Page 1

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2007 •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• / PUBLIC SPACES / PUBLIC LIFE •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

SYDNEY


client Sydney City Council Town Hall House 456 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

Project Team: Bridget Smyth Laurence Johnson Lei Liu Pauline Chan

The following students from University of NSW, have participated in collecting data for the public life survey: Maria Adriani Jahnavi Ashar Jillian Maree Bywater Guru Prasanna Channa Basappa Feng Hui Feng Xiao Gong Li Liang Jin Lin Zhi Jie Kathleen Walsh McDowell Rodrigo Ochoa Jurado Thi Thu Huyen Pham Fachri Dwi Rama Wiranti Teddy Wang Sheng Wang Shu Xie Qing Yi Xu Pian Pian Yue Jess Zhou Yimin Zhu Weijun The following people from PPS - THE PEOPLE FOR PLACES AND SPACES have participated in collecting data for the public life survey: Alison Hardacre Renee Morrow Heidi Willis Luke Wilson

consultant Gehl Architects ApS Project Manager: Jan Gehl, Professor, Dr. litt., architect MAA, FRIBA Project Coordinator: Henriette Mortensen, architect MAA Project Team: Sia KirknĂŚs, architect MAA Johanna Kaaman, stud.arch Johanna Ferrer Guldager, stud.arch Mariken Landstad Helle, stud.arch


FOREWORD BY LORD MAYOR CLOVER MOORE MP In February, the City of Sydney commissioned world renowned Danish urban designer Jan Gehl of Gehl Architects to undertake a Public Spaces Public Life Study of central Sydney. The study’s focus extended from Central Station in the south to Circular Quay in the north; Darling Harbour in the west to the Domain in the east. This is the most intensely used area of Sydney, with over half a million people each day. I am pleased to present Jan Gehl’s report, a blueprint to transform our CBD into a people friendly, public transport oriented, green, connected, attractive and distinctive city heart. The report considers reviews how people use our public spaces and streets in central Sydney. It assesses how they move around and how our public spaces could better promote public life and outdoor leisure. Jan’s proposals to improve the pedestrian and cycling potential of Sydney sit firmly with this Council’s vision for a liveable city. The report provides us with a useful benchmark to assess our city against others that have been studied by Gehl Architects, including London, Copenhagen, Melbourne and Stockholm. A Public Spaces Public Life Study is now being done for New York. Central Sydney has wonderful foreshore, great landmarks such as the Opera House and Harbour Bridge, extensive parklands, and distinctive topography. Much has been achieved through our heritage preservation, streetscape upgrades and tree planting programs. However, the City Centre needs a major rearrangement to get the best from our natural assets and to rescue pedestrians. The report challenges us to make the changes needed to unlock the full potential, particularly in respect to traffic and parking. Jan Gehl found that Sydney is at breaking point, unable to cope with the traffic volumes and gradually being choked in fumes and noise. Transport is the critical issue to make our city work properly for its residents, businesses, workers and visitors. Future plans must be fully integrated with wider transport solutions developed by State Government. Jan Gehl has provided us with a timely and comprehensive set of ideas that are challenging and insightful. His recommendations range from strategic to detailed; manageable to complex; and across the short, medium and long term. Many of the proposals complement current City directions, while others present greater challenges. Most cannot be delivered by the City alone and we will need partnerships with State and Federal Government, community and the business sector. Jan’s work coincides with preparation of Sustainable Sydney 2030, the City’s long term strategic vision for the next 20 years and beyond. We will assess his recommendations for inclusion in Sustainable Sydney 2030 and to develop an implementation strategy. This exciting vision will help us transform the City Centre and unlock our city’s true potential as a liveable, pedestrian friendly, vibrant and exciting city.

Clover Moore MP Lord Mayor City of Sydney


The report consist of 2 documents: PUBLIC SPACES - PUBLIC LIFE SYDNEY 2007 containing analysis of the study area including a summary of the public life survey, and a set of overall recommendations.

PUBLIC LIFE DATA 2007 presents the public life survey in detail.

4

INTRODUCTION


CONTENTS

introduction

Background for the study The Sydney study in broad outline Study area Major landscape values Major achievements Major problems

Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 14

the city

City scale comparisons Understanding the grid Walking distances Scale references Open spaces Lack of open space network Lack of street distinction The high city A steep topography Design codes A uniform paving Comprehensive tree planting Incoherent public art Heritage Ground floor frontages Active frontages Inactive frontages What is open at night Mono-functional districts

Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37

recommendations

Key recommendations CAPITALISE ON THE AMENITIES A waterfront city A green connected city A 21ST CENTURY TRAFFIC SYSTEM A better city for walking A better city for cycling A strong public transport city A traffic calmed city AN ATTRACTIVE PUBLIC REALM A strong identity An inviting streetscape A diverse, inclusive and lively city

Page 74

Page 92 Page 102 Page 106

INSPIRATION REFLECTIONS

Page 108 Page 112

Page 78 Page 82 Page 84 Page 86 Page 88 Page 90

the people

Living in the city centre Page 40 Students in the city centre Page 41 Driving in the city centre Page 42 A freeway environment Page 44 An introvert city Page 45 Parking in the city centre Page 46 Public transport Page 48 Cycling in the city centre Page 50 Walking in the city centre Page 51 Pedestrian traffic Page 52 Frequent interruptions Page 56 Cluttered streetscapes Page 58 Unnecessary interruptions Page 59 Low level of accessibility Page 60 Absent user groups Page 61 Stationary activities Page 62 Few facilities for children Page 63 Patterns of use Page 64 Few public benches Page 66 Outdoor cafĂŠ seating Page 67 Microclimate Page 68 Split level recreation Page 69 Great for parties... Page 70

INTRODUCTION

5


INTRODUCTION


BACKGROUND FOR THE STUDY

Gehl Architects’ work is based on the public space research conducted by Jan Gehl. With the human dimension as a starting point Jan Gehl has through the last 30 years worked to improve city environments in Denmark and abroad.

The book “Life between buildings” from 1971 has been translated to a number of languages and is compulsory reading in numerous architecture schools worldwide. “Life between buildings” describes the life that takes place in the spaces created by the buildings in both cities and suburbs and advocates for a stronger effort from planners and architects to understand and create the framework that provides for public life in the best possible way. The objective for Gehl Architects is to create a stronger coherence between the life lived and the planned or existing building structures. Public life is at the top of the agenda and great care is needed to accommodate for the people populating our cities.

As part of a working tool Gehl Architects have developed the Public Spaces and Public Life studies which can be used in several contexts. In Copenhagen, PSPL surveys have been conducted every ten years throughout the past forty years. The surveys clearly and thoroughly document the gradual change occurring in this time period and provide empirical evidence of the significant improvement of the quality of city life. Additionally follow-up surveys have enabled the municipal government to gather information and inspiration for the further development of the urban spaces and the general public has acquired a valuable understanding and interest in the public realm. This trend has spread to other cities as well, as Gehl Architects have performed follow-up surveys in Stockholm in 2005 (follow-up to a 1990 survey) and Melbourne in 2004 (follow-up to a 1994 survey). In both cases, PSPL studies have shown that public realm improvements truly have had a large impact on the quality of public life in the city. Such evidence has proven to be vital in maintaining public interest in further improvement projects, as well as general satisfaction amongst citizens as residents can see quantifiable evidence of improved quality of life.

public spaces and public life 2004

Public Spaces and Public Life study

places for people

City to Waterfront - Wellington October 2004

DRAFT

The City of Melbourne in collaboration with GEHL ARCHITECTS, Urban Quality Consulents Copenhagen

melbourne city centre

Melbourne - 2004 - 3 mio. inhabitants

Adelaide - 2002 - 1.3 mio. inhabitants

Perth - 1993 - 1.2 mio. inhabitants

Wellington - 2004 - 0.3 mio. inhabitants

SCOPE AND BUDGET, AUGUST 2007

Problem och potential 2005

september 2005

Stadsrum och stadsliv i Stockholms innerstad

Copenhagen - 2005 - 1.3 mio. inhabitants

8

INTRODUCTION

Stockholm - 2005 - 1.2 mio. inhabitants

London - 2003 - 7.5 mio. inhabitants

New York - 2007 - 8 mio. inhabitants


THE SYDNEY STUDY IN BROAD OUTLINE

the city

THE CITY is a presentation of the study area and an analysis of the

the people

THE PEOPLE is a presentation of the people living and spending time in the city. What are the major conflicts with pedestrian

actual physical conditions provided for pedestrians. How are the public spaces composed? How are the public spaces organised, designed and equipped?

movements? What is the traffic situation like? Through qualitative analysis the public spaces in Sydney are evaluated as to how people are accomodated in the city today. The analysis covers both the issues related to walking and getting around in general, and the issues regarding spending time in the city.

recommendations

public life data diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!

RECOMMENDATIONS are based on the above mentioned analysis and user surveys . A set of simple and overall recommendations are put forward covering the main problematic issues today. These are followed by more detailed guidelines indicating desirable improvements in selected spaces.

PUBLIC LIFE DATA presents a survey of pedestrian activities on summer and winter days in selected spaces. How are the streets, squares and parks in the study area used? How many people are walking in the streets? How many activities are going on? What goes on summer /winter and weekdays / Saturdays? Which groups in the population use the spaces in the City Centre? The data is divided in observations regarding pedestrian traffic and observations regarding staying activities. Collected, the data gives information and detailed background on the present state of public life in the city. The material is presented in an independent report.

INTRODUCTION

9


DEFINITION OF THE STUDY AREA The outline of the study area has been determined in close cooperation with City of Sydney.

ey

Ha

rb o

ur

Br id ge

STUDY AREA

Sy dn

Walsh Bay

Dawes Point

The main focus of the study is the City Centre with the boundaries being Central Station (south), Circular Quay (north), Darling Harbour (west) and the Domain (east). These areas encompass the most intensely used areas in the city. Having a coherent study area allows for a study of network and coherence as well as connections to the bordering areas. Thus the main feeders to the City Centre have been studied in terms of pedestrian movement to and from the city. These links are vital walking links and relate very closely to what is going on in the City Centre.

Bennelong Point

The Rocks

Barangaroo

Botanic Gardens

Circular Quay

Darling Harbour

Pitt Street

The Domain

Hunter Street Martin Place

The Domain

King Street

Pitt Street Mall

Major landscape values Sydney enjoys a wonderful setting created by natural landscape features. Much has changed since the early settlement but the foresight of the First Colony is still present. These landscape features create a setting for a world class city, but may also be so challenging to relate to that the development of the city has not received as much interest as needed because of the bi-focus.

et Sussex Stre

OUTLINE OF MAIN FINDINGS In the following pages are displayed a number of findings on an overall level concerning both current problems and potentials. The findings relate to the following topics:

Kent Street Street Clarence t ee York Str

George Street

The same approach for selecting the study area has been used in a number of previous studies including the Australian studies in Adelaide, Perth and Melbourne.

Macquarie Stree t

Bridge Street

10 minuter 5 minuter

Market Street

Town Hall

Hyde Park

Park Street

William Stre

Liverpo

Pitt Str eet

Georg e Stre

et Sussex Stre

et

ol Stree t

Major achievements Sydney has experienced many great improvements and new developments during times and especially some are worth mentioning in terms of issues of overall importance for the public realm.

Castlereagh Street Elizabeth Stree t

et

Ox fo

rd

St

re e

t

Hay Str eet

Major problems Although there are many positive things to mention, there are also some major problems in the Sydney City Centre.

Central Station

STUDY AREA 2.200.000 m2

0

10

INTRODUCTION

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Elizabeth Stree t

Cha

lme

rs S

tree

t

Br oa dw ay

Belmore Park

N 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

0

200


MAJOR LANDSCAPE VALUES

majormajor landscape values major landscape landscape values values

a wonderful foreshore

vast parklands

a characteristic topography

waterwater Sydney enjoys a wonderful setting at Port Jackson. water

parks The Domain, the Botanic Gardens, the Cook and parks Phillip parks Park and Hyde Park are places in close proximity to the City Centre.

Sydney enjoys a distinctive topography.

The water is a consistent feature which surrounds and embraces the city. The fringed coastline offers multiple opportunities for dwellings with a water view and with direct access to a foreshore promenade. The City of Sydney in collaboration with State Government agencies such as Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority have been progressively expanding the public access opportunities along the foreshore. Completion of Barangaroo will result in a continuous 11 km foreshore walk from Woolloomooloo to the Anzac Bridge at Pyrmont. This possibility of experiencing the city from the seaside has tremendous assets and also encompasses the possibilities of placing outdoor, recreational activities along the water inviting people to make use of their fortunate setting. The numerous harbour foreshore beaches, not all publicly accessible, and the many villages add another layer to the experience of a city with endless kilometres of foreshore.

topography topography topography

The topography of Central Sydney is like no other major Australian city. While Perth, Adelaide and Melbourne are primarily situated on plains, Sydney is built upon landscape contours providing a significant character to the streets as well as providing wonderful views to key destinations.

These vast parklands offer a diversity of recreational possibilties for the people of Sydney and hold the opposites to a dense and busy City Centre - quietness, space for big events or for space demanding activities, few sensual impacts and a low noise and pollution level. As such the In certain places there tends to be a rather steep topography diagrammen är skalerade skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! qualities of these natural reserves are needed ingredients (east /west streets) while other streets are left somewhat diagrammen diagrammen är är skalerade 50% av 50% originalfilen!!! av originalfilen!!! in a busy city. untouched (north /south streets). What is also offered from eg. Bennelong Point or Mrs. Macquaries’s Chair are views of the city and the Harbour allowing people to perceive a perspective of the city they are using in their daily lives.

The topography strenghtens an image of a strong landscape setting with a distinct profile offering significant characteristics to the city.

INTRODUCTION

11


major achievements major achievements major achievements

MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS

preserving heritage

heritage

heritage design codes

ACHIEVEMENT Sydney has succeeded in preserving a large part of the heritage buildings in the city.

great landmarks

landmarks landmarksstreet trees

ACHIEVEMENT Sydney Opera House is an icon for the nation at an international level. The building encompasses the spirit of Australia. The Harbour Bridge is a significant landmark at a national level.

BENEFITS diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! The heritage buildings add character to streetscapes and diagrammen diagrammen 채r skalerade채r50% skalerade av originalfilen!!! 50% av originalfilen!!! encompass the history and culture of the city. BENEFITS The branding value is immense. CHALLENGES Citizens experience a sensation of pride and ownership. Some heritage buildings appear to have been converted as part of major developments. Some of these buildings now CHALLENGES form parts of awkward juxtapositions between the new and To re-focus from the Harbour area and create new significant the old as well as the low rise and the high rise. landmarks in the core of the City Centre through a distinct public space plan.

12

INTRODUCTION

reclaiming land reclaimingopen land spaces

creating open spaces

ACHIEVEMENT A coherent waterfront at Circular Quay. A series of pedestrian spaces such as Martin Place. BENEFITS Important fixed points in the city for public life and specific events. Indication of what can be achieved when casting a critical look at the use of public space. CHALLENGES Widening the public space network to encompass more and new significant public spaces and to develop strong walking links in-between.


major achievements major achievements major achievements

MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS

heritage design codesdesign codes

street trees street treeslandmarks

reclaiming land open spaces open spaces

introducing design codes

introducing street trees

the barangaroo site

ACHIEVEMENT Turning traffic corridors into city streets.

ACHIEVEMENT Installment of street trees in the majority of the City Centre.

ACHIEVEMENT Freeing up a substantial harbour area from port activity. Working towards a collected plan for the whole area in close integration with the surrounding city.

BENEFITS BENEFITS A beautiful street environment of high quality, durable Greatly improved streetscapes in terms of the visual diagrammendiagrammen 채r skalerade 50% 채r skalerade av originalfilen!!! 50% av originalfilen!!! materials. Simplifying street layouts and raising pedestrian expression and environmental amenity. diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! priority. CHALLENGES CHALLENGES Making street trees have a significant impact at street level Expanding the program to widen footpaths in selected by avoiding invisible species. Creating a distinction between streets and to develop a public space plan for renewal of the streets by using different species. Introducing selected many needy public squares. Broaden the scope to include indigenous trees. funds for integrated public art. Upgrading the number of street trees on George Street to cover the street in its whole length.

BENEFITS Possibilities of strong links between the city core and the water. Possibilities of creating a succesful, well integrated, multi-functional city area as a most positive resource for the whole City Centre. CHALLENGES Difficulties in creating strong, integrated links with the city core caused by the topographical change as well as by the Western Distributor.

INTRODUCTION

13


heights

major problems

major problems

MAJOR PROBLEMS

B

B

A

CULTURAL DISTRICT

CULTURAL DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

CBD

CONSUMER DISTRICT

CONSUMER DISTRICT

FUN DISTRICT

FUN DISTRICT

an introverted city

monofunctional city the introvert city

PROBLEM Massive infrastructure in the City Centre carrying 150.000 vehicles directly through the centre plus an additional 80.000 vehicles through the parklands.

parallell streets traffic dominated city

monofunctional city a mono-functional city

PROBLEM The Western Distributor is a heavy traffic artery having a severe impact at street level in all of the western part of the City Centre. As a result of the large scale infrastructure surrounding the city the majority of all city streets are filled with traffic.

PROBLEM Various functions are confined to specific geographical areas creating a number of precincts dominated either by offices, retail or entertainment.

CONSEQUENCES The city is effectively cut off from the water. The walking links to and from are of poor quality either in terms of the visual CONSEQUENCES diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! quality or in terms of the walking quality. The Western Distributor has a severe downgrading effect Circular Quay where the city does access the water is on the western part of the City Centre. The streets here are downgraded by a bulky ferry terminal and a likewise railway turned into service corridors for the freeway and generally embankment as well as low quality retail. the public realm is under-developed compared to other erade 50% av originalfilen!!! The Barangaroo site is confronted with huge difficulties in parts of the city. Effectively the City Centre is divided into two providing integrated links with the city and Walsh Bay is cut separate city parts - a western and an eastern City Centre, off as a separate area. quite different in character and ambience. Darling Harbour is isolated, not only by closed frontages but also by an intersecting freeway.

14

INTRODUCTION B

A

open spaces - bits and pieces

a traffic dominated city divided city

CONSEQUENCES The lack of diversity and mix in functions within specific areas has a number of side effects. Generally there are fewer diagrammen 채r in skalerade 50%leading av originalfilen!!! experiences and fewer attractions each area to a lack of mixed user groups making the population more uniform and the user patterns quite alike. A number of areas appear overcrowded at nighttime while others appear deserted. Both can be perceived as unsafe areas to pass through either because of a lack of activities or because of a concentrated precinct of bars etc.


major problems

MAJOR PROBLEMS

major problems

B

A

CULTURAL DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

CBD

CBD

CONSUMER DISTRICT

FUN DISTRICT

building heights

a high city

building heights

the introvert city parallell streets traffic dominated city divided city

monofunctional city the introvert city

PROBLEM Substantial parts of the City Centre are dominated by buildings higher than 10 floors. The sun access planes appear to be difficult to reinforce.

parallell streets

open spaces - bits and pieces

a lack of street hierarchy

scattered open spaces

PROBLEM Streets generally serve the same purpose as transport corridors primarily for vehicular traffic, as service roads and as parking spaces.

PROBLEM There is a number of minor public spaces in the City Centre. A substantial part appear to have the same layout, the same functions and the same type of design /materials. The spaces are scattered covering most of the City Centre, the links in-between them are weak.

CONSEQUENCES CONSEQUENCES The streets are primarily dark and in shadow most of the day. The city has been filled to its maximum capacity with Wind velocities are high at certain points, eg. World Square vehicular traffic. As a result the general conditions for other diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! and Philip Lane /Spring Street where strong downwinds are transport modes have been downgraded. created making the public spaces undesirable places to be Pedestrian priority is quite low and there is an obvious lack and makes tree planting and establishment a challenge. of cycling facilities. High buildings often pay too little attention to ground level, Supplementary many of the streets look very alike and the diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! mmen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! where mirror glaced frontages and withdrawn private plazas distinction between them is weak. This makes the general represent the interface with the city streets. orientation hard and creates a sense of indifference towards Servicing the high buildings demands more roadspace for the individual streets. The streets are being perceived as traffic and additional lanes for service vehicles, as well as insignificant - it is what they connect that is important. adding extra demand on parking and increasing the number of commuters to and from the city, adding extra pressure to public transport at peak hours.

CONSEQUENCES There are few dedicated routes for promenading and no dedicated walking links between the various public spaces. Thus the small squares and pocket parks are not frequently visited Subsequently the somewhat similar, smaller public spaces appear under-utilised with only a limited number of users during the day. Their is a general lack of a distinct, unique character and a general lack of significant landmarks.

INTRODUCTION B

A

B

A

15


THE CITY


CITY SCALE COMPARISONS australian and european cities COMPARISON WITH OTHER CITY AREAS Studies of other cities will be used for comparison and will act as the frame of reference in this study. Comparisons will be based on similar studies carried out in - Melbourne, Adelaide, Perth, Stockholm and Copenhagen. A comparison with these cities will provide insight into the public life of other cities of comparable or somewhat smaller sizes. Adelaide, Perth and Copenhagen have populations in the metropolitan area of approx. 1 million. Melbourne and Sydney have a vast suburban sprawl and therefore a larger population of 3 - 4 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area. Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth are “new” cities comparable with Sydney in scale, architecture and type of public space. Stockholm was somewhat drastically reformed during the 60’s and has undergone changes in humanizing the city ever since. Copenhagen is a medieval city which serves as an inspiration for what can be achieved when leading a gradual urban renewal. Copenhagen has done so for the last 40 years.

All maps are shown in 1:40.000

PERTH

COPENHAGEN

(4 million residents in the metropolitan area)

1.200.000 m2 Approx. 1000 residents in the city centre (2006) 8 residents per hectare (1.4 million residents in the metropolitan area)

1.150.000 m2 7.600 residents in the city centre (2005) 66 residents per hectare (1,2 million residents in the metropolitan area)

MELBOURNE

ADELAIDE

STOCKHOLM

2.300.000 m2 12.000 residents in the city centre (2006) 52 residents per hectare (3.5 million residents in the metropolitan area)

1.575.000 m2 1.900 residents in the city centre (2002) 12 residents per hectare (1.1 million residents in the metropolitan area)

1.250.000 m2 1.700 residents in the city centre (2005) 14 residents per hectare (1.9 million residents in the metropolitan area)

SYDNEY 2.200.000 m2 15.000 residents in the city centre (2006) 68 residents per hectare

18

THE CITY


UNDERSTANDING THE GRID comparison of sydney and melbourne

GEORGE STREET /KING STREET

George Street

Compared to Melbourne, Sydneys grid structure is quite different. Where Melbourne has a clear and legible geometry the Sydney grid is influenced by how the city was first laid out. The original landscape features can still be read in certain places, eg. the Tank Stream, which runs underneath Pitt Street, and in George Street which used to be the main street and is the only street that connects the Central Station with the Rocks and essentially the Harbour Bridge and Port Jackson. SYDNEY CHARACTERISTICS: • Generally narrow street widths of 20 metres. • Narrow blocks (east /west) creating more streets running north /south. • Narrow streets lined by high buildings creating shadows and highwind velocities at street level. • Few laneways in context of previous development patterns - block amalgamations for office towers destroyed many of Sydneys laneways servicing the high buildings. Service is mainly done in the streets demanding more space for service vehicles and for parking. • Peninsula situation; “Everything ends at Circular Quay.”

400 cm

1200 cm

Pedestrian zone

Buses Taxi’s Cars Bicycles

Pedestrian zone

NARROW STREETS AND NARROW BLOCKS = MORE STREETS + MORE TRAFFIC + MORE SHADOW + STRAY WINDS

n sto an Sw et

e Str

WIDE STREETS AND LARGE BLOCKS = LESS TRAFFIC + MORE SUN + WIDER PAVEMENTS + STREET TREES + LIVELY LANEWAYS

520 cm

SWANSTON STREET /BOURKE STREET

Although Sydney and Melbourne share similar historical backgrounds and date back to the same time period in urban planning there are some significant differences between the two. These differences mainly has to do with how the city grid was originally laid out and how that has formed the urban development process and the influx of traffic. MELBOURNE CHARACTERISTICS: • Generally generous street widths of 30-40 metres. • Large blocks (east /west) creating fewer streets running north /south. • Height controls have been applied in the City Centre, especially at Swanston Street. • Laneways running through the large blocks servicing the high buildings. •Consecutive laneways creating continuous movement patterns. 800 cm

1400 cm

800 cm Pedestrian zone

Bicycles

Trams

Taxis

Bicycles

Pedestrian zone

THE CITY

19


WALKING DISTANCES a viable mode of transport SHORT DISTANCES The illustration to the right pinpoints how easily accessible destinations are by foot within Sydney. The illustration shows that just 12 minutes of walking can bring you to central locations and as such walking is a realistic mode of transportation. Most city centres have a size of approximately 1 km² as one kilometer is considered a reasonable walking distance when using the city facilities. Barangaroo

THE SUSTAINABLE CITY Emphasizing walking as a viable mode of transportation with a strong impact on health is leading towards a more sustainable city where energy consumption and focus on a lively city - also at night - are part of the new city strategies.

Circular Quay

10 minuter 5 minuter

Walking sets eyes on the streets, it enhances public life and increases the local ownership and knowledge of the city. “There is more to walking than walking”: Walking is the first step - making invitations to stop, to linger, to talk, to watch, to participate and to perform are the others.

Hunt er St

reet

Macquarie Street

Bridge Street The Domain

MartinPlace

HOW BIG IS THE CITY? The illustration shows walking distances within the City Centre. Within 12 minutes walking time one can cross the City Centre from east to west. 30 minutes walking time is what it takes to walk from Central Station to Circular Quay. Alas the east/west distances are short while the north/south distances are more challenging.

6 min. 500 m

Market Street Hyde Park

Darling Harbour Town Hall

t Pitt Stre e

Castelreagh Street

William Street

et

What is significant for Sydney’s streets is the narrow layout and the length of its main street, George Street. Few cities have a 2 km main street and few cities have one as narrow as George Street. What comes closest is Oxford Street in London which is 500 m shorter than George Street. Oxford Street is celebrated as the main street in London and its course is broken by the characteristic circuses.

Geor ge St re

treet Sussex S

On the opposite page is shown comparisons between main streets in Sydney, Melbourne and London.

Ox fo rd

St

re e

t

Hay S

treet

Belmore Park

tre

et

Central Station

Elis abe t

hS

y wa ad o Br

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

WALKING DISTANCES IN THE CITY CENTRE

00

20

THE CITY

100 100

200 200

300 300

400 400

500 500

(m) (m)

12 min. 1 km

0

200


SCALE REFERENCES comparison of key city streets

sydney

melbourne

london V

GEORGE STREET

PITT STREET MALL

SWANSTON STREET

BOURKE STREET MALL

icto ria OXFORD STREET Str

REGENT STREET

Total length: 2550 m Street width: 22-30 m Footpath width: 4-6 m Status: Main street with shopping and heavy traffic.

Total length: 186 m Footpath width: 18.5 m Status: Pedestrian street dominated by retail.

Total length: 1270 m Street width: 30 m Footpath width: 8 m Status: Main street dominated by shopping. Trams, taxis and bicycles.

Total length: 213 m Street width: 30 m Footpath width: 8 m Status: Shopping street for pedestrians and public transportation.

Total length: 2000 m Street width: 26 m Footpath width: 6-9 m Status: Main shopping street. Pedestrians and public transportation.

Total length: 1200 m Street width: 25-28 m Footpath width: 4-7 m Status: Shopping street dominated by classic architecture and a curved course. Heavy traffic.

King Street

Vic to

ria

Elizabeth Street

Swanston Street

Circular Quay

eet

Sct. Giles

0m

Str eet

All Souls Bourke Street

Market Street

Swanston Street

Bridge Street

Federation Square

et

Bourke Street

re Regent St

Macquarie Street

500 m

Flinders Street

Oxford Circus

1000 m Oxford Street

Total length: 450 m Street width: 30 m Status: Pedestrian street dominated by office buildings.

Oxford Street

Market Street

martin place

Swanston Street

Martin Place

Oxford Circu s

Piccadilly Circus

Flinders Street Federation Square

1500 m

Liverpool Street Castlereagh Street

George Street

Marble Arch

2000 m

Central Station

2500 m Broadway

George Street, Sydney

Swanston Street, Melbourne

Oxford Street, London

THE CITY

21


OPEN SPACES waterfront, parks and car free streets and squares

First Fleet Park

Lang Park

Jessie Street Gardens

Macquarie Place Park

The Royal Botanical Gardens

Wynyard Park

The Domain Hyde Park

Tumbalong Park Chinese Garden

Belmore Park

0

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

WATERFRONT AND PARKS

CAR FREE STREETS AND SQUARES

Coastline

Carfree streets

Parks

Carfree squares

Number of carfree streets: 5 Total length of carfree streets: 750 m

Coastline: 9 km Maximum distance to waterfront: 1000 m (Central Station - Darling Harbour) 0

100

22

200

300

400

THE CITY

500

(m)

0

Parkland in total: approx. 860.000 m2 (incl. Royal Botanical Gardens, Cook and Phillip Park and Domain) Maximun distance to parks: 500 m Number of parks within study area: 7

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Number of carfree squares: 17 Total area of carfree squares: 57.000 m2


OPEN SPACES laneways and privately owned spaces

10 minuter 5 minuter

0

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

Midblock Connections Underground Arcades Elevated pllazas

plazas inside blocks or at upper level private arcades

Number of laneways: 47 Total length: 3100 m

200

0

ARCADES

Laneways

100

200 400 600 800 meter

100 200 300 400 500 m

LANEWAYS

0

0

underground arcades

Laneways

Number of private squares: 11 Total area: 18.050 m2 Number of underground arcades: 10 Total length: 2600 m

THE CITY

23


LACK OF OPEN SPACE NETWORK

MISSING LINKS IN THE PEDESTRIAN NETWORK The map to the right clearly depicts one of the main issues in Sydney. Although there is a fair amount of open space in the City Centre (74.000 m2) there tends to be weak connections in-between. The existing open spaces are scattered across the city and although they cover most of the City Centre they do not constitute a connected network for users to enjoy. The size of the various squares and street closures are somewhat the same offering many spaces of the same scale and for the same kind of events /uses. The most important spaces are Martin Place, Pitt Street Mall, Sydney Square and Circular Quay. These make up the spine of Sydney’s open spaces. Still all of them have their limitations; Martin Place consists of 5 individual parts, Pitt Street Mall is only a 200 metre stretch, Sydney Square is a limited sized space and is partly sunken, while Circular Quay has an outstanding setting, it suffers from weak connections to the city. LACK OF PUBLIC SPACE HIERARCHY As mentioned Sydney’s City Centre has a number of quite similar open spaces, not only in size but also in function and layout. There tends to be an overload of smaller, more or less anonymous lunchtime plazas equiped with four benches, three palm trees and a kiosk, eg. Richard Johnston Square or Farrer Place. COMPARISON: COPENHAGEN Copenhagen has turned a car oriented city into a people oriented city in a step by step proces through 40 years. The development has involved stopping the through traffic, reducing the number of car parking spaces in the centre and increasing the amount of space set aside for pedestrian activities from 15.000 m2, when the first pedestrian scheme was introduced in 1962, to the present day 100,000 m2 of car free streets and squares. These streets and squares now form a coherent network of high quality walking links and public squares for recreation, all of individual quality and character.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

OPEN SPACES The network of car-free streets and squares in Copenhagen comprises

Public pedestrianised streets and squares

100.000 m (2005).

Private plazas

2

Public parks 0

24

THE CITY

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


LACK OF STREET DISTINCTION

ALL STREETS ARE USED FOR THE SAME PURPOSE The streets of Sydney primarily serve as traffic corridors. Over time their obligation to make traffic run smoothly has been more and more dominant, thus eliminating a number of other functions which streets are also used for, such as recreation, trading, the informal meeting place etc. The general tendency has also been that a number of user groups have disappeared from the footpaths as conditions for being there grew worse. The streets now work as part of a big traffic machinery, where their main purpose is to deal with as much traffic as possible. This has had a tremendous effect on the atmosphere in the streets and the gradual anonymisation process leading to an unclear distinction between various streets which all serve the same purpose. Because of this the general attractiveness of walking in the streets is low, since it tends to be difficult to orientate and the general experience of walking is low.

Clarence Street

NO CLEAR VISUAL DISTINCTIONS Because of the functional limitations to the use of streets there has been a gradual visual downgrading of the individual streets. Streets tend to look too much alike, and visitors as well as locals have a tendency of mixing up streets as they cannot tell which one is eg. Clarence, York or Kent Street. With the Design Codes it is planned to give these streets a serious upgrade in order to acknowledge their importance in the city structure. But still more could be done to individualise the streets in terms of their specific amenities, in terms of street trees or in terms of an extensive art program.

SUMMARY The north /south running streets primarily serve the same purpose as traffic corridors for vehicular traffic. No distinct visual distinction of the streets is present. Kent Street

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE CITY

25


THE HIGH CITY

SEVERE IMPACT ON TRAFFIC Sydney is a high city with narrow streets. The combination is unfortunate as high buildings demand more service than smaller ones in terms of delivery of goods, collection of rubbish, transport needs for people in the buildings etc. By their sheer size the tall buildings create problems at street level were heavy traffic is the result. POOR MICRO-CLIMATIC CONDITIONS Another problem is the micro-climatic conditions created at the base of high-rise. When strong winds meet a tall free-standing building turbulence and fast down winds will sweep the nearby streets in unpredictable ways. Fast winds lower the temperature of streets and public spaces, minimizing the comfort for people walking or staying nearby and effectively preventing public life. Additionally, high-rise casts long shadows limiting the recreational values of city streets and squares. CONFLICTS WITH PUBLIC LIFE However grand it may appear as both skyline and from within its apartments or offices, poorly placed and designed highrise can render public space useless as a place for public life activities. Unfortunately, Sydney is rich in examples of conflicts between high-rise and public space eg. World Square and Governor Macquarie Tower next to Phillip Lane. The inevitable result is public space with an absence of public life. A new sensitivity towards this issue is needed.

0

1-3 storeys

100 200 300 400 500 m

3-6 storeys

SUMMARY Areas troubled by strong winds and extensive shadow.

