Minimum Grid, Maximum Impact

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Minimum Grid, Maximum Impact: A Public Space and Mobility Plan for the Core Community Columbus, Georgia Prepared for MidTown, Inc.

by Gehl Studio December, 2015


Contents

Chapters 4 01 Background & Context...................................................... 14 02 Approach & Methods ..................................................... 26 03 Key Takeaways .............................................................. 46 04 The Network Plan ......................................................... 05 Pilot Projects ................................................................... 68 06 Appendix.......................................................................... 108

This report was prepared for MidTown, Inc. by Gehl Studio December, 2015 Gehl Studio team members Matthew Lister Julia D Day Sofie Kvist Andreas Røhl Christopher Rice Camilla Siggaard Andersen

Acknowledgments Thank you to MidTown, Inc., Community Foundation of the Chattahoochee Valley, and to Knight Foundation for their tireless leadership and inspiration.

Many thanks to the volunteers who helped with this project.

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Contents


We are lucky to live in a Knight City—one of 26 cities nationwide where John S. and James L. Knight once owned newspapers. It is in these cities that the Knight Foundation funds ideas and invests in civic innovators. Just over one year ago they initiated the first Knight Cities Challenge and posed a simple question: What is your best idea to make cities more successful? They received 7,160 answers. MidTown, Inc. responded with a proposal to establish a Minimum Grid to better connect people and places within our Core Community of MidTown and Uptown. Our proposal was selected as one of 32 national winners of the first Knight Cities Challenge. The Minimum Grid grant award has allowed us to partner with the internationally renowned urban design firm of Gehl Studio. They brought global experience and a people-first design philosophy to the project, and helped create a world-class plan that embraces our local character. The Minimum Grid project reimagines how we connect people and the distinctive places that we love, the places that define our community. Working with the team from Gehl has been eyeopening and affirming. A great outcome of the project has been the opportunity to partner locally, to grow local connections and friendships, and to see community assets and opportunities with fresh perspective, together. The Minimum Grid project has been guided by the board and staff of MidTown, Inc. and a local leadership team that includes Richard Bishop, President of Uptown Columbus, Inc.; Betsy

Covington, CEO of the Community Foundation of the Chattahoochee Valley; City Manager Isaiah Hugley; and Julio Portillo, Regional Community and Bicycle-Pedestrian Planner for the River Valley Regional Commission. The Minimum Grid proposal itself was bolstered by support from State Representative Calvin Smyre, Mayor Teresa Tomlinson and GDOT District 3 Representative Sam Wellborn, who continue to champion this initiative. Hundreds of citizens, students, leaders from partner organizations, and staff from the City, GDOT, CSU and the MCSD have participated, observed, surveyed, listened, questioned, affirmed, advised and informed the process and resulting recommendations. Thank you, all, for imagining a more connected Core Community. In her congratulatory note, the Knight Foundation Vice President for Community and National Initiatives Carol Coletta said, “To see Columbus embrace the concept [of a Minimum Grid] and commit to demonstrating it is a real thrill. We can’t wait to send people to see what Columbus has done.” This report represents the culmination of the first phase of the Minimum Grid project. With your continued engagement, support and investment, we are now ready to demonstrate how an exuberant Minimum Grid can make our community a healthier, more attractive and economically vibrant place for ALL residents and visitors.

Anne R. King Executive Director, MidTown, Inc.

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01 Background & Context


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A Connected Core Community

Columbus has a vision From the RiverWalk to Lakebottom Park, from the ziplines to the Museum, from Uptown’s farmers market to MidTown’s Library… Columbus is a city with great destinations. Columbus is also a city that wants more. Many of these great destinations, civic assets and ‘favorite’ places are less than 2 miles apart and are within walking and cycling distance of each other and residential neighborhoods. Yet the lack of walkable and bikeable connections - and active streetscapes between them - create a sense of distance that makes connecting to them by car seem like the best option. Despite this, the desire to walk and bike between these places exists. When people are invited to get on their bikes and pedal from Uptown to Lakebottom they do. Stakeholder meetings and engagement throughout this process have illustrated a great demand from residents for more options in how they move around their city. There is also a growing understanding and supporting data that these transportation options impact a city’s health and economy. While the Columbus region’s population increased by 24% between 1970 and 2013, this is a slower rate of growth than 57 of the 61 metro areas in Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

residents. Creating streets and public spaces that support more public life that is reflective of everyone who lives in the city is increasingly seen as a good place to start. From residents to local businesses to city agencies, there is a growing desire to connect people and places, and to create a Minimum Grid that demonstrates streets for people - to walk, bike, wait for transit, drive, or spend time. Creating invitations to attract and retain more residents can start now. With pilot and demonstration projects, city and civic leaders can test how to make context sensitive designs and programs that reflect the local climate and the local desires and behaviors of Columbus residents. This report outlines how and why these changes are possible. It illustrates key findings from public workshops, civic engagement and observational surveys, identifies a Minimum Grid; and proposes a set of pilot projects that can be tested immediately as ways to make the vision actionable. We’re thrilled to be working with Columbus’ many civic leaders in this process and we look forward to seeing what comes next. Sincerely,

_____________________________ Columbus wants to attract and retain more

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Background & Context


alone ck or van

Societal Trends Facts & Figures

The majority of people commuting in Columbus today travel by car. A Minimum Grid would provide people with more options for how to travel between home, work and school.

1.3%

Other means

9.8%

1.1% 0.8%

Worked from home

Walked

Public transport not including taxi rides Driving, carpooled car, truck or van

• 56% of millennials & 46% of active boomers would prefer to live in a walkable community, whether an urban, suburban or small town location. Many of Columbus’ young professionals told us the same thing. • Public Transit Ridership is increasing! In 2014, people took a record 10.8 billion trips on public transport. In Columbus, Dial-a-Ride ridership has grown 124% since 2008. • In automobile-dependent communities, the costs of parents driving their children often exceed congestion costs... -‘9-15% of U.S. peak period vehicle travel consist of parents chauffeuring young children to school’

9.7%

- 25% of the people that can travel on their own DON’T have access to cars - And not everybody knows a driver...

77.3%

• The older one gets the less likely they are to own a car. Driving alone car, truck or van

• The lower one’s income, the less likely they are to own a car.

Columbus, GA

Sources: Evaluating Household Chauffeuring Costs, Todd Litman, 2015 Investing in Place, APA 2014 The American Public Transportation Association U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2008–2012 Metra Public Transit Needs Assessment, City Council Presentation, March 2010

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What if...

you could easily and safely bike from the River to the Woods?

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Background and Context


What if...

the walk from the Library to Country’s BBQ was convenient, safe and attractive? Gehl Studio

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What if...

your kids could walk and bike

to school and to other activities?

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Background and Context


What if...

bus stops connected to sidewalks and became comfortable places to wait? Gehl Studio

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What if...

the River

and Uptown’s entertainment were connected? 12

Background and Context


What if...

the Columbus Museum was a civic hub

where you could also spend time outside?

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02 Approach & Methods

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People First Design

Understanding places people love in Uptown and MidTown Columbus Gehl Studio focuses on creating mutually beneficial relationships between people’s quality of life and their built environment. Gehl studies how people’s senses, movements, interests, and behaviors are influenced by the scale and quality of built form. The Gehl approach starts here to ensure design is guided by the unique features of a place - the features that make it welcoming and comfortable from the user-experience. This approach involves qualitative and quantitative analysis that helps collect data on people’s behavior and also understand their perception.

Public Space, Public Life (PSPL) Survey and Quality Criteria The Survey is a tool to collect people-oriented data and to document existing human behavior. It helps to understand how people use the streets in their city or neighborhood; the types of activities people engage in; the demographic mix of those people; and the barriers that may inhibit walking or socializing on the street. Data collected with the survey informs the strategies to make a place more connected, livable, walkable, and inviting to all.

Favorite Place Workshops Favorite Place Workshops start the planning process with a focus on what people love in their city and what’s working. They involve asking: Where do people currently feel invited or enjoy spending time? What qualities are missing from these places?

The Gehl Quality Criteria is a tool to understand the qualities of a place and how it feels to be there. The Criteria is used as a complement to the quantitative data collected with the PSPL. It is organized into three core categories: protection, comfort, and delight. While these categories are essential to a quality space, they are broad. The Favorite Place Workshops help identify the more specific, locally important qualities for a place.

From a busy street corner to the parking lot of a fast food joint, cities of all sizes have public spaces loved or well-used by residents. Favorite Place Workshops and activities are designed to understand the qualities that make these places thrive and to understand why other public spaces in Columbus might not be performing to their greatest potential. By asking people to share what they love and what leads them to have a great experience in a place, we collect feedback that can be applied to developing design principles and guidelines.

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Approach and Methods

Developing Project Principles The Favorite Place Workshops, the Public Space, Public Life Survey and Quality Criteria Assessment helped Gehl better understand what people love - and the areas in the city that need more love. They also helped define guiding project principles. The following pages detail the preliminary analysis and principles that emerged.


Approach & Project Process

01. We listened • We asked, what are your favorite places in Columbus and why?

02. We observed and experienced together • Using the PSPL, intercept survey and a mobility workshop, we spent time in the field to better understand how people get around and spend time in public space.

03. We strategized • Based on our findings, we developed a network plan and key strategies, and identified focus areas.

04. We prioritized • We worked together at public workshops to prioritize focus areas to develop pilot projects.

05. We proposed ways to measure, test and refine • The culmination of listening, observing and developing strategies together led to a series of pilot projects that can be tested as tactics to achieve long-term goals.

Surveyors count pedestrians on Broadway, mid-day on the weekend

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6 Guiding Principles

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01

Prioritize People, not Transportation

02

Support Democratic Streets

03

Create Streets as Public Spaces

04

Listen to Columbus

05

Connect Places and People

06

Focus on Design and Programs

Focus on how people live and their everyday routines; follow their ‘desire lines.’

Provide choice and options by fostering equally safe, convenient, affordable and comfortable ways to move around.

Make streets places, not just thruways to move from A to B.

Engage with residents, businesses, students and all stakeholders to understand how they experience public space.

Focus on connecting places with activity, favorite places, cultural centers, shopping hubs, schools, major intersections, and parks.

Change the design of places, but also host events and programs that draw people to a place.

Approach and Methods


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Favorite Places in Columbus

Mapping what people want and care about At a Favorite Place Workshop with 130 participants, held in March 2015 at the Columbus Museum, people worked in small groups to map their favorite places and identify the qualities that make them special. Understanding what people love and care about is an important element to making a successful mobility and public space plan reflective of Columbus’ identity, characteristics, and resident desires. We asked: What is your favorite place, and why? Where do you feel invited to spend time? What are the qualities of those places? What makes you want to spend time there? Favorite places ranged from parks and trails, active streets and busy coffee shops, to civic institutions. Despite their differences, each creates places for people to be together or to be alone, but still around others.

RiverWalk

The places mentioned more than once were: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

RiverWalk (31) Lakebottom Park (28) Broadway (20) Uptown Area (14) Iron Bank Coffee (9) 14th Street Bridge (8) Flat Rock Park (8) Bibb City / Fall Line Trace / Linwood Cemetery / The Village on 13th / Fountain City Coffee (4) 9. 1000 Block of Broadway / Maltitude / City Island (3) 10. Buena Vista Road at St. Mary’s Road, at Peabrook Rd / City Village / Columbus Museum / Columbus Library (2)

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Approach and Methods

Chattahoochee Island

Broadway


Fall Line Trace

Lakebottom Park

Linwood Cemetery

Columbus Library

The Village on 13th Dinglewood Park

Columbus Museum

Favorite Places

Major Employers

Schools

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Challenge Areas

Places that lack what people love At the same workshop, participants mapped locations that present the greatest barriers to walking, biking or taking transit and that lack the qualities associated with favorite places. As the map to the right shows, all of the locations identified were roads. This further emphasized that Columbus has great places and destinations - it is connecting to them that is the challenge. The top priority areas identified (mentioned more than once) included: 1. 13th Street (20) 2. 1st Avenue (14) 3. Front Avenue (11) 4. Civic Commons / Linwood Boulevard (8) 5. Macon Road (7) 6. 2nd Avenue / West 5th Avenue / Wynnton Road (5) 7. West 10th Street (4) 8. Central Railroad (3) The priority, challenge streets, along with the favorite places, helped identify where additional analysis and observation would be needed, as well as identifying opportunities for pilot projects.

