: AUTHENTIC PERSIAN CUISINE $

301 Cornell Drive SE, 312-8949 Authentic, made-to-order Persian food is constantly sizzling on the grill here. The koobideh kabab is made with minced ground beef or ground chicken, onion, and house spices. Each dish is a healthy size and comes with soup, salad, and rice. Top everything off with a glass of delicious banana milk, or majoun, which is banana milk with almonds, walnuts, pistachios, and honey.

KAKTUS BREWING CO.

$

KATHY’S CARRY OUT

$

471 South Hill Road, Bernalillo, 818-7285 kaktusbrewery.com Tucked away from it all, Kaktus specializes in European-style pints, and a menu featuring pizzas and apps uniquely topped with game meats like elk, boar, bison, and duck. Special events on weekends abound. 823 Isleta Blvd. SW, 873-3472 This carry out has been a South Valley favorite for 38 years. Look for the chicharron burrito with egg, fresh hand-cut fries, and the daily special—you just might land on a seems-too-good-to-be-true deal, such as three tacos for $3.

KATRINAH’S EAST MOUNTAIN GRILL $$ 150 State Road 344, Edgewood, 281-9111, eastmountaingrill.com This contemporary diner specializes in homemade dishes, such as gyros, hand-cut steaks and burgers, and the best-selling Southern Salad (with fried green beans, bacon, cheddar cheese, tomato, and fried or grilled chicken or steak).

KELLYS PUB

$

3222 Central Ave. SE, 262-2739, kellyspubabq.com On any given night, the patio at Kellys, converted from an old gas station, is filled with a diverse array

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of customers. Kids eat free on weekends, and dogs are welcome, too. It’s sporting a new brick oven pizza menu you should definitely check out.

KIMO’S HAWAIIAN BBQ

$

KOLACHE FACTORY

$

3239 Girard Blvd. NE kimosabq.com, 582-2797 Hawaii comes home. What began as a food truck is now a brick-and-mortar location also. Try freshfrom-the-isles Kalua Pork and Huli Huli Chicken plates served with sides like steamed cabbage, rice, and macaroni salad. 8001 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Suite B3 856-3430, locations.kolachefactory.com The Kolache Factory franchise out of Texas focuses on Czech style Kolaches that were traditionally a warm, semi-sweet pastry filled with sausage, cheese, or fruit and originated in Eastern Europe dating as far back as the 1700s.

LA CRÊPE MICHEL

$$

LA OJA RESTAURANT

$$

400 San Felipe St. NW, Suite C2, 242-1251, lacrepemichel.com Heavenly soups, sandwiches, and crêpes await you at this charming French restaurant: whether filled with salmon, asparagus and Swiss cheese or zucchini, eggplant, and tomato, you’ll find a crêpe to whet your appetite. Reservations are recommended. 201 Marquette Ave. NW, inside DoubleTree Hotel, 247-3344 La Oja Restaurant blends New Mexico and California cuisines, resulting in unique tastes that combine fresh seafood with local flavor. It’s MexiCali cuisine with a twist.

LA QUICHE PARISIENNE BISTRO

$

LA SALITA

$

LAGUNA BURGER

$

5850 Eubank Blvd. NE, Suite 17, 242-2808, laquicheparisiennebistro.com Long considered an authentic French staple of downtown ABQ, La Quiche has comfortably settled into the Heights and the baked goods will comfort your lazy weekend brunch cravings with true Parisian cuisine from the mainland. 1950 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, 299-9968, lasalita.com The name may mean “little room,” but this New Mexican restaurant always has a full house. The chile rellenos, chile con queso, sopaipillas, and shredded beef burrito (a Wednesday special) have earned loyal customers for 37 years. Various locations, thelagunaburger.com Every half-pound burger is made fresh upon ordering, topped with Hatch green chile, and slipped on a butter-toasted bun made specifically for Laguna Burger by Sara Lee. Also on the menu: freshly-cut fries, foot-long chile cheese dogs, and zingy breakfast burritos.

LAS RISTRAS

$$$

4940 Corrales Rd. #400, Corrales 433-4192, lasristras.com Though New Mexican fare is a huge part of Las Ristras’ menu–all the usual suspects from tacos and chile rellenos to burritos and bowls of fresh posole are in evidence–they are joined by some of the most dynamic steaks on the Rio Grande.

THE LAST CALL

$

Various locations, lastcallabq.com This late-night eatery specializes in freshly-made Baja Mexican street cuisine (think: carne asada fries). If you’re lucky, you just might run into the “Taco Box” while out on the town: a mobile extension of the restaurant that brings the food to you.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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BITES LAVA ROCK BREWING COMPANY $$ 2220 Unser Blvd. NE 836-1022, lavarockbrewpub.com

The casual brewpub on Unser currently has 7 of their own beers available on tap, with several other local guest taps as well. Standard bar fare gets gussied up here, like the housemade hot sauces on the wings and the fries loaded with green chile and queso.

LAZY LIZARD GRILL

$

12480 North Highway 14, Sandia Park 281-9122, lazylizardgrill.com From the King Cobra Pizza and made-fromscratch Jalapeño Poppers to their impressive selection of microbrews, the Lazy Lizard Grill has customers always coming back for more— and has the food and atmosphere to back it up.

LE BISTRO VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT

$$

brighten

$

1313 San Pedro Dr. NE, 266-6118 Le Bistro Vietnamese Restaurant is just as much a bakery as it is a restaurant, specializing in traditional Vietnamese cuisine.

2125 Louisiana Blvd. NE, 881-7272, lepeepabq.com With a menu spanning breakfast skillets, omelets, and flapjacks to a comprehensive and creative selection of lunch sammies, soups, and otherwise, Le Peep offers an enlightened take on American staples with a New Mexican twist.

LE CHANTILLY FINE PASTRIES

LE TROQUET

$

8216 Menaul Blvd. NE, 293-7057, lechantillybakery.com This French-style bakery features breakfast pastries, muffins, strudel, cookies, and tarts—not to mention delicious quiche, croissants, sandwiches and cakes. Try homemade soups such as creamy chicken and artichoke, then satisfy your sweet tooth with a tower of chocolate decadence.

THE SMALLEST BEAUTY

can

LE PEEP

up

every

day

$$

228 Gold Ave. SW 508-1166, www.abqfrenchrestaurant.com The Parisian bistro, open for lunch or dinner, offers classically simple French dishes made by Chef Jean Pierre Gozard. From Boeuf Bourguignon to quiche and delectable desserts, expect a tres bien atmosphere with a comprehensive wine list.

LEVEL 5 AT HOTEL CHACO

$$$

THE LIBRARY BAR & GRILL

$$

LIMONATA ITALIAN STREET CAFÉ

$$

2000 Bellamah Ave. NW 318-3998, hotelchaco.com The food here needs be good, because first and foremost, it competes with the view. Like the name implies, Level 5 sits on the 5th floor of Hotel Chaco and offers a near-360 degree view of the city. 312 Central Ave. SW, 242-2992, library-abq.com Featuring more than a great party, the Library offers drink specials and half-priced appetizers during happy hour, as well as salads, hamburgers, sandwiches, wraps, and specialty items. 3222 Silver Av SE, 266-0607, limonatanobhill.com Channel your inner Italian at this street foodinspired café, where the breakfast and lunch menus feature perfect pastries, craveable cappuccino and trattoria-inspired lunches. The chef makes every dish from scratch and insists that everything about the restaurant, from the menu to the atmosphere, be done just as it would in Italy.

LITTLE BEAR COFFEE

$

LOS COMPADRES RESTAURANT

$

2632 Pennsylvania St. NE 917-8902, littlebearcoffeeco.com Located near Uptown, Little Bear is not just serving up quality brew, but also providing an outpost for the neighborhood and coffee community. 2437 Central Ave. NW 452-8091, compadresabq.com Family recipes like the No. 16 Taco Plate, tacos with carne y papas (beef and potatoes) and the restaurant’s Menudo, have kept locals coming back for more than 15 years.

LOS CUATES

$$

LOYOLA’S FAMILY RESTAURANT

$$

Various locations loscuatesrestaurants.com Popular since it opened over 25 years ago, Los Cuates serves its own ancho-chile salsa and tons of delicious New Mexican dishes in humongous portions. 4500 Central Ave. SE, 268-6478 loyolasfamilyrestaurant.com You’ll find both American and New Mexican goodies here, from fried chicken, roast beef and sandwiches to tasty local favorites such as burritos and posole.

LUIGI’S RISTORANTE AND PIZZERIA $$

6225 4th St. NW, 343-0466, luigisitalianfood.com Enjoy more than 250 made-from-scratch Italian dishes, including pizza, chicken Florentine, spaghetti and meatballs, and green chile chicken lasagna.

3121 SAN MATEO NE • 505.881.3336 | 1416 JUAN TABO NE • 505.338.0038

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BITES LUNA MANSION

$$$

110 W. Main St., Los Lunas, 865-7333, lunamansion.com Said to be haunted, the Luna Mansion is an adventure in dining, featuring a wide selection of steak and seafood in a unique, historic atmosphere in Los Lunas.

M’TUCCI’S ITALIAN

$$

Various locations, mtuccis.com The menu at the Westside’s authentic Italian staple features refined comfort food classics, from meatball marinara to pot roast. Other menu items are crafted from choice Berkshire pigs that the eatery imports from northern Iowa and southern Minnesota farms. In fact, a unique pork dish is incorporated into a featured dinner special every night. Wash down your pasta, pizza, or salad with a carefully crafted cocktail from the bar.

MAC’S STEAK IN THE ROUGH

$

Two locations, macsnm.com Taquitas, onion rings, guacamole salad, and an original “steak in the rough”—slivers of beef served with French fries, coleslaw, a roll, catsup, and a fresh green scallion… these are just a few of the reasons Mac’s has been in business for so many years.

MANZANO GRILLE AT THE CANYON CLUB AT FOUR HILLS $$ 911 Four Hills Road SE, 299-9555, canyonclubgolf.com

This newly remodeled property was rejuvenated thanks to its own club members, and now boasts modern décor, floor-to-ceiling windows, and a relaxed and inviting atmosphere. Members can enjoy creative dishes like Pork Alexander, New Mexico Eggs Benedict with green chile Hollandaise sauce, or the Turkey Lurkey, including green chile and Pepper Jack cheese in the dining room or al fresco on its large, shaded patio overlooking the mountain vistas. Dining-only memberships available.