More than 10 storeys

0

0

100

200

300

400

26

500

(m)

THE CITY

BUILDING HEIGHTS IN THE CITY CENTRE

6-10 storeys

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

1-2 storeys

6-10 storeys

1-6 storeys

More than 10 storeys


B

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

A STEEP TOPOGRAPHY

A

SECTION A MACQUARIE STREET

PHILLIP STREET

YOUNG STREET

LOFTUS STREET

MACQUARIE PLACE

PITT STREET

GEORGE STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

MACQUARIE STREET

PHILLIP STREET

YOUNG STREET

LOFTUS STREET

MACQUARIE PLACE

PITT STREET

GEORGE STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

CUMBERLAND STREET

CUMBERLAND STREET

SECTION A

0

SECTION A MACQUARIE STREET

PHILLIP STREET

YOUNG STREET

LOFTUS STREET

MACQUARIE PLACE

PITT STREET

GEORGE STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

MACQUARIE STREET

PHILLIP STREET

YOUNG STREET

LOFTUS STREET

MACQUARIE PLACE

PITT STREET

GEORGE STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

CUMBERLAND STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

SECTION A

CUMBERLAND STREET

0

SPRING STREET

HUNTER STREET

MARTIN PLACE

KING STREET

MARKET STREET

PARK STREET

BATHURST STREET

LIVERPOOL STREET

GOULBURN STREET

HAY STREET

BELMORE PARK

EDDY AVENUE

CENTRAL STATION

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY

ALBERT STREET

BRIDGE STREET

SPRING STREET

HUNTER STREET

MARTIN PLACE

KING STREET

MARKET STREET

PARK STREET

BATHURST STREET

LIVERPOOL STREET

GOULBURN STREET

HAY STREET

BELMORE PARK

EDDY AVENUE

CENTRAL STATION

CIRCULAR QUAY

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY

ALBERT STREET

BRIDGE STREET

SPRING STREET

HUNTER STREET

MARTIN PLACE

KING STREET

MARKET STREET

PARK STREET

BATHURST STREET

LIVERPOOL STREET

GOULBURN STREET

HAY STREET

BELMORE PARK

EDDY AVENUE

CENTRAL STATION

CIRCULAR QUAY CIRCULAR QUAY

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY ALBERT STREET

BRIDGE STREET

0

0

0

0

0

0

CIRCULAR QUAY

CIRCULAR QUAY

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY ALBERT STREET

INTERESTING STREETSCAPES The lively topography in certain streets create a strong sense of character and distinction. Bridge Street is one of the most SECTION B distinct streets regarding topography and certainly a street that everyone remembers. Spring Street has a curved course as well as steep changes in level making it interesting to walk here as you walk towards “what is just around the corner”. Pitt Street, SECTION B which runs all the way through the City Centre, is the lowest part of “the valley”. Here used to be the Tank Stream which was a water supply for the first colony. Today the stream has been SECTION B piped and runs underneath Pitt Street.

CIRCULAR QUAY CAHILL EXPRESSWAY

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY

ALBERT STREET

ALBERT STREET

B

BEAUTIFUL VIEWS The topography also offers spectacular views to eg. the Harbour Bridge and the Harbour through a selected number of streets. These views are important in terms of understanding distances, creating a sense of place and in significantly characterising the individual streets. Thus it is unfortunate that some of these views are effectively blocked by the Western Distributor or by the Cahill Expressway.

SECTION B CENTRAL STATION

EDDY AVENUE

BELMORE PARK

HAY STREET

GOULBURN STREET

LIVERPOOL STREET

BATHURST STREET

PARK STREET

BRIDGE STREET SPRING STREET HUNTER STREET MARTIN PLACE KING STREET MARKET STREET PARK STREET BATHURST STREET LIVERPOOL STREET GOULBURN STREET HAY STREET

BELMORE PARK

BELMORE PARK

EDDY AVENUE

EDDY AVENUE

EDDY AVENUE

CENTRAL STATION

CENTRAL STATION

MARKET STREET

BELMORE PARK

KING STREET

HAY STREET

MARTIN PLACE

GOULBURN STREET

BRIDGE STREET SPRING STREET HUNTER STREET

0

ACCESSIBILITY CHALLENGES The topographical challenge is especially present in the northern part of the City Centre where the most steep streets run east / west. All the north /south bound streets are primarily unaffected by any grades decreasing problems created by topography. The City Centre is easily accessible by eg. bicycle and any steep east /west grades are short distances.

CUMBERLAND STREET

CUMBERLAND STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

HARRINGTON STREET GEORGE STREET

MARTIN PLACE

GEORGE STREET

PITT STREET

KING STREET

PITT STREET

MACQUARIE PLACE

MACQUARIE PLACE

LOFTUS STREET

MARKET STREET

LOFTUS STREET

YOUNG STREET

YOUNG STREET

PHILLIP STREET

PHILLIP STREET

MACQUARIE STREET

MACQUARIE STREET

SECTION A

SECTION A

CUMBERLAND STREET

PARK STREET BATHURST STREET

CUMBERLAND STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

GLOUCESTER STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

LIVERPOOL STREET

HARRINGTON STREET

GEORGE STREET

GEORGE STREET

PITT STREET

GOULBURN STREET

PITT STREET

MACQUARIE PLACE

MACQUARIE PLACE

0

LOFTUS STREET

HAY STREET

LOFTUS STREET

YOUNG STREET

YOUNG STREET

PHILLIP STREET

PHILLIP STREET

MACQUARIE STREET

MACQUARIE STREET

SECTION A

SECTION A

SECTION B

SECTION B

CENTRAL STATION

SECTION B

100 200 300 400 500 m

LIVERPOOL STREET

HUNTER STREET

BATHURST STREET

A

PARK STREET

SPRING STREET

MARKET STREET

0

KING STREET

BRIDGE STREET

MARTIN PLACE

ALBERT STREET

HUNTER STREET

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY

SPRING STREET

CIRCULAR QUAY

BRIDGE STREET

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

STREETS WITH STEEP GRADES IN THE CITY CENTRE Streets with steep grades

SUMMARY

Streets affected by a step topography. Streets with steep grades

Significant views

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE CITY

27


DESIGN CODES

A PALETTE OF MATERIALS The City of Sydney has developed a Public Domain Policy which sets out guiding principles for the range of policies, guidelines and codes which apply to the City public domain. To ensure these principles inform work in the public domain, and are applied consistently, an Interim Sydney Streets Guideline and Design Code has been made. The Design Code for Sydney contains a palette of materials (lights, paving, street furniture) to be used throughout the public domain. The Design Codes for Street, Parks, Lights, and Signs (the Codes) are indicating where opportunities exist to express the unique character of particular places, while providing legibility and avoiding visual clutter. It is a tool that can be used in the design and planning process, but goes further and is more regulatory than other forms of guidance commonly used in the planning system.

PAVING The city is constantly working with the upgrading of the paving in the City Centre. The Design Codes describe materials and the finish of new paving.

LIGHTING In 1997 the City commenced a program to upgrade lighting in the public domain in order to improve visibility for traffic and pedestrians, increase public safety and enhance the aesthetic look of the City. The Smartpole was designed to provide the new infrastructure, capable of delivering pedestrian and street lighting, and performing a multi-functional role for audio /visual equipment, traffic signals, signage and banners. A comprehensive lighting strategy (City of Sydney Exterior Lighting Strategy) is being implemented throughout the City Centre. The Smartpoles have been adapted as Council´s standard lighting pole in the City Centre. The Design Codes describe design and location of the Smartpole.

SUMMARY

Area where the Design Codes for Sydney are being implemented.

0

100

200

300

400

28

500

(m)

THE CITY

SIGNAGE Council produced a policy and manual on Signage in 1993. The manual includes a developed family of signs that have been designed in a cohesive manner. It treads in the right direction in providing a cohesive signage manual for the city, focusing on the City Centre and major places of interests. A survey of signs from 2006 concludes that Sydney has some issues with signage and suggest to prepare a signage and wayfinding strategy.


A UNIFORM PAVING

PAVING AS PART OF THE NEW QUALITY PROGRAM Since early 2000 a paving program has been installed as part of the Design Codes. The new paving program has been designed to both overcome some of the current functional difficulties and to enhance the visual quality of the various streetscapes. The result has been remarkable and is a strong example on how quality materials and a skillful design can enhance the whole atmosphere of the city at street level. The current upgraded paving covers somewhat half of the City Centre but is envisioned to encompass all of it with time. This will be achieved through a staged capital works program funding and public domain contribution works arising from the development process and as such it is a gradual process. Visiting streets outside the newly paved areas it is evident that help is badly needed. The old footpaths are characterised by frequent unnecessary interruptions, lack of kerbs, poor level of maintenance and a variety of materials. Apart from aesthetic problems, this creates severe difficulties for the elderly, people with disabilities and people with prams.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

PAVING PROGRAM IN THE CITY CENTRE Existing upgrade of paving

0

100

200

300

400

500

SUMMARY Austral black granite is now covering approx. half of the footpaths in the City Centre, but is intended to cover all.

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE CITY

29


COMPREHENSIVE TREE PLANTING

AN INTERCONNECTED STREET TREE MASTER PLAN Sydneys Street Tree Master Plan 2004 is a blueprint for the provision of street trees in the City of Sydney. The objectives of this coordinated Master Plan are to improve and develop the number, health, longevity and form of street tree species; and to enhance the distinct character of the various city precincts. The current street tree planting covers most of the City Centre and is primarily located in the north /south streets. This provides fine experiences of walking along or past tree lined streets. CURRENT ISSUES Street tree planting is difficult for a number of reasons: The streets are generally quite narrow and supplemented by awnings. The high rise further adds to the difficulties by creating long shadows, sparse sunlight and high wind speeds. Further traffic increases pollution and pavements radiate heat.

Tree lined streets. Pitt Street

The general effect of these difficulties is that Sydney is not experienced as a green city. Street trees tend to be in either a poor shape or of a tall and slender nature with limited impact on the streetscape. George Street has a rather sparse street tree planting because of some of the issues raised above - a narrow street profile, widespread use of awnings and a high impact by the buses in terms of emission.

0

STREET TREE PLANTING IN THE CITY CENTRE

SUMMARY

Street trees have primarily been planted in the north /south streets in most of the City Centre.

Street tree planting

0

0

100

200

300

400

30

500

(m)

THE CITY

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


INCOHERENT PUBLIC ART

INCOHERENT PUBLIC ART Different strategies have been used during the years to put more emphasis on public art in the public and private spaces. A fact is that Sydney today does not have a strong profile on public art. Public art in Sydney is quite sporadically placed and of a varying quality. The city has been in need of a more continuous and overall program, thus bits and pieces have been added without any masterplan which could have coordinated the individual pieces to form a greater whole. A PUBLIC ART MASTER PLAN City of Sydney has developed a Public Art Policy which will be a strong instrument in offering guidelines for the placement of art as well as the quality and type of art for specific spaces. The Policy focuses among other things at establishing sculpture walks connecting the parks with the city, - to integrate art into the fabric of the City in ways that will reflect, respond and give added meaning to Sydneys environment, history and culturally diverse society and to enhance and strengthen the distinctive identity and “sense of place� of the city as a whole.

Art installation. Australia Square

0

100 200 300 400 500 m Public art

PUBLIC ART IN THE CITY CENTRE Public art Private art Waterfeature public 0

100

200

300

400

500

Private art Waterfeature public Waterfeature private Waterfeature private Statue Artistic Statuelighting

Artistic lighting

SUMMARY Public art is primarily located in the northern part of the City Centre. The existing public art appears to be primarily individual art pieces which are not part of a larger whole.

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE CITY

31


PRESERVING HERITAGE

COMPLICATED MIX BETWEEN NEW AND OLD Sydney has made great efforts to protect and preserve many of its historic buildings and historic features. Thus the city is rich in heritage buildings which add a special character to the city and make interesting blends with the modern developments. The heritage buildings represent valuable assets not only as historic reminders and beautiful landmarks, but also as potentials for low rent functions attracting alternative businesses to the city. Despite of all these positive values there are problematic issues related to some of the newer developments where heritage is made part of a new urban block. Legislation allows developers to add extra floorspace to adjacent buildings as long as they keep any heritage buildings. This generally sparks the high city trend as well as forcing heritage on someone who did not really want it in the first place. Thus a substantial part of the old buildings are part of an awkward mix of different architectural styles where little attention has been paid to the historic values and where a superficial makeover has tidied up the heritage buildings.

Awkward mix of new and old. King Street

COMPREHENSIVE STORYTELLING Great effort has been put into interpreting historic characteristics as eg. the shoreline at Circular Quay. A quite developed system of precise information on historic buildings and places has also been installed in the pavements. This way of weaving past history with the present is a valuable way of informing visitors and residents on how Sydney came to be as it is.

0

SUMMARY Heritage buildings are spread all over the City Centre, rather than being confined to one area.

HERITAGE BUILDINGS IN THE CITY CENTRE Heritage buildings

0

0

100

200

300

400

32

500

(m)

THE CITY

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES categories for evaluating A ACTIVE • Small units, many doors. (15-20 units per 100 m) • Diversity of functions. • No closed or passive units. • Interesting relief in frontages. • Quality materials and refined details.

B PLEASANT • Relatively small units. (10-14 units per 100 m) • Some diversity of functions. • Only a few closed or passive units. • Some relief in the frontages. • Relatively good detailing.

C SOMWHERE IN-BETWEEN • Mixture of small and larger units. (6-10 units per 100 m) • Some diversity of functions. • Only a few closed or passive units. • Uninteresting design of frontages. • Somewhat poor detailing.

IMPORTANCE OF GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES The design of buildings’ ground floor frontages has a high impact on the attractiveness of the public realm. They are the walls of the urban environment, and contain the openings through which we see, hear, smell and engage in the city’s million-facetted palette of activities. On the ground floor and at eye-level we come close to the city. Good ground floor frontages are active, rich in detail and exciting to walk by. They are interesting to look at, to touch and to stand beside. High quality ground floor frontages create a welcoming sensation and encourage people to walk and stay in the city. TRANSPARENCY AND SMALL UNITS Other qualities include a high degree of transparency enabling interaction between activities inside the buildings and those occurring on the street. Also, frontages with many small units, many openings and a variety of functions make streets more diverse, stimulating and thereby attractive. Frontages with small units also provide a predominantly vertical facade structure which has the important visual effect of making distances feel shorter. EVALUATION OF GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES In order to create an attractive, lively and people friendly city, a substantial part of the ground floor frontages need to be of high quality. Through previous public spaces and public life studies a tool for evaluating ground floor frontages has been developed and used on other cities. The criteria are presented on the opposite page and an evaluation of the ground floor frontages in Sydney is displayed on the following pages.

D DULL • Larger units with few doors. (2-5 units per 100 m) • Little diversity of functions. • Many closed units. • Predominantly unattractive frontages. • Few or no details.

E INACTIVE • Large units with few or no doors. • No visible variation of function. • Closed and passive frontages. • Monotonous frontages. • No details, nothing interesting to look at.

THE CITY

33


ACTIVE FRONTAGES

ACTIVE FRONTAGES IN THE RETAIL HEART Active frontages are not surprisingly primarily found in the retail district where shops promote themselves and the area through an attractive streetscape. One of the better streets is Pitt Street were the largest concentrations of active frontages is found. George Street also has its moments. What is striking though is that there is no coherence along the two streets. The quality of frontages is varying quite a lot, which indicates that these two streets are not preferred promenades for people who travel between Town Hall and Circular Quay. Castlereagh Street is dominated by larger department stores and offices to the north and as such this is not where you find the most interesting stretches of active frontages.

Active frontages. Market Street.

NO ACTIVE FRONTAGES IN THE BUSINESS DISTRICT City Centre north is without any convincing stretches of active frontages which is quite unfortunate given the obvious importance of a strong link between the city’s retail district and the water. FEW ACTIVE FRONTAGES IN City Centre WEST Kent Street is the only positive exception in an area otherwise dominated by uninteresting frontages. Along Kent Street are several delis, cafes and smaller shops which all contribute to a more lively and attractive street environment.

0

A attractive ACTIVE GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES IN THE CITY CENTRE B pleasant (categories a + b)

SUMMARY These are the areas where active street frontages dominate. The best ground floor frontages are found in the area around Pitt Street Mall / Pitt Street, Hay Street, Dixon Street and George Street, but here only in a sporadic spread.

A active B pleasant 0

0

100

200

300

400

34

500

(m)

THE CITY

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


INACTIVE FRONTAGES

TOWERS IN THE SKY - THE BUSINESS DISTRICT Tall buildings are often designed as beautiful objects, where much has been done in designing the way the tower meets the sky. Little attention has been paid to the interaction with the area and the city they are placed in. The result is oversized, closed and passive ground floor frontages incapable of interacting with people at street level. The northern part of the city is thus being influenced negatively by big closed office buildings which is rather unfortunate since this area is the link between Circular Quay and Town Hall. The attractiveness of walking here in the daytime is minimal and the perception of safety drops at night since there are too many blank walls and too little going on.

Closed and uninviting frontage. Margaret Street.

DOWNGRADING INFRASTRUCTURE - CITY CENTRE WEST The Western Distributor has a huge impact on the western part of the City Centre which is basically a service corridor for the rest of the city. Streets are lined by entrances to car parks, severage facilities, power units or otherwise uninviting frontages. The result is a rather poor streetscape with little to offer in terms of excitement or functions. This area of the city is rather mono-functional and thus deserted by night where it is perceived as an unsafe place to be walking in.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

INACTIVE GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES IN THE CITY CENTRE Dull (categories d + e) Unattractive

D dull E inactive 0

100

200

300

400

500

SUMMARY These are the areas where inactive street frontages dominate. The areas with inactive street frontages are concentrated in the western and northern part of the city centre.

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE CITY

35


WHAT IS OPEN AT NIGHT

EVENING ACTIVITIES The number of evening activities and their location are important factors for the vitality of the city and the perception of safety. If there are few activities or if the evening activities are very concentrated the visitor gets the impression of a deserted city and avoids going there in the evening. QUIET EVENINGS The map to the right highlights the facilities that are open during the evening hours (after 9pm) on a normal summer weekday within the study area. The recording shows that most of the city is relatively quiet in the evenings, with the main entertainment and night activity areas confined to a small area of the city, the fun district with the main activities as bars, clubs, cinemas, restaurants and retail. The activity is highly concentrated on George Street and spills out onto the side streets, especially side streets down towards Chinatown. It is striking that the northern part; consumer district and working district are devoid of evening activities to such an extent that practically nothing is to be found in these streets after 9pm. It is very important to strengthen the retail district and working district as places for evening activities as they make up an important pedestrian link to Circular Quay. EVENING SAFETY To achieve a more even spread of evening activities throughout the city and to improve the public perception of safety it is recommended to develop and implement a policy that will promote evening activities throughout the city centre.

0

SUMMARY

EVENING ACTIVITIES IN THE CITY CENTRE RECORDED AT 11 PM ON A SUMMER WEEKDAY

The recording show that most of the city is relatively quiet in the evenings, with the main entertainment and night activity areas confined to a small area of the city.

0

0

100

200

300

400

36

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Eateries - restaurants , cafes & pubs

Entertainment - theatres, cinemas, clubs

Retail - shops, kiosk, stalls

Accomodation - hotels, apartments

24 hour convenience stores

THE CITY Eateries - restaurants, cafĂŠs & pubs Retail - shops, kiosks, stalls 24 hr convienence stores


MONO-FUNCTIONAL DISTRICTS

SAFETY ISSUES Security is an important factor for the development of public life. People need to feel safe during the day and at night to keep visiting the city and to bring their children. Experienced security and real security might not be identical phenomena, so making streets feel safe has much to do with creating a friendly environment that people find inviting. Residents and activities in the city generally assist to the feeling of security. Lights in windows – a symptom of eyes on the street – give visitors the feeling that help is close by if trouble should arise. The scale and detail of buildings is also important at night, as well as transparency and light from window displays. Furthermore, sufficient light to find your way and to be able to recognize the faces of passers-by assist to a general feeling of security. SAFETY ISSUES CONCERNING PUBLIC TRANSPORT Several train stations and transport nodes present their users with an environment of poor visual quality. Unclean, poorly detailed, deserted and monotonous surroundings, low level of maintenance and unwelcome entrances serve as discouraging features of public transport. PERCEIVED SAFETY Poor visual quality can create an atmosphere of insecurity around stations and nodes. It adds to other features associated with potential danger, such as being underground, out of public sight and having limited visual orientation. Feeling insecure induces a stressful state of heightened awareness which most people would rather avoid. The fact that the city centre closes down at 6pm is magnified by the low level of public transport. There are not many people in the city centre in the evenings and there is not a frequent running network of buses and trains, - apart from Friday/Saturday nights which have extended bus and train services. ACCESSIBILITY There are only four easily accessible points to /from train stations in the city centre and only 4 accessible bus stops for elderly, parents with prams or disabled people in the city centre. That is not acceptable for such a big city as Sydney.

THE FUNCTIONALLY DIVIDED CITY The City Centre consists of different areas or districts with their own individual character. This is a common phenomenon in cities, also in eg. New York where Greenwich Village and SoHo make out individual districts with their own separate identity. Common for these areas is a certain mix of uses, where residential, retail and commercial goes hand in hand. What is different is the urban fabric, the scale, the architecture, the flavour etc. This is not really the case in Sydney where the physical appearance of the areas is somewhat identical but where the use is quite different and to no extent multi-functional. The mono-functional city is an unfortunate development where different uses are confined to different areas and where the lack of mixed use have a huge impact on the public life in the area during day and night. Areas with one primary use as eg. offices tends to be areas which are only lively in the morning, during lunchtime and again during evening rush hour. Outside these peaks the areas appear isolated and deserted and do not act as pleasant destinations for visitors. ISOLATING THE CITY FROM THE WATER The big chunks of mono-functional used land soon become barriers between eg. the city and the water. Working town in Sydney is not an attractive area to walk through, thus people tend to decline from walking there and rather find other means of transport or avoid going at all. On the other hand Fun town sometimes gets too fun scaring other people away.

CULTURAL DISTRICT

BUSINESS DISTRICT

CONSUMER DISTRICT

SUMMARY

SUMMARY

The City Centre is made up of four characteristic districts with individual primary use.

Areas that can be perceived as unsafe at evening and night-time unfortunately cover the train stations.

0 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

ewa_einhorn@yahoo.se

100

FUN DISTRICT

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE CITY

37


THE PEOPLE


LIVING IN THE CITY CENTRE

IMPORTANCE OF RESIDENTS IN THE CITY CENTRE Having residents in the City Centre means that people live in and care about the city. Residents contribute to the vitality day and night, going about their daily tasks. Particularly in the evening, residents, even if relatively few in numbers, create an image of a city lived in and looked after - also at night. MORE RESIDENTS IN SYDNEY’S CITY CENTRE Within the past 10 years there has been a substantial increase of residents in the City Centre. Today Sydney has approx. 15.000 people living in the study area. Unfortunately these new residents have a somewhat limited effect on public life in the city : 1. Residents live in towers. The higher up people live the less they come down at street level to engage. Another fact is that the natural surveillance of people overlooking their neighbourhood street is minimized.

melbourne 2004 (2.300.000 m2) 52 residents per hectare

inner city area 2-3 km2

perth 2002 (1.200.000 m2) 8 residents per hectare

adelaide 2002 (1.575.000 m2) 12 residents per hectare

copenhagen 2005 (1.150.000 m2) 66 residents per hectare

4. Few residential amenities There are only few options for outdoor recreation in immediate connection with the living area such as common courtyards offering residents a private retreat. Another issue is the lack of facilities for families with children.

stockholm 2005 (1.250.000 m2) 17 residents per hectare

3. Part year occupancy Some residences are used as a summer /winter retreat for people living elsewhere. Other residences are used as investment objects.

COMPARISON: Residents per hectare

sydney 2007 (2.200.000 m2) 68 residents per hectare

2. Residences are confined to one area The majority of all residences have been built in the southern part of the City Centre, which leaves the rest of the city, especially the northern part almost without residents.

inner city area 1-2 km2

0

RESIDENCES IN THE CITY CENTRE

SUMMARY Residents are concentrated in the southern part of the City Centre.

Residences /serviced apartments Commenced construction

0

0

100

200

300

40

400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

Apartments/serviced apartments Commenced construction


STUDENTS IN THE CITY CENTRE

IMPORTANCE OF STUDENTS IN THE CITY CENTRE Students make a strong contribution to the city’s vitality and cultural diversity, providing a youthful stimulus and often international perspective. Students come and go day and night, keeping the city active in the evening. They also tend to engage more overtly with the street scene because they have more time available. STUDENTS IN SYDNEY’S CITY CENTRE The number of students attending academic institutions in the study area is approx. 7.000 students. The students are mostly short term overseas students attending classes in so-called shop front . Major institutions of higher education are University of Technology Sydney just at the rim of the study area (64.000 students) and Sydney Institute (30.000 students). University of Sydney 1,6 km southwest of Central Station (45.180 students) and University of New South Wales 13 km southeast of Central Station (37.840 students). STUDENT HOUSING Student housing is located outside the City Centre, where real estate values are lower. The students generally live in neighbourhoods close to the universities and do not use the City Centre at a frequent level.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m English Language / Buisness Schools

STUDENTS IN THE CITY CENTRE Sydney Institute / UTS

Tertiary “Shop Front” Institutions 7.000 students are enrolled in the CBD

64.000 are enrolled 7.000 students are enrolled in the Citystudents Centre. just outside the CBD 64.000 students are enrolled just outside the City Centre.

English Language /Business Schools Tertiary Shop Front Institutions / Secondary Education Schools 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Sydney Institute/UTS

TAFE

UTS

SUMMARY

64.000 students

Main location of major institutions of higher education. University of Sydney

45.180 students

30.000 students

University of Notre Dame

1.100

students

University of NSW

37.840

students

THE PEOPLE

41


DRIVING IN THE CITY CENTRE

HEAVY THROUGH TRAFFIC During the last 50 years cars have entered cities in increasing numbers. All planning has since then gradually been focused at increasing capacity for motor vehicles in order to make traffic running smooth through the city streets. No obstructions to traffic, please !! Thus the streets in Sydney are primarily run by capacity and not by quality issues. Through the years growing numbers of motor vehicles have been passing through the City Centre, some with an errand in the city others on their way to other destinations. The result has been a traffic dominated city where every last breathing space has been used for just an extra lane of traffic. Visiting Sydney today it is evident that there is a gridlock to be solved regarding priorities. The city is incapable of handling more traffic and is seriously struggling with todays traffic. Noise, fumes, high traffic speeds and low pedestrian priority is part of everyday life. AN “A CITY” AND A “B CITY” A dividing range runs along George Street between the A and the B city. The B city (City Centre west) is severely affected by the access routes to and from the Western Distributor and is effectively cut off from the water by the large infrastructure. The general impact of this freeway environment has a harsh downgrading effect on the majority of streets in B city.

80.000-150.000 40.000-50.000

20.000-30.000 10.000-20.000 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

3.000-10.000 SUMMARY

24 HOUR TRAFFIC FLOWS IN THE CITY CENTRE

Streets severely affected by heavy traffic.

80.000 - 150.000 40.000 - 50.000

Note: The illustration above is based on the information available (figures from 1999, 2002 and 2007)

20.000 - 30.000 10.000 - 20.000 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

3.000 - 10.000 Traffic volumes (2002)

42 0

100

200

300

400

500

THE PEOPLE (m)

20.000 - 30.000 cars per d 13.000 - 20.000 cars per d 3.000 - 13.000 cars per d Key intersections


DRIVING IN THE CITY CENTRE

SLIP LANES In the Australian traffic culture there are some remains from the earlier days car dominance. Slip lanes are one of them. Here cars are allowed to take left turns at their convenience and against traffic lights. In a world city with thousands of people on foot this an unfortunate habit which works against any common sense seen from a pedestrian perspective. Thus it causes many dangerous conflicts and accidents. Further this turning practice also works against the development of a strong cycling culture.

GREEN ARROWS BEFORE PEDESTRIAN LIGHTS The phasing of traffic lights have a great importance for the general traffic behaviour. Thus the general movement pattern needs to follow some basic logical principles in order to make people behave as it is expected. If traffic lights work against people’s basic logical principles, they start behaving more autonomously, not necessarily obeying to the traffic rules.

TRAFFIC SIGNS Another clear sign of a traffic dominated culture is the use of large scale traffic signals in downtown city places. These freeway signs appear completely out of scale with the context and fail to recognise the city quality turning city streets into means of serving an overall freeway system.

In most cities vehicle green is followed by pedestrian green. This is not the case in Sydney where in certain intersections (eg. Market Street /York Street) vehicule green is followed by vehicle green arrow and no pedestrian green. This is obviously to some surprise for the main part of all pedestrians and as such interesections like these are made more dangerous by pedestrians failing to obey the rules in a traffic environment, which they generally feel is not accomodating for them.

THE PEOPLE

43


A FREEWAY ENVIRONMENT

HEAVY TRAFFIC BARRIERS SURROUNDING THE CITY CENTRE Sydney suffers from past times traffic priorities. As many other cities Sydney did its best to accomodate for vehicular traffic - by continuously increasing the infrastructure. Today Sydney is at a breakpoint. It is clear that the city is unable to cope with the current traffic volumes and that the city centre is gradually being choked in fumes and noise. The massive infrastructure in terms of the Western Distributor, Cahill Expressway and the Eastern Distributor has a number of serious downgrading side effects explained in the following. AN INTROVERT CITY The large scale infrastructure builds a ring around the city which deteriorates the contact to the surrounding parts Barangaroo, the Domain, Wooloomooloo, Pyrmont and the Bay area. Access to the water is difficult caused by roads separating the water from the city and the harbour front is almost completely excluded from the pedestrian network and thus quite deserted at certain points. A CHALLENGING PEDESTRIAN LANDSCAPE The freeways create very unattractive pedestrian environments in the city centre. Environments where human scale is lost, where there are poor possibilites for walking, for orientating, for recreating and for socialising. People still have to move around in these areas though, where traffic is roaring above you, where there is no sunlight, where you can’t see the endpoint of your journey or whether someone is lurking in the background. These are areas where children cannot walk unaccompanied and where people if possible avoid coming, leaving the areas even more deserted.

150.000 vehicles /day

88.000

vehicles /day

SUMMARY A network of expressways are running straight through the City Centre. The result is a city full of traffic, effectively cut off from the waterfront.

0

100

200

300

44 400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

The Western Distributor is an artefact from the 1970’s traffic planning bringing a number of problematic issues into the city. Via the Western Distributor the city is being flooded by vehicular traffic either trying to access or exit the freeway. On top of this unfortunate situation the freeway structure also has a number of visual and functional difficulties at street level.

The Kent Street underpass is where pedestrians are confronted with the mishaps of the traffic structure. People DO have to walk here because there is nowhere elso to get across in the area.

Underneath the Western Distributor a secret world has its own life. Here are smaller public spaces, which serve as lunchtime areas during the day and drug retreats at night.


ur Tun

Syd n

ey

Harbo

Har

bou

y Sydne

r Br

idg

e

AN INTROVERT CITY

nel

Cahill Expres

sway

Western corridor

n Distr

ibutor

Wes te

rn D

istri

bu t

or

Circular Quay

Cross-Cit y

Botanical Gardens

Easter

Darling Harbour

Tunnel

Druitt Street

The Domain

0

HEAVY TRAFFIC BARRIERS IN THE CITY CENTRE Expressway Expressway tunnel Central Station 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 meter


PARKING IN THE CITY CENTRE

YOUR CAR IS WELCOME IN SYDNEY Sydney hosts a large number of parking spaces in the City Centre. A total of 26.000 parking spaces (on street and in structures) equally spread in the City Centre gives a range of choices for people who choose to drive to the city. Additionally there is around 5000 car spaces on the western side of Darling Harbour.

Several large parking structures in the City Centre have a severe downgrading effect on the street environment. The scale and continuity of ground floor frontages is broken and instead kingsize entrances, ramps and dominating signage is put in.

melbourne 2006 (2.3000.000 m2) 32.460 public parking spaces (does not include on street parking)

CONFLICTS WITH PEDESTRIANS Occasionally, entrances and exits of parking structures lead to conflicts with pedestrians. Often pedestrians have the lowest priority and cars are allowed to pass the footpath at their convenience. With the new Design Codes this pattern is changing. Footpaths are now taken across entrances to car parks giving pedestrians the right of way.

COMPARISON: Amount of public accesible parking spaces

sydney 2007 (2.200.000 m2) 26.000 public parking spaces

There is a large amount of parking options in the City Centre and a significant traffic generator in the City Centre is the cars that have access to private car spaces leased by various companies/ corporations in the basements of office towers. Usually offered as part of an employment package to “high end� workers. It is estimated that there is a further 19.000 private tenant parking in the city centre. The generous distribution is an open invitation to take the car into the city instead of using other traffic modes. This invitation unfortunately generates more traffic in the City Centre, both by more people driving in and by people who circulate to find the most conveniently placed parking spot.

inner city area 2-3 km2 Harbourside carpark

Entertainment carpark

perth 2007 (1.200.000 m2) 5.690 public parking spaces

adelaide 2004 (1.575.000 m2) 35.000 public parking spaces

stockholm 2004 (1.250.000 m2) 8.000 public parking spaces

copenhagen 2005 (1.150.000 m2) 2.700 public parking spaces

Harris Street carpark

0

inner city area 1-2 km2

LOCATION OF PARKING SPACES IN THE CITY CENTRE

SUMMARY The city centre offers many parking possibilities with a total of 26.000 mainly concentrated in the western part of the City Centre.

> 1000

100-299

500-999

< 100

+ 7000 on-street car parks

300-499 0

> 1000 500-999 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

46

THE PEOPLE

100 200 300 400 500 m

300-499

100-299 < 100

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


PARKING IN THE CITY CENTRE

LARGE SCALE PARKING STRUCTURES Huge parking structures, as in the example shown from Sussex Street /Market Street, have a tremendous downgrading effect on the public realm in that specific area if they are not carefully detailed and planned. In the example shown the parking structure suffers from being a mono-functional block with no public functions at ground floor, no residences and no office space. The facade is quite monotonous, the ground floor frontage is completely inactive and the footpath is interrupted by a four lane entry to the car park.

100 METRE OF INACTIVE FRONTAGE Little experience is offered when walking past here. At night this stretch of footpath is even less accomodating.

ACCESS TO UNDERGROUND CAR PARKS Access to underground car parks have been placed in a number of streets, the example above from York Street adjacent to the QVB. Although solving one practical problem this practice has a number of shortcomings in terms of limiting crossing options between the two footpaths as well as posing a number of more aesthetic issues.

FOUR LANE VEHICLE ENTRY TO CAR PARK Pedestrians need to yield for cars entrying the car park although they are walking on the footpath. The quality of the paving and the footpath level is in many incidents changing.

ON STREET PARKING Probably the most misplaced parking in all of the City Centre is found in front of St. Andrews Cathedral where a few parking spaces seriously downgrade the general experience of walking along the main street and reaching the Town Hall and the Cathedral, supposedly the most central location.

THE PEOPLE

47


rotterdam sydney NB m odes of journey to w ork

19%

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

36% 19%

rotterdam sydney NB m odes of journey to w ork sydney NB m odes of journey to w ork

A WELL DEVELOPED NETWORK Sydney enjoys a very large and complex public transport network system which joins the City Centre with suburbs far away. The system is quite effective transporting large numbers of passengers every day. This is reflected in the modal split where the majority of everybody arriving in the City Centre arrives by public transport (71%). TOO MANY BUSES Apart from the underground train system Sydney has a ground level bus system which operates routes from the suburbs of which many terminate in the City Centre. The buses offer surface transport desirable for many, especially the elderly or those who ride short trips. Buses integrate with the city and allow passengers to experience important connections within the city. Although many positive things can be said about buses there are also the negative aspects which mainly has to do with a bus overload. Thus the number of buses in the City Centre is extraordinarily high and several streets are suffering from a high bus impact.

19%

københavn

THE MODAL SPLIT OF SYDNEY CITY CENTRE 2007

copenhagen

Vehicular traffic: Public transport: Walking: Cycling + other:

25% 71% 3% 1%

26%

36% 19%

33% 1

27%

2 3 4

26%

sydney NB m odes of journey to w ork

THE MODAL SPLIT OF COPENHAGEN 2007 Vehicular traffic: Public transport: Cycling: Walking + other:

københavn

27% 33% 36% 5%

33%

5%

1 2

27%

140

36%

3 4

copenhagen

162

55

5%

36%

The current problems concern: 1. Unacceptable noise levels relating to somewhat tired bus fleet 2. Unacceptable high speed outside peak 3. Unacceptable low speed during peak 4. Misplaced bus layovers in the City Centre 5. Unaccetable high frequency of buses in eg. George Street 6. King-size bus interchanges in the City Centre 7. Bus lanes are not 24 hour lanes and thus not respected.

