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JU NE 2017

GD USA

GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS SPONSORED BY

THE CREATIVE GROUP

EDUCATORS TO WATCH JUNE 2017

PRINT 17 SHOWCASE LOGO TRENDS REPORT PRINT DESIGN SURVEY SPONSORED BY

VERSO

www.gdusa.com


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PRINT Communicates When the Affordable Care Act hRd cdeV_RTeVU<RZdVc Permanente needed to

T`^^f_ZTReVeYVSV_V ed`W its health plans to a large pool of new prospective clients.

Print played a big part in their marketing efforts.

“Healthcare in general is very daunting,” explains Amber Podratz, Senior Creative

Strategist for Kaiser Permanente. “In these complex information

spaces, print allows us to lay things out in a way that

consumers can easily follow and understand, so they get

the information they need to make an informed choice.”

To get the facts about

PRINT

visit ChoosePrint.org.

To learn more about how print helped Kaiser Permanente increase their membership, scan the code or visit http://bit.ly/PrintCommunicates.


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May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 12:52 PM Page 2

LETTER FROM THE PUBLISHER | EMOJIS AND AVOCADOES

Button-fly jeans. Voice mail. Passwords. Dentists. Mayonnaise on everything. Avocados in everything. Lena Dunham. Stepping in bubble gum. Emojis. Of these minor life annoyances, the relevant one for this purpose is the emoji because, in his 15th Annual LogoLounge Trend Report, logo guru Bill Gardner forecasts a future of more and more emoji-inspired logos. This is disappointing, but I have come to accept that life is not always fair. On the plus side, Mr. Gardner’s emoji-related observation is a small part of a riveting report, which we are pleased to publish in its entirety today. Other highlights to whet your appetite: logo design continues to emphasize simplicity and transparency. Geometric forms remain popular. Stripes are everywhere and head in every direction. As for what in the land of logos annoys the genial Mr. Gardner? “Octopuses, narwhals, turtles, hummingbirds, avocados, and hops for beer.” To each his own, though I would note that we both think avocados have overplayed their hand. In any event, enjoy the report: you will be amazed by the breadth of information and depth of insight. GORDON KAYE IS THE PUBLISHER OF GDUSA Comments, suggestions and letters can be sent to gkaye @ gdusa.com.

THE ACCIDENTAL EDUCATOR

Today we introduce a new “Educators To Watch” feature to complement our “People To Watch” and “Students To Watch” perennials. The reason: design education and educators have more influence than ever on the fast-changing shape of design, media and culture. In preparing the story, I found it interesting that many devoted teachers come to the role by serendipity. For example, Jason Fox of SCAD tells us: “While service has always been a part of my life, teaching was not in my original plans. I took a part-time role teaching evening classes in graphic design, and a year of teaching . . . revealed the rewards of being an educator. ” Allan Espiritu of Rutgers University says: “After graduate school, I had no intention to teach. But after teaching for 13 years, I really can’t envision my design practice without it.” Courtney Hurst-Windham of Auburn University notes: “The truth is that even though I had recently received my MFA, teaching was not on my mind.” States Matt Flick of SAA: “While working as an art director, a friend asked me to teach a college-level graphic design class. I hesitantly accepted the position, but quickly fell in love with the students.” Phil Hamlett of Academy of Art University observes: “Teaching has been part of my professional life for some time — but I often describe myself as the accidental educator, having only become a full-time educator relatively late in life.” Luckily for their students, schools and community, they all found the path. Whatever the disparate journies, Richard Wilde of SVA articulates a common theme: “I didn’t decide to become an educator, education chose me. To elaborate, I’ve always taught students to follow their passion, and I couldn’t have said that if I hadn’t done the same. For teaching to be a lifetime endeavor, the experience must nourish both the teacher and the student.” IT ALL WORKS TOGETHER

There is almost too much to read in this edition. In addition to the stories noted above, we include two features that speak to the state of print design and of digital media, respectively. Reduced to its essence, our 54th (54th!) Annual Print Design Survey finds that print and paper remain in the media mix because of classic and unique strengths, and that print done well can transcend the digital clutter. Our 2017 showcase of American Web Design Award™ winners tells the story of a medium’s massive reach and how graphic designers are increasingly sophisticated in mastering its power. Contemplating these editorial features in tandem, I am reminded of a simple truth stated by a print survey respondent: “When it comes to finding effective solutions, all media has a role to play and it all works together.”


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Register for Summer Classes Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;academyart.edu/GDUSA

2017 Top Design School by GDUSA Study in San Francisco or Online School of Graphic Design | Student design by Evelyn Furuta Academy of Art University | Founded in San Francisco 1929 | 888.680.8691 | academyart.edu/GDUSA | Yellow Ribbon Participant Visit academyart.edu to learn more about total costs, median student loan debt, potential occupations and other information. Accredited member WSCUC, NASAD, CIDA (BFA-IAD, MFA-IAD), NAAB (B.ARCH, M.ARCH), CTC (California Teacher Credential).


June 2017 TOC Impo_SEPT 07 TOC/Staff 5/31/17 1:24 PM Page 4

CONTENTS | JUNE

10

FRESH McDonald’s goes monochrome but few are lovin’ it; Cooper Hewitt honors Jennifer Morla; Pentagram serves up minimalist graphics for ice cream maker; Kick pairs men’s skin care line with exotic locations; and lots more.

22

PEOPLE Gail Anderson is new creative director at SVA Visual Arts Press; Strava social network for athletes hires former GE and Uber designer Andrew Crow; Ruba Abu-Nimah is first woman creative director at Elle magazine; and others.

28

PRINT DESIGN SURVEY Do creatives still value print and paper? Do they still control the spec and the buy? Do they have opinions about social media? Is this our oldest and most favorite survey? Yes, yes, yes, and yes. Verso Corporation is the sponsor.

38 LOGOLOUNGE Bill Gardner once again proves himself to be the most insightful and thorough logo and identity trendspotter around. He graces our pages with his 15th LogoLounge Trend Report.

92

PRINT 17 The PRINT 17 exhibition and event spans the entire graphic media realm of print, imaging, online and mobile. It’s a unique resource that can help you succeed. The dates: Sept 10-14 at Chicago’s McCormick Place.

94

EDUCATORS TO WATCH As a complement to our perennial and popular special reports — “People To Watch” and “Students To Watch” — we add “Educators To Watch”. The reason: these folks have more influence than ever on design, media and culture.

114

FOCUS Diane Domeyer of The Creative Group on transitioning to UX

GDUSA - Graphic Design USA Volume 54 / No. 3 May/June 2017 Kaye Publishing Corporation (ISSN0274-7499/USPS227020). Published 6 times a year with combined issues in January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December. Executive, editorial and advertising offices at 89 Fifth Avenue, Suite 901, New York NY 10003. Phone: 212.696.4380, Fax: 212.696.4564, www.gdusa.com. SUBSCRIPTION: Domestic, $72 one year. International, $140 one year. Periodicals postage paid at New York NY and additional mailing office. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to GDUSA - Graphic Design USA, PO Box 3072, Langhorne PA 19047. Permit #224.

design; Neenah’s new Classic Paper refresh; inMotion on better collaboration between creatives and marketers; partnership inspires 12th Mohawk Maker Quarterly; job search in a candidate-driven market place; and more.

WWW.GDUSA.COM


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June 2017 TOC Impo_SEPT 07 TOC/Staff 5/31/17 1:34 PM Page 6

| 2017 |

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS THE BEST IN WEB, INTERACTIVE + UX DESIGN

This competition is our annual showcase of the power of design to enhance websites and online communications. The outstanding work displayed are created by design ďŹ rms, ad agencies and inhouse departments, and encompass websites, microsites, apps, publications, video, social media, plus our burgeoning UX design category and more. You can view the winners here or on our new responsive website or in the GDUSA digital edition for

SPONSORED BY THE CREATIVE GROUP

52

desktop, tablet and phone.


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2017 SALARY FORECAST

Looking ahead at creative and marketing salaries in your area SALARY FORECAST

Download Your Salary Guide: creativegroup.com/salary-center 2017 Salary Guide

PROUD SPONSOR OF THE ANNUAL AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDSTM: THE BEST IN WEB, INTERACTIVE + UX DESIGN

855.787.0951 creativegroup.com

© 2017 The Creative Group. A Robert Half Company. An Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/Disability/Veterans. TCG-0517


June 2017 TOC Impo_SEPT 07 TOC/Staff 5/31/17 2:31 PM Page 8

A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO . . . THE CREATIVE GROUP The Creative Group (TCG) is exclusive sponsor of GDUSA’s American Web Design Awards - The Best in Web, Interactive + UX Design. TCG specializes in connecting interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations talent with the best companies. As the creative and design staffing division of Robert Half, TCG offers flexible solutions to meet companies’ project, contract-to-hire and full-time employment needs. TCG is wellconnected to the communities it serves, having built valuable relationships with top industry organizations, including AIGA, HOW Magazine, GDUSA, and The American Advertising Federation (AAF). They also have an exclusive relationship with The Wall Street Journal. For this reason, working with TCG gives companies and

GD USA GRAPHIC DESIGN USA

Gordon Kaye Publisher

individual professionals a unique advantage. With creative and design staffing agencies located in major markets

ART & PRODUCTION

across the U.S. and Canada, TCG “is proud to serve as a respected community partner in the cities where we

Ilana Greenberg Creative Director

live and work.” TCG is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Learn more at roberthalf.com/creativegroup VERSO CORPORATION Verso Corporation is once again exclusive sponsor of GDUSA’s Annual Print Design Reader Survey. A leading provider of Printing Papers, Specialty Papers, and Pulp, Verso’s distinguished product line, streamlined supply chain and flexible manufacturing capabilities make it ultra-responsive to market demand, extending its ability to get you the products you need, when you need them. Verso offers the best quality printing papers with a

Rachel Goldberg Production Director Sam Peltz Art/Photo/Multimedia Editor Jay Lewis Photographer

broad selection of certified and recycled options for all types of printing applications. Its paper mills are strategically located near top industry printers across North America, so products are available when you need them. They provide expert customer support, on-press technical service and insightful solutions that bring added efficiency and productivity straight to your business. And, says the company, “all of our products are MADE IN THE USA with pride and passion, vision and skill.” This special edition of GDUSA is printed on Influence® coated web 60 lb., with its enhanced optical properties for truer, more vibrant image reproduction, excellent surface gloss and smoothness, and unparalleled pressroom performance and printability. Contact: versoco.com

ADMINISTRATION & READER SERVICES Althea Edwards Accounts Manager Jennifer Hoff Scott Sczcypiorski Internet Services Bridget Bellavia Circulation

ABOUT THE COVER

EDITORIAL

With this issue, GDUSA introduces a new Educators To

Gordon Kaye Editor

Watch feature. Courtney Hurst-Windham has a BFA from RISD, an MFA from SCAD, and teaches at Auburn University's School of Industrial + Graphic Design. Full story begins on PAGE 94.

Sasha Kaye-Walsh E-News Editor Charlotte Kaye Assistant Editor

PHOTOGRAPH: HANNAH MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

FOUNDER Milton L. Kaye (1921-2016)

ADVERTISING Ron Andriani Executive VP, Integrated Marketing + Business Development 201.485.8720 212.696.4380 randriani@ gdusa.com

COVER PAPER CREDIT: The cover of this edition of GDUSA is printed on FSC-certified Kallima Coated Cover C2S, part

of the Kallima Paper family of FSC-certified coated cover paperboard, manufactured by Tembec. A leading advocate of sustainability, Kallima Paper has a distinct low-density high-bulk construction resulting in less trees used and significant cost savings to the customer. Kallima’s trusted line of Coated Cover C1S, C1S Plus and C2S are wellknown for their bright white surfaces. Visit http://www.kallimapaper.com

Gordon Kaye Publisher 212.696.4380 gkaye @ gdusa.com COPYRIGHT 2017 BY KAYE PUBLISHING CORPORATION


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September 10 -14, 2017 McCormick Place | Chicago, IL USA

PRINT2017.com

Grow YOUR Business PRINT 17 convenes the entire printing and imaging community—come connect, collaborate, and discover YOURQH[WSUR¿WRSSRUWXQLWLHV • Discover YOUR new sales streams • Innovate YOUR business with the newest trends and technologies • Determine YOUR new growth strategies and next business opportunities • Manage YOUR costs and improve YOURḢFLHQFLHV

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May 2017 FRESH Impo_feb news play 5/31/17 11:30 AM Page 10

FRESH | JENNIFER MORLA WINS COOPER-HEWITT HONORS

NEW YORK NY Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design

Museum names Jennifer Morla as the Communication Design honoree as part of the 2017 National Design Awards. Now in its 18th year, the awards program recognizes designers and supporters in 11 categories ranging from architecture to fashion to landscape to product to interaction design. Among the recipients who will join Morla at the Cooper-Hewitt October Gala: internationally known industrial designer Hartmut Esslinger for Lifetime Achievement; architect and author Craig L. Wilkins for Design Mind; Eric Rodenbeck and Stamen Design for Interaction Design; Deborah Berke Partners for Interior Design; and Joe Doucet for Product Design. Having established San Francisco-based Morla Design in 1984 as a multi-disciplinary studio, Morla has worked on projects ranging from motion graphics and branding to retail environments and textiles. She has created design programs for Levi’s, Design Within Reach and the Mexican Museum in San Francisco; took home the AIGA Medal in 2010; is an in-demand lecturer and artist with work in many important collections; and has taught at California College of the Arts for 23 years. Established in 2000 as a project of the White House Millennium Council, the National Design Awards is accompanied by National Design Week — October 14 – 22 this year — a robust offering of public education programs at the museum and across the country that seek to raise the profile of design as a vital humanistic tool. ndagallery.cooperhewitt.org PICTURED CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Designing the Taxi. Photo: Nissan; 2012 Olympic Bid Poster (2002). Photo: Morla Design; The Mexican Museum poster (San Francisco, California, 1992-1995). Photo: Morla Design; Design Within Reach catalog (2008). Photo: Morla Design; Ruffneck Constructivists (2014). 432 Park Avenue (New York City, 2015). Project partners: Rafael Viòoly Architects; SLCE Architects; Bentel & Bentel Architects; WSP Cantor Seinuk; Schlaich Bergermann and Partner; WSP Flack & Kurtz; Zion Breen & Richardson Associates. Photo: Scott Frances; Mubuga Primary School (Musanze, Rwanda, 2015). Project partner: M2 Foundation. Photo: Iwan Baan; Wedge sandal (NYC, 2012). Photo: Isabel Asha Penzlien; Metropolis (October 2008). Photo: Metropolis

10 G D U SA


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Keep it real with McCoy. In a world of fleeting fads, our paper endures. For 20 years, McCoy ÂŽ has never pretended to be anything but what it is: premium paper with superior surface quality and a one-of-a-kind silk finish that continues to set the standard. Learn more at Sappi.com/McCoy.


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FRESH | PENTAGRAM GIVES ICE CREAM BRAND A MINIMALIST FLAVOR

BROOKLYN NY Van Leeuwen Artisan Ice Cream is made

with organic ingredients, prepared from scratch in Brooklyn, and sold in classic and vegan varieties in New York and Los Angeles. Pentagram’s Natasha Jen and team created a new brand identity system to position Van Leeuwen’s as “the ice cream of choice.” Stripping off all the visual noise typical to ice cream branding, the identity deploys minimal graphic elements — the logo and a vivid color palette tied to the select flavors — that reflects the purity of the ingredients, stands out on shelves and on social media, and unifies and distinguishes the two previously separate lines. The refresh keeps the familiar wordmark (originally designed by Cathe Holden) and retains but tweaks the client’s signature buttercup yellow to appear more like cream. On the trucks and printed collateral, colors appear in cheery circular patterns that bring to mind ice cream scoops. In addition to Jen, credits go to Associate Designer Joseph Han, Designer Ji Park, Animator Rhea Manglapus, and Project Manager Georgina McDonald. www.pentagram.com

12 G D U SA


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FRESH | MCDONALD’S GOES MONOCHROME BUT TWITTER’S NOT LOVIN’ IT

OAK BROOK IL McDonald’s has unveiled new uniform collec-

tions for its 850,000 employees at more than 14,000 locations in the USA. WARAIRE for McDonald’s was designed by Waraire Boswell, who has dressed many A-list celebrities including Will Smith, Ellen DeGeneres and Pharrell Williams; Boswell once worked at a McDonald’s and hopes his uniform will give employees “a greater level of confidence.” Bindu Rivas is responsible for the Timeless Elements collection. The new gear has started to appear this Spring. Explains Jez Langhorn, McDonald’s Senior Director of HR: “Our new collections focus on comfort, fit, functionality and contemporary professionalism, delivering a uniform that crew and managers will feel comfortable to work in and proud to wear . . . Beyond that, it’s another step in the company’s continuous effort to raise the bar by investing in people and improving the restaurant experience with a focus on hospitality.” In a survey, the vast majority of McDonald’s employees approve, but social media is rejecting the dark gray monochrome styles, and matching aprons and hats, with critics having a field day evoking the dystopian world of the Hunger Games, Star Wars storm troopers, and the like. www.mcdonalds.com

14 G D U SA


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EVERYBODY WANTS TO CHANGE THE WORLD, BUT NOBODY WANTS TO CHANGE PAPER.

WE DO.

For more information, please visit ROLLANDINC.COM


May 2017 FRESH Impo_feb news play 5/31/17 11:36 AM Page 16

FRESH | CONCEIVING OF A BEAUTY LINE FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

LONDON UK ButterflyCannon has created the positioning, identity and

package design for a luxury beauty product range specifically created for women during and immediately after pregnancy. Unity Beauty Essentials – The Pregnancy Collection was conceived by Parvathi Nair during her own pregnancy after finding that existing pregnancy-safe beauty products were “either cold and clinical-looking or had a patronizing baby-centric aesthetic.” Combining experience in the beauty industry with natural and holistic remedies from her childhood in Kerala, India, Nair resolved to create a product line that would be safe but not compromise on indulgence. ButterflyCannon’s “Unity” positioning and name brings together three core needs of the consumer — beauty, care and efficacy — as well as celebrating the union of mother and baby. Packaging visualizes this through a series of interlocking foiled gold rings accentuated by an inner ring of golden dots that subtly nods to the founder’s heritage. These are laid over a soft, off-white background symbolizing caring and nurturing, with accents of pink, and sections of pale and vivid green inspired by the brand’s signature Indian Gooseberry ingredient. www.butterflycannon.com

16 G D U SA


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School’s Not Out! The Education Market buys folders all summer long! Mascot, Homework & Friday Folders • Certificate Covers Admission Folders • Band & Music Folders • MORE!