MARIO’S PIZZA

$$

MARISCOS ALTAMAR

$$

Various locations, mariospizzaabq.com Gourmet pizzas, big bowls of pasta, custom calzones and New York-style sandwiches are the norm at this tasty Italian eatery. Two locations, mariscosaltamarabq.com With live music on the weekends, colorful murals, and authentic Mexican seafood dishes such as tostada de ceviche with shrimp, fish, and snow crab, dining at Mariscos Altamar is well worth the trip.

MARY & TITO’S CAFÉ

$

2711 4th St. NW, 344-6266, maryandtitos.com From their famous carne adovada to their authentic New Mexican chips and salsa, Mary & Tito’s Café makes sure guests leave full and happy. This homey café also became the only Albuquerque restaurant to win a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award in 2010.

MATANZA CRAFT BEER KITCHEN

$$

3225 Central Ave. NE, 312-7305, matanzanm.com The New Mexican classic feast gets a sophisticated touch at the eatery serving up favorites such as carne adovada, to a wide range of salads, flatbreads and a cult-favorite brunch. One hundred taps feature local beer and wine.

MAY CAFÉ

$

111 Louisiana Blvd. SE, 265-4448, maycafenm.com Traditional Vietnamese cuisine is easily customizable, fresh and healthy. The café’s spring rolls, made fresh to order, are popular with diners new and old. Try the pho or the bún.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

MAZAYA CAFÉ

$

120 Harvard Dr. SE 582-2447, mazayacafe.com Mazaya Café is dedicated to adding an authentic Mediterranean dining experience to the medley of options in the Nob Hill area–without breaking the bank for its diners. If you are looking to fill up, freshgrilled kebabs, a half-dozen wraps, shawarma, and three kinds of fried or steamed dumpling plates headline the restaurant’s entrée menu.

MICHAEL THOMAS COFFEE ROASTERS $

Two locations, michaelthomascoffee.com Michael Thomas’ fresh-roasted coffees can be purchased in bulk or by the cup. Favorites include the Banda Bear Blend and the Duke’s Runners’ Blend. If you prefer to let them make your cup of Joe, try an espresso-based drink such as a Double Espresso, a Macchiato, or a Cubano.

MICK’S CHILE FIX

$

3351 Candelaira Rd NE Suite A, 881-2233, mickschilefix.com One of the city’s true spots for getting something hot: try The Shocker (an eight-pound breakfast burrito), huevos rancheros, or the Frito pie, all with homemade red or green chile.

MILLY’S $

Two locations, millysrestaurants.com If you’re not sure what to eat, have a little of everything with an American-New Mexican–Greek menu. This breakfast and lunch spot melds salads and sandwiches with traditional New Mexican and Greek entrees.

MIMMO’S RISTORANTE & PIZZERIA $$

3301 Coors Blvd. NW 831-4191, mimmosabq.com Mimmo’s serves authentic Italian food in a casual family atmosphere, with everything made on

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BITES premise: the sauces, pizza dough, lasagna, noodles and meatballs. An all-you-can-eat lunch buffet is offered every day of the week.

MODEL PHARMACY

$$

3636 Monte Vista Blvd. NE 255-8686, modelpharmacy.com Fill a prescription, buy some jewelry, then tuck into old-fashioned fountain classics like rickeys, ades, milkshakes, phosphates, and egg creams. Leave room for lunch: Model has grilled sandwiches and homemade soups.

MONICA’S EL PORTAL RESTAURANT

$

321 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, 247-9625 Traditional New Mexican favorites make up the menu at this Old Town staple that has been around for 34 years. Monica’s roasts their own green chile, makes biscochitos from scratch and offers red chile straight from the pod.

MONROE’S RESTAURANT

$

Two locations, monroeschile.com More than 50 years after they opened their doors south of Old Town, Monroe’s continues to serve reliable New Mexican favorites to a local fan base, and service around here is a team effort, so no glass goes unfilled.

MONTE CARLO STEAKHOUSE

$$$

3916 Central Ave. SW, 836-9886 The iconic steakhouse meets liquor store has been featured on the Food Network and boasts some of the best steaks in the city. Since 1971, locals always come back for hand-cut steaks, house-made Greek salad dressing, freshly cut fries, and a mean green chile cheeseburger.

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MONTE VISTA FIRE STATION 3201 Central Ave. NE, 255-2424

$

Once an actual working fire station, this second-floor restaurant now offers traditional bar food, wings, and nightly specials. Choose from tasty chicken wings and burgers, or order from the restaurant downstairs— they’ll bring your steak to you.

MR. TOKYO

$$

NEXUS BREWERY

$$

Two locations, nexusbrewery.com If the made-to-order fried chicken and waffles and mac and cheese has you drooling, reach for one of Nexus’ brewed in-house beers.

NICK AND AND BAR

JIMMY’S

RESTAURANT $$

11200 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 292-4728 Soak up the cool Zen-like atmosphere while enjoying six versions of fried rice, sushi, sashimi, tempura, hibachi, grilled udon, soups, and teriyaki spiced with fiery Thai chili peppers.

5021 Pan American Freeway NE, 344-9169, nickandjimmysrestaurant.com Nick and Jimmy’s vision was a comfortable atmosphere with comfortable food. They blend traditional foods with new twists and serve everything from enchiladas to green chile meatloaf.

MUSTANG CAFÉ

NOB HILL BAR AND GRILL

$

8601 Lomas Blvd. NE, 275-4477 Perfect for anyone shopping at the Rich Ford car dealership—or anyone at all—is this auto-themed restaurant, which serves up homemade breakfast burritos, papitas, enchiladas, rellenos, tamales, and the Dennis Snyder Favorite: a 16-oz. sirloin patty with cheese and chile.

NARUTO $

2110 Central Ave. SE 369-1039, narutonoodle.com Who knew Ramen noodles could be so creative, so diverse, and so darn good. Naruto is reinventing the Ramen noodle with specialized dishes that can’t be found anywhere else in the city.

NAMASTE

$

Two locations, namastenm.net Offering authentic Nepalese and Indian dishes— including chicken tikka masala and lamb curry— Namaste also serves traditional food with a New Mexico twist, such as the green chile chicken curry.

$$$

3128 Central Ave. SE, 266-4455, upscalejoint.com This restaurant manages to be simultaneously upscale and laid back, gourmet and down-home, visionary and traditional. Not to mention delicious: the Buffalo Calamari, Dirty “Kobe” Burger, Pineapple Chipotle BBQ Baby Back Ribs, and a slew of amazing cocktails make every visit exceptional.

NOMAD’S BBQ FOOD TRUCK 206-7654

$

Authentic, smoky goodness, Nomad’s BBQ sammies— including pulled pork and hotlink varieties—are succulent and feature its homemade sauce. This roving BBQ hut definitely knows how to do a quality turkey leg and rib tips, too.

OAK TREE CAFÉ

4545 Alameda Blvd. NE, 830-2233, cafeoaktree.com

$$$

This hometown café has served a lot of locales over the past 30 years, and the current venue on Alameda is great at the basics, including burgers, sandwiches, and salads, made fresh, in-house every day.

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OHANA HUT

$

5740 Night Whisper Rd NW, 508-4439, ohanahut.com Family owned and operated Ohana Hut means “Family Hut”. It specializes in Hawaiian, Japanese, and Korean flavors to create an Asian fusion menu with a New Mexican twist.

OLD TOWN PIZZA PARLOR

$$

108 Rio Grande Blvd. NW, 999-1949, oldtownpizzaabq.com This comfy, funky, family-owned restaurant serves tasty pies, huge calzones, and portions of pasta that won’t ever leave you hungry.

OLO YOGURT STUDIO IN NOB HILL

$

3339 Central Ave. NE, Suite C, 718-4656, oloyogurt.com Nothing is as sweet as a guilt-free treat. In the same building as Staples in Nob Hill, Olo features a Candyland-esque interior, complete with 10 flavor choices and a salad-bar-sized toppings bar.

O’HARE’S GRILLE & PUB

$$

O’NIELL’S PUB

$$

4100 Southern Blvd. SE, 896-0123, oharesgrillepub.com With a menu that is centered around the idea that variety is the key to success, O’Hare’s offers pub fare in a family-friendly atmosphere. Try the Corned Beef and Cabbage special, O’Hare’s Double Decker Reuben, or the staple Fish and Chips, for a truly Irish experience. Two locations, oniells.com O’Niell’s boasts the same neighborhood feeling, many of the same staffers, and virtually the same menu (including the “weird sandwich,” the “burger in paradise,” and homemade fish and chips). Added: an outdoor patio and more beer choices.

O RAMEN

$

ORCHID THAI CUISINE

$

ORTEGA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

$

2114 Central Ave. SE, 508-1897 Yes, the Duke City has the real thing. O Ramen’s Tonkotsu (pork bone broth) spends 18 hours on the stovetop before it blesses your bowl; expect plenty of options for vegetarians and Japanese curry lovers, to boot. 4300 Central Ave. SE, 265-4047, orchidabq.com Orchid Thai has been serving hungry Albuquerqueans traditional dishes like Pad Thai at its Nob Hill location for more than a decade. But this award-winning eatery goes beyond the traditional with unique dishes like deep-fried sesame duck, green tea curry, and Szechwan eggplant, all made from scratch. 3617 Wyoming Blvd. NE, 298-0223 Rudy and Edna Ortega were never selfish with their old family recipes—they’re all over the menu at Ortega’s. The green chile relleno and when in season, red chile relleno, please palates year round. Of course, don’t leave without ending your meal with a delectable dessert, like the ice-creamstuffed strawberry sopaipilla.

THE OWL CAFÉ

$$

P’TIT LOUIS BISTRO NOB HILL

$$

800 Eubank Blvd. NE, 291-4900, owlcafealbuquerque.com World-famous green chile cheeseburgers, milkshakes, fajitas, quesadillas, meatloaf, burritos, fries… the list of drool-worthy dishes goes on and on. 3218 Silver Ave. SE, 314-1110, ptitlouisbistro.com The quaint French bistro features a small patio, yellow umbrellas, and white tablecloths—it’s pure Paris fashion, circa 1920, with the authentic French cuisine to match it.