66

164

100

57 125

1

SUMMARY

PUBLIC TRANSPORT IN THE BCD

Train station Lightrail Monorail

Areas with heavy bus traffic, bus layovers and train stations.

0

Bus route Bus lane Key bus stop Number of buses 5-6 pm

1 1 0

0

100

200

300

400

48 500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

1

Bus route

Train station

Bus lane

Lightrail

Key bus stops

Monorail

Number of buses 5-6 pm

Ferry routes


PUBLIC TRANSPORT

CONTINUOUS ROWS OF BUSES Buses have a large impact on the public realm quality in Sydney in terms of sheer numbers and noise.

BUS CORRIDOR SEPARATING THE CITY FROM THE WATER At Circular Quay Alfred Street has an unfortunate side effect of efficiently cutting any sense of links between the water and the city. Thus the squares become individual islands and the quayside something else.

BUS LAYOVERS AT THE WATERFRONT The streets ending at Circular Quay are severely downgraded through present use as bus layovers. There are no visual links to the water, the buses produce noise and fumes and the general walking environment is deteriorated.

MONORAIL The monorail runs along a 12 minute scenic loop through the City Centre. It is mainly working as a turist attraction.

POOR ACCESS TO THE UNDERGROUND TRAIN SYSTEM Access to underground train stations are in most cases treated as routes for second rate citizens. Their general appearance is questionable and their attractiveness at night is low. The majority of all station entries are at present not laid out to accomodate people with disabilities.

A CITY CLOSING DOWN AT 6PM At present public transport is not supporting a 24 hour city. Travelling time increases drastically after evening rush hour, thus forcing people to travel home within rush hour, adding extra pressure on an already stretched system.

THE PEOPLE

49


CYCLING IN THE CITY CENTRE

CYCLING AS A DESIRABLE TRANSPORT MODE Cycling is an attractive alternative transport mode â&#x20AC;&#x201C; cheap and an excellent way of exercising. In cities worldwide cyclists are increasing in numbers counting both children and the elderly, where conditions for cycling are safe and attractive. In a number of cities cycling becomes a favorite transportation mode offering the same free choice as motor vehicles, just less congestion and parking problems. PRESENT CYCLE CONDITIONS IN SYDNEY Sydney has excellent natural conditions for developing a strong cycle culture since the climate and topography does not provide too many difficulties. Nevertheless cycling is still for the few, primarily younger male riders who tend to ride fast and aggressively, seldom following any traffic rules. This links very strongly with the lack of facilities in terms of proper cycle lanes, a linked network, dedicated cycle lights, markings on roads where cyclists are crossing or any of the other means that cyclist cities use to look after their cyclists. NEW CYCLE PLAN The City of Sydneys Cycle Strategy and Action Plan 2007-2017 is Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to making cycling as attractive a choice of transport as walking or using public transport. The strategy outlines the infrastructure needed to ensure a safer and more comfortable cycling environment and the social initiatives that will encourage more people to cycle. The plan is to install many more cycle lanes and to connect the City Centre with the suburban neighbourhoods to allow cyclists to cycle straight through to the city. Installing cycle lanes and installing them properly demands giving up on some roadspace. Thus the new cycle plan has had to compromise in terms of installing cycle lanes where they are actually needed. George Street is not part of the new cycle network although it is one of the busier cycle routes and also here people tend to get involved in accidents.

Kiribilli

City Centre

5 min

10 min

1200 m 0,75 mile

2400 m 1,5 mile

5min

10 min

1200 m 0,75 mile

2400 m 1,5 mile

Rushcutters bay Glebe Paddington

2 SHORT DISTANCES The illustration pinpoints how easily accessible destinations are on bicycles within Sydney. Bicycling is a realistic mode of transportation and the illustration shows that just 10 minutes of bicycling from Ruscutters Bay, Paddington,Glebe and Kiribilli can bring you to the middle of the City Centre.

bicycling speed: ca 15 km/h min

10 min

5min 1200 m 0,75 mile

2400 m 1,5 mile

0

SUMMARY

100 200 300 400 500 m

EXISTING BICYCLE LANES IN THE CITY CENTRE AND CURRENT BLACK SPOTS Pedestrian and bicycle accidents

Existing bicycle lanes Extended bicycle lanes

Existing bicycle network Pedestrian and bicycle accidents 0

50

THE PEOPLE

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


WALKING IN THE CITY CENTRE

Sydney Opera House

The Rocks

Circular Quay Royal Botanical Garden

NO PEDESTRIAN NETWORK Sydney has a weak pedestrian network of few streets rather dominated by vehicular traffic. As such walking is not an attractive mode of transport and people are primarily walking to reach a certain destination and not performing pleasure promenades.

Martin Place Domain

Pyrmont Bridge

Pitt Street Mall

Queen Victoria Building

THERE IS MORE TO WALKING THAN WALKING Walking is first and foremost a type of transportation, but it also provides an opportunity to spend time in the public realm. Walking can be about experiencing the city at a comfortable pace, looking at shop windows, beautiful buildings, interesting views and other people. Walking is also about stopping and engaging in recreational or social activities because you have planned them or because you were tempted to as you walked along. At some point we are all pedestrians walking from public transport, the bike rack, a parking structure or from home. As such streets should be welcoming to all of us.

Hyde Park

Town Hall

Hyde Park

World Square Chinatown

The current problems pedestrians are met by are: 1. Traffic congestion /pollution 2. Excessive delays at pedestrian lights 3. Pedestrian islands = capture zones 4. High speed traffic 5. Uninviting laneways 6. General low pedestrian priority 7. Street clutter 8. Crowded footpaths 9. Crowded crossings 10. Poor footpath amenity in some instances 11. Uninteresting streetscapes 12. Lack of safety at night 13. Missing links in the pedestrian network MISSING LINKS TO THE WATER AND THE PARKS As shown on the map the current situation consists of a series of pedestrian routes. The waterfront is not at present part of the pedestrian routes but more a tour in itself. The connections to the waterfront and the parklands are very poor.

Central Station TAFE

UTS 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

Destinations MAIN WALIKING LINKS AND PRIMARY DESTINATIONS IN THE CITY CENTRE

0

100

200

300

400

500

Main walking links

Primary destinations

Secondary walking links Secondary walking links

Main walking links

Tertiary walking links

Tertiary walking links

(m)

THE PEOPLE

51


WEDNESDAY 18-24

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday WEDNESDAY 10-18

11.020

LIMITED AMOUNT OF PEDESTRIANS COMPARED WITH OTHER CITIES The general walking pattern shows that the highest concentrations of pedestrians are to be found in the retail core; Pitt Street Mall, George Street (between Market Street and King Street), Other concentrations of pedestrian volumes are found in Martin Place, Park Street, the southern part of George Street and in Broadway, where the students are and where there is commuter traffic to and from Central Station. In the northern part of the City Centre George Street and Circular Quay are the most busy closely followed by Pitt Street.

3.500 1.130

4.830 7.570

2.440

12.070 1.570

3.980 9.070 1.900 6.040 8.350 8.350

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC LIMITED TO SHOPPING STREETS Most of the pedestrian traffic is located to shopping streets and there is a limited spread to the rest of the city centre.

15.140

1.240

2.350

8.170

13.240

11.120

4.990

20.740 3.950

9.910 12.360

LOW LEVEL OF EVENING TRAFFIC Compared to daytime traffic there is a substantial drop when the evening starts. Shops close between 6pm – 7pm and the majority of all visitors leave the City Centre. Evening traffic is 34% of daytime traffic. In comparison Copenhagen evening traffic is 50% of daytime traffic.

6.510

8.290

6.720

39.680 9.730 23.530 13.730

3.910

33.740

49.670

7.540

12.220 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

6.050 25.090

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER WEEKDAY EVENING 6pm - 12am 2007 Wednesday the 21st of March 2007 Weather: Mild, 23˚C 0

100

200

300

400

500

15.930

30.610 6.810 0

(m)

29.670 14.220 10.000

14.950

30.530

0

SUMMARY 0

100

200

Summer weekday 8am - 6pm 300

400

500

(m)

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER WEEKDAY 8am - 6pm 2007 Wednesday the 21st of March 2007 Weather: Mild and sunny , 28˚C

SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Summer weekday evening 6pm - 12am

0

52

THE PEOPLE

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday

SATURDAY 18-24 SATURDAY 10-18

UNCHANGED PATTERN OF MOVEMENT There are no significant changes in the use of the pedestrian network on a Saturday apart from Martin Place which is more affected by the many offices at weekdays and thus less busy on Saturdays. Saturdays would normally be the busiest day in a citys retail district. However pedestrian flows in Sydney point to a different picture where the city is not laid out for pleasure walks. As result pedestrian traffic is limited to the basic, necessary trips of going to work, going for lunch, going shopping etc. In general pedestrian traffic is lower in Sydney on Saturdays except for Circular Quay which experiences an increase. This is due to the many visitors to Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge.

20.190 3.880 3.890 9.430 1.010 1.440

3.620

9.510

1.030

2.560 7.930 6.110

2.900

1.060

7.060

23.980

560

1.390

8.360

8.110

11.350

2.330

13.150 3.300

3.340

MORE PEDESTRIANS THAN ON WEEKDAY EVENINGS There is a lack of pedestrian activity during Saturday evening compared to Saturday daytime. Sydney is apparently not a major destination for outdoor dining or for promenading, except for Circular Quay. This again points towards a city mainly laid out for necessities and not so much for pleasure.

22.750 9.230 9.230

8.880

9.320 3.610 11.150 22.940

6.740 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

11.120

1.700 22.950

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER SATURDAY EVENING 6pm - 12am 2007 Saturday the 17th of March 2007 Weather: Mild, 22˚C 0

100

200

300

400

500

43.820

2.230

2.280 8.190

18.760 5.200

(m)

28.510 11.590 15.260

NUMBER OF PEDESTRIANS BETWEEN 8AM - 12AM -in selected streets

12.780

590.000 150.000

455.000 440.000

10.930

155.000

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

300.000

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER SATURDAY 8am - 6pm 2007 Saturday the 17th of March 2007 Weather: Mild, sunny and partly clouded, 26˚C

pedestrian traffic 6pm - 12am

0

SUMMER WEEKDAY

pedestrian 100 200 traffic 300 8am 400 - 6pm 500

SUMMARY

SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

500

Summer Saturday 8am - 6pm (m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Summer Saturday evening 6pm - 12am

(m)

SUMMER SATURDAY

THE PEOPLE

53


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday

MORE PEDESTRIANS COMPARED TO A SUMMER WEEKDAY There is no significant difference between pedestrian volumes during winter and pedestrian volumes during summer. Basically the same pattern is repeating itself during the different seasons and there are only few differences between pedestrian volumes in specific spaces. LOW LEVEL OF EVENING TRAFFIC At night the same pattern is repeated as for summer weekday and Saturday. Not much is going on. The busiest locations being Martin Place, Park Street and the southern part of George Street.

6.900 3.890 3.020 5.320 1.010 2.150

21.520

18.320

8.600

4.300 8.120 6.470

1.510

1.810 7.660

1.310 1.140

1.990

6.790 6.220

14.180

17.980

17.350

8.970 7.610 20.570 7.420 6.370

7.820

53.060 28.670 40.110

8.410 48.430

4.780 10.070

17.050

6.490 9.210

13.110 31.770

0 100200300400500m

32.720

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC WINTER WEEKDAY EVENING 6am - 12am 2007 Tuesday the 3rd of July 2007 Weather: Windy, 17˚C

13.180 39.610 13.840 11.480

13.210

NUMBER OF PEDESTRIANS BETWEEN 8AM - 12AM - in selected streets 640.000 590.000 150.000

160.000

15.740

480.000 440.000

0

SUMMARY

SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

Winter weekday 8am - 6pm 500

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC WINTER WEEKDAY 8am - 6pm 2007 Tuesday the 3rd of July 2007 Weather: Clear skies, windy, 21˚C

Winter weekday evening 6pm - 12am

pedestrian traffic 6pm - 12am 0

100

200

300

400

500

pedestrian traffic 8am - 6pm SUMMER WEEKDAY

54

THE PEOPLE

100 200 300 400 500 m

WINTER WEEKDAY

(m)


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC comparison of main street traffic flows NUMBER OF PEDESTRIANS BETWEEN 10AM - 10PM ON A SUMMER WEEKDAY

126.360 30.250

96.110 79.670 13.120

58.140

66.550

57.280

8.470

14.790

72.100 61.360 2.130 59.230

49.670

39.780

57.410

55.610

11.510

56.400

12.060

45.900

42.490

6040

15.708

43.550

MAIN STREETS AROUND THE WORLD When comparing George Street with other main streets around the world it is striking how reasonably low the numbers of pedestrian traffic are. During a summer weekday approx. 100.000 people walk through George Street while cities much smaller in size than Sydney, as eg. Copenhagen, experience numbers which are substantially higher. Pitt Street 70.520 Mall experiences pedestrian traffic at the same level as Rundle Mall in Adelaide - again a city much smaller than 57% Sydney and less important in terms of international tourists and even domestic visitors. What is interesting though is that the evening traffic is substantial which is a healthy sign. Rundle 40.190and as such merely a shopping mall Mall is deserted at night and not a city street. 45% 43%

33.740

55%

pedestrian traffic 6pm - 10pm pedestrian traffic 10am - 6pm 2007 George Street Sydney

2007 Pitt Street Mall Sydney

2004 Swanston Street Melbourne

2004 Bourke Street Mall Melbourne

2002 Rundle Mall Adelaide

2005 Drottninggatan Stockholm

2005 Strøget Copenhagen

2004 Regent Street London

2004 Oxford Street London

Pedestrians between 10am - 6pm on a summer weekday (street level underground comparison)

Pedestrians between 10am - 6pm on a summer weekday

126.360

comparison of street level and underground pedestrian traffic 30.250 NUMBER OF PEDESTRIANS BETWEEN 10AM - 6PM ON A SUMMER WEEKDAY - in selected streets STREET LEVEL AND UNDERGROUND COMPARISON The underground pedestrian network is extensively used, since it is providing connections between the underground railway stations and street level. Cross traffic in these underground systems is very high and a whole network of underground establishments have developed, generally detracting public life from the streets. The figures show that when 10.000 pedestrians walk at street level, approx. the same amount of pedestrians is found underground in the same area.

13.120

14.790

57.410 George Street North 11.510

55.610 56.400

45.900

42.490

12.060 43.550

George Street South

Underground Street level

George Street South

61.360 2.130 59.230

66.550

70.520

15.708

57%

Town Hall North / QVB

57.280

72.100

43%

40.190

45%

Wynyard St., George St.

79.670

Wynyard North George Street North Town Hall North QVB, George St. B

96.110

55% Street level Underground

Comparison of pedestrian flows at street level and in the underground.

Pedestrians between 10am - 6pm on a summer weekday (street level underground comparison) THE PEOPLE 0

- 6pm

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

55


FREQUENT INTERRUPTIONS

GETTING ACROSS For the comfort of pedestrians and the vitality and functional quality of the city, it is important that people can cross the streets frequently and in an uncomplicated manner. It is a simple experience in most cities. In Sydney the focus has been on vehicular traffic and ways of facilitating car movements, so that pedestrians have gradually become a category of secondary city users who face many hardships and experience both great difficulties and real danger when choosing to walk in the city. This is a very unfortunate development because children, senior residents or disabled people do not feel invited to walk in the city.

park street (from Sussex Street to College Street) Walking time: Waiting time: Total trip time:

waiting time:

8 min 44 sec. 9 min 20 sec 18 min 4 sec.

52%

Waiting time

PUSH BUTTONS Push buttons are a widespread phenomenon all over Australia and in Sydney, where all crossings are supplied with push buttons. The installation of push buttons is part of State Government law. Here you have to apply to cross the street and if you press the button in time the digital device will give you between 7 and 10 seconds of green light to step off the kerb, before the lights start to flash red to tell you to finish walking across the road. Red periods are long, often lasting between 60 and 90 seconds. This system takes the elderly, children and people with disabilities hostages since they will often not be capable of moving across the streets at the pace needed. It also sends a clear signal that cars have higher priority than people.

30 %

Waiting time

38 %

Waiting time

52 %

PEDESTRIAN HARASSMENTS CREATE JAY WALKING What can be learnt from a number of other cities is that people find their way even under the most appalling conditions. As such pedestrians are often seen disobeying traffic rules in environments not laid out for walking. Their expectations of a system laid out for their convenience, eg. traffic lights turning green within a reasonable time frame, are quite low and thus they invent their own ways of dealing with a traffic dominated environment. This is generally a dangerous development since it puts people at high risk of getting hurt. Especially people with special needs, as the elderly, people with disabilities, people with prams, children etc. have a hard time coping in an environment where disobeying to the rules are normal.

Waiting time

33 % Waiting time

TEST WALKS In order to evaluate the walking quality offered six test walks were carried out. In each case ordinary walking speed was used and the walking time as well as waiting time at traffic intersections was recorded. The general conclusion on these test walks is that waiting time at crossings is a substantial problem in Sydney. The test walks show a general delay of 30-50 % in the east /west streets and approx. a 20% delay in the north /south streets A similar survey carried out in Adelaide 2002 showed an average delay of approx. 16%.

19 % Waiting time 0

THE PEOPLE

100 200 300 400 500 m

PERCENTAGE OF WALKING TIME SPENT ON WAITING AT TRAFFIC LIGHTS Test walks

0

56

17 %

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


Queing up at footpaths This illustration depicts the general movement pattern on Sydney’s footpaths. Observations showed that footpaths are not crowded for the whole strech, but at certain points like knots on a string. People tend to walk in groups, or “platoons” which is caused by long red lights at intersections. Stopped at the intersection: they are doomed to platoon. When the light changes, the few may escape if they are quick.

Tempted by impatience and a wish for greater mobility, many will attempt a crossing against the light.

Those few who do not start in a platoon will quickly catch the one just ahead, or be caught by the one coming from behind, unless they happen to be proceeding at the precise speed as both platoons.

Not far off is the previous platoon. A common sight in these platoons are those trying to escape by stepping off into the street and running forward to head off the platoons beginning.

With pedestrian platoons proceeding at a pace even less predictable than cars, synchronizing signals to their progression is impossible. As a result, the signals often only reinforce the platoon structure, rather than allow it to break up. When two platoons meet, the already slow speeds can be cut by more than half, coming almost to a complete stop.

THE PEOPLE

57


CLUTTERED STREETSCAPES

178 POORLY PLACED PAY PHONES IN THE CITY CENTRE In a country with one of the worlds highest rates of mobile phone ownership per inhabitant it is amazing how many pay phones are still needed in a city like Sydney. Just along Martin Place are placed 10 stands with a total of 20 pay phones. The pay phones obviously serve two purposes. One is the service of offering the inhabitants a public phone another is to place commercial ads in the City Centre to be viewed by people passing by. In order to place these ads in the best viewable way the pay phones are installed facing the footpath and thus blocking pedestrian movement in a number of streets. The positive benefits of the commercial street furniture have been elements of high quality both regarding design and the durability of materials. The negative aspects are the commercial side of things which is dictating the number and placement of the elements.

Bus stop creating clutter. Pitt Street

140 BOLLARDS IN PITT STREET MALL Although neatly designed the bollards in Pitt Street Mall are placed in such large numbers that they contribute to the cluttering of the street as well as the visual pollution. Their original purpose has been to kerb service vehicles in order to protect pedestrians during delivery hours. It appears though that time has run out for these bollards, since Pitt Street Mall is now a well established pedestrian street.

0

STREET FURNITURE IN THE CITY CENTRE 178 payphones in the City Centre Pay phone Bus stop 20 payphones in Martin Place 140 bollards in Pitt Street Mall

Endless room of bollards. Pitt Street Mall

Payphone unit (with 2 payphones) 0

58

THE PEOPLE

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Bus stop


UNNECESSARY INTERRUPTIONS

FOOTPATH INTERRUPTIONS A clear sign of low pedestrian priority is the many minor side streets and delivery lanes which interrupt footpaths in all streets. This habit is unfortunate as it forces pedestrians to walk up and down different levels, which is an obstacle for the elderly, people with children and people with disabilities. Another issue is that people have to take extra care even though they are on the footpath. This is not easily explained to children and it demands constant awareness from pedestrians. A walk through the study area disclosed 231 unnecessary interruptions of footpaths. Each of these interruptions should be addressed and efforts be made to create continuous footpaths.

Footpath interruptions disturb a comfortable walking environment. Kent Street

Design Codes seek to effectively eliminate the footpath interruptions by continous footpaths and high emphasis on the accessibility for those who choose to walk. As such the current footpath interruptions are primarily situated in areas which have not yet been upgraded according to Design Codes.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

UNNECESSARY FOOTPATH INTERRUPTIONS IN THE CITY CENTRE 231 unnecessary footpath interruptions Unnecessary footpath interuption - (Change in level or material)

SUMMARY Areas with low pedestrian priority.

Vehicle entrance to building across footpath - (No change in level or material) 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Footway interruptions Entrance to parking station

THE PEOPLE 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

59


LOW LEVEL OF ACCESSIBILITY

WELCOME TO SYDNEY The general streetscape of Sydneys City Centre is at present not laid out to accomodate people with special needs; people in wheelchairs, the elderly, parents with prams or toddlers or people carrying heavy burdens such as suitcases or boxes. MORE CAN BE DONE While significant improvements to the accessibility of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services and facilities have been achieved in recent years, there is still much more that can and should be done; upgrade of paving with even surface and kerb ramps, improving busy pedestrian crossings with broader marked crossings, prevent cluttered footpaths and provide more easily accessible train and bus stops.

Lack of drop kerbs. Access for wheelchairs, prams or suitcases is limited because of missing facilities.

The crossing between Hay Street and Belmore Park is broken into many pieces.

Crowded and cluttered footpath. Pitt Street

The pedestrian connection between Hyde Park and Queen Square is missing.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

Easy accessible trainstations EASY ACCESSIBLE TRAIN AND BUS STOPS IN THE CITY CENTRE Accessible busses

The old footpaths are characterised by a poor level of maintenance and a variety of materials. George Street

Easy accessible train station

The pedestrian connection between the City Centre and Millers Point is of poor quality. Kent Street underpass

Easy accessible bus stop

0

60

THE PEOPLE

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


ABSENT USER GROUPS

LOW DIVERSITY IN AGE AND GENDER Age and gender surveys were performed in the summer and winter 2007 on a selection of streets to determine how the public realm is used by males and females and different age groups. The selected streets and places were Circular Quay, Dixon Street, George Street (Bathurst /Wilmot) and Pitt Street Mall.

Circular Quay 51 43

2

Pitt Street Mall

0-6

3

2

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65 Age

57

37

2

3

1

0-6

11AM - MIDMORNING Children (0-14 years) had their peak presence at this time of day. The children were mostly found at Circular Quay. Young people (15-30 years) constitute 51% of all pedestrians at 11am. The lowest number of young people was registered at Circular Quay. The group of elderly is best represented at 11am where seniors (above 65 years of age) make up 20% of all pedestrians on Dixon Street. At this hour the elderly avoid the overcrowded situation which arises later in the day. 9PM - EVENING Children (0-14 years) have disappeared from all streets. Young people (15-30 years) are the most dominant. Of all pedestrians on Pitt Street Mall 68% are between 15 and 30 years. At 9pm this group is dominated by young males (39%). The elderly (> 65 years) are absent.

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65

WHO ARE THE PEOPLE USING SYDNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CITY CENTRE The average of all people recorded on a summer weekday on Circular Quay, Pitt Street mall, George Street and Dixon Street.

Age

Dixon Street

George Street 64

Children (0-14 years): 3% Young people (15-30 years): 57% Middle-aged (30-65 years): 37% Elderly (> 65 years): 3%

54

The survey illustrates a City Centre primarily inhabited by young people. Children and the elderly are poorly represented.

38 31

7

1

2

0

0-6

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65

0-6

3

0

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65

Age

Age

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

AGE DISTRIBUTION IN THE CITY CENTRE Recordings made on a summer weekday at Circular Quay, Pitt Street Mall, George Street and Dixon Street. The graphs show the average age distribution between 11am - 9pm at each recording place.

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

61


STATIONARY ACTIVITIES

sunny, 270 c

526

Chifley Square

Australia Square

Weather:

678

The illustration is showing the average number of activities found between 12pm and 4pm on a selection of the surveyed locations. Or in another way: If an aerial photo of the selected space was taken at any time between 12pm and 4pm this is the number of persons which is likely to be found in the photo.

598

1217

390

Circular Quay

12pm to 4pm

Herald Sq., Custom House Sq., Scout Pl.

Time:

494

Martin Place

Tuesday the 20th of March 2007

129

111

114

Date:

Maquarie Place Park

First Fleet Park

395

Wynyard Park

22% 30% 26% 0,05%

spending time in the city

Pitt Street Mall

People sitting on public benches: People sitting at outdoor cafes: People standing: Children playing:

1685

Sesquicentenary Square

SURVEY OF STATIONARY ACTIVITIES As part of an estimate of the usage and role of the different public spaces, a stationary activity survey was undertaken in a selection of public spaces. The survey registers the number of people staying in each place in the following categories: - those who are standing, sitting, or lying down as well as those who are engaged in cultural or commercial activities, such as vendors and street artists or children playing. The survey records both the number of stationary activities over a 10-hour period, as well as the distribution and type of activity. A high number of people engaged in stationary activities tell a story of a city with popular and inviting public spaces. Stationary activities were recorded in 23 locations in the City Centre between 10am and 8pm. In the period between 12pm and 4pm there was an average of 9.115 activities.

Sydney Square

340

World Square

Dixon Street

219

Hyde Park

403

302 Belmore Park

K:\516 - Sydney\Public Life Public Space\rapport\staying.ai

0

MOST POPULAR SPACES

Circular Quay and Hyde Park are the main places for stationary activity. The dominant activity being cafe visits or sitting on secondary seating. Other destinations are approximately half or less of what can be found in these two places. 0 100 200 300 400 500 (m)

Physical activities Cultural activities Commercially active Chrildren playing Lying down Sitting on folding chairs Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs

0

100

200

62

300

400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

100 200 300 400 500 m

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES Average figures of selected spaces in the period between 12pm and 4pm on a summer weekday. Physical activities Cultural activities Commercially active Lying down Secondary seating

Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Standing Surveyed public spaces


FEW FACILITIES FOR CHILDREN

FEW CHILDREN When we look at Sydney and the users of the city there are some user groups which are not present, children and senior citizens. Virtually no children were observed along several popular routes in the city centre. The low number of children and senior residents points towards accessibility issues. During School Holiday periods many children and their carers are either shopping or on the way to various museums or programmed holiday activities. What is missing however is a City Centre public space that is attractive to children and encourages children and carers to enjoy the public life of the city. School children on excursion in the City Centre. Druitt Street

The city has a low quality pedestrian environment and few possibilities for staying activities. The streets in the city centre are not pleasant to walk in with children or as a disabled. There are many narrow streets, a lot of fast and noisy traffic and in addition to that there are very few recreational facilities.

Sydney Museum

Sydney Aquarium and Wildlife World

FEW PLAYGROUNDS Children playing are very seldom found in the Sydney City Centre. The only places where children were playing was recorded in Hyde Park and at Circular Quay and the only public playground is outside the study area in Darling Harbour. The public spaces are generally surrounded by traffic and parents do not let their children loose to play.

The Mint museum Hyde Park Barracks

Sydney Tower

Cook & Philip Park pool Sega World and Australian Outback Centre

Australian Museum

Tumbalong Park

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

FACILITIES FOR CHILDREN IN THE CITY CENTRE Playground

Playground

SUMMARY

Paid children´s Only activity one playground is offered in the Library

entire City Centre.

Paid childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activity Library 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

63


PATTERNS OF USE

STATIONARY ACTIVITY USE PATTERN DURING A SUMMER WEEKDAY (Accumulation of 6 recordings carried out on a summer weekday between 10am and 8pm.) Where stationary activity was recorded.

Scale 1 :2000

Cultural activities Commercially active Lying down

300

Ma rtin P la c e

Sitting on folding chairs Secondary seating Sitting on caféchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

296

250

220

218

198

200

180

185

Role in the city: Iconic space with a strong identity. Function: A place to walk through and where people take a break. An open “urban floor” offering space for a wide variety of activities. Major event space, especially the western part. Appearance: A formal public space with several large and passive edges.

178

150

116 100

The map above shows where the stationary activities take place throughout a summer weekday.

Number of pers ons

112 Martin Place is a well visited space with a high use rate nearly all day. Highest use rate is found from lunchtime and onwards. The types of activity here are of a varied nature but mostly people stop for resting on the public benches, for socializing or for café/ bar visits. Evening activities decrease to half of the day time activity and Martin Place is not part of the night scene in Sydney, but is merely used as a passage route to other destinations.

Number of persons

100

50

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time 2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

Stationary activities recorded at Martin Place. Recorded: Tuesday 20th of March 2007 The rest of the survey is presented in the appendix report: Public Life Data - Sydney 2007

8 pm

Time

ties

ies

THE PEOPLE

tive

ng chairs

64

ing

hairs

Macquarie Street

Phillip Street

Elizabeth street

Castelreagh street

Pitt Street

George Street

martin place


800

650 750

600 600

700

dixon street

farrer place 650

550

500

600

500

550

400

Number of pers ons

450

500

400

450

Role in the city: Lively city destination. Function: Many restaurants and shops that attract visitors. Appearance: Friendly, relaxed and green street with a variety of activities. Fine 350 scale, small active units and active ground floor frontages.

Role in the city: An anonymous space. Function: A place to pass by and take a break. Appearance: Small public space surrounded by passive edges in terms of primarily office buildings. 400

Dixon Street is busy throughout the day, and experiences its peak in the evening, when many people come 300 to visit the many restaurants. The cafe chairs are 300 extensively used, while people also make use of the public benches.

Farrer Place is not a place where many people choose to spend time. This space is mainly used as a lunchtime plaza or for a smoking break by office employees in the area. The 350 main activity is people sitting eating their packed lunch on the public benches. As such, the use rate falls after 2pm. It is a fairly quiet place and the use pattern is very low. 300

250

Dix on S treet

250

200

200

179

Cultural activities Commercially active Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

200

150

150

100

100

94 85

100

78

Fa rrer P la c e

Number persons Number ofof pers ons

Numberofofpers persons Number ons

56 50

31

0

0 10 am

12 am10

2 pm 12

4 pm

14 6 pm

Time

Stationary activities recorded at Dixon Street. Recorded: Tuesday 20th of March 2007 The rest of the survey is presented in: Public Life Data - Sydney 2007

Time

16 8 pm

18

20

50

39 20

20

12

7

2

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

Stationary activities recorded at Farrer Place. Recorded: Tuesday 20th of March 2007 The rest of the survey is presented in: Public Life Data - Sydney 2007

THE PEOPLE

65


FEW PUBLIC BENCHES

COMPARISON: Number of public benches

Melbourne 2004 (2.300.000 m2) 3.380 seats on public benches

LACK OF PUBLIC BENCHES Sydney is not a pedestrian city. People do not walk for pleasure and it is very difficult to find a nice quiet public space to sit down and enjoy city life. There is a lack of public seats along the most frequented routes, forcing people either do without a rest or to seek some kind of secondary seating such as stairs, ledges, monuments or directly on the pavement. Sydney with 15.000 residents in the city centre as well as significant numbers of workers (220.000) and visitors (350.000 daily visitors) has approximately the same amount of benches as Copenhagen with 7.500 residents in the city centre (1.3 mio. in the metropolitan region).

There is a lack of public seating along all the streets in the City Centre. Druitt Street

Sydney 2007 (2.200.000 m2) 1.400 seats on public benches

FEW SEATS ON PUBLIC BENCHES Resting is an integral part of pedestrian activity patterns. Good seating opportunities give people the option to rest in order to be able to walk further and enjoy public life and the hustle and bustle of the city. Apart from the number of public benches other parameters are important in order to provide good quality possibilities for resting. Evidence shows that the seating most used is of good quality, has a nice view, sufficient shade, and most importantly is located close to important pedestrian links. Good, comfortable seating placed in the right locations provide visitors with a rest and an opportunity to stay longer contributing to a more lively city.

Number of seats on public benc

Total number of seats on public benches

1-4 seats 5-14 seats 15-29 seats 30-49 seats 50+ seats

3.380

inner city area 2-3 km2

Adelaide 2002 (1.575.000 m2) 1.250 seats on public benches

Stockholm 2005 (1.250.000 m2) 1.560 seats on public benches

Copenhagen 2005 (1.150.000 m2) 1.380 seats on public benches

1.400

1.380

Sydney Melbourne Copenhagen (2007)

0

inner city area 1-2 km2

(2004)

(2005)

100 200 300 400 500 m

SEATS ON PUBLIC BENCHES IN THE CITY CENTRE 1.400 seats on public benches in the City Centre

SUMMARY Public benches have been placed in selected popular spaces and are not part of a general street program.

1-4 seats 5-14 seats 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

15-29 seats 30-49 seats 50+ seats

0

100

200

300

400

500

66

(m)

THE PEOPLE

1-4 seats 5-14 seats 15-29 seats 30-49 seats 50+ seats


OUTDOOR CAFÉ SEATS

RECREATIONAL CITY LIFE The culture of outdoor cafe life has developed rapidly in many countries around the world. This has significantly changed the usage patterns of city centres. Today summer activities are of a much more recreational nature. Drinking coffee is an uncomplicated way of combining several attractions; to be outdoors, enjoy pleasant views and the ever present amusement of watching people pass by.

Melbourne 2004 (2.300.000 m2) 5.380 seats at outdoor cafes

1-24 25-49

100+ 4,5Sydney mm

has 5.410 outdoor serving areas compared to Copenhagen which has 7.000 outdoor serving areas or 29% more than Sydney. TOO MUCH TRAFFIC NOISE The high noise and the traffic pollution in the streets of the city centre does not invite for staying activities. It makes people seek away from the noisy streets - people move up, inside or under ground. For instance in the underground arcade at Town Hall is around 670 café chairs and at Australia Square is around 400 café chairs placed inside the block. This does not enrich public street life.

Adelaide 2002 (1.575.000 m2) 3.440 seats at outdoor cafes

Stockholm 2005 (1.250.000 m2) 5.750 seats at outdoor cafes

below ground

ground

inner city area 2-3 km2

Copenhagen 2005 (1.150.000 m2) 7.000 seats at outdoor cafes

QUANTITY OF OUTDOOR SERVING AREAS Generally there is a lack of outdoor serving areas in the City Centre. There are approx. 11 outdoor serving areas along the 2.5 km George Street from Central Station to Circular Quay and there 1,5are mmno outdoor serving areas along Pitt Street Mall and very few 2,5on mm Pitt Street.

50-99 3,5 mm above ground

Sydney 2007 (2.200.000 m2) 5.410 seats at outdoor cafes

COMPARISON: Number of outdoor cafées

0

inner city area 1-2 km2

100 200 300 400 500 m

THE NUMBER OF OUTDOOR SERVING AREAS IN THE CITY CENTRE 5.410 seats at outdoor cafees 1-24 seats 24-49 seats 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

50-99 seats 100+ seats

1-24 seats 25-49 seats 50-99 seats 100+ seats

SUMMARY In general the retail district is undersupplied with outdoor serving areas. There are many small lunch time cafes in the western part of the city and in the business district - which is characterized by daytime offers - most of the cafes close in the afternoon.