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Approach and Methods

Broadway

The map shows the relationship between challenge areas, favorite places and major destinations.


17th Street

Linwood Blvd.

Macon Road 13th Street

Wynnton Road 11th Street

Favorite Places

Major Employers

Schools

Challenge Areas

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Public Space, Public Life Analysis

How do we get more of what people love in the challenge areas? Mapping favorite places and challenge areas in Uptown and MidTown revealed the locations that people love, as well as those that need attention. This helped identify places to analyze in detail, including where to conduct more direct observation of people’s behavior, and where to focus on surveying and collecting quantitative and qualitative data that could provide evidence to inform the Minimum Grid and pilot project strategies. Three study methods were used to study public life and public space. Local partners and volunteers were critical to implementing the surveying. Intercept survey

Public Life, Public Space (PSPL) Survey

OBSERVE: Who and how are people using space? Where are people walking and biking? Where are they spending time? What are the ages and genders of the people walking and biking?

Intercept Survey

ASK: How do you travel & why? How would you like to get around in the future? Where are you going?

Mobility Survey

EXPERIENCE: Document the quality of one’s travel experience. How does it vary if one walks, drives, rides a bike or takes the bus?

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Approach and Methods

Broadway


Study locations

PSPL

Lakebottom Park Civic Commons

The Village on 13th

Mobility workshop

PSPL

Intercept survey

Mobility workshop

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03 Key Takeaways

Note: Full survey results available in the Appendix. 26


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Four Key Takeaways

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01

Even geographically close places seem disconnected and difficult to navigate if you aren’t in a car.

02

Streets are not seen as public spaces.

03

People want more options to move around than they feel currently exist.

04

When people feel invited, they come.

Key Takeaways


Data from the Favorite Place Workshop, the Public Space, Public Life Survey, the Intercept Surveys, and the Mobility Workshop was analyzed and revealed four key takeaways. These are outlined on the following pages. Please see the Appendix for an overview of all the collected material.

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01: Even geographically close places seem disconnected and difficult to navigate if you aren’t in a car Challenges • Wide roads and fast moving traffic separate destinations and amenities, parks, restaurants and shops. • Large setbacks separate shops from sidewalks. • Many front entrances cater to those arriving by car and at times even turn their backs to the street.

Walking between popular destinations - e.g. shops to grocery at the Village on 13th, involves crossing four lanes of traffic without a pedestrian signal.

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Key Takeaways

St Elmo Shopping Center is across the street from Lakebottom Park, where many people walk and recreate, but shop entrances are hidden by parking.


Challenges • Distances seem longer than they are due to a lack of consistent and comfortable sidewalks and wayfinding. A low quality walking environment, created by a lack of wayfinding and disconnected sidewalks, increases perceived travel time up to 2.5 - 5 times.*

Case Study: Actual versus perceived time when walking from the Village on 13th to the Columbus Museum Actual travel distance by car: 0.6 miles

Travel time 2-3 minutes.

Actual travel distance by foot: 0.3 miles.

Travel time 6-8 minutes. ?

Perceived travel time by foot: 14 minutes* * research by Lund University Sweden, Janson & Josefsson on perceived travel time vs actual travel time in relation to quality of trip.

A clear pedestrian desire line by Weracoba Creek, connecting to the Village on 13th, identifies a need for pedestrian connectivity.

Top image shows the view from the Columbus Museum to the Village on 13th. The bottom image shows the view from 13th Ave and Warren Williams Road to the Museum.

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01: Even geographically close places seem disconnected and difficult to navigate if you aren’t in a car Opportunities • Between the Civic Commons and Cross Country Plaza there is plenty of space and thousands of visitors, but little activity. This demonstrates untapped potential. • With the proximity between the Library and nearby residential neighborhoods and shopping centers, there is an opportunity to create walking invitations through wayfinding, narrowing roads to shorten crossings and calm traffic, and orienting entrances to nearby streets rather than parking lots.

The Library entrance is oriented to the parking lot, but more invitations to visit the space could be made from Boxwood Boulevard and other nearby streets, especially since desire lines show paths where people would like to walk.

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Key Takeaways

Macon Road is intimidating to pedestrians. More frequent pedestrian crossings and traffic calming are needed to invite people to walk from the Civic Commons to shopping.


Opportunities • The Columbus Public Library has 400,000 visitors a year - about equal to the Columbus population. But only 6 people walk by it an hour! (Less than 1% of all visitors)

Wayfinding, connecting sidewalks, and programming that activate the Civic Commons could inspire more people to walk to the Library and spend time on its grounds.

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02: Streets are not seen as public spaces

Challenges • Streets are designed as arteries for moving vehicles, not as places for people. • A lack of street hierarchy between local and major streets invites cars to move through quickly.

Streets with disconnected sidewalks - or no sidewalks at all - do not invite people to walk, especially children or those with mobility impairments.

A lack of shade and narrow sidewalks adjacent to fast moving vehicles make walking uncomfortable and even scary.

Bus stops create an opportunity to activate the street, but if they lack shade and connections to sidewalks and street crossings, they won’t be appealing.

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Key Takeaways


When Columbus’ streets are turned into public spaces - with seating or activities they become places

Opportunities • Little activity, but a lot of space. Most places are not very sticky, meaning people that walk by don’t feel compelled to stop and spend time. When streets in Columbus are turned into public spaces, this changes. At the weekend lunch hour, four out of five people linger on Broadway - this is when, we can imagine, they feel they have a reason to be there. What would make people want to linger at other times of day?

Broadway & 11th Weekday Lunch Hour

84 pedestrians

Civic Commons Weekday Lunch Hour

68 lingering

5 pedestrians 1 lingering

Broadway at lunch is sticky people feel invited to walk and stay. Civic Commons - without places to sit or walk around - is not.

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03: People want more options to move around than they feel currently exist Challenges • Options to move around without a car are few. • Sidewalks and bike lane networks are disconnected, and in many places non-existent. New lanes are being added and the City is now recognized as a “bronze” level for biking, but current conditions include: non-continuous routes, lack of clarity about where cyclists should be on the road, and lack of shade protecting sidewalks and bike lanes. • Intersections are wide and lack clear pedestrian markings, which can make pedestrians feel exposed to moving traffic. • Bus stops often are separated from connected sidewalks and lack wayfinding, shade, and seating.

Even if one wants to walk, missing sidewalks make doing so a challenge.

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Key Takeaways

Crossing wide streets - such as Macon Road - is difficult when crossings are far apart and confusing to navigate.


It’s hot out here! A lack of quality sidewalk connections and shade make bus stops inaccessible and uncomfortable.

If this road wasn’t closed, this wouldn’t feel safe! A lack of protection makes cycling feel unsafe.

Wide intersections without clear markings create confusion and danger for pedestrians and cyclists.

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03: People want more options to move around than they feel currently exist Opportunities • Columbus residents walk when there are safe and comfortable ways to do so. • In some neighborhoods - like the Broadway area Uptown - there are high quality, wide and even sidewalks that can support walking beyond special events, such as the farmers market.

Higher rates of weekend walking indicate people CHOOSE to walk when they have time & feel invited.

Walking Rates: Weekday and Weekend Average # of pedestrians/hour.

1200

Weekday Weekend

1000

I love getting out of the house!

400

200

Cherokee Ave

600

Broadway

Number of Pedestrians

800

0 Broadway at 11th Street

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Key Takeaways

Lakebottom at Cherokee Avenue

Lexington, KY W Short Street

C No


Opportunities • People want to get out of their cars. We asked: If you could get around just as easily would you switch how you travel?

We asked: What mode of transit do drivers want to switch to? Walk, 2%

Unreported, 15%

Yes, 71%

Unreported, 30%

Bike, 39%

No, 14%

Other, 18% Bus, 11%

When the options to ride are made comfortable via an event or support from the police in calming traffic, people turn out!

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04: When people feel invited, they come

Opportunity • Columbus has great events and beautiful neighborhoods. When these events are held, whether it’s a weekly bike ride or the annual Arts in the Park, people spend more time in public than on non-event days. • Columbus residents love to attend events - they attract more people than normal days - but they also invite more children and young people to walk and spend time in public.

The QUALITY of the built environment - a sense of history, street trees, active frontages that engage, opportunities to people watch - invites people.

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Key Takeaways


30

54 people / hour at 10am

20

30

20

0 3PM

0 1PM

10

10AM

10

8AM

Saturday afternoon event at Cherokee generated a lot of activity

40

46 people / hour at 2pm

2PM

40

50

12PM

Saturday morning Broadway is packed with people

50

60

10AM

60

8AM

Number of people spending time in Uptown and Lakebottom during the day

And PROGRAMS - that turn streets into public spaces and offer something for everyone - invite people too.

Friday night concerts on Broadway

Peach League Opening Day, Lakebottom Park

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Columbus Quality Criteria

A locally defined evaluation tool

Colum

Loca

tion:

Findings from the Favorite Place workshops - the attributes people liked about their favorite places, as well as a set of quality images* - were used to develop local ‘Quality Criteria’.

+ = YES

Findings

# = IN-B

EN

Crite

ria

- = NO

#1 M & Sh icro-Clim ade ate #2 A & Hu ctive, Bu man il Scalet Edges #3 Spo

ntaneo

#4 S Opencenic & A Space ctive #5 C

omfo

rt & S

afety #6 Fa

mily-F riendl y

#7 P & Soceople Wat ial Spa chin g ce

The Columbus Quality Criteria was tested at a second workshop and edited according to feedback.

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uality

ETWE

The Quality Criteria will be a tool to support engagement and planning. It can be used to evaluate current conditions and pilot projects, to generate ideas about how a space could work better, and to engage people in thinking about public space design and activation.

More information about where it will live can be found in the Pilot Projects section.

bus Q

#8 P & Releaceful, axing Quiet #9 A Wal ccess fo Takinking, Cyclir People g Tran ng & sit #10 & LocCultural al Iden Offer tity

*The quality images are a deck of photos representing quality public space, programming and activation examples from around the world. The images serve to inspire and kick-start dialogue.

#11 PlaceInviting s to S With it #12 P eople

& Act

ivitie

s

See Appendix for Columbus Quality Criteria Hand-Outs

us &

Fun


#1 Micro-Climate & Shade

#2 Active, Built Edges & Human Scale

#3 Spontaneous & Fun

#4 Open Space, Scenic & River

#5 Comfort & Safety

#6 Family-Friendly

#9 Connected

#7 People Watching & Social Space

#8 Peaceful & Relaxing

#9 Access, for People Walking, Cycling & Taking Transit

#11 Inviting - With Places to Sit

#12 People & Activities

#10 Cultural Offer

#10 Cultural Offer + Local Identity

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Linking the Four Key Takeaways

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01

Even geographically close places seem disconnected and difficult to navigate if you aren’t in a car.

02

Streets are not seen as public spaces.

03

People want more options to move around than they feel currently exist.

04

When people feel invited, they come.

Strategies


...to the Four Key Strategies

01

Improve connections between destinations and favorite places. Leverage existing qualities to decrease perception of distances.

02

Design streets that invite people to stay - not just move from A to B.

03

Provide more options for how to move around the city that are equally convenient, connected and comfortable.

04

Create more everyday invitations with events and quality buildings and streets.