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PACIFIC PARADISE TROPICAL GRILL AND SUSHI BAR $$

3000 San Pedro Drive NE, 881-0999, pacificparadise-restaurant-abq.com Faux palms and tiki huts frame a menu filled with more than 100 options: salads, soups, stir-fry, seafood, fried rice, noodles, sushi, and dessert menu. Try the Seafood Rice Pizza or Rock ‘n’ Roll Sushi.

PADILLA’S MEXICAN KITCHEN

$

1510 Girard Blvd. NE, 262-0115 It might not get any more New Mexican than it does at Padilla’s—from huevos rancheros and tamales to chile rellenos and egg-topped blue corn enchiladas. You may have to shake your head after a taste of the chile just to remind yourself you’re not in your grandmother’s kitchen. A sopaipilla dripping with honey will seal the deal for your traditional meal.

PAISANO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Order Online Scan QR code below.

$$

1935 Eubank Blvd. NE, 298-7541, paisanosabq.com Family recipes have kept Paisano’s going for more than 35 years, but the hand-rolled pasta, handstuffed ravioli, homemade sausage and marinara haven’t hurt business, either. It’s also the only place in town to get wheat-free pizza and pasta.

THE PALETA BAR

$

Various locations, thepaletabar.com A hidden Albuquerque gem, The Paleta Bar has taken a tried-and-true, frozen Mexican dessert to new heights. Since 2017, this paleta wonderland has been slinging refreshing Mexican popsicles in endless combinations of flavors.

PAPA FELIPE’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT $$

9800 Menaul Blvd. NE, 292-8877, papafelipes.com Papa Felipe’s exceeds expectations by offering traditional New Mexican cuisine (enchiladas, stuffed sopaipillas, tacos) as well as simple twists on favorite dishes (green chile carne adovada, Tampico Tacos, Green Tamale Pie).

PAPA NACHOS

Available on:

PARS CUISINE

We are open for take out! Order on the app, pick up in store, or curbside.

thelagunaburger.com 12th Street location only.

160

$$

7648 Louisiana Blvd. NE, 821-4900, papanachosfood.com Great, homemade Mexican food based on triedand-true family recipes is the specialty here: burritos, fish tacos, and the namesake nachos will all make your panza happy.

$$

4320 The 25 Way NE, Ste 100, 345-5156, parscuisine.us For more than 20 years, Pars has served Persian and Mediterranean menu items in a unique atmosphere. Choose to sit on the floor under a large tent, and enjoy the talents of belly dancers, and enjoy tasty kebabs, gyros and more.

PELICAN’S RESTAURANT

$$$

Two locations, pelicansabq.com For 30 years, customers have fallen for Pelican’s— hook, line and sinker. Favorite entrées include Alaskan king crab, Australian lobster tail, and prime rib.

PEREA’S TIJUANA BAR

$$

4590 Corrales Road, Corrales, 898-2442 Open for lunch only, the family-owned and -operated business specializes in real, home-cooked New Mexican food that’s consistently earned kudos from customers who can’t say “no” to the Frito pie, carne adovada, and green chile cheeseburgers.

PERICO’S $

Various locations, pericosmexicanrestaurant.com Serving delicious New Mexican food at affordable prices made Perico’s instantly popular, and the “home of the ½ lb burrito” is now an Albuquerque institution with three locations, catering services, and 22 different burritos.

PHO LINH

$$

9100 Central Ave. SE, 266-3368, pholinhabq.com Authentic Vietnamese cuisine is the name of the game at this restaurant. Look for pad thai, special noodles (with grilled barbecue shrimp), spring rolls, curry, and papaya salad.

PIATANZI $$

Two locations, piatanzi.com A neighborhood Italian eatery with artisan flair, Piatanzi serves up big bites on smallish plates that please families and adventurous foodies alike, in a venue that scores big points.

PIZZA 9

$$

PIZZERIA LUCA

$$

PLANTY SWEET

$$

POKI POKI CEVICHERIA

$$

POLLITO CON PAPAS

$$

Various locations, pizzanine.com Chicago-style pizza at 10 locations around the city, along with the option of gluten-free crust—that’s what Pizza 9 brings to the, er, table. Don’t forget the wings, salads, breadsticks and calzones to complement any meal. 8850 Holly Ave. NE, 797-8086, pizzerialuca.com With imported Italian flour, cheese, and pepperoni, Pizzeria Luca offers authentic Italian cuisine. The restaurant has a subway-inspired interior and features delicious and affordable lunch specials. 2506 Washington St NE 433-7111, plantysweet.weebly.com Planty Sweet is the city’s first 100% vegan and gluten-free bakery and dessert shop and the quality of the products available is hard to deny. Not only do their artisanal baked goods taste fantastic, they are impeccably presented, each crafted to please the eye as much as the taste buds. Two locations, pokipokinm.com Think deconstructed sushi if you’ve never had the traditionally Hawaiian poké. Completely customizable bowls with Latin and Asian fusion are the specialty here. Seven types of fish, twelve sauces, and 22 toppings make for endless combinations atop rice, chips, or a salad. Two Locations, pollitoconpapas.com Get ready for a punch of Peruvian cuisine. The menu is dotted with combinations of chicken, potatoes, and cilantro rice. The chicken is brined in vinegar and cumin for about 10 hours, then fired on a spit. The traditional drink, chicha, makes the perfect complement to any dish. The southeast part of town just inched a bit closer to South America.

PONDEROSA BREWING CO.

$

POP FIZZ

$

1761 Bellamah Ave. NW, 639-5941, ponderosabrewing.net A sister brew pub to Pints Brewing in Portland, Oregon, Ponderosa features a wide selection of American and German standard beers, with a classic menu of burgers, salads, and innovative appetizers. Two locations, pop-fizz.net Made in-house from all natural ingredients, kids can’t miss the Mexican paletas (popsicles) and ice cream tacos. For adults, boozy pops, shakes, and beer compliment the small but substantial menu of sandwiches, burritos, and the coveted carne asada

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


fries. Located at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, the patio is dog-friendly, and you might see its ice cream truck around the city at summer events.

PRAIRIE STAR RESTAURANT

$$

PRISMATIC COFFEE

$$

288 Prairie Star Road, Santa Ana Pueblo, 867-3327, mynewmexicogolf.com Taking a drive past Bernalillo is a pleasure when you know the visit will include amazing made-fromscratch dishes such as herb-grilled ribeye with chipotle cheddar gratin and New Mexico bisonraised tenderloin. Reservations are recommended. 1761 Bellamah Ave. NW, 205-1590, prismatic.coffee This third-wave coffee shop in the sawmill district features a small menu of expertly crafted coffee and the perfect coffee companion, stroopwafels. Beans are roasted and sold in-house with a rotating selection of stroopwafel fillings made fresh.

PUEBLO HARVEST CAFÉ AND BAKERY

$$$

2401 12th St. NW, 724-3510, puebloharvestcafe.com The Indian Pueblo Cultural Center is the perfect backdrop for the Native American-inspired cuisine prepared in the café, serving traditional and innovative dishes for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Reservations are recommended.

PUPUSERIA Y RESTAURANTE SALVADOREÑO $

1701 Bridge Blvd. SW, 243-8194 In El Salvador, pupusas (stuffed corn tortillas) are found on every street corner. In Albuquerque, they can only be found in the South Valley, stuffed with shrimp, calabacitas, cheese, beans, or guacamole and served with a side of fresh salsa and curtidos (a spicy cabbage salad garnish).

QUARTER CELTIC BREWPUB

$$

QUARTERS BBQ

$$

Two locations, quartercelticbrewpub.com Irish brews like the Crimson Lass and Rye’t Side of Dublin are paired nicely with Celtic pub fare with a New Mexico twist. Must-tries include the classic fish and chips, ruben, shepherd’s pie, and poutine with green chile. 801 Yale Blvd. SE, 843-6949, thequartersonyaleblvd.com Feeling hungry? How about 187,000 pounds of ribs and 15,000 pounds of Alaskan King Crab a year, an attached packaged liquor store, a secret sauce recipe, and customers hungry for more? Try the pork spare ribs or hot links.

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RANCHERS CLUB OF NEW MEXICO $$$

1901 University Blvd. NE, 889-8071, theranchersclubofnm.com With more fine dining awards on their wall than years they’re been in business, the Ranchers Club of New Mexico inside the Crowne Plaza Albuquerque is a meat lovers’ paradise and wine connoisseurs’ promised land. Reservations are recommended.

THE RANGE CAFÉ

$$

Various locations, rangecafe.com Locals flock to The Range Café when they’re in search of good, made-from-scratch comfort food, including meatloaf sandwiches, huevos rancheros, enchiladas, ice cream, and the gooey Life by Chocolate dessert.

REBEL DONUT

$

Two locations, rebeldonut.com Not only can you find their set flavors, including their raised glazed, chocolate cake glazed, rebel red velvet, birthday cake, and toasted coconut, but you can also order custom-made donuts or choose to experiment with their daily creations.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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BITES RELISH GOURMET SANDWICHES

$$

8019 Menaul Blvd. NE, 299-0001, relishsandwichesabq.com It’s no wonder this sandwich shop has been voted “best” by publications throughout Albuquerque— it serves only the best Boar’s Head meats and all of their dishes are accompanied by homemade sides or soups. Try the Cubano. You won’t be disappointed.

RICHARD’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT $$

3301 Menaul Blvd. NE, 881-1039 Mexican favorites—such as carne adovada, relleño, tacos, and green chile enchiladas—cooked in the healthiest, most nutritious, yummiest way possible. Open for breakfast and lunch.