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

67


MICRO-CLIMATE

SYDNEY HAS EXCELLENT CLIMATE CONDITIONS Sydney enjoys the most enviable climate conditions, being at the southern hemisphere with only glimpses of real winter and glimpses of extremely hot summers. Most days the weather is fair and the average temperature is somewhere around 20 degrees celsius. This creates excellent conditions for a thrieving public life where the most can be made of what the city has to offer. What is currently derailing the micro-climate (the sun and wind conditions at ground level) is the fact that tall buildings have been built in sometimes very unfortunate locations, leading to public space being deprived of sun and instead turned into windswept, overshadowed spaces. This is the fact in many of Sydneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s squares and streets where it is quite dark and gloomy, compared to eg. the sunlit waterfront.

HEARING AND TALKING IN THE CITY NOISE - NEGATIVE IMPACT Noise is an unpleasant factor in the street environment. Too much noise creates an uneasy and stressful environment, restricting talking, listening and social events. Different noise levels give different opportunities for public life to evolve. TOO MUCH NOISE Sydney has tremendous noise levels in most streets and squares where the pleasure of promenading, resting and engaging in conversation is deeply affected. George Street, with its more than 70 dbA during the day gives hardly any possibilities for engaging in conversation. Even resting in this traffic environment appears to be less attractive. Similar noise levels are recorded in the other study streets, with buses as the main offenders as they halt and accelerate.

Sunlit buildings - overshadowed public space. MLC Centre, Martin Place

Below is shown the current sun access planes, in terms of which areas are to be protected from further overshadowing. What is striking is that none of the most important public spaces in Sydney are covered by these sun access planes. Neither Martin Place, George Street or Pitt Street are covered. These are some of the most central locations used by a number of people everyday and would be obvious locations for strengthening the conditions for public life. The Barangaroo site where sun access is also very important in order to create successful public spaces by the water is equally not included. Streaks of sun in overshadowed streets. Pitt Street

70 -75 dbA A stressful traffic environment. Talking and listening becomes hard if not impossible. George Street

SUMMARY

SUMMARY

Sun access planes for the City Centre.

68 0

100

200

300

THE PEOPLE 400

500

(m)

60 - 65 dbA A more peaceful environment. Good possibilities for communicating with others. Macquarie Square

Streets affected by high levels of noise. Noise levels are measured in dbA. Sound levels double for every 8 dbA. 68 dbA is twice as loud as 60 dbA, and 76 dbA is four times as loud as 60 dbA etc. A spot survey of noise levels carried out on an ordinary weekday between 10am - 12pm reveals that noise levels frequently rise to high levels.

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

100 200 300 400 500 m


SPLIT LEVEL RECREATION

UNATTRACTIVE STREET ENVIRONMENTS When studying recreational patterns in Sydney it becomes obvious that streets have their deficiencies in terms of working as social meeting places where recreation can happen alongside the general movement pattern. There are several problems to be overcome. The most overriding is that space is limited, noise levels are high and the general level of maintenance and cleanliness appears to be low. Thus streets are not looked upon as attractive public spaces to linger in. UNDERGROUND, ABOVE GROUND AND INSIDE BLOCKS Because of the detoriating street environment people have found alternative places to be and gradually establishments have started appearing in larger numbers away from the street. A whole network of through-block, in-block, underground and aboveground establishments have developed, generally detracting public life from the streets. Few public benches and a varying quality in the outdoor spaces further sparks this trend. As such the streets of Sydney are derived of many of their essential purposes and are merely used as traffic corridors.

People seek recreation away from the noisy streets in the underground, above ground or in inside block establishments.

LOW LEVEL OF STATIONARY ACTIVITIES The survey work has displayed a surprising lack of activities in the City Centre. However when studies are made as to how much goes on underground and inside blocks the pattern is somewhat changed. There is a general tendency of people visiting establishments away from the streets either because it is convenient, close to train stations, or it is considered a better alternative to the few serving areas in streets.

5.690 61% Street level 39% Underground 0

ARCADES

100 200 300 400 500 m

Midblock Connections Underground Arcades Elevated pllazas

plazas inside blocks or at upper level private arcades underground arcades

COMPARISON OF STATIONARY ACTIVITIES AT STREET LEVEL AND UNDERGROUND

Between 12am and 1pm on a winter weekday. On a winter weekeday more than one third of all recreational activities at lunchtime take place underground in foodcourts and in underground arcades.

0

100

200

300

Underground Street level

400

500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

69


GREAT FOR PARTIES...

EXTENSIVE EVENT CALENDAR Sydney enjoys a large variety of events during the year engaging residents and visitors in common celebrations which strenghtens the bonds and raises the affection for the city. The Olympics in 2000 was a peak event where Sydneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s many residents proudly presented their city to the rest of the world. Events cover numerous topics as Sydney Festival, Mardi Gras, Chinese New Year, Christmas Parade, Anzac Day, Art and About and many others. The number of events tend to increase at Christmas time with the lowest periods being April, July and September. ACTIVATING LARGE PARTS OF THE CITY The large festivals mainly take place at the waterfront, in the Domain, The Botanical Gardens and Hyde Park where enough space is found for the various activities. The public spaces in the city are also used and Martin Place is especially popular in terms of events and parades. Parades and demonstrations tend to choose the main street and the most frequently used streets and squares to achieve as much attention as possible. As such George Street is a natural choice for the majority of all parades as it links key destinations, as eg. Central Station, Town Hall, Martin Place, Circular Quay and the Rocks.

SYDNEY OPERA HOUSE IS A FAVOURITE DESTINATION FOR MANY PEOPLE AND AS SUCH A POPULAR PLACE FOR EVENTS AND PARTIES. Australia Open is shown at a widescreen here getting thousands of people together to watch something outdoors with other dedicated fans. This is far more interesting than watching the games on television as the experience of being together with other people is far more interesting.

THE CALENDAR SHOWS A REPRESENTATIVE SELECTION OF THE RECURRING EVENTS HELD IN 2007

Event spaces Event routes

0

100

200

300

400

70 500

(m)

THE PEOPLE

January

February

March

April

May

June

Australia Day Open Air Cinema Jazz in the Domain Symphony in the Domain Sydney festival Chinese New Year Festival City Night Market

Chinese New Year Festival City Night Market

Mardi Gras Parade St Patricks Day Sydney Harbour Week Greek Festival City Night Market

ANZAC Day Indonesian Festival City Night Market

Mothers day Classic fun run May Day Sorry Day Half Maraton Jadeworld Carnival City Night Market

Sydney Film Festival Darling Harbour Jazz Festival Sydney Good Food and Wine Show


...BUT NOT FOR EVERYDAY LIFE

A UNIQUE WATERFRONT CITY The analysis section has pointed towards a number of potentials. The overriding being the wonderful and unique natural setting in Port Jackson. Few other cities can boast of such a world class location. Over time this unique location has proved not always to be a plus but also to be problematic. When the harbour, the water and the nature is so beautiful, why bother with the city. And so the city has been a victim of neglect. With the introduction of motor cars this process of neglecting the outdoor spaces in the city has been accelerated. Finding space for vehicular traffic has been at the cost of public space which has been severely suffering from a gradual reduction in quality. Todays situation represents a city choked in traffic and with a tilted traffic balance, where transport modes such as cycling and walking have been neglected. PROBLEMS IN THE PEDESTRIAN LANDSCAPE Pedestrians have been the big loosers in the present street layout. Too little space is being offered and generally the priority on walking is extremely low.

PEDESTRIAN CROSSING IN DRUITT STREET Everyday thousands of people leave the city during the evening peak. Their walks through the city are constantly obstructed by street clutter, traffic to minor side streets or by extensive long waits at traffic signals.

July

August

September

October

November

December

Live Earth Reserve Forces Day

Sydney International Boat Show Sydney Fashion Festival City to Surf Long Tan Day

Armenian Festival

Art and About Hyde Park Night Noodle Market Sydney Food & Wine Fair

Christmas Concert & Tree Lighting Sydney Christmas Parade African Festival Markets by Moonlight Remembrance Day

Darling Harbour Christmas Carols in the Domain DJs Christmas Concert Hyde Park Summer Gay Day Sydney Hobart Yacht Race New Year´s Eve Darling Harbour New Year´s Eve celebration Moonlight Cinema

1. Low level of accessibility 2. Unacceptable long waiting times at intersections 3. Push buttons at every intersection 4. Unacceptable short periods for crossing streets 5. Narrow footpaths 6. No benches along primary walking links 7. Low attractivity of walking routes 8. Unacceptable noise levels 9. Abrupt crossings /pedestrian islands 10. High speed traffic 11. Uninviting street layouts 12. Street clutter obstructing walking links 13. Poor footpath amenities 14. Continuous inactive ground floor frontages 15. Lack of safety at night 16. Missing links between key destinations

THE PEOPLE

71


RECOMMENDATIONS


KEY RECOMMENDATIONS

a waterfront city

a green connected city

Celebrate Sydney as an unique waterfront city

Develop a green and sustainable identity

Large scale Increase access and views to the waterfront. Ensure an integrated and urban development at Barangaroo. Re-integrate Darling Harbour with the city fabric.

water

Medium scale Complete the Harbour Foreshore walk. Upgrade the current waterfront squares. Create new places by the water. Small scale Celebrate the Tank Stream. Reinforce Sydney as the ”Harbour City” through the use of water features in the City Centre. Create public art which refers to the water.

74

RECOMMENDATIONS

a better city for walking Develop an attractive pedestrian environment. Identity

Large scale Strengthen the sustainable dimension. Create a strong green connected network of parks, green squares, green streets and laneways. Link them to the water.

Medium scale Continue the street tree planting. diagrammen är skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! Use street tree planting to enhance unique identity and improve pedestrian environment. Improve entrances and interfaces with the city parks. Small scale Introduce portable green. Continue programs of portable green and colour - ”Living Colour”. Run green campaigns to promote sustainability.

Cycling

Large scale Create a connected pedestrian network. Establish strong links between public transport and a pedestrian network. Medium scale Accessibility to public place, squares and parks should be provided for all people. Introduce differentiated street types that identify a hierarchy of vehicle and pedestrian network. Introduce new car free streets. Introduce a set of primary walking links. Cut down the number of intersections. Create safer, more generous crossing opportunities. Small scale Widen footpaths where appropriate. Introduce more public benches. Introduce health and walk-to-work campaigns. Improve legibility of the public domain through better signage and reduction of clutter.


40 km/h ZONE

0

a better city for cycling

a strong public transport city

a traffic calmed city

Develop a strong cycling culture.

Develop a strong, simplified and easily read surface public transport system

Develop a balanced traffic culture where the various transport modes are given equal importance.

Large scale Introduce a North-South pedestrian spine and dedicated public transport street with no vehicular traffic in the long term. Create a system of dedicated city routes and dedicated suburban routes. Place all major interchanges and any layovers at the periphery of the City Centre. Introduce a sustainable transport system - no fumes, no noise, green energy.

Large scale Develop a plan for a freeway traffic outside the City Centre. Encourage relocation of parking structures to the periphery of the City Centre. Demolish the Western Distributor in the long term.

Large scale Create an overall, connected cycling network. Ensure strong connections with cycle routes in the suburbs. Ensure a strong integration with public transport. Medium scale Develop a system of safe, dedicated cycle lanes. Introduce cycle lanes between footpaths and on street parking and carriageways. Small scale Introduce cycling campaigns to raise awareness and to promote the benefits of cycling.

Medium scale Upgrade interchanges. Small scale Introduce an information count-down system. Introduce a common ticketing system. Introduce campaigns to raise the quality image of public transport.

Medium scale Cut off all access /exit ways to the Western Distributor. Cut east /west links in the City Centre. Introduce a 40 km/h speed limit in the City Centre. Small scale Reduce on street parking. Review pricing of on street parking.

RECOMMENDATIONS

75

100

200

30


a strong city identity

an inviting streetscape

a diverse, inclusive and lively city

Develop a central spine of one main street and three significant squares.

Develop a strong hierarchy of significant public spaces.

Develop a multifunctional city with a close integration between various functions.

water

Identity

Large scale Take vehicular traffic out of George Street. Install sustainable, clean and silent public transport on George Street. Improve connection of the city to the harbour at Circular Quay, in the long term; Remove the Cahill Expressway at Circular Quay and tunnel the train station at Circular Quay.

Cycling

Large scale Develop a City Centre public space improvement strategy. Characterise types of streets and squares that provide a variety of settings and activities. Develop a staged implementation plan. Retain and enhance the urban fine grain.

Medium scale diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!! Medium scale Initiate urban design competitions. Upgrade Circular Quay as a major public square. Better signage and reduction of clutter. Create a new Town Hall Square. Create play environments for children. Upgrade Belmore Park and Railway Square. Upgrade and activate the Laneways. Small scale Upgrade urban space and squares along George Street. Introduce public art strategies that promote art in the streets and public realm of Central Sydney. Small scale Develop lighting schemes for specific spaces. Ensure a high quality public art programme for the central Introduce a wide range of types of greenery. spine and the three squares. Ensure inclusive access to public spaces. Create a sense of unity along George Street. Create subtle historical and visual links between the squares and the main street. 76

RECOMMENDATIONS

Large scale Identify a zone for mixed use. Develop a policy for gradual mixed use. Support liquor licencing reform to encourage diverse small bars and venues. Medium scale Ensure an accessible city for all. Ensure more active, attractive and transparent street frontages. Encourage and promote activation of laneways. Small scale Arrange festivals spurring new initiatives and partnerships across common borders. Develop campaigns to highlight the problems of a monofunctional city.


OVERVIEW OF RECOMMENDATIONS capitalise on the amenities

A WATERFRONT CITY

A GREEN CONNECTED CITY

a 21st century traffic system water

Identity

Cycling

diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!

40 km/h ZONE

0

A BETTER CITY FOR WALKING

A BETTER CITY FOR CYCLING

A STRONG PUBLIC TRANSPORT CITY

100

200

300

A TRAFFIC CALMED CITY

an attractive public realm

A STRONG CITY IDENTITY water

AN INVITING STREETSCAPE Identity

A DIVERSE, INCLUSIVE AND LIVELY CITY

Cycling

RECOMMENDATIONS

diagrammen 채r skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!

77


CAPITALISE ON THE AMENITIES a waterfront city

CREATE A CONNECTED WATERFRONT • In partnership with Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority and other State Government Agencies advance the development of a continuous and interesting Harbour Foreshore Walk from Glebe to Woolloomoolloo. • Ensure interesting experiences along the waterfront. • Celebrate the water squares. • Celebrate Circular Quay and Opera House Forecourt as natural gathering places in a harbour city. • Reinforce Sydney as the “Harbour City” through the integration of water features in the public realm including further interpretation and acknowledgement of the Tank Stream. ESTABLISH LINKS BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE WATER • Improve links between the city and the water physically and visually. Create interesting end points at the water like bridges, artwork, cafes or recreational facilities. INTEGRATE DARLING HARBOUR WITH THE CITY • Create a more extrovert Darling Harbour by improving the interface between Darling Harbour and the city. Upgrade frontages and integrate Darling Harbour with the general street structure. • Together with Sydney Harbour Foreshore Authority assess the feasibility of creating an expanded city park at Darling Harbour that provides a strong integration between the city, the water and Darling Harbour development. • Advocate a rethink on Darling Harbour to a multifunctional area, eg. by supplementing the area with dwellings and city functions.

0

100 200 300 400 500 m Foreshore walk “ Tank Stream”

SUMMARY

DEVELOP A CONNECTED FORESHOREImportant WALK AND links UPGRADE to the water THE ADJOINING STREETS AND SQUARES. ENSURE A STRONG BETWEEN THE ImportantCONNECTION waterfront squares WATER AND THE CITY. Barrangaroo site and Darling Harbour

0

78

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Harbour Foreshore Walk

Important waterfront squares

Interpretation element: “Tank Stream”

Important links to the water

RECOMMENDATIONS water

Identity

Cycling

Barangaroo and Darling Harbour


toolbox foreshore walk

A unified and continuous paving should dominate the Foreshore Walk. The paving should be of high quality and must ensure accessibility for all user groups. Denmark

Street furniture covering benches, lamp posts, rubish bins etc. should all be well coordinated from a design point of view. Vejle, Denmark

Create squares along the Foreshore Walk with different experiences and activity. Like “pearls on a string”. Bo01, Malmö, Sweden

Create direct access to the water by ramps or steps and give people opportunity to touch the water and perform a multitude of activities on the water. Bo01, Malmö, Sweden

A waterfront square with a permanent pavilion for different uses like music and theatre performances or just for shade on a sunny day. Hudson River Park, New York, US

A skateboard ramp could be one of many different activities at the harbourfront. Havneparken, Copenhagen, Denmark

Activities on the water. Havneparken, Copenhagen, Denmark

A recreational pause by the water. Bo01, Malmö, Sweden

Art installation in the pavement telling the story of the Tank Stream. Sydney

Mist from the many jets of water sparks the imagination, especially for children. Solbjerg Plads, Copenhagen

Paving stones with light a memory of water. Copenhagen, Denmark

Water stream in a pedestrian street. Freiburg, Germany

Water jets offering fun for everybody. Brønshøj Torv, Denmark

Water fountain on Place Pompidou. Paris, France

Waterwall installation. Melbourne, Australia

A simple water feature creates a quiet retreat. Thorvaldsens Plads, Copenhagen, Denmark

water squares

tank stream

points of activity

RECOMMENDATIONS

79


barangaroo

SUPPLEMENT TO THE CITY Investigate how Barangaroo can supplement Sydney; What is Sydney lacking at the moment? How can Barangaroo be a valuable addition to the existing and what special qualities should it hold?

LINKS WITH THE SURROUNDINGS Ensure strong connections with the rest of the City Centre. Walking, cycling and transport links are of high importance. Ensure a high level of continuation of existing street grids and urban pattern. Improve Hickson Road and Sussex Street as important interfaces and links to the city.

URBAN HARBOURFRONT Given the extraordinary location of Barangaroo in the middle of a large metropolitan city, the waterfront should be celebrated by an urban formulated public space relating to its highly urban situation.

DENSE AND LOW The buildings at Barangaroo ought to hold a multi-functional mix, within the buildings and within the individual quarters. Ensure passive surveillance by placing residences low and in close contact with public space. Avoid tall buildings creating problems at the micro-climatic level.

A GREEN PARK Celebrate the history of Sydney by creating a green park at the head. Link this park carefully with the harbour front and with the surrounding city areas.

BO01, WESTERN HARBOUR, MALMÖ, SWEDEN

AKER BRYGGE, OSLO, NORWAY

BATTERY PARK CITY, NEW YORK

In 2001, Sweden’s International Housing Exhibition provided the occasion to create a new urban settlement on reclaimed industrial land. A tight, irregular internal block layout protects inhabitants from strong and cold sea winds. Most importantly this contributes to a sense of human scale: delineating views and providing a sense of intrigue and delight through a sequence of spaces. Clear “fronts” and “backs” of housing blocks provide common semi-private spaces for residents. The development is energy-neutral, producing as much as it consumes, due partly to alternative energy sources and energy efficient design. Apartment buildings have been designed for mixed use - the ground floor level of buildings has a higher floor to ceiling height to allow easy conversion to shops when and if the need arises. Balconies and baywindows are common throughout, providing good visual connections and facilitating communication between inhabitants and visitors as well as providing views to the sea. Bo01 represents part of Malmö’s transformation from a depressed industrial city to a thrieving new multi-cultural centre of knowledge and advancement.

Aker Brygge was established in an abolished shipyard in the middle of Oslo in the early eighties. The area measures 260,000 m2 and is an exciting quarter and an good example on how to open up a city towards the waterfront. The project took over 10 years to complete and is today one of Oslo’s primary attractions. In the summer months Aker Brygge is Oslo’s primary and most popular meeting place, teeming with people both day and night. More than 5,000 people live and work in the area. The buildings are distinctive, with their combination of old, venerable shipyard buildings and modern architecture. The outdoor spaces are of high quality and a distinct design. Careful consideration has been paid to the scale of the area and on how to create human scale public space with the best conditions for a flourishing public life.

Battery Park City is a 90 acre (0.4 km²) planned community at the southwestern tip of Manhattan in New York City. The neighborhood, which is the site of the World Financial Center along with numerous housing, commercial and retail buildings, is named for adjacent Battery Park. Battery Park City is owned and managed by the Battery Park City Authority, a public corporation that is not controlled by New York City. From its inception, the defining vision for Battery Park City was to create a physical space welcoming the diverse people of New York City to work, shop, eat, play, relax, and, most important, live. Battery Park City is now some of the most scenic and engaging open space in New York City, establishing an urban fabric of mixed uses that has brought new life to lower Manhattan, sustaining it through difficult and turbulent times. At the heart of its success is the significant open space component that has resulted in a 1.2 mile esplanade, over 30 acres of parks, and streets that support active public participation in the life of the city.

80

RECOMMENDATIONS


Bo01, Western Harbour Malmรถ, Sweden

Aker Brygge, Oslo, Norway

Battery Park City, New York

RECOMMENDATIONS

81


CAPITALISE ON THE AMENITIES a green connected city

DEVELOP A SUSTAINABLE SYDNEY • Focus on sustainability and how Sydney can be a world leader on sustainable issues. • Investigate how the city can be sustainable at a number of levels relating to transport, energy use, green energy, waste, recycling, water etc. DEVELOP A GREEN CONNECTED SYDNEY • Create a strong connected green network of parks, squares, streets and laneways. Ensure links to the water. • Use the street tree planting program to enhance unique identity and improve the pedestrian environment. CREATE A CONNECTED OPEN SPACE/ PARK NETWORK • Celebrate the main parks, the Domain and the Botanic Gardens, as grand spaces and unified parklands that connect with the water. • Extend the cover on the Eastern Distributor in the Domain to unify the parklands. • Create strong links between the pedestrian network and the entrances points to the Gardens and the Domain.

Dawes Point Park Proposed Barangaroo

Link up green areas by developing a network of identifiable green routes.

King George Memorial Park

Sydney Observatory Hill

Jessie Street Garden Macquarie Place Park Lang Park

many unlinked peaces The parklands consists of many unlinked bits and pieces cut up by the Cahill Expressway and internal thoroughfares.

Royal Botanic Gardens

Wynard Park

The Domain

CELEBRATE HYDE PARK AS A GREEN LUNG • Progress implementation of the Hyde Park master plan. • Improve the interface between the park and the city by upgrading the surrounding streets and connections into the Park. • Create a strong link between Hyde Park, Cook and Phillip Park and the Domain.

Hyde Park

There is a need gateway for better create welcoming defined by artwork, entrances lighting or and gateways for city parks. landscaping Darling Harbour Parks

Belmore Park

0

SUMMARY

DEVELOP A GREEN NETWORK OF GREEN ROUTES AND GREEN SPACES LINKING WITH THE PUBLIC SPACE AND THE PEDESTRIAN NETWORKS Parks Pedestrian network 0

82

RECOMMENDATIONS

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


hyde park IMPROVE THE INTERFACE BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE PARKS The streets outside the parks need to clearly signal a special status as park streets. Wide pavements, high quality street furniture and lighting, beautiful paving and a calm traffic environment need to be standard elements where the parks and the city meet. Below is illustrated an improved Park Street which seeks to downscale the separation of the two parts of Hyde Park and serve as a high quality city street.

PARK STREET EXISTING SITUATION 1:400 400 cm footpath

280 cm parking lane

110 cm bicycle lane

280 cm bus lane

840 carriage lanes

280 cm bus lane

110 cm bicycle lane

280 cm parking lane

400 cm footpath

PARK STREET PROPOSED SITUATION 1:400 550 cm footpath

200 cm street furniture

150 cm bicycle lane

280 cm bus lane

280 cm carriage lane

80 cm median strip

280 cm carriage lane

280 cm bus lane

150 cm bicycle lane

200 cm street furniture

550 cm footpath

STRENGTHEN THE INTERFACE Strengthen the interface and connections into Hyde Park by emphasizing and celebrating the entry points using integrated identity elements like artwork, lighting and landscaping. Treat pedestrian connections to and from Hyde Park as special greenways and establish safe passage routes through the parks at night. Let the paving tell stories. Barcelona, Spain

Lights in trees give the area a special “feel” during the day and at nights. Copenhagen, Denmark

Host of “Stars” in the pavement. Solbjerg Plads,

Art installations can be used to establish identity. Melbourne

Sitting opportunities offering passers-by a rest. Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Establish identity in terms of small scale moveable green elements. Place de la Bourse, Lyon, France

Inviting edge with comfortable public benches. Lyon, France

Crossings are manifested through the paving materials. Copenhagen, Denmark

CREATE A DISTINCT STREET CHARACTER There needs to be a distinct character where Park Street dissects Hyde Park. The pavements along Park Street can at this stretch be widened by removing on street parking. Pavements can be used for public benches and for an urban “greenification” of the streetscape quite different from what is found inside the park.

700 cm footpath

150 cm bicycle lane

250 cm street furniture

325 cm carriage lane

80 cm median

325 cm carriage lane

150 cm bicycle lane

250 cm street furniture

700 cm footpath

RECOMMENDATIONS

83


A 21 CENTURY TRAFFIC SYSTEM a better city for walking ST

PEDESTRIAN NETWORK • Develop a unified pedestrian network of attractive walking links. • Identify a hierarchy of vehicle and pedestrian street types. • Create strong north /south connections and strong east /west walking links that have high pedestrian priority. • Establish and sustain an enjoyable, safe and interconnected pedestrian network for movement around the city centre. • Create strong walking links to the surrounding city hubs. • Expand the retail heart by extending the system of pedestrian streets and by linking the existing retail streets. • Ensure inclusive access and accessible paths of travel to allow all people to enjoy the city.

Sydney Opera House

The Rocks

Circular Quay

Botanic Gardens

Barangaroo

STRONG LINKS WITH OTHER TRANSPORT MODES • Create strong connections between public transport and the pedestrian network. • Ensure strong connections between main parking stations and the pedestrian network. • Promotion of pedestrians/ cyclists in the city. Conduct Sunday car free days.

King Street Wharf Martin Place Domain

Pitt Street Mall

Pyrmont Bridge

ATTRACTIVE WALKING ROUTES • Ensure high quality and attractive walking links (visually and functionally) • Raise the level of experiences and accessibility along walking routes. • Create new types of walking links through activated building frontages and public art etc. which leave out vehicular traffic and focuses on walking, cycling and public transport. • Maintain visual links and view corridors for city legibility. • Introduce a variety of sitting areas along the edge of the pedestrian network in places where people can interact or enjoy city views

Hyde Park

Town Hall

World Square Chinatown

UPGRADE INTERSECTIONS AND SAFETY • Minimize waiting time at intersections. • Minimize the number of pedestrian intersections on attractive walking routes by providing cross overs which carry pavement over minor side streets. • Remove push buttons. • Ensure safe walking links also at night. • Reduce occurrences of slip lanes. • Consider medians in streets to curb traffic and facilitate safe pedestrian crossings. • Assess opportunities to tightening corner radius of intersections by installing curb extensions to slow turning drivers. eg Spring /Gresham Streets and Spring /Loftus Streets.

Central Station

0

THE FUTURE PEDESTRIAN NETWORK SHOULD INCLUDE THE MAIN STREETS AND SQUARES AND CONNECT THE MOST IMPORTANT DESTINATIONS. Pedestrian street Primary walking link Foreshore walk 0

100

200 300 400 SUMMARY

500

(m)

RECOMMENDATIONS

Pedestrian street Primary walking links

Public transport, cycling and walking Pedestrian and Public transport street Destination

84

100 200 300 400 500 m

Destinations


elements for a pedestrian friendly city PEDESTRIAN NETWORK An extensive pedestrian network consisting of attractive walking routes, car free streets, pedestrian priority streets, walking friendly boulevards etc. is key to a successful city where walking is a competitive transportation mode. Links with public transport and major parking stations need to be strengthened and explored.

SQUARES A clear pedestrian network NETWORK A CONNECTED Develop an integrated pedestrian network where attractive routes link key destinations and major recreational spaces, parks and squares.

CLEAR WAYFINDING Well placed, easily read maps and directions are crucial in guiding visitors. An integrated way finding strategy should be developed and put in place. Town Hall, Sydney

EXPERIENCES At intervals the walking experience can be enrichened by artwork, beautiful urban spaces and squares or upgraded laneways which add extra quality to the walking experience. Palais Royal, Paris, France

EASY ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT The pedestrian network should be firmly linked to the public transport network offering attractive places for waiting and easily accessible platforms /stations. Göteborg, Sweden

HIGH QUALITY FOOTPATHS Widen footpaths when possible and strengthen the green, in terms of street trees or portable green. Aalborg, Denmark

CLEAR PASSAGE Avoid unnecessary footpath interruptions at minor side streets. Ensure that footpaths stay clear of inconveniently placed street furniture. Gammel Kongevej, Copenhagen

REDUCE NOISE LEVELS Initiate a study which carefully looks into the current levels of noise, where the noise comes from and how the streets can be substantially relieved from noise. George Street, Sydney

CITY HISTORY Continue the current tales of Sydney’s history on pavements, on plagues, in squares etc. Federation Square, Melbourne

GROUND FLOOR FRONTAGES Develop a program for upgrading frontages. Develop campaigns to raise awareness on the importance of transparent and interesting ground floor frontages. Vancouver, Canada

SOFT EDGES Encourage buildings with soft edges inviting people to stand, to sit and to enjoy public life from a comfortable distance. Copenhagen, Denmark

RESTING PLACES Develop guidelines for installing more public seating offering passers-by a rest and helping the elderly and families with kids. eg. benches /resting options per 250 m. Melbourne

PAVING Footpaths, laneways and car free streets as aesthetic pleasures, indicating high pedestrian priority and upgrading “the walking brand”. Bilbao, Spain

DIRECT ACCESS Improve pedestrian access by placing crossings according to pedestrian desirelines. Copenhagen, Denmark

PEDESTRIAN SIGNALS Timed pedestrian signals informing pedestrians about waiting /crossing time. Copenhagen, Denmark

FEW AND SHORT STOPS Limit the number of intersections along primary walking links. Reduce waiting time to eg. max. 15% of total travel time. Lyon, France

LIGHTING Extend the smartpole system to cover major streets. Introduce a more subtle and poetic lighting program in the intimate spaces. Esbjerg, Denmark

ATTRACTIVE WALKING ROUTES Straight forward interventions such as improving the footpath itself by upgrading main routes with high quality materials and paving will contribute significantly towards improving walking conditions in the city. But other aspects of the public realm are also important in achieving this aim. Soft edges and attractive ground floor frontages form the important interface between buildings and spaces. This zone needs to be carefully considered. The needs of pedestrians in terms of places to rest and the ability to lead conversations are also essential.

CROSSINGS AND SAFETY The analysis section indicated the numerous intersections that limit pedestrian movement and restrict walking in the city. In general, intersections should prioritise pedestrian and vehicle requirements equally. Crossings that are easy to use and consistently designed should replace the complicated crossings found in the city today. The pedestrian signals should be better timed so that pedestrians have a reasonable time to cross, a minimum time to wait and finally the number of intersections should be drastically reduced to increase walking speeds.

RECOMMENDATIONS

85


A 21 CENTURY TRAFFIC SYSTEM a better city for cycling ST

North Sydney

BICYCLE NETWORK • Develop a simple, easily read cycle system. • Ensure that cycle lanes are not under 1.5 m wide. • Do not leave any routes un-connected. • Establish a network integrated with public transport. • Place cycle lanes in desirable streets. • Introduce proper and secure cycle lanes, placed between footpaths and parking. (Copenhagen /Melbourne model) • Highlight cycle lanes in intersections to raise awareness. • Provide safe crossings with dedicated cycle lights. • Ensure strong links with cycling routes in the suburbs. BICYCLE PARKING • Introduce easily accessible and safe parking facilities. • Make bicycle parking facilities free of charge. • Ensure convenient locations for parking facilities including bike rings attached to smart poles. • Develop a policy for bicycle parking in buildings. • Ensure of adequate cycle parking in current parking structures. • Replace selected on street parking with cycle racks.

Barangaroo

BICYCLE ADVANTAGES • Spoil them to lure them up on their bikes !! • Make cycling a desirable, alternative transport mode. • Introduce a 3 second head start at intersections. • Introduce green waves for cyclists.

Bridge Street

King Stre

et

Pyrmont Bridge Woolloomooloo

BICYCLE CAMPAIGNS AND PROMOTIONS • Investigate viability for public bicycle hire schemes. • Introduce Ciclovias closing city streets during Sundays to allow cyclists to make use of the City Centre. • Cycle festivals: “Cycle in the park”, “Learn how to ride a bike”, “Cycling children”, “Cycling granny’s”. • Info campaigns focusing at: Motorist awareness, Safety, Cyclist behavior, Health and Sustainability.

Park Stre et

Elizabeth Street

eet Sussex Str

William Street

Glebe Oxford Street Hay St

reet

Broadway

SUMMARY

0

PROPOSED BICYCLE NETWORK Elisabeth Street

Dedicated cycle lanes Public transport and cycling Recreational routes 0

86

RECOMMENDATIONS

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m


elements for a bicycle friendly city BICYCLE NETWORK A consistent, connected bicycle network is essential in establishing an attractive alternative to vehicular traffic or public transport. Once the network has reached a substantial quality and size, cycling becomes a very attractive way of moving between eg. home and work.

A CONNECTED NETWORK Establish a connected cycle network that does not leave any routes unconnected and ensures strong links with cycling routes in the suburbs.

A complete bycycle network

DEDICATED CYCLE LANES Develop a simple, easily read cycle system with dedicated cycle lanes in desirable streets. Copenhagen, Denmark

ALL USER GROUPS Invite all age groups to use the cycle lanes by creating a safe and consistent system and by ensuring that cycling becomes a common mode of transport. Copenhagen, Denmark

EASY ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT Establish a cycle network integrated with public transport and allow bicycles to be taken onboard trains. New York

INFORMATION AND ADVANTAGES Easing wayfinding for new cyclists and visitors are equally important for cyclists as well as for pedestrians. Estimating distances and proposing possible routes are helpful elements. In order to make cycling an attractive transport mode and to increase travelling speeds, certain measures need to be put into place where cyclists get advantages easing their passage through the city.

INFORMATION ON ROUTES A connected network of cycle routes extending far into the surrounding suburbs needs a consistent signage program which ensures easy wayfinding. Odense, Denmark

KEEPING TRACK Counters at busy routes can register the number of cyclists passing during the day and year. The counter can also keep track of previous years and thus constantly updates the public on the development of a cycling culture. Odense, Denmark

CAR FREE- AND ONE WAY STREETS Cycling can be permitted in both directions in one way streets. Cycling can also be permitted in car free streets at certain times of the day. Linz, Austria

GREEN WAVES Introduce green waves for riders riding 20 km/h to ease passage through the city. Odense, Denmark

SAFETY Increasing the level of safety is the essential thing in order to get people up on their bikes. No half-hearted gestures, but a thought through policy of simple, easily read and successful safety means which effectively raises the level of safety for cyclists. As a side effect more cyclists will come along and a more diverse cycling culture will take place, where it is not only the young and brave, but also the grannies and their grandchildren. SAFELY PLACED LANES Cycle paths are clearly marked and placed between parked cars and the footpath. Swanston Street, Melbourne

SAFE INTERSECTIONS Cycle paths marked blue at major intersections raise awareness of motorists. Copenhagen, Denmark

TURNING LANES Dedicated turning lanes for cyclists so other cyclists can pass without having to slow down. Copenhagen, Denmark

3 SECONDS HEAD START Dedicated traffic signals for cyclists. Cycles start three seconds before cars to allow them to be seen in an intersection. Copenhagen, Denmark

BICYCLE PARKING Bicycle parking has two sides. One side relates to the cyclists need for a safe way of parking the bicycle at a desirable distance from the end point of the journey. Another side relates to the more aesthetic issues where uncoordinated cycle parking can have a serious downgrading effect on streets and squares, hamper pedestrian passage and block entrances to eg. train stations.