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04 The Network Plan 46


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Network Plan: Connecting Columbus

Creating a Minimum Grid to realize the four strategies The proposed network plan serves as a starting point for a connected Columbus where people can easily walk, bike or take public transport. The selected streets form an overall network that connects across neighborhoods and between Favorite Places.* The network prioritizes streets that can: • Improve connectivity between destinations and favorite places; • Become places, with enhanced design and programming; • Provide more convenient and comfortable options to move around the city; and • Accommodate everyday invitations to walk, bike or spend time.

Street Typology and Treatment Many of the streets and intersections in the network can benefit from the same types of treatments that can calm traffic and support walking and biking (such as the addition of bike lanes, crosswalks, and sidewalks). Yet it is important to note that all streets need to be studied in their local context, and the unique character of each street should be considered to identify the best possible solution to enhancing options for walking and biking.

RiverWalk

The network should be evaluated and adapted over time, according to future City projects, changes in people’s walking and biking behavior, and changing needs and desires.

Uptown

For all streets, streetscape enhancements should be included. Street greening, lighting, having places to meet and rest, signage and wayfinding are all important factors in creating a more desirable walking and cycling environment.

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Network and Focus Areas

*Smaller, local streets are not integrated in the overall network plan. This does not mean that they are not important or could not potentially be subject for redesign and programming. They should be addressed as the network develops and when they are integral to supporting the network’s expansion. See Focus Area plans 1-5 and pilot projects for how to integrate neighborhood streets.

Broadway

For example, larger streets with higher traffic volumes require a balance that provides safe space for all modes, including high quality connected sidewalks, separated bike lanes and upgraded intersections. Local, neighborhood residential streets, that are narrower, with less space to work with, require a different approach. These solutions may focus on traffic calming with chicanes, narrowed car lanes and upgraded /new crossings and intersections.


CSU

in

lL

Hilton Ave

l Fa

ce ra T e

Civic Commons 5 Points od wo

on ac

13th Street

M

Columbus Museum

11th St. 10th St.

M

Buena Vista Road

Lawyers Lane

oad on R t n n Wy

Boxwood Blvd.

d

a Ro

Rigdon Road

13th Ave

10th Ave

6th Ave

Lin

17th Street

d. Blv

ar

Lu

th

er

Ki

ng

Brown Ave

tin

Jr .B

lvd .

Focus area

1st priority

2nd priority

3rd priority

Path two-way separated Planned

Existing bike lane

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Network Plan: walking and cycling distances

The network plan highlights short- and longdistance connections between and within Uptown and MidTown Improved mobility requires creating a range of invitations to walk, bike or take the bus.These may involve enhanced opportunities to walk within neighborhoods and to bike or walk and/or take the bus between neighborhoods, such as from Uptown to MidTown’s Lakebottom Park. Creating a Minimum Grid is about creating options - some days walking may be more appealing, others biking and still others driving. The overarching purpose of the network plan is to strive for a network where walking, biking, taking the bus, and driving are comfortable, convenient and connected.

1 - 13th Street Connecting people from woods to water, and a few places in between

RiverWalk

Focus Areas The focus areas represent locations that were mentioned the most frequently during workshops and meetings over the past six months, both for their importance as places to connect Favorite Places and the Uptown and MidTown neighborhoods, as well as northern and southern parts of MidTown (such as across Macon or Buena Vista roads). They help identify major destinations and connection points that bridge places and communities. They were selected to help identify the most strategic locations for pilot projects. They are:

Uptown

5m

2 - Civic Commons Creating fine grain connections between major civic assets

4 - Columbus Museum Activating the streets with arts and culture 5 - Buena Vista Connecting people to Favorite Places and workplaces

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Network and Focus Areas

Broadway

3 - Uptown Connecting the public life of Uptown and activity along the RiverWalk


ce ra T e

in

lL

Hilton Ave

l Fa

Civic Commons 5 Points

17th Street 5 min

5 min

M

Buena Vista Road

10th St.

M

10 min

Ro

ar

5 min

Lu

th

er

Ki

ng

Jr .B

lvd .

Plan for separated bike lanes

Plan for other types of traffic calming

10 min

Brown Ave

tin

Lawyers Lane

Columbus Museum

5 min ad

Boxwood Blvd.

on ac

a Ro

Rigdon Road

d

5 min 10 min ynnton W

11th St.

10 min

10 min

13th Street

10 min

5 min

10 min

13th Ave

L

ood inw

d. Blv

10th Ave

6th Ave

min

CSU

Red circles - walking distances

Black circles - cycling distances

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13th Street Focus Area

– Connecting people from woods to water

In workshops and surveys people said they wanted more choices for how to travel between Uptown - an entertainment and recreation hub - and MidTown - a residential area with Lakebottom Park at its heart. At the center of this focus area is a protected cycle lane along 13th Street. But this new lane will need to be supported with shade, calmer intersections and more active open spaces along the route.

Connecting to Linwood Blvd.

Improve wayfinding to Broadway and RiverWalk from 13th Street with signage, paving or street markings.

Upgrade sidewalks according to desire lines and improve connections to Warren Williams Rd.

Connecting and Columb

10th Ave

6th Ave

5th Ave

1 St. Ave

Broadway

12th St.

13th Street Bridge

W ar

re n

W

ill

iam

sR d

11th St.

Connecting to 11th/12th St. and Wynnton Rd/MLK

A Multi-Modal Street - balance space between driving, walking, and biking by clearly designating space for all modes. - create protected cycling facilities along the road, especially on the bridge.

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Network and Focus Areas

A Shadier Street (not that kind of shady!) - provide shade and greenery along 13th Street to make walking or biking more pleasant.


Cherok ee Ave

Create high quality bus stops with seating, shade and pedestrian connections.

Weraco ba

Activate the sidewalk and improve access to to 5 Points and Fall Line Trace the Piggly Wiggly bus State University Parking Lot, the Village on 13th, and the parks.

Creek

Concept Diagram Utilize green area in front of Wynnton Towers for neighborhood pocket park, play, exercise, dog walking.

Safer crossing between Macon Rd & Lawyers Lane. on ac

Rd

M

13th Ave

Lakebottom Park

ck aco Pe Ave

The Village on 13th

ton

nn

Wy

Rd

Dinglewood Park Connecting to Brown Avenue

Bue

na V

Access to the Columbus Museum

ista

Priority Pilots Areas Priority intersections

Rd

Local intersections Public functions

Calmer Intersections - prioritize more vulnerable travelers, such as walkers and cyclists, and ensure they have the right of way.

Active Open Spaces - create opportunities to stay and to invite people along in open spaces adjacent to the street, such as Piggly Wiggly and at the Village on 13th.

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Auburn Ave

Civic Commons Focus Area – Creating fine grain connections between major civic assets Wouldn’t it be nice to walk to lunch? Or to safely enter the Library from the bus stop on Rigdon Road? People told us they want to walk from the Citizens Service Center to Cross Country Plaza - they know it’s technically close, but they don’t feel it’s safe or convenient to do so. Connecting the Civic Commons focuses on making it easier and more inviting to cross Macon Road and to access and spend time at some of Columbus’ most loved places, such as the Library and the Aquatic Center.

Publix Super Market

ntry Hill Cross Cou

Cross Country Plaza

C

C

MidTown Shopping Center

Improve the waiting experience and walk to and from bus stops

C

Create a protected bike lane on Rigdon Road

17th St.

Connecting to / Lakebottom Park C

C

C

d

C

Ri

M

gd

on

Playground

Rd .

Columbus Aquatic Center

. lvd

on ac

a Ro

Columbus Public Library

dB

Calm traffic on Macon Road with a green median.

City of Columbus Citizen Services Building

oo xw Bo

Improve pedestrian crosswalks and connections at Macon Road, Boxwood Boulevard and between places, such as the Library and playground and Government Center and popular lunch restaurants by connecting sidewalks, crosswalks, bus stops and destinations.

Connecting to Lindsey Creek Neighborhood

Connecting to the Columbus Museum and Uptown Activate under-used green and open spaces, such as the Library’s front lawn (“Wednesday Night Market.” or MidTown PopUp shops.). Enhance the micro-climate with trees and plantings in medians and on sidewalks.

Connecting to South MidTown / 8th St and Buena Vista Rd

Create wayfinding between key destinations and bus stops.

Priority priority pilot areas

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Network and Focus Areas

Priority intersections

Public functions

Local intersections

Bus stops


Concept Diagram

Invite Columbus Outside - use the large, open green spaces to bring cultural offerings outside and activate the lawns. - build on the high visibility of the area to host movie screenings or markets.

Shaded Streets - sidewalks are only one invitation to walk - but without shade and a pleasant look they may not be more appealing than a car. Greenery can help to provide shade, and also reduce exposure to noise from traffic and reduce the perceived waiting time at bus stops.

Connected Crossings - Major destinations are on either side of Macon Road - and mile-wise they are close together, but crossings needs to be made more direct and convenient to connect these places.

Quality Bus Stops provide information, seating and ensure access to bus stops for all user groups.

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Uptown Focus Area – Connecting the public life of Uptown and activity along the River

Bring the RiverWalk into Uptown by creating more bike ramps at more intersections, such as 12th Street. Build on the Path Foundation connections to 14th St.

5th Ave

1st Ave

Broadway

Connecting to 14th St Pedestrian Bridge

Riv erW alk

Connect the Path Foundations bike lanes to 13th St.

C

Connecting to Phenix City

C

Connecting to Linwood Blvd & 17th St

Support and build on existing public life and activity / bring into more side streets, by improving wayfinding, calming intersections and connecting pedestrian amenities on places such as 11th and 12th Streets. Create bike lanes on 12th and 11th Streets for more MidTown connections and to 6th Avenue bike lane.

6th Ave

The RiverWalk and Broadway between 10th and 12th Street were some of the most frequently mentioned Favorite Places. While they are physically close together it’s not clear how to move between the two - especially if you’re new to Columbus. This pilot focuses on connecting these two assets while also expanding the public life they support into more of Uptown.

Connecting to Midtown via 13th St

PHILLY-osopy

C

12th St

Freeze Frame Yogurt Shoppe

11th St

C

Iron Bank Coffee Co

Connecting to Phenix City

Riverside Theatre Complex

Springer Opera House

Connecting to Wynnton Rd via 11th St

Connecting to Martin Luther King Blvd

RiverCenter for the Performing Arts

Connecting to South Broadway

Connecting to South Broadway

Priority priority pilot areas

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Network and Focus Areas

Priority intersections

Local intersections

Cultural institutions

Priority access points


Concept Diagram

Know Your Way - Expand the life generated by Uptown’s cultural and recreational assets beyond Broadway and the River, and into the side streets throughout the district.

Access with Ease people bike and walk in Uptown to get to the River, but where to enter, especially with a bike, is unclear. Provide clearer, more direct access points between the RiverWalk and Uptown.

The Playful City - bring the playfulness of the RiverWalk into the streets of Uptown. People travel from across the region to enjoy the Riverfront - how can they also be invited to enjoy Uptown?

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The Columbus Museum Focus Area

– Activating the streets with arts and culture

Connecting to 5 Points Linwood Blvd., 17th St. and Fall Line Trace / CSU

13th Ave

The Columbus Museum is at the intersection of so many things - residential communities, a commercial shopping area with a large grocery store, and Dinglewood Park. To the south, it connects to busy Wynnton Road. Yet if one does not know about the Museum, it could be missed. This intervention is about bringing the culture from inside the Museum, outside to 13th Avenue and the surrounding area as a way to activate the street and improve walkability.

Connecting to Lakebottom Park

Piggly Wiggly

13th

Connecting to 13th St Bridge & Uptown Area

St.