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FRESH | BRAND UNION EMPOWERS ALL-FEMALE SUB-SAHARAN STARTUP

NEW YORK NY/LONDON UK Brand Union has unveiled a

new brand platform and website for technology start-up Kiteka, the first all-female, all-mobile digital outsourcing network for female entrepreneurs in Sub-Saharan Africa. Kiteka empowers small business owners in Uganda through access to smartphone technology, training and mentorship. The project is part of Brand Union’s involvement in parent company WPP’s commitment to Common Ground, an industry-wide initiative supporting the UN Sustainable Development Goals, within which WPP’s responsibility is addressing gender equality. Previously known as 100 Phones, Brand Union sought to bridge the perception gap between the client’s philanthropic cause and credibility as an effective service provider. The name is based on a Ugandan Goddess and the identity was envisaged by merging cues that express the enterprise’s African roots, gender empowerment and technology. The importance of storytelling in African design is channelled through contemporary symbolism, blending bold color palettes and traditional pattern work with more pared-back, tech-inspired design. Toby Southgate, Worldwide CEO of Brand Union, says: “Working collaboratively is at the center of Brand Union’s ethos and we are proud to be able to use our expertise to contribute to WPP’s Common Ground initiative addressing gender equality.” brandunion.com

18 G D U SA


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May 2017 FRESH Impo_feb news play 5/31/17 11:44 AM Page 20

FRESH | F*** YOU, PAY ME AND OTHER LIFE LESSONS FOR GRADUATES

PORTLAND OR With graduation season upon us, creative

agency Red & Co. has created six postcards, posters and tote bags that capture some of the life lessons the team has learned since starting the agency four years ago. Mirra Kaddoura, founder and creative director with a decade experience at Wieden+Kennedy, says that “we think this would make for a timely and engaging piece targeted to the next generation of Mad Men & Women.” Among the lessons: (1) “The more risks you take, the more risks you take.” (2) “You can’t find the perfect job, you have to invent it.” (3) “Fuck you, pay me.” and (4) “Surround yourself with awesome people. And go on vacation.” You can see them all on the Red & Co. website. www.redandco.com

20 G D U SA


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PEOPLE | NEW CREATIVE DIRECTOR AT WOLFF OLINS

CYNTHIA PRATOMO CREATIVE DIRECTOR, WOLFF OLINS, NEW YORK NY

Cynthia Pratomo, former Head of Design at Anomaly, joins the global creative consultancy Wolff Olins as Creative Director in New York. With 15 years of experience leading branding, advertising, packaging, print, retail display, as well as web and exhibition design initiatives, Pratomo brings a wealth of multidisciplinary design expertise to Wolff Olins, alongside a mission to support diversity in the creative field. “I’ve always admired that Wolff Olins’ practice is visually provocative and smart, while constantly pushing for integrity and cultural relevance in their work. Effective design compels us to viscerally feel something new, and even reconsider our relationships to each other and the world. I’m thrilled to be joining such a talented team, and love that leadership at Wolff Olins is truly hands-on and focused on the work.” At Anomaly, Pratomo built and led a design team known for its dynamism and cross-disciplinary capabilities, particularly in brand-led experience, interaction and campaign design. She also helped spearhead Anomaly’s women and leadership group, Unreasonable Women, bringing together industry women for mentorship, activism and training opportunities in reaction to recent political shifts in the world. Says Tom Wason, Managing Principal, New York: “Cynthia’s a potent leader who has worked with a number of influential brands including Google, Converse and Marriott. A culture of experimental design through creative technology is the goal here and the right leadership is critical.”

22 G D USA


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MAY 2017 PEOPLE impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:06 PM Page 24

PEOPLE | PROMOTIONS + HONORS

ANDREW CROW VICE PRESIDENT OF DESIGN STRAVA, SAN FRANCISCO CA

HILARY LENTINI OWNER, LENTINI DESIGN & MARKETING LOS ANGELES CA

Hilary Lentini, Principal and Creative Director of Lentini Design & Marketing has been named a 2017 “Woman of Influence” by Los Angeles Confidential, Spring 2017 edition. The article, which spotlights influential woman in the business, social and philanthropic landscape, describes her as “equally accomplished at both the creative and business sides ... She transformed her one woman operation into a thriving design firm that works with a bevy of premier brands.” It also notes that she is President of the National Association of Women Business Owners – Los Angeles Chapter and has received numerous honors including the Comerica Bank/Los Angeles Lakers Women of Entrepreneurship Award. Lentini was a GDUSA Person To Watch in 2015. School of Visual Arts has promoted Gail Anderson to Creative Director of the Visual Arts Press, SVA’s in-house design studio. Anderson was formerly Director of Design and Digital Media working with SVA Executive VP Andrew Rhodes. In her new role, Anderson leads the creative strategy for the College, working within traditional and new media to promote the diversity and creativity of its degree programs, students and alumni. Over the course of a 30plus year career, Anderson’s high-profile projects have included a bestselling stamp for the USPS honoring the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation; book jackets for musician Questlove and playwright Glen Berger; Broadway campaigns for Avenue Q and In The Heights; and a 14year tenure as senior art director for Rolling Stone.

24 G D USA

Strava, a social network for athletes, hires Andrew Crow as Vice President of Design. Crow brings 25 years of experience in visual, interaction, product, and UX design. Crow was most recently the Head of Design at Medium, where he launched a new platform for publishers. Before that, he led over 200 designers and researches at Uber as the Head of Design, and held positions as the Director of Global Brand & Design and Experience Design Director at GE. “We could not be more thrilled to have Andrew join the Strava team,” said Mark Gainey, CEO of Strava. “The combination of his leadership and consumer design experience is unparalleled.” Ruba Abu-Nimah succeeds Alex Gonzalez as creative director of Hearst’s fashion magazine Elle. Her appointment marks the first time the American edition, launched in 1985, will have a woman in this role. “We’re thrilled to have the first female creative director, but that’s not why we are hiring her,” says Elle editor-in-chief Robbie Myers Myers. “Her work speaks for itself.” Abu-Nimah was previously global creative director at Shiseido and, before that, spent eight years at Bobbi Brown. In March 2016, Elle debuted a new graphic look and larger trim size to underscore a premium positioning. Chris Ertel joins Design Resource Center as Director of Brand Strategy. Before joining DRC, Ertel worked at Bluedog Design as a Senior Brand Consultant and Strategist. He also spent time at Kaleidoscope and Landor, working on a range of brands of various sizes. Ertel’s reputation for breaking down complex analytics to help companies achieve business goals and brand aspirations brings a unique insight-driven focus to his new post. “Chris is passionately consumer-centric,” says DRC Partner John Norman. “His ability to translate strategy into the creative product will provide new opportunities for our clients’ branding and innovation efforts.” PureRED Ferrarra names George Russell, an accomplished consumer packaged goods and advertising veteran, as its CEO. Russell joins PureRED Ferrara as it seeks to become a leader in transformational digital strategy for retailers and consumer packaged goods companies. Russell’s career highlights include The Gillette Company’s North American razor business; Schick & Wilkinson Sword as VP of Global Business Management; and, on the retail side, Duane Reade Drugstores as COO. He began his career at Y&R working on the Johnson & Johnson and Kraft/General Foods accounts.


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I AM I AM InHouse

Jim Woods is the Creative Director of Spectrum Brands PHG Aquatic division. He and his team create all the collateral materials for PHG’s industry-leading aquatic brands such as Tetra, Marineland, Instant Ocean, Jungle, or half a dozen other store brands, which means if you’ve ever _X[XÔj_XjXg\k#pflËm\Yfl^_kk_\ work of Jim and his team. He also contributes to research and [\m\cfgd\ek#`eÕl\eZ\jgif[lZk design, and consults on business decisions outside the traditional role of graphic designers. He spends his extra time speaking at national and regional conferences Xe[`eÕl\eZ`e^pfle^d`e[jXk Radford University. Jim’s hair is also Pantone 165 C, and he’s 6’5”, making him rather conspicuous in crowds.

in-source.org Designed by Eric Rhinehart, InSource Member | Photo Credit: Zack Brodie


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:12 PM Page 28

54TH ANNUAL

PRINT DESIGN SURVEY

SPONSORED BY

VERSO CORPORATION

BY GORDON KAYE

28 G D USA


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:13 PM Page 29

TEN OBSERVATIONS ON THE STATE OF PRINT DESIGN For the 54th year, GDUSA has conducted a reader survey about print design. When print was predominant, our surveys got into the weeds: details about projects, presses, papers, practices. Today, print is an option and a choice and, therefore, the survey focuses on existential questions: its role, purpose and future. Here, the 2017 results and comments are both suggestive and informative.

Print remains crucial as to how professional

1 2

graphic designers make a living. Fully 98% of respondents say they work in print as part of their mix and 3-in-4 projects

Print’s special role comes with responsibility:

6

superior print design, well-crafted production, strategic deployment, sustainable manufacture and distribution matter as

involve a print component.

much, perhaps more, than ever.

Designers retain responsibility and control

Year-over-year trends move almost glacial-

for critical portions of the print process,

ly. Still, today’s results reflect continuing

with more than 8-in-10 involved in print buying and paper specification.

7

trends that will not surprise: paper specifying is modestly declining, somewhat less print is being bought, and digital printing

3

Designers believe print perseveres because

and related papers play in an increasingly larger role in the

of its classic strengths. Foremost is touch —

print marketplace.

sensual, physical, real, permanent, credible — the human connection that is

There is less resistance to the idea of

missing in the virtual world.

social media as an advertising and mar-

These classic strengths are amplified by

4

8

context. In today’s digital clutter print has

keting vehicle. Many respondents don’t love it but increasingly acknowledge that this is “where the eyeballs are” and seek

the potential to stand out and be special —

ways to maximize response through cross-media approach-

fresh, welcome, surprising, disruptive,

es that sometimes include print.

personal, engaging, meaningful, a statement that a brand values itself and its customers. Print lends itself to certain audiences and

5

offerings where communication needs to

Package design and packaging papers,

9

be retained, contemplated, touched or

labels, and substrates are a growth area since the need for packaging is less impacted by online communications than other traditional print areas.

trusted: luxury goods and premium services are a classic example. Age is also an issue:

the older the audience, the greater the need for a print component, and vice versa.

In this moment of in-your-face political

10

activism, many designers say that print works exceptionally well to embody and make tangible political expression. One consequence is a mini-boom in posters,

signs and flyers that appear at events and then as memes online. Temporary or permanent? Hard to know.

G D USA 29


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:13 PM Page 30

PRINT SURVEY | THE NUMBERS WHAT TYPES OF DESIGN PROJECTS DO YOU WORK ON?

WHAT KINDS OF PRINT PROJECTS HAVE YOU WORKED ON THE PAST YEAR? (TOP 15)) BROCHURES/COLLATERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS/INVITES/CARDS DIRECT MAIL/POSTCARDS

97%

ARE YOU DOING MORE OR LESS PRINT DESIGN THAN IN THE PAST YEAR?

17% MORE

LETTERHEADS/BUSINESS CARDS

61%

PRINT ADVERTISING

PRINT

SAME

POSTERS

61%

SALES PROMOTION

POP | PACKAGE | SIGNS

PACKAGING

22% LESS

POP/SIGNS PUBLICATIONS/MAGAZINES/CATALOGS ANNUAL/CORPORATE REPORTS SELF PROMOTION

81%

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND MORE OR LESS PRINTING THAN IN PAST YEARS?

CATALOGS

36%

ONLINE

BOOKS

TV | FILM | VIDEO

HOW MUCH OF YOUR WORK INVOLVES DESIGNING FOR PRINT?

CALENDARS

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND PRINTING?

17% MORE 65% SAME

22% LESS

74%

75%

OF YOUR TIME IS SPENT WORKING IN PRINT

OF YOUR PROJECTS INVOLVE PRINT

85% PRINTING IN GENERAL

77%

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND MORE OR LESS PAPER THAN IN PAST YEARS?

DIGITAL PRINTING

12% DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND PAPERS + SUBSTRATES?

DO YOU BUY, SPECIFY, OR RECOMMEND THESE RELATED BUSINESS PRODUCTS/SERVICES?

MORE 68% SAME

20% LESS

84% PAPERS IN GENERAL

70% RECYCLED PAPERS

87%

78%

ARE YOU DOING MORE OR LESS PACKAGE DESIGN THAN IN THE PAST YEAR?

SOFTWARE

TYPE | FONTS

28% MORE 59% SAME

71% DIGITAL PAPERS

71%

62%

COMPUTERS HARDWARE PRINTERS

STAFFING + RECRUITMENT

13% LESS

Our 2017 survey was sent to a random selection of 10,000 GDUSA print magazine and e-subscribers, and generated 1,016 responses. The benchmark results convey a clear message: print remains essential to the graphic design profession. A few specifics: 97% of GDUSA readers work in print as part of their mix and spend 74% of their time doing so. Control over key elements of the process still resides with the designer: 84% buy or specify paper and 85% buy or specify printing. Other notable findings: brochures and collateral are still the most frequent print projects; digital printing and digital papers have gone mainstream; sustainability continues to influence design solutions and purchasing decisions; and designers maintain significant purchasing influence with regard to related products and services such as type, images, software and hardware.

30 G D USA


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:14 PM Page 31

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

PRINT AND PAPER HAVE CLASSIC STRENGTHS Designers feel strongly and positively about print. They value print for its classic strengths and how these can be effectively leveraged to convey a message or a feeling. Foremost is touch, but other practical attributes continue to matter: permanence, portability, convenience, accessibility. Print works, in the view of respondents, because it creates a human connection and a trustworthiness missing from the ephemeral, oversaturated, often anonymous world of digital communications. In addition, many observe that the relative rarity of printed communications makes the impact of print felt even more.

Print is still an important means of communication. Especially when digital content is so easily changeable and replaceable, commitment to print gives importance to a company, a brand, a project. — GINA VIVONA, OWNER/ART DIRECTOR, GV CREATIVE Print is still very important both professionally and personally. The strengths it offers are more meaningful now than they used to be because there is less print. Print can make an impression and have a greater impact because people still respect and respond to it. I love it! Paper and print can never really be duplicated in the digital world as it has a physical and emotional connection with the viewer. Print is still extremely strong, especially in the retail environment. Brands need to stand out more than ever, and that is leading more innovative printed creative. I do, indeed, believe print is still viable, in fact, extremely valuable. The ability to keep, hold and share print makes it perfect for marketing! Print is a very important part of business. It gives accreditation and professionalism to a company or brand, and often sets them apart from competition. I still believe there is more power in print than in digital. The receiver of print materials can hold onto those items and return to them easily when the product or service is needed. With digital, you need to reach the person right at the moment they are ready to buy. Print still has an important role in my work as an inhouse designer. I'm a huge lover of paper and print and use it as often as possible. Paper and print can never really be duplicated in the digital world as it has a physical and emotional connection with the viewer. Print is still relevant and necessary, and is a key tool in promoting and marketing an organization to key audiences.

Printed media has introduced new paper options that keep me coming back to it. From polyvinyl paper to digital metallic ink, the possibilities are ever changing and endless. I don't see print going anywhere as long as the print options continue to evolve, change, improve. — LYNLY GRIDER, GRAPHIC ARTIST, KIMRAY, INC Digital is here to stay, but print is not dead. Many of our clients still find a print magazine one of the most valued pieces their audiences and clients receive. However, this is in addition to digital online offerings. We suggest clients take advantage of both channels to reach a wider variety of audiences. The tactile nature of print is still very important and necessary. Print can have an impact, but no less or more than it has had in the past. A well thought out piece today is just as relevant as it was 20 years ago. I have transitioned to primarily digital and development work, but print is still very vital in my personal life. The strengths of print make it much more valuable in an era of transient media. LP Records were once the delivery standard for music but there is now a resurgent interest in LP's for the experience and art form. I see the same for print. It's no longer the standard for information delivery but it still delivers a unique and resonant experience that can be very effective if used correctly. I work with print every single day. I had no preference for working with print; out of college I expected to work mostly in the digital landscape. Being at a small design agency, I do a lot of poster design and magazine design. Print for me is as pervasive as social media and web design. Print is still alive and well from our point of view. As consumers and humans, we still appreciate touch and the ease of printed pieces. Print doesn’t require batteries or a charger to dazzle. We print fewer copies than in the past, but there is a broader distribution strategy. Our print work is more poignant, but clients are increasingly interested in less expensive work. Larger clients are spending tons on print but smaller clients are just trying to get by with cheaper alternatives. Print is so important! People still like to hold something in their hands and read it, feel it and then share it. Touch is huge, and I believe that the coatings are key to continuing the growth of print such as soft touch, aqueous, etc. Print is important for many reasons: the ability to take a printed piece with you and share it with a friend or the ease of hanging something on a local bulletin board. Plus receiving mail, whether direct mail or an invitation, is still fun. Print is part of the mix, but flash sales, heavy content and customer interaction are better served on the web. In those cases print is used to drive traffic to web. G D USA 31


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:14 PM Page 32

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

PRINT AND PAPER HAVE CLASSIC STRENGTHS CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Today's barrage of interactive media helps strengthen the value and importance of a beautifully printed and designed piece. Because print is less necessary, it has become a novelty, of sorts. It has become more rare, but more valuable. I have heard ‘Print Is Dead’ since 1982 and it still comprises 100% of my company's business. My clients depend on printed material to communicate with their customers. There will always be a need for print. Done well, it helps garner attention that might be lost in the quick reaction of the delete button. People need to see things that are printed to get a feel for the image we are projecting to the public. Most of my clients rely on feel, color and texture. A motto: Keep Print Alive! Print is still significant in my professional and personal life. I am an avid reader and always have at least two books that I am currently reading. I love the feel of special papers with satin finishes or other textures. I also love the look of spot laminates that cause a piece to pop.

I primarily focus on print. I think a hard copy has a greater impact than digital because it engages more of your senses. Print, done well, will always have an impact. I do feel that now is a time for print material to shine since so many companies and organizations are using digital forms of marketing. Print definitely has more impact. I still believe in the traditional strengths of the piece being right there and visible at all times, and the tactile quality of feeling the stock it is printed on. When done right, print is perfect. In a world where digital media is literally within your grasp at all times, print can make a larger impact. Print can be a more impactful experience because of its physicality. I've found that print volume may have decreased over time, but it is used more strategically than ever before, too. Strategically print is going away and being replaced by a digital footprint. Print should be more recognized as a strong complement to digital design. But often it's ignored due to the cost of printing, paper and mailing.

AREAS OF PARTICULAR RELEVANCE FOR PRINT We asked designers whether there are particular clients, industries, projects or demographics where print remains especially relevant. The consensus is that print lends itself to certain audiences and offerings where communication needs to be retained, contemplated, touched, personalized or trusted: luxury goods and premium services are a classic example. So, too, are places that offer an experience such as museums, theaters, restaurants, fundraisers. Invitations and direct mail are also favored as printed projects. And many people remain zealous, almost defiant, about reading books, newspapers and magazines on paper rather than screen. Of course, age is seen as a factor: the older the audience, the greater the need for a print component. I work on high-end packaging, so our daily lives revolve around premium quality paper and the perception of the consumer. It's very prominent and important, especially in this age of digital, that the premium package experience is still there — and greater than ever. When upscale clients are considering a law firm or a medical practice or a financial advisor, it is essential for those services to present themselves as trustworthy and substantial. Quality print and beautiful papers give them gravitas. We do a lot of magazine design and people love printed magazines; they have a much longer life span than digital pubs. Working for a theatre, print is still very important to us. It is a visual, physical medium. People would be shocked not to have

32 G D USA

a program when they enter and they expect to see posters and banners, as well. As a corporate history company, we're hired specifically to preserve the past and leverage it for the future. Print is still best for that, because it conveys permanence and quality. Specialized invitations lose so much when sent via email — especially when sending for a black tie affair or a fundraiser, and when needing a reply card for more elderly prospects. Some of our clients are admittedly “old school.” They have members or customers who prefer a printed letter or printed publication versus an email. Then we have clients who are the complete opposite. Depends on demographic, industry and how far you want to push people out of comfort zones.


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:14 PM Page 33

Many of our clients are museums and galleries and these clients still like printed material - catalogues, brochures, etc. A tactile approach is still relative and can't be replaced through a web experience.

Some projects geared toward older audiences work better in print; at same time, targeting the younger crowd sometimes works better digitally. Not always, but sometimes.

Print remains meaningful in areas that lend themselves to more personalization and less mass market.

In the veterinary specialty industry, we rely a lot on printed materials for doctors and pet owners. On a personal level, I still purchase books over e-books.

It is extremely important to be creative with print instore. People love to read, see, touch. And now, people don't want to work with a sales person, they want to walk a ďŹ&#x201A;oor and educate themselves. Print is so necessary for this.

Print remains a vital part of graphic design. There is still a large population that prefers paper publications to digital. There are things you can't do in digital. Certain techniques really add class to a piece such as letterpress or embossing.

There are clients, where it makes more sense to use print, like direct mail and promotional collateral. Again, it depends upon the target market and who you want to reach and what part of the campaign needs emphasis.

Almost everyone will need print design at some point. Not just stationery but reports, sales sheets, brochures, posters, and so much more. Even with the world being so digital today, digital materials need to be designed so that they print as ďŹ&#x201A;awlessly as possible.