FREE AND ACCESSIBLE Easy accessible bicycle parking Odense, Denmark

CYCLE RACKS INSTEAD OF CAR PARKING Convert parking spots into bicycle parking facilities. Copenhagen, Denmark

PARKING POLICY Develop a policy for bicycle parking in buildings (New York has just introduced such a legislation) Copenhagen, Denmark

PUBLIC TRANSPORT Ensure convenient locations for parking facilities at transport interchanges. Copenhagen, Denmark

RECOMMENDATIONS

87


A 21 CENTURY TRAFFIC SYSTEM a strong public transport city ST

RETHINK AND SIMPLIFY SURFACE TRANSPORT • Develop a well integrated and well connected public transport network to provide an alternative to cars. • First phase could be a simplified bus network which is gradually replaced by light rail. • Investigate how underground train services can support a simplified surface transport system. • In the long term reduce the number of bus routes to the city centre. • Let metropolitan lines touch the periphery of the City Centre and provide an alternative transport link within the City Centre. • In the long term avoid bus layovers in the City Centre. • In the long term avoid major surface interchange facilities in the City Centre - place them at the periphery. • Extend the existing light rail system by adding more lines if possible to include the inner suburbs in a light rail network in order to reduce traffic in the City Centre. • Provide 24 hour bus lanes to ease access for public transport through the city. • More frequent running buses and trains. Introduce a 24 hour system with increased peak at evening and weekend services. • Take down the monorail.

Walsh Bay

George Street

George Street

Walsh Bay

A DEDICATED CITY SYSTEM • Develop George Street as the most important public transport route. • Investigate how a more environmentally sustainable surface transport system can be developed.

Park Str e

et Kings Cross

Park Str e

et Kings Cross Liverpool Street

Lilyfield

Liverpool Street Kensington

Lilyfield

Kensington

Central Station Leichhardt Central Station Botany Bay

Leichhardt

SUMMARY

0

Botany Bay

0

100 200 300 400 500 m Lilyfield

100 200 300 400 500 m PROPOSED FUTURE PUBLIC TRANSPORT NETWORK Lewisham (Uni) IN THE CITY CENTRE Paddington

Lilyfield Lilyfield Lewisham (Uni) Leichhardt Paddington Kings Cross Botany / Bondi Junction BotanyBay Bay/ Kensington 0

0

88

RECOMMENDATIONS

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Trainstations stations Train

Botany Bay / Bondi Junction Train stations


a public transport friendly city PUBLIC TRANSPORT NETWORK Relieving the City Centre of noise and fumes is a strong success criteria for any surface transport improvements. Investigate how light rail or buses can provide a simplified, attractive, silent and pollution free ground level public transport supplementing the extensive rail network. A future surface transport system should incorporate a strong sustainable dimension.

SURFACE TRANSPORT NETWORK Simplify surface transport to facilitate a traffic calmed City Centre. Let all suburban routes terminate at the periphery of the City Centre and allow only one route to dissect the centre.

24 HOUR PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICE 24 hr lanes for buses ensure a frequent running bus system. Extend service into the evening /night to support city functions. Copenhagen

PUBLIC TRANSPORT INTERCHANGES Strong connections between the various transport modes are an important success criteria. Ensure that the city system and the suburban system link up. Create strong links between the underground system and surface transport. Lyon, France

DEDICATED PUBLIC TRANSPORT IN THE CITY CENTRE. Introduce a simple one route system maintaining George Street as a public transport spine in the City Centre. Support this route by free small scale service buses as eg. in Perth. Auckland, New Zealand

GEORGE STREET Develop a new street type for pedestrians, cyclists and public transport. Indirectly this can effectively traffic calm George Street. Barcelona, Spain

INFORMATION An information pillar shows bus routes, schedules as well as how many minutes until the next bus. Copenhagen

INTEGRATED TICKETING SYSTEM Ensure that tickets and travel passes are valid for any public transport mode - buses, light rail or trains. Copenhagen, Denmark

ATTRACTIVE INTERCHANGES High quality interchanges in terms of light rail or bus stops, train stations and ferry terminals are crucial in attracting passengers. A number of possible passengers tend to avoid dark and deserted places at night, including stations with grotty entrances or a run down appearance. Strasbourg, France

Introduce a light rail or a simplified and rapid running bus system with few routes, easy to understand and use. Avoid bus layovers and major bus stops in the City Centre by replacing major interchanges and layovers to the periphery of the City Centre. Substitute the current system with one dedicated city line. Introduce dedicated 24 hr light rail/bus lanes, ensuring a frequent running 24 hr public transport system with a high evening and weekend coverage to support public life activities outside peak periods.

ENSURE ACCESSIBILITY AT ALL LEVELS Raise awareness on accessibility issues and develop a policy for increasing the number and placement of accessible stops and stations as well as ensuring easy access to trains, light rail or buses. Strasbourg, France

PUBLIC TRANSPORT INTERCHANGES Ensure friendly and inviting public transport facilities by improving the interface between streets and interchanges /stations /bus stops. A good quality pedestrian network is vital to achieve a higher rate of public transport. Routes to and from stations and terminals need to be clearly signed (and lit) and provide comfortable walking paths to invite people to use trains, lightrail or buses. Ensure when possible that interchanges are overlooked by passers-by, residents or other functions.

RECOMMENDATIONS

89


A 21 CENTURY TRAFFIC SYSTEM a traffic calmed city ST

REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF TRAFFIC IN THE CITY CENTRE • Investigate how traffic can be reduced in the City Centre. • Investigate how the present tunnels can be better integrated and form a coherent system underneath the city. • Remove all access and exit ways to the Western Distributor. • Investigate how the Western Distributor in the long term can be demolished to better connect the city and the harbour. • Advocate for the long term removal of the Cahill Expressway at Circular Quay and encourage all through traffic to use the Harbour Tunnel. • Establish park and ride systems outside the City Centre at key locations. • Reduce the capacity of inner city streets. • Reduce speed in general to 40 km/h. • Cut the majority of all east /west links in the City Centre.

40

REDUCE THE AMOUNT OF PARKING • Reduce the amount of parking in the City Centre. • Remove on street parking to off street locations. • Promote relocation of parking structures to the periphery and ensure strong links with public transport.

40

40 km/h ZONE

40 km/h ZONE

0

SUMMARY

100 200 300 400 500 m

ThroughTRAFFIC traffic only (no exit/access LONG TERM CONCEPT TO REDUCE THROUGH

to the Western distribution in the CBD)

Through traffic only (no exit/access ways to the Western Interrupt East - Distributor West traffic 40 mph zone Interrupt east-west traffic 40 km/h zone Expressway/Underground expressway Through traffic only (no exit/access to the Western distribution in the CBD) Interrupt East - West traffic 40 mph zone

0

90

100

200

300

RECOMMENDATIONS

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


a people friendly city CONSTRAINTS ON VEHICULAR MOVEMENT In order to improve the quality and vitality of the inner city a reduction in vehicle traffic volumes needs to be achieved. Through traffic with no business in the city centre should be redirected to a tunnelled vehicular route outside the City Centre.

40 km/h

REDUCE THROUGH TRAFFIC Develop an underground vehicular route outside the City Centre linking into the regional road network and relieving the city centre from unnecessary through traffic.

INTRODUCE SPEED LIMITS Create a traffic calmed City Centre with a drastically reduced amount of traffic and a 40 km/h speed limit.

CREATE A BETTER BALANCE BETWEEN THE VARIOUS TRANSPORT MODES Swanston Street, Melbourne

INTRODUCE SPEED LIMITS A speed restriction of 40 km/h should be introduced in the City Centre. Lowered speed limits and general traffic calming schemes will reinforce the perception of streets being city streets and not thoroughfares. CUT THE EAST /WEST TRAFFIC LINKS Cut the east-west traffic links to avoid people shooting through the City Centre to reach destinations at the other side. Identify George Street as a dividing range for cross town movement and allow only vehicular traffic at a few east /west streets. Effectively the Cahill Expressway at Circular Quay should be removed as the first example of this strategy. NO ACCESS /EXIT FROM THE WESTERN DISTRIBUTOR Avoid flooding the City Centre with cross-cutting traffic by removing all access and exit ways to the Western Distributor. Dedicate the Western Distributor to through traffic only. On the long term the Western Distributor ought to be demolished and replaced with a city street.

CUT EAST /WEST TRAFFIC LINKS Explore options to interrupt east /west vehicular links to avoid cars driving through the City Centre to reach destinations which are really on the other side of the city centre.

NO EXIT /ACCESS TO THE CITY CENTRE Reduce the traffic flooding of the city centre by removing access and exit ways from the Western Distributor, thus dedicating the Western Distributor to through traffic only. In the long term aim to remove the elevated road infrastructure.

CREATE SAFE AND COMFORTABLE CITY STREETS Increase the general awareness of a sustainable city where people need to find alternative transport modes. Bourke Street, Melbourne

A CRITICAL LOOK AT PARKING Reduce the amount of parking in the City Centre drastically in order to control traffic coming into the City Centre. Reduce on street parking at desirable locations and demolish existing public parking structures. Establish new and modern parking structures at the entry points to the City Centre and review pricing of on street parking. Review planning controls to reduce car parking ratios in connection with new developments. REDUCE PARKING Investigate options to reduce the amount of parking in the city centre and establish parking structures at the entry points to the City Centre.

ESTABLISH NEW PARKING STRUCTURES Introduce less space demanding and more intelligent parking structures at entry points to the City Centre. Volkswagen, Wolfsburg, Germany

INFORMATION ON AVAILABLE PARKING Parking info showing how many parking spaces are free and in which structures they are. Svendborg, Denmark

RECOMMENDATIONS

91


AN ATTRACTIVE PUBLIC REALM a strong city identity A CENTRAL SPINE AND THREE SIGNIFICANT SQUARES • Create a central high quality walking link along George Street linking three significant squares - Circular Quay, Town Hall Square and Railway Square. GEORGE STREET AS THE MAIN STREET • Celebrate George Street as a natural main street linking Central Station with Circular Quay and the Rocks. • Take private vehicular traffic out of George Street. • Create a combined public transport, walking and cycling street. CIRCULAR QUAY - WHERE THE CITY MEETS THE WATER • In the long term remove the Cahill Expressway. • Investigate options to tunnel Circular Quay train station. • Create a unified square from the buildings edge to the water. TOWN HALL SQUARE - A NEW MEETING PLACE • Upgrade the existing Sydney Square. • Expand across a traffic calmed George Street. • Develop a new civic square at the Woolworth’s site. CENTRAL STATION - TURNING BACKSIDES INTO FRONTS • Simplify traffic movements to free up land for a unified Railway Square. • Create a building edge along the railway embankment in Belmore Park to activate the park.

0

SUMMARY

100 200 300 400 500 m

“THE BEATING HEART” ONE MAIN STREET, THREE MAIN SQUARES AND A NETWORK OF PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY STREETS George Street, Circular Quay, Town Hall Squre and the Central Station precinct

0

92

RECOMMENDATIONS

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Squares Pedestrian network


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY george street

GEORGE STREET George Street at Town Hall Square served by a north /south going light rail line. Credits: Cleveland Rose (base drawing) & Gehl Architects (photoshop rendering)

RECOMMENDATIONS

93


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY george street

t Str eet Mar gare

ESTABLISHING A CLEAR MAIN STREET The vision is to provide a clear hierachy of north-south streets with George Street as the preferred north-south link - off which three key public squares; Circular Quay, Sydney Square and Railway Square as well as the Martin Place pedestrian precinct- and a number of smaller scale urban public spaces - are connected.

Hun ter S treet

VISION • George Street as the main street. • The ‘grand retail strip’ with a wide variety of retail and other functions on offer. • Vivacious and dynamic street with fine grain ground floor frontages. • Attractive side streets, small urban spaces and squares attached to George Street. • Footpaths taken across all minor side streets in order to increase the pedestrian priority. • Planting on side streets and placing of public benches could be a positive supplement.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT STREET The traffic on George Street should be simplified and changed into a public transport street with zones for public transport, cyclists and pedestrians only. The street profile should be narrowed down to 2 lanes dedicated to public transport and 2 lanes for bicycles. A preferred option is to investigate whether a light rail line could serve George Street. PEDESTRIAN ZONE The pedestrian zone should be upgraded into an attractive pedestrian environment with wide footpaths and offer recreational and social activities along the street with appealing street furniture and a safe and inviting pedestrian environment. Pedestrians should be given high priority throughout the street. As such the main use - promenade walks - should be enhanced. Footpaths need to be taken across all minor side streets. The result will be a dignified city walk. Where footpaths are taken across side streets, the pavement needs to be widened and small oases can be created where a tree and a bench can offer good possibilities for resting.

94

RECOMMENDATIONS

GEORGE STREET 1:800

Wide footpaths with room for benches and street tree planting. Swanston Street, Melbourne

A complete lighting strategy for street lights and shop lights. Rue de la Republique,Lyon, France

Light rail serving the city centre and used as a traffic calming element. Strassbourg, France

Public Art as a significant part of the identity, telling the history of the street. Holmbladsgade, Copenhagen

Footpaths are taken across all side streets giving pedestrians high priority. Gammel Kongevej, Copenhagen

Benches offering passer-bys a rest have been placed in connection to the narrowed side street entries. Gammel Kongevej, Copenhagen


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY urban spaces and squares /laneways

URBAN SPACES AND SQUARES The study area in Sydney is already a dense and compact city centre. The city does however have a lot of underutilized “corners” and “pockets” especially along George Street. If beautified, the spaces improve staying opportunities and consequently the quality of public life, providing a sense of repose and opportunities to linger away from the hustle and bustle.

LANEWAYS The City’s Laneway Revitalisation Program will redevelop the city’s quiet alleyways and lanes into busy “outdoor rooms” with cafes, wine bars, restaurants, live performances and open air galleries and stimulate public life and vitality. It will breathe new life into the City Centre and provide new intimate places for people. Physical improvement of the city’s lanes provide for the comfort, engagement and entertainment of pedestrians, inviting a range of popular uses. They also create opportunities for innovation, surprise and unique approaches to both permanent and transient design.

Water, trees and a change in paving create a peaceful pocket in a bustling city. Paley Park, New York

Waterwall installation. Exxon Park, New York

A small pocket space with simple attractions such as trees and a fountain. Santiago de Compostella, Spain

A pocket space offering space for sport, play and cultural activities. The Multi Square, Copenhagen

Laneway with a playful lighting. Brighton, UK

A lively laneway with bars and art installations Bulletin Place, Sydney

Art installation in a laneway Melbourne, Australia

Inviting and lively laneway Brussels, Belgium

URBAN SPACES AND LANEWAYS ALONG GEORGE STREET Laneways Urban spaces and squares

Laneways 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

RECOMMENDATIONS

95


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY circular quay

First Fleet Park appears under-utilized.

CELEBRATE SYDNEY AS A WATERFRONT CITY Circular Quay with the city landmark, Sydney Opera House, the water and the all day sun access as its main attractors is the end point of George Street. The vision is to enhance these qualities and celebrate the city’s position /location by the water. Through establishing an open and coherent foreshore square at Circular Quay a visual contact between city and water will strengthen the city’s identity as a waterfront city and provide a greater and undisturbed experience of the waterfront.

RECOMMENDATIONS • Initiate an architectural competition to explore its possible re-design as a “contemporary urban square”. • The competition needs to facilitate a comprehensive and inclusive debate about the use and design of the square. • Introduce high quality paving emphasising the entry to the space and giving notice of a traffic calmed zone. • Coordinated lighting plan for all Circular Quay treating the square as a whole. • Use corners for temporary retail eg. ice cream stalls or cafes using the corners for outdoor serving.

CAHILL EXPRESSWAY The Cahill Expressway is to be removed and a new underground station constructed to create a unified and broad square open to the harbour and the city. FIRST FLEET PARK First Fleet park is to be upgraded or redone (possibly following a design competiton) with the aim of providing the harbourfront with a more attractive urban harbour park as a supplement to the promenade character of Circular Quay. A desolate area underneath the Cahill Expressway

THE FERRY TERMINALS The ferry terminals should have a great level of transparency opening up for a greater visual contact to the water when arriving at Circular Quay as well as when staying or strolling in the area.

ferry wharfs

First Fleet Pa

rk

embankm Alfred Street

ent

Views between the city and the water are blocked by the embankment. CIRCULAR QUAY EXISTING SITUATION 1:4000

main issues today

BARRIER Circular Quay is downgraded by the railway and Cahill Expressway embankment.

vision “a link between city and water”

WATERFRONT CITY Celebrate Sydney as a waterfront city.

96

RECOMMENDATIONS

ALFRED STREET The street is a public transport street squeezed in between the embankment and the city. It draws a visual and physical borderline between the city and the harbourfront.

PATCHWORK There is a lack of cohesive public space due to the infrastructure corridors, which are separating public space in bits and pieces.

VISUAL CONNECTION Strengthen the visual links between the city and the water.

UNIFIED HARBOURFRONT Create a unified square linking the city with the water.


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY circular quay

Create a light and transparent ferry terminal. Bus terminal, Auckland

Create a harbour square with many different activities and installations. Hafencity, Hamburg, Germany

Celebrate the unique location by the water. Create a world class water square re-uniting the city with the water. Sct. Marks Square, Venice, Italy

Establish a water square by the harbour. Thisted, Denmark

long term strategy

stage o

stage 1

stage 2

Existing situation

a. Remove Cahill expressway. b. Remove Alfred Street. c. Create a unified pavement. d. Improve the environment under the embankment and open up. e. Remove unnecessary built form. f. Redevelop First Fleet Park.

a. Relocate the train station. b. Demolish the embankment. c. Create a unified world class square by the water.

RECOMMENDATIONS

97


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY town hall square

”THE BEATING HEART” Town Hall lies in the heart of the city. It faces George Street and lies opposite the new planned city square on the Woolworths site. The vision is to provide Sydney with a large public, dynamic and lively gathering place, in a potential key interchange area, and make it a special event /public forum where all kinds of activities can take place; Large arrangements and festivals but also everyday life activities.

The connection to George Street from the square is weak as it is obstructed by access points to the underground system.

Town Hall

LEVELS Sydney Square needs to be levelled out to optimise accessibility and provide a smooth pedestrian link to George Street. GEORGE STREET The street layout of George Street needs to be upgraded by widening footpaths in front of Town Hall Square and at the opposite side. As George street is to be traffic calmed and turned into a public transport street noise levels will drop and the environment be made more pleasant.

There are many different levels which create many stairs and strange “holes” on the square.

QVB

St. Andrews house St. Andrews Cathedral

RECOMMENDATIONS • Create a new civic plaza with a strong identity and sense of place. Develop a distinct profile and a high level of maintenance. • Introduce a one level surface allowing free pedestrian movement. • Develop a catalogue of multiple uses for the plaza. • Illuminate prominent facades at night. • Coordinate street square furniture and square elements all of high quality. • Introduce a high quality lighting scheme to enhance the qualities of the square at night.

TOWN HALL EXISTING SITUATION 1:2000

The street furniture is of a very low quality.

main issues today

LEVELS The changes in levels complicate the visual contact and the accessibility.

QUALITY AND CLIMATE The quality and the climate on the square is not satisfactory.

LINKS The link between Sydney Square and George Street is weakened by poorly placed street furniture, changes in levels and openings to the underground.

vision “a new meeting place”

A UNIFIED SQUARE Buildings on a unifying “carpet”.

AN EXPANDED SQUARE Create an expanded square across from Town Hall at the Woolworth’s site.

GEORGE STREET George Street is traffic calmed and turned into a public transport street with bicycles. George Street creates a spine and unifies Town Hall square with the northern and the southern parts of the city.

98

RECOMMENDATIONS


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY town hall square

Establish a new and unifying Town Hall Square City Square, Melbourne

Create a relaxed meeting place. Place de la République, Lyon, France

TOWN HALL SQUARE A new meeting place for the city, where the Woolworths site, Town Hall Square and Queen Victoria Building are unified and create a new plaza. Credits: Cleveland Rose (base drawing) & Gehl Architects (photoshop rendering)

Public transport through the Allow outdoor seating day and night, summer and winter. Magasin Torv, Copenhagen

stage 1

a. Roll out a unifying “carpet”. b. Create a unified square at street level (no changes in level). c. Remove the cathedral parking (no changes in level). d. activate frontages.

stage 2

a. Change the street layout of George Street. b. Link Town Hall Square with Queen Victoria Buildingh forecourt.

stage 3

a. Demolish the Woolworth’s buildings and adjacent buildings. b. Create a new Town Hall Square. c. Redevelop the north-west corner of Town Hall Square (the building between St. Andrew’s House and Town Hall).

light rail

light rail

long term strategy

RECOMMENDATIONS

99


A STRONG CITY IDENTITY central station precinct

RAMP TO HAY STREET Poor quality pedestrian link from Hay Street.

t

Llightra

il

Hay Str eet

EDDY AVENUE The street profile needs to be rearranged to obtain a much more defined and narrow street. On street parking needs to be removed. Parking of tourist busses can take place in the northern part of Railway Square with vehicular access from the Hay Street ramp. A wide pedestrian crossing should be installed to secure access between Central Station and Belmore Park. BELMORE PARK A new layout for Belmore Park should strengthen its position as an urban park in an active transit area. Parts of the park along the edge and on the present parking structure on Hay street should be dedicated to buildings which include service functions to serve passers-by and provide a greater sense of safety in the late hours of the day.

P

Str ee

LIGHT RAIL STOP AT CENTRAL STATION The existing light rail stop is unattractive and dark.

RAILWAY SQUARE Railway Square needs to be strengthened through a unified paving and inviting staying possibilites. The paving outside Central Station should stretch all the way down to Hay Street and around to Eddy Avenue providing optimal access and safety for pedestrians coming to and from the station. With a new street profile for the Hay Street ramp, consisting of two lanes and no on-street parking, a Kiss & Ride point should be integrated near the entrance of the station allowing short stops for dropoff/pick-up’s. At Railway Square a dedicated parking area can be established for regional buses, taxis, etc.

RECOMMENDATIONS • Create a cohesive masterplan for the Central Station precinct. • Introduce a traffic calming scheme. • Establish a unified Railway Square with simplified pedestrian access to Central Station. • An architectural competition should be held to explore Belmore Parks possible re-design as a contemporary urban park.

Belmore Park

Pit t

AN ATTRACTIVE ARRIVAL For many, Central Station is the first meeting with Sydney. The vision is to establish a coherent and more attractive area around Central Station where Railway Square, Belmore Park and Eddy Avenue will form a new and upgraded public domain which will be linked to the main street – George Street.

P

P

P P

P

Ce n

ue

P

lS

tat i

on

Railway Square

P P

Av en

P

tra

P

Ed dy

P

P P

CENTRAL STATION PRECINCT EXISTING SITUATION 1:4000

RAILWAY SQUARE Unworthy arrival to Central Station.

main issues today

WEAK LINKS Weak pedestrian links to and from Central Station.

BARRIER Eddy Avenue forms a barrier between Central Station and Belmore Park.

UNATTRACTIVE SURROUNDINGS Unclear traffic movements generally downgrade the public space quality. Especially Railway Square lies in bits and pieces, while the pedestrian links to Hay Street is unattractive.

vision

IMPROVED ARRIVAL Create direct and attractive walking links to Central Station which are integrated parts of a collected pedestrian network for the whole city centre.

A UNIFIED SQUARE Create a unified and pedestrianised Railway Square. Dedicate the Hay Street ramp to vehicular access and define a drop of point and a dedicated parking area in the northern part of Railway Square.

ATTRACTIVE URBAN PARK Upgrade Belmore Park to form an attractive and more urban city park. Investigate whether buildings along the railway embankment can strengthen the activity level in the park.

“ a worthy arrival to the city”

100

RECOMMENDATIONS


Waiting possibilities in the shade. Railway Square, Vienna, Austria.

A new meeting place. Federation Square, Melbourne (Approx. same size as Belmore Park).

Public functions in the centre part, shops and small scale offices in the pavillons to the sides. Kungsträdgården, Stockholm (Approx. same size as Belmore Park).

RAILWAY SQUARE Strengthen the public domain in the area around Central Station by upgrading Railway Square, Eddy Avenue and Belmore Park. Credits: Cleveland Rose (base drawing) & Gehl Architects (photoshop rendering)

long term strategy

stage 1

stage 2

stage 3

a. Re-arrange vehicular access to Central Station. (Hay Street ramp). b. Unify Railway Square, create a new urban public space. c. Dedicate the North-East part of Railway Square to short term parking.

a. Introduce a traffic calming scheme at Eddy Avenue. b. Relocate bus parking and short term parking to Railway Square. c. “Shrink” the street profile and introduce a direct pedestrian crossing to Central Station.

a. Introduce new functions in Belmore Park to add activities and variety. b. Introduce an ideas competition for Belmore Park asking for new ways of thinking public, urban park.

RECOMMENDATIONS

101


AN ATTRACTIVE PUBLIC REALM an inviting streetscape

IMPROVE THE VISUAL ENVIRONMENT • Finalise the Interim Public Domain Policy and Strategy. • Continue the City Centre streetscape upgrade program. Plant street trees along George Street - from Park Street to Bridge Street where future footpath widening provides clearance to awning structures. • Retain and enhance the urban fine grain. • Develop a high quality public art culture, with art works created distinctly for specific public spaces. • Develop a City Centre Spaces public domain improvement plan that provides a variety of settings and activities. • Strengthen history and the architectural heritage. Develop guidelines for successful integration between new developments and heritage buildings. • Celebrate the heritage. Develop lighting schemes to emphasize heritage landmarks and streetscapes. • Ensure that ground floors of the high rise buildings are carefully designed to a human scale environment and add quality to the pedestrian landscape in terms of interesting, active frontages with small units. • Improve the legibility of the public domain through better signage and reduction of clutter. • Investigate possibilities of creating a high quality precinct of heritage /warehouse buildings in the western part of the City Centre. IMPROVE THE MICRO-CLIMATE • Protect the sensitive micro-climate from increased wind and shade caused by high rise buildings. • Introduce height controls. • Reinforce sun access planes. • Take care of the acoustic environment by reducing traffic and replacing buses with silent alternatives. IMPROVE CONDITIONS FOR STAYING • Provide more public benches for formal seating. Provide places to rest in squares and along streets at reasonable intervals. • Ensure inclusive access and accessible paths of travel for public domain. • Improve condition for children. Create a series of new play environments across the City Centre. Create a child friendly city.

0

SUMMARY

AREAS WHERE A HIGH QUALITY PUBLIC REALM SHOULD BE ENCOURAGED High level of attractiveness

0

102

RECOMMENDATIONS

100

200

100 200 300 400 500 m

300

400

500

(m)


toolbox FRONTAGES

WATER ELEMENTS

ART

GREENERY

Ground floor frontages are rich in detail and exciting to walk by, interesting to look at, to touch and to stand beside. Activities inside the buildings and those occurring on the street enrich each other. In the evening friendly light shines out through the windows of shops and other ground floor activities and contributes to both a feeling of security as well as genuine safety.

The fact that Sydney is a waterfront city should be felt in all of the City Centre, either through celebrating views to and from the water or by installing water elements reminding visitors and residents of the larger context. Water elements generally have a positive effect on the general quality and attractiveness of the public realm. Water attracts children of all ages and adds a subtle beauty to the hard surfaces in an urban environment. Promote sustainable water elements, eg. using recycled water or sea water, should be investigated.

Public art comes in many shapes and qualities. A general strategy for the overall use of public art in the City Centre is very useful. This can be supplemented by art strategies for specific areas - eg. Martin Place, George Street, Bridge Street etc. Artists should generally be involved in this work and as much art as possible should be created for specific sites and be part of a broader strategy, where the various art objects create an overall connection of larger value than that of the individual objects.

Greenery has a softening effect on the streetscape and effectively muffles the noise of traffic as well as cleans the air. Given the constraints on street tree planting in terms of harsh climate conditions and lack of space, there needs to be a strategy for portable greenery. Also the sustainable dimension needs to be investigated. Melbourne has made interesting solutions where street trees collect and filter storm water.

Attractive retail units - many units, many doors, high level of transparency etc.. Melbourne

Water elements integrated in the pavement. Varde Torv, Denmark

Playgrounds as land art. Sapporo, Japan

Temporary flower exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living Colourâ&#x20AC;?. Herald Square, Sydney

Tasteful and inviting frontages with the possibility of opening up part of the glazing on hot days. Degraves lane, Melbourne

Water jets offering hours of fun. Somerset House, London, England

Example of a temporary art installation in a laneway in Melbourne

Removable planting pots. Place de la Bourse, Lyon, France

Open and inviting frontages also at nighttime. Copenhagen, Denmark

An elegant water surface. Thorvaldsens Plads, Copenhagen, Denmark

Orange coloured temple walk, defining a distinct path through a public space. Kyoto, Japan

Street tree filtering storm water. Melbourne

RECOMMENDATIONS

103


major problems

public squares vocabulary CREATE CHARACTERISTIC AND WELCOMING PUBLIC SPACES The analysis section indicated that there is a number of minor public spaces in the City Centre and that a substantial part appears to have the same layout, the same functions and the same type of design /materials. These spaces appear to be quite under-utilised with only a limited number of users during the day.

B

A

CULTURAL DISTRICT

Develop a follow up to the Open Space Study by identifying problems and potentials of all the squares in the City Centre relating to physical, functional and usage issues. On this basis a public space hierarchy and a public space plan can be developed with strong BUSINESS DISTRICT links between pedestrian network and the individual squares. Celebrate the many small and large spaces in the city centre and clarify the use of the various spaces by giving them a clear function supported by a unique design profile. Introduce different kinds of public spaces to accomodate various activities, some fixed CONSUMER DISTRICT in their use and others more flexible. Ensure that Sydney holds a variety of spaces which present the best of urban design in all its different aspects and which hold different qualities attracting different user groups. FUN DISTRICT

monofunctional city

PLAYFUL SQUARES

FRAMEWORK FOR LIFE

open spaces - bits and pieces

traffic dominated city divided city

CLASSIC VERSION

TEMPORARY

diagrammen är skalerade 50% av originalfilen!!!

Red rubber paving is the essential element in a provocative new public space design. A result of a strong cooperation between the architect and the artist. Urban Lounge, St. Gallen, Switzerland

Bryant Park is a popular retreat in a dense city. The simple elements consist mainly of portable chairs and a distinct green context. The park is privately managed by a non-profit organisation and a succesful example of such a constellation. Bryant Park, New York

High quality paving materials, specifically designed street furniture and a professional lighting system developed especially for this square serving its many functions as market square, scene of events, everyday functions etc., are the main elements. St. Pölten, Austria

Burned almonds tempt passers–by at the christmas market. Nyhavn, Copenhagen, Denmark

Interactive lighting elements symbolising harbour cranes are the main feature at this popular public space. Schouwburgplein, Rotterdam

Woolloomooloo Playground is a rare mix of four main functions; A playground, a community garden, a basket ball field and a classic recreational space with benches and flowers. Woolloomooloo, Sydney

The sound of cascades of water dominates this square and muffles the nearby sounds of traffic. Place de la République, Lyon, France

Temporary and inexpensive space by the harbour with sand, beach chairs and hammocks. An urban beach in the city centre. Copenhagen harbour front, Denmark

104

RECOMMENDATIONS


street types vocabulary CREATE A DISTINCT STREET HIERARCHY The analysis section also indicated that the majority of all streets in the City Centre generally serve the same purpose as transport corridors primarily for vehicular traffic, as service roads and as parking spaces. The consequences for the city is that is has been filled to its maximum capacity with vehicular traffic. Consequently many of the streets look very alike and the distinction between them is weak. This makes the general orientation

hard and creates a sense of indifference towards the individual streets and the adjoining squares and parks. Differentiate the various streets by introducing distinct design profiles related to a difference in traffic use. Ensure that streets are not only for transport, but also for a wide range of more recreational activities as well as a social meeting place.

Boulevards are grand city streets carrying heavy volumes of traffic, while still providing an attractive environment for walking and for cycling. Street trees, wide footpaths and a green median are essential parts.

High quality walking link with the occasional ligh trail or bus passing through. A low level of noise and a busy atmosphere of many people visiting and promenading are distinct trademarks. Cycling is a natural part of these streets.

Pedestrian priority streets prioritize walking. No kerbs have been installed and it is more a negotiation process, than a right of way. These types of streets hold strong restrictions on vehicular traffic in terms of turning options and driving directions. Thus the level of vehicular traffic is low and space is gained for other people activities.

Pedestrian streets are often part of a larger network of more or less pedestrianised streets and squares. Together they form a network of various experiences and possibilites for play in a calm and safe environment. The most succesful of these types of streets are the ones with a multitude of activities extending into the evening.

BOULEVARD

PUBLIC TRANSPORT STREET

PEDESTRIAN PRIORITY STREET

PEDESTRIAN STREET

24 metre wide footpaths are essential parts of Champs-Élysées, which have a strong green profile and a clear division between transport zones and zones for street furniture etc. Champs Elysée, France

A homogeneous paving unifies the street with the square and indicates a high level of shared space, where pedestrians are invited to cross at their convenience. Strasbourg, France

The one levelled pavement is divided into patterns defining the different zones for movement and for recreational purposes. Strædet, Copenhagen, Denmark

Pedestrian streets are distinct gathering points for a number of people, both locals and visitors. Strøget, Copenhagen, Denmark

Wide footpaths and distinct street trees frame the pedestrian space. A green median provides a safe retreat. Copenhagen, Denmark

Grass defines the zoning of the street in a public transport part and a pedestrian part. Barcelona, Spain

Shared surface with attractive paving and public benches. New Road, Brighton, England

Wall to wall paving defines the streetscape and sends a strong signal of pedestrianisation. Here kids can run freely to play and a multitude of activities can take place. Bilbao, Spain

RECOMMENDATIONS

105


AN ATTRACTIVE PUBLIC REALM a diverse, inclusive and lively city

CREATE A MULTIFUNCTIONAL CITY CENTRE • Identify a zone, consisting of certain key streets, where multifunctionality is especially important. • Develop a policy for minimum requirements regarding mixed use. Eg. retail at ground floor, residences above (eg. 30% of the total floor space in the building), offices at the top. • Investigate how the western corridor can gradually be turned into a multi-functional area supporting the central spine of the City Centre. • Encourage activation of laneways. • Support liquor licensing reform to encourage diverse small bars and venues. IMPROVE SAFETY AT NIGHT • Ensure more active and transparent street frontages. • Ensure active shops along key streets. • Increase the number of full time occupancy residences and spread them equally in the City Centre. • Invite more students to live in the City Centre by promoting student housing. • Expand the running hours of public transport to support a 24 hour city. STRENGTHEN THE CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS • Increase the cooperation between the cultural institutions. • Increase their visibility by strong partnership in common projects. • Ensure engagement from the cultural institutions in issues related to art, design, music, theatre etc. • Provide and promote a diverse annual program of cultural and social events to foster social interaction and sense of community.

Encourage diversity of people Encourage diversity of and functions. people and functions

Createvaried varied diverse Create andand diverse invitationsfor forstaying staying. invitations

Create safe public Create aa lively lively and and safe realm is inclusive public which realm that is inclusivefor for all all.