RICHIE B’S PIZZA

$$

7200 Montgomery Blvd. NE, Suite A-2, 312-8579, richiebsabq.com New York-style pizza has come home to roost in Albuquerque’s Northeast Heights. Whether by the slice or by the pie—some of which measure 25 inches in diameter—you’ll need every bit of your appetite when you visit Richie B’s. Not in the mood for pizza? Wrap your hands around a turkey, cheesesteak, or Italian sandwich, topped with its signature Viper sauce, or tempt your sweet tooth with traditional cannoli or New York-style cheesecake

RIO BRAVO BREWING COMPANY

$

ROCKIN’ TACO

$

1912 2nd St. NW, 900-3909, riobravobrewing.com The pub and grill is bright and airy with high ceilings and a modern industrial style, mixed with the cozy rustic feel of a neighborhood bar, with 32 taps, including their award winning La Luz Lager. 3600 Cutler Ave NE, 401-1000, greenjeansfarmery.org Rockin’ Taco is housed inside of Albuquerque’s premier indoor/outdoor gathering place, Green Jeans Farmery. With a food truck vibe and an East Coast flare, this hidden gem is elevating the street taco.

ROMA BAKERY & DELI

$

501 Roma Ave. NW, 843-9418, romabakeryanddeli.com You’ll find more than fresh-baked cookies and pastries at this bakery—feast your eyes (and taste buds) on grilled sandwiches and eight fresh deli salads and soups.

ROSEMARY $$

4565 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Suite A 361-1842, rosemaryabq.com This plant-forward restaurant offers a soothing atmosphere, creative menu, and amazing food. Any menu item can be adapted to meet personal preferences and dietary restrictions.

RUDY’S COUNTRY STORE AND BAR-B-Q

$$

Two locations, rudys.com Texas-style slow cooking over oak is what makes Rudy’s brisket, ribs and sausage so mouthwatering—not to mention the “sause.” Every serving comes with paper towels, unlimited sliced onions and pickles, and bread to mop up the leftover BBQ.

RUSTIC BUBBLE TEA CAFE

$

840 Juan Tabo Blvd Suite B, 505-1813, rusticbubbleteacafe.com Rustic Bubble Tea Café has all of the fundamentals of a bubble tea shop down, of course–the hint is in the name, after all–but what sets the independent Albuquerque startup apart is the Vietnameseinspired menu that accompanies their decadent beverages.

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RUSTIC ON THE GREEN

$

3600 Cutler Ave NE, 315-1148, rusticburger505.com Rustic simplicity is the key for this burger joint at Green Jeans Farmery, serving up five equallycraveable burger options and two different kinds of fries from its minimalist menu. Don’t let the simplicity fool you: this unique eatery does gourmet burgers that has fans coming back for more, including its Day of the Dead burger with a secret “Diablo” puree and the Divine Intervention, topped with bleu cheese and caramelized onions.

RUTILIO’S NEW MEXICAN FOODS

$

455 N. Main St., Belen, 864-0093 Belen Mayor Rudy Jaramillo’s carne adovada is what put Rutilio’s on the map. This hangout serves their perfect pork with rice and beans, stuffed inside burritos and sopaipillas, and layered inside enchiladas and quesadillas. Add Rutilio’s breakfast burritos and classic New Mexican combos, and guests are sure to find something worth campaigning for.

SADIE’S OF NEW MEXICO

$$

Various locations, sadiesofnewmexico.com A staple in New Mexican cuisine, Sadie’s features enchiladas, carne adovada ribs, tacos, burritos, and of course, world-famous chips and salsa. Reservations are recommended.

SAHARA MIDDLE EASTERN EATERY

$

SAIGON RESTAURANT

$

2622 Central Ave. SE, 255-5400, saharamiddleeasterneatery.com Delectable Middle Eastern plates served up Manhattan-deli style. The chicken shawarma plate, complete with greens, pita, hummus, and awardwinning tabbouleh, is always a good bet. Complete with beer and wine, and belly dancing on weekends, this is a fave of students, locals, and out-of-towners alike. Two locations, saigonrestaurantnm.com Vicky Truong’s secret to 12 years of success has been consistency. Truong maintains an extensive menu that caters to every type of eater. From summer dishes such as noodle bowls to winter mainstays like beef noodle soup, Truong will make sure you find your favorites.

SAKURA SUSHI & GRILL

$$

6241 Riverside Plaza NW, 890-2838, abqsakurasushingrill.com Favorites at Sakura are the Stone Pot Bibimbap (which is cooked at the table in a stone pot), the Tiger Roll, the Short Rib, the Baked Lobster Roll, the Sushi Tacos, and the impressive list of sake imported from Japan.

SALATHAI $

3619 Copper Ave. NE, 265-9330 Made-from-scratch, fresh, ingredients and keeping it simple are owner Pitak Pitakkan’s rules to cook by. Pitakkan cooks every menu item himself so don’t go to Salathai in a hurry. Pitakkan’s grandmother taught him to make curry and his curries are a longtime customer favorite.

SAL-E-BOY’S PIZZERIA

$$

THE SALT YARD

$$

1706 Southern Blvd. SE, 892-5454 Whole-milk mozzarella paired with homemade pizza dough and fresh tomato sauce… Brooklyn would be proud. This neighborhood pizza joint is a casual in-and-out; you don’t sit and eat here, just take it with you. Don’t forget to try a calzone.

SAMURAI GRILL AND SUSHI BAR

$$$

9500 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 275-6601, abqsamurai.com What’s your pleasure, sushi or teppan? Here, you can have either expertly crafted right in front of you. It’s also where you can get fresh sushi favorites such as the California roll, the dragon roll, and a veggies-and-sushi “Viagra salad” special.

SANDIAGO’S MEXICAN GRILL AT THE TRAM

$$

40 Tramway Road NE, 856-6692, sandiagos.com As if the view from Sandiago’s wasn’t enough— at the base of the tram, it offers a view of the city like no other—the restaurant has the food to match: unique coastal Mexican cuisine, New Mexican favorites, and blood orange margaritas. Reservations are recommended.

SANTA FE BITE-ABQ

3407 Central Ave NE 369-1621, santafebite-abq.com

$

At Santa Fe Bite-ABQ, the green chile cheeseburger is treated with the reverence it deserves, presenting a precision crafted recipe. The details, in fact, are so carefully crafted that even the grilling surface needs to meet certain criteria. Absent a turn on the surface of a custom cast iron grill, it’s just not a Santa Fe Bite burger.

SANTIAGO’S NEW MEXICAN GRILL

$

1911 Eubank Blvd. NE, 292-8226 It’s in the sauce—Papa Jim’s Taco Sauce, at least— which comes with items such as burritos, tacos, and salsa. This Santiago Scramble—a pile of scrambled eggs, cheese, corn tortillas, chorizo, and hash browns—is great morning fuel. The tamale and enchilada take-and-bake casseroles will please any partygoer. And take a jar of that taco sauce home— after all, you can.

SAVOY BAR & GRILL

$$$

10601 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 294-9463, savoyabq.com Resembling a California wine-country bistro, Savoy Bar & Grill is one of Albuquerque’s premier finedining establishments. Specializing in food and wine pairing, Savoy’s menu is a toast to the art of balance of food and wine.

SCARPAS BRICK OVEN PIZZA

$$

Two locations, scarpaspizza.com That brick oven is cornerstone to this neighborhood favorite, producing pizzas such as the shrimp pesto, the Greek, and the chipotle chicken. But Scarpas also knows pasta, including red chile cream pasta and pasta sorento with oak-roasted chicken.

SEARED $$

119 San Pasquale Ave SW 999-8414, searedabq.com During the day, the space is Cheese & Coffee, but at night, it gets a makeover and becomes Seared, a fine dining establishment serving up steak, pork loin, and Atlantic Salmon among other things.

THE SEASONAL PALATE

$$

7600 Jefferson St. NE, Suite 2, 369-1046, theseasonalpalate.com From a food truck to a brick-and-mortar location, The Seasonal Palate specializes in simple, yet artful creations, including crowd favorites like the Buffalo Burger, Shrimp Po’ Boy, and Asian Salad. Now with an expanded menu, expect beer and wine options in the future, along with prepared to-go dinner options.

Two locations, thesaltyardnm.com A multi-concept bar and restaurant, The Salt Yard is

equipped with games, dozens of televisions, great food, drinks, and plenty of space to stretch your legs. This unique location is a great place for parties, trying the newest beer and tequila (Blue Agave Republic is now a part of it), or just watching the game.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


BITES SEASONS ROTISSERIE AND GRILL $$$

2031 Mountain Road NW, 766-5100, seasonsabq.com As the name suggests, Seasons varies its menu in accordance with what’s going on throughout the year, using the finest, freshest ingredients. Depending on what time of year you venture in, you’ll find butternut squash ravioli, grilled Atlantic salmon, and bleu cheese-crusted beef filet. Reservations are recommended.

SERGIO’S LA DOLCE VITA

$

SHARK REEF CAFÉ

$

2740 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Suite 8, 554-2602 Fresh, made-from-scratch cookies, donuts, breads, pastries, cakes, and cannoli are on the mouthwatering menu at this Italian bakery. 2601 Central Ave. NW, 848-7182 To conclude your tour of the Albuquerque Aquarium, grab a seat at this full-service restaurant whose dining room features a view of the oceanic reef exhibit. Catering to visitors, families, and daytime dates, the menu offers simple, fun options. Call ahead for special events, like themed dinners and holiday celebrations.

SHARKY’S FISH & SHRIMP

$

5420 Central Ave. SW, 831-8905 Slip on your flip-flops and enjoy some Baja–inspired seafood, tacos, and carefree beach house ambiance in this roadside outdoor eatery. Sharky’s won acclaim as the little food truck that could, and this brick-and-mortar locale delivers the goods.

SHOGUN JAPANESE RESTAURANT

SLATE STREET BILLIARDS

$

2003 Southern Blvd SE #139, Rio Rancho 994-0363, slatestreetbilliards.com Come for the pool, stay for the nachos, and the burgers, and the wings. Rio Rancho’s favorite pool hall also offers has great Happy Hour pricing and plenty of special events.

SLATE STREET CAFÉ

$$

515 Slate Ave. NW, 243-2210, slatestreetcafe.com Slate Street Cafe is a sleek, contemporary eatery that combines big city ambience with inspired, modern cuisine. From the smoked salmon frittata to build-your-own bruschetta to mouthwatering Ahi tuna, their culinary flair will tantalize and delight from breakfast through dinner.