MidTown Coffee House

Dinglewood Park

The Village on 13th

Dinglewood Historic District

d

Connecting to Linwood Blvd. en rr

a W

i

W

s

m

a lli

a Ro

Warren Williams Community

nton

Wyn The Columbus Museum

C

Rd

Buen

a Vis ta Rd

10th Ave

Connecting to Uptown Area

Connect the museum to the north by enhancing the path on the hill and improving access from Buena Vista and 13th Ave / Leverage the trees and topography... could there be a slide down the hill? / Create opportunity to bring Columbus Museum offer outside. Connect the Museum and the Park with sidewalks and wayfinding.

Priority priority pilot areas

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Network and Focus Areas

C

Connect the Museum the other Favorite Places and neighborhoods. Pedestrian and Bike Connectivity & bus shelters. Simplify / reorganize parking on Bradley Drive and Buena Vista Road to make space for cycling and walking and to improve safety .

Priority intersections

Cultural institutions

Improve pedestrian environment by connecting sidewalks, crosswalks, and bus stops, such as at 13th Avenue between 13th Street, Warren Williams Road and Buena Vista Road / the Museum. Close the slip lane and create a public plaza. Sidewalk connectivity on Wynnton Road.

Local intersections

Priority access points

Con Wyn

Conn e South Vietn am Mem ori


Concept Diagram

Follow the Desire! prioritize sidewalk extensions where there are clear desire lines between destinations, such as along 13th Ave between Warren Williams Road and 13th Street.

Streets as Places use the great arts and culture in the museum to activate the surrounding streets as places, and create space to show art outside.

to ting nnec Rd n nnto

ecting to MidTo wn / m Vet er ial Pa ans rk

Creative Connections and Art Outside - create fun ways to interact with the museum and enter or exit, such as with a slide down the hill on the north side; and re-purpose open spaces around the museum as places to view and experience art.

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Buena Vista Road Focus Area Buena Vista Road is a link between North and South Columbus, and a connector of parks, businesses and major employers, such as Aflac. Yet when not in a car, these places feel far apart. This pilot intervention is about following the desire lines of where people travel and creating more direct and visible connections to local shops, Veterans Memorial Park and major employers. These changes may create opportunities for businesses and employers to a have a more visible presence.

– Connecting people to Favorite Places and workplaces

High quality bus stops with seating and shade.

Calm traffic at Wynnton and Buena Vista with sidewalk connectivity and public art and greenery at the triangle. Echo the fountain park at the triangle to the SE.

Improve sidewalk continuity and connectivity. C

Connect destinations and enhance or create new crosswalks between the park, church, Piggly Wiggly and bar-b-q restaurant with sidewalk connectivity and traffic calming (Britt Avenue and Buena Vista and Buena Vista near park).

Create a high quality cyclists’ lane along Buena Vista Road. Partner with a business to improve end of trip facilities, with bike parking, showers and other facilities. Investigate potential for new use of vacant lots and green areas along the street. Use for community activities or for new buildings in order to create more activity and more destinations.

Connecting to Columbus Museum and the Village on 13th oad ton R

Wynn

Connecting to Wynnton Road

C

Family Dollar

yA ve n

Part parking part park

Cathedral of Prayer COGIC

ue

Aflac Aflac main entrance

Connecting to Macon Road

Brown Avenue

Aflac

Daycare Piggly Wiggly

He

nr

C

Veterans Memorial Park C

Wynnton Pit BBQ & Diner

Baldw

Lawyers Lane

Connecting to Martin Luther Jr. Boulevard

Connecting to Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard

Priority priority pilot areas

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Network and Focus Areas

Priority intersections

Local intersections

Community functions and businesses

Bus stops

Wynn Bapt


Concept Diagram

Options to Walk or Bike to Work or to Run Errands - enhance crossings by following pedestrian desire lines and commuter behavior, and thereby making people not in cars more visible on the street.

win Street

Employer Partnerships and End of Trip Facilities - partner with Aflac to support people who walk or bike to work by providing clear bike parking or places to wash-up after one’s commute.

Connecting to Rigdon Road

nton Hill tist Church

Connecting to Rigdon Road and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

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Network Plan and Focus Area Workshop

Public feedback Community feedback has been crucial to this project. Gehl has been fortunate to hear from so many engaged stakeholders, from the 130 who attended the first March workshop to the 40 who volunteered to survey and collect data, to the hundreds who helped prioritize where to focus and develop pilot projects in September. This feedback helps to understand how people want to travel, what the Minimum Grid should look like, and the long-term vision for a more connected Columbus. The feedback summarized here was collected at two September workshops - one in Lakebottom Park and one at the Citizens Service Center - to discuss the network plan and preliminary focus areas. Community comments helped identify where the pilot projects should be developed and how they can be used to test components of the Minimum Grid in Columbus.

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Network and Focus Areas

Columbus stakeholders placed sticky notes on the draft network and shared their ideas about where to develop pilots.


PEOPLE TOLD US THEY WANT ... to walk and bike in a nice and safe environment ... better connections between destinations, and wayfinding to guide them ... programming in public spaces with events, activities, art and culture

54%

of the most frequently mentioned comments were about moving around, by foot, bike or public transportation

25%

of the most frequently mentioned comments had to do with the hardware of the streets - such as trees, benches, lights and general aesthetics

21%

of the most frequently mentioned comments involved software - such as general programming of the public spaces for activities and events

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Public Feedback: Network Plan and Focus Areas Workshop

Walking and Biking

54% of the comments were about moving around, by foot, bike or public transportation

“Wide bike paths feel safer”

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Network and Focus Areas

“More signs directing pedestrians”


Street design (hardware)

25% were about the hardware of the streets - such as pedestrians crossings, trees, benches, & lights

“Consider shade in all pedestrian designs”

“Shade at bus stops, and crosswalks that connect to them”

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Public Feedback: Network Plan and Focus Areas Workshop

Programming & Events (software)

21% were about software programming, activities and events

“A unique/singular art installation”

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Network and Focus Areas

“More events!”


Most frequently mentioned locations Network Plan Overall

Uptown Focus Area

01 The Viaduct Calls for a safer pedestrian and cyclist environment.

01 The RiverWalk Better connectivity and more options for dining and retail.

02 13th Street and 13th Avenue Calls for enhanced streetscape with active retail.

02 10th Street / RiverCenter More programming outside the RiverCenter.

03 Lakebottom Park to the Village on 13th St Calls for better connections for pedestrians and cyclists.

03 Side streets Improved streetscapes to extend the network of Uptown. Columbus Museum Focus Area

13th Street Focus Area 01 The Viaduct to 13th Avenue A safer pedestrian and cyclist environment. 02 13th St and 13th St by the shops Enhanced streetscape with active retail. 03 Lakebottom to the Village on 13th St Better connections for pedestrians and cyclists. Civic Commons Focus Area

01 The Museum Grounds Open the back of the Museum with an entrance & activities. 02 Old Bradley Library Make better use of area around the building. Activate the site. 03 Path through Dinglewood Park Connections for bicyclists and pedestrians from 13th Street.

01 The Library and library greens More openness and better use of the Library’s Buena Vista Road Focus Area outdoor space. 01 Veterans Memorial Park Better use of the open spaces along the street. 02 Macon Road Safer crosswalks. 02 Buena Vista Road Streetscape improvements: sidewalks and 03 Civic Commons aesthetics. Increased accessibility and more programming. 03 Buena Vista Road Enhance the green areas along the road.

See Appendix for details

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05 Pilot Projects

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Pilot Projects in Columbus

The hundreds of comments shared at the Focus Area workshops helped identify opportunities for pilot projects to test out Columbus’ vision and support the long-term implementation of the Minimum Grid.

The Pilot Project Pilot projects - which can be implemented and tested by the City, MidTown, Inc. and civic partners - can help to reduce barriers between citizens and decision makers and make the City’s goals to improve the public realm more tangible. Pilots vary in scale, time-frame and typology, but in all cases they are a way to test new solutions at a 1:1 scale out in the streets and public spaces. This 1:1 scale invites residents and business owners of Columbus to engage in the process of changing the City and to experience their streets as public spaces. Pilots help to continue building momentum and demonstrating how the project aims to improve quality of life for all in Columbus. The type, time-frame and level of investment for a pilot depends on the project goals and success criteria. To ensure project success, a high level of maintenance should be provided throughout the test period. A pilot project with broken furniture and worn off paint can easily have the opposite of the intended effect and attract negative attention. Pilots can also be leveraged with City and other initiatives to improve connectivity. Measure, Test, Refine Pilot projects have proven to be strong political tools for decision making, as they directly show how changes to the public realm affect city life. They start in areas where public life has been measured and baseline information has been gathered. This baseline information informs what the test should look like. The test then can be measured again, against the baseline, to understand impact. Findings from this analysis then inform how to refine the pilot for a second iteration or for a more permanent installation. Data collection should happen before and after pilot implementation.

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects

1 / Measure

1 / Measure

Collect baseline public life information

International example SĂŁo Paulo Pilot

US example The Porch, Philadelphia


Approach e

tes t

n refi

2 / Test

2 / Test Do before and after tests

3 / Refine

3 / Refine Reimagine the design, based on evaluation of tests

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Different Approaches to Piloting Change

City Facilitated / User Generated: Community groups or residents generate a pilot project, which can help ensure a strong sense of ownership. This model requires an engaged community that can help with implementation and maintenance. For project types such as the Prototyping Festival and Open Streets, the long-term impact is less transparent. City Led / City Designed: The City leads the pilot project. Infrastructural changes, new uses of road space, and changes to intersections, for example, need to be studied, designed and carried out in a proper manner to prevent unsafe situations. The City can also take the lead on implementing new spaces and activities in an area. In both cases, informing the public is important, and both passive and active civic engagement can be a part of the project. No matter which type of project - whether City facilitated or City led - the pilot can serve as a platform for citizen engagement and a more democratic approach to public space design.

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects

ga ge En

This diagram describes six different types of pilot project interventions, from short- to long-term, from ‘City Facilitated and User Generated’ to ‘City Led and Designed.’ Each type has pros and cons, listed in short in the diagram, but what they each share is a prioritization of people. All the project types require a level of city and citizen engagement that varies from facilitation to leading design and implementation. Despite the simplicity of some of the pilot types, they all require elaborate pre-implementation planning.

City Facilitated / User Generated R Ba em rr ove ie rs

Varying levels of city and civic investment

Prototyping Festival

Open Streets

Ten to 50 user created interactive prototype interventions in public space.

Street closed for vehicles and open for active leisure and recreation.

Civic engagement 1:1 - Short term and intense - Encouraged to think differently about the city’s street and squares

- Reimagine the streets - 3 - 12 Sundays, i.e.

Requirements - Award money - City permits - Active citizenry Involved - Shop owners - Artist, organizations, everyone

Requirements - Police / Fire department permitting - Active citizen engagement / volunteers Involved: - DOT - Transportation advocates - Private stakeholders and businesses

- Quick wins - Experimental Nature - Test new ideas

- Quick wins - High visibility - Can support citywide initiatives

- Long term impact unknown - Targeted involvement - Experimenting - Usability, audience

- Targeted involvement


Ap pl y

City Led / Designed

In fo r

m

In ve st

Investment / Permanence

Parklet Program

NYC Plaza Program

Our City

Pilot as Best Practice

Parking spaces converted to people spaces.

Repurpose and redesign road bed as public space.

City identifies opportunities to quickly implement test projects.

- Bundle of permits to deliver parklet

- City pays for initial implementation - Community groups apply and manage maintenance

- Identify quick wins

City identifies opportunities to make permanent changes and tests them with a pilot.