0

SUMMARY

AREAS WHERE A MORE MULTI-FUNCTIONAL USE SHOULD BE ENCOURAGED Multi-functional zone

0

106

RECOMMENDATIONS

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


mixed use

office

CREATE A GOOD MIX OF DIFFERENT USES Ensure integration of shops, offices and dwellings in each city area and preferably in the individual buildings. Retail can be located on the ground floor, dwellings (eg. min. 30 %) on the first floors and offices on the upper floors. A mix of uses can secure life in the city streets and squares at all times of the day.

residential (min. 30%) retail

improve safety PROVIDE PASSIVE SURVEILLANCE The analysis section indicated that certain areas significantly change character between night and day. Certain areas that are lively, safe and secure during the day become deserted and frightening at night. The best way to reduce the empty and isolated feeling of certain areas at night is to accommodate passive surveillance by encouraging more eyes on the street. CREATE LIVELY STREETS AT NIGHTTIME Passive surveillance may be encouraged in two ways. One is by maintaining a lively flow of people in the streets, moving from one destination to another along key links. Key routes must be well-lit and attractive in the evening hours to encourage activity and provide safe and comfortable passage through the city at night. PROMOTE MIXED-USE AREAS The other type of passive surveillance occurs naturally in mixed-use areas, when restaurants, shops and street stalls that are open at night activate the edges of the public realm. Most vital are the residents in the area, which, regardless of whether shops are open or not, offer the impression that others are occupying the buildings that overlook the public realm. Promoting mixed-use by encouraging a combination of commercial, residential and office use would be beneficial for the city centre.

WORKERS Going to and from work Lunchtime guests (8am - 10am + 12pm - 2pm + 5pm - 7pm)

DWELLINGS The varying building uses ensure passive surveillance eyes on the street providing a natural sense of safety vital for city activity at night. The City Centre of Copenhagen, Denmark

RESIDENTS Going to and from the dwelling Passive surveillance (7am - 10am + 5pm - 9pm)

AMBIENT LIGHTING Ambient lighting spilling out from entrances to buildings gives a sense of activity while reducing dark corners and niches. A well and uniformly lit building edge improves wayfinding and orientation at night thus increasing the feeling of safety and security at night. Lyon, France

SHOPPERS Drifting during opening hours (10am - 6pm (10pm))

ACTIVITIES During the day as well as in the evenings it is important to plan and invite for activities to happen. Cafes and restaurants are of course ideal for this, but generally the most important thing is to create a natural flow of people ,so that there are always many people present in the public space. Venice, Italy

RECOMMENDATIONS

107


INSPIRATION

POETIC, COORDINATED AND SOCIAL PUBLIC SPACE POLICY - LYON, FRANCE - 1.3 MILLION INHABITANTS (GREATER LYON) DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC SPACES • Projects are spread over the city, with a balance between the Inner City and suburban districts.

POLICY PROFILE • The public space planning is coordinated with social policy with the aim of creating “a city with a human face” and a city for all its inhabitants. Equality and balance between projects in the Inner City and in suburban districts are underlined, for instance by giving the same architect the commission to design public spaces in both the centre and the suburbs. • Three different types of plans have been developed: A green plan, which focuses on the city’s public spaces, a blue plan that deals with the way the city meets the rivers, and a “yellow” plan, a lighting plan. The latter addresses the character and quality of lighting of monuments and other buildings as well as the streets, squares and parks. It is also a tool for collaboration between the public and the private sector in relation to the quality of lighting in different locations. • Lyon is actively supporting smaller shops in the inner city by stopping all further development of out-of-town shopping centres.

108

RECOMMENDATIONS

PUBLIC SPACES AND TRAFFIC • In order to create a human face to the city, the traffic policy is aiming at putting car parking underground. Many of the renovated spaces in the centre of the city have 4 to 6 stories of parking garages under the car-free surface of the public space. A partly public and private firm has been established to build and run the new parking structures. •

New light raillines and a metro are giving alternative forms of transportation.

TYPES OF PUBLIC SPACES • Most of the renovated public spaces in the Inner City were existing “classical rooms” in the historic city fabric, whereas the spaces in the suburban districts were “free floating” spaces between high-rise housing blocks. These suburban spaces had to be redefined and redesigned for new uses, thus creating new types of public spaces. A FIXED SET OF MATERIALS AND FURNITURE • A “Lyon vocabulary” of materials to be used in the spaces has been developed, particularly to underline the identity of the city but also to limit the number of materials to be maintained. To stress the equality between different districts, the same street furniture can be found in suburban housing projects as well as in central city spaces.

ORGANISING THE TASK • The city created two new organisations to cope with the coordination of public space policy. On the political level an organisation called “Group de Pilotage Espaces public” was formed, headed by the mayor. This group, with representatives from all departments involved in the process, meets once or twice a month. A parallel interdisciplinary organisation called “Group Technique de Suivi”, with experts from all departments, is meeting every week to prepare and coordinate the technical and practical sides of the implementation of the plans. PROCESS • As a response to the deteriorating quality of the public realm under the pressure of a growing number of cars entering the city centre, combined with social tension between suburbia and down town, one of the mayors, Henry Chabert, formulated the policy to create a city with “a human face” (or surface) in 1989. • Poets and other artists have been asked to generate the spirit of the place, the genius loci, before the brief is given to the architects or landscape architects who were designing the spaces. • A large number of public meetings and interaction with the local people are other characteristic elements of the process, which has also aimed to create a good interaction between the private and public sectors. RESULTS • Lyon suffered an industrial decline in the 1970’s, but has reformulated its role and become a very dynamic city. The policy has changed the appearance and image of the city, with a large number of high quality public spaces.


DEMOCRATIC AND PIONEERING PUBLIC SPACE POLICY - BARCELONA, SPAIN - 3.5 MILLION INHABITANTS (GREATER BARCELONA)

TWO DIFFERENT OCCASIONS AND POLICIES 1. The new democratic society and public spaces • The policy to create new public spaces for free meeting and talking was formulated in Barcelona after the fall of the dictatorship of general Franco. The new democratic government that came to power in the first free elections in 1979 promoted new public spaces to give inhabitants immediate improvements in living conditions and open up democratic discussion. 2. The Olympic Games and the city plan • The Olympic Games in 1992 was used as a great opportunity to make large-scale improvements to the city. Investment was used to drive development of the city plan, where unfinished parts were completed and derelict industrial sites were transformed into new city districts. In this way, Barcelona got new sports arenas but also a new district of housing with a leisure harbour connecting new city districts to the beach along the coast. PUBLIC SPACE POLICY PROFILE • Barcelona has been pioneering public space policies, where a great number of imaginative new designs have been applied across the city. • New public spaces in each neighbourhood for people meeting, talking, discussing, playing andunwinding. • The public space policy has been called “projects versus planning” as it turned the traditional planning methods upside down by focusing on what independent small projects can do for a city district - and for a whole city. Instead of waiting for the grand coordinated master plan to be

developed, the city has been implementing public spaces - even where no spaces existed - by tearing down derelict buildings, using old railroad yards, or renovating existing spaces. Without any great need of coordination, these projects improved the city for inhabitants. No standard designs but “tailor-made” solutions place-by-place, involving a great number of local architects. With the slogan “the gallery in the street”, contemporary sculptures have been an integrated part of the public space programme with the dual intention of giving each place its unique character and to create discussions between local people.

DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC SPACES • Hundreds of projects in many different scales, from major parks to local piazzas, or just a little corner with a couple of trees and a bench standing on a fine new urban floor, are spread over the whole surface of the city. It functions like a kind of urban acupuncture, where the whole body of the city becomes better without a great need for coordination of projects. PUBLIC SPACES AND TRAFFIC • Initially the public space policy was not an integrated part of any major traffic plan and in most cases projects were made without taking space from driving and only a few of the many spaces have underground parking garages as part of the new designs. Later projects with more traffic and parking emphasis have been emerging, such as parks on top of freeways.

ORGANISING THE TASK • The city created a new office called Servei de Projectes Urbans to work with new projects in the 10 city districts. Meetings are held with local people in each district as part of the process, and architects at the office coordinate the technical and administrative aspects of the project. There are a large number of local architects from private practice working in collaboration with - and doing projects for - the office. PROCESS • The new democratic city council selected Oriol Bohigas as a city councillor for urban design. Bohigas was both the director of the School of Architecture and partner of a major private practice, and he formulated the general approach. The results show an interesting relation between the public and private sectors, as the public investments in new city spaces were followed up by property owners renewing surrounding buildings. The early projects were designed after architects’ competitions and later the office for public space design was put into place to work continuously with the projects. RESULTS • The idea of reconquering public spaces was formulated in Barcelona as a political idea of providing democratic space as well as a vision for re-creating the art of making public spaces. Nowhere in the world can the viewer see so many different examples of new and experimental designs of parks, squares and promenades in a single city as in Barcelona.

TYPES OF PUBLIC SPACES • Barcelona has developed a wide range of public space types from small hard scapes in the form of piazzas, to large parks that function like “green oases”, often established on derelict land or former industrial sites. Promenades and other types of new interpretation of the rambla motif are frequent as well as a series of spaces dominated by gravel and soft shapes, mostly for playing. In this city with high density in both building mass and in traffic volumes, all the different types of open spaces are highly appreciated.

RECOMMENDATIONS

109


A BETTER CITY - STEP BY STEP - COPENHAGEN, DENMARK - 1.3 MILLION INHABITANTS (GREATER COPENHAGEN) •

• POLICY PROFILE • Copenhagen’s step-by-step policy covers a zone where a series of policies are applied to create better conditions for soft traffic and people on foot. • Public spaces are seen as a network of streets that link with public transit and a series of piazzas or squares that open up for different activities and urban recreation. DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC SPACE PROJECTS • Early projects were all in the historic core of the Inner City. Later, local spaces in the outer districts of the city were developed and, more recently, new spaces have been established along the waterfront. PUBLIC SPACES AND TRAFFIC • Bicycle lanes and bicycle priorities in different forms have been applied throughout. Access to the Inner City is possible by car but driving through is restricted, so walking or cycling is easier.

110

RECOMMENDATIONS

In the Inner City most of the public spaces are part of traffic calming measures and a series of different types of street designs have been applied from pedestrian-only, to pedestrianpriority streets and to streets with other limitations for driving. No new parking structures have been established in the Inner City for some years and kerb side parking has been reduced by an average of 23% annually. Surfaces have been converted to accommodate other people-oriented activities. New metro lines have been built recently to give better access to the Inner City from some of the new development areas of the Oerestad, a new town being built close to the city centre.

TYPES OF PUBLIC SPACES • The new public spaces in the Inner City consist of renovated existing “rooms” in the historic city, all with a modest and fine human scale. The spaces are mainly streets and squares, which through time have got different functions as “living rooms”, “dining rooms” for staying activities or “corridors” for strolling along as part of urban recreation. ORGANISING THE TASK • For many years the design of public spaces has been taken care of by the City Architect’s office, while the City Engineer’s office, paved and maintained them. In recent years the organisational structures at Copenhagen City Hall have been reorganised and an office established especially for public space design and policy.

PROCESS • The policies have been emerging gradually from early experiments with the first pedestrian streets in the 1960s to the 1980s, where consistent and coordinated policies were formulated. • Copenhagen has changed gradually through the last 30 to 40 years, from a city dominated by cars to a city centre for daily life for people on foot. RESULTS • Copenhagen Inner City has gained the reputation of being a fine place for urban recreation, where each new step has increased the quality for people on bicycles and on foot. These qualities of life are part of the reason that a growing number of people want to live in the centre of the city, where new housing has been built along the harbour fronts. Copenhagen has also experienced a general development from the first pedestrianisation years, where public life revolved around walking and shopping, to a more developed city culture where the number of mixed activities increase and where people spend four times as much time as before the redevelopment schemes started. The public money invested in renovating public spaces has been paid back through an increased number of tax payers in the city - more residents - and an increased turnover for city-based businesses. The general image of Copenhagen has changed towards a much more attractive city as a base for larger corporations and businesses in general.


URBAN TRANSFORMATION INTO A PLACE FOR PEOPLE - MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

(APPROX. 67,200 INHABITANTS IN THE MELBOURNE MUNICIPALITY, 3.6 MILLION INHABITANTS IN MELBOURNE’S METROPOLIS)

URBAN TRANSFORMATION INTO A PLACE FOR PEOPLE - MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - 3.6 MILLION INHABITANTS (GREATER MELBOURNE)

POLICY PROFILE POLICY PROFILE

 The design philosophy was • The City CityofofMelbourne’s Melbourne’s design philosophy was firstin outlined the 1985 Plan first outlined the 1985 inStrategy PlanStrategy that called for thattocalled for its theexisting city to strengths build on its the city build on in aexisting manner a manner thatlocal reflected Melbourne’s that strengths reflected inMelbourne’s character, while local character, while diversifying within diversifying uses within the central city uses to transform thea central central business city to transform from a activities central it from district to ita central business district to a central activities district. district. Melbourne’s existing strengths and physical Melbourne’s existing strengths and physical patterns were identifi ed and later elaborated upon patterns were identified and later elaborated in Grids and Greenery. Published in 1987, Grids in Grids and Greenery. Published in 1987, and upon Greenery provided a vision for the future of Grids and Greenery provided a vision for the Melbourne. future of Melbourne.  Alongside its early strategic vision and • Alongside its early strategic vision and directions, Council developed urban planning and directions, Council developed urban planning conservation controls, broad-perspective master and conservation controls, broad-perspective plansmaster and guidelines, as well as detailed action plans and guidelines, as well as plans, streetscape plans and streetscape street furniture technical detailed action plans, plans and notes. Council also instigated retail, events andalso arts street furniture technical notes. Council policies and programs, as well as strategic initiatives instigated retail, events and arts policies and and programs, project partnerships 3000 as well asincluding strategicPostcode initiatives andto encourage living back into the city.3000 to projectresidential partnerships including Postcode encourage residential living back into the city. DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC SPACE DISTRIBUTION OF PUBLIC  Since 1985, City of SPACE Melbourne’s urban design • Since has 1985,been City of Melbourne’sthroughout urban design program implemented the program although has been high-profi implemented throughout municipality, le projects have the municipality, althoughinhigh-profile generally been concentrated the central projects business have generally been concentrated in the central district, Southbank, and most recently, Docklands. business district, Southbank, and most recently, Docklands. PUBLIC SPACES AND TRAFFIC

 A principal objective of Melbourne’s urban design PUBLIC SPACES AND TRAFFIC program has been to reduce car dominance in • A principal objective ofa Melbourne’s the street while establishing more invitingurban public design program has been to reduce car dominance in the street while establishing a more inviting public realm for people.

realm for people. To achieve this, Council has this, butCouncil has process undertaken undertakenTo anachieve incremental consistent an incremental but consistent process of pedestrianisation through the installation of high- of pedestrianisation the installation quality bluestone paving, through street furniture, trees, of high-quality bluestone paving, street furniture, newsstands, and kiosks, complemented by a policy trees, newsstands, and kiosks, complemented for more active street-level building frontages. Such by a policy forhave morecreated active street-level building physical improvements a safer, more frontages. Such physical improvements inviting and engaging public realm. The area of have safer, more inviting engaging pedestriancreated space ahas increased through and footpath public realm. The area of pedestrian space extensions, most significantly in Swanston Street has increased through footpath extensions, most and little streets such as Flinders Lane. Temporary significantly in Swanston Street and little streets lunchtime road closures provide pedestrians with a such as Flinders Lane. Temporary lunchtime less congested through-route in Little Collins Street. road closures provide pedestrians with a less  In addition to improving public space for walking congested through-route in Little Collins Street. and social interaction, Melbourne has sought to • In addition to improving public space for walking promote sustainable alternatives to reduce and social transport interaction, Melbourne has sought emissions toandpromote traffic congestion, and to ensure the sustainable transport alternatives public realm inclusive and accessible to all people. to isreduce emissions and traffic congestion, While streets within thethecitypublic centre do isnot have and and to ensure realm inclusive formally dedicated bicycle dueWhile to thestreets competing accessible to all lanes people. within the demands city for centre road space, the closure Swanston do not have formallyofdedicated bicycle Street to daytime through-traffi c has established as road lanes due to the competing demandsit for a popular north-south cycle route. space, the closure of Swanston Street to daytime through-traffic has established it as a popular TYPES OF PUBLIC SPACE north-south cycle route.

 The City of Melbourne has aimed to enlarge TYPES OF PUBLIC SPACE the public realm and pedestrian networks with a TheofCity of Melbourne hasthrough: aimed to(1) enlarge broad• range public space types the the public realm and pedestrian networks establishment of main public spaces such as Bourkewith a broad of public space Square, types through: Street Mall, Cityrange Square, Federation and (1) the establishment of main public spaces such waterfront promenades including Southgate; (2) as Bourke Street Mall, City Square, Federation small-scale spaces established by re-claiming surplus Square, and waterfront promenades including road space; and (3) works to upgrade existing streets Southgate; (2) small-scale spaces established by and laneways. re-claiming surplus road space; and (3) works to upgrade existing streets and laneways. A STANDARD SUITE OF MATERIALS AND FURNITURE A STANDARD SUITE OF MATERIALS AND FURNITURE

 The City has created standardised designs for The ofCity hasfurniture createdin standardised designs a wide• range street order to improve for a wide range of street furniture in order to streetscape amenity with attractive, durable, functional improve streetscape amenity with attractive, and unobtrusive elements that complement the urban durable, functional and unobtrusive elements culture, character and significance of each street. that complement the urban culture, character Melbourne’s bluestone pavement program, founded and significance of each street. Melbourne’s on the city’s traditional materials, has ensured that bluestone pavement program, founded on the repaving successfully fits into both contemporary and city’s traditional materials, has ensured that historic settings. repaving successfully fits into both contemporary and historic settings.

PROCESS AND ORGANISING THE TASK

PROCESS AND ORGANISING TASK out  In the 1980s, Melbourne’s citizensTHEspoke • destruction In the 1980s, citizens spoke about the slow of their Melbourne’s city. Inappropriate out about the slow destruction of their city. international style developments, the invasion of the Inappropriate international style developments, automobile, destruction of heritage areas and general the invasion of new the automobile, destruction of decline of the central city saw political forces heritage areas and general decline of the central emerge at both a State and Local Government level. city saw new political forces emerge Their success at the polls allowed them to reset the at both a State and Local Government level. Their success agenda for Melbourne. polls allowed them to reset the agenda for  Commencingatinthe1985, the City of Melbourne’s Melbourne. urban design department developed a comprehensive • Commencing in 1985, the City of Melbourne’s planning and design policy framework that defined a urban design department developed a simple vision to transform Melbourne’s ailing central comprehensive planning and design policy business districtframework into a central activities district, that defined a simple vision to while retaining the physical characteristics that central were business transform Melbourne’s ailing distinctive to Melbourne. This vision was adopted district into a central activities and district, while has been gradually implemented through ambitious retaining the physical characteristics that but achievable targets over the past two decades.This vision was were distinctive to Melbourne.  Using in-house professional the City implemented of adopted and has skills, been gradually Melbourne has worked to lead rather than just managetargets over through ambitious but achievable the city’s transformation. It has mastered the art of the past two decades. successful partnerships and directed the resources • Using in-house professional skills, the City Melbourne and has the worked to sector lead rather than of other levels ofofgovernment private justthe manage city’sthrough transformation. It has towards improving publicthe realm such mastered theand artQV. of successful partnerships projects as Federation Square

and directed the resources of other levels of government and the private sector towards improving the public realm through such projects  Council’s urban design program has been as Federation Square and QV. RESULTS

instrumental in inspiring, directing and accelerating the process of revitalising Melbourne through a gradual RESULTS but consistent transformation of streets, lanes and urban design program has been other spaces• intoCouncil’s public places that are engaging and instrumental in inspiring, directing and diverse. This is evident from population and economic accelerating the process of revitalising Melbourne growth. Since 1994, there has been a staggering through a gradual but consistent transformation 830% increase in city residents, and this has been of streets, lanes and other spaces into public accompanied byplaces a signifi cant rise in pedestrian that are engaging and diverse. This is volumes and the evident number from of people choosing to spend population and economic growth. time in the publicSince realm.1994, The follow-on there haseffects been ainclude staggering 830% revived street useincrease patternsinascity theresidents, communityand utilises this has been the city as its recreational, retail entertainment accompanied by aand significant rise in pedestrian base, and this hasvolumes been highly influential creating and the numberinof peopleachoosing to more vibrant, safer, and sustainable 24 hour city. spend time in the public realm. The follow-on effects include revived street use patterns as the community utilises the city as its recreational, retail and entertainment base, and this has been highly influential in creating a more vibrant, safer, and sustainable 24 hour city.

RECOMMENDATIONS

111


REFLECTIONS

Sydney is a world class city enjoying a beautiful landscape setting and a wonderful climate offering the best possible conditions for a thriving public life. Despite these obvious qualities the City Centre appears to be suffering from an overload of vehicular traffic and is at present not living up to its full potential. In January 2007 Gehl Architects was invited to cast a critical view on to how the public spaces in Sydney are performing in terms of public life. The findings are presented in this report and in an additional â&#x20AC;&#x153;public life dataâ&#x20AC;? section. The analysis performed pointed towards a city which is choking in vehicular traffic and where there is no balance between the various transport modes. Pedestrians and cyclists are consequently at the bottom of the agenda and as a result conditions are quite poor for people who choose the most sustainable transport modes - discouraging some and excluding others. An equally problematic consequence is the fact that there are a number of problems in relation to the visual environment and the general lack of celebration of the waterfront. Thus the extraordinary physical qualities are not cherished and the city is gradually losing quality. Looking to other cities in the world it is evident that change is possible. Thus Melbourne, Portland in the US and Lyon in France are remarkable examples of cities which have radically transformed. Common for all of them is a movement towards a more balanced traffic system, a strong focus on public space and an understanding of how a high quality public realm can invite more people to use the city in a variety of ways. Changing the current situation in Sydney demands a change of mindset. A more holistic approach needs to be used where traffic planning and public space planning are thought of one. Visions need to be formulated looking at what ought to be achieved to celebrate Sydney as a world class city. Strategies then need to be put in place to gradually change the current course and deal with how the visions can be achieved on practical terms. Looking at practicalities first and then formulating visions second will set the bar too low. Sydney will no doubt change dramatically during the coming years. The spirit is there, the knowledge is there and the potential is there. How the process and the end result will be is still to be seen.

112

RECOMMENDATIONS


RECOMMENDATIONS

113


••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••


••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 2007 ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• / PUBLIC LIFE / DATA ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 PUBLIC LIFE DATA ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

SYDNEY


client Sydney City Council Town Hall House 456 Kent Street Sydney NSW 2000 Australia

Project Team: Bridget Smyth Laurence Johnson Lei Liu Pauline Chan

The following students from University of NSW, have participated in collecting data for the public life survey: Maria Adriani Jahnavi Ashar Jillian Maree Bywater Guru Prasanna Channa Basappa Feng Hui Feng Xiao Gong Li Liang Jin Lin Zhi Jie Kathleen Walsh McDowell Rodrigo Ochoa Jurado Thi Thu Huyen Pham Fachri Dwi Rama Wiranti Teddy Wang Sheng Wang Shu Xie Qing Yi Xu Pian Pian Yue Jess Zhou Yimin Zhu Weijun The following people from PPS - THE PEOPLE FOR PLACES AND SPACES have participated in collecting data for the public life survey: Alison Hardacre Renee Morrow Heidi Willis Luke Wilson

consultant Gehl Architects ApS Project Manager: Jan Gehl, Professor, Dr. litt., architect MAA, FRIBA Project Coordinator: Henriette Mortensen, architect MAA Project Team: Sia KirknĂŚs, architect MAA Johanna Kaaman, stud.arch Johanna Ferrer Guldager, stud.arch Mariken Landstad Helle, stud.arch


FOREWORD

NEED FOR PEOPLE DATA As most cities have excellent statistics on traffic flows and parking patterns, issues relating to traffic and parking are generally well represented in planning processes. Very few cities however, have data on how people use the city as pedestrians!

introduction

SPECIAL PEOPLE CONDITIONS Sydney has a population of 4 million in the metropolitan area and welcomes more than 2.5 million visitors each year. The high number of people using the city makes it even more important to understand pedestrian activity and ensure pedestrian needs are reflected in future strategies and developments impacting on the public realm.

pedestrian traffic

PEOPLE SPACES PUBLIC LIFE In 2007 Gehl Architects conducted a public space and public life study in Sydney. The report published, Public Spaces, Public Life, Sydney 2007, includes summaries of the public life survey conducted. The detailed data is published in this separate document.

Method Survey area

Walking in the city centre Summer weekday 8am-6pm Summer weekday 6pm-12pm Summer Saturday 8am-6pm Summer Saturday 6pm-12pm Winter weekday 8am-6pm Winter weekday 6pm-12pm

stationary activities

Spending time in the city Summer weekday 10am-8pm Winter weekday 10am-8pm

age distribution

Absent user groups Summer weekday 11am-9pm Winter weekday 11am-9pm

Page 6 Page 7

Page 9 Page 10 Page 10 Page 17 Page 17 Page 24 Page 24

Page 33 Page 34 Page 40

Page 47 Page 48 Page 50


PUBLIC LIFE DATA


METHOD

PEDESTRIAN COUNTS AND OBSERVATIONS The purpose of this study was to examine how public spaces are used. It provides information on where people walk and stay either as part of their daily activities or for recreational purposes. This can form the basis for future decisions on, which streets and routes to improve, to make them easy and pleasant places to visit, and not just act as traffic conduits. The study also provides information on how many people sit, stand or carry out other stationary activities in the city and where they do it. These stationary activities act as a good indicator of the quality of the urban spaces. A large number of pedestrians walking in the city does not necessarily indicate a high level of quality. However a high number of people choosing to spend time in the city indicates a lively city of strong urban quality. HOW THE DATA WAS COLLECTED • Counting pedestrians • Surveys of stationary activities (behavioural mapping) METHOD The method for collecting this information has been developed by GEHL Architects and used in previous studies in Perth, Melbourne, Adelaide, Wellington, London, Riga, Stockholm, Oslo, Copenhagen, Rotterdam, Edinburgh and a number of provincial cities in UK and Scandinavia. • • •

Pedestrian counts were carried out in selected streets for 10 minutes every hour between 8am and 12am. Stationary activities were mapped every second hour between 10am and 8pm. The surveys took place on summer days with fine, sunny weather in March 2007 and on a fine winter day in July 2007. The data was collected on weekdays (Tuesday /Wednesday) and Saturdays.

STUDY AREAS The counting positions have been chosen to provide the best possible overview of pedestrian traffic. The areas for recordings of staying activities are equally chosen with the intention to achieve knowledge of the study area as a hole.

6

PUBLIC LIFE DATA


pedestrian traffic survey 1. William Street 2. Oxford Street 3. Broadway 4. Pitt Street (a) 4. Pitt Street (b) 4. Pitt Street (c) 5. Dixon Street 6. George Street (a)

j.

6

22. 6a.

i.

4a. 20.

18. 4c.

14. 11. 12. 6b. 13. 8.

e.

a. f.

v.

r.

c.

l.

s. h.

15. o.

k.

6c. x.

p.

17. Martin Place 18. Hunter Street

a. Farrer Place b. Jessie Street Gardens

t.

4b.

15. Queen Square 16. Macquarie Street

stationary activity survey

q. 5.

11. Sussex Street 12. Clarence Street

21. Young Street 22. Circular Quay

n.

2.

9. Pyrmont Bridge 10. King Street

19. Bridge Street 20. Loftus Street

7. 1.

George Street (d) 7. Park Street 8. Market Street

13. Pitt Street Mall 14. Castlereagh Street

g.

m.

16.

10.

b.

d.

17.

9.

k.

21. 19.

6d.

6. George Street (b) 6. George Street (c)

c. Richard Jonson Square d. Macquarie Place Park e. First Government House f. Philip Lane

u.

g. Chiefley Square

3.

h. Queen Square i. First Fleet j. Circular Quay k. Herald Square, Custom House Square, Scout Place l. Regimental Square 0

COUNTING POSITIONS FOR PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC 0

100

200

300

400

500

0

(m)

0 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

SQUARES AND STREETS WHERE STAYING ACTIVITIES HAVE BEEN RECORDED 100

100 200 300 400 500 m

200

300

400

500

(m)

m. Sesquicentenary Square n. Sydney Square o. Pitt Street Mall p. World Square q. Brickfield Square r. Wynyard Park s. Martin Place t. Dixon Street u. Belmore Park v. Australia Square x. Hyde park PUBLIC LIFE DATA

7


8

PUBLIC LIFE DATA


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC walking in the city centre

Sydney Opera House

The Rocks

Circular Quay Royal Botanical Garden

THERE IS MORE TO WALKING THAN WALKING Walking is first and foremost a mode of transportation, but it also provides an opportunity to spend time in the public realm. Walking can be about experiencing the city at a comfortable pace, looking at shop windows, beautiful buildings, interesting views and other people. Walking is also about stopping and engaging in recreational or social activities because you have planned them or because you were tempted to as you walked along. At some point we are all pedestrians walking from public transport, the bike rack, a parking structure or from home. As such streets should be welcoming to all of us.

Martin Place Domain

Pyrmont Bridge

Pitt Street Mall

Queen Victoria Building

Hyde Park

Town Hall

Hyde Park

World Square Chinatown

Central Station TAFE

UTS 0

100 200 300 400 500 m

Destinations MAIN WALIKING LINKS AND PRIMARY DESTINATIONS IN THE CITY CENTRE

0

100

200

300

400

500

Main walking links

Primary destinations

Secondary walking links links Secondary walking

Main walking links

Tertiary walking links

Tertiary walking links

(m)

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

9


WEDNESDAY 18-24

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 6pm WEDNESDAY 10-18

LIMITED AMOUNT OF PEDESTRIANS The general walking pattern shows that the highest concentrations of pedestrians are to be found in the retail core; Pitt Street Mall, George Street (between Market Street and King Street), Other concentrations of pedestrian volumes are found in Martin Place, Park Street, the southern part of George Street and in Broadway Street, where the students are and where there is commuter traffic to and from Central Station. In the northern part of the CBD George Street and Circular Quay are the most busy closely followed by Pitt Street.

11.020 3.500 1.130

4.830 7.570

2.440

12.070

8.350

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC LIMITED TO SHOPPING STREETS Most of the pedestrian traffic is located to shopping streets and there is a limited spread to the rest of the city centre.

8.350

15.140

1.570

3.980 9.070 1.900 6.040

1.240

2.350

8.170

13.240

4.990

20.740

11.120 3.950 12.360

summer weekday evening 6pm - 12am

6.510

9.910

8.290

6.720

39.680 9.730 23.530 3.910

13.730

LOW LEVEL OF EVENING TRAFFIC Compared to daytime traffic there is a substantial drop when the evening starts. Shops close between 6pm – 7pm and the majority of all visitors leaves the city centre. Evening traffic is 34% of daytime traffic. In comparison Copenhagen evening traffic is 50% of daytime traffic.