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED BY THE SAMS FAMILY

SLICE PARLOR

$

SOO BAK

$

Two locations, sliceparlor.com Made-from-scratch pizza dough that is hand stretched daily and cooked on a pizza stone. Have a slice of the old faithful pepperoni pizza; try the Pesto Pizza or the House Calzone. Don’t forget to enjoy the local artwork hanging on the walls. 111 Hermosa Dr SE 268-0017, soobakfoods.com Serving up a style of food known as “koi fusion”, Soo Bak offers a wide variety of delicious entrees including eight different varieties of kimichi. Try the Soy Crunch Kimichi, which comes with pickled chayote squash, onions, some jalapenos, and fish sauce, apple juice, soy sauce, and vinegar.

4801 ALAMEDA BLVD NE SUITE E-2, ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87113 505-554-3264 8101 SAN PEDRO DR NE, ALBUQUERQUE, NM 87113 505-821-0047

$$

3310 Central Ave. SE, 265-9166 When your order of sushi comes around the bend on its floating wooden boat, you couldn’t be happier, whether you’ve ordered the “Super Crunch” (shrimp tempura roll), or the “TNT Roll” (fish, zucchini and onion, baked with spicy mayo and smothered on a California roll).

THE SHOP BREAKFAST & LUNCH

$

2933 Monte Vista Blvd. NE, 433-2795 Breakfast and lunch at The Shop guarantees a plethora of flavors and textures that are tough to find in the Duke City. Combining down-home Southern staples with Mexican and New Mexican traditions, you’re bound to discover a new appreciation for bacon and eggs.

SIAM CAFÉ

$$

5500 San Mateo Blvd. NE, Suite 101, 883-7334, siamcafeabq.com With its array of freshly-made curries—all made with coconut milk and a wide variety of luscious spices—this restaurant scores high marks with Albuquerqueans who love Thai food.

SIXTY-SIX ACRES

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU. OPEN FOR TAKEOUT AND DELIVERY.

$$

2400 12th St. NW 243-2230, sixtysixacres.com If you had to boil Sixty-Six Acres down to two words, they would be “casual” and “classy.” Featuring craft cocktails and a wealth of locally sourced, globallyinspired dishes, Sixty-Six Acres is the ideal spot to grab a relaxed, refined meal.

SLAPFISH $$

Two locations, slapfishrestaurant.com Have you ever had fish so fresh that it jumped up and tail slapped you in the face? Well, that’s the joke behind the very popular eatery, Slapfish, located in Holly Square. This fast casual gem has gained a great reputation for efficiency, service, flavor combos, and the freshness of their seafood.

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BITES SPINN’S BURGER & BEER

$

SQUEEZED JUICE BAR

$

4411 Montaño Road NW, 899-6180, spinnsrestaurant.com Every burger served at Spinn’s is made with never-frozen, fresh-ground Angus beef. Try the restaurant’s signature Armadillo Burger. Spinn’s fries are cut and fried when you order them. Various locations, squeezedjuicebars.com

Incredibly innovative, modern mixed juices, smoothies, and other healthy delights for people on the move and looking for exercise recovery. Three to five pounds of fruit are squeezed into every drink, and it’s all extract, no fillers, and sure to brighten your day.

STEEL BENDER BREWYARD

$$

8305 2nd St. NW 433-3537, steelbenderbrewyard.com The 275-seat brewery has an industrial vibe with cozy undertones. But the Los Ranchos brewery stands apart from competitors based on its wide selection of house made beers and its gourmet menu.

ST. JAMES TEAROOM

$$$

320 Osuna Road NE, Suite D, 242-3752, stjamestearoom.com Albuquerque’s long-standing, go-to teahouse, this enveloping, intricately detailed, and authentically British tearoom provides old-fashioned conversation and honest service.

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STANDARD DINER

$$

320 Central Ave. SE, 243-1440, standarddiner.com There’s nothing standard about this diner. With a gourmet twist to many of your favorites, Standard Diner offers appetizers, daily entrée specials, and desserts by an in-house pastry chef, as well as their special Standard Burger made with Snake River Farms Kobe beef.

STARR BROS. BREWING

$

5700 San Antonio Dr. NE, Suite B1 492-2752, starrbrothersbrewing.com With dishes ranging from American favorites to Southern fare, Starr Bros. Brewing is more than an award-winning brewery. It’s turned heads with Poutine Burqueño, a New Mexican take on the Canadian, greasy-spoon classic. The house burger, with high-quality beef and homemade green chile aioli, is a customer favorite.

STEVE’S ICE CREAM AND JAVA

$

323 Romero St. NW # 16, 242-8445 In addition to a dozen ice cream flavors and an array of sherbets, the ‘chill’ side of the menu boasts delightfully smooth malts and fountain drinks. For those looking for a good cup of Joe, Steve’s also delivers–offering a broad selection of coffees and a full set of espressos.

STICKY RICE

$

7600 Jefferson St. SE, Suite 5, 797-1288 Likely the only authentic Laotian sticky rice to be found anywhere in ABQ, this simple menu offers moist, slow roasted chicken and a few frills at prices you can’t beat with a chopstick. The family meal is a steal.

STRAIGHT UP PIZZA

$$

2801 Eubank Blvd. NE, Suite G, 796-9343, straightuppizza.com Offering New York style pizza with a New Mexican edge, Straight Up Pizza serves the Northeast Heights with specialty pizzas, unique toppings, and a plethora of options for any pizza connoisseur.

STUFYS $

Three locations, stufys.com Tasty stuffed sopaipillas are on the menu of this customer favorite, which has been around since 1968. Each sopaipilla is made with a custom machine invented by the owners, then stuffed with savory fillings.

SUSHI & SAKE

$$

SUSHI KING

$$

SUSHI XUAN

$$

4214 Central Ave. SE 797-8000, abqsushiandsake.com With specialty sushi rolls, select Korean favorites, and a family-friendly atmosphere, Sushi & Sake specializes in Asian food with a Korean flair. Also look for non-sushi options, such as teriyaki chicken. Various locations, sushikingnm.com With three locations around Albuquerque, Sushi King proves day-after-day that it is king of the sea, boasting a large variety of specialty sushi rolls, Japanese curry dishes, and monthly menu revisions to keep the options fresh and appealing. Reservations are recommended. 417 Tramway Blvd NE #3, 200-2477, sushixuannm.com

You’ll find more than tasty sushi here. Diners dig into Chinese, Vietnamese, and Thai dishes, too. Sushi Xuan has multiple shipments of fresh fish during the week, and only uses Japanese Kokoro rice, and organic veggies whenever possible.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


BITES SUSHIYA $$

THAI SPICE

$$

SWISS ALPS BAKERY

THAI TIP RESTAURANT

$$

$$

2906 Juan Tabo Blvd. NE, Suite D, 275-4777, nmsushiya.com This family-owned and operated restaurant strives to serve up sushi the way you’d find it on the southern California coast. A clean and comfortable atmosphere pairs well with friendly service and some of the thickest cuts of sashimi in the city.

$

3000 San Pedro Drive NE, 881-3063, swissalpsbakery.com Desserts rule, but the sandwiches hit it out of the park. Endless flavors of pastries, tiramisu, and over a dozen cookies line the bakery case. Everything is scratch made including the many varieties of bread and authentic Bavarian style pretzels available on Saturdays. Paninis, grilled, and cold sandwiches round out the sweets with a full espresso bar.

TACO SAL

$

9621 Menaul Blvd. NE, 298-2210 This family-owned and operated restaurant offers tasty, traditional New Mexican (burritos, chile rellenos, enchiladas, tacos, huevos rancheros and more) with its very own chunky salsa, made with real green chile.

TAJ MAHAL CUISINE OF INDIA

$$

1430 Carlisle Blvd. NE, 255-1994, tajmahalabq.com Taj Mahal is filled with all of your Indian favorites, from fresh naan (try the garlic version) to tasty saag paneer. The line goes out the door for the popular lunch buffet.

TALKING DRUMS

$$

1606 Central Ave. SE 792-3221, talkingdrumsabq.com Talking Drums restaurant is serving up some unique African and Caribbean fair inspired by a form of communication expressed through specific drumbeats. Though most of the items are traditional, keep an eye out for some New Mexican flare.

TEOFILOS $$

144 Main St. NW, Los Lunas, 865-5511, teofilos.com The restaurant’s generations-old made-fromscratch recipes will draw you to Los Lunas, along with the warm chips, chile rellenos, crème cake, enchiladas, and more, all handmade from scratch.

THAI BORAN

$$

3236 La Orilla Rd. NW, 492-2244, thaiborannm.com Steeped in spicy tradition, Thai Boran has quickly gained traction as one of the top Thai restaurants Albuquerque has to offer. Thai Boran, which means “Old Thai”, features 53 items on its menu, including five soups, six curries, and five unique dishes off the “Chef’s Collection” section.

THAI CUISINE 2

$

4201 Central Ave. NE, 232-3200, thaicuisinenm.com thaicuisinenm.com/home2 Housed in perhaps the most curious A-frame along Route 66, this is the second-coming of a muchbeloved Westside Thai staple, and judging by the fandom, it’s simply better. Be wary of the heat in these dishes, and if you’re vegan/vegetarian, be very, very thankful.

THAI KITCHEN

$

10701 Corrales Road NW, 890-0059, thaikitchenabq.com Art Xaiyasiha is one of two siblings who crafted one of the Duke City’s first great Thai restaurants, Siam Café. Thai Kitchen is his very own venture, featuring his takes on authentic dishes that taste “just like they do back home.”

7441 Paseo Del Norte NE, 503-1521, thaispiceabq.com An extensive menu features authentic Thai favorites like Pad Thai or Thai fried rice. Lunch special includes an egg roll, entrée, and coconut milk tapioca pudding punctuated with an origami rose–topped straw.

TOMASITA’S $$

4949 Pan American Fwy NE, 344-1204, tomasitas.com Serving family recipes and making traditional dishes with local ingredients, Tomasita’s has been one of the state’s most popular local spots since Georgia Maryol opened it in Santa Fe in 1974.

TOMATO CAFÉ

$$

1512 Wyoming Blvd. NE, Suite E, 323-7447 The folks at Thai Tip make grocery store runs three times a day to ensure they have enough fresh ingredients for their delicious rice, Thai-style noodle dishes, stir-fries, and salads.