Requirements - Private funds - Design approval, parklet manual - Public outreach Involved: - Community organizations - Local businesses - DOT

- Open for all - Simple, recognizable - Applicable in variety of contexts - Involvement, ownership, stewardship - Small scale, but scalable - Mostly business owners apply - Space perceived as private - Little diversity in program - Formalized, restricted

Requirements - City funds - Design / furnishing palette - Public outreach - Community funds Involved: - Community / Neighborhood groups - Local businesses - DOT

Requirements - Open dialogue / Public outreach - Open process / Informative - Local stakeholder buy in - City staff guidance Involved: - City led - Carefully selected partners - All citizens can test

- Identify potential for long term change Requirements - City funds - Open process / Inform - Local stakeholder buy in - City staff guidance - Design team Involved: - City led - DOT - Carefully selected partners - Designers

- Community engagement - Recognizable - Targeted

- PS/PL synergy - Lead the way to permanent change - Showcase priority

- PS/PL synergy - Showcase priority - Display best practice

- Requires community capacity and money to maintain and operate - Day to day management - Only organizations can apply - Application process - Formalized, restricted

- Ownership - Public engagement - Day to day management

- Ownership - Public engagement - Cost - Time frame

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Measuring the Impact of Pilot Projects

Evaluate and Learn Pilots are tests to inform and support long-term planning and visions. Evaluation of the project and the process taken to get to implementation is essential. Questions organizers of pilots should ask include: How does it perform? Does it meet the project goals? Are adaptations necessary? Interventions should be evaluated from two different perspectives: 1. City perspective: • Focus on learning: What works and what doesn’t? What issues (positive and negative) arise from implementation? Which stem from the planning process? Are they design or program related? What opportunities (partners, usage of space, spin-off activities) popped-up that weren’t expected? 2. User perspective: • Focus on experience: How does this impact my everyday routine? What’s in it for me? How can I better see that the public sector has my interest in mind? Where/How/When is it possible for me to have a say in these pilots? The evaluation findings can then be used to adapt the pilot interventions, as well as to inform other projects in the city. Evaluation can be done in close partnership with civic and educational organizations, such as the local university.

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects


Indicators: Performance Metrics and Evaluation Tools Statistics • Reduction of traffic injuries • More public transportation user Observational analysis • Increase in pedestrian activity? • Increase in people on bikes? • More people lingering? • Greater variety of activities? Qualitative analysis • Quality Criteria Improvements? • More active frontages? • New functions? Intercept survey • New social encounters? • Stronger sense of community? • Higher feeling of safety? • New ‘Favorite Places’ emerged? Engagement • Spontaneous programs happen? • Social media increase? Use the Columbus Quality Criteria to assess and evaluate existing places subject for change as well as future projects to come.

Columbus Quality Criteria Location:

+ = YES # = IN-BETWEEN - = NO

#1 Micro-Climate & Shade

#2 Active, Built Edges & Human Scale

#3 Spontaneous & Fun

#4 Scenic & Active Open Space

#5 Comfort & Safety

#6 Family-Friendly

#7 People Watching & Social Space

#8 Peaceful, Quiet & Relaxing

#9 Access for People Walking, Cycling & Taking Transit

#10 Cultural Offer & Local Identity

#11 Inviting - With Places to Sit

#12 People & Activities

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Pilot Projects

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1

From Woods to Water on 13th Street

2

Connecting neighborhood assets around 13th Avenue

3

Connecting civic assets at the Civic Commons

Next Steps and Pilot Projects


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From Woods to Water on 13th Street

1

Create a safe, inviting environment for people to walk and bike on 13th Street and that enhances connectivity between the RiverWalk, Uptown, the Village on 13th and Lakebottom Park - with the possibility of extending all the way to Civic Commons. Key elements for safety and enjoyment: • Protected bike lane with buffer • Wider sidewalk • Narrowed intersections • Shade • Green • Invitations to sit • Art • Lighting • Vista points on bridge • Activations of dead facades

A more enjoyable trip for all! More space for walking and cycling. Remove a lane on both sides of the street; allow for sidewalk widening bike lanes with a wide buffer.

Trees in moveable planters. Provide shade, beauty, and traffic calming.

Wider sidewalk. The added sidewalk is painted on. App. 1.5 - 3 feet.

13TH STREET

Wide buffer. A combination of pavement marking and actual spatial dividers. App. 1.5 - 3 feet.

Traffic volumes today - a study conducted by URS for the City of Columbus in 2014 found that the city streets,

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects

Bike lane. Painted all the way or simply marked with bike icons. App. 6 feet wide.

RAILWAYS

overall, have a capacity ratio that exceeds the traffic volumes. *The segment between 10th and 11th Ave could potentially become a critical point if a lane is removed. Here we suggest narrowing the existing lanes

Viewpoints. Allow for vistas to the rail yard and the city panorama; add seating.

and adding a narrow bike lane. On the rest of the street we suggest testing the removal of a full lane on either side, or one lane and re-striping, allowing space for central turning lanes. Source: Alternative Transportation Study page 13.


Bike lanes. Mark bike lane through intersection to enhance safety.

NO RIGHT TURN ON RED

WAREHOUSE

10TH AVE

WAREHOUSE

Opportunity area. Activate the corner and use existing shade; add seating.

Activate facade. Add art / info-graphics to wall to enhance experience.

VACANT

Extend treatment to 13th Avenue

HISTORIC BUILDING

NO RIGHT TURN ON RED

VACANT

13TH STREET NO RIGHT TURN ON RED

VACANT

DINER

P

10TH AVE

Corner extensions. Shorten pedestrian street crossings; mark area clearly, such as with bollards.

NO RIGHT TURN ON RED

P

HARD WARE SHOP

Opportunity area. Outdoor seating near restau- P rant.

Re-striping - to not take out two full lanes*, a road re-striping is suggested on this segment, still allowing for bike lanes with a buffer stone. Place trees in planters on sidewalks instead of in buffer zone.

Bike lane. Painted or marked with bike icons. App. 4.5 feet wide, including buffer. 1:600

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From Woods to Water on 13th Street - The Pilot How to start? Open Streets • Kick start the process with an ‘Open Streets’ program, that changes the street layout with moveable items and wash-away paint. • Help people see the street differently, even if just on a temporary basis. • Get started right away, without all investment needed for long-term change, to allow for a faster process and one that helps people visualize future changes. The Open Streets should be accompanied by positive campaigning that: • Encourages people to share the road; and • Creates opportunities for people to engage in the design and planning process

13th Street becomes a space for all!

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects

1


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From Woods to Water on 13th Street - The Pilot Short term changes lead to long term changes. The pilot project serves as a test for how a permanent street redesign could function. Space division can be scaled accordingly and adapted to the road width available in the different sections of 13th street.

13th Street Bridge - A Place!

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects

1


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From Woods to Water on 13th Street - The Village

1

The Village on 13th is a Favorite Place in Columbus. Many functions are in close proximity, but are not convenient to walk between. Changes to the street surface can visually and physically enhance connecting the two sides of the street, slow traffic speeds and invite for cycling and walking. In addition, providing safer street crossings, places to sit, and places to wait for the bus can encourage businesses to open up towards the street and further enhance the area as a place. At this particular segment of 13th street the road can become a shared surface area, with a safe zone for pedestrians. Or another option is to remove a lane, and re-stripe and add bike lanes - see yellow line on plan.

P

A neighborhood meeting place! SLOW DOWN

SALON

Encourage shop owners to open up towards 13th Street.

P

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects

NT

RESTAURA

CAFE


Share the road. Mark the street with temporary materials. Enhance neighborhood node and calm traffic.

P

Bus stop. On street bus stop with shade and seating on edges of existing planters.

Opportunity area. Add seating on public and private property and shade elements along planter beds.

Enhance the pedestrian crossing. Add sidewalks along 13th St. and Warren Williams Road. Extend sidewalks to side streets.

Opportunity area. Add features (play, seats) to Dinglewood Park. Connect to future trail to Lakebottom Park.

P

P

BUS

SLOW DOWN

BUS STOP

SHOPS & RESTAURANTS/DINERS DINGLEWOOD PARK

P

WERACOBA CREEK

Bike lanes and re-striping. Another option for this segment of 13th Street is to remove a lane and re-stripe e.g. yellow lines on diagram. This will provide traffic calming without creating a shared surface.

1:600

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Connecting neighborhood assets around 13th Avenue Key elements - Higher quality local walking connections - Traffic calming on local streets - Invitations to linger in relation to existing assets, such as Weracoba Creek - High quality waiting experience for bus riders - Temporary closing of ‘slip-lane’ - Midway Drive by The Village. Weekend / event related.

EYE WEAR

SIGN

Streets as public spaces!

2

T

AN VAC

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Next Steps and Pilot Projects


13TH ST BUS

BUS STOP

Add zebra crossings.

P

P P

13TH AVE

Pedestrian islands. Enhance crossing near desire lines.

BUS

R

P MARKET

T

E AG

R GA

YD WA D I M

AN VAC

ICE

OFF

SM

K LOC

BUS STOP

Crossing. Pull sidewalk across side street.

NT

ITH

T AN VAC

LIQUOR STORE

Opportunity area. ‘Pop-up’ plaza.

P Bus stop. Add seating, shade; visibility.

A VAC

Street greening. Trees in planters at 13 Ave.

P

LLER

JEWE

P

BUS

Activate corner. Add artistic elements, seating and shade to link to the K Museum and the EE R C Creek. A

B CO A R

D

E

W

BUS STOP

T

OUTSIDE GARDEN NURSERY

GARDEN NURSERY

N & BANNERS SHOP

EN

A

I LL

I

W

R MS

RR WA

P

Upgrade sidewalks W . Low cost solution: level SLO N DOW and stamp to create even out unpaved areas surface; add small ramps in asphalt by zebra crossings to improve access. Medium cost: add epoxy gravel to create hard, even surface. High cost: add sidewalks, with paving stones and access ramps at zebra crossings.

SHOP

P

ITURE

Continue fencing enhancements. Around the back side / Old - Garden Center on the corner - make the fence green. Potential partner for adding planters to the 13th Street ‘Pop-Up’ Plaza?

Upgrade intersection. Re-stripe the zebra crossings. FURN

Traffic calming. Narrow the road with chicanes.

SLOW DOWN

Traffic calming. Narrow road with chicanes to reduce vehicle speeds

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Connecting neighborhood assets around 13th Avenue The Pilot Short term changes lead to long term changes. The pilot project is a test for how a permanent street redesign could function. Short term: start with the corner and intersection at 13th Avenue and Warren Williams Drive. Upgrade the zebra crossings, add ramps for universal access and even out the surface for pedestrians where there are missing sidewalks. Follow pedestrian desire lines. Add trees in planters for a more pleasant walking environment. Upgrade the bus stop with seating and shade and orient it in relation to the creek bridge and corner of Warren Williams. Create a mental link to the Museum with an art installation. Long term: a neighborhood with connected sidewalks, traffic calmed streets, clear connections to civic assets, such as the Museum, the Creek and local shops, and high quality bus stops.

This place is made for walking! And waiting for transit, relaxing and socialising!

88

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

2


Gehl Studio

89


Connecting civic assets on Civic Commons Make Civic Commons a connected, walkable place to shop and spend time. Create a clear, fun, inviting walkway to the Library from Macon Road and Boxwood Boulevard, and across the lawns, or with trees or public art. Key elements: - Traffic calming to improve walkability between the Library and Cross Country Plaza at Citizens Way - Pedestrian crossing & traffic calming at Macon Road and Boxwood Boulevard, between Civic Commons and MidTown Shopping Center. - Bus stop enhancement and improved walkability and bikeability to the Library, from Boxwood Boulevard, Macon Road and Citizens Way - Programming and activation of the Library lawn and entry area

3

90

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

Walking in Civic Commons is great!


’S ZAXBY

P ON AC

Q

S

Y’ TR

BB

M

K

N BA

UN

RD

N BA

CO

AU

BU

RN

SY EA AK E SP

Sidewalks. Continuous sidewalks, across sidestreets and parking lots.

AV E

Improve intersection. Restripe crossings, add pedestrian islands and curb P extensions.