Print has a very huge impact on my life and my clients. We print menus and promotional ads. Personally, I prefer handling advertising I can hang on my fridge versus something I bypass on the web. Print makes the most sense for branding/identity and premium products. Not everyone is wired that way [for digital media]. Maybe its older folks, over 50, but I personally still print and mail invoices, love getting the mail each day, and consistently hang event info on fridge!

As a theater company, our survey of new patrons revealed our print advertising was the second most seen medium. Clients also seem to still want printed invitations for their formal events. We also need printed programs for our plays. As a manufacturer, not all employees have access to email and digital distribution. We heavily rely on the printed piece to communicate events and opportunities within our organization.

In most cases the older populations, 40 and over, want print.

Museum quality books will always remain archival records of our culture and civilization. To me there is no replacement in the electronic world for them.

Print makes the most sense when you can create a relationship with the recipient. Do you know who they are; do you have something special to tell them?

Particularly in a small state, like where we are, print is necessary. Not all places have access to broadband and they still see value in the printed page.

Educational institutions need to use printed products as tools. Magazines are best in print. Surveys should always be digital.

Printed publications will never go out of fashion. Touch and permanence are very attractive factors for me.

Print invites and collateral are especially valuable for fundraisers, galas and events.

Social media is good for millennials and for immediate contact, but if you want the text to be referred to numerous times, print is better suited.

Certain products demand pieces that one can hold to help consumers absorb information that may inďŹ&#x201A;uence and better promote purchase or usage.

G D USA 33


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:14 PM Page 34

PRINT SURVEY | SELECT COMMENTS

THE IMPACT OF SOCIAL MEDIA

I do think it is an odd place to advertise.

We asked about the explosive growth of social media as a marketing vehicle, and how it effects the value or utility of print design and media. Comments suggest that designers are growing more comfortable with the rush to social media, and looking to develop cross media campaigns that tap its extraordinary reach and affordability. Print, they say, can be part of that mix. At the same time, many respondents are skeptical of whether digital advertising really reaches the numbers it claims, whether it is too ephemeral for some content, whether it can be meaningfully monetized and, in particular, whether Facebook advertising makes sense. Selected reader responses follow.

The power of the internet is strong and people are on those sites everyday throughout the day. But I think it needs to be used along with print advertising for the best marketing results.

Online marketing has captured most of the budget that used to be allocated to low-end printed items. This is fine so long as printed materials strive to move up-market. Print designers will be more valued by both clients and employers in a world where they create premium items instead of throwaway mailers or collateral. Social media is just another means of communication in the same way as postcards or sky writing. When creating a strategy for a campaign, all means should be considered in the best way to market a client's message. Communication is communication. All media has a role to play and it all works together. Print pieces can organically move to less frequency and higher quality, and still remain relevant. For us social media is in addition to print, not in place of it. Internet marketing is not the low cost value it once was, and a saturated market is forcing decreased interest. More people see our ads on social media, but our surveys show that they walk in the door in response to print. Advertising, design and marketing dollars should be spent where the people are, for the same reason a great billboard has no value in the middle of a cornfield. Over time the money will move; where exactly I'm not sure – though print won’t die in my lifetime. We advertise with Facebook and Google, but then take that content and share it across all our print collateral. We often offer printed items as a hook within our digital marketing.

It's definitely the end of an era, but the start of a new one. We just need to discover new ways to make this new form of design creative and stimulating. Social media is trackable. People ignore print ads. I don't think print advertising is nearly as effective as it used to be. Times are changing. We have to be creative and change with it. You can't put all your eggs in one basket. Certainly social media is a huge area but unless users are being reached at different touchpoints, then the overall impact of those social media ad buys is reduced. Yes, digital marketing is gaining on traditional print marketing, but at the end of the day, there is so much that bombards us online that a lot of it gets missed or overlooked all together. Google is justified. Facebook? Time will tell. The numbers around digital media are still not honest or accurate. Social media is great because it's free and the ability to target paid promotions is an asset. However, there is something special about receiving something in the mail. I suggest treating direct mail as a specialty item that makes customers feel valued and special. There is so much noise in the digital world that traditional methods shine brighter The target audience is easily reachable online. Direct marketing via the USPS does not make too much sense any more and, yes, I am against cutting trees, just so 90% direct marketing can end up in the trash. Google and Facebook are readily available and inexpensive options for promotions, especially for start-ups and those with limited advertising dollars. Money is almost always at the root of these decisions, especially when ROI is most-easily obtained through analytics they provide. Social media is definitely something to be embraced and not feared. With as many eyes as there are on these sites, it would be foolish to ignore it. Print can still be used though, for sure. I understand that most people, millennials especially, are on social media, but print should not be overlooked in marketing. Touch can have a greater emotional impact on brand experience.

There needs to be more social media training/delineation. So m much of the messaging looks disjointed and amateur.

The same was true for television years ago. While these new forms are generating a lot of spending, they are quite disposable in the minds of consumers. Print provides permanence.

Technology has changed the game. Society forces us into trends whether we want it to or not. Especially when clients want to reach the masses. We are in a cyber world that we must adapt to. Adapt or die!

Social media marketing has its place but I do not believe it can effectively replace traditional marketing and advertising.

I support and use Google daily so I don't feel negatively about a shift in media and marketing dollars. I don't use Facebook, but

34 G D USA

The great news is that dollars keep increasing, and all creatives should be expanding their skills in any and all ways needed.


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:15 PM Page 35

PRINT AND POLITICAL ACTIVISM In this moment of in-your-face political activism, many designers say that print works well to help express, embody and make tangible political expression. One consequence is a mini-boom in hands-on protest posters, signs, flyers and the like that appear at events and then as memes online. We wondered if this really says anything about the strengths, value and authenticity of print as a means of political expression. Like the country, readers are split. Print has long been a means of propaganda for many political activists. Print brings the concreteness to a concept, making it seem more real than just an idea floating around in the cloud. Print can be a powerful force in promoting ideas. Print allows people to be expressive and share their view with others through signs, postcards, posters, bumper stickers, etc. They can share a moment and a thought without the risk of sharing their whole life or their data. There is no substitute for a sign in a protest — in political advocacy people seem to respond to the immediacy of the handheld and the hand-written. Once again print shows its value over impermanent, transient, ephemeral online media. Print media will always have a place in historical movements. There won't be Facebook posts in history books. Personally, I don't see this as being relevant to print or any linkage to single medium. This publication should steer clear of comments relating to politics. American politics is an underdeveloped market for graphic communication.

With the increase in protests, people want to make sure their voices are being are being “seen” by the right people; using posters and signs helps promote and spread their message. It is incredibly easy to project a message on a poster, billboard, etc. to a large audience. And the message doesn't go away when the device goes to sleep. Protesters and marchers need print signage to be seen and spread their message on television, You Tube and all mass media. This just shows how useful and relevant print still is in our world! Activists and protesters can't walk into Washington with giant monitors... It's a grass roots revival! People are used to having things in their hands for rallies, conventions, and even protests. I feel that the opposite is happening. Print pieces are mostly just signs used in protests. Social media is where the real action is and it is used effectively by all ends of the political spectrum. I'd say this is making big assumptions on a small sample. We see more protests, but the level of visual artistry is not reflected. Protests are momentary and clever slogans are more what people are interested in than exploring or advancing the rich history of poster art. If print is gaining or generating new interest, it may be because it breaks away from the social media avenues everybody is becoming jaded by. People are getting smarter about what they see on Facebook, Twitter, Google; they question, is this real? A poster or billboard or print ad is more authentic and more affirming these days. Combining social media and print to make a statement culminates in strong messaging and national optics.

There has been huge creativity in the protest signs, it has been an amazing statement for print. The famous Obama poster exemplified this phenomenon, which is exploding now.

There has always been political activism and protests in the U.S. so I don't think it is generating a 'new' interest in print but rather returning to what has always traditionally been done – it may just now be done at a higher quality or with more unique printing processes.

Print posters are straight to the point and less is more; a few simple thoughts are always the best way to communicate as long they look modern, clean and are meaningful!

The argument may have merit and a case can be made, but it's a bit early to call the race. If it's merely a momentary blip, neither print nor activism may have long term staying power.

Fewer words, bolder visuals and type, especially in a meme-driven society, seem to be more effective than ever before.

I have not experienced this directly, but I have noticed an influx of preprinted materials at political events.

Power to the people! And as an old-school print designer, I adore seeing the great design (especially posters!) out there now. I agree print is gaining more ground. The adage that “everything old is new again” is why political printing is increasing. Unions and social organizations will always rely on print pieces.

Anything that generates interest in print is okay with me.

G D USA 35


June 2017 Print Survey Impo_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 12:15 PM Page 36

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June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:41 PM Page 38

LOGOLOUNGE THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT BY BILL GARDNER

I can’t believe it, but this is the 15th LogoLounge Trend Report, and nothing yet everything has changed in the last decade and a half. Certainly, the depth of this report has grown more robust as this

As you start to think about trend longevity, it has to be a really

exhaustive review included the literal evaluation of just better than

relevant, useful tool for designers to continue to use it for a

25,000 logos submitted over the last year to LogoLounge.com.

decade. Transparency and monoline are a couple of trends that

In addition, we continue to review all major brand identity shifts

have had long lives because they continue to evolve. Every time

of note introduced worldwide. If it happened during the last

I think they’re dead, they continue to sprout; they put out new

12 months, it hit our Trend Report radar.

roots, and something else blooms. And that’s cool because it shows me that designers aren’t being complacent. They’re trying

We usually look for nuances or progressions of past trends to try

to find new ways to push it forward, and that’s what’s supposed

and identify where things are going. Trend cycles that used to

to happen. For instance, Michael Bierut and Pentagram trans-

run in 30-year chunks are now cycling through at half that rate,

formed the MasterCard logo by going back to a pure transparent

if not less. As designers, we’re burning through ideas rapidly,

overlay and getting rid of the striped element in the middle. By

and we’re learning that there’s a cap to all of this — there are

laying one circle over the other, you see the intensity build up. To

a limited number of ideas out there, which is why we see

me, this is a trend that I could’ve just as easily reported on ten

things that peaked ten years ago coming back, but with a fresh

years ago, but now it is more complex, bringing new relevance.

coat of paint. We also follow what is happening in other areas of design like This year’s trends weren’t so much a revelation as a continuation

fashion, consumables, or motion graphics in film, commercials,

and evolution of things we noticed last year — which isn’t a bad

television shows, and other mediums. It’s not uncommon for

thing. There are three design baselines I noticed in this year’s

concepts from those areas to carry over into identity design.

crop of logos:

For instance, Apple is currently running a commercial for Apple Stickers. It’s basically a quasi-set of emojis that are unique to

1. Last year, simplicity ruled the roost, and it still does. We’re

Apple. They’ve hired a whole series of designers and illustrators

still coming out of that period, and it’d be fair to say that the

to create these Apple Stickers. As you look at them, you can see

pendulum has barely moved. Simple shapes, lines, type, and

how they’ll translate to identity design. In that same commercial,

forms either converged or played solo to create solid, lasting

you’ll notice the Apple logo being animated with a rainbow series

marks that are easily interpreted. If anything, we’re starting to

of high-chroma colors that are bursting out of the middle of

see a bit of an upswing with more attention given to those really

the apple. We’ll likely see that soon translating to logo design.

simple elements that we were looking at last year. Another thing that’s happening is logos that are trading in 2. Stripes have appeared in massive abundance, being used

rotating fields like polka dots, wavy lines, checkers, stripes,

in concentric circles, letterforms, and patterns to indicate move-

and other patterns. Designers are placing these as still images

ment, like chevrons, zig zags, and waves.

or occasionally using animation to move images in and out of the inside of a mark. It’s not a new idea, but it’s coming back

3. Geometry is really coming in to play. Geometric shapes and forms that create multidimensional logos, often using monolines, were prevalent.

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with traction.


June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:41 PM Page 39

This is the first year that we started to see logos that were utilizing drones as a design element. It’s kind of interesting, but likely short-lived. I imagine, for better or worse, we’ll see more of this as drones become more mainstream, just as game controllers became a design artifact for a brief period. Other things that caught my attention, but weren’t ready for the trend label: • Orbiting rings with little balls on them. Think atomic satellite rings. • Highly geometric animals, constructed of circles and squares and other simple geometry • Monoline logos that appear over a splash of pastel color • Exertion marks. Four or five little strokes coming off the top to show stress or effort.

THE 2017 REPORT 2017 marked a major milestone in LogoLounge history as the site surpassed the quarter-million mark and currently contains nearly 265,000 logos. As we acknowledge that each design represents hours and hours of thought and struggle from designers around the world, we are as humbled and awed as ever by their dedication to the craft and grateful for the important role they play in helping us create these reports. So thank you to all of the designers who have and will contribute to the Trend Reports then, now, and for years to come. For an even deeper look at this year’s trends, visit the 2017 LogoLounge Trend Report learning course on LinkedIn Learning (formerly Lynda.com).

• Steps, which is kind of a continuum of the “Ombré” trend from last year, except using stepped values of color rather than elements. • Fat lines. A lot of the really thin monoline stuff that we had seen going on previously are putting on some heft, and employing fewer lines.

BILL GARDNER is the president of Gardner Design and founder of LogoLounge.com, a repository site where, in real time, members can post their logo design work and search the works of others by keyword, designer’s name, client type, and other attributes. The site also offers articles and news

And, of course, I have to mention the things that annoyed me:

written expressly for logo designers and much more. Bill can

octopuses, narwhals, turtles, hummingbirds, avocadoes, and

be contacted at bill@logolounge.com.

hops for beer. Hops have become this ubiquitous symbol for craft brewing, and there’s so much of it going on — it’s overkill. The design keywords that were trending this year are also interesting. For instance, the word magic increased by over 1,000% this year over last, inferring mystical elements in the logo design; symmetrical increased 600%; and carrot increased by 500%, for logos that seemed to represent healthy food /lifestyles. Words that increased by more than 400% included luxury, coin, foot, nose, watch, crossfit, trainer, realtor, rope, eat, jewelry, layers, and more. It’s a wide wacky world in logo design, and anything goes! Like any report, this is just a synopsis of what we’re seeing in logo design. You should use this information to build on and push design forward to the next level. It’s about evolving forward, not repeating where we’ve been.

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June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:42 PM Page 40

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT SHADOW BREAKS Even when limited to the claustrophobic confines of a two-dimensional page, turning potential reality into graphic representation has never been insurmountable by a crafty pack of designers. Over the years, the traditional and signature move of any designer worth their salt has been to create a line-break when one element briefly passes beneath another. Excising a clean piece of a line from the mark just before it passed beneath another gave a visual signal of layers intermingling without one layer merging into another. And despite the appearance of this in a portfolio signaling a designer’s coming of age, replacing the gaping hole with an abrupt shadow is a much more normal course of action. These Shadow Breaks are generally managed without slow gradation. A flat tone, a step or two deeper in value achieves everything a line break could but moves a mark one step closer to a natural representation and not just a symbolic representation of dimensional layering. This technique demands an additional tone as opposed to flat color, but that’s seldom a deal killer. I can’t imagine line breaks are ready to shuffle off the mortal design coil, but at least this fresh way of expressing hierarchy of levels will allow us to mix it up a bit. Shaking up the status quo is always worth a second consumer glance.

GARDNER DESIGN, SWPLUS

UNIPEN, DOUBLE DIFFERENT

DAMIAN KIDD, UNUSED

ALMOSH82, BOTANIKA

FADES Watch these marks, as they seem to rise out of a deep fog to expose themselves to the public. Whether in the process of coming or going, the viewer can be assured there is transition afoot. These marks are defined by gradient that takes an image and slowly allows it to sink into the page as it brakes from 100 to zero. Though it’s easy to imagine these living against a black or colored background, there is a freshness that seems to make white the field of choice. This lightness signals new beginnings and virgin opportunities and offers up an ideal sense of place. These gradual fades only work if the designer is willing to reveal enough of the design bones to allow the consumer to complete the missing picture. This mark for Be! Five Branding, composed of a series of five sequentially vanishing circles, works because even the quarter circle alludes to enough of its former self. Even letterforms let themselves get caught early enough in a vanishing act to be fully identified. I note the circular marks remind me a bit of the “loading” animations that rotate onscreen. Not sure that’s a smart device to associate with an identity. My encounters with these usually leave me wondering if I’m committed enough to the promised forthcoming content to stick it out or click off.

JULIAN THOMAS PECK | BRAND-CRAFT, BRAND-CRAFT

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STORIENCE, EBC

BRANDFORMA, SIMPLY ANALYTICS

BE!FIVE BRANDING & IDENTITY, BE!FIVE BRANDING & IDENTITY


June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:42 PM Page 41

RISING COLOR This wraps up our third trend that is actually more technical in nature as opposed to form in orientation. Rising color is a subtle approach to the separation of layers or depth in a logo. A mark generally lives on a flat plane, so any inference of depth or dimension has to choose early on if it’s leaning towards realism or symbolism. If this trend had to choose, it would probably set up camp toward the realism side, but since it lacks shadow and highlight, it may fall closer to the middle. The premise here is to build a surface gradation that follows a pathway through a mark so that any line or shape crossing over itself is evident by a shift of color intensity from the area it overlaps. Though this is rife with possibilities for linear marks, it doesn’t have to reside there. The mark for Minneapolis Downtown Council starts with a deep blush of color in the lower right, and as it loops around like an off-ramp, it’s able to project under and upward without shadows or line-breaks for separation. Obviously, you won’t pull this off without the use of halftone, but that consideration in a mark seems to be losing the tug-of-war with such a high percentage of clients living in an RGB world.

NOT PROVIDED, AVANADE

CAPSULE, MINNEAPOLIS DOWNTOWN COUNCIL

DOTZERO DESIGN, GENERATIONS UNITED PDX

COURTRIGHT DESIGN, BITWISE

SIMPLICITY As a continuing homage to a Spartan lifestyle and not candy-coating our words, form in logo design is wearing the simplicity moniker like a badge of honor. These marks remind me a bit of natural food products that suggest you best avoid ingredients you can’t pronounce. If the building components of a mark don’t look like they belong in a set of play-blocks, you may be busted. Though many of these look like a throwback to the 60’s and 70’s, the more mature color palettes and application of attending visual brand language assure us they’re tomorrow’s generation. Color is still clean but usually tweaked to avoid the primary juvenile aesthetic. Shapes are usually standalone but always compound with others to tell the story. If your parts require much more than a right angle and an arc or two, you probably aren’t going to fit in this genre. Like the Colorforms, Legos, or blocks of your youth, the juxtaposition or arrangements of three or four elements can become infinite. Note the logo for Love Cinema. Fashioned from a heart, a box, and two circles, it could be reconfigured for hours before someone would arrive at this arrangement with such evident symbolism. A client trying to express an unencumbered aesthetic could do much worse.

CHERMAYEFF & GEISMAR & HAVIV, GRUPO IMAGEN

ZENDESK, ZENDESK

MASKON BRANDS, LOVE CINEMA

LOGOHOLIK, ALCO ELECTRONICS

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June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:43 PM Page 42

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT SIMPLE OVERLAYS Pairing the austere aesthetic of the previous category with the unencumbered clarity of simple transparency creates a message as evident as its construction. These logos cast aside any pretense of overachievement and completely rely on a simple geometric message: Embellished forms need not apply. This trend relies on two elements creating the purest of intersections with a formula of one plus one equals new. MetLife’s two quarter-rounds obviously create a mnemonic M but also suggest strength where the twain meet. Transparency has become a standard in the identity canon with a diverse array of applications and styles. One of the primary attributes is to convey the open nature of the company, organization or practices it represents. Often affiliated with entities in the financial field, transparency shows consumers their investment is open to inspection, and the process is not cloaked from the public. Pentagram brought MasterCard back to this genre with a smart clean version of the classic Venn diagram in brilliant orange where the red and yellow hemispheres of the world meet. If there is a challenge with this trend, it may be that a reliance on two pieces of simple geometry means we’ll run out of good building materials soon, so let’s hope an affinity for this trend also includes a plan to evolve it forward.