6.050 25.090

100 200 300 400 500 m

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER WEEKDAY EVENING 6pm - 12am 2007 Wednesday the 21st of March 2007 Weather: Mild, 23˚C 100

200

300

400

500

49.670

7.540

12.220 0

0

33.740

15.930

30.610 6.810

(m)

29.670 14.220 10.000

14.950

30.530

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER WEEKDAY 8am - 6pm 2007 Wednesday the 21st of March 2007 Weather: Mild and sunny , 28˚C SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

Summer weekday 8am - 6pm 500

10

(m)

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

Summer weekday evening 6pm - 12am

500

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 12am

George Street B 21-03-2007 wed

George Street A 21-03-2007 wed

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000 George Street A

8000 George Street B 7000

6000

6000

5000

5000 3816

3000 2000 175

1410

1470

George Street A 21-03-2007 wed 2040 2172 2178

1746

2202 1518

1000

1230

1110 564

150 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

3018

62

50 24

25

34

29

36

36

2034 1428 912

1000

25 16

25

21

19 9

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

696

660

9-10

10-11 11-12

312

150 0 9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am 97

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

pm pm

91 69

75

37

4212

George Street B 21-03-2007 wed

2340

8-9

63

61

4464 3888

1812

2000 175

100

64

5448

3438

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

3000

10-11 11-12

pm pm

100

75

5832

4000

948

125

44.610 pedestrians all day

4116

3750

3732 3648

Pedestrians per hour

4000

Pedestrians per Pedestrians per hour hour

33.534 pedestrians all day

7000

74 65

70

57

50 50

39

34

30

24

25

15

12

11

9-10

10-11

5

0

11-12

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

11-12

pm pm

George Street A

George Street B

George Street C Dixon Street 21-03-2007 wed

George Street C 21-03-2007 wed

Dixon Street

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Dixon Street

17.094 pedestrians all day

8000 7000

8000 George Street C

6000

6000

5000

5000 300

400

500

Dixon Street 21-03-2007 wed

2000 175

1476 660

198

390

8-9

9-10 10-11

1710

894

1446 1248 1398 1380 1230

1710

1356

960

540

498

1500 11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

3000

8-9

75

25 3

7

8-9

9-10

11

21

15

23

21

24

29

23

16

9

8

10-11

11-12

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

3156 2532 2604

1752

1368 1548

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pm pm

75

23

2304

1152

150 0

100

29

2148

George Street C 21-03-2007 wed

1000

100

25

3384 3366 2568

2000 175

10-11 11-12

50

4812 4782 4650

4620

(m)

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perhour hour

200

0

3000

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

100

Pedestrians per hour hour

0

4000

1000

46.746 pedestrians all day

7000

12-1

1-2

43

36

3-4

Time Tim e

77

80

56 50

2-3

am am

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

42

43

9-10

10-11 11-12

23

26

9-10

10-11

pm pm

80

78

56

53

38 29

25

19

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

11-12

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

11


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 12am Pitt Street A 21-03-2007 wed

11000

10000

9000

Pitt8000 Street A

20.574 pedestrians all day

Pitt Street Mall

65.172 pedestrians all day

Pitt Street Mall 21-03-2007 wed

7000

11000

6000 5000

9000

2244 1542

2586 Pitt Street A 21-03-2007 wed 1770

1470

1320

996

966

1686 1638 1164

1080 540

930 432

150 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

Pedestrians per hour

1000

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

Tim e Time

7-8

8-9

9-10

210

pm pm

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

75

50

37 26

43 30

25

22

17

16

28

27

19

18 9

16 7

4

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

Time Tim e

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

7000

6948

6672

6000

5226 5208

5000

3000

5466

4362

4000

10-11 11-12

100

25

7866

8000

3000

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians Pedestriansper per hour hour

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

4000

2000 175

10446

10000

3654 2946

2772

am

Time

pm 1908

2000 1000

564

534

408

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

9

9

7

8-9

9-10

192

0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

175

12-1 1-2 2-3 3-4 4-5 5-6 Pitt Street Mall 21-03-2007 wed am Time am Tim e 174

6-7

7-8

pm pm

150 131

11-12 125

pm pm

116 Time

111am

100

Pitt Street Mall

Castelreagh Street

87

50

87

91

73

75

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pitt Street A

pm

61 49

46

32 25 3

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

10-11

11-12

pm

Castlereagh 21-03-2007 wed

Pitt Street B 21-03-2007 wed

Pitt Street B 11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Pitt Street B

24.636 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Castlereagh Street

7000

7000

6000

6000 5000

5000 300

400

500

(m)

1800 1170

1200 1242

Pitt Street B 21-03-2007 wed 2400 2334 2184 2076 1968 1542

1716

1566 1056

1000

672

996

714

150 9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

2000 175

8-9

75

75

30 20

25

20

35 26

21

33

36 29

26 18

11

17

12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

2028

16 2 0

17 2 2 15 7 8 15 5 4 10 14

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pm pm

39

14 2 8 13 2 6

564

420

7-8

8-9

9

7

7-8

8-9

150 0

100

40

18 0 6

1000

100

50

3354 2 7 4 8Castlereagh 21-03-2007 wed

3000

10-11 11-12

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

3000

125

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

200

0

8-9

12

100

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians

0

4000

2000 175

21.516 pedestrians all day

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

19 8 9-10

14 4

12

10-11 11-12

pm pm

56 46

50 30 25

24

22

34

27

29

26

26 17 3

2

0

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 12am

King Street 21-03-2007 wed

11000

Martin Place 21-03-2007 wed

10000 9000

11000

8000Street King

32.070 pedestrians all day

10000 Martin Place

7000

63.348 pedestrians all day

9000

6000 4632

5000

8022

8000

5250

7554 6726

7000 6228

3000

1812

2000 175

6000

3096 2934 King Street 21-03-2007 2430 wed

2742

1878

1608 1704

1842 780

1000

576

306

408

72

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

100

3-4

4-5

Pedestrians per per hour Pedestrians Pedestrians hour per hour

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

4000

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm

4218 3330

2922 2874

3000

2694

2000

1404

1000

am Time Martin Place 21-03-2007 wed

0 9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

175

77

5238

4000

8-9

88

5520

5376

5000

1-2

2-3

am

3-4

4-5

pm 5-6

Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

534

456

9-10

10-11 11-12

252

pm

52

46

Pedestrians per minute

50

49 41

30

27

31

28

31

25

13

10

5

7

1

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

150 134 126 125

112 104

100

92

90

87

70

75

Pedestrians Pedestrians per perminute minute

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

75

pm pm

49 50

48

56 Time

am

pm

45 23

25 9

8

9-10

10-11

4

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am

Martin Place

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

11-12

pm

King Street Market Street Park Street

Market Street 21-03-2007 wed

Park Street 21-03-2007 wed 11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Park Street

47.238 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Market Street

6000

6000

5352 4122

4008

3000

2898

2796

200

0

Park Street 21-03-2007 wed

2322

100

2124

2244 1092

1000

918

966

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

100

3-4

4-5

300

400

500

(m)

3774

3438

2000 175

125

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

50

47 35

37 18

15

16

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

552

522

9-10

10-11 11-12

9

9

6

10-11

11-12

348

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

pm pm

88

75

25

9-10

1296

1000

125

63

57

39

8-9

2028

1608

75

69 59

48

1836 1902

100

67 53

2000 175

3498 3480 3606

3300

2730 wed 2544 2676Market Street 21-03-2007

3000

10-11 11-12

pm pm

89

75

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

0

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per per hour hour Pedestrians

3510

3192

5250

5000

4482

Pedestrians per per hour hour

5000 4000

37.176 pedestrians all day

7000

7000

58

55 50

42 31

32

58

60

46

45

34

27

22

25

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

13


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 12am

Macquarie Street 21-03-2007 wed

Clarence Street 21-03-2007 wed

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000 Clarence Street

8.574 pedestrians all day

8000 Macquarie Street

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

2000 175

1014

1000

1224 1146 600

546

408

804

570

474

882 402

258

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians Pedestrians per hour

4000 Clarence Street 21-03-2007 wed

3000

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

48

72

84

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

42

2000 175

8-9

75

75

50 20 10

9

19

7

13

10

8

15 7

4

1

1

1

1

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

1218

954

1038

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

9-10 10-11

11-12

1194 696

378

252

126

54

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

6

4

2

1

1

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

60

pm pm

20

16

17

26 17

17

21

16

20 12

0

11-12

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

pm pm

Macquarie Street Queen Square

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

7.038 pedestrians all day

8000 Queen Square

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

11.640 pedestrians all day

5000 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

4000 3000

Sussex Street 21-03-2007 wed

2000 175 642

582

270

234

9-10 10-11

11-12

150 0 8-9 125

576

12-1

816

1-2

540

2-3

am am

396 3-4

456

4-5

624

5-6

Time Tim e

498

6-7

438

7-8

468

8-9

150

162

186

9-10

10-11 11-12

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per hour

4000 0

2130 2000 175

75

50

4

10

14

9

7

8

10

8

7

8

3

3

3

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pm pm

75

5

1122

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

1212

1392

600

1278 576

678

678

2-3

3-4

4-5

720

150 0

100

10

732

1000

100

11

Queen Square 21-03-2007 wed

3000

8-9

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per Pedestrians per hour hour

12-1

29 25

11000

Sussex Street

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

1278

Queen Square 21-03-2007 wed

8000

14

954

50

Sussex Street 21-03-2007 wed

25

1026

am am

pm pm

Clarence Street Sussex Street

1000

1536

990

150 0

100

17

1716

1000

100

25

Macquarie Street 21-03-2007 wed

3000

125

pm pm

Pedestrians Pedestrians per perminute minute

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

4000

13.470 pedestrians all day

50

12-1

1-2

am am

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

252

132

78

42

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

4

2

1

7-8

8-9

18

pm pm

36

25

12

19

20

23

10

21 10

11

12

11

1

0

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

9-10


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 12am Circular Quay 21-03-2007 wed

Loftus Street 21-03-2007 wed 11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

14.352 pedestrians all day

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

4000

3000 2000 175

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perhour hour

7000

Loftus Street 21-03-2007 wed 1830 858

1000

684

1008 1188

1272

954

1482 1320 780

846

798

576

324

336

9-10

10-11 11-12

150 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

8000 Circular Quay

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

96

3000 2000 175 1000

8-9

100

75

75

50

25

14

11

17

21

20

25 16

22 14

13

13

10

5

6

2

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

1164 564

Circular Quay 21-03-2007 wed 2472 2304 2346 2190 2124 2100 1854 1662 1494 1428 1278

600

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

2772

972

1500

100

31

27.324 pedestrians all day

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pm

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

8000 Loftus Street

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

50

39

38

37

28 25

3-4

4-5

31

10

8-9

9-10

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm

35

35

46

41

25

19 9

5-6

Tim e Time

24

21

16

0

11-12

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

Circular Quay

BridgenStreet

Loftus Street Young Street

Young Street 21-03-2007 wed

Bridge Street 21-03-2007 wed 11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000 8000 Bridge Street

8000

15.024 pedestrians all day

Young Street 7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

4000

100

200

300

0

Bridge Street 21-03-2007 wed

3000

1944

1752 930

1000 150 8-9

1296

1212 684

9-10 10-11

1836 1314

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

1134

852

768

3-4

4-5

564

5-6

6-7

7-8

204

156

168

210

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

400

500

(m)

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestriansper perhour hour Pedestrians

0

2000 175

am am

Time Tim e

3000 2000 175 1000

Young Street 17-03-2007 sat 1362 336

480

9-10 10-11

11-12

318

125

pm pm

100

588

816

414

570

2-3

3-4

690

1098 510

246

168

48

132

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

1

2

1

3

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

150 8-9

125

12-1

1-2

am am

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

24

pm pm

100

75

75

50 32

29 25

16

11

13

31 22

20

22

19

14

9

3

3

3

4

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1 am am

1-2

2-3

3-4 Tim e Time

4-5

5-6

6-7 pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

7.800 pedestrians all day

50

25 1

2

8-9

9-10

6

4

10-11

11-12

9

4

5

3

5

4

4

6

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

0 12-1

am am

Time Tim e

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

15


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer weekday 8am - 12am Pyrmont Bridge 21-03-2007 wed

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000 Pyrmont Bridge

25.218 pedestrians all day

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

Pyrmont Bridge 21-03-2007 wed 19 8 6

2000 175

822

1000

924

110 4

14 5 8

12 5 4

15 5 4

2790

19 6 2

17 6 4 10 5 6 119 4

708

834

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

3000 2000 175

8-9

75

75 52

25

14

18

15

24

21

47

33

26

29 18

20 12

14

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

1476 822

528

534

9-10

10-11

11-12

125

100

33

1188

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

840

888

780

810

954

1170

1056

708

456

276

9-10

10-11 11-12

8

5

5

10-11

11-12

150

10-11 11-12

pm pm

45

William Street both sides 21-03-2007 wed

1000

100

50

12.774 pedestrians all day

4000 3 13 8 2670

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

3000

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

8000 William Street

7000

4000

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

William Street both sides 21-03-2007 wed

12-1

1-2

2-3

am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

288

pm

50

25

20

25 14

9

9

10-11

11-12

14

15

13

14

16

20

18

12

0

11-12

8-9

9-10

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

pm pm

Pyrmont Bridge William Street

Broadway both sides 21-03-2007 wed

Oxford Street both sides 21-03-2007 wed

Oxford Street

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

Broadway

9000

Broadway

51.354 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Oxford Street

6000

6000

5088

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

3768 3318

4422 3660

2682 2592 2688

2460 Broadway both sides 21-03-2007 wed

2000 175 762

1000

564

150 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

3036

3000

5000 0

3696

3558

4446

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians

4614

5000

55

63

74

62

59

45

43

45

13

9

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

1452

1152

1776

1596

1356

1000

918

930

9-10

10-11 11-12

522

150 0 9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

pm pm

75

25

9-10

1278

2784

74

61

41

8-9

2000 175

1728

100

51

50

1698

8-9

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

75

2454 Oxford Street both2376 sides 21-03-2007 wed 2184

2256

125

85 77

3000

10-11 11-12

pm pm

100

16

26.460 pedestrians all day

7000

7000

4000

0

50

40

38 28

25

29 21

36 24

19

41

46 30

27

23

15

16

9-10

10-11

9

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

11-12

100


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 6pm

SATURDAY 18-24 SATURDAY 10-18

UNCHANGED MOVEMENT PATTERN There are no significant changes in the use of the pedestrian network on a Saturday apart from Martin Place which is more affected by the many offices at weekdays and thus less busy on saturdays. Saturdays would normally be the busiest day in a citys retail district. However pedestrian flows in Sydney point to a different picture where the city is not laid out for pleasure walks. As result pedestrian traffic is limited to the basic, necessary trips of going to work, going for lunch, going shopping etc. In general pedestrian traffic is lower in Sydney on Saturdays except for Circular Quay which experiences an increase. This is due to the many visitors to Sydney Opera House and Harbour Bridge.

20.190 3.880 3.890 9.430 1.010 1.440

3.620

9.510

2.900

1.060

7.060

23.980

1.030

2.560 7.930 6.110

560

1.390

8.360

8.110

2.330

13.150

11.350 3.300

3.340

22.750

summer saturday evening 6pm - 12am

9.230 9.230

8.880

9.320 3.610 11.150 22.940 6.740

11.120 0

1.700 22.950

100 200 300 400 500 m

100

200

300

400

500

MORE PEDESTRIANS THAN ON WEEKDAY EVENINGS There is a lack of pedestrian activity during Saturday evening compared to Saturday daytime. Sydney is apparently not a major destination for outdoor dining or for promenading, except for Circular Quay. This again points towards a city mainly laid out for necessities and not so much for pleasure.

2.230

2.280

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER SATURDAY EVENING 6pm - 12am 2007 Saturday the 17th of March 2007 Weather: Mild, 22째C 0

43.820 8.190

18.760 5.200

(m)

28.510 11.590

THE NUMBER OF PEDESTRIANS BETWEEN 8AM - 12PM -in selected streets

15.260

12.780

590.000 150.000

455.000 440.000

10.930

155.000

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

300.000

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC SUMMER SATURDAY 8am - 6pm 2007 Saturday the 17th of March 2007 Weather: Mild, sunny and partly clouded, 26째C

pedestrian traffic 6pm - 12am

0 100 traffic 200 8am 300- 6pm 400 pedestrian

SUMMER WEEKDAY

500

SUMMARY

SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Summer Saturday 8am - 6pm

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Summer Saturday evening 6pm - 12am

(m)

SUMMER SATURDAY

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

17


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 12am George Street A 17-03-2007 sat

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

24.522 pedestrians all day

8000 George Street B

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

4000

3000

2232

2000 1000 0

14 7 0 13 14

17 4 6

17 9 4 16 5 6 15 4 2 15 7 8

12 8 4 14 4 0

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

Pedestrians per per hour hour Pedestrians

8000 George Street A

16 9 2 15 6 0 14 5 8 16 3 8 16 4 4

474 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

am Time am Tim e George Street A 17-03-2007 sat

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

3534 3012

2682

1938

150

150

125

100

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

25 25

22

30

29

28

26

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

37

pm 26

21

24

28

26

24

27

27

8

George Street A

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

1062

6-7

7-8

1704

1272

1254

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm

125

100

75

Time

1512

1122 648

am Time am Tim e George Street B 17-03-2007 sat 175

am

3090

0

175

50

2808

1644

pm pm

75

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

2400

2000 1000

33.162 pedestrians all day

3480

3000

8-9

Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per minute

George Street 17-03-2007 sat

50

45

40

58 am 50

59

Time 52 47

27 25

pm 32

25

19

18

6-7

7-8

11

28

21

21

9-10

10-11

0

11-12

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

8-9

11-12

pm pm

George Street B

George Street C George Street C 17-03-2007 sat

Dixon Street 17-03-2007 sat

Dixon Street

11000

10000

9000

9000

Dixon Street

25.110 pedestrians all day

8000 7000

6000

6000

5000

5000 300

400

500

(m)

53.406 pedestrians all day

Dixon 2580 2460 260417-03-2007 sat 2514 Street 2334 2112 2166

2000 175

1506 942

1000 246

372

8-9

9-10

10-11

1248

1080

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

960

9-10

1194

792

10-11 11-12

1000

25

16 4

35

36

39

41 21

18

16

20

6

13

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

4038

4038 3546

3198 3342

3054

3654

1506 648

8-9

75

42

3720

150 0

75

25

4302

3408

George Street C 17-03-2007 sat

2298

2000 175

100

50

3186

3000

100

43

4008

9-10

10-11

11-12

125

pm pm

43

5460

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perhour hour

200

0

3000

150 0

100

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians

0

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

8000 George Street C 7000

4000

18

11000

10000

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm 91

67 53

50

72 62

57

67

67 59

51

53

56

9-10

10-11

61

38 25

25

11

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

11-12


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 12am

Pitt Street A 17-03-2007 sat

11000

Pitt Street Mall 17-03-2007 sat

10000 9000

11000

12.528 pedestrians all day

10000 Pitt Street Mall

7000

9000

6000

8000

5000

7000

4000

6000 Pedestrians per Pedestrians hour per hour

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

Pitt8000 Street A

3000 2000 1000

2 10

330

8-9

9-10

7 14

660

10-11

11-12

10 6 8 10 6 2 10 8 6 114 6

112 2

12 5 4

954

762

864

7-8

8-9

474

438

384

9-10

10-11 11-12

0 12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

am Tim e am Time Pitt Street A 17-03-2007 sat

6-7 pm

51.102 pedestrians all day 7830 6492

5820

5412

5000

4554

4176

4000 2862

3000

2238

2000 1000

834 330

am Time Pitt Street Mall 17-03-2007 sat

0 8-9

175

175

150

150

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per minute

am

125

100

3-4

4-5

25 4

6

8-9

9-10

12

11

18

Time

18

18

19

pm

19

21

16

13

14

7

6

8

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pitt Street A

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

am

50

858

840

708

780

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

14

14

12

13

12

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm 5-6

Tim e

6-7

690

pm

131 125

108

111 97

90

100 76

70

75

75

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

6678

48

am

50

Time

pm 37

25

14 6

0 8-9

Pitt Street Mall

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

12-1

1-2

2-3

am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e

6-7 pm

Castelreagh Street

Pitt Street B 17-03-2007 sat

Castlereagh 17-03-2007 sat

Pitt Street B

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Pitt Street B

23.100 pedestrians all day

8000 7000

8000 Castlereagh Street

6000

6000

5000

5000 300

400

500

(m)

2000 175 576

864

10 9 2

Pitt Street B 17-03-2007 sat 2034 18 2 4 17 7 0 18 0 6 16 4 4 15 6 0 14 4 6 14 6 4 13 5 6

19 0 8 1116

13 0 8

13 3 2

150 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

3000

1000 150 0

100

75

75

25

10

14

18

24

30 23

27

34 26

30

30

32 24

19

22

22

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

204

384

564

8-9

9-10

10-11

972

11-12

125

100

50

Castlereagh 17-03-2007 sat

2000 175

10-11 11-12

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

200

0

3000

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

100

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

0

4000

1000

10.164 pedestrians all day

7000

1248 1236 1332

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

1218

3-4

924

4-5

696

5-6

Time Tim e

390

216

132

120

210

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

7

4

2

2

4

5

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

318

pm pm

50

25 3

6

8-9

9-10

9

16

21

21

22

20

15

12

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

19


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 12am

Martin Place 17-03-2007 sat

King Street 17-03-2007 sat

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000 King Street

14.376 pedestrians all day

8000 Martin Place

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

2000 175 1000

1590 234

432

1116

792

King Street 17-03-2007 sat 2250 1734 1440 1398 834

474

816 378

282

300

306

1500 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per per hour Pedestrians

4000

3000

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

2000 175 1000 150 0

100

75

75

38 29

27 25 4

7

8-9

9-10

24

19

13

23 14

8

6

6-7

7-8

14 5

5

5

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

216 8-9

100

50

Martin Place 17-03-2007 sat

3000

534

9-10

888

10-11

1134

11-12

125

pm pm

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perhour hour

4000

13.686 pedestrians all day

8-9

1212

12-1

1368 1326

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

990

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

624

510

672

6-7

7-8

8-9

10

9

11

6-7

7-8

8-9

462 9-10

726

624

10-11 11-12

pm pm

50

25 4

9

15

19

20

23

22

24 16

17

8

12

10

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

King Street

1428 972

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

9-10

pm pm

Martin Place Market Street

Park Street

Market Street 17-03-2007 sat

Park Street 17-03-2007 sat

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Park Street

231.878 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Market Street

7000

7000

6000

6000 5000

5000 0

3000 2082 2088 2000 175

2880 2850 Park Street 17-03-20072706 sat 2424 2310

0

2142 1404

948

1704

2100

912

150 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

200

300

400

500

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

100 200 300 400 500 m

1000

16 6 8

12 9 6 384

888

8 10

5 16

690

9-10

10-11 11-12

600

150 0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

pm pm

100

75 48

50

35 14

16

35

39

40

45

48

52 36

24

23

28

35

15

0 8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestrians per minute minute

2 10 0 2000 175

125

75

20

3000

10-11 11-12

pm pm

100

25

3774 3 3 6 6 3 4 14 3 15 0 3 2 8 2 2700 Market Street 17-03-2007 sat 2568

4000

(m)

3090

1416 822

100

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

4000

1000

31.206 pedestrians all day

63 53

55

56

57 45

43

50

35 28

22

25 6

15

14

9

12

10

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 12am

Clarence Street 17-03-2007 sat

Macquaire Street 17-03-2007 sat

11000 10000

10000

9000

9000

Clarence Street

3.528 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Macquarie Street

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

Clarence Street 17-03-2007 sat

2000 175 1000 150 0

156

114

222

330

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per hour hour

4000

3000

372

348

12-1

1-2

234 2-3

am

192

300

3-4

4-5

204

186

216

144

198

126

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

Time

186

2000 175 1000 1500

100

75

75

50

25 4

2

6

6

6

4

3

5

3

3

4

2

3

2

3

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

Time Tim e

222

252 9-10

474

564

564

10-11

11-12

12-1

125

pm

100

3

Macquaire Street 17-03-2007 sat

3000

8-9

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perhour hour

4000

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

2-3

336

432

432

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

156 6-7

474 7-8

108

96

8-9

9-10

2

2

1

2

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

72

120

10-11 11-12

pm pm

25 4

4

8-9

9-10

8

9

10-11

11-12

9

4

9

6

7

7

3-4

4-5

5-6

3

8

0

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

pm pm

Macquarie Street Queen Square

Queen Square 17-03-2007 sat

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Sussex Street

5.688 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Queen Square

7000

7000

6000

6000

3.078 pedestrians all day

5000

5000 0

100

200

300

400

500

Sussex Street 17-03-2007 sat

3000

0

2000 175 204

300

204

252

264

450

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

125

258

324

228

300

432

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

am am

Time Tim e

564 7-8

444 8-9

390 9-10

558

516

4000

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per hour hour

4000

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

1-2

558

50

Sussex Street 17-03-2007 sat

150 0

252

am am

pm pm

Clarence Street Sussex Street

1000

5.112 pedestrians all day

Queen Square 17-03-2007 sat

3000 2000 175 1000 150 0

174 8-9

10-11 11-12

114

252

222

126

306

294

456

336

240

180

156

36

78

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

125

pm

am am

Time Tim e

54

54

10-11 11-12

pm

100

100 Clarence Street

75

50 150 25 125

3

5

3

4

4

8

4

5

4

5

9

7

7

7

9

9

0 100

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

75 175

50

25 3

2

8-9

9-10

4

4

2

5

5

8

6

4

3

3

1

1

1

1

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 10-11

am am

Time Tim e

pm pm

Pedestrians per minute

75

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

50

25 3 0

2

4

6

6

6

4

3

5

3

3

4

2

3

2

3

21


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 12am Loftus Street 17-03-2007 sat

11000

Circular Quay 17-03-2007 sat

10000

9000

11000

Loftus Street

13.026 pedestrians all day

10000 Circular Quay

7000

9000

6000

8000

5000

7000

4000

6000

3000 2000 1000

1512 330

450

8-9

9-10

714

1092

1026

996

810

1068 1140

Pedestriansper per hour Pedestrians Pedestrians hour per hour

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

8000

1098 1080 384

420

324

582

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

am Tim e am Time Loftus Street 17-03-2007 sat

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm

7002

5000 3312

3000

150

150

Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per minute

175

100

am

Time

pm

50

Circular Quay

25 25 6

8

8-9

9-10

12

18

17

17

14

19

18

18

Loftus Street

18 6

7

5

10

Bridgen Street

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

Young Street

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians per minute minute

9-10

10-11

11-12

am

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm

100 77

74

am 50

55

52

39

Time 41

49

59 pm

57

27

37

33

9-10

10-11

20

25 5

11

0 8-9

11-12

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

11-12

pm

Young Street 17-03-2007 sat

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Bridge Street

5.256 pedestrians all day

8000 Young Street

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

3.504 pedestrians all day

5000 100

200

300

0

3000

Bridge Street 17-03-2007 sat

2000 175 1000 14 4 8-9

330 9-10

456 10-11

3 12 11-12

125

360 12-1

492

1-2

570

2-3

am am

408 3-4

378 4-5

366 5-6

Time Tim e

3 18 6-7

282 7-8

228 8-9

19 8 9-10

15 0

264

400

500

(m)

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per hour

0

4000

2000 175 1000 150

75

75

50

6

8

5

6

8

10

7

6

6

5

5

4

3

3

4

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

108

8-9

9-10

336

210

10-11

11-12

125

pm

100

2

60

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

564

216

288

150

312

252

246

354

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

150

84

96

78

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

0

100

25

Young Street 17-03-2007 sat

3000

10-11 11-12

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

6-7

117

pm pm

8000

Pedestrians Pedestrians per perminute minute

1986

pm 5-6

Tim e

125

Bridge Street 17-03-2007 sat

22

am Time Circular Quay 17-03-2007 sat 1-2 2-3 3-4 4-5

12-1

75

75

1500

2208

684

0

175

3432

2940 2484

1590

1212 300

3522

3120

2316

2000 1000

4632

4410

4000

8-9

125

45.150 pedestrians all day

12-1

am am

Time Tim e

pm

50

25 1

2

8-9

9-10

6

4

10-11

11-12

9

4

5

3

5

4

4

6

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

1

2

1

3

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 12-1 am am

Time Tim e

pm pm


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC summer saturday 8am - 12am

Pyrmont Bridge 17-03-2007 sat

William Street both sides 17-03-2007 sat

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

21.606 pedestrians all day

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

4000

3000 15 6 0

2000 1000

6 18

360

8 2 2 10 2 0

19 5 6 18 9 6 13 6 8 12 4 2 12 5 4

15 18

15 4 8

18 3 6

14 6 4 15 0 6 16 3 8

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

am am Time Tim e Pyrmont Bridge 17-03-2007 sat 175

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

2000 1000

354

492

588

708

720

768

216 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

468

708

750

678

630

672

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

516

444

360

9-10

10-11 11-12

0

10-11 11-12

pm pm

3-4

am Time am Tim e William Street both sides 17-03-2007 sat

pm pm

am

pm

175

Clarence Street

150 175

150

125 150

100 125

125

100

75

75 100

am

Time

50 75

33

26 25 50 6

10

14

pm

23

17

21

32

21

25

26

31

24

25

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per minute minute

Pedestrians per minute minute Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per

9.072 pedestrians all day

3000

Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per minute

8000 William Street

Pedestrians Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour

8000 Pyrmont Bridge

27

250 8-9 3

9-10 2

10-11 4

9-10

10-11

11-12 6

0 8-9

11-12

12-1 6

1-26

am am 12-1 1-2

2-3 4 2-3

am

25 4

6

8

8-9

9-10

10-11

10

12

12

13

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

12

13

11

11

11

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

8

7

6

9

9-10

10-11

11-12

0

3-4 4-55 5-6 6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 10-11 11-12 3 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 Time pm Tim e pm 3-4 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 8-9 9-10 10-11 11-12 Tim e

Time

50

3-4

am am

Time Tim e

pm pm

pm

Pyrmont Bridge William Street both sides 17-03-2007 sat

William Street

Oxford Street

Oxford Street both sides 17-03-2007 sat 11000

10000

Pedestrians per minute

Broadway both sides 17-03-2007 sat 11000

10000

9000

Broadway 7000

9000

Broadway

19.164 pedestrians all day

8000

8000 Oxford Street

6000

6000

5000

5000 300

400

500

(m)

3000

Broadway both sides 17-03-2007 sat 1854

2000 175 540

954

816

1110 1044

1530

1818

1596 1686

1158

1080

828

798

1074

1278

1500 9-10

10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

4000

100 200 300 400 500 m

4 3000

1000

8-9

100

75

75

50

25 9

16

14

19

26

17

19

27

28 18

14

13

8-9

9-10

18

21

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

10-11

11-12

13

12

13

12

8

11

11

11

Oxford Street both sides 17-03-2007 sat 9-10 10-11 11-12 12-1 1-2 2-3 3-4 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 1842 1488 1572 1602 1566Tim e 1404 1446 1140 1086 1026 798

888

9-10

8-9

10-11

11-12

125

pm pm

30

426

12

10

8

6

8-9

7

9

6

2592 9-10 10-11 11-12 1974 1188

150

100

31

8-9

2000 175

10-11 11-12

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

200

0

8-9

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

100

Pedestriansper per hour hour Pedestrians

0

4000

1000

22.038 pedestrians all day

7000

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm

43

50

25 7

13

17

18

10-11

11-12

25

26

27

26

31

33 23

24

19

15

20

0 8-9

9-10

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

23


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 6pm MORE PEDESTRIANS COMPARED TO A SUMMER WEEKDAY There is no significant difference between pedestrian volumes during winter and pedestrian volumes during summer. Basically the same pattern is repeating itself during the different seasons and there are only few differences between pedestrian volumes in specific spaces.

6.900 3.890 3.020 5.320 1.010 2.150

18.320

8.600

4.300 8.120 6.470

1.510

1.810 7.660

21.520

1.310 1.140

1.990

17.350

6.790 6.220

14.180

17.980

8.970

7.610 20.570

winter weekday evening 6pm - 12am

7.420 6.370

7.820

53.060 28.670 40.110

LOW LEVEL OF EVENING TRAFFIC Compared to daytime traffic there is a substantial drop when the evening starts. Shops close between 6pm – 7pm and everybody leaves the City Centre.

8.410 48.430

4.780

10.070

17.050

6.490 9.210

0 100200300400500m

13.110 31.770

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC WINTER WEEKDAY EVENING 6am - 12am 2007 Tuesday the 3rd of July 2007 Weather: Windy, 17˚C

32.720 13.180 39.610

THE NUMBER OF PEDESTRIANS BETWEEN 8AM - 12AM - in selected streets

13.840 11.480

13.210

640.000 590.000 150.000

160.000

480.000 440.000

15.740

0

SUMMARY

SUMMARY 0

100

200

300

400

500

Winter weekday 8am - 6pm

(m)

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Winter weekday evening 6pm - 12am

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC WINTER WEEKDAY 8am - 6pm 2007 Tuesday the 3rd of July 2007 Weather: Clear skies, windy, 21˚C

pedestrian traffic 6pm - 12am

pedestrian traffic 8am - 6pm SUMMER WEEKDAY

24

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

WINTER WEEKDAY

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m


George St C tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

George St C tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000

8000

7000

George Street A 6000

PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am

7000

27.462 pedestrians all day

George Street B 6000

5000

56.340 pedestrians all day

5000

4000

3636

4000

3636

3000

2256

2000

1446 1326

1662

1998

1788

2172

3138 1860

George St D tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

1074

1000

936

546

504

175 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

150

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

3138 2718

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

402

10-11 11-12

3000

2718 2256

2000

1446 1326

1662

1788

1860

George St C tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 1074

1000

936

546

504

9-10

10-11 11-12

9

8

7

9-10

10-11

11-12

175 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

150

pmpm

1998

2172

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

18

16

402

pm pm

124 125

125

100

98

95

99

93

100

79

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

61

68

75 47

42

50

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

71

75

33 25

15

11

11

10

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

50

61 52

45 38

24

28

22

33

36

30

31

25

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

pm pm

George Street A

George Street D

George Street B

GeorgeSt StDCtues tues03-07-2007 03-07-2007 WINTER George WINTER 11000 11000 George Street C

64.740 pedestrians all day

11000 George Street D

10000 10000

10000

9000 9000

9000

8000 8000

7464

6000 6000

5880 5916 5448

5700 4956 4740

5000 5000 3666

4000 4000 3000 3000

2880

2892 1680

2000 2000

5766 5586 4278

6000

4080

3696

3300

2514 1920

1854

642

570

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

12-1 12-1

1-2 1-2

2-3 2-3

am am

150

3-4 3-4

4-5 4-5

5-6 5-6

Timee Tim

6-7 6-7

912

7-8 7-8

8-9 8-9

684

9-10 9-10

10-11 11-12 11-12 10-11

pm pm

100 200 300 400 500 m

am

Time

100

108

106

2000

George St D tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

1000

8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

150

100

42 32

25 0 0 9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

684

642

9-10

10-11 11-12

570

pm

Time 98

95

pm

99

93

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

71

75 56

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

62

55

28

8-9

2-3

am

74

50

1-2

912

79

75 48

12-1 am

83

48

2802

2532 1956

125

pm 96

91

4080

124

120

125

4278 3666

3000

1750

5586

4740

4000

3360

2802

2532

9-10 10-11 10-11 11-12 11-12 9-10

5880 5916

5700

5000

George St C tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 8-9 8-9

7464

7000

6486 6348

1956

1000 1000 17500

4416

57.408 pedestrians all day

8000

7224

PedestriansPedestrians per hour per hour

7000 7000

PedestriansPedestrians Pedestrians per hour per per hour hour

George St D tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

George Street C

61

68 47

42

50 33 25

15

11

11

10

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

pm pm

Note: George Street D is an extra pedestrian count done on a winter weekday

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

25


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am Pitt St Mall tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Pitt St north tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Pitt11000 Street Mall 10000

9000

9000

8000

8000

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000 4000 2892

3000 2000 1104 1000

996

882

1086

2028

1620 am

2424 1752

1626 1626 Time

pm

936

564

276

192

168

0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12 Pitt 12-1 St

1-2 tues 2-3 03-07-2007 3-4 4-5 5-6 6-7 7-8 north WINTER

am am

175

Time Tim e

8-9

9-10

125

am

Time

5040

3000

2718

34

27 18

17

15

40 27

29

27

Pitt Street A

18

16

9

5

3

3

Pitt Street C

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

48

2000

am

11000

9-10 10-11

St Mall 11-12Pitt 12-1 1-2

Tim e Time

150

113

50

84 67

45

48

47

15

9-10

10-11

1000

810

1512

888

768

840

0

636

Pitt St south tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

0 8-9

9-10 10-11 11-12 12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm

150

125

am

Time

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per minute hour Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per

4000

4000

1380

16

23 14

31

25

15

13

14

11

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

20 25

37

4-5

5-6

2

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

4488 3096

2790

2262

1902 972

696

Pitt St middle tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

246

414

9-10

10-11 11-12

198

175

am am

Time Tim e

pmpm

am

Time

pm

150

77

77

35

3-4

4632

2814

125

pm

31

2-3

Tim e Time

1962

0

75

32

1-2

1000

75

35

12-1

4176

2514

2000

100

37

7

37.758 pedestrians all day

4596

3000

100

50

10

9000

5000

972

11-12

11000

6000

1224

pm 68

Pitt Street C 10000

5000

1830

89

Time

Pitt St middle tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

7000

2082

132

0

6000

1830

am

6

7000

1908

10-11 11-12

pm pm

25

8000

2100

9-10

113

am am

Pitt Street B

2232

8-9

426

136

125

8000

2214

7-8

576

159

Pitt Street Mall

23.226 pedestrians all day

3000

912

tues WINTER 2-3 03-07-2007 3-4 4-5 5-6 6-7

am am

8-9

9000

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per hour

pm

348

0

11-12

pm pm

Pitt10000 Street B

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Time

1000

Pitt St south tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

175

4074

2850 2814

75

50

5334

4038

4000

pm

75

2000

6756

100

100

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

6756

175

150

25

8178

5000

10-11 11-12

pmpm

60.462 pedestrians all day 9510

8-9

Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians per minute

20.172 pedestrians all day

10000

Pedestrians Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per per hour hour

Pedestrians per per hour hour Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians

Pitt11000 Street A

75

70

42

50

52

47

47

38

33

32 16

25

12 4

7

9-10

10-11

3

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

11-12

pm pm

Note: Pitt Street C is an extra pedestrian count done on a winter weekday

26

PUBLIC LIFE DATA


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am King St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 11000 King Street

Martin Pl tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

39.342 pedestrians all day

11000 Martin Place

10000

10000

9000

9000

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

4000

3828

3426 2988

3000

2754

3138 2538

2466

2118

1842

2000

am

pm 1188

Time

1000

792 294

0 9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1 St 1-2tues 2-303-07-2007 3-4 4-5 WINTER 5-6 6-7 King

Time Tim e

8-9

9-10

102

pmpm

114

100

57 50

Time

42

41

35

31

25

13 5

1

2

0 9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

3000 2000

1638

am

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

Time

pm

744

1000 0

175

9-10 10-11

Martin Pl tues WINTER 12-1 1-2 2-3 03-07-2007 3-4 4-5 5-6 6-7

11-12

am am 163

Time Tim e

7-8

8-9

9-10

1050 618

10-11 11-12

pmpm

156

151

151

150 134 121

125 107

96 87

83

87

84

Time

pm

75

20

8-9

4000

am

64

50

5190

4950 5022

pm

52 46

5208 5000

100

82

am 75

5748

6000

8-9

150

125

6444

10-11 11-12

Pedestrians per minute

am am

175

7-8

84

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestrians per hour Pedestriansper perhour hour

4944

8-9

Pedestrians Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute Pedestriansper perminute minute

7000

6000 5000

9072 9078

7248

6840

7000

9366 8058

8000

8000

89.196 pedestrians all day

9762

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

50 27 25

18 10

0 8-9

Martin Place

pm pm

12

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

King Street

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

Market Street Market St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Park St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 11000