P ’S

M

JI

Add pedestrian P Islands in turning lanes.

Y

M

Make a clear, fun, inviting walkway to the Library from Macon Rd. and Boxwood Boulevard, across the lawns, such as with trees or public art. K

HN

JO

/ G IN S PP ET O L SH UT O

BUS

Opportunity Area. Create a Library entrance. Pedestrian islands. For safer crossing

ON

S GA

ON AC

I AT ST

P

Connected sidewalks on Boxwood Boulevard and bike lanes to connect to 17th Street.

RD

M

Improve bus stops. Add shade, info, and playful elements to enhance wait

BUS

P

RY

RA

LIB

U AQ

Traffic calming. Mark areas connecting across Citizens Way.

Less grooming. Turn areas ‘back to nature’. Variety!

VD BL

P

D OO XW BO

E GE CO TY US UN OLS M CO O H SC

P

C

I AT CE R

E NT

Treat as local street. Shared surface; pedestrians first!

P

Add Zebra Crossing. Investigate options for improving the pedestrian connection across Macon Road at Citizens Way.

Active Edges. In the long-term, build along the edges to connect buildings to the street and sidewalk. If possible introduce a mix of functions.

Opportunity Area. Activate the area in front of Library with seating and events, and playful elements.

250ft. PLAYGROUND

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91


Connecting civic assets at Civic Commons - The Pilot Understand use and user needs: Conduct follow-up observational studies to better understand how people move in the area: • Partner with the Library and other groups in the area to understand daily user patterns. • Study how and where people walk in the area. The follow-up study will help guide and focus the pilot project and where to start making better walking connections.

Build partnerships to host events: Identify a local partner (could be the Library or other) to host events on the lawn that invites people to spend time outside in the area. • METRA and a local artist could be partners to improve the waiting situation at existing bus stops. • Trees Columbus could be a partner by adding trees that make the lawns more human scale and outline walking paths. • Start small and invite citizens to participate and take ownership. • Local partners could help with other wayfinding elements: • Seating • Shade • Bike parking • Signage • Lighting ...and other features that create a more enjoyable environment for pedestrians and an identity for the area.

This place is made for walking! AND for relaxing, reading, playing or socializing!

92

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

3


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93


Connecting civic assets at Civic Commons Imagine that...

Today

little to do or look at while waiting for the bus...

...and a lot of inactive open space, despite well visited destinations.

Tomorrow

Start with swings! Invite people to sit.

Defined space and walkways with seating.

The Porch at 30th Street Station in Philadelphia 94

Next Steps and Pilot Projects


Small Interventions Build Buzz! User Feedback_Instagram photos

The swings are amazing I have been raving about them to everyone i know!

The Porch Swings in Philly. I love this city!

Morning coffee on The Porch.

‘The best kind of friend is the kind you can sit on a porch and swing with, never say a word, and then walk away feeling like it was the best conversation you’ve ever had.’

#theporchswings

#theporchat30th Gehl Studio

95


Pilot Project Road Map

Principles for selecting the first pilot projects and how to get started With many different types of pilot project opportunities available, it is important to evaluate which ones can best achieve the minimum grid and connectivity goals. The following principles help to choose where to start and ensure pilots relate to the key strategies and longterm vision for a Connected Core Community. Go to the People: • Start with where people are. • Identify how visible and usable it will be. Determine Interest: • Start where stakeholders are engaged. Leverage • Start where the City or other stakeholders are already working. Be Visible: • Start with what people can see and experience, and can have an impact. Be Adaptable: • Start with places that can adapt over time based on changes to adjacent land use or volumes of users. Long-Term Perspective: • Start with projects that can display long-term visions and show best practice solutions. Diversity: • Support a socioeconomically diverse range of stakeholders and residents.

96

Next Steps and Pilot Projects


1. Project Process Project Kick-Off Workshop Exchange platform

Pilot Project Design

Pilot Project Testing

Process ideas

Implementation

1st month

Process up to November 2015

Pilot Project Evaluation Lessons learned

Pilot Project Refining Alterations/additions

2nd / 3rd month

4th / 6th month

2.a From Water to Woods on 13th Street

2.a Connecting Neighborhood Assets around 13th Avenue

2.a Connecting Civic Assets on Civic Commons Involve key stakeholders Launch event

2.b Outreach

Evaluate pilot, Follow up survey, quality with stakecriteria etc. holders, key Invite for and new events

Follow up with stakeholders, key and new

Add/change pilot according to evaluation

campaigning, informing The three projects can be developed and implemented simultaneously or one by one, depending on funding, management capacity and stakeholders. The process for each pilot is the same.

Next Steps: Lessons Learned 3. Expand the network Project Kick-Off Workshop

Pilot Project Design

Pilot Project Testing

Pilot Project Evaluation

Pilot Project Refining

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97


Best Practice - Learning from...

Embarcadero Pilot Plaza in San Francisco Floor

Seating, greening and play

Latex painted hexagon floor

98

Hexagon seating element and planter box combined

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

Playful elements for interaction


Custom seating elements and planter boxes

The pilot plaza was initiated by the Exploratorium to activate the underused space outside their long-term temporary facility on the San Francisco harborfront. The plaza created a meeting place - both functional and playful - that linked the exhibits in the museum to the space outside the walls of the building. Designed by Rebar / Gehl Studio Components and cost (Bid) • Decking Labor $34,000 • Decking Materials $11,500 • Painting Labor $3,250 • Painting Materials $2,000 • Circles Labor $4,500 • Circles Materials $300 Total $55,550 Not including delivery of trees to site, cleaning of surface and other maintenance, hexagon shape templates. Hardware for the circles. Taking community labor into account - painting surface. Additional service bid $20,000 App. 6,000 ft2

Circles, seating and play element

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99


Best Practice - Learning from...

SĂŁo Paulo, Pilot Projects - Two new meeting places Largo Paissandu

Before

Seating and Shade

100

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

After

Play equipment

Container for storage

Citizen engagement activities


São Paulo Part 1 - Continues on the following page...

The pilot projects were initiated by the city of São Paulo and brought to life through a series of workshops with City staff across municipal departments. The goals of the project were to create the foundation for a more active city life in downtown São Paulo and to change the city planning focus to a more people-oriented approach.

Largo São Francisco

The design was based on observed needs PSPL and Intercept Surveys. Concept design by Gehl Architects. Construction details by Metro Arquitectos Components and cost - part 1: • Urban furniture and other facilities (roughly half of the budget) • Survey and info staff for 2 months • Plaza managers for 3 months • Cultural events • Power generator for 2 months • Plastic chemical toilets – 3 months App. USD 480,000 funded by Banco Itaú

Everyday and event activities

Day and night activities

Activity program and plaza manager

Gehl Studio 101


Best Practice - Learning from...

S達o Paulo, Pilot Projects - Street redesign in 6 locations Corner bulb outs - Avenida S達o Jo達o

Before

After

Bike lanes and crossings

Crossings and bike lanes - Largo S達o Francisco

Before

Paint and movable planters and bollards

102

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

After

Shorter crossing distance

Bus stop by crossing


São Paulo Part 2

Components and cost - part 2: • Free Wi-Fi • Renewal of public lighting • Road signage • Small works and repairs App. USD 100,000 funded by the City

From slip-lane to public space

Not including consultancy fee and City staff hours. Covers 2 larger plazas (app. 15,000 ft2), 1 smaller plaza and 6 crossings (one with 2 phases) Note! The majority of the urban furniture was custom designed for the project. And play equipment and wooden decks are permanent installations, not temporary. Timeframe: 1 1/2 year process to implementation 3 month program and evaluation. Some components, such as wooden decks are still there, December 2015. (implemented November 2014) Led by SP Urbanismo, São Paulo Municipality, under Centro Aberto program

Avenida São João

Before

Protection from traffic

Seating and shade

Street gym

After

Taxis and delivery vehicles allowed

Gehl Studio 103


Best Practice - Learning from...

Mar del Plata, Argentina - Pilot Project - Street redesign Corner bulb outs

Seating, shade and greening

Shorter crossing distance

104

Implementation over night with paint

Next Steps and Pilot Projects

Paint and movable planters and bollards

More sidewalk space by placing seating and outdoor serving in ‘parklets’


6 on-street parking spaces became 54 seats in just one 300 foot block

The pilot project was intiated by the City of Mar del Plata and Gehl Architects. It was part of a larger project framework looking at a series of key areas in the City - how they connect and are used. For the pilot, a few parking spaces were removed from Calle Güemes, a busy shopping street. This made space for public seating, greenery and bike parking, as well as corner bulb outs to create safer street crossings and to free up cluttered sidewalk space for chairs and tables. PSPL and intercept surveys were carried out before and after. Concept design by Gehl Architects. Construction drawings by the City. 1 of 9 blocks was implemented as a test and adapted according to user feedback. Components and cost: Pilot test 1 - 10 days - part of 1 block • Urban furniture • Paint • Plants • Wooden decks (app 1/3 of the budget) App. 46,000 USD Pilot test 2 - 77 days - 1 full block • Urban furniture • Paint • Plants • Wooden decks (app. 1/3 of the budget) App. 326,000 USD Note! The majority of the urban furniture was custom designed for the project. Not including consultancy fee and City staff hours. Implemented January 2014.

More space to linger, yet still having space for on-street car and bike parking

Gehl Studio 105


Upscaling the pilot projects

Take the learnings from the first series of pilot projects and adapt them into streets and spaces with similar characteristics within the network plan. This plan is to be seen as a starting point and should be evaluated, added to and adapted over time.

More for all!

A

B

D

Street upgrade - separation of traffic modes RiverWalk

C

Opportunity area

Street upgrade - traffic calming elements

Intersection upgrade

D A C

C

Uptown Broadway

106

Next Steps and Pilot Projects


CSU

in

lL

Hilton Ave

l Fa

ce ra T e

C

C

5 Points D

. lvd D dB

B

A

C C

12th St.

D C A D B A

11th St.

B

10th St.

D

B

A

A

oad on R ynnt

D D

Lu

th

er

on ac

D B

D

Ki

ng

Jr .B

lvd .

B

D

a Ro

C

A

Civic Commons B

B A

M

W

C D B Columbus Museum D Buena Vista Road

C

C

A

D

Brown Ave

C

d

13th Street

D

D M ar tin

B

B

Lawyers Lane

C

D

C

Rigdon Road

D D

A

D A

D

Boxwood Blvd.

6th Ave

B

10th Ave

L

13th Ave

oo inw

17th Street

D

C

A D

C

D

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06 Appendix

108


Gehl Studio

109


How People Walk: Overview

Pockets of great walkability... Broadway & 11th Weekday 1000 900

275 Peds/ average per hour

800 700 500 400 300 200 100

9PM

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

7AM

0

Time of Day

But many areas are not that inviting to pedestrians Cherokee Ave, Columbus High School Weekday 1000 900 800 700 600 500

103 Peds/ average per hour

400 300 200 100

110

Appendix - PSPL Findings

9PM

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

0 7AM

# of Pedestrians

600


How People Bike: Overview

Few people biking Broadway & 11th, Weekday 100

80

23 Cyclists/ average per hour

60

20

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

0

Time of Day

100 11th and Broadway, Weekday

80

13 Cyclists/ average per hour

60

40

20

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

0 8AM

# of Cyclists

40

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111


How People Walk: Comparisons

Pedestrian Comparisons Uptown, on Broadway between 10th and 12th Streets, had the most people walking in the entire study area. The rates of walking on the weekend - when the farmers market takes place - rival those of neighborhoods in cities with much larger populations, such as Philadelphia and Seattle, and demonstrate that people in Columbus choose to walk (when they have free time) and walk when they are invited.