PROPHET, METLIFE

NCTA, NCTA – THE INTERNET & TELEVISION ASSOCIATION

PENTAGRAM, MASTERCARD

PAVEL SAKSIN, MATTERFUND

MULTICENTRIC Unless we’re talking to flat-Earth folk, a few parallel stripes circumscribing the globe are basically concentric circles. This year, we’re talking stripes, so it’s only natural we’re knee-deep in plenty of logos with round stripes, and particularly the idea of multiple series of these intentionally overlapping. Pebbles dropped in the water, radiowaves, WiFi, heat, good karma. Think about what radiates, and if this fits the objectives of your clients, this may be a good candidate to consider. The true heart of this trend is the impact of multiples on each other. Lance Wyman might be proud, as there’s a streak of his ’68 Mexico City Olympic design reflected in this neo-revival. The cadence of positive to negative space varies broadly amongst these. Some solutions appear more monoline in aesthetic, and other circles are fat enough that there’s no good room for negative space in the design. Of the group of MultiCentric marks exhibited here, it’s worth noting there is not a complete circle in any of the designs. Not that it’s imperative to the trend, but it speaks to the inventive nature of the designers that circles are only inferred by a series of overlapping or disconnected arcs.

ORTEGA GRAPHICS, UNUSED

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BRANDFORMA, CHATOLOGIA

MONOME, SOUNDREC

BOTOND VÖRÖS, NEMETH WINERY


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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT

ELLIPSES Each year provides us with a glimpse at what digital symbolism has entered into the general public’s vernacular. It’s somewhat comforting that ellipse — or as I grew up referring to them, the “etcetera dots” — are reintroducing themselves. Better known in tech jargon as Read Receipts or Typing Awareness Indicators, these three specks command a new level of respect. Society now sees grown individuals fixated on, teens obsessed with, and relationship counselors profiting from those mighty pulsating dots. Inserting in a flag may well indicate a political dialogue while I note the single bubble in Discussion Records looks to be more of a monologue than a discussion. At one time, these dots were a great shortcut for lazy writers that didn’t have the inclination to finish a list. However, in 2005, Blackberry introduced ellipses to their interface, and iPhone followed suit two years later. As a result, in logo parlance as in conversation, they now show that you have something of note to say. You are holding the floor while others await your words with riveted anticipation. Though keeping the symbol encased in a speech bubble gives the dots a sense of place, we can only imagine they’ve reached the age of consent and could stand on their own, bubbles or not.

STEVENSON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DESIGN, STEVENSON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DESIGN

ARCANE, PHM SEARCH GROUP INC.

JOHN MILLS LTD, JML

JAREDLDESIGN, DISCUSSION RECORDS

TEXT BOXES Personally, I think a beautiful wordmark is the epitome of clarity and functionality. Too often, it seems the pure text solution suffers a bit of an inferiority complex in comparison to its sibling, the graphic logo. It’s just this insecurity that often leaves a typographic solution needlessly busting every move it can to be more competitive. How does type assure itself it will be recognized as a logo and not just another piece of text on the page? In the continuing appropriation of digital devices, the lowly text highlight box resurfaces to underscore the importance of “so much type.” Imagine drawing your cursor over a sentence and seeing a graphic text box encompassing your selection. That’s where the eye is directed as the highlight enunciates, “this is the important part.” Appropriated from broader industry use, the highlighted artifact has found its place behind headlines on Bloomberg or Fast Company online to allow text to float over a photo or graphic. It now finds itself serving as more than just a box but with greater importance. From an identity standpoint, this lends itself to a technical personality or finds itself equally comfortable when a client is dealing in language or words as its trade. Here it frames out a name like Mozilla, the free software community. A mark that could well have stood on it’s own but that with the encapsulating box gives viewers a trigger to help them visualize this word on their screens.

TYPOTHEQUE, MOZILLA

NATIONAL GALLERY OF VICTORIA, 3 DEEP

WHEELHOUSE COLLECTIVE, SCOTT BLAKE

COREY MCPHERSON NASH, DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT

YIN YANG As happens from time to time, resurgence in the popularity of a motif will resurface with a vengeance. But seldom does that happen with one that dates back 3,500 years. That’s the first noted record of the Yin Yang symbol that’s received a bit of a lift with the discussion of multiculturalism in the west. Yang — the lighter side, represents the positive, active male, and Yin — the dark half — represents the negative, passive, and female. Sounds like a pretty misogynistic perspective for such an enlightening symbol. The concept of bringing opposites or conflicting agents together to create a greater strength is as old a tale as the mark. Hot and cold, sweet and sour, pricey and cheap, reflective and aggressive, or you pick your own counter-traits of your client. This may be the way to best exemplify the divergent advantage they create. From a graphic perspective, the reflective nature of this mark is pleasant, selfcontained, and allows great latitude for interpretation. Fitting in a circle is a nice plus, but feel free to explore other shapes and iterations that still convey the essence. Bringing diversity into a state of oneness is older than the Yin Yang and as relevant as today.

DESIGNMIND, DANISH DEAF ASSOCIATION

HATCH CREATIVE, THE MANE INTENT

WEIRDO, MOON GIRL

RAZOR DESIGN CO., TWO LITTLE BIRDS

PASTA BENDS Virtual reality has taken off, and the race to create the best mind-blowing experience without leaving a tether is on. More than a few VR addicts have found themselves leaving their basements, sporting an obligatory Oculus hickey across their nose. That amount of enthusiasm still peaks the ire of designers long feeling their designs are destined to the flat world with lift-off relegated to the occasional crystal cap effect or highlight ping. What designers do know is that the public can be lured by the mere suggestion of 3D. That gauntlet cast before us, we are seeing more attempts than ever to jailbreak the surface of the screen. This group of marks has pushed beyond the flimsy film-like twisted ephemeral shards of the past. They’ve put on the pounds and bulked up to flex their muscle even if it doesn’t look much thicker than a piece of al dente pasta. Chances are none of these will vanish when they turn sideways. Their profile shapes could be enough to convey a visual message, but by crafting a three-dimensional form out of these, they take on a personality and life that so many two-dimensional logos could just envy. Utilizing strong shadow and highlight with gradation, these complex marks have some of the qualities of a popular pet toy. Pasta Bends need to fit with the client’s personality, so give strong consideration to compatibility. Anticipate seeing this trend expand as there is much room to be explored, and dimension is on the rise.

RAINFALL, GAMMAMED

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ORTEGA GRAPHICS, BORLYTE

ROLANDREKECZKI, YUEFANGYA PLASTIC SURGERY

VELES, WINELOVE


June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:44 PM Page 47

WRAPPED Obfuscation of the premise of your logo is tantamount to talking to someone in a whisper. Done at just the right tone, it’s a sure way to quiet a crowd and guarantee their opportunity to eavesdrop. A bit like a puzzle or guessing game, these marks appear as if someone draped a striped bed sheet over the entity’s product to hint at but not fully disclose their undertaking. Taken another way, the buried image could indicate part of the process that defines the product. Keep in mind the sample identities here utilize stripes of various iterations, but there’s no reason the same effect couldn’t be achieved with distortion in any pattern: a good grid, a plaid, water surface, bark on a tree, or any pattern that has a regular nature that seems to be resting over a fundamental representation of a firm’s endeavor. Klarwin, an emerging technology firm dealing with filtration, defines its product with a K that looks like it’s having a challenge passing through the filter. Code Architecture gives a sense of structures rising under the precise topographical grid of a community. It’s the undercurrent that’s always stronger than it looks, and this may be the way to deliver that message.

BRANDIENT, KLARWIN

ORTEGA GRAPHICS, BULLSEYED

ODB, CODE ARCHITECTURE BURO

DESIGNMIND, ADVENTURE SPORT

MICROLINES Going against every rule of smart identity design, this works. We’ve been admonished time and again that too fine of a line will not scale down well. Allowing line work to run together will create a printing nightmare. And don’t go for a swim for a half-hour after you’ve eaten. I’m here to say this trend dispels at least two-thirds of those warnings. Banking on the public’s familiarity with wireframe design may be the influence behind these logos. With the advances in 3D modeling and printers, or “additive manufacturing” as the industry prefers, consumers are becoming conversant with the linear mesh geometry that defines an item to be printed. It is the shorthand vector language that defines even the most curvaceous of items, whether it’s to be fabricated or animated. The unexpected nuance of this trend is the linear surface for all intents serves as a halftone effect or a printing screen. Where lines come together, the color becomes more intense. As lines compound at an angle or in a curve, it darkens in shadow. One of the upsides to this genre is it conveys a technical essence and demonstrates precision of process. The open grid work also allows for the mark to tie to the field and integrates the marks to the page or the screen. Scale can definitely fight these marks, but managed properly, it may be worth breaking a rule or two.

ARMA GRAPHICO, AURORA COOPERATIVE

PAUL HOWELL:DESIGN, CHIMERA SCREEMS

DENNARD, LACEY & ASSOCIATES, INTERFACE TEKNOLOGIES

TERRILOWRY.COM, CLAD, INC.

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LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT

DOUBLES In a marriage of several past trends, the idea of Links, Simplicity, and Monoline all converge for a plethora of marks that we’ll refer to as Doubles. Obviously, Doubles earns its moniker because each of these brings together exactly two items in a knot or a weave of a continuous line. Or, it could be a single item split into two sections. Since initials or acronyms are such a target-rich resource of symbolism, it’s no surprise to see this trend saturated with letterforms. The mark for Pertiva is about as basic as these get as it takes on an extruded form, but note that the other examples are linked inside, outside, woven between, and twisted around. Bright House plays out structures and a foreshortened perspective to create a bit of dimension as well. Line breaks, shadow breaks, and no breaks at all are in play here, but the linkage aspect of these is undeniable. Bringing two elements or concepts together with this simple language can signify strength of unity or compounding of capabilities or concepts. Connecting disparate thought or kindred ideas both work well here. It might also be worth noting that the strokes on these and other marks in the monoline aesthetic are starting to put on a bit of weight. Maybe a sign of evolution of the linear trend, or it could just be our eyesight is getting worse, and designers are learning to fatten the stroke or die.

UNIPEN, PRETIVA

SIEGEL+GALE, RADIAL

GIZWIZ STUDIO, ANAND PATEL

STUDIO INK, THE BRIGHT HOUSE

WINGS This trend caught me a bit off-guard based on the number of designers that landed on this idea without an evident epicenter logo causing the anomaly. It may well have been a natural migration from the bars or stripes so prevalent in this year’s design vernacular. Imagine lifting the opposite ends of a series of lines upward in an aspirational motif. These lines take on an ethereal wing-like quality with a certain symmetry that evokes nature or the natural vanes of a feather. The airy quality of any of these allows the environment to shine through the mark. It’s just that gravity-defying quality that makes this trend so engaging. Individual lines express a tension that gives the appearance they are taut and ready to spring forward or lift into the air if released. The logo for Dell Young Leaders is reminiscent of a flame as well as a pair of extended wings and a woven aspect as well. There’s a great deal of symbolism here for such tight quarters. The active nature of these marks can represent an entity in motion with many parts coming together to allow it to launch.

BRANDORA, THE MICHAEL & SUSAN DELL FOUNDATION

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PARADIGM NEW MEDIA GROUP, VISITATION ACADEMY

BRANDEXTRACT, HELIOS MEDICAL VENTURES

ACCENT BRAND CONSULTANTS AG, FAWCO FEDERATION OF AMERICAN WOMAN’S CLUBS OVERSEAS


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imagination on

Starbrite

®

O PA Q U E S E L E C T

escape on

Endurance

®

journeys on

nordic+

®


June 2017 Logolounge_feb news play 5/31/17 12:45 PM Page 50

LOGOLOUNGE | THE 2017 LOGO TREND REPORT

COLOR SPLIT Besides being a great place for birds to perch, there’s just not a lot of space to do much of anything on a line. Maybe this is one of the reasons the monoline aesthetic has been so bereft of color. In an attempt to employ lifesaving techniques or to keep pushing evolution of the trend forward, designers have again discovered a way. By dissecting line work via color splits, new symbolism can rise from the mark to tell a deeper story. And sometimes it appears to be just another attempt at decoration. In the creation of the companion G logo in 2015, Google quartered the letter and attributed each section to one of the company’s signature colors. Though the stroke was pretty fat, it is the most likely influencer for the rash of color-split monoline marks we’ve seen. The bird logo here is actually a monogram of the initials E and M and the mark for Simione in Tutti Sensi allows the blue line segment to create the initial S. I note the letter M is a bit outside this trend but included here because the designer elected to not only color split but managed to even work halftone information into the line. Besides serving as a clever way to extract additional visuals from a line, the color breaks can help a logo express diversity or elements coming together to achieve a greater goal. It’s a bold enough motif that using it purely for its decorative nature won’t be nearly as successful as the succinct or ah ha! moment message.

PAVEL SAKSIN, PODEGIKI AGENCY

1DEA DESIGN + MEDIA INC., COUNTY MUSEUMS

JAVIER GARCIA DESIGN, EM MONOGRAM

RAINERI DESIGN SRL, COMUNE DI SIRMIONE

ABOUT LOGOLOUNGE LogoLounge.com is the most comprehensive and searchable database of logos available today. More than 264,000 logos have been submitted to the site since 2002, growing it to the largest online treasury of professionally designed logos. Through their submissions, members also gain the benefit of consideration for publication in the LogoLounge book series, the best selling graphic design books series in the world. Through the line of LogoLounge books (currently published in volumes 1 through 9, with volume 10 slated for later this year), designers can gain even more insights from a collection of the smartest logo designs submitted to LogoLounge from all over the world and hand-selected by a prestigious team of some of the most respected names in the industry. In 2016, LogoLounge took a giant step forward as it extended membership to the next generation of designers with LogoLounge Leap, which allows educators and students free or deeply discounted access to the site as well as online resources and educational tools. For more information on membership and identity design news, visit LogoLounge.com.

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2017 web awards_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 11:15 AM Page 52

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS THE BEST IN WEB, INTERACTIVE + UX DESIGN Welcome to our annual showcase of the power of design to enhance websites and online communications. The outstanding work displayed here are created by design firms, ad agencies and inhouse departments, and encompass websites, microsites, apps, publications, video, social media, plus our new UX design category and more. You can view the showcase, selected from more than 1,200 entries, in print and on our new responsive website and in the GDUSA digital edition for desktop, tablet and mobile.

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52 G D USA

55,

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KUDOS Design Collaboratory L+R Langton Creative Group LEWIS Los Angeles County Department of Beaches & Harbors LRXD Mad Dog Graphx Madeleine Corson Design Marshfield Clinic MassMutual Financial Group/studio m mg MiDESign & Marketing Consultancy Millward and Millward LLC MotivAction Neoscape, Inc. Nesnadny + Schwartz Netlify Nicer Collaborative Pixel Parlor Porchlight Primary Digital Principle Rebecca Indelicato RedTree Web Design REVERED Rizco Rule29 Creative Russell Creative Saputo Specialty Cheese School of Advertising Art Signalfire Something Digital Streetsense Studio LD Taylor Design Test Monki TFI Envision, Inc. The Kitchen Collaborative The Lab Design Studio The Walker Group TYS Creative Virginia Department of General Services Weller Smith Design, LLC World Synergy York & Chapel Yu-Jia Huang

65, 66 83 66 66 67 83 67 67 84 78 67 68 68 68 68 69 69 70 70 70 70 71 71 71 71, 72 72 72 72 73 86, 87 84 73, 84 73, 74 84 74 74 78, 79 74 75 75 85 76 76 76 76, 80, 85 88


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2017 web awards_SEPT 07 People 5/31/17 10:44 AM Page 54

AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

54 G D USA

Design Firm: 828:design, Asheville NC Client: Sitework Studios Title: Sitework Studios Website Designer: Chris Hunter Web Developer: Andrew Kinnear Photographer: Amplified Media Copywriter: Courtney Morgan

Design Firm: 828:design, Asheville NC Client: Bunn House Title: Bunn House Website Art Director: Jim Bixby Designer: Andrew Kinnear Web Developer: Andrew Kinnear Photographer: Warner Photography

Design Firm: 828:design, Asheville NC Client: Precedent Furniture Title: Precedent Furniture Website Designer: Tom Petruccelli Web Developer: Integritive Photographer: Robert Allred

Design Firm: 828:design, Asheville NC Client: The Old Wood Co. Title: The Old Wood Co. Website Designer: Tom Petruccelli Web Developer: Integritive Photographers: Creative Cargo, Michael Oppenheim


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Design Firm: Adventure House, New York NY Client: American National Bank Title: American National Bank Website Creative Director: Alexander Acker Art Director: Brian McDermott Web Developer: Max Tokman, Off-Site Services, Inc. Copywriter: Dan Foley, Tailored Ink Interactive Producer: Nathan Crandall

Design Firm: Anda Creative, St. Louis MO Client: Deployed Resources Title: Deployed Resources Website Creative Director: Amanda Summers Art Director: Tim Holdmeier Designers: Ed Sheehan, Corey Lee Digital Director: Amanda Potts

Design Firm: Andra Design LLC, New York NY Client: Altria Group, Inc. Title: Altria 2016 Annual Report Website Photographers: Casey Templeton, Ed Wheeler Art Director and Designer: Andra Hoffman Senior Website Designer: Brianna Meyer Senior Website Developer: Nic Scott

Design Firm: Argus, Emeryville CA Client: Berkeley Lights Title: Berkeley Lights Website Art Director: Jeff Breidenbach Designer: Jeff Breidenbach

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Argus, Emeryville CA Client: Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Country Title: Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Country Website Art Directors: Jeff Breidenbach, Stephanie Wade Designers: Jeff Breidenbach, Stephanie Wade

Design Firm: Association Management Center, Chicago IL Client: Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses Title: APHON Website Redesign Designer: Miku Kinnear Senior Web Manager: Monica Moore

Design Firm: Atlas Branding, Asheville NC Client: The Farm - A Gathering Place Title: The Farm Events Website Art Director: Lisa Peteet Designer: Sarah Smalley Web Developer: Daniel Bryant Illustrator: Sarah Smalley Account Director: Dean Peteet

Design Firm: Auburn University School of Industrial + Graphic Design, Auburn AL Title: Women of Auburn Industrial + Graphic Design Art Director: Courtney Windham Designer: Courtney Windham Web Developer: Courtney Windham Content Development: Courtney Windham Student Designer: Laura Walks Social Media Coordinator: Charlotte Weaver

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Design Firm: Bartlett Interactive, Concord MA Title: Bartlett Interactive Agency Website Art Director: Harry Bartlett Designer: Yvette Perullo Programmer: Ben Davis Web Developers: Ben Davis, Nate Lamkin Photographer: John Earle Project Manager: Janet Leydon Digital Growth Specialist: Anthony Tourville

Design Firm: Christiansen Creative, Hudson WI Client: CentraCare Health Title: Feeling Good MN Art Director: Tricia Christiansen Designers: Ellie Alexander, Sara Erlandson Web Developer: Bjorn Hagstrom Project Manager: Kevin Nelson

Design Firm: Christiansen Creative, Hudson WI Client: CentraCare Health Title: Report to the Community Art Director: Tricia Christiansen Designer: Sara Erlandson Web Developer: Bjorn Hagstrom Copywriter: Robert Prevost - Prevost Public Relations Project Manager: Rachel LaVoie

Design Firm: Creating Digital LLC, Hoboken NJ Client: Kimiko Beauty Title: Kimiko Beauty Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Programmer: Brian Essig

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Creating Digital LLC, Hoboken NJ Client: Palazzo Title: Palazzo - Investment Bankers Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Programmer: Brian Essig

Design Firm: Creating Digital LLC, Hoboken NJ Client: Family Management Corporation Title: Family Management Corporation Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Programmer: Brian Essig

Design Firm: Creative Mellen, Iowa City IA Client: D.C. Taylor Co. Title: D.C. Taylor Co. Corporate Site Art Director: Kevin Mellen Designer: Chance Morgan Web Developer: Nick Bushman Copywriter: Jana Madsen