7900 San Pedro NE, 821-9300, tomatocafe.com A buffet-style, all-you-can-eat, sit-down restaurant where you create the menu: thin-crust pizzas, pastas, meatballs, steamed broccoli, and Italian green beans cooked over an open flame are just some of the treats.

THAI VEGAN

TORINOS’ @ HOME

$$

12611 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 293-6545, theobromachocolatier.com More than 20 years of experience goes into every morsel of European–inspired chocolate and sweet treat at this 505 sweet-tooth savior. Streamlined and polished, Theobroma has the look of a franchise, but everything is hand-crafted and produced on-site.

TROMBINO’S BISTRO ITALIANO

$$

THUNDER ROAD STEAKHOUSE AND CANTINA AT ROUTE 66 CASINO HOTEL

TSAI’S CHINESE BISTRO

$$

TULLY’S ITALIAN DELI

$$

Two locations, thaivegannm.com Utilizing local organic produce, you’ll get some of the healthiest food around, all without sacrificing taste. This non-vegan favorite has hearty offerings and a soy chicken that satisfies even the pickiest of meat eaters.

THEOBROMA CHOCOLATIER

$

$$

14500 Central Ave. SW, Laguna Pueblo 352-7888, rt66casino.com Nestled inside this busy casino, you’ll find dishes that are a confluence of cultures at Thunder Road: made-from-scratch salsas, fresh tortillas, Pastel de Tres Leches Cake, Yucatan Tacos, Smoked Baby Back Pork Ribs, and much more.

TIA BETTY BLUE’S

$

1248 San Mateo Blvd. SE, 268-1955, tiabettyblues.com 1940s influence is sprinkled throughout this gem, from the décor to the food. The chile, red or green, is nice and spicy, just like your grandma made it. New Mexican breakfast and lunch items dot the menu (including many gluten-free and vegetarian options), but often have a unique twist, like ranchero blue corn waffles piled high with eggs, carne adovada, and chile. The coffee is fresh, and numerous specialty beverages are poured up daily.

TIA B’S LA WAFFLERIA

$

3710 Campus Blvd. NE, 492-2007, lawaffleriaabq.com You’ve never experienced waffles of this magnitude. A residential home-turned-restaurant, anticipate artisan flare (lavender whipped cream, goat cheese, and caramel apple toppings) and plenty of goods for vegans and celiacs.

TIA JUANITA’S

$

Albuquerque International Sunport, 2200 Sunport Blvd. SE, 842-4280, fresquezcompanies.com Headed on a flight out of ABQ? Stop here for your New Mexican food fix: breakfast burritos, green chile chicken enchiladas, carne adovada. You can even take your green chile to go with the restaurant’s special “thermal bags” for travel.

TINGLEY BEACH CAFÉ

$

1800 Tingley Drive SW, 248-8524, cabq.gov For runners and bikers along the Bosque Trail, or for the fishermen that frequent Tingley Beach lakes, the Tingley Beach Café is a well-kept secret for snack seekers, offering fare such as hamburgers, hot dogs, French fries, pickles, and more.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

7600 Jefferson St. NE, 797-4491, torinostrattoria.com Now under the ownership of Daniel and Jenna John, Torinos’ still offers fresh Italian favorites— and you can look forward to the addition of new seasonal specialties to the menu, too.

5415 Academy Road NE, 821-5974, bistroitaliano.com

The former Trattoria Trombino cooks up Italiano autentico, with huge dishes of pasta with homemade sauces, grilled meats and fish, and veal marsala. The cool atmosphere lends relaxation, turning any meal into a vacation. Reservations are recommended.

2325 San Pedro Drive NE Ste 1E, 508-2925, tsaischinese.com Tsai’s offerings range wide across the traditional (diners especially recommend favorites like the Shrimp Kung Pao or Orange Beef) but those looking for something new to try should make for the Chef’s Specials. 1425 San Mateo Blvd. NE, 255-5370, tullysdeli.com This Italian deli serves two-dozen subs for dine-in or pick-up lunch. A fully stocked market features Italian pantry goods from pasta to olive oil. Don’t forget a box of pastries, cookies, biscotti, cake, or a famous cannoli on your way out.

TURTLE MOUNTAIN BREWING COMPANY $$

905 36th Place SE, Rio Rancho, 994-9497, turtlemountainbrewing.com turtlemountainbrewing.com Known for its handcrafted ales and lagers, which are brewed on the premises, this is more than just a place to enjoy a few drinks. It’s also a great place to enjoy wood-fired pizzas and calzones in a relaxed, laid-back atmosphere.

TWO BOYS DONUTS

$

6400 Holly Ave NE, Ste H 302-0102, twoboysdonuts.com Regularly stocking more than 30 flavors of donut, Two Boys has particular favorites—like their blueberry cake donut with maple icing and cinnamon sugar—and also brews up Villa Myriam coffee, giving you everything you need for a fullcourse wake-up.

TWO FOOLS TAVERN

$$

3211 Central Ave. NE, 265-7447, 2foolstavern.com A taste of the Emerald Isle: fish and chips, bangers and mash, bread pudding, Guinness on tap, and live Celtic music on Sunday afternoons.

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BITES UPTOWN SPORTS BAR

$

6601 Uptown Blvd. NE, 884-4714, uptown-sportsbar.com A huge sports venue with wall-to-wall televisions and all the extras—solid American fare alongside a wide selection of local and national beers.

URBAN HOTDOG COMPANY

$

Various locations, urbanhotdogcompany.com With about 20 choices—and even a vegetarian option—this restaurant has become a dog-lover’s go-to. Look for Chicago and NYC classics, plus adventurous temptations like the Crafty Dog (topped with mac ‘n’ cheese and bacon).

VERNON’S HIDDEN VALLEY STEAKHOUSE $$$

6855 4th St. NW, 341-0831, thehiddensteakhouse.com This unmarked restaurant requires a secret password to gain entrance. Once inside, you’ll discover a world of perfect steaks and gourmet seafood, paired with an unbeatable loungey atmosphere. Reservations are recommended.

VIC’S DAILY CAFÉ

$

3600 Osuna Road NE, 341-9710, vicsdailycafe.com With a full range of breakfast items, New Mexican favorites, and comfort food, this is a one-stop shop for tasty options like breakfast burritos, meatloaf, and coconut cream pie.

VICK’S VITTLES COUNTRY KITCHEN

$

8810 Central Ave. SE, 298-5143, vicksvittles.com Rustle up your posse and head to Vick’s for heaping helpings of Texas-New Mexico fusion and breakfast

served all day. Country comfort meets southwestern flair in an environment that welcomes suits and cowboys alike. Prepare to be stuffed.

VIET TASTE

$

5721 Menaul Blvd. NE, 888-0101, pwbportal.us/viet-taste-abq With more than 100 menu options—noodle and rice dishes, eight varieties of Pho, coconut shakes, and many more—this restaurant is true to its name, offering a real taste of Vietnamese cuisine.

VIET PHO

$$

4208 Menaul Blvd. NE, 717-2359 This Vietnamese-based cuisine restaurant offers a homey feel and Southeast Asian comfort food. Try the popular Beef Pho Soup or go for a lighter dish like the Shrimp Spring Rolls.

VILLAGE PIZZA

$

Two locations, villagepizzanm.com Family owned and operated, Village Pizza offers salads, nachos, calzones, pasta, and of course, signature pizzas, along with an all-you-can-eat buffet.

VINAIGRETTE $$ 1828 Central Ave. SW, 842-5507, vinaigretteonline.com

Getting in touch with your “green” side has never been as hip as it is at Albuquerque’s newest go-to salad bistro. Vinaigrette offers a menu full of unique salads made with fresh produce from owner Erin Wade’s farm in Nambè. Items like The Nutty Pear-Fessor and the Asian Chopped Salad don’t sacrifice deliciousness just because they’re healthy. Expect one of 17 vinaigrette dressings to be perfectly paired with your salad.

VINTAGE 423

8000 Paseo Del Norte Blvd. NE, 821-1918, vintage-423.com

$$

Decorated with plush booths, black and white photos of vintage cars, a glass wine cellar wall, and an outdoor patio with couches and fireplaces, Vintage 423 is a goto location for good eats and happy hour—all year long.

WECK’S $$

Various locations, wecksinc.com For nearly 20 years, Weck’s has served up huge, tasty portions of breakfast and lunch. Examples: The Original comes with one pound of potatoes mixed with eggs, cheese, and chile; the “Scratch Made” Buttermilk Pancakes are more than seven inches wide.

WHICH WICH

$

WHOLE HOG CAFÉ

$

WISEPIES PIZZA AND SALAD

$

Various locations, whichwich.com A national brand with local twists, list your favorites on the bag and await a sammie that edges the competition. The UNM location is a student mainstay. Two locations, wholehogcafenm.com Get award-winning Memphis-style barbecue in a family-friendly atmosphere. Can’t-miss items include the pulled pork, potato salad, and the homemade banana pudding. Various locations, wisepiespizza.com WisePies serves up steaming hot pizza pies for wise guys and gals throughout New Mexico with plans for future expansion into other states. Their pizza and salads are fast and inexpensive… not to mention delicious.

YANNI’S MODERN MEDITERRANEAN $$

3109 Central Ave. SE, 268-9250, yannisabq.com Impeccable Mediterranean cuisine paired with a fresh atmosphere that whisks you away to Grecian shores, you can always count on Yanni’s for savory spanakopita, perfect pasta, and other delicious treats. Reservations are recommended.

YASMINE’S CAFÉ

$

THE YELLER SUB

$

1600 Central Ave. SE, 242-1980 Yasmine’s is one of the few places in Albuquerque with shawarma—pitas filled with marinated chicken or beef that’s been pressed, stacked and cooked slowly on a rotisserie. Also try lamb and beef shish kababs, baba ghanoush, fatah, and four varieties of baklava. 7200 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 888-9784, yellersub.com Owner Mark Roerick has been perfecting his sandwiches since 1979 and the customer favorite, Steak & Grilled Onions Sub proves it. The potato chips, fries, and onion rings made from scratch the old-fashioned way sure won’t let you down.