Park 10000 Street

Park Street 11000

56.994 pedestrians all day

Market Street 10000

43.524 pedestrians all day

9000

9000 8000

8000

7632 7140

7000

7000

6000

6000 4644

4554

4392

4362

3000

2364 2460

3672

2130

1476

1488

1212

1000

175

Park St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am am

3-4

4-5

4902

4000

1872

2000

0

5160

4140

3888 3708

4000

5496

5000

5-6

Time Time Tim e

6-7

0

100

200

0

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

pm pm pm

150

300

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per minute hour Pedestrians per hour

PedestriansPedestrians per hour Pedestrians Pedestrians per hour per hour minute per hour Pedestrians per

5000

3792 3960 2856

3000 2130 2000

1962

2382 1938

1818 1092

1000 0 175

852

Market St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

6-7

am am

Time Tim e

pmpm

am

Time

pm

7-8

8-9

9-10

600

444

10-11 11-12

150

127 125

am

119

Time

125

pm

100

100

75

73 65

39

50

41

36 25

25

25

20

0 9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

82

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

69

75

61

62

31

8-9

86

73

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

77

76

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

92

63

66 48

50

36

33

40

32

30 18

25

14

10

7

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

27


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am

Macquarie St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Clarence St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

13.032 pedestrians all day

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

4000

2000 175

1632

1326 684

1000

882

828

1494

972

1140

942

1320 552

528

492

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

Pedestriansper perhour hour Pedestrians

Clarence St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

3000

125

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

8000 Macquarie Street

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

84 9-10

90

66

2000 175

10-11 11-12

75

50

25

11

15

14

16

19

16

22 9

9

8

1

2

1

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

762

1020

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

9-10 10-11

11-12

15

8-9

10000 9000

7.008 pedestrians all day

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

150

354

366

432

1008 522

474

396

282

288

192

162

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

114

0 9-10 10-11

11-12

125

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

200

0

8-9

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

300

400

500

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

100 200 300 400 500 m

13

17

9-10

10-11

2000 175

7

13

8

12

8

7

5

5

3

3

2

0 9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

7-8

168

66

8-9

9-10

48

24

10-11 11-12

pm pm

18

16

18

22 11

6

3

1

1

0

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

9.774 pedestrians all day

1296 504

642

780

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

630

125

17 9

12-1

1518

8-9

pmpm

50

8

6-7

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

1296 612

660

696

2-3

3-4

4-5

870

150 0

75

6

5-6

Queen Sq tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

1000

75

6

4-5

Tim e Time

12

11-12

3000

100

25

3-4

4000

(m)

100

8-9

28

100

Pedestrians per per hour hour

0

Sussex St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

4000

690

2-3

8000 Queen Square

7000

762

366

Queen Sq tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

9000

492

642

Macquarie Street Queen Square

10000

474

1-2

am am

11000

1000

1338

0

11000

2000 175

1074

25

24 25

Sussex St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

3000

960

50

11-12

Clarence Street Sussex Street

Sussex Street

12-1 am am

pm pm

8000

1050

696

125

pmpm

75

25

900

150 0

100

27

1512

1464

1000

100

22

12.090 pedestrians all day

Macquarie St both sides tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

3000

8-9

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

Pedestrians per hour

8000 Clarence Street

1-2

am am

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

54

144

24

7-8

8-9

9-10

1

2

0

1

0

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

30

18

10-11 11-12

pm pm

50 25 25

22 11

8

11

13

22 10

11

12

15

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am Circular Quay tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Loftus St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

11.844 pedestrians all day

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

4000

2000 175

1518

1000

558

522

702

864

1464

1266 762

648

1254 714

522

396

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

hour Pedestrians per hour

Loftus St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

3000

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

8000 Circular Quay

6-7

7-8

8-9

252

234

9-10

10-11 11-12

168

75

50

9

9

12

21

14

13

11

21 12

9

7

4

4

3

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

942

8-9

75

25

2508

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

2034

1626 1032

990 516

588

450

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

9

10

8

5

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

150 0

100

24

3384 2916 Circular Quay tues 03-07-2007 WINTER2544 2736

2000 175

100

25

3864 3966

3000

1000

30.390 pedestrians all day

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pmpm

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians per Pedestrians per hour hour

8000 Loftus Street

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

294

pm pm

66

64

56 46

50 27 25

16

17

49

42

42

34

17

0 8-9

11-12

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

pm pm

Circular Quay Loftus Street BridgenStreet

Young Street

Bridge St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Young St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

Bridge Street

13.662 pedestrians all day

8000 7000

8000 Young Street

6000

6000

5000

5000

1806

1632 732

1000

738

792

1266 846

1158

822

360

252

150 0

126

114

144

0

100

200

300

0

8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

1152

1722

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per hour hour

4000

Bridge St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

3000

3000

1000

8-9

75

75

50

25

12

12

13

19

29 21

14

19

14

6

4

2

2

2

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

642

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pmpm

100

27

468

540

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

816

1170 588

1188

912

570

438

150 0

100

30

Young St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

2406

2000 175

10-11 11-12

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestrians per perhour hour

4000

2000 175

10.176 pedestrians all day

7000

50

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

192

60

48

60

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

78

3

1

1

1

1

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

40

25

9

8

11

14

20 10

20

15

10

7

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

29


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am

Pyrmont Bridge tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000 Pyrmont Bridge

28.866 pedestrians all day

8000 William Street

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

2000 175

4000

3312 2748 Pyrmont Bridge tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 2466 2448

3000 1842 1374

1560

1608

2202

2028

1992

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

Pedestrians per hour Pedestrians per hour

William St both sides tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

1746

1512 762

1000

594

672

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

50 31

23

26

27

41

33

41

34

37

29

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestrians per minute minute

1212

1428

1632

1434

1200 1224

756 288

150 0 9-10 10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

20

20

10-11 11-12

pmpm

75

25

25

13

10

11

0 9-10

10-11 11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time e Tim

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

54 50

41 27 19

25

20

38 28

23

24

45

27

24

13 5

0 8-9

10-11 11-12

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

pm pm

Broadway St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

pm pm

Oxford St both sides 03-07-2007 WINTER

Pyrmont Bridge

11000

11000

William Street

10000

10000

9000

9000

Broadway

Oxford Street

27.876 pedestrians all day

8000 7000

Oxford Street

24.606 pedestrians all day

8000 7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

Broadway

4000

2100

2000 175

1458

1572

1848

2142

1956

1962

2334

1992 2166

1956 1494

1092

612

750 0

100

1500

200

300

400

500

(m)

0

8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

100 200 300 400 500 m

Pedestrians per per hour hour Pedestrians

4000

Broadway St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 2442

3000

2000 175

8-9

75

24

31

36

33

33

33

36

41

39

33 25

18

10

13

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

1752 1020

1188

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

75

35

1344

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

2004 1836

1980

1800 1902

1626 1656 858

684

9-10

10-11 11-12

618

1500

100

26

1998

1000

100

50

Oxford St both sides tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 2340

3000

10-11 11-12

pmpm

Pedestrians per minute Pedestrians per minute

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perhour hour

1116

1674

1392

1000

8-9

55 46

am am

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

2292

1596

100

8-9

30

William St both sides tues 03-07-20072712 WINTER 2436

2000 175

125

75

25

3234

3000

10-11 11-12

pm pm

100

1000

25.626 pedestrians all day

50

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

33 22

25

29 17

20

10-11

11-12

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

33

31

30

32

6-7

7-8

8-9

27

28

pmpm

39

33

14

11

10

9-10

10-11

11-12

0 8-9

9-10

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

pm pm

7-8

8-9


PEDESTRIAN TRAFFIC winter weekday 8am - 12am Hunter St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

Castlereagh tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 11000

11000

10000

10000

9000

9000

8000 Castlereagh Street

18.258 pedestrians all day

8000 Hunter Street

7000

7000

6000

6000

5000

5000

4000

4000

29.370 pedestrians all day

4632

2874

Castlereagh tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 2400

3000 2000 175

1806 1350

1000

1758

1710

1026 1086

1008

1248

912 438

372

150 0 8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

Pedestrians Pedestrians per hour

Pedestrians per Pedestrians per hour hour

4158

3-4

4-5

5-6

Tim e Time

6-7

7-8

8-9

168

66

9-10

10-11 11-12

36

3480

Hunter2874 St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 2448

3000 1848

2000 175

2124

1416

1000

1626 1632 1098

8-9

9-10 10-11

11-12

125

pmpm

936 396

258

234

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

7

4

4

4

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

150 0

100

100

75

75

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

210

pm pm

Pedestriansper perminute minute Pedestrians

Pedestrians Pedestriansper perminute minute

77

48

50

40 30 23

25

29 17

29

18

17

21

15 7

6

3

1

1

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

69 58 48

50 31

24

25

27

27

18

16

0 8-9

9-10

10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

pm pm

41

35

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

pm pm

Note: Hunter Street is an extra pedestrian count done on a winter weekday

Hunter Street

Castelreagh Street

Dixon St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER 11000 10000 9000

Dixon Street

18.912 pedestrians all day

8000

Dixon Street

7000 6000 5000

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per hour hour

4000 3000

Dixon St tues 03-07-2007 WINTER

2000 175 1000

1158

1260

1476

1470

1524

1566

1494

1536

1662

1566

1332 708

528

534

8-9

9-10 10-11

684

414

1500

0

11-12

125

12-1

1-2

2-3

am am

3-4

4-5

5-6

Time Tim e

6-7

7-8

8-9

9-10

10-11 11-12

100

200

300

0

400

500

(m)

100 200 300 400 500 m

pmpm

100

Pedestrians Pedestrians per per minute minute

75

50

25

19 9

9

8-9

9-10

21

25

25

25

26

25

26

28

26

22 12

11

9-10

10-11

7

0 10-11

11-12

12-1

am am

1-2

2-3

3-4

Time Tim e

4-5

5-6

6-7

7-8

8-9

11-12

pm pm

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

31


32

PUBLIC LIFE DATA


STATIONARY ACTIVITIES spending time in the city SURVEY OF STATIONARY ACTIVITIES As part of an estimate of the usage and role of the different public spaces, a stationary activity survey was undertaken in a selection of public spaces. The survey registers the number of people staying in each place in the following categories: - those who are standing, sitting, or lying down as well as those who are engaged in cultural or commercial activities, such as vendors and street artists or children playing. The survey records both the number of stationary activities over a 10-hour period, as well as the distribution and type of activity. A high number of people engaged in stationary activities tell a story of a city with popular and inviting public spaces. Stationary activities were recorded in 23 locations in the City Centre between 10am and 8pm.

spending time in the city

Date:

Tuesday the 20th of March 2007

Time:

12pm to 4pm

Weather:

sunny, 270 c

In the period between 12pm and 4pm there is an avarage of 9.115 activities in all of the spaces surveyed.

People sitting on public benches: People sitting at outdoor cafĂŠs: People standing: Children playing:

22% 30% 26% 0,05%

The map is showing the average number of activities found between 12pm and 4pm on a selection of the surveyed locations. Or in another way: If an aerial photo was taken at any time between 12pm and 4pm this is the number of persons which is likely to be found in the photo.

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES Average number of stationary activities in selected spaces found at any time in the period between 12pm and 4pm on a summer weekday.

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

33


550 550

300

300

500

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES

500

250

250

summer weekday 10am - 8pm 450

450

200

200

400

Farrer Place 150

100 activities

400 Jessie Street Gardens 150

(registered at selected times)

all156 day: 156

activities (registered at selected times)

350 350 100

100

J es s ie S treet Ga rdens

Fa rrer P la c e

300 50

39

Jessie Street Gardens Macquarie Place

20

20

12

250

7

2

Farrer Place

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

Number of persons Number of pers ons

Number of persons Number of pers ons

300 50

38

35 13

14

250 0 10 am

8 pm

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

8 pm

Richard Johnson Square

200

200

150

150

Richard Johnson Square

all38 day: 38 activities

Macquarie Place

(registered at selected times)

all259 day: 259

Ma c qua rie P la c e

100

activities (registered at selected times)

100

69

R ic ha rd J ohns on S qua re

8

9

11

10 am

12 am

2 pm

Number of persons Number of pers ons

50 Number of persons Number of pers ons

6 pm

Time Time

Time Time

6

3

1

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

0

24 3

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

26

3

2

5

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

Physical activities Commercially active Children playing Lying down Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

50

44

50

55

24 17

0 10 am

Time Time

34

36

20

12 am

2 pm Time Time

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm


550

550

300

300

500

500

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES summer weekday 10am - 8pm 250

250

450

450 200

200

400

400

First Government House 150

all97 day: 97

Philip Lane 150

activities (registered at selected times)

Firs t Government Hous e

350

P hilip L a ne

350

100

100

300

50

50

15

8

1

First Government House

3

Philip Lane

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Number of persons Number of pers ons

Number of persons Number of pers ons

70 300

250

all185 day: 185

activities (registered at selected times)

66

35 20 13

250

0 10 am

Time Time

26

25

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time Time

Chifley Square 200

200

Queen Square 150

150

Chifley Square

Chifley S qua re

all199 day: 199

activities (registered at selected times)

100

100

72

Queen S qua re

61 50

Number of persons Number of pers ons

Number of persons Number of pers ons

all63 day: 63

Queen Square

activities (registered at selected times)

29 21 7

9

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

50 24 3

0

0

100

200

300

400

500

100 200 300 400 500 m

3

2

4 pm

6 pm

5

0 10 am

Time Time

26

12 am

2 pm

8 pm

Time Time

(m)

Commercially active Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Standing

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

35


450

800

400

800

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES summer weekday 10am - 8pm 750

Circ ula r Qua y

750

350

3469

Circular Quay First Fleet Park Firs t Fleet P a rk 700

(registered at selected times)

705

703 700

300

650

activities (registered at selected times)

all753 day: activities 753

251

650

250

Circular Quay 600 600

200

573

First Fleet Park

169

550 550

150

Herald Square, Custom House Square, Scout Square

129

506

500 97

100

500

493

489

65

Number of persons Number of pers ons

450 50

450

42

400 400

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time Time

350 350

300 300

250

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

250

Herald Hera Square, Custom House 951 ld S qua re, Cus toms Hous e S qua re, S c out S quaactivities re (registered at selected times) Square, Scout Place 200

192 184

200 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

158 144

150

141

132

150

Physical activities

100

Cultural activities

100

Children playing 50

Sitting on folding chairs Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm TimeTime

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

36

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

Number of pers ons

Lying down Number of persons

Number of persons

Number of pers ons

Commercially active

50

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm


650 250

250 800 500

800

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES summer weekday 10am - 8pm 600

200

200 750 450

750

550 150 700 400

150

157

Regimental Square

Sesquicentenary Square

activities (registered at selected times)

178

activities (registered at selected times)

700

S es quic entena ry S qua re

500

R egimenta l S qua re

100

100 650 350

650 450

27

144

23

22

17

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

58 50 600 300

10 0 250 550

10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

53

49

50 36

29

600

9

400

2

0 10 am

8 pm

12 am

2 pm

550

Time

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

350 200 500

26

Sydney Square 24 3

525

Regimental Square

activities (registered at selected times) 3

S ydney S qua re

Sesquicentenary Square

Pitt500Street Mall

5

2

488

activities (registered at selected times)

300

Pitt Street Mall 150 450

137

450

112

250

Sydney Square 99

100 400

91

P itt S treet Ma ll

400

World Square

Brickfield Square 200

Number of pers ons

185 50 350

45

41

350

150

0 300

122 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

300

8 pm

Time 0

100

100 200 300 400 500 m

83 250 Square World

775 activities

250

(registered at selected times)

Number of pers ons

51

W orld S qua re 200

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

50

38

200

9

0 10 am

156

12 am

2 pm

151 144

150

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time 150

130 117

Brickfield Square

100

16

activities (registered at selected times)

100 77

B ric k field S qua re

Cultural activities

50

Commercially active Lying down Secondary seating 0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm

Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Standing

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

Physical activities 50

4

3

10 am

12 am

7

2

0 2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

37


500

500

800

800

450

450

750

750

400

400

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES summer weekday 10am - 8pm Wynyard Park 700

Martin Place 700

876

activities (registered at selected times)

350

350

650

650

1313

activities (registered at selected times)

Ma rtin P la c e

W ynya rd P a rk 300

300

600

600 251

250

250

550

550

293

296

218 209

200

200

185 177

Wynyard Park

170

500

500

Martin Place 150

150

450

450 105

100

100

70

400

50

350

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

400

112

103

Dixon Street

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

50

350

0 10 am

Belmore Park

Time 300

12 am

2 pm

300

0

Dixon Street 250

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

100 200 300 400 500 m

523

Belmore Park 250

activities (registered at selected times)

Dix on S treet

526

activities (registered at selected times)

B elmore P a rk 0

200

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

200

179

150

150 129

100

82

Sitting on folding chairs

31

Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches

0 2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm

Waiting for transport Standing

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

Lying down

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

91

Children playing

56

38

94

Commercially active

50

12 am

100

Cultural activities

85 78

10 am

105

Physical activities

94

50 25

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm


800 800

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES summer weekday 10am - 8pm 750

750

Australia Square 700

700

1048

Hyde Park

activities (registered at selected times)

1652

activities (registered at selected times)

650 650

600 600

Hyde P a rk 550 550

Aus tra lia S qua re

509

Australia Square 500

500 484

450 450 424

Hyde Park 400

400

350

350

300

300

284

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

250

250

216 199

200

200

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

167

150

150 128

100

100

93 78

Physical activities 52

Cultural activities

50

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

66

Commercially active Children playing Lying down Secondary seating 192 184 Sitting on cafĂŠchairs

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

158 144 132

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

Sitting on benches

Time

50

Standing

141

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

39


550

550

300

300

250 500

500

250

250

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES winter weekday 10am - 8pm

450

200

200 Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

200

450

150 400

Farrer 150 Place

214

Jessie Street Gardens 150

activities (registered at selected times)

Far r e r P lace WINT ER Far r e r P lace WINT ER

100 350

123

activities (registered at selected times)

350

84

100

400

100

84

50

50

38

38

42

42 28

28 18

250

Jessie Street Gardens Macquarie Place

18 4

4

Farrer Place

00 1010 amam

12 am 12 am 2 pm 2 pm 4 pm Time

4 pm6 pm

8 pm 6 pm

Number of pers ons

Number ofofpers ons Number pers ons

J e s s ie S treet Gar de ns WINT ER

300

300

50 34 24

250

Time

150

150

12

4 pm

6 pm

M aquar ie P lace WINT ER

14 activities

Maquarie Place

8 pm

192

activities (registered at selected times)

100

100

69

R ic hard J ohns on S quare W INTER 50

6

4

3

0

1

0

10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

0

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

2 pm

22

Time

200

(registered at selected times)

0

0

100

200

300

400

500

100 200 300 400 500 m

(m)

Physical activities Commercially active Children playing Lying down Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

50 33

31 23

16

20

0 10 am

Time

40

12 am

Richard Johnson Square

200

Richard Johnson Square

16

0 10 am

8 pm

15

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm


550

550

300

300

500

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES winter weekday 10am - 8pm

250

250

450

450

200

200

400

First 150 Government House

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

500

112 activities

400

Philip Lane 150

(registered at selected times)

143

activities (registered at selected times)

P hilip L ane WINT ER

Fir s t Government Hous e WINT ER 350

350

100

100 83

300

54

50 28 18

250

8

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

First Government House 2 6 pm

0

Philip Lane

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

300

50

38

14

250

4 10 am

8 pm

12 am

2 pm

Chifley Square

Time

1

3

6 pm

8 pm

0 4 pm Time

200

200

Queen Square 150

150

Chifley Square

62

Queen Square

activities (registered at selected times)

100

100

Queen S quare W INTER

Chifley S quare W INTER 50

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

36

activities (registered at selected times)

29 12

9

4

5

3

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

0

0

100

200

300

400

500

100 200 300 400 500 m

50

8

10

10 am

12 am

7

6

5

0 2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

0 8 pm

Time

(m)

Physical activities Commercially active Children playing Lying down Sitting on folding chairs Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

41


Herald Square, Custom House Square, Scout Place WINTER

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES winter weekday 10am - 8pm 800

800 Scout Place, Herald Square, 1686 activities Custom House Square (registered at selected times)

800

760

750

750

Circular Quay 700

750

2307 activities

(registered at selected times)

C ir cular Quay WINT ER

C HS , HS , S S WINT ER

700

650

First Fleet Park

650

618

700

Circular Quay

650

617

600

Herald Square, Custom House Square, Scout Place

600

550

500

600

550

550

500

500

450

Number of pers ons

466

450

400

450

400

400

Firs t Fleet P ark W INTER

350

350

350

339

0

First Fleet Park 300

0

100

200

300

250

400

500

707

302

300

100 200 300 400 500 m

activities (registered at selected times)

309

300

292

(m)

250

250

216

200

200

200

150

150

174 158

150

117

100

93

100

100 82

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

42

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

6 pm

8 pm

50

21

26

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm

Number of pers ons

50 Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

69 50

50

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm


300

300

700

600

500

250

250

550 800

Number of pers ons

450

200

200

600

500 750

400

2307

Regimental Square 150

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES winter weekday 10am - 8pm

450 700 350

Number of pers ons

100 500

30

250 9

Number of pers ons

50

17

13

7

0 400

10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

Regimental Square

Time

200

(registered at selected times)

150

350 600

38 29 14

8

2

0

6 pm

8 pm

0 12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

437

Pitt500 Street Mall 250

activities (registered at selected times)

P itt S treet Ma l W INT E R 450 200

100

Brickfield Square World Square 66 58

Number of pers ons

50

Sydney Square

S ydney S quare W INTER

300

400 650

550 300

Sequicentenary Square

Pitt Street Mall

239 activities

Sydney Square

100

10 am

8 pm

50 37

37 27

Number of pers ons

Number Number of pers ons of pers ons

300

activities (registered at selected times)

S es quic entenary S quare W INTER

R egimental S quare W INTER

28

91

Sesquicentenary Square 150

activities (registered at selected times)

400 150

146

14

200

101

350 100

103

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

100 200 300 400 500 m

Number of pers ons

Brickfield Square

0

25 activities

(registered at selected times)

100

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

300 50

49 33

5

250 0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

B ric k field S quare W INTER

50

200

World Square 6

8

10 am

12 am

244

activities (registered at selected times)

11

0 2 pm

0

0

0

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

150

Time

W orld S quare W INTER

100

Physical activities Cultural activities

62

Commercially active Children playing Lying down Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

Time

60 46

50

33 25 18

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

43


300 550

550 800

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES winter weekday 10am - 8pm 250 500

200 450

Number of pers ons

Wynyard Park

500 750

450

171 activities

Martin Place

(registered at selected times)

883

activities (registered at selected times)

700

Wynyar d P ar k WINT ER 150 400

400 650

M ar tin P lace WINT ER 97

100 350

350

Number of pers ons

600

50 300 25

550

12

0 250

300

300

10 am

11

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

16

6 pm

Wynyard

10

8 pm

250

Martin Place

Time

500

200

200

Dixon Street

399 activities

194

450

Number of pers ons

(registered at selected times)

150 Dixon S treet WINT ER

Dixon Street

155

150 400

128

100

100 84

350

82

80

80

75

47

50 31

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

Belmore Park

8 pm

50 300

26

0 250

10 am

12 am

2 pm

0

100

200

300

400

500

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

Time

(m)

200

Belmore Park

170

activities (registered at selected times)

150

B elmore P ark W INTER 100

Physical activities Cultural activities Children playing Lying down Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

44

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

Number of pers ons

Commercially active 50

40

35

37 21

27 10

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm Time

6 pm

8 pm


550

800

STATIONARY ACTIVITIES winter weekday 10am - 8pm

500

750

610

Number of pers ons

450 Australia Square

1362

Hyde Park

activities (registered at selected times)

activities (registered at selected times)

700 400

650 350

Aus tralia S quare W INTER

600

300

Hyde P ar k WINT ER

Australia Square 550

260

250

524

500 200

Hyde Park

450

150

109

400 106

100

50

346

350

50

0

19

100 200 300 400 500 m

300

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

250 0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

200

199

171

150

100

88

Physical activities Children playing Lying down Sitting on folding chairs Secondary seating Sitting on cafĂŠchairs Sitting on benches Waiting for transport Standing

Number of pers ons

Number of pers ons

66

50 34

0 10 am

12 am

2 pm

4 pm

6 pm

8 pm

Time

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

45


AGE DISTRIBUTION absent user groups LOW DIVERSITY IN AGE AND GENDER Age and gender surveys were performed in the summer and winter 2007 on a selection of streets to determine how the public realm is used by males and females and different age groups. The selected streets and places were Circular Quay, Dixon Street, George Street (Bathurst /Wilmot) and Pitt Street Mall.

Circular Quay 51 43

2

Pitt Street Mall

0-6

3

2

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65 Age

57

37

2

3

1

0-6

11AM - MIDMORNING Children (0-14 years) had their peak presence at this time of day. The children were mostly found at Circular Quay. Young people (15-30 years) constitute 51% of all pedestrians at 11am. The lowest number of young people was registered at Circular Quay. The group of elderly is best represented at 11am where seniors (above 65 years of age) make up 20% of all pedestrians on Dixon Street. At this hour the elderly avoid the overcrowded situation which arises later in the day. 9PM - EVENING Children (0-14 years) have disappeared from all streets. Young people (15-30 years) are the most dominant. Of all pedestrians on Pitt Street Mall 68% are between 15 and 30 years. At 9pm this group is dominated by young males (39%). The elderly (> 65 years) are absent.

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65 Age

WHO ARE THE PEOPLE USING SYDNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CITY CENTRE The average of all people recorded on a summer weekday on Circular Quay, Pitt Street mall, George Street and Dixon Street.

Dixon Street

George Street 64

Children (0-14 years): 3% Young people (15-30 years): 57% Middle-aged (30-65 years): 37% Elderly (> 65 years): 3%

54

The survey illustrates a City Centre primarily inhabited by young people. Children and the elderly are poorly represented.

38 31

7

1

2

0

0-6

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65

0-6

3

0

7-14 15-30 31-64 >65

Age

Age

0

100 200 300 400 500 m

AGE DISTRIBUTION IN THE CITY CENTRE Recordings made on a summer weekday at Circular Quay, Pitt Street Mall, George Street and Dixon Street. The graphs show the average age distribution between 11am - 9pm at each recording place.

0

100

200

300

400

500

(m)

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

47


Pitt St Mall 3 pm tues

Pitt St Mall 11 am tues

100

90

Pitt Street Mall Percent

Percent

50 37

40 30 20 10

2

1

0-6

7-14

3

0 15-30

31-64

Pitt Street Mall

57

60

Circular Quay Percent

51 43

40 30 20 3

2

0 15-30

31-64

60

53

50

30

20

20 8

10

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

100

Age

80

80

70

70

50

0-6

7-14

31-64

>65

50 43

40

35

30

20

20 6 Dixon St 11 am tues

10

4

3

3

2 Dixon St 1 pm tues

0 0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

>65

100

0-6

7-14

90

90

80

80

70

70

60

60

15-30

31-64

>65

Age

Age

100

15-30

50

30

100

4

0

60

53

0

>65

Circular Quay 1 pm tues

Age 90

2

3

0

>65

90

10

Age Dixon St Average

40

30

4 Circular Quay 11 am tues 2

53

50 40

34

40

Circular Quay

Percent

60

7-14

70

60

70

0-6

70

100

90

2

80

0

>65

100

10

80

10

Circular Quay Average

50

90

40

Age

80

90

60

70

1pm

100

Percent

80

11am

100

Pitt St Mall average tues

Percent

summer weekday average between 11am - 9pm

Dixon Street

80

54

50 38

40 30 20

7

10 1

0

0-6

7-14

0 15-30

31-64

>65

20 10

20 4

90

0-6

7-14

0

15-30

31-64

0

>65

100

90

90

80

80

30 20 10 2

3

0

0 0-6

7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

31-64

>65

65

50 40

40

31 28

30

30 20

20 3

5 0

0-6

7-14

10 1

0

0-6

7-14

2

0

0 15-30 Age

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

15-30

60

50

10

7-14

70

65 Percent

Percent 31

George Street

40

0-6

Age

60

50

6

George St 1 pm tues 0

Age

70

George Street

60

48

10

George St 11 am tues 0

0

100

Percent

30 20

100

64

44

31

George St Average

70

50

50 40

30

Age

80

45

50 40

Dixon Street

Percent

60

Percent

70

Percent

90

31-64

>65

15-30 Age

31-64

>65


Pitt St Mall 1 pm tues

Pitt St Mall 5 pm tues

90

90

80

80

80

50 40

60

60

50

30

30

20

20

20

10 1

0 100

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

0

>65

100

Age

0-6

7-14

15-30

10

2

5 pm tues 1 Circular Quay 0 31-64

40

100

Age

20 10

4

2Circular Quay 2 7 pm tues

0

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

>65

100

Age

90

90

80

80

80

80

70

70

70

42

50

60

42

50 40 40

40

30

30

30

30

20

20

20

20

2

10

5

1

0 100

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

10

Dixon1St 5 pm tues

1

0

0

>65

100

Age

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

100

Age

1

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

100 90

80

80

80

80

70

70

70

50 36

50

40

30

30

30

30

20

20

20

20

10 0

George St 3 pm tues 0

10 1

10

3

George1 St 5 pm tues

0

0 100

40

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

0-6

>65

7-14

100

Age 90

15-30

31-64

>65

0-6

7-14

100

15-30

31-64

>65

0

0

0-6

7-14

0 15-30

31-64

>65

Age

90

80

80

70

70

70

70

60

60

60

60

80

74

40 30

23

20 2

4

0

0 0-6

7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

44

50

40

40

30

30

20

20

10

2

2

0

Percent

52

50

Percent

Percent

60

50

10

George St 9 pm tues

100

Age

90

70

42

0

90

80

>65

58

10

3

George St 7 pm tues 1

0

Age

31-64

40

33

2

15-30

50

40

6

7-14

60 Percent

44

0-6

70

61

60 Percent

Percent

50

6 Dixon 1 St 9 pm tues

Age

90

60

38

0

>65

90

50

>65

55

1

90

60

31-64

Age

Age

59

15-30

10

Dixon 0 St 7 pm tues

0

>65

7-14

50

40

Dixon St 3 pm tues 2

0-6

60

40

10

3

70 58 Percent

50

56 Percent

Percent

60

Circular Quay 9 pm tues 1

0

90

49

29

30

23

0

>65

68

50

90

60 Percent

50

48

30

3 pm tues 1 Circular Quay 1

80 70

40

35

90

70

40

10

Percent

49

Percent

60 Percent

Percent

60

9pm

100

70

70

63

7pm

100

90

70

Percent

5pm

100

Percent

3pm

100

Pitt St Mall 9 pm tues

Pitt St Mall 7 pm tues

10

0-6

7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

36

40 30

23

20

2

2

0

10 0

2

0-6

7-14

2

0

0

0

50

0-6

7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

15-30

31-64

>65

Age

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

49


Pitt St Mall 1 pm winter

Pitt St Mall 11 am winter

winter weekday average between 11am - 9pm

100

Pitt St Mall average 11 am-9 pm winter

90

90

100

80

80

90

70

60

55

60

50 36

40 30 20 7

10 1 0

1

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

60

50 40 30

30

20

20

10

10

0 100

>65

Circular Quay 11 am winter 3 2

0-6

7-14

>65

100

90

70

70

60

40 40 30 20 11 10

2

1

0-6

7-14

0 15-30

31-64

>65

50 41

40

30

30

20

20 2 Dixon0St 11 am winter

10

4

0 100

Age

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

0

>65

100 90

100

80

80

90

70

Dixon Street

40 28

30 20 10 0

8

5

1

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

>65

Dixon Street

50

50

40

30

30

10 0

Age

11 10

George St 11 am winter 0-6

7-14

100

15-30

31-64

90

70

70

60

60

80

Percent

George Street

60 51

30 20

0-6

2 7-14

1 15-30 Age

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

31-64

>65

George Street

46

40

50

44

Percent

80

0

0-6

Dixon St 1 pm winter 1

7-14

42

40

30

30

20 10

10

1

0 7-14

>65

24

8

9

George St 1 pm winter 7-14

15-30

31-64

2 >65

Age

64

27

20

12

0-6

31-64

50

40

0

15-30

56

100

80

0

3

0-6

>65

Age

100

10

16

0

90

50

36

2

90

70

45

20

16 8

>65

50

40

20

31-64

Age

60 Percent

Percent

58

15-30

70

63

60

70

1

Age

90

60

7-14

Age

Dixon St average 11 am-9 pm winter

80

0-6

50

40

10

Circular Quay 1 pm winter

2

60

53

Percent

Percent

46

50

14

90 80

Circular Quay

Percent

31-64

80

60

38

0

100

80

Percent

15-30

1

Age

90

Circular Quay

45

31

Circular Quay average 11 am-9 pm winter

Percent

50 40

Age

70

1pm

70

64

Percent

Pitt Street Mall

Percent

70

Pitt Street Mall

Percent

80

50

100

11am

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

2

6 1

0 0-6

7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65


100

100

3pm

100

7pm

90

90

90

80

80

80

80

70

70

70

50 40

33

60 Percent

Percent

60

50 40

58

34

46

50 40

40

30

30

30

20

20

20

20

0 100

6 2Circular Quay 3 pm winter 0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

10 1 0 100

>65

Age

90

7

Circular Quay 5 pm winter

1

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

10 0

0

>65

100

Age

90

Circular2Quay 7 pm winter

0

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

0 100

>65

90

70

70

70

70

60

60

30

0 100

40

30

30

1

1

7-14

15-30

31-64

>65

100

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

0 >65

100

31-64

>65

Age

50 50 39

20

13 0 0-6

0

7-14

15-30

31-64

10

10

Dixon St 7 pm winter

0

>65

100

0 0-6

Dixon St 9 pm winter 0

7-14

Age

Age

Age

15-30

30

10

Dixon0 St 5 pm winter

7-14

40

20

10

Dixon St 3 pm winter

0 0-6

37

11

10 3

50

50

40

20

20 10

42

0-6

3

60 Percent

Percent

40

40

46

Percent

80

50

1

90

80

50

Circular Quay 9 pm winter

0

Age

80

47

42

10 0

80

60

54

50

30

10

9pm

60

51

Percent

58

60 Percent

100

5pm

Pitt St Mall 9 pm winter

90

70

Percent

Pitt St Mall 7 pm winter

Pitt St Mall 5 pm winter

Pitt St Mall 3 pm winter

15-30

31-64

>65

Age

90

90

90

90

80

80

80

80

70

70

70

70

60

60

40 30 20 10 0

11 6

George St 3 pm winter 0-6

7-14

100

38

15-30

31-64

20

20

>65

4 1 George St 5 pm winter 0-6

7-14

100

Age

15-30

31-64

30

7 1

0

>65

0-6

10

George St 7 pm winter 7-14

100

Age

15-30

31-64

0

0

90

90

80

80

80

80

70

70

70

70

60

60

30 20 10 0

15

0-6

40

30

30

20

20

10

4

0 7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

0

3 0-6

36

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

0

0 >65

Age

51 46

50

30 20 11 10

1

1

0

31-64

40

10

3 7-14

50

50

40

Percent

39

Percent

41 40

47

15-30

60

60

50

7-14

100

Age

90

50

2 0 George St 9 pm winter 0-6

>65

90

47

27

30 20

10 0

50 40

40 30

0

60

50

30

10

2

Percent

Percent

50 40

29

62

60 Percent

50

57 Percent

53

Percent

Percent

71

0

2

1

0 0-6

7-14

15-30 Age

31-64

>65

0-6

7-14

15-30

31-64

>65

Age

PUBLIC LIFE DATA

51


•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Sydney - Public Space Public Life 2007  

'Public Space Public Life' study conducted by Gehl Architects for City of Sydney.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you