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MAY | J U N E 2014

GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS SPONSORED BY

THE CREATIVE GROUP

51ST ANNIVERSARY

PRINT DESIGN SURVEY PANTONE COLOR FORECAST | LOGO TRENDS REPORT | GRAPH EXPO’S FUTURE VISION


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LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER | NO SECRET SAUCE I was recently interviewed by NPES News for their One-To-One series. NPES is the association of suppliers for the printing, publishing and converting industries. Among other things, they kindly me asked why GDUSA is healthy when most publications are not. I said: “I have no deep pockets and no secret sauce. I simply start from the fundamental belief that people still love print for its classic strengths — touch, feel, permanence, portability — and that a magazine can stand out from the digital noise if, and only if, it delivers relevant content and high production values . . . we are investing more in design and production elements because the brand matters, and the experience of receiving GDUSA had better be special and memorable.” The current edition of GDUSA, I hope, moves us a bit closer to the aspiration: graphic design news, people, milestone and events; lots of commentary and career tips; Pantone’s always influential color forecast; a logo trends report in which Bill Gardner explores the impact of mobile device use and how designers are coping; our 51st annual print and paper survey which detects a modest swing of the pendulum; and an inspiring showcase of the winners of our annual American Web Design Awards. No secret sauce, just more beef. For our many vegetarian GORDON KAYE IS THE PUBLISHER OF GDUSA Comments, suggestions and letters can be sent to gkaye @ gdusa.com.

readers, same idea but think tofu, tempah or seitan. SEEK HELP I have worked most weekends of my life. Sometimes weekend work is motivated by necessity — in my first job as an associate at a Wall Street law firm they liked to inflict pain. Sometimes it is driven by sheer compulsion — as a lawyer at NBC it was hard to

I have no deep pockets and no secret sauce. I simply start from the fundamental belief that people still love print for its classic strengths . . .

fill five days with meaningful labor but I showed up at 30 Rock on Saturdays anyway. And sometimes it is hard to separate the practical from the obsessive: at GDUSA the deadlines are sometimes real and sometimes not, but I am losing the capacity to tell the difference. For this reason, I was drawn to a recent set of career tips by The Creative Group, the specialized staffing firm, about how to minimize weekend work. Their ideas about avoiding unnecessary weekend toil are wise and pragmatic: prioritize, plan, delegate, refresh. I thought they were also addressing the compulsive aspect of weekend work that plagues me — and perhaps some of you other weekend worriers? — since one of their recommendations is to “Seek Help.” Turns out the advice refers to hiring freelancers for overflow, rather than to locating a mental health professional. Oh well. WHERE THE DESIGNERS ARE A new policy brief by the Center for an Urban Future tells the intriguing story of how design can be a powerful driver of an urban economy. Taking into account major disciplines — from interior to industrial to fashion to graphic design - New York City tops the U.S. with more than 40,000 designers. The next largest pool is Los Angeles, with nearly 25,000 designers, followed by Chicago at more than 16,000. Since we all love lists, let’s continue the countdown. Considering all designers, the three big cities are followed, in order, by Dallas, Seattle, Boston, Philadelphia, San Francisco and Miami. For graphic design firms only, the order changes a bit: the behemoths are trailed by Miami, Boston, San Francisco, Seattle, Dallas, and Philadelphia. The Center’s study focuses on the Big Apple, showing design employment rose 74% from 2000 to 2013, graphic design firms grew by 2%, and Brooklyn (of course) outpaced Manhattan in relative growth. But the lessons of the report are widely applicable: in a post-industrial economy, creative businesses generate jobs, growth, stimulation and innovation; design employment is clawing its way back from the shock of 2008 to near pre-recession levels; and local governments can be helpful at the margins with tax reform, real estate incentives, entrepreneurial training, new market development, support for local design schools, and regular official events that recognize the value of design. It is a tall order in a time of scarcity, but the payoff can be substantial.


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CONTENTS | MAY – JUNE 2014

11

FRESH Beech-Nut and Bluedog disrupt baby food category; Sagmeister & Walsh inspired by the sacred; Indiegogo identity is fluid; Hornall Anderson identity gets to heart of matter; Mucca's homage to Brooklyn; and lots more.

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PEOPLE Ivan Chermayeff and Tom Geismar honored by CooperHewitt; thoughts on the passing of Massimo Vignelli; Crispin’s Bob Winter joins VSA; Target’s Todd Waterbury to National Design Museum Board; Lindsay Gravette moves to Metadesign; and many others.

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COLOR FORECAST Pantone. It’s almost unnecessary to say anymore. We are lucky, as always, to have the color experts give us their take on directions. And as great designers know, when it comes to color, there is nothing less at stake than the success of products, services, ideas and causes.

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51ST ANNUAL PRINT SURVEY Has the pendulum swung too far from printed communications? Do creatives still value print and paper? Do designers still control the spec and buy? Is this our oldest and most favorite annual industry survey? Yes, yes, yes. And yes.

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LOGOLOUNGE 2014 Step into the LogoLounge, and enjoy the incomparable Bill Gardner as he leads us through the evolving world of logos. There is no tour guide quite as well equipped, evocative or fascinating.

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FOCUS So many subjects and so little time. A preview of the Graph Expo conference and event; a view on why print catalogs are hanging tough; a milestone for innovative photo co-op Stocksy; wise career advice from The Creative Group; Design Army’s work on a new paper

GDUSA - Graphic Design USA Volume 50/No. 3 May/June 2014 Kaye Publishing Corporation (ISSN0274-7499/USPS227020). Published 6 times a year with combined issues in January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December. Executive, editorial and advertising offices at 89 Fifth Avenue, Suite 901, New York NY 10003. Phone: 212.696.4380, Fax: 212.696.4564, www.gdusa.com. SUBSCRIPTION: Domestic, $72 one year. International, $140 one year. Periodicals postage paid at New York NY and additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GDUSA - Graphic Design USA, PO Box 3072, Langhorne PA 19047. Permit #224.

grade; and more.

WWW.GDUSA.COM


CONTENTS | MAY – JUNE 2014

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS SPONSORED BY

THE CREATIVE GROUP In five decades, we have never had a competition grow as exponentially as the American Web Design Awards, GDUSA’s annual showcase of the power of design to enhance websites and online communications. Then again, we never had to add so many new categories to reflect the explosive growth and versatility online design: apps, social media, digital publishing, tablets and mobile. Here are a select 100 winning pieces; you can also view them or share them on our website or download the free iPad App. THIS FEATURE BEGINS ON PAGE 68.


A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO ... VERSO PAPER A special thanks to Verso Paper Corp. for supplying the entire text paper for this edition of GDUSA magazine, including the special print design survey report. Verso is a leading North American producer of coated papers and specialty products, and its papers are used primarily in media and marketing applications. The text paper is Verso’s 60lb. Influence® Gloss. A recognized leader in its category, Influence® is an excellent option for all types of upscale end uses. Its heavy basis weights deliver the printability and appearance expected of a higher grade paper while the lighter weights are ideal for postage sensitive applications. To learn more about Influence® or Verso’s entire product portfolio, visit their website or read more at page 66 of this edition. Contact: versopaper.com THE CREATIVE GROUP This leading specialized staffing firm is, once again, exclusive sponsor of GDUSA’s annual American Web Design Awards competition. That is most appropriate. Finding top-notch interactive, design and marketing talent to help with new and ongoing projects can pose quite a challenge for employers today. To ease the process, firms and agencies alike turn to The Creative Group (TCG) to access highly-skilled professionals with cutting-edge digital skills. Contact: creativegroup.com PANTONE Pantone is celebrating its 51st year. For almost that long, its experts have been helping us bring information and insights to the creative community. Pantone is the world-renowned authority on color and provider of color systems and leading technology for the selection and accurate communication of color across a variety of industries. The PANTONE® name is known worldwide as the standard language for color communication from designer to manufacturer to retailer to customer. The company is a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite. Contact: www.pantone.com LOGOLOUNGE LogoLounge is a vital resource for logo and identity designers on the web. Here, you'll find tens of thousands of logos for study and inspiration, designs from leading agencies as well as from talented up-and-comers. A special thanks to Bill Gardner for sharing each year with GDUSA readers his take on how logos are evolving. Contact: www.logolounge.com

ENTER NOW AT

www.gdusa.com/contests/aida14

GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

Gordon Kaye Publisher

ART & PRODUCTION Ilana Greenberg Creative Director Rachel Goldberg Production Director Jay Lewis Photo Editor

ADMINISTRATION & READER SERVICES Althea Edwards Accounts Manager Milton L. Kaye Competitions Nisa Andrews Competitions Jennifer Hoff Scott Sczcypiorski Internet Services Robert Kaye-Walsh Circulation

EDITORIAL

ABOUT THE COVER Ronald McDonald had not changed clothes since 2005 and people were beginning to talk. But with the spokesclown stepping lively into social media channels, he has a new wardrobe courtesy of Tony-award winning theatrical designer Ann Hould-Ward.

Gordon Kaye Editor Sasha Kaye-Walsh E-Newsletter Editor Charlotte Kaye Assistant Editor

ADVERTISING Ron Andriani Executive VP, Integrated Marketing + Business Dev. 201.485.8720 212.696.4380 randriani@ gdusa.com Gordon Kaye Publisher 212.696.4380 gkaye @ gdusa.com

COVER PAPER CREDIT The cover of this edition of GDUSA is printed on FSC-certified Kallima Coated Cover C2S 8pt, part of the Kallima Paper family of FSC-certified coated cover paperboard, proudly manufactured by the Tembec Paper Group. A leading advocate of sustainability, Kallima has a distinct low-density high-bulk construction resulting in less trees used and significant cost savings to the customer. Kallima’s trusted line of Coated Cover C1S, C1S Plus and C2S are well-known for their bright white surfaces. Contact: www.kallimapaper.com and http://kallima.com/blog1-Storyboard

COPYRIGHT 2014 BY KAYE PUBLISHING CORPORATION


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May 2014 FRESH Impo_feb news play 6/4/14 11:52 AM Page 11

FRESH | SAGMEISTER & WALSH DRAW UPON SACRED GEOMETRY

NEW YORK NY A new graphic identity designed by

Sagmeister & Walsh is being implemented by the Jewish Museum, located on New York City’s Museum Mile on Fifth Avenue. Stefan Sagmeister and Jessica Walsh say they were inspired by ancient sacred geometry, and sought to fuse it with a contemporary aesthetic. Everything from the logo mark, logo typography, patterns, and illustrations were drawn on the same geometric grid from which the Star of David was formed, yielding a structured yet flexible graphic system. A completely new website also launches this month. Designed by the firm, the website gives users access to all site content across any device or screen size, allows personal user accounts for interaction with the online collection and social media, and provides a platform for multimedia content including live streaming, embedded video content, archival video access, and original content such as online-only exhibitions. “One of our priorities has been to refresh the look and feel of the Museum and its graphic identity,” said Claudia Gould, Helen Goldsmith Menschel Director. “We engaged the innovative team of Sagmeister & Walsh to help us create a dynamic system that will evolve with the institution.” www.thejewishmuseum.org

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FRESH | HORNALL ANDERSON REFRESHES ARTISAN BAKER’S IDENTITY

LOS ANGELES CA With their 25-year anniversary in 2014, La Brea

Bakery — a leading producer of artisan breads for restaurants and grocery — partnered with Hornall Anderson to transform the brand identity. Why the need for change after a quarter century? A recognition that the craftsmanship behind La Brea Bakery bread, a hallmark of the brand, was not clearly articulated. Wanting to better communicate the bakery’s core attributes and personality (while understanding that the longstanding “B” identity was to be retained) the Hornall Anderson team took the deep red color from the original identity while prominently featuring a more stylized lowercase “b” as the hero. At the center of the new “b” is a very subtle outline of a loaf of bread. The intent: to put a smile on peoples’ faces as they uncover the heart of the bakery. The font was also updated and a 1989 emboss was added. The new identity was introduced at the grand reopening of La Brea Bakery’s flagship café in Los Angeles. Displayed on exterior signage and at the entryway on a new blackened steel oven hood, the logo is a centerpiece of a complete café makeover that includes packaging, uniforms, murals and signage, menu boards, menus and additional collateral. A video helps introduce the rebrand to employees, stakeholders and partners. http://vimeo.com/82330362

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FRESH | PACKAGING FOCUSES ON SUSTAINABILITY AND FUNCTIONALITY

SAN FRANCISCO CA Hungry for fresh quality prepared dinners by local chefs? Thirsty for delivery and takeout packaging that is sustainable and functional? Just call, text or email The Munchery, a company started a couple of years ago by two new parent dads. Their rebranding (they call it Munchery 2.0) features a fresh look, as we well as packaging sustainability and also functionality. In place of plastic packaging they now describe as “ugly, bad for the environment, and it also didn't work in the oven,� their new containers are microwave and oven safe, made from renewable and sustainably sourced plant fibers, and they are compostable and biodegradable. A colorful sleeve is made from sustainably sourced, non-virgin paper that is SFI and FSC certified, as are the bags. To underscore their positioning, The Munchery is partnering with The Conservation Fund to offset delivery drivers carbon footprint by planting trees, and with The San Francisco Food Bank to donate a meal for every order placed. www.munchery.com

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FRESH | MM GENERATES LUXURY BRANDING FOR THE BATTERY

SAN FRANCISCO CA The Battery, an exclusive and opulent

five story private club in San Francisco, complete with 20-person hot tub and 3,000 bottle wine room, chose MM to design a new logo and identity that captured its special character. Said Peter Markatos, Co-Creative Director of the design firm: “Our material choices and printing techniques were deliberate and ranged from very tactile letterpress to laser etching in wood.� The project touched the complete brand experience: identity, all collateral for hotel, club and restaurant, member cards and kits, staff uniforms, umbrellas, signage, luggage tags, custom playing cards, and The Battery Customs handbook. Interior design is credited to Ken Fulk, the renowned interior decorator and event planner to the stars. Markatos and Tyler Moore head the MM firm. www.mm-sf.com/work/the-battery-vol-01

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FRESH | RONALD MCDONALD IS STYLIN’ AND LOVIN’ IT

NORTHBROOK IL As the old-saying goes: clothes makes the spokesclown. Taking a bigger role in McDonald's social media channels, Ronald McDonald is dressing for success with two au courant outfits. His mission is to promote a new “Fun Makes Great Things Happen” campaign. This is the celebrity’s first wardrobe upgrade since 2005. Tony-winning theatrical designer Ann Hould-Ward (“Sunday in the Park with George” and “Beauty and the Beast”) gets creative credits. Comments David Zlotnik, McDonald’s Director of Global Marketing: “We’ve been working on his new clothes for probably close to two years.” twitter.com/mcdonaldscorp

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FRESH | BEECH-NUT AND BLUEDOG DISRUPT BABY FOOD CATEGORY

CHICAGO IL As demand for commercially produced

and processed baby foods declines, Beech-Nut is trying to change the dynamic, with the help of Chicago’s Bluedog Design. In an effort to rejuvenate the segment, Beech-Nut adopted a “Bring Moms Back” initiative. From a product standpoint, the company worked with its chefs to emphasize purity, freshness and natural ingredients. And in response to the health and wellbeing concerns of millennial moms, and their tendency to spend time in the produce aisle, Beech-Nut’s VP of Marketing, Andy Dahlen turned to Bluedog to create a more organic graphic look and feel for the baby foods. The design solution includes redesigned glass jars, an emphasis on simple ingredients, and wooden end cap displays that cradle the jars in sturdy wooden boxes akin to a fruit crate. Says Bluedog CEO Michelle Hayward: “Together we have created visual disruption in stores and are delivering a modern brand and meaningful baby food experience across America for Beech-Nut.” www.bluedogdesign.com

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FRESH | WHOLE FOODS HOMAGE TO BROOKLYN

BROOKLYN NY Mucca pays homage to Brooklyn

with a new design language for Whole Foods that builds upon the grocer’s commitment to handcrafted, high quality products. Developed initially for the company’s store in Gowanus, a neighborhood in Brooklyn, the packaging and signage is being implemented in stores throughout the Northeast. Since the Whole Foods focus is on freshness, and new products are introduced on a daily basis, each system needed to be flexible enough to fit a wide variety of container types and signage platforms — yet simple enough to produce on a regional scale. For the private label system, Mucca created a premium look and, at the same time, developed an environmental signage system, introducing a suite of graphic assets that perform on chalkboards as well as floor-to-ceiling windows. www.mucca.com/work/whole-foods-market

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FRESH | INDIEGOGO IDENTITY ALWAYS EVOLVING

LOS ANGELES CA Indiegogo, the largest of the crowdfunding

platforms, has unveiled a comprehensive brand redesign, including a new logo and refreshed website. The redesign was executed over the last year by digital strategy and design agency PUSH Offices based in Los Angeles. In contrast to traditional identity systems which are typically fixed in approach and execution, this identity is intended to be active and constantly changing — featuring different Indiegogo crowdfunding campaigns, community members, images and colors in the window box at any given time — to reinforce the idea that finance is being democratized and users are in control. Push Office describes the logo as “fluid, evolving and dynamic.” Changing the logo frequently on the website may have its challenges, but even business cards have many different mini-case studies on the back, and every new employee gets stack to share and trade. www.pushoffices.com/work/push-offices-rebrands-indiegogo

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PEOPLE | LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

IVAN CHERMAYEFF + TOM GEISMAR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS SMITHSONIAN’S COOPER-HEWITT, NATIONAL MUSEUM OF DESIGN Ivan Chermayeff and Tom Geismar are being honored for lifetimes of achievement in American design. The recognition comes via the National Design Awards, the annual program conceived back in 2000 by the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. The two men are founding partners of what is now known as Chermayeff & Geismar & Haviv, a firm behind many iconic trademarks and a pioneer in the modern movement of idea-driven design across discipline. Their activities spanned brand identities, exhibitions, print and motion graphics, and art in architecture, and among the hundreds of identities they have created are Chase Manhattan Bank, Mobil Oil, Showtime, NYU, PBS, and National Geographic. (In our recent 50th Anniversary survey, GDUSA readers voted Chermayeff & Geismar as the second most influential design firm of the era.) Others to receive honors at the program’s October gala include Office, for Communication Design; Etsy, for Corporate and Institutional Achievement; and Aaron Koblin, for Interaction Design. The National Design Awards were first launched at the White House as a project of the White House Millennium Council; they now include a week of educational activities, and the whole affair is presided over this year by First Lady Michelle Obama.