Design Firm: CT Marketing, Kingston NY Client: Extell Development Company Title: 555TEN Building Website Art Director: Jason Cring Designer: Alexandrea Mobijohn Web Developer: Next Step Digital Photographers: Evan Joseph, Tim Williams Copywriter: Chuck Wells President: Pat Thompson

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Creating Digital LLC, Hoboken NJ Client: Palazzo Title: Palazzo - Investment Bankers Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Programmer: Brian Essig

Design Firm: Creating Digital LLC, Hoboken NJ Client: Family Management Corporation Title: Family Management Corporation Website Art Director: Justin Miskowski Programmer: Brian Essig

Design Firm: Creative Mellen, Iowa City IA Client: D.C. Taylor Co. Title: D.C. Taylor Co. Corporate Site Art Director: Kevin Mellen Designer: Chance Morgan Web Developer: Nick Bushman Copywriter: Jana Madsen

Design Firm: CT Marketing, Kingston NY Client: Extell Development Company Title: 555TEN Building Website Art Director: Jason Cring Designer: Alexandrea Mobijohn Web Developer: Next Step Digital Photographers: Evan Joseph, Tim Williams Copywriter: Chuck Wells President: Pat Thompson

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Design Firm: Design North, Racine WI Title: Design North Website Art Director: Gwen Granzow Designers: Andraya Wimmer, Jane Marcussen, Zeynep Tangun-Kaplan, Christina Fapso Web Developer: Michael Diedrick Photographer: Design North Illustrator: Design North Copywriter: Design North

Design Firm: Design on Edge, Reno NV Client: KYND Cannabis Company Title: KYND Cannabis Consumer Website Art Director: Courtney Meredith Designer: Courtney Meredith Programmer: Chris Meredith Web Developer: Tucker Monticelli Photographer: Chris Holloman Copywriter: Jessica Timmons

Design Firm: Design Principles, Inc, Marion MA Client: Summit Retail Solutions Title: New Domaine Website Custom Design and Code Art Director: Karen Alves Designer: Karen Alves Programmer: Michael Cronin Web Developer: Michael Cronin

Design Firm: Devarj Design Agency, Chicago IL Client: Kotys Wealth Professionals Title: KotysWealthPRO Website Art Director: Silva Devarj Designer: Shanoor Devarj Programmer: Devarj Design Agency Web Developer: Devarj Design Agency Photographers: Shanoor Devarj (Banners), Aran Kessler (Portraits) Illustrator: Shanoor Devarj Copywriter: Brent Brotin Chief Financial Officer: Sarah Kotys

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Digital Hive Mind, Rockford IL Client: J.L. Clark Inc. Title: J.L. Clark Corporate Website Art Director: Jason Farris Designers: Courtney Bradford, Liz Shear Programmer: Philip Zaengle Web Developer: Jacob Zaengle Photographers: Liz Shear, Jason Farris Illustrator: Jason Farris Copywriter: Erin Salisbury

Design Firm: Dragon Rouge, New York NY Client: RĂŠmy Cointreau Title: The Master Blenders Guide To Rum Making Creative Director: Rietje Becker Design Director: Craig Hench Designer: Claire Lieber Web Developer: Joe Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Espinosa, Wellington Graphics Account Director: Monica Grace Malto

Design Firm: Ellen Bruss Design, Denver CO Client: NAVA Real Estate Development Title: Lakehouse Website Creative Directors: Ellen Bruss, Ken Garcia Designer: Michelle Merlin

Design Firm: Experian, Costa Mesa CA Title: Experian Sales Summit Conference 2017 Art Director: Bambi Crowell Designer: Jeffrey Adriano Web Developer: Joseph Rodriguez

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Design Firm: Fifth Letter, Winston-Salem NC Client: IFB Solutions Title: IFB Solutions Disabiity Accessible Site Art Director: Elliot Strunk Designers: Valecia Hopper, Lyn Fonzi Web Developer: David Morton Photographer: John Walsh Copywriter: David Horne, Garfinkle & Associates

Design Firm: Firmseek, Washington DC Client: Cowan, Liebowitz & Latman P.C. Title: Cowan Liebowitz & Latman P.C. Website Art Director: Firmseek Designer: Firmseek Programmer: Firmseek Web Developer: Firmseek

Design Firm: Firmseek, Washington DC Client: Middleton Reutlinger Title: Middleton Reutlinger Website Art Director: Firmseek Designer: Firmseek Programmer: Firmseek Web Developer: Firmseek

Design Firm: Fluke Corporation, Everett WA Client: Fluke Thermography Title: Fluke Infrared Learning Center Art Director: Susan Boehnlein Designer: Susan Boehnlein Web Developers: Aron Norberg, Ryan Neff Copywriter: Joanna Mecko

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Gabe Diaz Graphic Design, Tampa FL Client: Joseph Garry Psychotherapist Title: Joseph Garry Website Art Director: Gabe Diaz Designer: Gabe Diaz Programmer: Gabe Diaz Web Developer: Gabe Diaz Copywriter: Gabe Diaz

Design Firm: GCNY Marketing, Brooklyn NY Client: Emerstone Title: Emerstone Website Art Director: Joseph Blumenfeld

Design Firm: Gill Fishman Design, Cambridge MA Client: Maud Morgan Arts Title: Maud Morgan Arts Website Art Director: Tammy Torrey Designer: Tammy Torrey Programmer: Vicinius Digital Web Developer: Tammy Torrey

Design Firm: GNGF, Cincinnati OH Client: Levy Law Offices Title: Levy Law Offices Website Art Director: Brianna Sullivan Designer: Brianna Sullivan Programmer: The Website Project Photographers: Kathryn Tilmes, Chris Schaljo

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Design Firm: GNGF, Cincinnati OH Client: Tronfeld West & Durrett Title: Tronfeld West & Durrett Website Art Director: Brianna Sullivan Designer: Melina von Hacht Programmer: The Website Project

Design Firm: Hershey Cause Communications, Los Angeles CA Client: Dwight Stuart Youth Fund (DSYF) Title: Dwight Stuart Youth Fund Website Art Directors: Kristin Moore, Jenna Schweitzer Designer: Jenna Schweitzer Web Developer: Josh Schuyler, Schuyler Design Copywriters: Vanessa Schait, Bethany Babyak

Design Firm: Ideas on Purpose, New York NY Client: Nielsen Holdings plc Title: Nielsen 2016 Year in Review - The Science Behind Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Next Design Director: Anna Tan Project Manager: Morgan Sendor

Design Firm: Ideas on Purpose, New York NY Client: Stanley Black & Decker Title: 2016 Year in Review - Building On . . . Creative Director: John Connolly Designer: Fred Lee Strategist: Michelle Marks Project Manager: Morgan Sendor

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Ideas on Purpose, New York NY Client: TB Alliance Title: 2016 Annual Report - Making an Impact Creative Director: John Connolly Designer: Darina Karpov Project Coordinator: Jonathan Allard

Design Firm: Ideas on Purpose, New York NY Client: United Technologies Title: 2016 Annual Report - Doing More, More To Do Creative Director: John Connolly Design Director: Anna Tan Project Coordinator: Jonathan Allard

Design Firm: Jennings Design, Weekhawken NJ Title: PrideTribe.org Changing the Name of the Washington Redskins Art Director: Kurt Jennings Designer: Kurt Jennings Programmer: Markations Web Developer: Markations Illustrator: Kurt Jennings Copywriter: Kurt Jennings

Design Firm: JL Marine Systems, Inc, Tampa FL Client: Power-Pole Title: Power-Pole Website Creative Director: Scott Hereford Art Director: Scott Hereford Designer: Scott Hereford Programmer: Anthony Thorn Web Developer: Anthony Thorn Copywriter: Barry Wallace Marketing Director: Barry Wallace

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Design Firm: John McNeil Studio, Berkeley CA Client: Caledonia Spirits Title: Caledonia Spirits Website Creative Director: Kim Le Liboux UX Designers: Alexandra Camacho, Pora Rith Senior Technologist: Phil Williams Technologist: Chris Stott Jr. Technologist: Aaron Phillips Quality Assurance Specialist: Chris Packer Executive Producer, Digital: Deva Ferar Producer: Jane Scoleri Project Manager: Ken Chou

Design Firm: KBI Design Group, New York NY Title: KBI Design Group Portfolio Web Design Art Director: Kim Brown-Irvis Designer: Kim Brown-Irvis Programmer: Prologic Web Design Web Developer: Prologic Web Design Photographer: Kim Brown-Irvis Illustrator: Kim Brown-Irvis Copywriter: Kim Brown-Irvis

Design Firm: Knowble Media, Columbus OH Client: Whittier College Title: Whittier College Website Art Director: Knowble Media Designer: Knowble Media Programmer: Knowble Media Web Developer: Knowble Media Photographer: Knowble Media Illustrator: Knowble Media Copywriter: Knowble Media

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: EG Conference Title: EG Conference Website Redesign Art Director: John Kudos Designer: Sumit Paul Web Developer: Chris Manlapid

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Mark DeGarmo Title: Mark DeGarmo Dance Branding & Website Design Art Director: John Kudos Designer: Brienne Jones Web Developer: Chris Manlapid

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Sukhadia Caterers Title: Sukhadia Foods Branding & Website Design Art Director: John Kudos Designers: Andy Kurniawan, Ryan Adenata Web Developer: Chris Manlapid

Design Firm: Langton Creative Group, Ltd, New York NY Title: Langton Creative Group Website Art Director: David Langton Designer: Jenny Christopherson Programmer: Scott Mele Web Developer: Michael Sutula Photographer: Alison Sheehy Copywriter: Copywriters:

Design Firm: LEWIS, Burlington MA Client: SP Commerce Title: Corporate Website Art Director: Sarah Spaziano Designer: Rachel Lemieux Web Developer: Tim McAuliffe Copywriters: Rebecca Blouin, Sherri Gray, Lillian Dunlap, Leah Barrett Demurs

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Mark DeGarmo Title: Mark DeGarmo Dance Branding & Website Design Art Director: John Kudos Designer: Brienne Jones Web Developer: Chris Manlapid

Design Firm: KUDOS Design Collaboratory, New York NY Client: Sukhadia Caterers Title: Sukhadia Foods Branding & Website Design Art Director: John Kudos Designers: Andy Kurniawan, Ryan Adenata Web Developer: Chris Manlapid

Design Firm: Langton Creative Group, Ltd, New York NY Title: Langton Creative Group Website Art Director: David Langton Designer: Jenny Christopherson Programmer: Scott Mele Web Developer: Michael Sutula Photographer: Alison Sheehy Copywriters: Debby Coughlin, David Langton

Design Firm: LEWIS, Burlington MA Client: SP Commerce Title: Corporate Website Art Director: Sarah Spaziano Designer: Rachel Lemieux Web Developer: Tim McAuliffe Copywriters: Rebecca Blouin, Sherri Gray, Lillian Dunlap, Leah Barrett Demurs

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Design Firm: Los Angeles County Department of Beaches & Harbors, Marina del Rey CA Title: Department of Beaches & Harbors Website Creative Director: Taylor Grant, RD Technology Solutions Project Director: Carol Baker Project Co-Managers: Catrina Love, Lucie Kim IT Project Managers: Kevin Fountain, Betsy Barker, Diana Hui Designer/Web Developer: RD Technology Solutions

Design Firm: Mad Dog Graphx, Anchorage AK Client: SOUTH Restaurant + Coffeehouse Title: SOUTH Website Design Art Director: Aurora Hablett Designer: Aurora Hablett Programmer: Kris Swanson Web Developer: Kris Swanson

Design Firm: Madeleine Corson Design, San Francisco CA Client: West Marin Review Title: West Marin Review Website Art Director: Madeleine Corson Designers: Lily Bone, Supreeya Pongkasem, Maxine Ressler Programmer: Benjamin Katz

Design Firm: mg, Pleasant Prairie WI Title: simply mg Website Design Art Director: Ben Hermsen Designer: Ben Hermsen Programmer: Ben Hermsen Web Developer: Mike McMahon Copywriters: Ben Olson, Jen Borucki, Anne Marie Burke

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: MiDESign & Marketing Consultancy, El Dorado Hills CA Client: Darcy Clarke Title: Living in Alignment Website Art Director: Marco Ippaso Designer: Marco Ippaso Programmer: Marco Ippaso Web Developer: Marco Ippaso Photographer: Craig Coski Copywriter: Darcy Clarke

Design Firm: Millward and Millward LLC, Stamford CT Client: Acoustic Distinctions LLC Title: Acoustic Distinctions Website Art Director: Ruth Millward Designers: Peter Millward, Ruth Millward Programmers: Answer Yes Consulting Inc. and MBD Studios Inc. Copywriter: Kirsten Haas Content Management: Aline Halle, Kirsten Haas Social Media Management: Aline Halle Leadership & Messaging: Acoustic Distinctions Principals: David W. Kahn, Ronald Eligator, Paul J. Sawyer

Design Firm: MotivAction, Minneapolis MN Client: Quick Base Title: Empower 2017 User Conference Creative Director: Stephanie Teig Senior Designer: Stephanie StuderWeb Developer: Pete Klein Project Manager: Lacey Cobb

Design Firm: Neoscape, Inc, Boston MA Client: National Real Estate Advisors and The HYM Investment Group, LLC Title: Bullfinch Crossing Website Designers: Neocape, Inc. Web Developers: Neoscape, Inc.

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Design Firm: Nesnadny + Schwartz, Cleveland OH Client: FRONT Title: FRONT Website Creative Director: Greg Oznowich Designers: Kim Hall, Jon Woodruff, Shawn Beatty Web Developer: Nate Druss

Design Firm: Nesnadny + Schwartz, Cleveland OH Client: The George Gund Foundation Title: 2015 Annual Report Website Creative Director: Greg Oznowich Designer: Kim Hall Web Developer: Bryce Taylor Photographer: Lisa Kessler Copywriters: Geoffrey Gund, David Abbott, Ann Mullin Interactive Design Director: Shawn Beatty

Design Firm: Nesnadny + Schwartz, Cleveland OH Client: Vassar College Title: 2015/16 Annual Report Website Creative Director: Greg Oznowich Designers: Shawn Beatty, Kim Hall Programmers: Shawn Beatty, Nate Druss Copywriters: Bridget Hollenback, Lance Ringel Interactive Design Director: Shawn Beatty

Design Firm: Netlify, San Francisco CA Client: JAMstack Title: JAMstack Javascript, APIs, and Markup Art Director: Eli Williamson Designer: Eli Williamson Web Developer: Eli Williamson Illustrator: Eli Williamson Copywriter: Jessica Parsons

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Nicer Collaborative, Chicago IL Client: Music Box Theatre Title: Music Box Theatre Website Art Directors: Eric Cheeseman, Brian Hahn Designer: Eric Cheeseman Programmer: Eric Cheeseman Web Developer: Eric Cheeseman Photographers: Kate Vogel, Brian Hahn, Eric Cheeseman Copywriter: Terin Izil

Design Firm: Pixel Parlor, Philadelphia PA Client: Scape Landscape Architecture Title: Scape Studio Website Art Director: Andrew Nicholas Designer: Lisa Demusis Web Developer: Rich Orris, Strange Bird Labs Illustrator: Andrew Nicholas

Design Firm: Porchlight, Atlanta GA Title: Porchlight Company Website Art Director: Greg Corey Project Manager: Natalie Moffett

Design Firm: Primary Digital, Centennial CO Client: RemedyConnect Title: Pedriatric Associates of Kingston Website Designer: Deb Braun Web Developer: Deb Braun

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Design Firm: Principle, Houston TX Client: Evelyn’s Park Conservancy Title: Evelyn’s Park Website Art Director: Allyson Lack Designers: Elizabeth FoxHelser, Rachel Rothberg Programmer: Kudos Design Collaboratory Web Developer: Kudos Design Collaboratory Copywriter: Erin O’Connor

Design Firm: Rebecca Indelicato, Delran NJ Client: Monetate Title: Monetate Corporate Website Art Director: Rebecca Indelicato Web Developer: Theresa Monaco Primary Editor: Marc Hummel

Design Firm: RedTree Web Design, Pittsburgh PA Client: SMARTSolution Technologies Title: SMARTSolution Technologies Website Redesign Designer: Meesha Gerhart Web Developer: Meesha Gerhart

Design Firm: REVERED, Raleigh NC Client: Duke University Title: Duke Campus Center Website Art Director: Kevin Polonofsky Senior Designer: Kristina Fick Designers: Jorge Gonzalez, Ben Markoch Copywriter: Darren Kautz

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: REVERED, Raleigh NC Client: Lynwood Brewing Concern Title: Lynwood Brewing Concern Website Art Director: Kevin Polonofsky Senior Designer: Kristina Fick Copywriter: Darren Kautz

Design Firm: Rizco Design, Spring Lake Heights NJ Title: Rizco Website Art Director: Keith Rizzi Designer: Steph Solerno Copywriter: Debra Rizzi

Design Firm: Rule29 Creative, Geneva IL Client: Wheels4Water Title: Wheels4Water Website Art Director: Justin Ahrens Designer: Susan Herda Web Developer: Factor1 Studios Photographer: Wonderkind Studios Copywriter: Wills Francis

Design Firm: Russell Creative, San Diego CA Client: Bionano Genomics Title: Bionano Genomics Website Creative Director: Don Russell Design Director: Yih-Chi Senior Designer: Wayne AllenDesigner: Nestor Sanchez Programmer: Mark Grostick Photographer: Rob Andrew Copywriter: Lauren Zaniboni

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Design Firm: Saputo Specialty Cheese, Richfield WI Title: DCI Cheese Co. Website Art Director: Kristy Klug Designers: Tyler Nordstrom, Andrea Harris Web Developer: Matthew Dutczak

Design Firm: Streetsense, Bethesda MD Client: Greystar Title: The Chelsea Apartments Art Director: Eduardo Garcia Designer: Eduardo Garcia Programmer: Eric Tulle Web Developer: Streetsense

Design Firm: Something Digital, New York NY Client: Mackenzie Limited Title: Mackenzie Limited Redesign Creative Director: Mickey Winter Designer: Gina Angelotti Photographer: Mackenzie Limited Copywriter: Mackenzie Limited Senior Developers: Nadav Spiegelman, Todd Christensen Frontend Developers: Dima Dromov, Brandyn Bold, Kate Eldridge, Gil Greenberg Development Manager: Jon Tudhope Project Manager: James Idoni Testing Engineer: Yathish Papanna

Design Firm: Streetsense, Bethesda MD Client: Midway Title: Century Square Art Directors: Shadman Sakib, Daniel Troconis Designer: Shadman Sakib Programmer: Eric Tulle Web Developer: Streetsense

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Streetsense, Bethesda MD Client: King of Prussia/The JBG Companies Title: King of Prussia Town Center Website Art Directors: Shadman Sakib, Daniel Troconis Designer: Shadman Sakib Programmer: Eric Tulle Web Developer: Streetsense

Design Firm: Taylor Design, Stamford CT Client: Foundation Source Title: Foundation Source Website Art Director: Dan Taylor Designer: Stephanie Baumer Programmer: Hannah Wool Photographer: Don Hamerman Illustrator: James Steinberg Copywriter: Catherine Censor

Design Firm: Test Monki, The Woodlands TX Client: Hanigan & Johnson Orthodontics Title: Hanigan & Johnson Orthodontics Website Art Directors: Suzy Simmons, Gabby Nguyen Designers: Suzy Simmons, Gabby Nguyen Programmers: Suzy Simmons, Sarah Wright Web Developers: Suzy Simmons, Sarah Wright

Design Firm: The Kitchen Collaborative, Burbank CA Client: Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;eclisse Cosmetics Title: Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;eclisse Website Design Creative Director: Aniko Hill Art Director: Aniko Hill Designers: Jenny Dox, Doris Jew Photographer: Jesse Hill Writer: Lauri Maerov