Everything for Your Garden

Fruit Trees, Veggies, Flowers, Shrubs & Perennials On the SW Corner of 4th St & Alameda Blvd Open Daily 9 AM–5:30PM

505.898.3562 AlamedaGreenhouseABQ.com 9515 4th St NW Albuquerque, NM 87114 ■

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ZINC WINE BAR AND BISTRO

$$$

3009 Central Ave. NE, 254-9462, zincabq.com Imaginative, gourmet cuisine (think: duck confit eggrolls, chicken skewer salad, and pine nut spanakopita) and an out-of-this-world wine list meets a friendly, laid-back atmosphere at this Nob Hill favorite. Reservations are recommended.

ZORBA’S FINE GREEK CUISINE

$

11225 Montgomery Blvd. NE, 323-2695, zorbasabq.com The family behind University area favorite, Olympia Café, have relocated their tasty homemade Greek food to the Northeast Heights. Try the Southwestern Gyros or the enduring customer favorite, the pork, chicken, or lamb kebob.

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


‘TIL YOU DROP P. 168 | PASSENGER WINDOW P. 176 | PHOTO CONTEST P. 172 | 25 THINGS P. 179

VOLCANIC ABQ Among its many wonders, the west mesa of Albuquerque is home to several volcanoes that can be veiwed from the road or hiked to using city trails (p. 176).

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

OUT AND ABOUT: YOUR GUIDE TO SHOPPING IN THE DUKE CITY

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Look good Feel good

‘TIL YOU DROP

YOUR INSIDER’S GUIDE TO ABQ’S SHOPPING SCENE

Tips to be a better you...

“QUARANTINE IS OBVIOUSLY DIFFICULT, BUT I’VE FOUND WAYS TO KEEP MY BODY ACTIVE. IT’S MY MIND THAT NEEDS SOME HELP. WHAT CAN I DO TO KEEP MYSELF SANE DURING THIS TIME?”

T ER P X

OUR E

OU R

E

Q:

ll By Kelli Trapne

XP ER T

Heather Smelser Owner Mi Vida Yoga Studio mividayoganm.com Helen McKinney, Therapist Elevation Counseling elevationcounseling.com

A:

“I think about therapy as an opportunity to talk to somebody, an impartial third party, but an opportunity to talk to somebody and to have this space to normalize, to better understand, what it is that happens in terms of the human experience: why I feel the way I feel, why and how certain things impact me, and trying to create space that’s validating and acknowledging why things happen. We’re living in a time right now where we’re seeing the entire globe, and more specifically communities all across our country, facing a really real threat, and I think it makes sense that folks would feel stressed, things are really uncertain right now. But folks aren’t alone. And it can be really nice to talk to somebody to know, hey, you’re not alone.”

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A:

”I tend to suffer from anxiety and depression, which is why I got into this practice. Yoga helps reset the nervous system. By doing yoga even 2 times a week, we’re giving ourselves the chance to reset, to reboot. Even if people come into it for the physical aspect, they end up realizing there are other benefits as well. We have a couple of really nice classes for people who may be intimidated. One of the nice things about live-streaming is that people can join us out of their own homes. For beginners, I would recommend Gentle Flow or Chair Yoga, which are designed to accommodate everybody. We’re offering not only the live stream, but also an online, five session workshop called Yoga 101 With Heather.”

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020


E OU R

T ER P X

Kevin Snow, Intuitive Counselor/ Founder Snow Wellness

A:

“Wellness is basically a description of this integrated human that we are. So, to really achieve the state of wellness, we have to address our physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual aspects or lives or dimensions. This integration is achieved through introspection and by focusing on our growth in each area. From a core human standpoint, we have been beings who’ve practiced ritual and ceremony since the beginning of time. We’re built that way. We live in a world now, where the rituals usually become habits; usually they’re bad habits. So what we’re trying to do with wellness is actually to try to undo some of the bad habits and turn them into good rituals. We do that by essentially making your life more sacred.”

[

[

Want to look good and feel good? Send us your questions, and we’ll ask the city’s experts, lookgoodfeelgood@abqthemag.com

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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‘TIL YOU DROP

We Find It FOR YOU QUESTION The quarantine is starting to get to me a little bit. I don’t have sports and all I do is sit and binge Netflix. Are there any ways that I can stay active while isolating?

ANSWER Absolutely! Albuquerqueans have stepped up their game in the virtual sphere. Here are just a few of the options we found for staying in shape during these difficult times.

EXERCISE LIKE A GLADIATOR The Duke City Gladiators may not get to play in a stadium this year thanks to the COVID-19 closures, but that hasn’t kept them off the field. To help bolster our community and offer a much-needed physical outlet for fans of all ages, the football team has been going live on their Instagram page three times a week in a guided exercise program called “Recess.” Every session of Recess features Duke City Gladiators like Jayson Serda and Dello Davis, there to lead participants through 15 to 30 minutes of simple stretches and drills that are kid-friendly, parent-friendly, and most of all, indoor-friendly. The classes are free and easy to access—all you need is an Instagram account to view the live stream. Plus, the class isn’t the only way the team has been giving back—they’ve also been helping feed the elderly with New Mexico Aging Long Term Services, and they’ve been FaceTiming with young Gladiators fans, too.

COURTESY PHOTO

Recess with the Duke City Gladiators, Free 1 p.m. every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday on Instagram @dcgladiatorsofficial

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DANCE LIKE NOBODY’S LOOKIN’ If cutting a rug is more your speed, you’re in luck, because NDI New Mexico is offering three special online summer programs for dancers of all ages and skill levels. Dance Daily contains programming specifically designed to get your family moving—featuring live and pre-recorded classes. With classes like Stretch, Advanced and Intermediate Ballet, and Salsa Cardio (which is taught in Spanish) the program spans a huge variety of styles, skill levels, and functions. Or, if you’re aching for the great outdoors (and hoping for a workout that’ll also encourage your artistic side), try the Summer Institute: Outside/In, which is specifically designed for ages 9-13, and offers classes that are set in gorgeous scenic locations like the Florida Everglades, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, and even right here at home in the Land of Enchantment. These classes will also focus on your creative side, teaching you stories and legends about each place and encouraging you to create your own poetry and art. Last but not least, for more advanced dance students, there’s the Dancing 101 summer intensive, during which guest instructors from around the world will teach dance history and culture, and which culminates in a choreography project that students present in the final weeks of class. There are over 80 class offerings a week, across all programs, which means there’s a little boogie for everyone. Online Summer Dance Programs with NDI New Mexico, $10 (sliding scale up to $4,500) Register for classes at ndi-nm.org ($4500 for unlimited summer access to three different programs)

WORKOUT LIKE A REBEL If you’re looking for a more traditional group exercise class feel while you’re staying home, check out the offerings from Rebel Workout, an independent, women-owned gym that has a sizeable local following. Their class offerings heavily feature TRX: a specialized form of suspension training called Total Resistance Exercises, which uses resistance bands and is a common part of high intensity programs like CrossFit. The difference is that Rebel Workout focuses on teaching workout practices and movement patterns that will work and tone your body without exacerbating pain. Whether you take a TRX class or one of their stretching or mobility classes, the goal is to help you build strength and stamina and get your body moving by leveraging your bodyweight against you, even at home. Best of all, Rebel Workout is a community-focused gym, and that community comes through in their YouTube classes as much as in person. If you’re looking for encouraging trainers and a low-impact workout that lets you try something new, look no further. Rebel Workout, $6 per class ($50 for a full month) Hosted on YouTube. Register at rebelworkout.com

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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PHOTO CONTEST

RUNNING THE ROAD By Becky O’Neill

B

ecky O’Neill has always had a passion for wildlife. It was there when she was just a little girl running around the woods in eastern Kentucky, and it was definitely there years down the line when she earned a master’s degree in biology off research into the peculiar relationship between carrion beetles and the mites that live on them. Little surprise then that she eventually developed a taste for wildlife photography. She’s snapped shots of fauna—feathered or otherwise—in Yellowstone National Park, on the Tonle Sap in Cambodia, in the rainforest of Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula, and amongst the mangroves on Isla Holbox off Mexico’s Caribbean coast. Her photo of a greater roadrunner— captured on a Nikon D810 with a 300mm lens—came about on one of her regular forrays to the Rio Grande Nature Center State Park. “People feed them there,” O’Neill says of the bird. “That makes them pretty friendly and patient, as far as wild birds go.” Feeding the wildlife, she’s quick to caution, is not something people should be doing. The shot captures a lot of detail, including the iconic southwestern bird’s distinctive feathered crest, along with the swaths of blue and orange that mark the otherwise white skin around and behind the eye. “I really love roadrunners. They really look like living dinosaurs,” she says. As O’Neill explains, that impression captures a sometimes overlooked reality: birds literally are dinosaurs. “Birds evolved from dinosaurs,” she explains. “If you look at the dinosaur family tree, birds are on it.” —ZB

Enter ATM’s photo contest and see your photo featured in our PHOTO OF THE MONTH! Submissions should include one high-resolution digital file sent by email. All photos sent to ATM will be property of the magazine and will not be mailed back to sender. All entries should include your name and phone number. Please include a bio and a brief description of how the photo was taken. Email entries to: photocontest@abqthemag.com

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PET OF T H E MONTH

PET OF THE MONTH ATM readers’ furry, fuzzy, feathered, or scaly best friends. This month's winner: Stella.

W

hile some people have a particular love for this or that dog breed, true dog lovers know that the best dogs often don’t go by fancy breed names. They’re just dogs, through and through. So it is with Stella, a 14 year old blend of cattle dog and beagle. Stella’s family adopted her from a shelter in Decatur, Illinois when she was just 5 months old. Apparently, she’d been adopted by an older couple who found her a bit too excitable. “That energy was perfect for our young family,” says Amy McKenzie. “Stella has been a huge part of our family since day one.” Stella grew up alongside McKenzie’s two sons, playing fetch and joining the family on hikes—essentially the perfect activities for a young, excitable dog. Fourteen years later, she’s slowed down a bit, building a sweeter and sweeter demeanor in the process. “She may not walk as far or as fast as she used to, and games of fetch are a little slower and shorter, but we’re happy to go at her pace,” McKenzie says. These days, Stella has her routine perfectly mapped out. Since McKenzie works from home, Stella is both her canine companion and office mate, even earning well-deserved recognition as “Employee of the Quarter.” “[She] has all the sunny spots in the house mapped out for optimal snoozing,” McKenzie says. “But [she’ll] come out of a dead sleep to alert me when the mailman is approaching the door.”—ZB

Is your pet ATM’s next Pet of the Month? Send a photo and short story about why you think your pet belongs in these pages to petofthemonth@abqthemag.com.