GDUSA 27


PEOPLE | PROMOTIONS + HONORS

TODD WATERBURY SVP/ECD, TARGET, MINNEAPOLIS MN BOARD MEMBER, COOPER-HEWITT, NEW YORK NY Todd Waterbury, senior vice president, executive creative director, marketing at Target, has been appointed to the board of trustees of Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Waterbury is responsible for establishing the creative direction of Target’s marketing efforts and leading an internal team of art directors, designers, developers, writers and producers, as well as its external agency partners. He joined the retailer in

LINDSAY GRAVETTE DESIGN DIRECTOR, METADESIGN, SAN FRANCISCO CA

Lindsay Gravette is now Design Director at MetaDesign. In this position, Gravette brings 20 years of interactive and strategic design experience. “He brings a wealth of identity design and creative expertise to the table,” says Stan Zienka, MetaDesign Creative Director. Previously, Gravette held the same role at Duncan/Channon where he helped expand their growing design and branding practice with work for Palms and Hard Rock International. He also spent more than fifteen years in his own practice working directly with Fortune 500, technology and startup companies, as well as with creative firms such as IDEO and Larsen. MetaDesign clients include Apple, Adobe, Current.TV, Nike, Sony, Four Seasons, and Samsung.

BOB WINTER PARTNER AND EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, VSA, CHICAGO

Formerly creative head of Crispin Porter + Bogusky’s Miami Office, Bob Winter joins VSA Partners as a partner and executive creative director. He is the latest big name to come aboard, joining partner William Rosen, former president-chief creative officer of Leo Burnett’s Arc Worldwide, who heads VSA consumer marketing, as well as partner Patrick Palmer, former EVP of strategy at Leo Burnett, who oversees strategy and analytics. Winter has worked on brands including Budweiser, Bud Light, Altoids, McDonald’s, Craftsman, Greenpeace and Best Buy with agencies from CP+B, to DDB, Goodby Silverstein and Partners, Leo Burnett and Y&R. (He is credited with creating the Bud Light “Real Men of Genius” campaign.) Says Winter: “VSA feels like a new model,” referring to the combination of designers, planners, data scientists, and technologists.

28 G D USA

January 2013 from the consulting company he founded. Prior to that, Waterbury served as co-executive creative director at Wieden+Kennedy New York. His work has received numerous design and advertising awards, and is included in the permanent collections of the Guggenheim and The Museum of Modern Art. The Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum board is made up of 36 “distinguished civic and business leaders dedicated to the continued growth of the museum.” Poulin + Morris has named Meaghan Tirondola-Button a Senior Designer. She was hired as a Staff Designer in 2008. In her new job, she is responsible for project design, management, and coordination. Her current work includes environmental graphics, donor recognition, and wayfinding sign programs for The City University of New York’s School of Law, New York Hall of Science, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Princeton University, University of Kentucky HealthCare, and Vassar College; environmental graphics and wayfinding for ABC News’ and Madison Square Garden Media’s corporate headquarters in Manhattan and Prudential’s new North American headquarters in Newark NJ; and publication design for Rockport Publishers. Tirondola-Button is a graduate of SVA. Catherine D. Brown was recently honored by Hamilton College with the 2014 Distinguished Service Award. Senior Director of Visual Communications at the liberal arts college, Brown was a freelance graphic designer and then joined the institution as an art director in 2002. Since then “she has elevated the College’s visual communications to precipitous heights and earned prestigious design awards from CASE and GDUSA.” Before earning her graphic design degree, she rose to management ranks at GE, and was certified as a tool and instrument maker, the first woman at the company to earn that distinction. The Distinguished Service Award is presented annually by the Hamilton Alumni Association.


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OBITUARY | MASSIMO VIGNELLI That quote by Massimo Vignelli elegantly summed up his philosophy of design — and, by the way, what did he do that was not elegantly done? Mr. Vignelli died in late May at the age of 83 after a long illness. Born in Milan and trained as an architect in Milan and Venice, he was an admirer of Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe, and spent a lifetime translating the concept of “functional beauty” into everything he designed. He was the leading “modernist” graphic designer, striving for disciplined, intelligent and simplified solutions based on timeless geometric forms. A biography accompanying the presentation of the AIGA Medal to he and his wife Lella states: “Vignelli design, in both three dimensions and two, is highly architectural in character. Massimo’s posters, publications and graphic designs seem to be built in stories, separated by the now-familiar, bold, horizontal rules. Basic geometry is respected. The investigative design process moves from the inside out: ‘The correct shape is the shape of the object's meaning.’ The Vignelli commitment to the correctness of a design has taken their work beyond the mechanical exercise of devising a form best suited to a given function. They’ve always understood that design itself, in the abstract, could and should be an integral part of function.” His clients are too numerous to enumerate but included American Airlines, IBM,

MASSIMO VIGNELLI

Knoll, Ford, Xerox, Bloomingdale’s Saks, Barneys, the National Parks Service, and

1931-2014

U.S. in the 1950s on a fellowship and returned permanently in the mid-1960s as

the New York and Washington DC subway systems. Mr. Vignelli first came to the a co-founder of Unimark International, which grew into an influential global pioneer

“Styles come and go. Good design is a language, not a style.”

in the creation of corporate identities through design. He headed the New York office of Unimark and then later opened Vignelli Associates. The firm eventually morphed into Vignelli Designs in 1978 with Massimo and Lella as equal partners in every way. Mr. Vignelli was honored with every major design award, including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Cooper-Hewitt, National Museum of Design, and the first US Presidential Design Award, presented by Ronald Reagan, for work with the National Parks Service. His graphic, product, furniture, industrial and environmental designs appear in permanent collections worldwide such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Smithsonian. On a personal basis, Mr. Vignelli and the GDUSA family crossed paths over the years. My father, Milton Kaye, was publisher of Print magazine through the early 1960s, and Mr. Vignelli consulted on the design of a spin-off magazine for package designers — even visiting our little subdivision house on Long Island when I was roughly eight years old. In the mid-1960s, once my father founded GDUSA, the publication was a close friend and supporter of Unimark and vice versa. Over the years as editor of GDUSA, I occasionally ran into Mr. Vignelli and he kindly participated in several of our trend forecasts. The final time I saw him, a few months ago, he surprised me by graciously remembering that we had first met when I was a small child in pajamas (to make that clear, I was the one in pajamas). Interestingly, he asked after my parents and wondered aloud if they were still alive. In GDUSA’s recent 50th Anniversary reader poll, Mr. Vignelli was named by our readers as one of the top five designers of the era and his still-controversial New York City Subway Map (circa 1972) was ranked as one of the top three favorite design projects of all time. May 27 was a sad day. – GORDON KAYE

30 G D USA


xed a l e r e r o 100% m s e e r t e r o 49% m

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Did you know that there are now 49% more trees growing in the U.S. forests than 50 years ago.† Magazines are printed on paper made from renewable wood…good news if you love spending a leisurely afternoon leafing through your favorite magazine. †

Society of American Foresters

To discover some surprising environmental facts about print and paper, visit www.youlovepaper.info/us

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ANNUAL COLOR FORECAST


FALL 2O14

Color That Transcends Time and Place Whether it was a particular decade or a trip to a special place, designers are fascinated with the beauty of the past and the spirit of the present — recreating it with color, fabric and style. Design and color are inspired by everything from books, artisan crafts, photography and retro architecture to exotic landscapes and the children of rock legends. The inspiration from travel and the need to explore brings a more adventurous use of color, especially through the use of combinations. Rigid color rules have been replaced by more creative guidelines to inspire new color direction, and we are beginning to see untypical colors that are reflective of imagination and ingenuity. One such color is PANTONE 18-3224 Radiant Orchid – the 2014 Pantone color of the year. Radiant Orchid reenergizes almost any color palette and provides a unifying element for diverse spaces. Through carefully examining the world around us for new color influences, Pantone has remained the global color authority and provider of professional color standards for the design industries for more than 50 years. Color forecasts including the PANTONE Fashion Color Report, PANTONE VIEW home + interiors report and Color of the Year declaration continue to influence product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, beauty, home and industrial design. And, of course, graphic design and all its subsets. For more than 20 years, Pantone has surveyed the designers of New York Fashion Week and beyond to bring you the season’s most important color trends. The following pages are excerpts from the Pantone Fashion Color Report which previews the most prominent hues for Fall 2014, including the 10 most directional colors which appear below.

RADIANT ORCHID

ROYAL BLUE

ALUMINUM

AURORA RED

MISTED YELLOW

SANGRIA

MAUVE MIST

COGNAC

BRIGHT COBALT

CYPRESS

Pantone LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Incorporated, has been the world’s color authority for over 50 years, providing design professionals with products and services for the colorful exploration and expression of creativity. Always a source for color inspiration, Pantone also offers paint and designer-inspired products and services for consumers. www.pantone.com All images © Pantone Fashion Color Report and the fashion designer attributed below the photograph. PANTONE® and other Pantone LLC trademarks are the property of Pantone LLC. Pantone LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Incorporated. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © Pantone LLC, 2014. All rights reserved. Colors displayed here may not match PANTONE-identified standards. Consult current PANTONE FASHION + HOME Color System publications for accurate color. PANTONE® and other Pantone LLC trademarks are the property of Pantone LLC. Pantone LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Incorporated. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

PICTURED LEFT: YOANA BARASCHI GDUSA 33


ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE Sangria, an exotic red that evokes a sense of glamorous adventures and faraway destinations is enhanced by Aurora Red,a more sophisticated shade that adds verve and spark.

NICOLE MILLER

KENNETH COLE

34 G D USA


PANTONE COLOR BRIDGE® The PANTONE PLUS SERIES for graphics and multimedia Create brilliant designs on multiple platforms with 1,737 PANTONE Solid colors – including 84 new shades for 2014 – and side-by-side simulations for process printing, web design and displays. Exceptionally versatile. Exceptional value. Learn how you can Make it Brilliant at pantone.com/colorbridge PANTONE® and other Pantone trademarks are the property of Pantone LLC. Pantone LLC is a wholly owned subsidiary of X-Rite, Incorporated. © Pantone LLC, 2014. All rights reserved.


ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE The grown-up reds are followed by two extremes of the purple family that intrigue the eye and inspire the imagination. Mauve Mist, a romantic and elegant purple shade, reminds us of the deco era and stimulates a sense of femininity and empowerment, while Radiant Orchid, a captivating and adaptable shade, enchants the complete spectrum. Pair either with Cypress, a majestic and powerful green; indicative of its name, this shade has a towering presence and serves as a stunning perennial.

NOON BY NOOR

NANETTE LEPORE

CHRISTIAN SIRIANO

36 G D USA


With its slightly green undertone, Bright Cobalt offers a subtle twist on the traditional cobalt, which unifies this season’s blues. Likewise, Royal Blue, which is both evocative and dignified, provides more complexity and excitement than the average navy, while still remaining versatile. Pair Bright Cobalt with Sangria and Cypress, or Royal Blue with Mauve Mist and Aluminum, a futuristic stainless steel shade that serves as a complex neutral.

LELA ROSE EMERSON M. PATMOS BY MARCIA PATMOS

GDUSA 37


ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE Similar to Sangria, Cognac’s name alone leads to glamorous illusions. This classy and cultured brown takes a typical autumnal color to a sumptuous realm, making the shade unexpectedly ideal for evening wear. Adding a ray of sunlight and warmth, optimistic Misted Yellow alludes to the promise of spring to come. Both Cognac and Misted Yellow will also be prevalent in prints – a surprisingly popular trend this fall season.

SAUNDER BY EMILY SAUNDERS

BIBHU MOHAPATRA

38 G D USA


ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE

JAY GODFREY

BIBHU MOHAPATRA

STEVEN ALAN

SAUNDER BY EMILY SAUNDERS

MONIQUE LHUILLIER

NANETTE LEPORE

TIA CIBANI

CHARLOTTE RONSON

WHIT NY

RACHEL ROY

LELA ROSE

TRINA TURK

For more than 20 years, Pantone has surveyed the designers of

NEW YORK FASHION WEEK and beyond to bring you the season’s most important color trends. 40 G D USA


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ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE PANTONE PLUS SERIES 84 Vivid New Shades and Limited-edition Artist Covers Bringing the total number of colors in the PANTONE PLUS SERIES to 1,755, 84 new colors were added this year. Additions incorporate a broader range of blushes and pinks, as well as a wider variety of vibrant blues, greens and violets. The new colors are available in coated and uncoated formats and are printed on text-weight paper to match popular print specifications. These colors, along with the 336 colors introduced in 2012, have been integrated into the color sequencing for a chromatic arrangement. Artist Edition covers were also introduced this year and feature the work of two artists from PANTONE Canvas, Pantone’s free, online portfolio sharing network powered by Behance. The PANTONE PLUS SERIES guides can be purchased at www.Pantone.com.

PANTONEVIEW.com Catering to designers across all areas of design, PANTONEVIEW.com is a digital subscription service that features visual inspiration, critical color direction and a global perspective on color from the world’s leading experts. PANTONEVIEW.com lets designers make more informed decisions and perfect their color strategies, while providing macro and local views on key color stories, including insight and analysis on how color is breaking across different industries and geographies. The site includes forecasting and orientation where key color direction is mapped out six to 12 months ahead of the season, in addition to reporting and analysis as the season progresses, in order to provide color confirmation and new color updates. PANTONEVIEW.com also features topical color news and live events where subscribers can hear directly from a variety of global color experts. Subscriptions are available at PANTONEVIEW.com.

42 G D USA


ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE VIEW home + interiors 2015 PANTONE VIEW home + interiors 2015, a compendium of major color trends that will influence the home and interiors marketplace, contains nine key trend palettes, plus individual color and material direction and arms home furnishings and interior designers with the critical color information they need to appeal to consumers. PANTONE VIEW home + interiors 2015 contains visual inspiration, suggested color harmonies, individual tear-out palette cards for each of the nine forecasted palettes, swatches of the 72 forecasted colors, and images from the forecast for use in presentations and storyboards.

THE NINE PALETTES FOR 2015 ARE:

Style-Setting Abstractions Botanicum Zensations Urban Jungle Tinted Medley Past Traces Serendipity Spontaneity

PUFFIN’S BILL

SCARLET SAGE

MAGENTA

SPRING CROCUS

EGGSHELL BLUE

TIGER’S EYE

BRIGHT CHARTREUSE

GOLDEN GLOW

The literal meaning of Serendipity is “a pleasant surprise” or “a happy accident.” In the parlance of styling, it is the coming together of unlikely designs and unexpected colors. An outgoing orange engages cool eggshell blue, while bright chartreuse is enhanced by a yellow gold and hot pink embraces a lofty scarlet – all under the watchful gaze of a tiger’s eye taupe.

GDUSA 45


ANNUAL COLOR REPORT | PANTONE VIEW home + interiors 2015

PALE GOLD

The palette titled Zensations truly engages and heightens the senses as it displays a literal “enlightenment” by taking the thoughtful, meditative qualities of the blue and blue-green family to more visceral level by adding a compelling red, an atmospheric green as well as sparkling silver and gold.

SILVER

AZURE BLUE BLUE CORAL

ECLIPSE

SURF THE WEB

ANEMONE

SEA SPRAY

ROSETTE

RED DAHLIA

SEAPORT

CRUSHED GRAPE

HAZEL

APRICOT ILLUSION

STONEWASH

VINEYARD GREEN

Abstractions unleashes the inner artist, similar to the formulation of abstract art where styling might seem randomly gathered, forming a mosaic of differing shapes and many of them geometric. Colors such as grape and apricot, dahlia red, stonewashed blue, hazel nut brown and vineyard green seem to come from equally disparate places, but when brought together create an artistic whole.

46 G D USA


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BY GORDON KAYE

A PENDULUM SWING 51ST ANNUAL PRINT DESIGN SURVEY For the 51st year GDUSA has conducted a reader survey about print design. When print was pretty much the only game in town, our surveys split hairs: lots of detailed questions and analysis of projects, presses, papers, specification practices. In 2014, print is far from the only game in town and our annual survey, appropriately we think, focuses on fundamentals — the present and future role of print in graphic and media communications. Here, the 2014 survey results are both suggestive and informative.