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Design Firm: The Lab Design Studio, Grand Forks ND Title: The Lab Design Studio Website Art Director: Lindsey Brammell Web Developer: Lindsey Brammell

Design Firm: The Walker Group, Digital Marketing Solutions, Farmington CT Client: Aurora Foundation Title: Aurora Foundation Website Creative Director: Jeffery Williams Art Director: Jeffery Williams Programmer: Michael Delaney Web Developer: Michael Delaney Copywriter: Nancy Dunn

Design Firm: The Walker Group, Digital Marketing Solutions, Farmington CT Client: Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor Pumps Title: Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor Pumps Website Creative Director: Jeffery Williams Art Director: Nicole Pierzchalski Programmer: Michael Delaney Web Developer: Michael Delaney Brand & Marketing Strategist: Amanda Bedard

Design Firm: The Walker Group, Digital Marketing Solutions, Farmington CT Client: Social Enterprise Trust Title: Social Enterprise Trust - reSET Website Creative Director: Jeffery Williams Art Director: Jeffery Williams Programmer: Michael Delaney Web Developer: Michael Delaney Brand & Marketing Strategist: Amanda Bedard

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | WEBSITES

Design Firm: Virginia Department of General Services, Richmond VA Title: Responsive Mobile First Website Art Director: Paris Ashton Designer: Paris Ashton Web Developers: Ameex Technologies Inc, Sang Han, Khanh Duong, Anup Khanal, Chuck Ludwig Director of Communications: Dena Potter Project Manager: Karen Solarte Enterprise Architect: Alan Paxton

Design Firm: Weller Smith Design, LLC, Valley Stream NY Client: Lauren LeaderChivĂŠe Title: Branding & Website Design Art Director: LeAnna Weller Smith Designer: LeAnna Weller Smith Programmer: by Franziska Web Developer: Weller Smith Design Project Manager: Sarah Weller

Design Firm: World Synergy, Cleveland OH Client: Fastener Tool & Supply Title: Corporate Responsive Website Design Art Director: Jay Kozak Programmer: Chuck Wilson Web Developer: Ross Ritchey

Design Firm: York & Chapel, Shelton CT Title: York & Chapel Website Designers: Derek Traver, Vincent Palumbo, Justin Girard Web Developers: Alon Shur, Tom Gabrysiak, Mireille Gallegos, Matt Spiller, Derek Traver Copywriter: Tom Cook Executive Director: Nicole Bonito

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | APPS

Design Firm: Hausman Design and Two Bees Books, Stanford CA Client: Two Bees Books Title: Duck, Dog, and Bear Go To Africa App Art Director: Joan Hausman Designers: Joan Hausman, Mary Marsh Programmer: Talespring Illustrator: Joan Hausman Copywriters: Mary Marsh, Joan Hausman Technical Assistant: Greg Hausman

Design Firm: L+R/Client Success, Client: Ad Council Title: Ad Council Advocate App Art Director: Chris Martinie Designer: Alex Levin Programmer: Ivan Leider Copywriter: Alex Levin

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | ADVERTISING + PROMOTION

Design Firm: Bailey Brand Consulting, Plymouth Meeting PA Client: Suncast Corporation Title: Suncast March Newsletter Email Art Director: Christian Williamson Designer: Matt Silverman Programmer: Daniel Nocket

Design Firm: MassMutual Financial Group/studio m, Springfield MA Client: MassMutual Financial Group Title: “I Do” Insurance Art Director: Mathew Fischer Designer: Christopher Berrien

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc, Norwalk CT Client: Covercraft Industries, LLC Title: Covercraft Awareness #thatsmybaby Ad Campaign via Social Media Static and Animated Ads Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designer: Mary Ellen Butkus Copywriter: Roy Barker Production Artist: Denise Coke

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc, Norwalk CT Client: Standard Motor Products, Inc. Title: Standard ‘The Turbocharger’ Multi Channel Campaign Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designer: Keith Ehmke Illustrator: Mark Hatfield Copywriter: Aimee Silk Production Artists: Cindy Emmert, Richard Wall

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Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc, Norwalk CT Client: Standard Motor Products, Inc. Title: SMP AAPEX 2016 Standard Turbocharger :30 TV Spot Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designer: Keith Ehmke Illustrator: Mark Hatfield Copywriter: Aimee Silk Production Artist: Luke Fiore Producer: Roy Barker

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc, Norwalk CT Client: TFI Envision, Inc. Title: Covercraft Social Media Awareness Campaign Video Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designers: Roy Barker, Mary Ellen Butkus Copywriter: Aimee Silk Producer: Denise Coke

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc, Norwalk CT Client: TFI Envision, Inc. Title: Standard The Turbocharger Advertising Campaign Case Study Video Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designers: Roy Barker, Keith Ehmke Illustrator: Mark Hatfield Copywriter: Aimee Silk Producer: Luke Fiore

Design Firm: TFI Envision, Inc, Norwalk CT Client: TFI Envision, Inc. Title: Automotive Aftermarket ‘Sizzle’ Reel Video Creative Director: Elizabeth P. Ball Art Director: Roy Barker Designer: Hunter Haubert Illustrator: Hunter Haubert Copywriter: Roy Barker Production Artist: Hunter Haubert

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | ANIMATION + VIDEO

Design Firm: York & Chapel, Shelton CT Client: Felicity House Title: Felicity House Handbook Video Art Director: Tom Cook Illustrator: Yeahhaus Copywriter: Tom Cook Executive Director: Nicole Bonito

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Design Firm: York & Chapel, Shelton CT Client: Nexmo Title: Nexmo Brand Video Art Director: Tom Cook Illustrator: Yeahhaus Copywriter: Tom Cook Executive Director: Nicole Bonito Acount Executive: Dan Brown


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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | UX + UI DESIGN

Design Firm: AeroVironment, Monrovia CA Client: PosiCharge Title: PosiCharge Responsive Website Design Art Director: Aniko Szatmari Designer: Aniko Szatmari Programmer: Spinx Digital Web Developer: Spinx Digital Copywriter: Kyle Winters

Design Firm: AppFolio, Goleta CA Title: AppFolio Tenant Portal Senior Visual Designer: Raymond Brown Web Developer: Danger Team UX Designer: Sheriff Jolaoso

Design Firm: Behavior Design, New York NY Client: Red Hat Title: Red Hat Partner Programs Page

Design Firm: Code Roadies/Anchor Marketing, Grand Forks ND Client: PS Doors Title: PS Doors UX Design Creative Director: Jay Mindeman Web Developer: Brett Wysocki Copywriter: Tera Olmstead Digital Project Manager: Jasper Jacobson Account Managers: Hal Halliday, Jill Avery

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | UX + UI DESIGN

Design Firm: Cre8and9, Montreal Quebec Client: AirMedic Title: UX Optimization for Improving Membership Art Director: Tarik Safouan

Design Firm: Gaslight, Cincinnati OH Client: ComputerEase Construction Software Title: Monarch by ComputerEase Art Director: Katie Pohlman Designers: Katie Pohlman, Bailey Miller, Haley Moore Programmers: Doug Alcorn, Chris Nelson, Tyler Shipe, Myles Gearon, Dan Hennessy

Design Firm: Gift Card Impressions, Kansas City MO Client: GCI Digital Title: 360 Connect Art Director: Dominique Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Hara Designer: Christina Carter

Design Firm: Ihor Shadko, San Francisco CA Client: Mycelium Title: Mycelium SWISH Restaurants Automation System Designer: Ihor Shadko

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Design Firm: Kneadle, Fullerton CA Client: NAB Velocity Title: Velocity UX/UI Design Art Director: Ryan Deshler Designer: Owen Song Programmer: Christopher DeCaro Web Developer: Danielle Atnip Illustrator: Ryan Deshler

Design Firm: L+R, Brooklyn NY Client: Jammcard Title: Jammcard App Designers: Ryan Riegner, Eugene Krivoruchko

Design Firm: L+R, Brooklyn NY Client: FLIR Title: FLIR Therminator Photobooth Art Director: Chris Martinie Designer: Alex Levin Programmer: Lev Kanter Web Developer: Ivan Leider Copywriter: Alex Levin

Design Firm: LRXD, Denver CO Client: Hubertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lemonade Title: Hubertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lemonade Interactive Design Creative Directors: Jamie Reedy, Andy Dutlinger Designer: Drew Bentley Web Developers: Turpana Molina, Dan Alexander, David Lawson Copywriter: Greg Lewis Digital Producer: Austin Power Chief Digital Officer: John Gilbert Production: Valerie Hawks Account Manager: Olivia Koszuta

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | UX + UI DESIGN

Design Firm: Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield WI Title: Provider Directory Designer: Melissa Easker Programmer: Bill Hoag Web Developer: Andy Knecht Photographer: Mac Bailey Copywriters: Kristie Shakal, Barb Knight Manager of User Experience: John Tracy

Design Firm: Something Digital, New York NY Client: Maddie Style/Kahn Lucas Title: Maddie Style Ecommerce Site Creative Director: Mickey Winter Designers: Sydney Lynch, Lindsay Stork Web Developer: David Borishansky Photographer: Kahn Lucas Illustrator: Something Digital Copywriter: Kahn Lucas Senior Developers: Todd Christensen, Nadav Spiegelman Frontend Developers: Gil Greenberg, Kate Eldridge Developer: David Borishansky Development Manager: Jon Tudhope Project Manager: James Idoni Testing Engineer: Yathish Papanna

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Design Firm: Signalfire, Delavan WI Client: Fish Creek Civic Association Title: Fish Creek Tourism Website Designer: Heather Harris Web Developer: Nereus Dooley Project Manager: Lisa Oren

Design Firm: Studio LD, Long Beach CA Client: Ink Cartridges Title: InkC Responsive eCommerce Art Director: Fred Machuca Designers: Greg Favro, Lilia Yermakova, Christine McKinnon Web Developer: Gary Longwith


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Design Firm: TYS Creative, Monterey Park CA Client: Amazon/Sony Title: The Sony Online Experience on Amazon.com Art Director: Edwin Gil Designer: Edwin Gil Programmer: Martin Shue Web Developer: Martin Shue

Design Firm: York & Chapel, Shelton CT Client: SyFy Network Title: Hall of Magic Event Microsite Art Director: Matt Delbridge Designer: Mash Studio Web Developers: Alon Shur, Tom Gabrysiak, Mireille Gallegos, Matt Spiller, Derek Traver Copywriter: Greg Privett Executive Director: Eric Fleming Account Executive: Rebecca Sampara

Design Firm: York & Chapel, Shelton CT Client: JAXJOX Title: JAXJOX Website Designers: Vincent Palumbo, Derek Traver, Justin Girard Web Developers: Alon Shur, Tom Gabrysiak, Mireille Gallegos, Matt Spiller, Derek Traver Copywriter: Tom Cook Executive Director: Nicole Bonito Acount Executive: Rebecca Sampara

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | STUDENT DESIGN

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Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Throne Website Designer: Adam Handermann

Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Button Poetry Website Designer: Kelli Hunt

Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Noughts+Crosses App Designer: Cierra Kies

Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Rudis Website Designer: Cierra Kies


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Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Organized Home Website Designer: Lauren Landes

Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: General Youth Division Website Designer: Jevin Ramsey

Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Tentree Website Designer: Ana Surface

Design School: School of Advertising Art, Kettering OH Title: Thailand Website Designer: Ana Surface

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AMERICAN WEB DESIGN AWARDS | STUDENT DESIGN

Design Firm: Yu-Jia Huang, New York NY Title: Monsta Moove UI/UX Design Art Director: Yu-Jia Huang Designer: Yu-Jia Huang Photographer: Yu-Jia Huang Illustrator: Yu-Jia Huang 3D Render: Cheng-Ta Hsieh

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Feared by writers. Cherished by designers. Accent Opaque By George Hammermill Springhill Williamsburg ®

The blank sheet is your canvas. And nobody gives you a wider variety of starting points for your print projects than International Paper. To learn more about how our full and varied portfolio can maximize every piece you print, visit www.InternationalPaper.com.

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©2017 International Paper Company. All rights reserved. Accent, By George, Hammermill and Springhill are registered trademarks of International Paper Company.


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COLOR FORECAST Pantone Color Institute Releases Fall 2017 Fashion Color Report for New York and London Fashion Week PALETTES LEAN INTO WARM AND COMFORTING CLASSICS, WITH REFRESHING AND DYNAMIC ACCENTS Each season the Pantone Color Institute evaluates the colors shown by fashion designers in their collections at New York Fashion Week and now London Fashion Week. This information is used to create The PANTONE® Fashion Color Report, which serves as a color reference throughout the season for fashion enthusiasts, reporters and retailers.

NEW YORK COLOR PALETTE “Bookended by a dynamic Grenadine red and a tawny Autumn Maple, the color palette for Fall 2017 leans more to warmth,” says Eiseman. “While comforting, enveloping colors and ease are crucial to the seasonal feeling, standout shades like pale pink Ballet Slipper, a refreshing Golden Lime and a bright Marina blue add a striking touch when paired with the classic autumnal shades of Navy Peony, Neutral Gray, Butterum and Tawny Port.”

GRENADINE

TAWNY PORT

BALLET SLIPPER

BUTTER RUM

NAVY PEONY

A powerful, evocative, dynamic red, Grenadine is a confident and selfassured attention-getter.

Taking the Red family to new depths, Tawny Port is elegant, sophisticated, and tasteful.

Descended from the Red family but with a softer touch, Ballet Slipper is always flattering and reminiscent of the rosy glow of health.

This snug, warming, and toasty shade is evocative of drinking a glass of its namesake by a roaring fire on a cool Fall evening.

A mainstay for the season for both palettes, Navy Peony is a dependable and anchoring shade. Solid and stable, the hue takes some of the load off of black as a go-to neutral.

NEUTRAL GRAY

SHADED SPRUCE

GOLDEN LIME

MARINA

AUTUMN MAPLE

The standard bearer of all neutrals, Neutral Gray shares the anchoring role with Navy Peony in this palette. It can be used as an accent or a head-to-toe statement shade.

Shaded Spruce is a green you might see in the forest — sheltering and protective as evergreen trees.

An earthy tone with a twist, the golden undertones of Golden Lime makes this yellowgreen shade a refreshing complement to Fall classics.

Cool with an enhanced vitality, Marina is the only truly cool color in the Fall palette for New York that brings with it freshness and brightness.

A quintessential autumn color, Autumn Maple is tawny and russet, introducing warmth into the palette.

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“There is a commonality between the colors we are seeing on the runway in New York and London,” says Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute. “However, individuality is evident and we are seeing a distinct difference between the shows in the two cities in the way these same colors are being combined.” “Led by a vivid Flame Scarlet, the color palette for Fall 2017 is comprised of strong classic colors complemented by a few unpredictable shades for the autumn and winter seasons,” noted Eiseman. “Unexpected combinations such as Royal Lilac and Otter or Lemon Curry with Blue Bell are eye-arresting and create an unusual color dichotomy.”

LONDON COLOR PALETTE “Led by a vivid Flame Scarlet, the color palette for Fall 2017 is comprised of strong classic colors complemented by a few unpredictable shades for the autumn and winter seasons,” noted Eiseman. “Unexpected combinations such as Royal Lilac and Otter or Lemon Curry with Blue Bell are eye-arresting and create an unusual color dichotomy.”

FLAME SCARLET

PRIMROSE PINK

TOAST

BLUE BELL

ROYAL LILAC

A vivid, powerful red, this strong shade leads the way in for Fall in London.

Primrose Pink is an embracing and gentle pale pink shade.

Toast brings a comforting, warmhearted presence to the autumn winter season.

This tranquil blue reflects connection and a soothing sense of peace.

An enchanting purple that provides a theatrical linkage to the other colors in the palette.

OTTER

NAVY PEONY

COPPER TAN

LEMON CURRY

GOLDEN OLIVE

A country color that comes to the city, adding an earthy grounding and a sense of rootedness.

A mainstay for the season, Navy Peony is a dependable and an anchoring shade. Solid and stable, the hue takes some of the load off of black as a go-to neutral.

Copper Tan is a burnished shade known for its welcoming warmth.

Exotic and spicy, Lemon Curry adds a touch of piquancy to the seasonal color story.

A staunch yet stately green, Golden Olive provides sturdiness.

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May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 12:53 PM Page 92

THE POWERFUL ROLE PRINT 17 PLAYS IN THE IMPACT OF DESIGN

Many large and small brand owners struggle to design and deliver content that drives quantitative results. The lack of enterprise-wide understanding of what great content looks and feels like is challenging. Finding a good educational source that enables success can be a daunting task.

PRINT 17, a forum where marketing, media, printing and publishing visionaries share insights and experiences September 10-14, 2017 at Chicago’s McCormick Place, is a place that provides an enabling resource that offers YOU ideas for future success. Spanning the entire graphic media realm of print, imaging, online and mobile, PRINT 17 will showcase the newest, most innovative and comprehensive exhibition of technologies and software that can be found in North America.

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You will learn to breakdown the historical silos and achieve fully-integrated, omni-channel marketing which is reshaping the creative world. The live equipment demonstrations across the show floor and the new product introductions highlight why print is a critical component of any customeroriented, personalized marketing program. THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE AT PRINT 17 This year, PRINT 17 presents more than 50 education sessions that will shed light on topics ranging from design/ creative process, packaging, marketing and sales, business growth strategies, new emerging technologies and more. These educational programs provide a systematic way to learn, view and analyze potential new methods to increase marketing ROI. They will be presented through a variety of formats, including a range of sessions, panels, BIZ Talks, show-floor Learning Experience Theater presentations, and two “Distinguished Leader” speakers. The event will feature knowledgeable presenters on compelling topics, beginning with a trends and technology pre-show conference, OUTLOOK 17.


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NETWORKING, NEW TECHNOLOGIES AND MORE PRINT 17 isn’t just about learning from creative marketing thought leaders. Here is how you can take advantage of all the event has to offer: • Network with Colleagues and Partners in the Industry

HERE IS A SAMPLING OF WHAT IS AVAILABLE:

The connections you make with colleagues, potential partners and vendors will lead to lasting friendships — and make a significant impact on your success. PRINT 17 offers many opportunities to introduce yourself, share, and learn throughout the event. Most importantly, it provides the venue for networking and idea sharing within our creative community.

Distinguished Leader: Tod Szewczyk, VP, Director of Emerging Technology and Innovation of Leo Burnett, provides insight to successfully integrate new technologies into marketing initiatives that create immersive and engaging brand experiences. His free session explores The Future of Technology, Advertising & People. OTHER PROMINENT SPEAKERS INCLUDE: • Trish Witowski, President of Foldfactory.com presents “That’s Fold-tastic!” and “Direct Mail Simplified”— two sessions on unique direct mail pieces that bring excitement to the recipient. • In a hands-on lab, Ivan Bradley demonstrates the “A, B, Cs, and D of Adobe InDesign.” • Son Do, of Creative Color offers “Best Practices for Content Creators.” This three-hour lab will take you through the steps of designing and maintaining consistent color for cross-platform marketing campaigns. • During “Fads, Trends and Disruptive Technology,” Daniel Dejan teaches how to discern what these factors might mean to the marketing world. • Max Dunn from Silicon Publishing, delves into “10 DAMs from the InDesign Out,” making the best DAM choice to fit your creative workflow. • Taz Talley, of Taz Talley Photography will speak on Mastering the Creative Suite and the Perfect Picture: Digital Photography and Adobe Lightroom for Print & Web.” • Clemson University’s Erica Walker discusses “Using the Design Thinking Process” to innovate, inspire and address complex needs.

• Discover the Latest Technologies at the Exhibition Your success hinges on knowing about the latest trends. In no other place will you see so many of the most advanced technologies, services and products as will be demonstrated at the PRINT 17 Exhibition. No other industry event brings together as many graphic media professionals in such close touch with each other — and with you — in one place. Don’t have time to see them all? The “MUST SEE ‘EMS” provide a roadmap to see the most exciting new products onsite at the show, many of which will be seen for the first time in the U.S. These exhibits and products will guide you to the most compelling technologies and products to be found on the show floor. Don’t continue the struggle to learn the latest marketing innovations. Come to PRINT 17 where the world’s leading graphic media professionals, brand owners, and creative marketing gurus are already planning to attend. This is YOUR chance to experience top-notch learning opportunities that will assist to define, assess and implement effective customized omni-channel strategies to maximize customer value. This is THE “must-attend” event!