Weekend

See appendix for more PSPL data

112

Appendix - PSPL Findings

9PM

7PM

8PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9PM

7PM

8PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

0 12PM

0 11AM

100

0

10AM

100

9AM

200

100

8AM

200

7AM

300

200

9PM

300

7PM

400

300

8PM

400

6PM

500

400

5PM

500

4PM

600

500

3PM

600

2PM

700

600

1PM

700

12PM

800

700

11AM

800

10AM

900

800

9AM

1000

900

8AM

1000

900

7AM

1000

9AM

Seattle 3rd Ave 949 Peds/h

8AM

Philadelphia Market Street 668 Peds/h

7AM

Columbus Broadway & 11th 774 Peds/h


Active shop fronts and streets designed for people attract more people - pedestrians, cyclists and drivers.

Broadway & 11th

Fewer people walk and bike when there is less to engage with.

11th Street

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113


How people move - Walking in Columbus

In some areas it is great to walk...

In other it is less inviting...

Broadway & 11th Weekday

Cherokee Ave by Columbus High School Weekday

1000

1000 900

900

800

800

275 Peds/h

700

Time of Day

There are pockets of great walkability in Columbus, but most areas do not invite for walking.

114

Appendix - PSPL Findings

9PM

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

103 Peds/h

7AM

9PM

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

0 3PM

100

0 2PM

100

1PM

200

12PM

300

200

11AM

400

300

10AM

500

400

9AM

600

500

8AM

600

7AM

# of Pedestrians

700


Weekends on Broadway are as lively as they are in downtown areas in major cities.

Compared to other cities... Broadway & 11th Weekend

Market Street Philadelphia Weekend 774 Peds/h

1000

1000

900

900

800

800

700

700

600

600

500

500

668 Peds/h

400

400

300

300

200

200

100

100

9PM

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

9PM

7PM

8PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

7AM

7AM

0

0

Weekend activity on Broadway is 3 times higher than weekday.

3rd Avenue Seattle Weekend 1000 900 800

949 Peds/h

700 600 500 400 300 200 100

9PM

7PM

8PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

7AM

0

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How people move - Cycling in Columbus

In general few people bike... Broadway & 11th Weekday - Main activity is in the afternoon

100

100

80

80

60

Time of Day

In general there are very few cyclist on the streets in Columbus...

116

Appendix - PSPL Findings

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

0 11AM

0 10AM

20

9AM

20

8AM

13 Cyclists/h

40

4PM

23 Cyclists/h

40

3PM

60

# of Cyclists

11th and Broadway Weekday - Main activity is around dinner-time


Compared to other cities... Philadelphia University City District Weekday in Walnut Street 100

80

60

80 Cyclists/h

40

20

8PM

7PM

6PM

5PM

4PM

3PM

2PM

1PM

12PM

11AM

10AM

9AM

8AM

0

...But when people feel safe and invited riding a bike is popular - especially for recreation and exercise

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How people move - Cycling in Columbus

Fountain City Cycling App User Data The typical user of the app is a white, middle-to-upper income male between the ages of 35-54 who cycles multiple times per week for recreation and is a confident rider; likely riding in mixed traffic as much as riding on separated paths.

Reported Trips • Of 280 total trips recorded by 55 users, 148 reported their Primary Trip was on Separated Multi-Use Trails. • Of 766 reported intermediate trips (-destinations) 246 were on Separated Multi-Use Trails. • Fall Line Trace, Broadway and RiverWalk account for the majority of recorded trips. • Streets with bike lanes, such as Linwood Blvd. and Front Ave. are also preferred routes. • Roads without bike lanes, such as 17th Street and 6th Ave, are frequently used, suggesting that these are important links between preferred destinations. • Even roads that are perceived as unsafe, such as Wynnton/ Macon Road, are represented - again suggesting a need for cycling infrastructure on these routes.

118

Appendix - Findings


Exercise was reported as main purpose for 50% of the trips .

Majority of reported trips were on separated multiuse trails: Fall Line Trace and RiverWalk.

10% Social

27% Commute

50% Exercise

The majority of the riders are ‘Enthused and Confident’ cyclists.

5% Interested but concerned

24% Strong & Fearless

71% Enthused & Confident

The Fountain City Cycling App riders, reported use of a large variety of types of streets suggesting a demand for a more varied cycling infrastructure.

12% 32%

56%

Road w/Bike Lane

Separated Multi-Use

Road

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119


How people move - taking the bus in Columbus

Public Transport in Columbus Data from METRA • Paratransit ridership has seen a 124% growth since 2008, while annual bus ridership has remained more or less stagnant since 2006. • METRA believes the rise in para-transit use as opposed to bus use is due to people not being able to walk to or from their final destinations or the bus stops. People feel they have to call para-transit rather than take the bus because bus stops are so inaccessible.

Mobility workshop participants stated: • Bus was of good quality, and comfortable with air-conditioning. • Staff was friendly and helpful, but the system was very difficult to navigate. • The trip was very time consuming and did not necessarily get close to one’s destination, which meant have to walk after taking the bus.

120

Appendix - METRA & Mobility Workshop Data


Total Annual Fixed Route Ridership 1,200,000

1,000,000

800,000

600,000

400,000

200,000

0 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

40,000

Total Annual Dial-A-Ride Ridership 35,000

30,000

25,000

20,000

Dial-a-ride ridership is increasing rapidly

15,000

10,000

5,000

0 2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Source: METRA Public Transit Needs Assessment, City Council Presentation, March 2010

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Weekday 14 May Lakebottom

Columbus Stationary Spring 2015

Weekday 14 May Broadway Where do people

R Columbus Stationary Spring 2015

Weekday 14 May Lakebottom

linger in Columbus

68

43 27

33.8% 0.0%

Standing

38.7% 2.1% 0.0% 2.1% 0.7% 1.4% 1.4%

Cafe Seating

21.2% 0.0%

Waiting Transport

St

W

16 16 43 Bench Seating Be 19.7% 5.1% Main activitiesStationary are centralized around R Columbus Spring 2015Broadway... Columbus Stationary Spring 2015 0

16

68

25

AVERAGE

16

16

11

823 AM 11 16

12

16

18

27

Weekday 14 May Lakebottom Park* Secondary Seating 16 16 Weekday Lakebottom Lying Down 0

Children Playing

20

Commercial Activity Cultural Activity

AVERAGE

43

Physical Activity

27

No counts

23 Weekday 14 May Broadway 16 16 11 Broadway Weekday

16

0.0%

Ca

20.2%

Se

0.0%

Ly

3.0%

Ch

0.0% 0.0%

Co

50.5%

Ph

25

16

AVERAGE

0

9 AM 11

9 AM

122

12

14

16

Standing Waiting for Transport Bench Seating Cafe Seating Working Secondary Seating Lying Down Children Playing Commercial Activity Cultural Activity 11 12 14 16 Physical Activity

18

8 AM 11

12

16

18

*Counts: from Cherokee Ave. by Columbus High School

25

AVERAGE

18 Weekday activity is dominated by standing.

Appendix - PSPL Findings

8 AM 11

Lakebottom: Exercising moving 12and16 18 through the area are most common activities.

Cu


Weekend 16 May

Drizz Columbus Stationary Spring 2015 Lakebottom Columbus Stationary Spring 2015 Weekend 16 May

Weekend 16 May Lakebottom

Broadway 46

45

52

25

47.3%

16.9%

Standing

0.0% 15.4%

Waiting Transport

46 Bench Seating ... and events Stationary Spring 2015 Columbus 3 Columbus Stationary 28 0 Cafe Seating 24.6%

Weekend 16 May Broadway Weekend Broadway 5

33

45

AVERAGE

52

28 8 AM 10

8 AM

13

37.7% 0.0% 0.0%

12

5

8 AM 10

25 16 May Weekend SecondaryPark* Seating 0.0%Lakebottom Weekend Lakebottom Lying Down 0.0% 3 0 Children Playing 5.4%

15

Standing Waiting for Transport Bench Seating Cafe Seating Working Secondary Seating Lying Down Children Playing Commercial Activity Cultural Activity 10 13 15 Physical Activity

Commercial Activity Cultural Activity

46

Physical Activity

3

0.0%

19

AVERAGE

33

25

14

0.0% 0.0%DrizzS 16.9% Spring 2015 0.0% W 0.0% 25.7% B 15.4%

AVERAGE

0

8 AM 10

12

14

33

AVERAGE

8 AM 10

12

14

Gehl Studio

24.6% 0.0% 0.0% 27.0% 0.0% 0.0% 16.9% 5.4% 0.0% 0.0% 37.7% 15.4% 0.0% 24.6% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 5.4% 37.7% 0.0% 0.0%

123

C

S

L

S C

W C

B C

C P

S

L

C

C

C

P


Who is there

Gender Balance Lakebottom/Cherokee Ave. Weekday

Broadway Weekday

Gender W

60.0%

W

53.3%

M

40.0%

M

Age 9.1% 46.0% 35.9% 4.2% 4.9%

9 AM 11

14

15

17

19

Gender

46.7%

Age 12.5% 45.0% 23.8% 12.5% 6.3%

65+ 31-64 15-30 07-14 00-06

9 AM 11

13

15

17

19

Balance between men and women on Broadway. More women in Lakebottom area.

124

Appendix - PSPL Findings

65+ 31-64 15-30 07-14 00-06


In general, few children and young people Broadway Weekend

Lakebottom/Cherokee Ave. Weekend

Gender 45.2% 54.8% Age 7.9% 34.5% 41.3% 7.3% 8.9%

9 AM 11

13

15

17

19

Gender W M

65+ 31-64 15-30 07-14 00-06

50.0% 50.0% Age

W

5.2% 39.7% 34.5% 15.5% 5.2%

65+

M

31-64 15-30 07-14 00-06

9 AM 13

But there are more younger people present on the weekends.

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125


‘How did you get here’ Intercept Survey

If you could get around just as easily would you switch how you travel?

Most people surveyed get around by car, but most also like to switch to riding a bike.

Unreported, 15%

No, 14%

Yes, 71%

What mode of transit do drivers want to switch to? Walk, 2% Unreported, 30%

Bike, 39%

Other*, 18% Bus, 11%

126

Appendix - Intercept Survey findings

*Other represents: Train, 2% Shuttle 2% Multi-modal 5% Car 2% Other 5%


Distance

The interviewed listed: Distance, Safety & Crime and Lack of Bike Lanes as the main obstacles for switching transport modes.

10

Safety + Crime

9

Need more bike lanes and paths

7

Money

6

No Obstacle

5

Traffic

4

Weather

3

More Buses, More Often

3

Lack of Sidewalks

2

Don't Know Routes

2

Don't Own Bike

2

Parking

2

Convenience / Not Efficient

2

Dial-A-Ride requires 24 hours notice

1

No ID

1

Unreported

29

0

5

10

15

20

25

Gehl Studio

30

127


Mobility Workshop

How does the experience getting around change if one walks? Bikes? Rides the bus? Or drives? What are the impediments to walking, biking or riding transit in Columbus?

4 Key takeaways 1. The car is easy and convenient. How to travel by other modes is less clear and enjoyable. 2. Riding a bike is seen as a recreational activity, not a commuting activity. 3. Riding the bus is seen as a major challenge in terms of convenience and lack of information about routes. 4. The reaction to walking is mixed: most say it isn’t great to be a pedestrian, but others point out that infrastructure does exist.

128

Appendix - Mobility Workshop findings

Convenience, safety and efficiency are priorities for people when they travel, and influence how they get around.


One journey by different modes: Getting from Civic Commons to Uptown 1ST AVENUE

Considering a population range of 8 - 80 years most people reported that the journey could not be done by children under 16 and adults over age 65.

60

Riding the bus took up to 5 times longer than biking or driving.

50

40

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ON AC

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13TH STREET AD N RO

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Bike

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Public Feedback: Network Plan and Focus Areas Workshop

People told us they want to be able to move between destinations in the city by foot and bike, in a safe and attractive environment.