48 G D USA


First, the survey finds that print remains crucial as to how professional graphic designers make a living. More than 9-in-10 designers work in print as part of their mix and near 3-in-4 projects involve a print component. Second, designers retain responsibility and control for large swaths of the print process, with nearly 9-in-10 involved in print buying and paper specification. Third, designers still value print for its classic strengths. Foremost among these strengths is touch — the promise of the tangible, sensual, physical, real. Print works, they say, because it creates a human connection missing from the virtual world of digital communications. Fourth, designers sense that the pendulum swing away from print communications has gone a bit too far. Their premise is that, in the digital clutter, effective printed pieces can be fresh, surprising, welcome, personal, special. Fifth, print’s evolution to a smarter and leaner profile — think digital printing and sustainable paper making — are helping keep the medium a relevant option when hard choices are being made about effectiveness, economics, and ethics.

GDUSA 49


PRINT SURVEY | THE NUMBERS

WHAT TYPES OF DESIGN PROJECTS DO YOU WORK ON?

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND MORE OR LESS PAPER THAN IN PAST YEARS?

=

94% PRINT 76%

64%

18%

ONLINE

POP/PACKAGE

TV/FILM

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND PRINTING?

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND PAPERS + SUBSTRATES?

86% PAPER IN GENERAL

88%

87%

78%

PRINTING

DIGITAL

RECYCLED PAPERS

IN GENERAL

PRINTING

76% DIGITAL PAPERS

HOW MUCH OF YOUR WORK INVOLVES DESIGNING FOR PRINT?

73% OF YOUR TIME IS SPENT WORKING IN PRINT

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND MORE OR LESS PRINTING THAN IN PAST YEARS?

IS SUSTAINABILITY INCREASING OR DECREASING AS A FACTOR IN DESIGN SOLUTIONS?

= 36% 58% 6% INCREASE SAME DECREASE

= 21% 51% 28% MORE

SAME

LESS

71% OF YOUR PROJECTS INVOLVE PRINT

11% 62% 27% MORE

SAME

LESS

WHAT KINDS OF PRINT PROJECTS HAVE YOU WORKED ON THE PAST YEAR? (TOP 12)) Brochures/Collateral/Sales Promotion Announcements/Invites/Cards Direct Mail/Postcards Letterheads/Business Cards Print Advertising Posters POP/Packaging Publications/Magazines/Catalogs Annual + Corporate Reports Self-Promotion (Own Firm) Books/Photobooks Calendars

WHY DO YOU BUY OR SPECIFY DIGITAL PRINTING? (TOP 6) Price Quick Turnaround Targeted Print Runs Quality/Look & Feel Ease of Digital Workflow Sustainability

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, RECOMMEND THESE RELATED BUSINESS PRODUCTS/SERVICES?

Aa 92%

80%

TYPE/ FONTS

SOFTWARE FOR DESIGN

82% HARDWARE + ACCESORIES

Our 2014 survey was sent to a random selection of nearly 15,000 GDUSA magazine and e-subscribers (one-in-three) and generated 2,812 responses. The benchmark numbers tell a convincing story: though print is no longer the superstar of the design business, it remains crucial to how most working designers make a living. Specifically, 94% of GDUSA readers work in print as part of the mix and spend 73% of their time doing so. As has been true for decades, control over the process still resides with the designer: 86% buy or specify paper and 88% buy or specify paper. Other interesting findings: digital printing has become commonplace and mainstream, mostly because of the capacity to control print runs and target markets; the popularity of digital printing has increased the focus on the character and value of quality digital papers; sustainability influences the design solutions and print decisions; and, finally, the majority of designers are printing as much as in the recent past but the trend continues to be modestly downward at the margins.

50 G D USA


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PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

PRINT AND PAPER HAVE CLASSIC STRENGTHS Designers feel strongly and positively about print. They value print for its classic strengths and how these can be effectively leveraged to convey a message or a feeling. Foremost among these strengths is touch. Other practical attributes that continue to matter: permanence, portability, convenience, accessibility. Print works, in the view of most of our readers, because it creates a human connection and a trustworthiness missing from the ephemeral, desensitizing, often anonymous world of digital communications. That said, everyone understands the reality that print operates in a multi-media world, and the comments clearly grapple with exactly when, where and how to deploy print to its best advantage.

Print still has a vital part to play in communications because one of its traditional strengths, touch, is not offered by other mediums. It’s the part of a communication package that clients reach for because it’s the only thing they can hold. To them, it is something real and static while everything else seems to be in constant flux. You can’t ignore one of the basic senses and offer a complete experience. Print will always be part of graphic communications.

I get tired of the adage ‘print is dead.’ I actually started on the digital side but have been getting more and more work for print. I think the way that we use it has changed. Companies no longer see value in blasting out tons of cheap, glossy mailers or wasteful catalogs. They’re being much more intentional about well-designed pieces on higherquality papers, and with more unique and attention-getting folds or die lines. Print is not dead, it just requires more creative solutions than designers have given it in the past.

There is a perception of credibility toward printed materials that is a direct outcome of all that is online, ever-changing, and can often be questionably authored. Holding a well-created printed piece in your hand, I believe, creates an emotional connection that can seldom be achieved on screen. Patricia Korch, Creative Director, Nichols College Print will always have a place in communications, just not the same way as it has in the past. Ana McCormick, Sr. Graphic Designer, MD Anderson Tactile interaction will always have a place in visual communication. Its role may change — the pros and cons will shift from time to time — but there will always be value in connecting through touch. Something a screen can not replicate — varying finishes and textures that evoke an emotional response. That will always have a place in communication. David Burney, Senior Designer, Wenzel Design, Inc. The most successful campaigns are multifaceted! Printed materials are just as important as digital and interactive tools. As studies show, print offers a deeper emotional connection and a greater sense of permanency than digital. I see print and digital as equals: ultimately it is all feeding into the user’s perception and interaction of our brand/product. Charles Lockwood, Interactive Designer, Suffolk University OMC

52 G D USA

MARY-FRANCES BURT CREATIVE DIRECTOR BURT&BURT

RUSSELL SHAW DESIGNER, RUSSELL SHAW DESIGN

Print communications have potential to bring a more unique, engaging, and memorable experience to the audience than digital communications. Personally, I prefer the printed page for certain information because of the flexibility in presentation, the tactile qualities, the construction and the portability. These qualities can be a great asset if used properly in communications. I find digital presentations to repetitious and boring after a short period. Philip McCormick, Owner, Design Works Call me sentimental, but I love being able to reflect on past events and memories by pulling invitations and specialized photo books from my desk drawers. Visiting a web page doesn’t give you that same sense of nostalgia, not to mention that sites and pages can be taken down. Tactile memories are more permanent. Elizabeth Nici, Owner, Gusto Designs, LLC A resounding ‘yes’ to print, both personal and professional. Even with the evolution of digital and online design, there is still a strong market for tangible items. Our college has reduced printing quantities of publications and moved online, but we still produce a lot of tangibles such as posters and invitations. Jane Beckler Bird, Graphic Designer/Webmaster, Spartanburg Community College Yes, print is still vital and vibrant, especially in the luxury markets. Our luxury brands are supported by increasing amounts of fine printed materials. Jeff Harris, Creative Director, Spectrum Brands


PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

PRINT AND PAPER HAVE CLASSIC STRENGTHS Traditional print is wonderful; there’s nothing as magnificent as a heavy cotton paper with engraving or toothy recycled stock that you can hold in your hands. However, clients hire designers with specific project parameters, many requiring online or social media as their medium of choice. I find all methods of communicating exciting, adds breadth to brands and campaigns. There’s a time and place for both! Andrea Costa, Andrea Costa Design We were Boston’s first all digital design firm, founded in 1986. Most of our clients have us design their print and web materials. They both have their place in the marketing/communications mix. Paper meets one set of needs; the web meets others. Surprisingly, we still design and print newsletters, reports and journals for some clients that have migrated to the web for other clients. Some clients only use the web for external communication. Others must use print and web to meet multiple client needs. Marc Kaufman, President, Digital Design Group, Boston The feel of printed pieces is very important to me. Darcy Davies, Marketing Director, Coldwell Banker Commercial Alliance Even though we offer digital, many people prefer to have the hard copy of a datasheet. I find that if we have paper, people don’t necessarily want to throw it out right away, whereas digital media is easier to delete. Especially at trade shows — there is a sort of passing of the baton or handshake with the giving of a sheet of paper. Heather Smiles, Marketing Manager and Designer, Rocket Software Print is still very relevant in my personal and professional life. There’s just something about putting your hands on something printed. Sure, print media is confining compared to interactive media but having something to hold onto and keep is long lasting communication. Bobby Chavarrae, Art Director, Creative Handbook I love print, the smell and touch of it. However, client budgets and timelines are not allowing for print as much anymore, even when I prove it as a better tactic! Clients are often so late that time for execution has compressed tremendously. They also feel the pull to react quickly to what’s trending, and that means doing something interactive and immediate. The end-consumer loves print. They like to hang cool posters and see beautiful announcements. The appreciate the creativity. It the client and the budget (and the USPS) that are killing print. Victoria Wise, Director of Marketing, Infinity Direct

We see print and packaging as an even more important part of the marketing mix. With print (and packaging) there are those irreplaceable tactical aspects. Feel the paper . . . open the box . . . it’s a unique human interaction. Of course, digital fulfills interactive aspects in entirely different ways.

Print absolutely plays a primary role in graphic communications. Most digital experiences are flat and easily lost and forgotten. The tangible benefits of print can never be matched with an on-screen experience. Physical touch creates an experiential memory that a keyboard or piece of glass cannot provide.

JAMES C. SMITH CEO, SMITH DESIGN

MARK ZWART SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER, LUTRON ELECTRONICS

Print is important in my personal and professional life. In my experience, the results are better than web. Antonio Navarro, Art Director, Ler Editora How the world communicates and interacts has changed, and that has diminished the use and need for print. I feel print has a significantly smaller role in graphic communication than the past. Brad Kennedy, Marketing Design Manager, ECCU

Nothing on-screen matches the touch and feel of quality paper and printing techniques. Rebecca Henigin, Creative Director, Henigin Design Print is still important, but for most, only as appropriate and necessary to avoid waste and save money. Clients are using web-based marketing more often now, but many still need some print and should not give it up completely. Jeanette Dyer, Designer, akta creative There are times when print is needed. Business cards, special invitations, sales literature, and items printed for tradeshows and meetings: banners, posters and smaller signage, as well as some handouts. Leah Hanlin, Graphic Designer/Print Services Manager, Gardner Denver

Print will never die. David Raube, Creative Director, Siemens Even the digital mass majority still appreciate tactile solutions for communications and experiences. Personally, printing has allowed customization and personal taste to be explored in interior design and decor and even social events. Professionally, printing will always be a part of the process. Digital and print have their pluses and minuses. Touch and paper weight play a unique role in quality and impression. Dan McElhattan III, Owner/Instructor, M3AD/CSN

GDUSA 55


Print is easier on the eyes. Staring at a computer screen, tablet or phone is as unnatural as you can get! Print will endure this rush to digitize everything ... Also, there are some great advances in synthetic papers ... If we can streamline synthetics to be safe, cheap, and appealing I think we'll have a winner! ... Go print! Ryan Schocklin, Graphic Artist III, Stockton College

FAVORITE COLORS FOR PRINT DESIGN 1

RED

PMS 185

PMS 485

2

ORANGE

PMS 7417

PMS 717

3

BLUE

PMS 646

PMS 653

4

GRAY

COOL GREY #10

COOL GREY #11

5

GREEN

PMS 348

PMS 375

6

PURPLE

PMS 669

PMS 5265

Printed ephemera becomes a lasting artifact. There are events in our lives that we want to have something tangible to refer to that provide a memorable proof to the existence of what we experienced. Jeryl Jones, Sr. Graphic Designer, SRP I am still interested in print, especially anything with the new creative die cuts and papers. Finding and saving these pieces has become a design scavenger hunt for our company. And designing our own pieces of a creative nature is a feather in our cap of which we are extremely proud. Mary Schill, Art Director, Forte Design Print design is as important as ever. Print design has a feel and a presence. Not to mention it has been proven in the last year that print is more cost effective in energy saving than digital/ web based information. Print products also communicate much better; studies have shown that information consumed through print is more easily remembered. Anarae Ascuena, Owner, Anarae Design Group Print will always be important; not everyone is connected at the hip/right arm to a digital environment. In my personal life, print is essential since the majority of my day is spent in front of a computer. I still feel the need to detach, with love, of course. And the feel of holding a magazine or book, reading a printed newspaper, remains a crucial part of my life. One of favorites things to do is hide out in the local library, scanning the shelves and observing others doing the same. Cathy Kratovil, Owner, Graphic Design Visuals

Print has lessened, but yes, it still holds an important place in communication.

7

8

BLACK

PINK

BLACK

PMS 219

PROCESS BLACK

PMS 212

9

YELLOW

PMS 123

PMS 130

10

METALLIC

PMS 871

PMS 877

56 G D USA

Nola Mortenson Barger, Information Specialist, Iowa Department of Transportation Print is still an important medium in the current industry. There’s now a reflection that people are becoming too dependent on technology, and the graphic arts are becoming hip and trendy again. Print still provides a personal touch and experience to most customers. Lee May, Creative Designer, USA Financial I love the smell of ink on paper, the texture of a toothy cover weight, and the look of multi-level embossing or letterpress. To flip through old books with printed color plates is an experience. I don’t know how much people outside of the field appreciate this though. Print may have to disappear further from our lives before it is appreciated, desired and welcomed back. Melanie Bass Pollard, Owner/Creative Director, Bass Designs Printing is still a very relevant form of graphic communication for my clients and the College. I believe the convenience, permanence and touch remain important factors in why we choose print. Pam Barby, Self and Pennsylvania College of Art & Design


PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

THE PENDULUM MAY BE SWINGING BACK As noted above, professional graphic designers feel strongly that print has traditional strengths that can make it stand out in the digital crowd. To explore print’s appropriate place in the mix of media communications, we asked readers to react to a recent Wall Street Journal article (March 7, 2014) which theorized that Americans are “renewing their relationship with paper,” not so much for commonplace activities and functions, but when special, important or personalized communications are required. Interestingly, 97% of those who answered the question agreed that the relative rarity of print is beginning to imbue it with heightened potential and power for sophisticated and important messaging that requires emotional connection, authenticity and permanence.

Since media sites now have an ad at every turn, many people are becoming numb to them. There are so many, the effect begins to dwindle. Print can be more controlled. Not many people will see the print pieces, but they will be more effective for each viewer. For pieces such as business cards, invitations, magazines, etc., this is a very important part of how printed marketing and design continue to have impact.

I agree to a point. Print is becoming more alluring. But there is also a huge DIY, hand-made surge. People are beginning to reconnect with pen and paper on a smaller scale. I don’t think our renewed relationship with paper needs to be anchored on “high-end” nor do I think the corporate marketplace is necessarily finding a new appreciation for quality paper products. Though there is definitely a sense of getting back to basics for which we seem to be nostalgic.

SCOTTIE GARDONIO OWNER/ GRAPHIC DESIGNER DAYMARK DESIGNS, LLC

DAVID BURNEY SENIOR DESIGNER WENZEL DESIGN, INC.

Clients are beginning to associate the tactile experience of print with luxury. Digital is cheap, fast, and easy. Who wants to be identified with any of those things? Mary-Frances Burt, Creative Director, Burt&Burt

Print is beginning a comeback in marketing and advertising with small business in my area. A printed flyer or ad has much more staying power than digital. Peter Brandenstein, Owner, Schoolhouse Graphics

The pendulum has swung too far away from real, tangible communications. Yes, I believe printed pieces — well executed and created to be special — have value, authenticity, and the ability to cut through the electronic clutter. Emma Lewis, Emjay Associates

I agree that people are renewing their relationship with paper. Physical print pieces are a part of a home — a conversation and art piece rather than merely functional. Well-designed, high-end periodicals, books, or annuals are a treat to get. And as Americans understand and appreciate design more and more, getting a package that is high-design is experiential rather than simply something you tear through to get to the product. Russell Shaw, Designer, Russell Shaw Design

I agree that the appreciation for higher-end papers has increased somewhat, but in truth, receiving a printed piece now makes a statement in and of itself. Of course, this can sometimes make specialty papers and specialty printing techniques appear to be overly luxurious or wasteful. From a business development standpoint, it is important that marketing and branding materials do not appear indulgent. Magen Raine Massey, Communication Design Manager, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple Announcements of life’s milestones are always better in print. They become cherished mementos and can be displayed for others to enjoy. A beautiful coffee-table book still makes an impact that the digital version never can. Andrea Leigh Ptak, Designer, Communicating Words & Images Agree. Many of my clients have tried to shift much of their marketing online, but they never seem to get the results they're seeking. I see a return to catalogs, flyers and brochures. POP displays and packaging have never gone away. F. Dennis Dickerson, Owner, Respond Grafiks 58 G D USA

Paper appeals to the new ‘maker’ generations we see growing in numbers, though in admittedly online commoditized spaces like Etsy and even Fab. Digital is not something to completely “own.” It lives beyond the physical, tactile world and it doesn’t offer the sensory experiences and surprises familiar to all people from their very first day on the Earth. Not to deify it, but paper is present with us, in our space, in the real world. There’s nothing sadder than an empty postbox, a bare community announcement kiosk, or even an e-card. Adrian Constantyn, Chief Creative, MeMyself&Co. Design Unlike mobile or computers, I cannot find the ‘off button’ on the brochure that has been sitting on my kitchen table for weeks. Its work ethic is outstanding, 24/7 and without even asking for a coffee break. :) James Bland


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PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

THE PENDULUM MAY BE SWINGING BACK Print is a strategic choice and plays an important role in our branding and marketing. All digital becomes too much mental clutter and the ‘good stuff’ gets caught up in a sea of digital noise ... I would never reach out to a donor without a quality print piece. I would follow up digitally, but the initial ask needs to have class and style. Sarah Brancato, Art Director, Cincinnati Museum Center Print still has an impact on communication. In a fast paced digital world where things change every minute, the tactile presence of a printed piece feels more permanent and special. Sue Taube, Art Director, Taube/Violante, Inc. With so many things being digital, a well designed printed piece has even more relevance than before because it is more likely to stand out and be remembered. A paper invitation, for instance, will always be welcome; people want a physical object to commemorate milestones, anniversaries, etc. The importance of a particular event or anniversary carries more weight when delivered as a high-end printed piece. Nadia Gomez, Graphic Designer, CUNY In the ever increasing commonality of disposable digital media, we are finding that physical media, print media, is gaining more attention and popularity because it is harder to ignore. However, said print media needs to stand on it’s own. Print media needs to evolve or it will die. Kyle D. Kubik, Vice President, Island Pro Digital

It’s like fashion, it comes and goes. Jane Beckler Bird, Graphic Designer/Webmaster, Spartanburg Community College Absolutely agree. These projects are usually high quality and use special printing methods like engraving, letterpress, embossing and foil stamping, special coating and more. They often provide a tactile experience. Susanne Schropp, President Diva Design, Inc. I believe that paper is now used to impress, i.e., a formal invitation or thank you note. Daily stuff, like daily news, will all move online. Andrea Costa, Andrea Costa Design Agree. We find that people still respond best to print. People love when we use paper that is out of the norm such as textured uncoated stocks. Jane McGrath, Senior Creative and Design Manager, AAA Western and Central New York Agree. Print is simple and direct, with no intervening electronic medium. The modern definition of ‘media’ seems increasingly to refer exclusively to electronic platforms. Print is out here with us, in meatspace. Thus, 21st century print seems ‘media-less.’ More trustworthy. Ralph Bentley, Art Director, Kittelson & Associates 60 G D USA

Print is still needed for a lot of our target market. When it comes to personalized communications, yes, I agree that print can still stand out. For example, the look or feel of the paper and print techniques creates an impression when you receive an invitation or direct mail piece. Nonetheless, it's important to be aware of the target market and design accordingly. For example, a glitzy piece likely will not inspire people to donate money but it may well inspire people to attend a high-end event.