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JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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THE

PASSENGER WINDOW

ART IN RETROSPECT The west mesa volcanoes are natural Albuquerque icons

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valley.” For a more recent point of comparison, Zimmerer points to the 2018 lower Puna eruption in Hawaii, when magma reached the surface of Kilauea’s East Rift Zone. There, tongues of molten rock boiled out of the earth for over four months, sometimes reaching 300 feet into the air. When the Albuquerque volcanoes erupted, the lava they spewed ran generally eastward, running down toward the Rio Grande itself before solidifying into basalt and scoria. Over time, the river cut away the land to form the west mesa, in the process shaping those distinctive black basalt

cliffs that mark the western boundary of the city. Today, the spatter cones are part of Petroglyph National Park, easily visited along the Volcano Day Use trails, just off Atrisco Vista Boulevard. A fifteen minute walk can take you from the trailhead parking lot to the top of Black Volcano, where you can stand in the middle of the ancient spatter cones and get a close look at the geological signature of a fissure eruption. For a bonus treat, turn east and you can get a mighty splendid view of Albuquerque and the Sandias. —ZB

WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM | JUNE 2020

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

N

ot every city has a string of volcanoes for a neighbor. Sure, the ones running roughly north to south across the skyline on Albuquerque’s west mesa are extinct, but that hardly makes them less unusual. “The Albuquerque volcanoes are a type of eruption called a fissure eruption,” explains Dr. Matthew Zimmerer, a field geologist with the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources who specializes in geochronology, geochemistry, and volcanology. “This is a type of eruption that forms when a large crack in the earth is filled with molten rock—magma—and that magma reaches the surface and produces a line of volcanoes.” To be clear, the stretch of Rio Grande rift Albuquerque currently calls home never played host to a Vesuvius or Mount St. Helens. These were less violent eruptions, brought about when the sort of runny, low viscosity magma that forms basalt reached the surface by following a fault associated with the Rio Grande rift system up from lower down in the earth’s crust. That doesn’t mean the eruptions that built the spatter cones we now call JA, Black, Vulcan, Bond, and Butte weren’t spectacular in their own right. Had any humans been around 190,000 to 220,000 years ago (they weren’t—early humans were still living in Africa at the time), they’d have been treated to some pretty incredible fireworks. “Even though it looks like multiple volcanoes—and in fact it is multiple volcanoes—[they] were produced during a single eruptive event,” says Zimmerer. “If you had been in what would become Albuquerque 200,000 years ago when this was erupting, it probably would have looked similar to what we’ve seen at places like Hawaii. There would have been fire fountaining, lava shooting into the air hundreds of feet. That lava would then fall to the surface, producing these lava flows that flowed down toward the Rio Grande


ADVERTISING REGISTRY 3 Advertising.......................................................................................................42 Above & Beyond Events..................................................................................... 84 ABQ The Magazine............................................................48, 68, 69, 76, 79, 169 Admiral Beverage......................................................................................... 87, 128 Alameda Greenhouse....................................................................................... 166 Albuquerque Business First................................................................................39 Albuquerque Florist..........................................................................................156 Albuquerque Plumbing Heating & Cooling...................................................106 All World Travel.......................................................................................23, 82, 83 American General Media........................................................70, 74, 85, 158, 164 Animal Humane Association of New Mexico.................................................. 173 Anthem Financial..............................................................................................105 Assistance League...............................................................................................117 Blake's Lota Burger............................................................................................147 Blue Rose Studios...............................................................................................39 Bridal Elegance....................................................................................................43 California Closets...............................................................................................88 Casa Taco.............................................................................................................45 Clark's Pet Emporium........................................................................................ 44 Central New Mexico Community College........................................................49 Coe & Peterson, LLC Commercial Properties..................................................130 Cosmetic Dentistry of New Mexico.................................................................6, 7 Courageous Transformations...........................................................................155 Crystal Springs.............................................................................................81, 149 D.H. Lescombes Winery & Bistro.................................................................... 143 Daniel's Plumbing, Heating & Air Conditioning..........................................16, 17 Dermatology and Skin Cancer Center...............................................................40 Dr. Jayne Buttner.................................................................................................51

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JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

Radiology Associates of Albuquerque............................................................... 30 Rio Grande Dermatology..................................................................................177 Route 66 Casino Hotel......................................................................2, 3, 4, 5, 160 Route 66 Dry Cleaners.......................................................................................89 Rudy's Country Store & BBQ...........................................................................155 Sacred Garden...................................................................................................150 Sagecore Technologies........................................................................................41 Salt & Board......................................................................................................152 Sandia Area Federal Credit Union......................................................................27 Siarza..................................................................................................................133 Slate Street Billiards..........................................................................................145 Southern Glazer's Wine & Spirits....................................................................132 Southwest Labs.................................................................................................103 Southwest Women's Oncology..........................................................................29 Stribling Chiropractic.......................................................................................154 Strictly Repairz................................................................................................... 76 Subway - The Sams Family...............................................................................163 Tamashi..............................................................................................................142 The Canyon Club............................................................................................... 25 The Cleanery......................................................................................................159 The Grove..........................................................................................................157 The Law Office of Adam Oakey........................................................................ 137 Tito's/Southern...................................................................................................80 UNM School of Medicine....................................................................12, 13, 14, 15 UNM Ticketing..................................................................................................50 Wise Pies...........................................................................................................175

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Co-Artistic Director, Cardboard Playhouse Theatre Company Growing up in Albuquerque, Doug Montoya dreamed of being in Star Wars. His path didn’t lead to a galaxy far, far away, but his life and career still managed to end up in theater. As a trained thespian, Montoya helped build Albuquerque’s theater scene. He has run numerous improv troops (he started out in 1988 while living in Los Angeles) and is the co-owner (along with partner Kristin Berg) of Cardboard Playhouse Theatre Company, one of Albuquerque’s premier children’s theaters. He’s also a father, cook, medic, comedian, screenwriter, and (wait for it…) singing zombie. —TAYLOR HOOD

1. My favorite childhood memory was when my uncle and four sisters and I went to Disneyland. It was 1976 and the Matterhorn [rollercoaster] was brand new.

2.

My most treasured possession is my hamburger wallet. My son got me my first one and I just keep buying new ones when they wear out.

3. A few years after Kristin Berg and I opened The Box Performance Space, we decided to visit one weekend. Nobody knew who we were, and we just watched how much fun everyone was having in this place that we had built. 4. I hate the term, “butts in the seats.” It makes the audience seem like asses. 5. I have a Van Dyke mustache. It was a problem when I was on the television show Interrogation. They thought it wasn’t period accurate. 6. I’ve never actually gotten to see a show on Broadway, but I

catch all of the traveling shows. My favorite has to be The Lion King. 7. When I was a child, all I wanted to do was be in a Star Wars movie. It didn’t happen, but I am still a huge Star Wars geek. 8. I build a lot of LEGO. Specifically, I build a lot of Star Wars LEGO. My favorite piece is a huge replica of BB-8. [A droid from the new Star Wars trilogy.] 9. My personal motto is: If you are going to pick your nose, pick it big!

10.

My mentor growing up was my high school theater teacher. He was a hard-core Marine and ran rehearsals with an iron fist. He didn’t mess around but was caring at the same time.

11. My very first job was at Der Wienerschnitzel. I was in high school and a few months after I started, the company removed the “Der” from the name.

JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

22. My favorite showtune is Isn’t it Possible. Yes, it’s from Seussical: The Musical.

13. I took third place in my middle school talent show. I dressed up in tie-dye and stuck paper musical notes all over me and sang I Write the Songs by Barry Manilow.

23. I wrote a script a few years ago called The Third Act. We just filmed it this year and it’s set for an August release.

14. I was in the National Guard from 1981 to 1987. I was a medic. 15. I was on national news during the Iran Contra affair for creating the “Ollie North Burger.” I was working in a Pasadena restaurant and suggested a burger with everything shredded and topped with an American Flag. [Oliver North was a central figure in the Iran-Contra affair and admitted to Congress that he had illegally shredded documents.]

24. The first show I ever produced was Charlie Brown Christmas. Nobody had done it at that point and so getting a script and the rights was impossible. 25. I got into the theater business by helping a friend bring audiences into his struggling theater with a children’s show. It was a huge success and so I did another one and here I am 15 years later.

16. I played a singing zombie in the Netflix show Daybreakers. I was put in a tuxedo and full makeup and sang a commercial jingle over and over. 17. I love hip hop documentaries. It’s funny because I don’t even listen to hip hop. 18. My most interesting role was in the female version of the famous play, The Odd Couple, in which I played one of the Castillo Brothers. 19. I started out doing children’s theatre as a way to have fun with my son. He was in all of my shows at the beginning. 20. I make loud comments during the previews at movie theaters. My son gets so embarrassed that, in the past, he has moved seats to get away from me. 21. My favorite show that I’ve ever produced is Seussical: The Musical.

PHOTO BY DON JAMES/ATM

With Doug Montoya

12. I have a weakness for margaritas. They are my guilty pleasure.

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Š Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2020. This material is for descriptive purposes only. Kubota disclaims all representations and warranties, express or implied, or any liability from Š Corporation, 2020. This material is for descriptive purposes only. Kubota all representations warranties, express or KubotaUSA.com/disclaimers implied, or any liability from theKubota use of Tractor this material. For complete warranty, safety and product information, consult yourdisclaims local Kubota dealer. For the and complete disclaimer, go to the use material. For complete warranty, safety and product information, consult your local Kubota dealer. For WWW.ABQTHEMAG.COM the complete disclaimer, go to KubotaUSA.com/disclaimers | JUNE 2020 and seeofthethis posted disclaimer. and see the posted disclaimer.

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Albuquerque’s German Auto Specialists

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JUNE 2020 | ALBUQUERQUE THE MAGAZINE

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