MOST FREQUENTLY MENTIONED THEMES: 01 Connectivity and bikeability: improved and more miles of bike lanes. 02 Traffic safety and walkability: more and better sidewalks. 03 Attractive streetscape: shade and greenery.

Most Mentioned Streets 01 17th Street

Calls for improving the conditions for walking and biking along this corridor.

02 Cherokee Avenue

Calls for bike lanes and for a more bicycle-friendly environment.

03 13th Street

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Appendix - Focus Area Workshop Feedback

Calls for making 13th Street more bicycleand pedestrian-friendly.


Public Feedback on Network Plan 20 comments Network Map

CSU

e ac Tr e n

i

lL

Hilton Ave

l Fa

Cherokee Ave

5 Points

17th Street

M

13th Street

Columbus Museum

Buena Vista Road

10th St.

M

Road

Lawyers Lane

nton

Wyn

Uptown 11th St.

a Ro

Boxwood Blvd.

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on ac

Rigdon Road

10th Ave

6th Ave

13th Ave

RiverWalk

od wo

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Civic Commons

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Focus area

1st priority

2nd priority

Brown Ave

Broadway

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3rd priority

Path two-way separated Planned

Existing bike lane

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13th Street Focus Area - Public Feedback

People want better conditions for walking and biking, including increased traffic safety and a more appealing street environment, along 13th Street

MOST FREQUENTLY MENTIONED THEMES: 01 Improved walkability and bikeability

Calls for bike lanes and crosswalk improvements.

low quality of crosswalk

no street trees

02 More greenery that provides shade

Calls for more trees along the road and for more vegetation in general.

03 Improvements to streetscape Calls for “street appeal” and

not much to catch the eye

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Appendix - Focus Area Workshop Feedback

general “beautification.”


13th Street Focus Area - Public Feedback 60 comments

“Revitalize shops with streetscape”

“Top priority has to be better traffic organization to allow for bike and foot movement along 13th”

“Make bridge more pedestrian and cyclist friendly and more visually appealing”

“More appealing street scape along 13th Street: public places, landscaping, etc.”

“Connect Lakebottom to Linwood Cemetery” “Wide bike paths feel safer” “wider sidewalks, more shade, more trees”

“Designated bike lanes, and reduced speeds would increase safety”

“Crossing 13th St at the Village is tough!”

Top Mentions (and # of occurrence)

Most mentioned locations 01 The Viaduct

Calls for a safer pedestrian and cyclist environment.

02 13th Street and 13th Avenue

Calls for enhanced streetscape, with active retail.

03 Lakebottom Park to the Village on 13th Street

Calls for better connections for pedestrians and cyclists.

Bikeability

22

Walkability

18

Traffic Safety

17

Greenery

12

Aesthetics

8

Streetscape

8

Programming

5

Revitalize Retail

4

Connectivity

4

Arts & Culture

4

(from a total of 60 comments)

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Civic Commons Focus Area - Public Feedback

People want better opportunities for moving freely and safely without infrastructure barriers, such as roads with no or low quality crosswalks and fences limiting access to public areas.

MOST FREQUENTLY MENTIONED THEMES: 01 Better conditions for walking and biking with safe crosswalks low quality

Calls for better sidewalks and bike lanes with crosswalks.

alk of crossw

02 Improved connectivity between destinations and easy wayfinding no path

to

w

ar ds

Calls for better opportunities for moving to (and within) the area with few infrastructure barriers.

the

d e st i n

ation

no activity, programming or invitations to use the public space

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03 Enhancements to the public space with more programming Calls for more activities, events and

Appendix - Focus Area Workshop Feedback

greenery on the public lawns and grounds.


Civic Commons Focus Area - Public Feedback 61 comments

“Create passive recreation areas in green space in Civic Commons”

“Better pedestrian/bike access across Macon Road”

“More benches, trees, bike paths and racks” “Shade, shade, shade”

“Remove fence on east section of library. It appears to be a pedestrian barrier what other purpose does it serve?”

“Improve landscaping, create inviting space”

“Connecting both sides of the road [Macon Road] is vital”

“Not just here but in all of these spaces, add art installations”

“Plant trees in grassy areas. Create a more inviting space for people to dwell or gather”

Top Mentions Most mentioned locations

(and # of occurrence) Walkability

27

01 The Library and library greens

Connectivity

12

Bikeability

12

Programming

11

Public Space

9

02 Macon Road

Shade

9

Greenery

8

03 Civic Commons

Arts & Culture

7

Wayfinding

6

Public Transport

5

Mixed Use

5

Calls for more openness and better use of the Library’s outdoor public spaces.

Safer crosswalks..

Calls for increased accessibility and more programming.

(from a total of 61 comments)

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Uptown Focus Area - Public Feedback

People want better access to the River and to increase the use and activities along this great natural resource. They also want more creative and attractive public spaces, animated by public art and events.

MOST FREQUENTLY MENTIONED THEMES: 01 Stronger connectivity and intuitive wayfinding between destinations

where is the wayfinding g u i d a n ce ?

Calls for better physical and mental connections to the River.

02 A better network of streets for walking and biking uninsp

eetscap iring str

e on sid

Calls for an improved streetscape with quality sidewalks and bike lanes between Uptown and the RiverWalk

e streets

03 More art, events and programming in the public space Calls for more activities that include art, make event here

136

Appendix - Focus Area Workshop Feedback

interactive art and even water, as a celebration of the River.


Uptown Focus Area - Public Feedback 66 comments

“Convert Plaza on 10th Street by RiverCenter to a public space with stage”

“More signs directing pedestrians”

“Create more access points. For instance, consider making parts of 10th Street for pedestrian traffic only”

“Use art, flora, or something attention-grabbing, that will naturally lead pedestrians to follow that path [to the River]”

“More places to eat and shop closer to RiverWalk”

“Improve sidewalk and landscape/ hardscapes on side streets”

“For a more obvious route to the RiverWalk: simple signs and/ or distinguishable, aesthetically attractive pathways”

“Art that features water themes will bring RiverWalk atmosphere to rest of Uptown”

“Potential for a unique/singular art installation, either near, on, in or over the river”

Top Mentions (and # of occurrence)

Most mentioned locations 01 The RiverWalk

Calls for better connectivity and for increasing the offers of dining and retail.

02 10th Street / RiverCenter

Calls for more programming of the public spaces in front of the RiverCenter.

03 Side streets

Calls for improved streetscapes to extend the network of Uptown.

Connectivity

14

Walkability

11

Arts & Culture

11

Programming

10

Bikeability

10

Public Space

9

Streetscape

9

Wayfinding

9

Amenities

8

Traffic Safety

6

(from a total of 66 comments)

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Columbus Museum Focus Area - Public Feedback

People want to leverage the potential of the public spaces around the Museum by displaying more art outside and by improving the accessibility and usability of the green areas for both public events and daily activities.

MOST FREQUENTLY MENTIONED THEMES: 01 Better conditions for walking with increased accessibility

p

h at

to

w

ds ar

th

e

s de

tin

at

ion

Calls for easier access routes to the museum via back roads and paths.

02 More usage of the green spaces for arts & culture

display a r t here

Calls for programming the public area by the museum with activities and art.

03 Improved Wayfinding Calls for promoting the museum more ?

um

to ay hw

the

se mu

ic

wh

138

Appendix - Focus Area Workshop Feedback

visibly in the streetscape.


Columbus Musuem Focus Area - Public Feedback 51 comments

“Make gardens more open and extend design around the back of the Library”

“It would be great to see a mix of events occur at the Museum that incorporate performance art in addition to traditional art installations”

“Connect back of Museum with winding trail to 13th Avenue and 13th Street”

“Capitalize on unused green space to hold more events” “Better signage to Museum”

“The Museum needs to create a space that extends beyond the inside of the facility”

“The Columbus Museum should have an outside art exhibition that involves themes of rivers or water in general to drive home the theme of the Chattahoochee”

“I would love to see outdoor artwork installations created at the museum”

Top Mentions (and # of occurrence)

Most mentioned locations 01 The Museum Grounds

Open the back of the Museum with a new entrance and activities.

02 Old Bradley Library

Make better use of the area around the building. Activate the site.

03 Path through Dinglewood Park

Connections for bicyclists and pedestrians from 13th Street.

Walkability

19

Accessibility

17

Arts & Culture

12

Leverage Green Space

10

Bikeability

9

Connectivity

7

Wayfinding

7

Communication

7

Programming

6

Public Space

4

Lighting

4

(from a total of 51 comments)

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Buena Vista Road Focus Area - Public Feedback

People want the destinations to have more impact on how the streetscape is designed and experienced.

MOST FREQUENTLY MENTIONED THEMES: 01 Better conditions for walking and biking Calls for improved conditions for pedestrians and cyclists, including more bike parking and safer sidewalks.

sid

ew alk

in p

oor

con d

itio

n

02 Creating local partnerships

Calls for collaborations with Aflac and other local companies regarding unprogrammed space.

collaboration potential?

m an inim d a no l b sh en ad ch e

03 Improvements to public transport facilities Calls for improvements to bus stops and

140

Appendix - Focus Area Workshop Feedback

for better connectivity between public transport and destinations.


Buena Vista Road Focus Area - Public Feedback 41 comments

“Make sure bus stops have well-maintained sidewalks leading to them”

“Better pedestrian/bike access across Buena Vista as well as along the road”

“Consider shade in all pedestrian designs” “Bike sharing stations to connect. Bike lanes everywhere.”

“I wonder if zoning requirement is inhibiting positive development here?”

“Shaded places with water fountains to make transit more pleasurable”

“Connect workers to workplace by having an outside job fair”

“Wynnton/Buena Vista streetscape that is friendly”

“Make bus stops more appealing and comfortable for citizens”

Top Mentions Most mentioned locations 01 Veterans Memorial Park

Better use of the open spaces along the street.

02 Buena Vista Road

Streetscape improvements: sidewalks and aesthetics.

03 Buena Vista Road

Enhance the green areas along the road.

(and # of occurrence) Walkability

17

Bikeability

8

Partnerships

8

Public Transport

8

Streetscape

6

Connectivity

5

Wayfinding

5

Aesthetics

4

Policy & Regulations

4

Seating

4

Shade

4

(from a total of 41 comments)

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Columbus Quality Criteria Hand-Outs

Columbus Quality Criteria Location:

+ = YES # = IN-BETWEEN - = NO

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#1 Micro-Climate & Shade

#2 Active / Built Edges & Human Scale

#4 Scenic & Active Open Space

#5 Comfort & Safety

#6 Family-Friendly

#7 People Watching & Social Space

#8 Peaceful, Quiet & Relaxing

#9 Access for People Walking, Cycling & by Public Transit

#10 Cultural Offer & Local Identity

#11 Inviting - With Places to Sit

#12 People & Activities

Appendix - Columbus Quality Criteria

#3 Spontaneous & Fun


Columbus Mobility Quality Criteria Location:

Experience

Safety

Connectivity

+ = YES # = IN-BETWEEN - = NO

Continuous space for walking and cycling - clear marked routes - connecting from a-b - sidewalks, bike lanes and paths

Protection from traffic

Crossings

- zebra crossings - pedestrian islands - placed in desire lines & connecting destinations

Space for walking and cycling

- bufferzone - speed reducing elements - information

- high quality sidewalks - protected bike lanes - shared streets, low speed - clearly marked intersections

Built Edges / Active Edges

Access to Buildings / Destinations

- defined streets - ground floor functions, retail etc. - activity along the street, built or active open space

- clearly marked entrances - end of journey facilities such as bike parking - no barriers, fences

Access to public transport

- bus stops in key locations - walking to the bus stop - high quality bus stops

Protections from crime

- light - people presence

Street Appeal

- shade - greenery - high quality street furniture - seating ‘rest areas’ - art & lighting - signage

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