MELODY KRIS ART DIRECTOR, CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL OF WISCONSIN

I totally agree. The everyday tactility of average stocks and print processes are not enough to keep the attention of today’s audience, but by using specialty papers and processes — not just great design, but specialty stocks, varnishes, spot varnishes, foil stamps of all types, emboss, specialty inks, etc.— you can elevate a piece to garner a more targeted response versus the ease of saturation of online media. Alan Burnitt, Hederman Brothers Print is still extremely important. Communications can be easily overlooked or lost in the daily barrage of digital media. The tactile qualities of a welldesigned printed piece are difficult to replace. Todd Gordon, Supervisor, Corporate Identity & Branding, Medical Mutual I would agree, especially in the niche markets such as wedding and event collateral printing. Leah Hanlin, Graphic Designer/Print Services Manager, Gardner Denver When targeted or interesting, print has more presence than online communications. When typical, like most direct mail, it gets lost fast. Print is better for longer, detailed information. I agree that there is a continual swing, especially among different generations, between the convenience of online and the ease of use and availability of print. Bob Wonders, Owner, Executive Art I would agree. My clients like to have their direct mail printed, because they (and I) feel the consumer will take a longer look at it then an email blast. In packaging and collateral material like brochures, clients like to see how many crazy type folds they can do on a piece, they feel they can get the consumer to be more interested in dimension than something flat on a screen. Michael Lyons, Owner/Art Director, ML Creative I agree, but not for the reason given. I do not believe paper’s ongoing value lies solely in exclusive or high-end uses (although it does very much play a role more coveted than the electronic blink of an email), but rather for its overall permanence, reusability/recycling/upcycling, durability, and relative affordability, when compared to the expense of digital devices. I have yet to find an electronic device as durable as a board book in the hands of a toddler. Adrian Constantyn, Chief Creative, MeMyself&Co. Design Possibly true. As more communications are digitized, the special qualities of paper may become more appreciated due to the rarity of its usage. Karen M. Beers, Proprietress, Karen M. Beers Designs Agree! I have had lots of clients comment that they feel disconnected from life the more digital they become, so paper is a way to feel like ‘the good ol' days’ again. Krystlyn Giedt, Designer/Coder, even design


WE MA M MAY AY NO NOT T BE SCIENTISTS, SC CIENTIS CIENTIS STS STS, BUT T WE KN KNOW NOW CH CHEMISTRY. HEMISTR RY Y. CREA CREATIVE AT TIVE FUSI FUSION: ON: When forces forces ccollide ollide e and cr create eate something w wonderful. onderful. Whether tha thatt something is a w website, ebsite, mo mobile obile app or mark marketing eting ccampaign, ampaign, w we e hav have e all the e el elements ements ffor or an ac accurate curat a e solution. Every Ev very time we we unit unite e a ne new w ttalent alent and client, it’ it’s sa an ne exciting xciting e experiment. xperiment. And we we al always ways pr p promise omise the same rresults: esultts: SUCCES SUCCESS. S.

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PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

PRINT AND PAPER ARE LEANER AND CLEANER Our survey respondents give printers and papermakers credit for getting the wake up call, i.e., evolving to meet the challenges of a new era. Most of the discussion revolves around new technologies and sustainable practices. First, designers say they are taking increased advantage of digital print-related technologies to target, customize, personalize, sharpen, interact and integrate. Second, they recognize that print has become more environmentally friendly, and that printers and paper companies have made great strides to make products and processes sustainability. In short, these bundle of innovations are making print leaner and greener, and thus more competitive when hard media choices are being made. Printing smarter, leaner and greener is a part of why print still has relevance. As designers, it is our job to be mindful of and sensitive to the processes and materials, so that we do not create more waste for an already cluttered landscape. But I also think that print's relevance is furthered, too, by the nature of the higherend papers, substrates, and processes, in addition to their environmental impact. Print is an elegant and tangible solution to communication in a digital world; where it would be cheap and easy to communicate digitally, print says that forethought and design weighed heavy into the piece. Russell Shaw, Designer We digitally print very small runs of literature inhouse to meet our demand. Lean and green! Leah Hanlin, Graphic Designer/Print Services Manager, Gardner Denver What has bothered many of us in the past is the amount of waste associated with print. Now we can offer our clients environmentally sound paper choices in addition to soy inks and at the same time print the smaller quantities that we will actually use versus large print runs to get a better price per piece. I believe we’re at the point where print can be an efficient and sustainable part of graphic communications. Mary-Frances Burt, Creative Director, Burt&Burt

Technology is improving and quality is on the rise, but we will need to keep on this path to sustain the print industry. Educating the consumers is essential every step of the way.Most people are unaware of the what is possible and how good design and quality print can set them apart.

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In the past, waste was prevalent. Now with tighter budgets, less time to produce and recyclable requirements, the industry has improved. And look how much “cleaner” printing has gotten! James C. Smith, CEO, Smith Design We continually have short print runs since we need to add important and necessary updates to our information and materials. Digital printing allows us to be agile and effective. Barbara Moser, Graphic and Web Designer, Tampa General Hospital In my personal experience, I see an increase in efficiency as well as sustainability in the print industry. Lee May, Creative Designer, USA Financial It is amazing how far professional digital printing has come. The quality is awesome, print runs are quick, and you can get such targeted quantities printed for a small amount of money. Michael Lyons, Owner/Art Director, ML Creative When I started in this business, clients had to be extremely careful about determining the quantity of a piece. They needed to print enough to bring the per-piece price down, yet make sure the content did not become obsolete before they were used up. Today, it is cost-effective to print a finely-targeted, small quantity — and update as needed. Also, personalized Christmas cards and calendars were reserved for the wealthy. Now I produce custom cards and announcements for the average Joe! Andrea Leigh Ptak, Designer, Communicating Words & Images For a while, people who were environmentally conscious were moving away from print. However, those same people are starting to realize that being responsible for the environment doesn’t mean you have to give up on paper. Whether the communications are for more specialized projects or your everyday brochure, all it takes are the right resources and some creativity. Elizabeth Nici, Owner, Gusto Designs, LLC High end digital presses allow us to print shorter runs of selected publications and marketing materials that co-exist on the web. Customization has impact, though not for every consumer. We choose recycled and sustainable paper and ink for both offset and digital print runs when possible, matching our values and client needs. Marc Kaufman, President, Digital Design Group, Boston Digital printing has been a boon to my clients. Short runs, high quality, affordable. Recycled paper? My clients still want to use the best paper for the least cost. F. Dennis Dickerson, Owner, Respond Grafiks With what digital printing presses are able to do today — spot colors, white ink, gloss, emboss, etc. — there’s a lot more you can do today with short quantity, quick runs. I don't believe traditional offset has changed a whole lot, but with the right design and advice in stocks and processes, offset can be financially accessible enough to remain relevant … at least for a little longer. Alan Burnitt, Hederman Brothers

JEANETTE DYER DESIGNER AKTA CREATIVE

We have customers ordering just what they need from a digital press instead of 5,000 prints that will last two years. Customers are changing up information for each piece to make it more relevant for each customer group they are targeting. Lona Munger, President, Color-ize


PRINT SURVEY | A MESSAGE FROM VERSO PAPER CORP.

OUR SUSTAINABLE IDENTITY

And so it is with sustainability at Verso Paper Corp. It’s woven into every layer of our company, including the papermaking process, our innovative approach to renewable energy, customer and community relationships, and the health and safety of our employees. Our character as a company is built on our commitment to sustaining a balance among economic, social and environmental needs. Sustainability is part of our very makeup. PRINT ON PAPER: A SUSTAINABLE DECISION Conversations with our customers and recently published research confirm what we’ve known – print on paper remains a key component of integrated marketing campaigns. Studies show that 74 percent of consumers rely on both print and digital media*, suggesting that the best way to increase customer engagement is by offering a variety of media options. And since Verso procures wood fiber from responsibly managed forests, paper consumers can be confident that print on Verso paper is a sustainable decision.

“When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” JOHN MUIR SCOTTISH-BORN AMERICAN NATURALIST AND EXPLORER

TURN TO VERSO FOR QUALITY PRODUCTS Our parallel commitments to sustainability and to delivering quality products to our customers combine to drive our focus on lightweight and ultra-lightweight coated paper products. We remain committed to producing new products that require less wood fiber, water, chemicals and energy to product, but that continue to offer stellar look, feel and performance. Since our lightweight papers also require less energy to transport, they provide our customers an excellent balance of quality and environmental stewardship. Our portfolio of sustainably manufactured coated, uncoated and specialty papers, from our Aspect® line of label and release papers to our industry-leading Influence® grade, are known for their exceptional optical properties and reliable performance.

TURN TO VERSO FOR HIGH QUALITY, SUSTAINABLY MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS. To view paper specifications, order product samples, and view our 2013 Sustainability Report . . .

CONTACT: versopaper.com E: verso247@versopaper.com P: 1.800.258.8852 *American Business Media Association/Value of B-to-B. July 30, 2013

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS SPONSORED BY THE CREATIVE GROUP The American Web Design Awards is our annual showcase of the power of design to enhance websites and online communications. The growing importance of this discipline for professional graphic designers is reflected by a doubling of entries in this year’s competition as well as the growth of new categories for apps, social media, tablets, digital publishing and more. We are pleased that GDUSA's web awards has emerged as among the most prestigious and competitive, and we hope you enjoy the 120 winners showcased here. 3M Global Design Lab 70 5 by 5 Design 70 5Seven 70 A+E Networks/360 Creative Access Communications 71, 102, 105 Ad.In Design 71 Anda Creative 71 Argus 72, 95 Behavior Design 72 Carlow University 100 Casey Jelinski Design 72 Chandon Nicholas, LLC 73 Collipsis Web Solutions 73 Creativo Inc. 73 Dade Medical College/Marketing & Creative Department 102 Design Partners, Inc. 95 dreamscapes design group 73 Ellen Bruss Design 74 Enrich Creative 74 Exceleron Designs 75 FVM Strategic Communications 75 Firehouse 100 Fluke Corporation 102 Franke+Fiorella 76 Fusionfarm 76 Greenfield/Belser 76, 102 Hartford Design 77 Huge 77 Idea Marketing Group, Inc. 77 Ideas On Purpose 95, 96 Imagemakers, Inc. 77, 78 Integrated Marketing Services 78 iPrezence - Groupe Huot Web Department 78, 100 John Rivas Publicidad 78, 100 Keystone Resources 81 Kimberly Garcellano 81 Kitchen Collaborative 81 Lamar Advertising Company 81 Malwarebytes Corporation 82 MarketSpace Communications 82, 96, 103 McDill Design 82

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MediMedia Managed Markets 82 Mermaid, Inc. 83 Metropolis Creative 83 MetroStar Systems 101 Minds On Design Lab 83 MojoTech 99 Neoscape 105 Neustar, Inc. 83 Oblique Design 84 Paragraphs Design 84, 103 Peter Hill Design 101 Positive+Space 84 Premier Agency Inc./Creative Department 85 Premier Communications Group 85 RMH Marketing & Media 86 Rowland Creative 86 SAS Corporate Creative 87, 105 Satellite Six LLC 87 Skeggs Design/Union Design 87 SMC Ltd. 87 Spohn Design 88 Stephen B. Starr Design, Inc. 88 Studio Kudos 88 Suissa Messer 89, 103 Susan Newman Design Inc. 89 Test Monki 89, 90 TFI Envision, Inc. 101, 104 The Hive, Saint-Gobain's Creative Hub 105 Transformation Marketing 90 Visible Logic 90, 91 Vision Internet 91 VMC Art & Design, LLC 90 W&Company 91 Walsh Design 92 Warkulwiz Design Associates 92 Windy City Web Designs 92, 93 Wonderful Machine 94 Xin Huang, Pratt Institute, Graduate Communication Design 104 York & Chapel 99 Zoomph 94


A WORD FROM OUR SPONSOR

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: 3M Global Design Lab, St. Paul MN Client: 3M Title: 3M Design Website Art Directors: Kevin Gilboe, Space150 Designers: Kevin Gilboe, Space150 Programmer: Space150 Web Developer: Space150 www.3m.com/design

Design Firm: 5 by 5 Design, Minneapolis MN Client: Saint Thomas Academy Title: Saint Thomas Academy Website Art Director: Wendy Ruyle Designer: Wendy Ruyle Web Developers: Hutman, Inc. Account and Project Manager: Diana Lillicrap www.cadets.com

Design Firm: 5Seven, Napa CA Client: 5Seven Title: 5Seven Website Art Director: Clint Delapaz Designer: Clint Delapaz Programmer: Amit Sakunia Web Developer: Amit Sakunia Copywriter: Clint Delapaz www.5seven.com

Design Firm: A+E Networks/360 Creative, New York NY Client: History Consumer Marketing Title: History Emmy Site Senior Interactive Art Director: Jarrett Brilliant Web Developer: Julio Martinez Multimedia Director: Tim Call Project Manager: Lauren Carrabs www.historyemmy2013.aetncsg.com/mpx

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Access Communications, New York NY Title: Access Communications Website Art Director: Keith Hart Web Developer: Keith Hart www.accesspr.com

Design Firm: Ad.In Design, Ocean Springs MS Client: Ocean Springs Chamber of Commerce Title: Ocean Springs Chamber Website Art Director: Beverly Dees Designers: Beverly Dees, Paul Donnell Programmer: Joe Saienni Photographer: Paul Donnell Copywriter: Samantha Hebert www.oceanspringschamber.com

Design Firm: Anda Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Kate & Company, LLC Title: Kate & Company Website Art Director: Miranda Summers Digital Director: Amanda Potts www.kateandcollc.com

Design Firm: Anda Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Mercy’s Hope Title: Mercy’s Hope Website Art Director: Miranda Summers Web Developer: Amanda Potts Digital Director: Amanda Potts www.mercyshope.net

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Argus, Emeryville CA Client: Zen Hospice Project Title: Zen Hospice Project Website Art Director: Jeff Breidenbach Designer: Serena Sea Photographers: Peter Cunningham, Teresa Kennett, David Butow Copywriter: Diane Mailey www.zenhospice.org

Design Firm: Behavior Design, New York NY Client: Center for Art and Thought Title: Center for Art and Thought Website Creative Director: Jeff Piazza Visual Design Lead: Heather Shoon Design Technologist Lead: Matthew Knight Project Manager: David William Managing Director: Mimi Young www.centerforartandthought.org

Design Firm: Behavior Design, New York NY Client: Cablevision Title: Optimum Website Creative Director: Jeff Piazza Visual Design Lead: Lee Chakov Program Manager: Jim McGrath Information Architect Lead: Matthew Marco Managing Director: Mimi Young www.optimum.net

Design Firm: Casey Jelinski Design, McGregor MN Client: SPEDCO Title: SPEDCO Website Rebrand Art Director: Casey Jelinski Designer: Casey Jelinski Programmer: Jason Berberich Web Developer: Agent701.com Photographer: Michael Hendrickson Copywriters: Tara McAdams, KochMcAdams Communications SPEDCO Executive Director: Kristin Wood www.spedco.com