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EDUCATORS

TO WATCH As a complement to our perennial and popular special reports — “People To Watch” (influential professional creatives) and “Students To Watch” (rising graduates of note) — we add an annual “Educators To Watch” feature to our mix. The reason: design education and educators have more influence than ever on the fast-changing shape of design, media and culture. This is certainly true of todays group, who run the gamut from legends like Richard Wilde, Mary Scott, Phil Hamlett and Ellen Lupton to relative newcomers, from full-timers to adjuncts, from teachers to administrators, and from those who planned a teaching career and those who found it by serendipity. The common thread is that these are people who are making a difference to their students, schools and community. In a field this broad and deep, the selection process is clearly subjective and weighted to those we know, admire and respect. We humbly invite your help in identifying our next round of educators to honor.

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RICHARD WILDE

SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS (SVA) For the past five decades, Richard has been the founding Chair of the BFA Design Department at the School of Visual Arts as well as Chair of the BFA Advertising Department with a combined enrollment of over 1,000 students. He is also a Laureate of the Art Directors Club Hall of Fame and Laureate of the One Club Hall of Fame. Richard states: “I’m a Designer, an Art Director, and Author of more than 20 books, including ‘Visual Literacy’ and ‘Problems:Solutions.’ My latest book, ‘The Process: A New Foundation in Art and Design’ focuses on solving visual communication design problems by creating conditions that put students into the unknown, where questioning and risk taking maximizes possibilities of innovation, which leads to a trust of process.”

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

I didn’t decide to become an educator, education chose me. To elaborate, I’ve always taught students to follow their passion, and I couldn’t have said that if I hadn’t done the same. For teaching to be a lifetime endeavor, the experience must nourish both the teacher and the student. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S CULTURE OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR POLITICS OF THIS MOMENT?

Although teaching has always been a challenge and I’ve found that when I embrace change, which is inevitable, it becomes a question of responding to the demands of the industry, technology and society. But, what doesn’t change is teaching one to think in a new way, where innovation of both thought and form is the criteria. This is the constant, and this unique ability is what prepares students for a career for the next 50 years.

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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

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MARY SCOTT ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY After eighteen years as Director of the Academy of Art University’s School of Graphic Design, Mary Scott recently became Director Emeritus in order to devote herself to teaching her comprehensive portfolio class full time. Mary has also taught at Art Center College of Design. Her work for Maddocks and Company has been published in CA, Graphis, How and Step. She has served as AIGA Chapter President, the AIGA National Board and is an AIGA Fellow of the San Francisco chapter. In May 2013, Mary was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters by the Academy of Art University. HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

I was invited to teach at Art Center College of Design in 1981 and fell in love with educating young designers. Since then, teaching has always been an integral part of my life and have found that teaching is the best way to learn. Sharing your experiences and knowledge with students and then watching them go out into the world and become successful is certainly addictive. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY’S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

These times are particularly complex since many of our students come from other countries. Not only do they have to learn a new language they must also learn the language of design. The domestic students as well must adapt to it’s language in order to become media savvy, conceptually ready and must achieve the formal skills to bring it all together. Critical thinking about any topic must be mastered and the ability to make it into something that creates awareness and changes thought is at foundation of communication. Todays’ students are sometimes lacking in historical context and the encouragement of learning must always be nurtured and revered.

PHIL HAMLETT ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY Phil Hamlett is the Director of the School of Graphic Design at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, the largest private art and design school in the country. As a former AIGA national board member, founder of Compostmodern, and co-author of the Living Principles for Design, he sets the agenda for sustainable business practice within the design community. Phil recently completed his term as president of the AIGA San Francisco chapter, for which he continues to serve ex officio. HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

Teaching has been part of my professional life for some time — but I often describe myself as the accidental educator, having only become a full-time educator relatively late in life. In 2004, my colleague and predecessor Mary Scott invited me to take over the nascent graduate program at the Academy of Art University. As it turns out, this is where I belonged all along. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY’S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

Design education abounds with both challenges and opportunities. Integral in both of these is determining how much curriculum is devoted to new technologies and forms versus teaching bedrock design skills that are readily transferable to any situation or medium (if you have this completely figured out, please feel free to contact me).

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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

ELLEN LUPTON MARYLAND INSTITUTE COLLEGE OF ART (MICA) Ellen Lupton is a writer, curator, educator, and designer. She is Senior Curator of Contemporary Design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in New York City. Recent exhibitions include Beauty — Cooper Hewitt Design Triennial (with Andreas Lipps), How Posters Work, and Beautiful Users. Lupton also serves as director of the Graphic Design MFA Program at MICA (Maryland Institute College of Art) in Baltimore, where she has authored numerous books on design processes, including Thinking with Type, Graphic Design Thinking, Graphic Design: The New Basics, and Type on Screen. Her next book, Design Is Storytelling, will be published by Cooper Hewitt in 2017. Lupton earned her BFA from The Cooper Union in 1985.

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HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

Design can change how people see the world. People engage with design as makers and users. As a curator at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, I create exhibitions for the general public. Thousands of people visit the museum each week, and I get to meet just a few of them personally. As faculty at MICA, I’m working with students in a more personal way. I learn so much from talking with students about how design works and what's its purpose is in society. I've have a truly exhilarating career immersed in the discourse of design — history, theory, practice, methodology, aesthetics. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

MICA students come from all over the world and from all over the US. Many students feel uncertain about the future. Baltimore has experienced police violence and social upheaval. It is important now, as always, to use design as a tool for truth-telling, for illuminating what is happening in the world. Many of our students seek to use design to address issues such as racial discrimination, LGBTQIA rights, sustainability, income inequality, and globalization. At the same time, students are preparing for professional careers and learning to communicate across many media platforms. The challenges are big, but our students have so much energy.


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JASON FOX SCAD Jason Fox began his teaching career as a part-time professor in 2000 while working as a creative manager and illustrator in the dental industry. In 2002, the call to educate led him to commit to teaching full time. Since then, Jason has worked in academic leadership positions, and accepted the role of department chair for SCAD’s graphic design programs in 2012. As department chair,

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

While service has always been a part of my life, teaching was not in my original plans. I took a part-time role teaching evening classes in graphic design, and a year of teaching balanced with full-time work soon revealed the rewards of being an educator. The accomplishments and gratitude of my students convinced me that education was more than a natural progression in my desire to serve. Now, as an educator cultivating relationships with some of the world’s leading companies, I act as a catalyst for the future of design.

Jason leads curriculum development, including multiple graphic design program revisions at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Most recently, he helped reimagine graduate curriculum in graphic design and visual experience, a novel graphic design program with increased emphasis on human context, data visualization and brand experiences in the built environment. In 2015 Jason co-led a SCAD team in partnership with Google to develop the first user experience design undergraduate program of its kind, specifically targeted to young designers seeking careers in UX.

IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

Today’s greatest challenge in graphic design education is maintaining the core tenants of our discipline while keeping pace with industry. Whether through media or global commerce, visual storytelling has no borders. Young designers must be ready to design immersive experiences using media appropriate to the need. Moreover, department leadership must be willing to emphasize educational initiatives that ensure professional relevance through constantly evolving course content.

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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

KEETRA DIXON RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN (RISD) Keetra Dean Dixon is a designer whose work inhabits speculative terrain, leveraging emergent technologies and process-focused making. She lived in NYC and rural Alaska before relocating to Providence to teach at RISD. Her work earned a U.S. Presidential Award, a place in the permanent design collection at SFMOMA and an ADC Young Gun Award (in 2008). Her clients have included

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

I’ve been working with different modes of experiential design for about 17 years. My role often involves orchestrating moments which engage an audience via curiosity, discovery, and contribution to an evolving narrative. I fell in love with setting the stage for learning. My role in education is an extension of that process amplified by the classroom context and determination of the students. Watching others find ways to extending those moment of engagement is always a delight and the reason why I’m here.

The New York Times, Nike, VW and Coach. She acted as Design Director for installations featured at the Venice Architecture Biennale and has shown at the Walker Art Center, the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum and the Museum of Arts and Design in NYC. In 2015, Dixon was a featured speaker at the Type Directors Club and the AIGA Design Conference.

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IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY’S CULTURE OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR POLITICS OF THIS MOMENT?

The extremes of our current context feel more pronounced, but it’s the speed of change that seems most impactful. The frenzy that can be intimidating, but the rapid pace resists stagnation and can act as an equalizer in the classroom. Learning to contend with the constant shift, adapting to the new and unknown, helps to flatten hierarchies; teacher and student become beginners together. This disruption/ adaptation process highlights how vital it is to integrate a love of learning into a longterm creative practice.


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MATTHEW FLICK SCHOOL OF ADVERTISING ART (SAA) Matthew Flick serves as vice president of education, creative director, and instructor at the School of Advertising Art, a graphic design college in Kettering OH/ He has nearly 20 years of industry experience as an award-winning art director, and has been teaching design courses for the past 13 years, including Graphic Design I and II and Portfolio Completion. Matt also leads curriculum development at the college. In the industry, his clients have included Titleist, FootJoy Worldwide, IMG Canada, PGA Tour professional Mike Weir, Duncan Seawall, and others. Matt’s work has received numerous awards by organizations including the American Advertising Federation-Dayton, the District Five Advertising Federation, the AIGA, the Columbus Society of Communicating Arts, and the Admissions Marketing Report. He has been awarded several Gold ADDY/Hermes design awards by the American Advertising Federation-Dayton and two Silver ADDYs from the District Five Advertising Federation. Matt was featured as one of GDUSA’s “People to Watch” in 2013, named a “Forty Under 40” up-and-coming regional leader by the Dayton Business

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

While working in the design industry as an art director, a friend asked me to teach a college-level graphic design class. I hesitantly accepted the position, but quickly fell in love with the students. That was nearly 15 years ago. Every day I look forward to working with students who are inquisitive, passionate, and eager to learn. I not only get to teach them about design, I get the opportunity to see them grow into professionals and have a career doing something they love that helps them live a life they’ve dreamed about and worked hard to achieve. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

Every year is different, and I recognize that each student is an individual with unique needs. It seems more students are facing significant challenges. Many have jobs while attending school fulltime, most are away from family for the first time, and some have trouble coping with the stress of new responsibilities while juggling projects and deadlines. Others need reminded to think of their college education not just as the next step after high school, but as an opportunity and an investment. Education is like so many other things in life, “you get out of it, what you are willing to put into it.”

Journal, and honored as Educator of the Year by the American Advertising Federation-Dayton twice in recent years. G D U SA 101


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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

CINDY BUCKLEY KOREN PRATTMWP After working on award winning projects with clients including: AT&T, Global Finance and Runner’s World Magazine, Cindy Buckley Koren could not resist the calling to return to Upstate NY in order to teach and raise her family. She established two successful B.O.C.E.S. vocational programs in Visual Communications and is currently professor of Communications Design at PrattMWP College of Art and Design. Her students’ work is routinely recognized in the U.S. and abroad. As a featured speaker at the inaugural TEDx Utica, she challenged today’s educational institutions to stop being “instistupid” and “do stuff that matters.” PHOTOGRAPH: Joe Owens, student, PrattMWP, who is interning with Annie Leibowitz ILLUSTRATION: Claire Hallett, student, PrattMWP

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HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

Thirty-five years ago, I informed my high school Commercial Art teacher that I wanted to be a teacher — just like her. She told me I was too talented to be a teacher, so I studied advertising and design, got my BFA, and moved to the Big Apple. When I returned to the Mohawk Valley, I was invited to teach a college design course. That was it — I committed myself to becoming a full time educator. Looking back, I am grateful that I did not take a traditional route in education because I believe my professional experience has fostered my students’ successful placement in this creative and competitive field. Annie Leibowitz's studio, Pentagram, NBC, and Apple are just a few places where you can find my former students. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S CULTURE OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR POLITICS OF THIS MOMENT?

From letterpress to mobile apps, you would be hard pressed to find a field that has undergone as many paradigm shifts as Communications Design. The biggest challenge we have as design professors is finding ways to make every lesson relevant in a world where technology moves faster than curriculum and students are graduating into salaries that do not add up to their student loan debt. I encourage students to make the best of their education and I challenge all college administrators and professors to provide an experience that is worth the tuition price.


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CATE ROMAN WOODBURY UNIVERSITY Cate Roman is an accomplished educator, designer, and storyteller whose work in education and for private clients spans more than 20 years. Her professional experience ranges from brand strategy and packaging design to exhibit graphics. Clients have included Mattel, Inc., the UCLA Events Office, Caruso Affiliated, and the Library Foundation of Los Angeles. Cate has taught classes in Nonprofit Branding, Information Design, Packaging Design, Typography, and Portfolio Presentation. Before joining Woodbury University as full-time faculty, she taught in the Communication Arts Department at Otis College of Art and Design. Cateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experimental work explores language as visual structures that replace verbal communication. The abstracted and ambiguous objects use both the presence and the absence of letterforms to articulate a visceral experience of communication. Before turning her attention to the study of design, Professor Roman was a successful actor and dancer who performed in New York, London and Los Angeles. She toured with the Cambridge Theatre Company and brings many aspects of her theatre background into the classroom. Cate holds a B.A. in Art from Pitzer College, Claremont and an MFA from Claremont Graduate University.

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

Someone once taught me to see the world through the lens of design. And when my eyes adjusted to that light, I was connected to a rich and deep curiosity that remains undeterred. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of anything more rewarding than to inspire curiosity in others, so they can tackle some of the most challenging problems of our time. Design is as much about meaningful relationships as it is about solving problems. These relationships are a critical part of making meaningful design, and the relationships I build with my students form a mutual exchange of ideas and inspiration. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

Engaging students in deep design inquiry always presents challenges. However, this year marks an extreme political and social sea change. The current political climate is, of course, impossible to ignore; and I see it as an opportunity to engage students in a more meaningful personal conversation of social and global responsibility. Devising research driven experiences where students can explore current issues that affect them and their families engages their curiosity, while the stories they share with each other builds an empathy that leads toward developing informed designers, makers, and thinkers. Typography Background in Photo: Special thanks to graphic design students Sunde Thomas, Patricia Hajjar, Briana Pong, Marineh Markarian, Elaine Chicas, Laurel Fosnight and the rest of my Typography 3 class. G D U SA 103


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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

ERIC KARNES DREXEL UNIVERSITY WESTPHAL COLLEGE OF MEDIA ARTS AND DESIGN The son of a painter and a special-education teacher, Eric grew up on the edge of lovely Baltimore MD. After a brief, unsuccessful stint as a journalism student, Eric enrolled in the Graphic Design program at Maryland Institute College of Art, where he developed an abiding love for all things typographic. Upon graduation, Eric punched the clock at a number of well-known design and advertising firms (Pentagram, The Martin Agency, etc.), where he managed projects for a wide range of corporate and institutional clients. Eric has taught design and typography since 2006, and is currently an Assistant Professor of graphic design at Drexel University in Philadelphia. In addition, he maintains a shadowy, unofficial poster design studio (erickarnes.com) and a small branding studio with longtime friend and fellow classmate Christine Coffey. Eric’s work has been recognized by organizations and publications such as the AIGA, Art Directors Club, Type Directors Club, Society of Publication Designers, German Society for Book Arts, American Advertising Federation, CA, Graphis, and Print Magazine.

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HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

I was fortunate enough to have studied under Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips while an undergraduate at MICA. They were incredibly inspiring and when I was eventually given the opportunity to come back to teach, I jumped at it. It was important to me to give back and I quickly found that I loved the challenges of the classroom. I’ve since gained experience at other schools, but Ellen and Jennifer remain my benchmarks for what makes a great design educator. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY’S CULTURE OR POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OF THIS MOMENT?

The biggest challenge I’ve found in educating aspiring designers is making them comfortable with the ambiguities of an iterative design process. Cultural and public education policy shifts seem to have created more college students noticeably uncomfortable with processes that lack prescribed directions. Therefore, in Freshman and Sophomore courses, I try to stress the necessity of rigorous experimentation. It’s a tried and true technique that teaches students it’s ok — and in fact preferable — to tackle a visual problem without being able to predict the final solution.


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HANNAH MILLER PHOTOGRAPHY

COURTNEY HURST-WINDHAM AUBURN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL + GRAPHIC DESIGN Courtney Hurst-Windham is an Associate Professor of Graphic Design in the School of Industrial + Graphic Design at Auburn University. She teaches courses in Interactive Media, Kinetic Typography, Package Design, and Branding. Before teaching at Auburn, she was a designer in Atlanta GA where she specialized in corporate identity and branding, marketing, web design, and information design. Courtney attended The Rhode Island School of Design where she received a BFA degree in Illustration. In 2009, she received an MFA from the Savannah College of Art and Design in Savannah GA. She says: “I come from a family of bee keepers and master gardeners so it’s no surprise that my work is heavily influenced by patterns in nature. There are endless color palettes, rhythms, and types of motion in nature that filter into my compositions. As a result of a life of observation, I create collages out of repurposed paper materials that most often mimic types of organic motion. All of the work inevitably filters into my teaching

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

The truth is that even though I had recently received my MFA, teaching was not on my mind. I was completely focused on building up my professional career. However, a surprise opportunity presented itself in 2012 — someone I cared for and respected suggested that I apply for a full time faculty position at Auburn University. I threw my hat into the ring, received the offer, weighed the pros and cons, and accepted the position not knowing what an incredible blessing this path would be for me. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S CULTURE OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR POLITICS OF THIS MOMENT?

In this world of smart phone distractions and Pinterest regurgitation, I have found that many times students need to be led to places where they can find authentic inspiration. Natural patterns and ideas in nature are one of my influencers but sources can be found in many places and are unique to each designer. Though economics can sometimes hinder opportunities to travel, I encourage them to venture outside of their immediate space and keep notebooks of collected items that are interesting to them. For additional inspiration and ideas, I encourage them to listen to podcasts while they work so as to stay in touch with what is happening in the world.

which makes for a wonderful feedback loop of inspiration.” G D U SA 105


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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

JAMES GOGGIN

RHODE ISLAND SCHOOL OF DESIGN (RISD) James Goggin is a graphic designer and educator from London via Sydney, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Auckland, Arnhem, and Chicago. He received his MA in Graphic Design from the Royal College of Art and founded a design practice named Practise in London upon graduation in 1999. The studio is now based in Providence where James has joined the Rhode Island School of Design as full-time

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

Education is such a fundamental part of my practice that I already started teaching graphic design while I was still a student. One of the main reasons that I love working as a graphic designer and as an educator is because both involve continued education and research, as well as engaging dialogue with a constant mix of diverse, interesting people. I saw an old USA postage stamp the other day with a Josef Albers painting on it that said “Learning never ends.” I couldn’t agree more.

faculty on the BFA and MFA Graphic Design programs, after a number of years as a visiting critic. In parallel with Practise, he has worked as a long-term consultant to Tate Modern and Tate Britain; art director of the avant-garde British music magazine The Wire; and director of Design and Publishing at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. He previously taught at Werkplaats Typografie in Arnhem, The Netherlands, and at Ecole cantonale d’art de Lausanne (ECAL) in Switzerland. James lectures and runs workshops at art and design institutions around the world and contributes writing to a range of international publications and journals. He has works in the permanent collections of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Chicago Design Archive, and is a member of Alliance Graphique Internationale. 106 G D U SA

IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S CULTURE OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR POLITICS OF THIS MOMENT?

There have always been moral and ethical questions that particularly relate to graphic design practice (whose messages are we communicating, for which purposes, by which means) but this new post-Brexit, post-Trump, post-truth, post-privacy world, while definitely challenging for educators, has actually highlighted many issues that our profession has long needed to address. Classes involve daily (often hourly) discussions and debates (largely initiated by students) about how graphic designers might truly contribute to a more equal and just society. The current situation in 2017 has provided a stark reminder that we cannot separate our profession from our humanity: we are both designers and people.