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Chandon Nicholas, LLC, Vero Beach FL Title: Chandon Nicholas Website Art Director: Marc Vorkapich Designer: Jacqueline Williams Programmer: Jacqueline Williams Web Developer: Jacqueline Williams Illustrator: Jacqueline Williams Copywriters: Marc Vorkapich, Katherine Vorkapich www.chandonnicholas.com

Design Firm: Collipsis Web Solutions, Tulsa OK Client: Paige1Media Title: Paige1Media Website Designer: JP Jones Programmer: Nicholas Clayton Web Developer: Nicholas Clayton www.paige1media.com

Design Firm: Creativo Inc., Alexandria VA Title: Creativo Inc. Stand Above The Rest Art Director: Josecarlos Merino Designer: Josecarlos Merino Programmer: Josecarlos Merino Web Developer: Josecarlos Merino Illustrator: Miss Moon Copywriter: Patrice Ford www.creativoinc.net

Design Firm: dreamscapes design group, Essex CT Client: Slรกinte Event Planning & Design Title: Slรกinte Website Art Director: Rachel Edwards Designer: Ernie Lewis Programmer: dreamscapes design group www.slainteevent.com

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Ellen Bruss Design, Denver CO Client: Dandizette Magazine Title: Dandizette Website Creative Director: Ellen Bruss Designer: Dan Delli-Colli www.dandizettemagazine.com

Design Firm: Ellen Bruss Design, Denver CO Client: Continuum Partners Title: Prairie Pines at the Ridge Website Creative Director: Ellen Bruss Designer: Greg Jesse Programmer: Greg Jesse www.prairiepineswilliston.com

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Design Firm: Ellen Bruss Design, Denver CO Client: Pilates Aligned Title: Pilates Aligned Website Creative Director: Ellen Bruss www.pilatesaligned.com

Design Firm: Enrich Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Plant-Based Nutrition Healthcare Conference Title: PBNHC Website Art Director: Kory Waschick Designer: Kory Waschick Programmer: Kirk Roberts Web Developer: Kirk Roberts Copywriter: Susan Benigas www.pbnhc.com


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Exceleron Designs, Jupiter FL Client: One Ocean Drive Realty Title: One Ocean Drive Realty Website Art Director: Ryan Kidd Designer: Oliver Ching Programmer: Eduardo Delgado Web Developers: Crystal Brown, Sean Allen, Leo Samayoa Photographer: Morgan Brannon Copywriters: Maggie Hill, Alyssa Schreiner Project Manager: Lora Devine www.oneoceandriverealty.com

Design Firm: Exceleron Designs, Jupiter FL Client: Comprehensive OBGYN Title: Comprehensive OBGYN Website Art Director: Ryan Kidd Designer: Giovanna Viale Web Developers: Crystal Bown, Sean Allen, Leo Samayoa Photographer: Morgan Brannon Illustrator: Giovanna Viale Copywriters: Maggie Hill, Alyssa Schreiner, Morgan Brannon Project Manager: Lora Devine Social Media: Autumn Brown www.comprehensiveobgyn.net

Design Firm: Exceleron Designs, Jupiter FL Client: CYTOWAVE Title: CYTOWAVE Website Art Director: Ryan Kidd Designer: Giovanna Viale Web Developers: Crystal Brown, Sean Allen, Leo Samayoa Illustrator: Giovanna Viale Copywriters: Maggie Hill, Morgan Brannon Project Manager: Stephanie Laing Social Media: Autumn Brown www.cytowave.com

Design Firm: FVM Strategic Communications, Plymouth Meeting PA Title: ThinkFVM Agency Website Art Director: Rob Devaney Designer: Rob Devaney Programmer: Jordy Pickel Web Developer: Jordy Pickel Photographers: Joe Delich, Victor DeAnda Illustrator: Mark Parker Copywriter: Emma O’Brien www.thinkfvm.com

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Franke+Fiorella, Minneapolis MN Client: Louellen Essex and Associates Title: Louellen Essex and Associates Website Creative Director: Craig Franke Designer: Claire Marrinan Photographer: Thomas Strand Photography www.louellenessex.com

Design Firm: Greenfield/Belser, Washington DC Client: Hanna Brophy Title: Hanna Brophy 2013 Website Art Director: Burkey Belser Designer: Mark Ledgerwood www.hannabrophy.com

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Design Firm: Fusionfarm, Cedar Rapids IA Title: Fusionfarm Website Creative Director: Michael Zydzik Designers: Neil Brewster, Keaton Reeder, Seth Smith, Jake Vardaman Web Developer: Greg Apel Photographer: Neil Brewster Illustrators: Keaton Reeder, Seth Smith Copywriters: Regina Gilloon-Meyer, Michael Zydzik www.fusionfarm.com

Design Firm: Greenfield/Belser, Washington DC Client: Nexsen Pruet Title: Nexsen Pruet 2013 Website Art Director: Burkey Belser Designers: Alexis Thornlow, Siobhan Davis www.nexsenpruet.com


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Hartford Design, Chicago IL Client: CD One Price Cleaners Title: CD One Price Cleaners Website Art Director: Tim Hartford Designers: Tim Hartford, Brandon Murray www.cdonepricecleaners.com

Design Firm: Huge, Brooklyn NY Title: The Redesigned Hugeinc.com Art Directors: Stefanie Pitaro, Chris Huban Designers: Casey Sheehan, Ross Proulx, Jose Guizar, Justin LaFontaine Programmer: Jens Wachtel Web Developer: Wes Hatch Associate Creative Director: Megan Man www.hugeinc.com

Design Firm: Idea Marketing Group, Inc., Plainfield IL Client: Phil Stefani Signature Restaurants Title: Chicago Restaurant Group Website Photographer: Nick Ulivieri www.stefanirestaurants.com

Design Firm: Imagemakers Inc., Wamego KS Client: Innovate Kansas Title: Innovate Kansas Website Art Director: Dan Holmgren Designer: Ben York Programmer: Brian John Web Developer: Clayton Leis Photographer: Colin MacMillan Copywriter: Jaclyn Collins www.innovatekansas.org

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Imagemakers, Inc., Wamego KS Client: U.S. Stone Industries Title: U.S. Stone Website Art Director: Dan Holmgren Designer: Ben York Programmers: Brian John, Luis Carranco, Clayton Leis Web Developer: Scarlett Sidwell Photographer: Colin MacMillan Copywriter: Jaclyn Collins www.usstoneindustries.com

Design Firm: Integrated Marketing Services, Princeton NJ Client: Agfa Pitman Title: Agfa Pitman E-Store Art Director: Heather Muller www.shop.agfapitman.com

Design Firm: iPrezence - Groupe Huot Web Department, Quebec City QC Client: Complexe Capitale Hélicoptère Title: Website Design Web Director: Tarik Safouan Senior Designer: Andrew Spangler Programmer: Adil Zili Integration: Fred Duguay www.complexech.com

Design Firm: John Rivas Publicidad, San Juan PR Client: Hera Printing Corp. Title: Hera Printing Website Art Director: John Rivas Designers: John Rivas, María Isabel Meléndez Programmer: María Isabel Meléndez Web Developers: WebPADPR, John Rivas Publicidad Photographers: John Rivas, Juan Sostre Illustrator: John Rivas Copywriters: Juan Sostre, María Isabel Meléndez www.heraprinting.com

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2 0 1 4 american graphic design awards

ENTRY DEADLINE

JULY 1, 2014

The editors of Graphic Design USA invite you to join the thousands of creative professionals who have been PRESENTED BY recognized by this national design competition for five decades. The competition is open to everyone in the community: advertising agencies, graphic design firms, corporate, institutional and publishing inhouse departments, and more. It honors outstanding new work of all kinds: print, packaging, point-of-purchase, internet, interactive + motion graphics.

SPONSORED BY


AMERICAN GRAPHIC DESIGN AWARDS

WHO IS ELIGIBLE? Entries may be submitted by any company or individual involved in the creation or production of the work.

SPONSORED BY

WHAT IS ELIGIBLE?

ENTRY GUIDELINES

Entries must have been created between January 1, 2013 and June 20, 2014.

ENTRY FORM

HOW TO ENTER

CONTACT INFORMATION

OPTION 1 ENTER ONLINE Go to www.gdusa.com/agda2014 to download an entry form. Fill out one entry form for each entry your are submitting. Create a folder which includes all completed entry forms and one digital image per entry. Please zip the file and name it with your company name. Upload the zipped file on our site.

________________________________________________________________________________ submitter’s name ________________________________________________________________________________ company/department name ________________________________________________________________________________

OPTION 2 MAIL IN YOUR ENTRY Please send the actual printed piece, unmounted but well protected. We cannot return entry materials. Do not send original artwork or any work in low supply.

address

ENTRY FORM PREPARATION ____________________________________________ ____________________ _____________ city

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MAIL ENTRIES TO: Graphic Design USA 89 Fifth Avenue, Suite 901 New York, NY 10003 Attention: Awards Department


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Keystone Resources, Houston TX Client: Scout’s Honor Rescue Title: Scout’s Honor Rescue Website Art Director: Lynsey Jones Designer: Erica Bogdan Programmer: Roger Sullivan Web Developer: Shonna Godoy VP Interactive: Roger Sullivan VP Creative: April Guzik www.scoutshonor.com

Design Firm: Kimberly Garcellano, San Diego CA Client: Nicole McGaha Title: Nicole McGaha Website Designer: Kimberly Garcellano Web Developer: Kimberly Garcellano www.nicolefit.com

Design Firm: Kitchen Collaborative, Burbank CA Client: Infratech Title: Infratech Website Art Director: Aniko Hill Designers: Jenny Dox, Aniko Hill Programmer: Tracy Swanson Photographer: Jesse Hill Copywriter: Alexa Chigounis www.infratech-usa.com

Design Firm: Lamar Advertising Company, Baton Rouge LA Title: Lamar Advertising Company Website Creative Director: Mendi Robinson Art Director: Alise Johnson Designer: Design Sensory Programmers: Candace Hoeksema, Perficient Web Developers: Ian Fitz, Design Sensory Photographer: Lamar Advertising Company Illustrator: Design Sensory Copywriters: Allie McAlpin, Lamar Advertising Company Design Sensory: Lindsay Miller, Ian Fitz Perficient: Candace Hoeksema Director of Marketing Services: Cheryl Zimmermann Project Manager: Michael Kulivan from Lamar Advertising Company www.lamar.com

GDUSA 81


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Malwarebytes Corporation, San Jose CA Title: Malwarebytes Corporate Website Designer: Sid Bodalia Web Developer: David Crandall Illustrator: Grumo Media Copywriter: Eric Fairbanks Director of Marketing: David Curtner www.malwarebytes.org

Design Firm: MarketSpace Communications, Cranberry Township PA Title: Colorama by Fiesta速 Interactive Plate Setting Tool Chief Creative Officer: Trish Parkhill Art Director: Jake Metzger Copywriter: Megan Prucnal Digital Marketing Manager: Jen Yavorsky Senior Digital Developer: Dustin McGrew Digital Developer: Mike Boory www.colorama.fiestafactorydirect.com

Design Firm: McDill Design, Milwaukee WI Client: Journal Communications Title: Corporate Website Design Creative Director: Michael Dillon Designer: Brenda Mraz-Skibinski Web Developers: Javier Centeno, Brandon Prochnow Copywriter: Laurel Jahn, Journal Communications www.journalcommunications.com

Design Firm: MediMedia Managed Markets, Yardley PA Title: MediMedia Managed Markets Website Designer: Karen Onorato Web Developer: Travis Tingey www.medimediamanagedmarkets.com

82 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Mermaid, Inc., New York NY Client: Digital Arts Title: Digital Arts Website Art Director: Sharon Lloyd McLaughlin Web Developer: Sharon Lloyd McLaughlin Copywriter: Adrian Bonvento www.digitalartsimaging.com

Design Firm: Metropolis Creative, Boston MA Client: Park Square Realty Corporation Title: MotorMart Garage Website Art Director: Michael Flint Designer: Matt Reynolds Programmer: Christopher Gladney Web Developer: Christopher Gladney Photographer: Bill Horsman Illustrator: Matt Reynolds www.motormartgarage.com

Design Firm: Minds On Design Lab, Brooklyn NY Client: Global Campaign for Education, US Chapter Title: Global Campaign for Education, US Website Art Director: Michelle Perreault Designer: Gabriella Tato Web Developer: Naomi Royall Project Manager: Ash Shepherd Strategic Planning: Seth Giammanco www.campaignforeducationusa.org

Design Firm: Neustar, Inc., McLean VA Title: Neustar Corporate Website Designer: Ray Henry Web Developer: Ray Henry Copywriters: Fred Guthrie, Mark Jackley www.neustar.biz

GDUSA 83


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Oblique Design, Boulder CO Client: Carrier Mausoleum Construction Title: CMC Website Art Director: Janice Ferrante Designer: Jeffrey Steffonich Programmer: Chad Phillips Web Developer: Chad Phillips Photographer: Lloyd Paul Illustrator: Jeffrey Steffonich Copywriter: Jordan Sher Senior Director of Marketing & Strategic Development: Joshua Lintz French Translation: Johanne Tremblay www.cmc-carrier.com

Design Firm: Paragraphs Design, Chicago IL Title: Paragraphs New Website Art Director: Robin Zvonek Designer: Carrie Ceresa www.paragraphs.com

Design Firm: Paragraphs Design, Chicago IL Client: Quantum Group Title: Quantum Group New Website Art Director: Robin Zvonek Designers: Carrie Ceresa, Hannah Kim Programmer: Hannah Kim www.quantumgroup.com

Design Firm: Positive+Space, Rome NY Client: Adobe Systems Title: Adobe ADIM14 Conference Website Designer: Jason Occhipinti Web Developer: Jason Occhipinti www.adimconference.com

84 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Premier Agency Inc./Creative Department, Atlanta GA Client: Premier Agency Inc. Title: Grab A Seat Art Director: Jeff Corey Designers: Leslie Moreno, Sarah Araya Web Developer: Jeff Corey Photographers: Jeff Corey, Leslie Moreno Copywriters: Justin Epstein, Mandy Nicholas, Natalie Macking www.grabaseat.premieragencyinc.com

Design Firm: Premier Communications Group, Royal Oak MI Client: Saroki Architecture Title: Saroki Architecture Website Art Director: Randy Fossano Designer: Lisa Dion-Struebing www.sarokiarchitecture.com

Design Firm: Premier Communications Group, Royal Oak MI Title: Premier Communications Group Website Art Director: Randy Fossano Designer: Lisa Dion-Struebing www.premiercg.com

Design Firm: Premier Communications Group, Royal Oak MI Client: The Alan Group Title: The Alan Group Website Art Director: Randy Fossano Designer: Lisa Dion-Struebing www.thealangroup.com

GDUSA 85


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: RMH Marketing & Media, Houston TX Client: Children at Risk Title: Children at Risk Website Redesign Art Director: Jonathan Netek Designer: Jonathan Netek Programmer: David Stagg Web Developer: David Stagg Account Manager: Chris Buckner www.childrenatrisk.org

Design Firm: RMH Marketing & Media, Houston TX Client: Lone Survivor Foundation Title: Lone Survivor Foundation Website Redesign Art Director: Jonathan Netek Designer: Jonathan Netek Programmer: David Stagg Web Developer: David Stagg Account Manager: Chris Buckner www.lonesurvivorfoundation.org

Design Firm: RMH Marketing & Media, Houston TX Client: ThumbWar Title: ThumbWar Web Design Art Director: Jonathan Netek Designer: Jonathan Netek Programmer: David Stagg Web Developer: David Stagg Account Manager: Chris Buckner www.declareathumbwar.com

Design Firm: Rowland Creative, State College PA Client: Videon Central, Inc. Title: Videon Website Art Director: Dan Rowland Designer: David Spak Programmer: The Team at West Arete Web Developer: West Arete Illustrator: David Spak www.videon-central.com

86 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: SAS Corporate Creative, Cary NC Title: 2014 SAS Website Redesign Creative Directors: Eric Morales, Gray Heffner Art Director: Jeff Foxx Designers: Carl Blackwell, Bill Dotson, Brian Lape, Brian Lloyd, Kyle Wilson Web Developer: Jeff Foxx Copywriter: Joy Bisesi www.sas.com

Design Firm: SMC Ltd., Somerset WI Title: SMC Ltd. Corporate Website Art Director: Christie Wanderer Designers: Brandon Overland, Christie Wanderer Programmer: Room 34 Creative Services Web Developer: Kenton Hanson Copywriters: Christie Wanderer, Barbara Tischart, Greg Frost www.smcltd.com

Design Firm: Satellite Six LLC, Eau Claire WI Client: Asher Lasting Exteriors Title: Asher Lasting Exteriors Website Art Director: Ben Stroinski Designer: Ben Stroinski Programmer: Ryan Lauritsen Web Developers: Ryan Lauritsen, Ben Stroinski Copywriter: Dean Mathwig www.goasher.com

Design Firms: Skeggs Design/Union Design, New York NY Client: Central Park Conservancy Title: Plan for Play Website Art Directors: Gary Skeggs, Clint Bottoni Designers: Gary Skeggs, Alison Ivens, Austin Kurowski Programmers: Michael Murphy, Dean Pajevic, Jen Braun Web Developer: Murphy Web Consulting Copywriter: Marie Warsh, Central Park Conservancy www.planforplan.centralparknyc.org

GDUSA 87


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Spohn Design, Redondo Beach CA Client: Just Body Essentials Title: Just Body Essentials Website Art Director: Ron Spohn Designer: Melissa Vannucci Web Developer: Ron Spohn Copywriter: Martha Cook www.justbodyessentials.com

Design Firm: Stephen B. Starr Design, Inc., Evanston IL Client: Chicago Philharmonic Society Title: Chicago Philharmonic Society Website Art Director: Stephen B. Starr Designer: Stephen B. Starr Web Developer: David Rodman www.chicagophilharmonic.org

Design Firm: Studio Kudos, New York NY Client: 1100 Architect Title: 1100 Architect Website www.1100architect.com

Design Firm: Studio Kudos, New York NY Client: Rauch Foundation Title: Build a Better Burb Website www.buildabetterburb.org

88 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Suissa Messer, New York NY Client: Teachley Title: Teachley Website Art Director: Andrea Messer Designer: Andrea Messer Programmer: Justin Suissa Web Developer: Justin Suissa Copywriter: Justin Suissa www.teachley.com

Design Firm: Susan Newman Design Inc., Jersey City NJ Client: Chef Camillo Sabella Title: Chef Camillo Sabella Website Art Director: Susan Newman Designer: Susan Newman Web Developer: Susan Newman www.chefcamillosabella.com

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Magnolia Pharmacy Title: Magnolia Pharmacy Website Art Director: Suzy Simmons Designer: Julie Bruton Web Developers: Suzy Simmons, Julie Bruton www.magnoliapharmacy.com

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Carrie Muzny DDS Title: Muzny Website Art Director: Suzy Simmons Designers: Julie Bruton, Yiwen Lu Web Developers: Suzy Simmons, Julie Bruton, Yiwen Lu Photographer: Taylor Kerr www.carriemuznydds.com

GDUSA 89


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Synchro Corp. Title: Synchro Website Art Director: Suzy Simmons Designer: Julie Bruton Web Developers: Suzy Simmons, Julie Bruton www.synchrocorp.com

Design Firm: Transformation Marketing, Panama NE Client: Elegant Occasions Gowns Title: Elegant Occasions Gowns Website www.eogowns.com

Design Firm: VMC Art & Design, LLC, Allendale NJ Client: Tali Nay Title: Tali Nay Books Website Art Director: Victoria Colotta Designer: Victoria Colotta Programmer: Victoria Colotta Web Developer: Victoria Colotta www.talinaybooks.com

Design Firm: Visible Logic, Portland ME Client: Relax America Title: Relax America Web Site Art Director: Emily Brackett Photographer: DeAnne Curran www.relaxamerica.com

90 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Visible Logic, Portland ME Client: The Muddy Rudder Restaurant Title: Muddy Rudder Web Site and Mobile Site Art Director: Emily Brackett Photographer: DeAnne Curran www.muddy-rudder.com

Design Firm: Visible Logic, Portland ME Client: Climb Technology Title: Climb Technology Corporate Web Site Art Director: Emily Brackett Photographer: DeAnne Curran Copywriter: Emily Brackett www.climbtechnology.com

Design Firm: Vision Internet, Santa Monica CA Client: City of Reno NV Title: City of Reno NV Website Photographer: Vision Internet www.cityofreno.com

Design Firm: W&Company, Brooklyn NY Client: Tabush Title: Tabush Website Art Director: Will McDermott Designer: Will McDermott Programmer: Regan Wilders Illustrator: Charles Draper www.tabush.com

GDUSA 91


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Walsh Design, Seattle WA Client: Advanced Research Corporation Title: Connecting The Marketplace, Dealers & Fishermen Art Director: Miriam Walsh Lisco Designer: Miriam Walsh Lisco Programmer: Wil Black Web Developer: Wil Black Copywriter: Jeanne McKnight, McKnight PR www.marketplace.fishtrax.org

Design Firm: Warkulwiz Design Associates, Merion Station PA Client: DAKdirect Title: DAKdirect Website Art Director: Bob Warkulwiz Designer: Roni Lagin Web Developer: Stephen Reinstein www.dakdirect.com

Design Firm: Warkulwiz Design Associates, Merion Station PA Client: The Arthur Jackson Company Title: iMops Website Art Director: Bob Warkulwiz Designer: Patrick Midway Web Developer: A+L Development

Design Firm: Windy City Web Designs, Algonquin IL Client: Brite IM Title: Brite IM Company Website Art Directors: Bjorn Torling, Rich Miller, Alisha Lowans Designers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Programmers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Web Developers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Copywriter: Harry Eschel www.brite.im

92 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Windy City Web Designs, Algonquin IL Client: Britton Gallagher Title: Britton Gallagher Child Care Insurance Program Art Directors: Bjorn Torling, Rich Miller, Alisha Lowans Designers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Programmers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Web Developers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Copywriter: Patrick Treend www.childcareinsuranceprofessionals.com

Design Firm: Windy City Web Designs, Algonquin IL Client: Clarence Davids Title: Clarence Davids & Company Website Art Directors: Bjorn Torling, Rich Miller, Alisha Lowans Designers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Programmers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Web Developers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Photographer: Alan Watkins Copywriter: Alan Watkins www.clarencedavids.com

Design Firm: Windy City Web Designs, Algonquin IL Client: RPS Products Title: Best Air Filters Company Website Art Directors: Bjorn Torling, Rich Miller, Alisha Lowans Designers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Programmers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Web Developers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Copywriters: Curt Weber, Kira Haines www.rpsproducts.com

Design Firm: Windy City Web Designs, Algonquin IL Client: Windy City PPC Title: Windy City Strategies’ Pay Per Click Website Art Directors: Bjorn Torling, Rich Miller, Alisha Lowans Designers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Programmers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Web Developers: Rich Miller, Kelly Hammersmith Copywriters: Bjorn Torling, Alisha Lowans www.windycityppc.com

GDUSA 93


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Wonderful Machine, Conshohocken PA Client: Souders Studios Title: Deliciously Different Designer: Melissa Ginsiorsky Web Developer: Inverse Paradox Illustrator: Rick Souders www.soudersstudios.com/recipes

94 G D USA

Design Firm: Zoomph, Reston VA Title: Zoomph Website Chief Strategy Officer: Amir Zonozi Lead Web Designer: Nick Cronin Lead Visual Designer: Sean Cummings Lead Developer: Lee Kohn Lead Content Strategist: Rachel Lore Project Manager: Val Treshchov www.zoomph.com


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | MICROSITES

Design Firm: Argus, Emeryville CA Client: Opportunity Fund Title: Opportunity Realized Art Director: Jeff Breidenbach Designer: Serena Sea Photographers: Alma Elizondo-Bailey, Alain McLaughlin Copywriters: Catlin McShane, Alma Elizondo-Bailey www.opportunityfund.org/2013/index.html

Design Firm: Design Partners, Inc., Racine WI Client: Gilmour - Robert Bosch Tool Corp. Title: LeakFree Microsite Art Directors: Allen Inman, Erin Sliwinski Designer: Erin Sliwinski Programmer: Allen Inman Web Developer: Allen Inman Photographer: Black Box www.gilmourleakfree.com

Design Firm: Design Partners, Inc., Racine WI Client: RotoZip - Robert Bosch Tool Corp. Title: Zip It Certification Quiz Art Director: Allen Inman Designer: Allen Inman Programmers: Allen Inman, Laced Web Developers: Allen Inman, Laced Photographer: Black Box Illustrator: Allen Inman www.rotozip.com/zipitcertified

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: Delphi Title: 2013 Online Annual Report Designers: Anna Tan, Jiayin Yu Web Developer: Ideas On Purpose Design Director: Anna Tan Online Strategist: Michelle Marks Project Manager: Tom Rattigan www.delphi.com/static/2013annual/site/index.htm

GDUSA 95


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | MICROSITES

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: Pfizer Title: 2013 Year in Review Website Creative Director: Darren Namaye Designer: Soryi Am Web Developer: Ideas On Purpose Online Strategist: Michelle Marks Project Manager: Tom Rattigan www.pfizer.com/annual

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: TB Alliance Title: 2013 Online Annual Report Creative Director: John Connolly Designer: Marielle Gross Web Developer: Ideas On Purpose Project Manager: Tom Rattigan www.tballiance.org/annualreport

Design Firm: Ideas On Purpose, New York NY Client: United Technologies Title: 2013 Online Annual Report Creative Director: John Connolly Designers: Anna Tan, Jiayin Yu Web Developer: Ideas On Purpose Online Strategist: Michelle Marks Project Manager: Tom Rattigan www.2013ar.utc.com

Design Firm: MarketSpace Communications, Cranberry Township PA Title: LearnAboutDOC速 Microsite Chief Creative Officer: Trish Parkhill Art Director: Jake Metzger Senior Graphic Designer: Lindsay Polito Copywriter: Megan Prucnal Digital Marketing Manager: Jen Yavorsky Senior Digital Developer: Dustin McGrew Digital Developer: Mike Boory www.learnaboutdoc.com

96 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | MICROSITES

Design Firm: MojoTech, Providence RI Title: JEET.gs I A grid system for humans Art Director: Andrew Shedd Designer: Eli Williamson Programmer: Cory Simmons Web Developer: Eli Williamson Copywriter: Andrew Shedd Framework Developer: Cory Simmons www.jeet.gs

Design Firm: York & Chapel, Shelton CT Client: Nikon USA Title: Nikon “Life is an Awdventure” Sweepstakes Art Director: Peter Michels Designer: Tad Kimball Programmers: Alon Shur, Jason Fountain www.awdventure.com

GDUSA 99


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | SOCIAL MEDIA + NETWORKING

Design Firm: Carlow University, Pittsburgh PA Title: Carlow University Social Media Refresh Art Director: Lindsay O’Leary Designer: Lindsay O’Leary Web Developer: Lindsay O’Leary Photographer: Lindsay O’Leary Content Creator and Manager: Lindsay O’Leary www.carlow.edu/social

Design Firm: Firehouse, Dallas TX Client: National Cheerleaders Association Title: Brand Book Art Director: Zack Ward Designer: Zack Ward Photographer: Dennis Murphy Copywriters: Greg Hunter, Andrew Tiu Group Creative Director: Greg Hunter Executive Creative Director: Tripp Westbrook Printer: ColorMark Retouching: Imaginary Lines www.instagram.com/dna_of_nca

Design Firm: iPrezence - Groupe Huot Web Department, Quebec City QC Client: Complexe Capitale Hélicoptère/Rotornation Title: Rotornation Campaign Strategy and Web: Tarik Safouan Content Management: Stephanie Cotnoir www.rotornation.com

Design Firm: John Rivas Publicidad, San Juan PR Client: VaganciaCreativa.com Plagio Gimenez Title: VaganciaCreativa.com - Plagio Gimenez Facebook Page Art Director: John Rivas Designers: John Rivas, María Isabel Meléndez Programmer: María Isabel Meléndez Web Developers: WebPADPR, John Rivas Publicidad Photographer: John Rivas Illustrators: John Rivas, Fernando Roque Copywriters: María Villalonga de Dios, John Rivas www.facebook.com/vaganciacreativa

100 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | SOCIAL MEDIA + NETWORKING

Design Firm: MetroStar Systems, Reston VA Client: New York Road Runners (NYRR) Title: NYRR Marathon Social Hub Chief Strategy Officer: Amir Zonozi Lead Web Designer: Nick Cronin Lead Developer: Lee Kohn Developers: Robert Scullin, John Seaman www.zoomph.com/nyrr-half

Design Firm: Peter Hill Design, Minneapolis MN Client: GNP Company/Just BARE Chicken Title: Just Dish Blog Art Director: Megan Junius Designer: Allison Krogstad Programmer: Aleksandar Kolov Copywriter: Maccabee Public Relations www.justdish.com

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc., Norwalk CT Client: Standard Motor Products, Inc. Title: TechSmart Social Media for May 2013 - March 2014 - Facebook and Twitter Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designer: Paula Barker Copywriter: Paula Barker Strategy and Content Director: Roy Barker www.facebook.com/TechSmartParts / www.twitter.com/TechSmartPants

GDUSA 101


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | DESKTOP

Design Firm: Access Communications, New York NY Client: Transit Wireless Title: WiFi? Why Not? Art Director: Keith Hart Designer: Tom Meehan

Design Firm: Dade Medical College/Marketing & Creative Department, Coral Gables FL Client: Dade Medical College Title: Start Your Career Designer: Bill Cruz Programmer: Jaxanna Martinez

Design Firm: Fluke Corporation, Everett WA Client: Fluke Thermography Title: 8 Reasons Nurture Campaign Designer: Jordan Barber Web Developers: Danny Pouley, Sheri Smith Photographer: Louis Fliger

Design Firm: Greenfield/Belser, Washington DC Client: Greenfield/Belser and ALM Title: MarketOpps 2013 e-Blast Art Director: Burkey Belser Designer: Mark Ledgerwood

102 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | DESKTOP

Design Firm: MarketSpace Communications, Cranberry Township PA Title: DermatologistOnCall速 How It Works Video Chief Creative Officer: Trish Parkhill Art Director: Jake Metzger Senior Graphic Designer: Jenessa Kaldorf Copywriter: Megan Prucnal Editor: Mike Boory www.vimeo.com/dermatologistoncall/howitworks

Design Firm: Paragraphs Design, Chicago IL Client: Hyatt Title: Hyatt Thrive Art Director: Cary Martin Designer: Mike Schulz Web Developer: Mike Schulz www.youtube.com/watch?v=jz9Cqf3E4zg&list=PLBF98EBBF04A141AA

Design Firm: Suissa Messer, New York NY Client: Abacus Group Title: Hungry for a Career Change? Landing Page Art Director: Andrea Messer Designer: Andrea Messer Programmer: Justin Suissa Web Developer: Justin Suissa Copywriters: Justin Suissa, Lauren R. McGrath www.abacusnyc.com/workwithus/accounting

Design Firm: Suissa Messer, New York NY Title: Adaptive Emails Landing Page Art Director: Andrea Messer Designer: Justin Suissa Programmer: Justin Suissa Web Developer: Justin Suissa www.adaptiveemails.com

GDUSA 103


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | DESKTOP

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc., Norwalk CT Client: Standard Motor Products, Inc. Title: Standardr TPMS Sensors “If Its Not A Perfect Clone” Rich Media Ad Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designers: Hunter Haubert, Chris Plaisted, Elizabeth P. Ball, Roy Barker Illustrators: TFI Envision, Inc. Copywriter: Roy Barker

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc., Norwalk CT Client: Standard Motor Products, Inc. Title: NASCAR Champion’s Week Vegas Sweepstakes Social Media Promotion for TechSmart, Standard and Intermotor Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Directors: Elizabeth P. Ball, Roy Barker Designers: Gus Galicia, John Fiedler Illustrators: TFI Envision, Inc. Copywriters: TFI Envision, Inc. Production Artists: Cindy Emmert, Richard Wall Research: Kelly Daut

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc., Norwalk CT Client: Goodwill of Western & Northern Connecticut, Inc. Title: Goodwill of Western & Northern Connecticut “The Stuff Change is Made Of” Digital Advertising Campaign Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Directors: Mary Ellen Butkus, Roy Barker Designer: Mary Ellen Butkus Copywriter: Aimee Silk Production Artists: Cindy Emmert, Richard Wall Strategy Director: Roy Barker

Design Student: Xin Huang, Pratt Institute, Graduate Communication Design, Jersey City NJ Title: Idea Bottle Designer: Xin Huang Illustrator: Xin Huang Advisor: Ashish Shah www.behance.net/gallery/Idea-Bottle/15459141

104 G D USA


AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | MOBILE/TABLETS + HANDHELD DEVICES

Design Firm: Access Communications, New York NY Client: Transit Wireless Title: NYC Subway Wireless Art Director: Keith Hart Web Developer: Keith Hart Copywriter: Jared Leavitt www.nycsubwaywireless.com

Design Firm: Neoscape, Boston MA Client: Federal Realty Trust Title: Pike & Rose Art Director: Rodrigo Lopez Designer: Mark Hickey Programmer: Evan Buxton www.itunes.apple.com/us/app/federal-realty-investment/id647982573?mt=8&uo=4

Design Firm: SAS Corporate Creative, Cary NC Title: sascom® magazine Creative Director: Marchellina Waugh Designer: Marchellina Waugh Technical Support: Dana Smith, Ken Howell, Doug Brann Photographer: Steve Muir Editor-In-Chief: Anne-Lindsay Beall Editorial Director: Kelly LeVoyer Usability Tester: Beth Heinig www.itunes.apple.com/us/app/sas-com-magazine/id619301980?mt=8&ls=1

Design Firm: The Hive, Saint-Gobain’s Creative Hub, Valley Forge PA Title: Proppants Lead Generation App Client: Saint-Gobain Proppants Creative Director: Kristin Dankanich Designer: Paul Nangle Programmers: Eric Marcussen, John Clark Copywriter: Tina Cox Project Manager: Amanda Froehlich

GDUSA 105


LOGOLOUNGE THE 2014 LOGO TREND REPORT Dazzle, Waves, Wires And So Much More BY BILL GARDNER If home is our first place, and work is our second place, then mobile screens have definitely become our third place. Smart phone use has increased from 21 percent in 2010 to more than 63 percent today, and with 83 percent of all Americans online regularly, that percentage of mobile users is bound to keep edging up. The fact that so many people now view the world through a window the size of a business card has spelled an inevitable change in logo design. It used to be that minute favicons had to be kept extremely simple: Now, as a rule, logos must be as well — but that doesn’t mean boring. Designers continue to push back and evolve the meaning of “simple.” That logos have to be scalable has always been understood. But our perception of “small” has changed — in some cases “tiny” is being rather generous. Dimension and detail are necessarily removed so that these logos read properly on mobile screens. Designs have become more and more flat. Surfaces are plain and defined by mono-weight lines. Of course, there’s a limit to this flattening out and removal of information. Designers and audiences alike need an escape from all things digital. They need a chance to decompress and take a deep breath in a place that provides shelter from information’s frantic pace. Everyone needs to step outside and bask in sunlight, not screen light. And so the pendulum starts to swing back. People seem to be more and more drawn back to what is real, whether that is perusing handmade hats on Pinterest, exploring other cultures or our own family histories, or reconnecting with stories from mythology or our childhoods. By bringing back what is human-made, we gain a sense of control over the digital tide that threatens to overtake us. Designers have responded to the mobile screen’s harsh requisites in a variety of ways, many of which are detailed in this year’s Trend Report. Artisan crafting is ever more important as evidenced by the “Hand Type” solution in abundance this year. Colors are brighter and lighter. Typographic solutions, which can be absorbed immediately with no symbolic interpretation, are ever more important. Designers also have found ingenious creative workarounds, such as introducing long shadows to very flat designs, suggesting that dimension is still there. Logo designs may be reduced

106 G D U SA

to line work (see the “Geo Wires” trend below), but now every facet of the design is visible. These designs are simpler, but now somehow more complex. In other designs, like this year’s “Pompons,” solutions are less reliant on exact, specific shapes, instead communicating with energy and emotion. As with all things, it’s about balance. When anything pushes people too far one way, the natural reaction is to push back. Perceptive designers will always be able learn from watching the pendulum as it swings between people’s wants and needs, and technology’s gifts and demands. As Proctor & Gamble’s global marketing and brand building officer Marc Pritchard said, “Creativity without insight is worthless.” Today, insight means learning how to move design forward by turning digital limitations into communication advantages. WE ALSO SAW PLENTY OF: • Mountains, both representing geographic entities as well as a metaphor for achieving great heights or reaching a summit of success. • Acorns a plenty, as a return to nature and the promise of potential and greatness from an auspicious beginning. These demonstrated planning for the future and as a reminder, the best time to plant a tree was yesterday. • Bees in every form, and a few hives as well. A versatile symbol of fertility, industry, dedication and teamwork. All the critical ingredients for a sticky reward delivered without a sting. • Digital controllers, whether for a game or otherwise, seem to symbolize the ability to manage any challenge at the push of a button or flick of the wrist. • Symbols are being adopted by consumers at an extraordinary pace, and many of these from digital devices or associations with that industry. Clouds, Wi-Fi® waves, loading wheels and a rush of icons from our mobile devices are providing the analogies for the next generation of logos. • Faceting cannot be stopped as it continues to evolve. Since it first hit the scene in 2010 it has sprouted more offshoots than a hydra at a knife fight. • Flat, overly simple logos are giving realism a breather. Skeumorphic design is so yesterday. Unfortunately designers are breaking the surface tension by letting long shadows creep onto the faces of their work. So if we’re living in flat world, what’s casting the shadow?


MONO CREST Let’s start this year’s report with the spawn of the most prolific trend we identified in last year’s report. The use of mono-weight line work and in this case as used in crests or other combination marks that utilize typography and illustration. Last year we identified “Line Craft” using the same single weight stroke throughout and this year the movement has invaded with a vengeance. We identified at least five strains of mono including the most ubiquitous “Mono Script,” “Mono Icons” and this year’s “Mono Crest.” The non-scalable single line weight gained serious use as the go-to for icon designers, and the simplicity can also be seen where it carries forward into illustration work. These crests have a lightness that proves half of the idiom, “you can never be too rich or too thin.” Certainly there is a refinement here, but it allows designers to embrace the rich language they’ve used for years in crests without tonality or color. These are bit like stripping away the heavy flesh to expose a really striking bone structure.

URBAN SUGAR MOBILE CAFE, HEY MONKEY!

COTERIE MARKET, MAKE & MATTER

TATUANA TRADING COMPANY, SEAN HEISLER DESIGN

VALOR + FORGE, GEARBOX

LETTER STACKS Lowly hyphens should abandon hope and designers should be admonished as they lose care for the need to break words between consonants. A primary concern here is whether mathematically the total number of letters gives us an even break. The solution for a stubborn name that’s too long to behave is to parse it into a stack of segments and box them up. Presto, you have a compact solution that suddenly stands out on a T-shirt’s logo ghetto. Typographically, the font is less important but obviously these are seldom lower case. Upper case letters have a parity that allows designers to arrange them like building blocks. Some of this ilk is visually encased and others just arranged to create the illusion of a shape. Either way, this solution is not a true puzzle but it chides viewers enough to actively draw them into the discovery process. It is that modest participation that can initiate the brand bonding process for the consumer.

VORDERMAN VOLKSWAGEN, SECOND STREET CREATIVE

BANDOLERO, THE GENERAL DESIGN CO.

APARTMENTLESS, KOMMUNIKAT

SEE THE MATRIX, MOONLIGHT CREATIVE GROUP

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2014 LOGO TREND REPORT

HAND TYPE It should be no surprise that the use of “hand drawn” type has migrated from the printed page and illustration world to the small and powerful logo. So much so that designers are both revolted and enamored with the mechanization and inundation of these crude digital fonts and abundant template solutions. This last year’s explosion to near critical saturation had been building slowly but with recently blown floodgates, we have to question how much enchanting handcrafted messaging a consumer can take. The promise is the same as the book Hand Job released in 2007, which offered designers and consumers alike a refreshing respite from the churn of digital type. But handcraft be damned as the majority of what appears to be original is no more than a digital font pretending not to be. However, there are exceptional examples of truly hand drawn solutions out there and they standout like a clarion voice. This trend has enough traction that it won’t die soon, but it must surely evolve, and soon.

THE URBAN TAP (INKED), LARRYDOESDESIGN.COM

SPORTIQE BRAND WEST, HALLER DESIGN

SF VINTER'S MARKET, HATCH DESIGN

ELF CAFE, BRAND TONIC

DAZZLE Two centuries ago when Firman Didot crafted his modern serif font of the same name, it became the signature text to usher in the age of enlightenment in literature. Little could he suspect that the Achilles heel of Didot would become an attribute or a trend. When reproduced digitally at it’s smallest, the hairline strokes of the letterform often vanished, an anomaly referred to as “dazzle.” Magnify those misprinted letters and you have a typographic solution that is intriguing and legible in its incompleteness. Designers take particular pride in removing 40 percent of the letterform, which at a distance and to aged eyes appears missing already. Gone is the need for a client to be concerned with how small you can make your wordmark before it starts to fall apart. This is closely related to similar solutions where thick and thin strokes alike are dissected from serif letterforms to create compact visuals ready for consumer interpretation.

YESIL AVLU, UFFINDELL

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MAGNA, NO-BAD

LOVE DENTISTRY, GARDNER DESIGN

THE MAGS DIGITAL AGENCY T-SHIRT, CHADOMOTO/DIMITER PETROV


FLAT FACETS Another equally prolific line of trends over the last few years has been the facet. Watching this particular technique rocket and split into a variety of interpretations embraced by the design community has proven it has legs. This year’s report identified four emerging strains, including “Facet Fields,” “Crystals,” “Type Facets” and “Flat Facets,” which we'll expound on here. Facets first came about with an attempt to create three-dimensional objects from a series of intersecting plains. With shifting gradients or transparency, these marks certainly tried to define volume for the viewer. This trend steps back and allows the very same plains to become dimensionally flat. No attempt to fool the eye here. The greatest value of these marks come from telling the story of recognizing worth in a worthless stone then, making it perceptible by finely honing the surfaces until it takes on the qualities of a priceless gem.

MULTIPURPOSE TERMINAL, MT ESTUDIO

SAINTY SOLAR, HANQINGTANGDESIGN

DIAMOND, FOCUS LAB, LLC

RUSSKAYA MEDNAYA KOMPANIYA, LANDOR

GEO WIRES Looking more like a gem cutter’s instruction manual, this is where facets and mono line trends first intersect by mapping out the cleavage of a rare substance. Often crafted in black and white, these logos take their volume and form from scribing the edges of an invisible host. Canting the shape to create depth, the viewer instinctively knows these lines incase an unknown substance of extreme value. By using a wireframe solution these marks convey a level of precision, whether geometrically symmetrical or resembling an oddly shaped element of deeper symbolism. No curvilinear segments required here as every surface is defined by the straightest of edges. Scientific associations abound with an immediate connection for clients in math, architecture, chemistry and digital endeavors.

ALLCAST, O' RIORDAN DESIGN

GLAVPROMEKSPERTIZY, STILISTICA STUDIO

PRIME (B/W SIGN), OLEG PETERS

MOTER, ELVTN

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2014 LOGO TREND REPORT

TRANS MENAGERIE Flat yes. Transparent yes. Animals yes. In one of the oddest clusters of kindred thinking, the desire to craft beast logos from very flat transparent layers has arrived. Appearing from seemingly diverse geographic sectors, these marks are created from a handful of geometric shapes and are executed with base simplicity. Though I’m absolutely positive I could rearrange these parts to make an inanimate subject, designers have a real fixation on animals here. The clarity of the overlays represents a transparency of process to be expected in dealings with the client. This is a key factor whenever see through layers are used as building blocks. Although there is some modest use of gradation, the majority of these rely entirely on flat overlapping color. This outgrowth of 2012’s “Tessellation” trend brings transparent pattern to the eventual construction of a specific subject.

OPS CAT, CALIBER CREATIVE, LLC

EMPIRE DISASTER2, VELOCITY DESIGN GROUP

ORYX LAND QATAR, RADIUS

DEKAMED, ALEX STANCIU

WAVES We can hardly use the name of a registered product for a trend, thus Waves instead of Wi-Fi®. The protected term has become such a common descriptor that it is starting to suffer trademark erosion and could soon end up like Aspirin, Zipper and Thermos. But here is the rub. Show the three curved, concentrically diminishing lines and everyone in the room will tell you that it stands for Wi-Fi®. In fact, the Wi-Fi Alliance logo has no such lines. Consumers know that when they see these waves, it means the possibility of civilization in the air. It means that they can power up and, cross your fingers, have a wireless connection. It doesn’t hurt that this is a generic icon on most devices for joining a network. Anticipate this icon will not stay confined to digital devices. This symbol is on its way to standing for simply making connections, even if they’re analog.

LIVE FROM THE COMPOUND, OMAR MADE

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HOMENET (MARK PROPOSAL), GREEN INK STUDIO

THALMIC LABS, ENTZ CREATIVE

SPECTRUM MAX, MCGUIRE DESIGN


HEXAGONS Bees knew this was coming long before we did. They have long known the hexagon was the universal building block of shapes. Aim the corner of a perfect cube at your eyes and what do you see? Another hexagon. A regular six-sided polygon with equal edges is perfect for tiling without a gap to be had. So why did it take designers until the last year to bury themselves under an avalanche of these? For all these reasons and more, designers have universally gravitated to hexagons but each with their own take on the shape. The four examples we have selected for this trend could not be more different. The typical crest created in a shield or circle or square is now firmly ensconced in the shape du jour. Interestingly, the shape seldom rolls over to a flat base as the potential of seeing the outline of a cube is most evident when sitting on point.

ETCH CLIMBING HOLDS, BEN DOLEZAL DESIGNS

BOMBER BEARING CO., STILES DESIGN

ASSED, BUROCRATIK - DESIGN

HIVE COMMUNITIES, DEI CREATIVE

GEOGRAPHY Generally the topography, rivers, coastlines and parallels of the world give us a pretty irregular looking batch of continents, as well as national and regional boundaries. Unless you live in Colorado, where your state is often mistaken for the H&R Block logo. Short of a boot shaped like Italy, finding a way to subtly ease a country’s profile into a mark could be a real test for any designer. Of late, there are many that appear up to this challenge. Literally placing a silhouette of your homeland into a logo is not new. Finding a way to incorporate it to achieve an “aha!” moment when discovered seems to be on the rise. Nationalism in general seems to be a favorable recent motif with an abundance of state colors and symbolism. Not every attempt is successful, but when a designer turns Brazil into a frothy head of beer or buries Africa in the spots of a leopard, the magic is impeccable.

MILK CUPS, CROSSTHELIME

AFRICA, FORMFARM CREATIVE

BRASILEIRA BEER, WOX

THE NEW ZEALAND CHEESE SCHOOL, THE CREATIVE METHOD

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2014 LOGO TREND REPORT

POMPOMS No simple balls of fluff, these marks are a series of line segments with a central pivot point. Aside from a common intersection, there are few other rules. Some have a random nature to the grouping and others are highly organized and seem to radiate with great regularity. Others show transparent segments, while still others are as opaque as night. Color can be very limited, or it could just as well give the rainbow a run for the Chroma award. There is a common theme of strength in numbers with each individual element connected in the center with a mutual bond. Examples of this trend are found with flat 2D solutions, as well as attempts to create an illusion of 3D. A measure of radiance is undeniable in each, though the more precise the disbursement the more likely they are to resemble a stellar body. Still others readily accept a kinship to an asterisk, conveying a note of surprise or something special is happening here.

INVICTUS ONCOLOGY, ISHAN KHOSLA DESIGN

BRINELLA SMITH, UNIVISUAL

AVENOR COLLEGE, STORIENCE CONSULT SRL

BG ADVENTURE, COLEMAN DESIGN

KNIT The essence of weaving is the ability to take fine threads of modest strength and arrange them in an overlapping sequence to form a surface of substantial strength. We have reported variants on woven logo solutions for a number of reports, but this year the genetics of the idea jumped the fence. These designers understood the value of the story of a woven solution but they have taken a different path to a similar result. These marks still have the strength of the warp and the weft, but someone called out “knit one, purl two.� The story here is that textiles come about in many ways. Most of these solutions appear to be the result of knitting, crocheting, darning or some other method of assembly that requires an interlocking stitch. This micro-view of the process demonstrates unobserved intricacies to the consumer. Intricacies that might turn an institution of delicate strands into fabric of an impervious nature.

JULIEL, B_WERK MARKENARCHITEKTUR GMBH

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SIMON FOUNDATION - ICON ONLY, INFINITE SCALE

SUN INTERNATIONAL, LUKA BALIC

JAYA, SABINGRAFIK, INC.


STATES Homage to simplicity could not be more evident. Keep it one color and no gradients please. A simple yet symbolic shape. Could be a silhouette but keep it flat. Make sure the text is short and to the point. Knock it out of the shape and preferably scaled down. I refer to these as “states” because they often remind me of a simple geometric bordered parcel with the name of the entity subtly placed atop. These solutions are about as Spartan as a mark can get and they speak to an unadulterated proposition. The shape may hint at the industry or business type, but it's never a literal answer. Compared to glossy, transparent, overworked identities, these have a strong voice by virtue of their zigging while much of the design world is still zagging. If there is a challenge it is scaling; once the text is minimally legible, the shape on some of these could appear large and horsey.

SKYFOTO 2, VERVE DESIGN

WOOLHOUSE, MONSTROS & CIA

AMERICAN EDUCATION, B_WERK MARKENARCHITEKTUR GMBH

VOLGA FILM, ONY

LINKS Proof that hotdogs can be made out of anything and that anything can be made out of hotdogs. Welcome a variety of solutions that live and die by using a series of straight and quarter-round transparent links. In 2012, the Pentagram team of Michael Bierut and Joe Marianek crafted the colorful and engaging identity for Mohawk. Though not the first use of this technique, it would be fair to ascribe credit to this project as a seminal influence for this trend. Credit designers that have examined these building blocks and created their own spin on how to reassemble with a degree of originality. Transparent linkage shows how multiple components work together for a flexible and greater good. The connecting overlap serves as a joint in the marks. Consumers can almost imagine a real life version of these logos with functional pivot points. Friendly and approachable with no sharp points, as if it were a toy from the public’s childhood. It’s an instant bond.

WINK, PUSH BRANDING AND DESIGN

DODANA STUDIO, KOMMUNIKAT

VANIXA, UNIVISUAL

CARMEN, SUMO

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2014 LOGO TREND REPORT

MOTION LINES Everything designers know about demonstrating action they learned from Stan Lee. The most dynamic super hero was just stationary flesh until a few streaks were added for motion. Logo motion has gone old school with the influence of icons for apps and user interface. The simplest graphic language is still the best shortcut. If something turns on, it radiates lines. If something rings, just add vibration lines. Identity designers have had no larger influencing factor than the plethora of icons, most of which were created for digital media. Many of these icon systems were built with a common mono-line as a signature to identify other icons from the same set. It's not surprising to find designers of these sets are also creators of logos. Seeing this influence migrate to both areas of their work is only natural.

TURBEAN COFFEE CO, FOCUS LAB, LLC

EMAIL MARKETING, 903 CREATIVE, LLC

ARTICO FISH, KABALA DISENO

SHAKE FOR PIZZA, FOCUS LAB, LLC

THE 2014 REPORT At the writing of this report there are more than 212,000 logo on the LogoLounge website, submitted from designers all over the world. The last year’s submissions – 24,500 in all – were examined for this report. In studying these large collections, trends are noted. The intention of this report is to share with you what we see, not to make suggestions for what you should do. Often a trend we see may be an outgrowth of a direction identified in a previous report. Proof that the product of this industry is part of a healthy evolutionary cycle. Perhaps the greatest value of these reports is to enable designers to map out the trajectory of specific styles, concepts, techniques and solutions. Once a chain of design evolution is identified, it is much simpler to forecast and design the next step in the sequence. We encourage you to visit www.LogoLounge.com where the last decade of reports can be viewed in their entirety. These resources and the trends identified here, combined with your unique interpretation and ingenuity, may fuel the beginning of a truly exceptional logo. Special thanks to some of the world’s best identity designers for their generous suggestions that helped enhance this report, including Brian Miller, Brian Wiens, Adam Anderson, Stephan Smith, Ty Wilkins, Alen Pavlovic, Brett Stiles, Valera Namzov, Jeron Ames, Denis Ulyanov, Sherwin Schwartzrock, and others. A note of appreciation as well to the LogoLounge members whose work is displayed here.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Bill Gardner is the principal of Gardner Design and creator of LogoLounge.com, a unique website where, in real time, members can post their logo design work; study the work of others; search the database by keyword, designer’s name, client type, and other attributes; learn from articles written expressly for logo designers; and much more. Bill can be contacted at bill@logolounge.com. Mr. Gardner is also the author of the best-selling LogoLounge 1-8 book series, the recently released Logo Creed, a text on logo design, and now is an online author for Lynda.com in LogoLounge

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EVEN E-COMMERCE COMPANIES SEND PRINT CATALOGS | PRINT INCREASES ONLINE SALES BY GERRY BONETTO

Printed catalogs are decidedly old-school. Long before the advent of computers, let

What’s so magical about printed catalogs? A lot! Printed catalogs:

alone the internet, smart phones, social media and online payment systems, businesses across the country successfully used printed catalogs to sell their wares.

GET READ Printed catalogs are read at the kitchen table, on the sofa and in bed. According to U.S. Postal Service data, 48% of households read catalogs, and only 24% discard them without reading them 3. Compare that to things sent via

So why is it that over the past several years a number of well-known pure-play e-commerce companies have launched offline campaigns, sending out printed catalogs to drive sales for new and existing customers alike? And why haven’t all of those well-established “mail order” companies that now have significant web presences switched over to a purely digital marketing approach? It’s simple. Printed catalogs work, and today they work to drive and increase online sales.

email, where a 5% open rate is considered outstanding! GET SAVED Consumers hold on to catalogs that interest them, often for many weeks. Plus, catalogs are frequently shared by multiple members of the household – something that rarely happens when messages are sent via email. ARE DELIGHTFULLY TACTILE People like holding a catalog in their hands. They can circle

A 2013 study shows that print catalogs directly boost online

an item they want, fold back the corners of pages, put it

sales. They do this by increasing consumer’s purchase

down and pick it up again later. People who shop online

intent — 58% of online shoppers surveyed said they like to

are often on a comparison shopping mission. Those who

browse catalogs for ideas, and 31% have a retailer’s catalog

browse catalogs may be more likely to relax and enjoy the

handy when they make an online purchase. Catalogs also

shopping experience.

increase average order size by 12.5%, as compared to internet-only customer shopping 1.

Printed catalogs have an interruptive value when they arrive

This is in line with what was found in a study completed

a very emotional connection and motivate them to take

in the mail. They grab and hold consumers’ attention, make

in 2011, which showed that 75% of consumers use cata-

action. It’s no wonder so many e-commerce companies are

logs to browse and research products and services, with

printing and mailing catalogs to drive their online sales!

79% of consumers doing so at least four times each year. Once they’ve made a decision, though, consumers often

NOTES:

shift to other channels, such as the internet, to complete

1. Kurt Salmon, “Is the Catalog Dead? Not in the Omnichannel

the purchase 2.

World,” 2013 2. Oracle, “Cross-Channel Commerce: A Consumer Research Study,” 2011 3. U.S. Postal Service, “2011 Household Diary Study”

GERRY BONETTO is VP Government Affairs for Printing Industries Association, Inc. of Southern California (PIASC) and a Choose Print content provider. PIASC is the trade association for the graphic arts community in Southern California. Founded in 1935 and incorporated in 1944, today, PIASC is the largest graphic arts trade association in the nation. Choose Print is an educational campaign designed to promote the effectiveness of print and to reinforce the fact that print on paper is a recyclable and renewable and thus a sustainable environmental choice. Choose Print is sponsored by PIASC. Contact: ChoosePrint.org

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For five decades, GDUSA has presented competitions that focus on areas of growth and opportunity for graphic design. In 2014, that's the perfect description of health and wellness, the hottest topic in the news and the fastest-growing segment of the economy. This new competition encompasses the big picture of healthcare: traditional medical industries such as doctors and nurses, hospitals and homecare, pharmaceuticals and insurance, as well as newly energized preventive and holistic areas such as fitness and exercise, meditation and spiritual, and natural and organic lifestyles.

HEALTH + WELLNESS DESIGN AWARDS The Best in Graphic Design PRESENTED BY

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INNOVATIVE STOCK COOPERATIVE CELEBRATES FIRST ANNIVERSARY

Stocksy United, a photo licensing co-op, celebrated its one year anniversary this Spring by announcing growth, profitability and the appointment of a new CEO, Brianna Wettlaufer (pictured left) and CTO, Richard Brown. With its launch, Stocksy created what it describes as an

doing real things, to designers everywhere,” she says. Former

“authentic movement” in the world of stock photography

Stocksy CEO, Bruce Livingstone, becomes Chairman of the

“providing a highly curated online marketplace owned col-

Board where he will continue to provide strategic guidance.

lectively by its photographer members who are paid one of

“Ms. Wettlaufer invented the authentic category,” says Liv-

the highest royalties in the business as well as sharing in the

ingstone. “A gifted creative director, exceptional curator, tech

cooperative's total profits in the form of year-end dividends.”

savvy, with strong leadership skills; this kind of talent doesn't come along very often. She will be a rock star CEO.”

After only one year Stocksy and its co-op members have achieved profitability with its business model. With a grow-

Richard Brown brings close to 15 years of experience man-

ing co-op membership estimated to reach 1,000 this year,

aging large teams of IT professionals to his new role. “I'm

Stocksy boasts some top photographers, in addition to up-

excited for the opportunity to continue to push the technical

and-coming tastemakers from social media. In the first year,

boundaries in the stock photography space and to help shape

the co-op has also introduced a website built around respon-

a tool that allows both buyers and sellers to get what they need

sive web design principals, which allows it to provide the

as quickly as possible. With our strong leadership and our tal-

same optimized research and buying experience across any

ented team of technologists there is no limit to what Stocksy

smartphone, tablet or desktop device. For example, Mobile

can accomplish," said Richard Brown, Stocksy's new CTO.

device users can swipe through image galleries that automatically fit their screen, save photos for later, share images via email or social media sites and make purchases very easily.

As part of Wettlaufer’s first duties, she presented 20 awards to photographers in Stocksy's first Annual Awards, celebrating one year of photographic excellence. They can be seen on the

A founder and former vice president at iStock, Stocksy's

company’s website, www.stocksy.com.

new CEO Brianna Wettlaufer, brings more than a decade of leadership and innovation to her role. “Stocksy is leading the way for photographers by bringing real people, in real places,

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PICTURED ABOVE (LEFT TO RIGHT): PORTRAIT OF BRIANNA WETTLAUFER BY TYLER STALMAN, YOUNG SKATER GIRL BY EDUARD BONNIN AND MAN IN WORKSHOP BY TRINETTE REED


GRAPH EXPO 14 ENVISIONS PRINT INTEGRATED FUTURE OF COMMUNICATIONS

WORLD-CLASS EVENT HAS A ‘HOW-TO’ FOCUS

AMONG THE CUTTING EDGE SHOW FLOOR ATTRACTIONS THAT AWAIT GRAPH EXPO 14 SHOW GOERS WILL BE THE: Inkjet Candy Store Showcasing “cream of the crop” new Wide Format Inkjet Technologies. Future Print Pavilion and Experiential Lab Presenting today’s hottest technologies including OSCAR EINZIG PHOTOGRAPHY

GRAPH EXPO 14, coming September 28October 1, to Chicago's McCormick Place is set to impress attendees with an array of the latest technologies, cutting edge show floor attractions, and new applications from which to discover their next profit opportunities.

Printed Electronics, 3-D printing and RFID. Photo IMPACT Pavilion Featuring leading suppliers of equipment and services for photo, photo book, wide format and all-sized imaging, creation, finishing related equipment, products, software, and substrates. BIG The Wide Format Pavilion, and ISA Wide Format Innovation & Application Theater Offering the output equipment, software, media/substrates, inks, finishing equipment and supplies, plus new applications and innovations. DELIVER

-

This year’s “how to” focused exhibition and conference

The Mailing & Fulfillment Center and Deliver Theater

program has been designed to intrigue, educate and demon-

Sponsored by United States Postal Service (USPS) and

strate the multifaceted and profitable new future of print.

Association of Marketing Service Providers (AMSP), a

Here, in addition to the very latest technologies and new

one-stop resource for the very latest equipment, software

solutions, show goers will discover and learn how to use new

and supplies, research, market data, best practices and

applications to expand their service offerings, boost their

solutions for bridging print with marketing.

bottom line, and forge a path into profitable new markets. These innovative show floor attractions join a host of popuGRAPH EXPO events perennially present the latest graphic

lar returning favorites including: the Marketing Pavilion and

communications technologies in live equipment demon-

The Marketing Theater; Sidelines - The Expanded Revenue

strations across the show floor, plus education on the most

Streams Pavilion; The In-Plant Place; GREENspace (co-

in-demand products and newest profit-making opportunities.

sponsored by GDUSA); the cornerstone Prepress/Software:

This year’s event offers more than 70 interactive learning

Workflow & Design and Press/Finishing sections; the Print-

sessions and 60+ co-located events for attendees across 12

erverse, sponsored by PrintMediaCentr; and, Education Main

key market segments. The 2014 “Integrated Print, Online,

Street, for attendees seeking well-educated, talented indus-

Mobile” themed industry event is a comprehensive exhibition

try newcomers to augment their company’s workforce.

of digital, inkjet, offset, flexo, gravure and hybrid technologies, products and services for the commercial, package

Several of the pavilions will have specialized “Ask the Expert”

printing and converting, display, inplant, transactional, pub-

stations where attendees can go with their specific questions

lishing, mailing, photo imaging, marketing and industrial

for individualized guidance and advice.

printing industries. Contact: www.graphexpo.com

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THE RAW BEAUTY OF PAPER

A new premium line of paper by Neenah — with a rich color palette by Design Army and a new finish impeccably crafted — is inspired by both the natural and made world. The new ENVIRONMENT® Papers brand has been released with changes in colors, weights, textures and improvements in recycled content and printability that have revolutionized the line. The process took more than 18 months and involved more than a hundred print specialists and creative professionals. Creatively, Design Army of Washington DC led the way.

“Every designer needs room to play,” added Pum. “She wants to explore and discover meaning through her process. These new colors and textures offer flexibility and, thus, surprise. Colors can shift and change depending upon her choices. This brings ENVIRONMENT Papers into the process and that should delight users.”

Pum and Jake Lefebure at Design Army say their goal was to redefine the concept of the meaning behind “environment” and “green”. Says Jake: “Designers and papermakers have been ahead of the sustainability curve for a decade. We needed to redefine the category for paper. We wanted to make it more relevant today so that more people would choose it and use it.” Observes Pum: “Environment isn’t always green. Sometimes its the color of stone and iron. With 70% of the world’s population expected to live in urban centers by 2050, we recreated ENVIRONMENT® Papers as a reflection of the environment most call home — and home for most is a city, not a country meadow.”

Design Army says that being a part of the R&D process of a popular paper line was both challenging and humbling. They pushed Neenah to try new things. “Through testing and development, the entire team found new opportunity for paper use. We all learned by doing,” Jake concluded.

Making a beautiful line of papers, the team points out, does not always mean swatch books loaded with jewel-colored papers. “Dark paper colors are not flexible in terms of readability,” said Jake. “Instead, we offered a palette of essential whites and mid-tones that are paired with a waterfall of rich natural colors. Every color in the line is ‘neutral’ — they can showcase printed images and words beautifully.” 122 G D U SA

Design Army made its choices. Now Neenah want today’s designers to make theirs, pushing ENVIRONMENT Papers further through new applications. “We want everyone to experience what we did: joy of discovery by taking something beautiful and adding value that people will want to hold onto for a long time,” added Tom Wright, Neenah’s Director of Advertising and Design. “Besides, who throws away a Chanel handbag?” asked Pum. “No one. They repurpose them by giving them to their daughters and friends. We think objects made of paper should enjoy long lives, too. The new ENVIRONMENT paper line makes that possible.”


The new ENVIRONMENT® Papers include seven fresh, new, natural colors with descriptive names like Grocer Kraft, Honeycomb, Weathered and Concrete — each inspired by our natural, real-world surroundings. The new additions complement a full range of whites and mid-tone colors, including the popular color Desert Storm. The entire offering contains 30% to 100% post consumer fibers and is manufactured using sustainable practices. Matching envelopes are available in 19 styles.

“RAW is the New Luxe” It is only a matter of time before uncoated high recycled-content paper packaging is seen on more retail shelves. Inspired by Chanel, Design Army created a diamond-score across an entire RAW™ 100C Grocer Craft sample sheet and included it in the new ENVIRONMENT Papers swatch book. Pum Lefebure knows this is wishful thinking: “Yes, Chanel buyers today want their shoes to travel home in shopping bags printed in black and white gloss-finish bags. I also believe luxury-goods customers will soon demand gorgeous well-made products inside packages and bags with new premium Grocer Kraft colored RAW™ finish paper with high recycled content. It is inevitable: this Raw is the New Luxe.”

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KEEPING ALL WORK AND NO PLAY AT BAY: HOW TO BALANCE WORK AND LIFE BY DIANE DOMEYER

Forty-seven hours. That’s the average workweek for creative executives, according to a survey by The Creative Group. And that’s just scratching the surface. Four in 10 respondents said they work 50 or more hours a week,

3. MINIMIZE DISTRACTIONS

and 62 percent bring work home on weekends. It’s easy to praise

This is a hard one for creatives. Many of us get our best ideas

the importance of work-life balance, but making it a reality is

from browsing the Web, watching cool videos and seeing what

much harder. Creative professionals struggle with heavy workloads

tidbits our friends are sharing. To maximize productivity with-

and tight deadlines, which impede their ability to experiment

out cutting off sources of inspiration, allow yourself to check

and innovate. Technology has upped our productivity, but it’s

social media feeds and personal messages during designated

also made it harder to know how to balance work and life. These

periods each workday — but not all the time. Minimize app

five tips will help you maximize your time on the job so you can

notifications or mute your devices so you’re not distracted by

pursue interests off the clock.

incessant buzzes and pings.

1. KEEP YOUR CALENDAR REALISTIC

4. MAKE TIME FOR BREAKS

Don’t plan too much for one day. Over-ambitious scheduling is a

As much as we admire the industrious ant, it could learn a thing

setup for failure and compels you to take unfinished work home.

or two from the grasshopper and take a breather from time to

Rather, spend 10 minutes each morning creating a realistic to-do

time. A big part of knowing how to balance work and life is un-

list. Consider your most important and time-sensitive tasks, and

derstanding that health and productivity suffer when there’s no

plan the next eight hours around them. Move other items to

time to recharge. So, even when deadlines loom, take time to

later in the week, if possible.

refill your water bottle for a walk, eat a decent lunch or simply close your eyes for five minutes. Your creativity will thank you.

Also, break down monster projects into smaller tasks. For example, if you were designing a website, you wouldn’t just write “design

5. SET LIMITS

website” on your to-do list — you would break it down into more

Finally, here are three important rules to live by when managing

manageable pieces. The same holds true for any kind of project.

work-life balance:

A smarter way to manage big assignments is to create a production calendar of items to be completed and attach a due date to each one. Doing so allows you to see the project as a series of doable assignments, not an overwhelming beast. 2. SIMPLIFY YOUR SURROUNDINGS Managing work-life balance also means managing your space — both physical and virtual. If you take the time up front to organize your work area and computer files, you’ll be more efficient and productive in the long run because you’ll know where to find what you need, when you need it.’ But each person thrives in a different creative space. As Albert Einstein famously quipped, “If a cluttered desk is a sign of a

• Tame time-sucks. Keep meetings short and to the point, extricate yourself from long personal conversations during work and be the master of your email inbox. • Don’t let work encroach upon your personal life. This means taking work home should be the exception, not the rule. Also refrain from checking work-related email outside office hours. • Delegate some of your excess work. You could also ask your manager to bring in project-based staff during peak periods. Knowing how to balance work and life is different from actually doing it. With determination and discipline, you can make the most of your workday – and fully enjoy your personal time, too.

cluttered mind, of what, then, is an empty desk a sign?” Some people are at their most creative when surrounded by “organized chaos.” Others require the white spaces of minimalism for ideas to take root and sprout. How to tell whether clutter is improving or impairing your productivity? If you spend more time searching for documents than reading them, you may have a problem.

124 G D U SA

DIANE DOMEYER is Executive Director of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service placing interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals with a variety of firms. For more information, visit creativegroup.com. See also: http://blog.creativegroup.com/managingcreative-people-and-projects


GDUSA May/June 2014  

American Web Design Awards Annual Pantone Color Report Logolounge Logo Trends 2014 Print Design Survey

GDUSA May/June 2014  

American Web Design Awards Annual Pantone Color Report Logolounge Logo Trends 2014 Print Design Survey