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ALLAN ESPIRITU RUTGERS UNIVERSITY Allan Espiritu, founder of GDLOFT PHL, is a Philadelphia-based, award-winning graphic designer and educator. Espiritu received his BA in graphic design from Rutgers University - Camden and his MFA in graphic design from the Yale University School of Art. Espiritu is also an Associate Professor at Rutgers University-

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

After graduate school, I had no intention to teach. But after teaching for close to 13 years, I really can’t envision my design practice without it. Teaching allows me to constantly analyze my own approach to design, as well as the profession at large. My students connect me to the zeitgeist and contemporary perspectives. In addition, the academic world has afforded me the ability to create work that may have more of a social impact and personal relevance.

Camden where he heads the Graphic Design concentration. Espiritu’s work has been published and acknowledged by AIGA, GDUSA, UCDA, Graphis, Communication Arts, Print Magazine, HOW, STEP, Applied Arts, and the Art Directors Club. His work has also appeared in Gestalten and Rockport publications and in various galleries and museums, most recently at The Barnes Museum in Philadelphia, as part of the Person of the Crowd: The Contemporary Art of Flânerie Exhibition. He served as President of the AIGA Philadelphia Chapter from 2011 to 2013 and was recently named the 2017 AIGA Philadelphia Fellow.

IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY’S CULTURE OR POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OF THIS MOMENT?

We live in uncertain and tumultuous times. As educators, we need to develop skills in our students that extend beyond graphic design. For me, the following serves as the foundation of this pedagogy: 1. Develop independent and critical thinking so students can decipher the bombarding “noise” put out by the media, politics and technology. 2. Assist in defining and creating awareness of their individual perspective by constantly questioning and addressing their unique cultural positions. 3. Encourage the development of interests and inspirations beyond design. Looking “inward (at graphic design) only perpetuates imitation of graphic methods and aesthetics.”

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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

RENEE COLETTE STEVENS

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY, S.I. NEWHOUSE SCHOOL RenĂŠe Stevens is an award-winning motion and interactive designer, educator, and public speaker currently living in Syracuse, NY. She splits her time between owning a design studio (R studio) and as an Assistant Professor of Design at the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. She is an exclusive designer for Minted, where she has had the opportunity to teach typography to designers around the world. She

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

At a young age, my grandfather would give me jobs, like rolling his coins. Afterwards, he would hand them back to me to pay me for my time. What I saw as a chore actually taught me things like math skills, being an entrepreneur, building a strong work ethic, and about being a teacher. He showed me that the best teachers are those where the students donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even realize they are learning. This small act is brilliant. It is what inspired me to become a teacher, and everyday I aspire to be the kind of teacher to others that my grandfather was to me.

is an active member of AIGA Upstate New York and serves on the board as the Assistant Director of Education. Her favorite things include properly kerned type, perfectly paced music, and beautiful whitespace. In 2014, Stevens brought her passion project to life by created the design workshop, Pixels & Print, which provides a real-world collaborative experience to students by working on projects focusing on the power of design and social impact. Stevens has been recognized nationally and internationally with awards from Graphis, Print, GDUSA, AEJMC, Minted, and Lightwork, but her proudest achievements happen every day through the work of her students.

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IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR CULTURE OF THIS MOMENT?

More than ever there is a need to emphasize problem solving and empathy in every aspect of the design process for this generation of designers. The more technology we have, the more challenges will arise that need a design solution, and the more unstable the political and economical world becomes, the more we need to focus on the power of design for the greater good. In every course, there is a need to spend more time teaching students how to be problem solvers with a sense of empathy for the user and other humans.


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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

CHRISTINA + DAVID AT ELEVEN FOOT SIX PHOTOGRAPHY

MEAGHAN A. DEE VIRGINIA TECH Meaghan A. Dee is an Assistant Professor and Chair of the Visual Communication Design Program at Virginia Tech. She earned her BFA in Graphic Design from the University of Illinois at ChampaignUrbana and her MFA in Design from Virginia Commonwealth University. Prior to joining Virginia Tech, Meaghan worked professionally as a designer for the architecture and design firm Marnell Companies, where she regularly collaborated with architects, interior designers, and industrial designers on large-scale resorts. Her design focus is on branding, typography, editorial design, user experience, and packaging. She regularly collaborates on freelance design projects and grant research. She is a part of the Communication Design team on the FutureHAUS which is a prototype for the home of the future. Her work has been recognized nationally and internationally by the American Advertising Federation, AIGA, GDUSA, Graphis, and Hiii Typography. Meaghan is currently on the steering committee for the AIGA Design Educators Committee and serves as the faculty director for the local AIGA student chapter. In her spare time, she mails individually designed postcards to strangers, which

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

Since I was a child, teachers have encouraged me to make creative work. In high school, a teacher went so far as to tell my parents, “I know Meaghan is good at math, but I think she might actually be able to make it in the arts.” (As a side note: I was fortunate to have parents who supported my choice to go to art school.) Being inspired by my own teachers made me want to provide this motivation for others. Additionally, I have a selfish attraction to teaching: I love learning. Any time I spend teaching is also time spent discovering new ideas. IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY’S CULTURE OR POLITICS OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OF THIS MOMENT?

Every year comes with its own challenges, but this year’s events are very directly impacting universities. For instance, I have many international students, and the proposed travel ban has made several of them too fearful to visit their families in their home countries because they worry that they will not be able to re-enter the United States. I truly want all students to feel welcome in my classroom, which can be a challenge when students do not feel welcome in the country. Additionally, I'm a researcher and am concerned about funding opportunities that are being cut, such as the proposed elimination of funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.

are documented at http://meaghandee.tumblr.com. G D U SA 111


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2017 | EDUCATORS TO WATCH

JENNIE THWING FARMINGDALE STATE UNIVERSITY, SUNY Jennie Thwing is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Visual Communications at Farmingdale State College - State University of New York, and a New York-based designer, artist and animator. She received her BFA from Tyler School of Art and an MFA from the University of Maryland. She teaches time-based

HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO MAKE EDUCATION A MEANINGFUL PART OF YOUR CAREER?

I never expected to be a teacher. I was asked to teach a course in graduate school and soon learned that I loved watching students discover the joy of creation. I get to see students experiment and struggle, and then finally start to “get it.” I learn so much from watching what students do with a new skill. My favorite part of teaching is that I get to be a part of their creative formation. I also love being immersed in the tools of my discipline.

media and graphic design. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, in solo and group shows in countries such as Norway, Czechoslovakia, Germany and Great Britain. She has received numerous awards, including the Meyer Family Award for Contemporary Art, the Center for Emerging Visual Artists Fellowship, the SPARC Artist in Residence grant, and the Queens Arts Fund Grant. She was a 2009 semifinalist for the PEW Foundation for the Arts Grant.

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IS THERE A SPECIAL CHALLENGE TO EDUCATING STUDENTS IN 2017 IN LIGHT OF TODAY'S CULTURE OR ECONOMICS OR TECHNOLOGY OR POLITICS OF THIS MOMENT?

I worry that technology might homogenize the creative work students produce, especially if they are hearing and seeing the same things online. I also worry that students will stop using their hands. I love the hand-drawn animations they create.


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May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 12:55 PM Page 114

BETTER TOGETHER

Uniting Marketing & Creative With Workflow Lets Them Achieve More BY ALEX WITHERS

What’s coffee without donuts? What’s PB without J? Some things are just better together. And marketing and creative used to be one of them, united by a shared passion for engaging their audience. But the demands of today’s industry have put a strain on the traditionally strong partnership. Marketing is expected to reach consumers in more channels, with more targeted campaigns — which means creative is tasked with producing enough content to fuel them.

“When I first started, we were assigned projects by someone walking over and saying hey, can you design an email for me? Everyone wanted everything immediately. It was very stressful, explains Trish Olives, Creative Manager at YETI. I needed to figure out how to get some structure, retain our top talent, and become a true service department that marketing wants to work with, where we’re delivering high quality, effective, impactful results.” “In today’s digital world, everything can be published imme-

Like Olives, many other creative leaders report a top concern

diately. As marketers, we always need to deliver leads now,

is building stronger strategic partnerships with marketing

so everything we ask for is ‘needed now,’” explains John

so they can accomplish more. And uniting both sides with

Lewellan, Director of Marketing Operations at LexisNexis.

a better workflow is the answer.

Marketing’s increased speed has really created problems for creative departments.” On the creative side of the house, Andy Brenits, President of the Board at InSource, agrees. “With marketing under pressure, they rely on creative more. Yes, creative teams are being recognized for doing great work, but as a result, they are being assigned more work without necessarily increasing headcount.” Lacking additional resources, the only way for teams to keep up is to operate more efficiently. But process challenges often make that all but impossible, further contributing to friction between marketing and creative.

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May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 12:56 PM Page 115

“To solve inefficiencies, you need a good creative and marketing process — from strategic planning all the way to delivery,” says Lewellan. “We had creative and marketing flow out the specifics of our process together: who’s involved when, how does work flow through, and who should approve what. Getting that buy-in from everyone upfront and maintaining it has allowed us all to stay on the same page.” Aligning marketing and creative to a better workflow can be challenging, but adopting a flexible, easy-to-use technology solution can help by reducing headaches and frustration on both sides and providing a framework that allows teams to scale. Creative gets more bandwidth to focus on producing world-class content, which in turn gives marketing the fuel they need to deploy more successful campaigns. As a result, they’re able to stay ahead of rising demand by being better together. “A technology solution empowers creatives to do their best work. It gives them time and space to ideate, and that’s exactly why we’re working with marketing in the first place,” says Olives. “Implementing a tool is new, its different, but you say, let’s work together, and as a result get the best creative possible.”

A better workflow helps marketing and creative teams be better together. Contact: inMotionNow.com ALEX WITHERS is the Chief Marketing Officer of inMotionNow, a leading provider of workflow management solutions for marketing and creative teams. Alex is a seasoned digital technology and marketing executive with more than 20 years of senior marketing experience with brands including Pepsi, ESPN, USGA, the Financial Times, and LexisNexis. Contact: inmotionnow.com

G D U SA 115


WHAT A ‘CANDIDATE-DRIVEN MARKET’ MEANS TO DESIGNERS BY BEJAN DOURAGHY

Have you heard the phrase “candidate-driven market” lately? Not sure what it means for your career? Relax, it’s good news! It means now is a great time to be looking for work as there are more jobs for talented creatives. A high demand for specific skills paired with the longer amount of time companies take to fill open roles is good news for job seekers. Even Inc. is reporting “the most difficult step these days is finding employees — any employees at all. We’re in the midst of one of the most difficult hiring markets of all time.”

What does all this mean for you? THESE FIVE THINGS ARE TRUE FOR DESIGNERS IN A CANDIDATE-DRIVEN HIRING MARKET. THERE ARE MORE JOBS

Speaking of location . . . Simply put, you have more choices in jobs now than you did three years ago. Businesses that had to cut back during the recession of 2008 are finally hiring again, and new tech adds more and more jobs every day. Creatives can now be more selective when it comes to what types of roles and which companies they apply to.

FREELANCERS CAN CHOOSE THEIR LOCATION It used to be that companies would settle down in their area and make talented job seekers come to them. Now, companies are starting to move to markets where their type of talent is living. Looking for a tech gig? You no longer have to go to Silicon Valley — you can check out Chicago. Want to live the start up

NEGOTIATIONS ARE IN YOUR FAVOR

life? Try Denver instead.

A candidate-driven job market means you, the job seeker, can negotiate a better pay and benefits package. Companies are

STAFFING AGENCIES ARE THE PLACE TO BE

becoming more sensitive to the wants of job seekers when it

More job vacancies means more job postings and more inter-

comes to their compensation packages. As jibe.com points out,

views, but not necessarily more quality talent . . . it’s a lot for

if you have skills that are in short supply (bilingual speakers or

HR departments to handle! As more specialized roles need to

work with A.I., for example), or you work in an industry that has

be filled, companies aren’t having time to source for talent on

boomed post-recession, there is heightened competition among

their own, so they’re turning to staffing agencies to help them

employers … which means better benefits for the right candidate.

fill the roles. If you haven’t submitted your portfolio to one of the major digital and creative staffing agencies (like Artisan Talent

BRIDGES ARE MORE EASILY BURNED

hint, hint), now is the time!

Thinking this market can help you get a huge salary bump and unlimited time off for less work? Not necessarily. It’s important

Bottom line? Companies need talent and you have it. So it’s

to remember to empathize with potential employers and not get

time to embrace the sophisticated job seeker within you.

too greedy. Playing offers against each other or demanding too much can end up burning some bridges. Make sure you’re staying

BEJAN DOURAGHY is the founder of Artisan Talent, an award winning

within the market range for your role, level of experience, and

staffing agency that has been inspiring better lives and matching talent

geographic location. Consult a salary guide to see what compet-

since 1988, with offices in Chicago, New York City, Indianapolis, Washington

itive compensation looks like for your career.

D.C., Denver, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. For more information, visit artisantalent.com

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May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 12:57 PM Page 117

A REFRESHING POINT OF HUE Q&A WITH THE MINDS BEHIND NEENAH’S CLASSIC PAPERS REFRESH The recent refresh of the CLASSIC® Papers portfolio, more than a year in the making, resulted in inspired colors, trendsetting textures, and dynamic promotional materials. Here is a Q&A with longtime industry veteran and Neenah Brand Manager Kathy Kemps, and design partner Pum Lefebure of Design Army about how this undertaking evolved. READ ON > G D U SA 117


May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 12:58 PM Page 118

A REFRESHING POINT OF HUE Q&A WITH THE MINDS BEHIND NEENAH’S CLASSIC PAPERS REFRESH | CONTINUED FROM PAGE 117 infused the collection with new colors that would both energize and complement the entire portfolio. For example, we incorporated two new grays to the existing ones to offer a broader range, because designers asked for more gray options. There are now three dozen colors across the CLASSIC Brands.

What was the design brief for the refresh of CLASSIC® Papers? KK: While our beautiful whites are the foundation of the brand, the colors and the textures are really the heart of what makes the CLASSIC® brand iconic. So, we wanted to maintain everything that designers know and love about these papers, and then give them even more to love. And before we made any changes, we wanted to preserve the essence of the brand family.

“We wanted to maintain everything that designers know and love about these papers, and then give them even more to love.” – KATHY KEMPS, NEENAH PAPER PL: We thought a lot about what makes something a classic. or even a 1960’s classic design like an Eames Molded Ply-

Is it true the color inspiration started with a trip to the art store?

wood chair. For something to be considered classic, it must

PL: (laughs). Yes! We stocked up on art supplies and mixed

stand the test of time. That was the benchmark we set out.

hues, by hand, in the office. The new Imperial Red was a color

It could be literature, or Renaissance art from the 17th century,

that existed in my head, inspired by a dramatic red hue I

So, where did you start the process?

saw during a trip to Beijing. We also looked at color in terms

KK: It was important for us to build a portfolio that our cus-

of fashion. Not fashion trends, per se, but wardrobe staples.

tomers wanted, not just what we thought they wanted. So we talked with designers across the country, to really understand their needs. All of these customer insights laid the

What are the core items, the foundations that we use to build upon? Black, white, neutrals, and so on. For example, the new Chambray is like your favorite pair of jeans. We

foundation for creating what would become the new line

created colors that would work hard and have staying power.

And then you developed the eight new colors?

“The new Chambray is like your favorite

KK: Yes. We examined the color palette as a whole and incor-

pair of jeans. We created colors that would

porated what we’d learned. We held on to the colors designers

work hard and have staying power.”

love, the hardworking colors they use every day. Then we

– PUM LEFEBURE, DESIGN ARMY

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So then you made all of the colors in all of the textures? KK: No, and this was a carefully thought out decision. Design Army was invaluable in this regard; Pum has great natural instincts. She really helped us think through how the colors and textures would actually be used by designers.

That’s a lot of pressure. PL: It is. But, it was important for us to think through items like the new Woodgrain, it’s an organic texture so there are

What about the two new branded textures? KK: We actually asked designers to show us samples of

colors that naturally make sense, and others that don’t. Color evokes so much emotion, so when you get the right shade, combined with the right texture, it’s going to be emotional.

textures that inspired them. Many great ideas came from those discussions, including the new CLASSIC® Woodgrain. The new CLASSIC® Techweave finish was inspired by today’s tech products. It’s a high-touch texture that presents a modern way to depict a high tech service or product.

Is it hard to design for designers? PL: As designers ourselves we felt the pressure to create colors that our peers would use . . . colors that would be seen as current, yet timeless. And there’s business pressure . . . what happens if an item doesn’t turn? You want the selections to be right. KK: (laughs) I love it. Having worked in this business now for more than 30 years, I still get excited to see designers look at brand new, finished materials like these. Now I just can’t wait to see what they do with them. The new portfolio, including the new additions, can be found in the new three-volume swatchbook set and a new promotion. All are available, free, through your Neenah Paper sales rep.

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MOHAWK AND HYBRID DESIGN CELEBRATE THE POWER OF PARTNERSHIPS

The twelfth issue of the popular Mohawk Maker Quarterly focuses on partnership as the organizing principle for design and content. The Partnership issue explores the ebb and flow of partnerships from 18th century patrons to 21st century communes. Through the use of imagery and text, each feature article explores the dynamic tension inherent to any partnership be it accidental or intentional, adversarial or collegial. “Humanity’s greatest achievements have happened when people — two or two thousand — worked together,” says Chris Harrold, VP and Creative Director at Mohawk. “In this issue, we celebrate the partnerships that underpin notable projects today — and that helped bring life to influential work in our past.” Adds Dora Drimalas, whose Hybrid Design firm is behind the project: “Partnership takes many different forms, but when we collaborate with those who challenge, support and inspire us, we can create some of our most satisfying work. Partnership allows us to produce work that’s bigger than the sum of its parts. It’s a whole lot more fun too.”

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For issue twelve, the Hybrid team chose a 9.75 x 13.25â&#x20AC;? perfect-bound format with a die cut dust jacket and contrasting cover paper to create three unique versions, each with foil stamped mastheads. The 28 pages are designed with short sheet photo essays in support of the feature articles, creating a harmonious balance of full-bleed photography and text forms. Throughout the book, twelve different paper stocks are used to explore process color and match colors on white, off-white, colored and textured papers. As with past issues, #12 contains a special artifact that supports the narrative. In this case, it is a 5 x 7â&#x20AC;? card with coordinating envelope featuring one of 12 designs printed on the new Strathmore Impress Pure Cotton paper in foil, letterpress and offset. The issue was printed by Sandy Alexander, using four color printing, match green, match orange, match brown, match blue, match gold, match gray, foil and spot dull varnish. Postcards were letterpress printed and foil stamped by Aldine in New York City. Contact: mohawkconnects.com/cultureofcraft

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May 2017 Pub Letter Focus_feb news play 5/31/17 1:00 PM Page 124

HOW TRADITIONAL DESIGNERS CAN BREAK INTO UX DESIGN BY DIANE DOMEYER

Technology continues to open up exciting career paths for design professionals with digital savvy and stellar soft skills. One of the hottest jobs right now is user experience (UX) designer, and companies are willing to pay top dollar for people with experience.

CREATING AN OPTIMIZED USER EXPERIENCE What exactly is user experience design? UX design describes the entirety of a user’s interactions with a product. From the look and feel of the interface to experiences like customer service and order processing, UX is all part of a journey that — if done right — ends with the user forming a positive emotional bond with the product and brand. It’s about creating feelings, specifically, a sense of enjoyment and satisfaction.

According to a recent survey by The Creative Group, six in 10 hiring managers said it’s challenging to find UX design

Graphic design is a crucial element in creating that feeling,

talent. It’s little surprise, then, that mid-level professionals

but UX design is an interdisciplinary role that requires unique

in this field are expected to see a 6.1 percent increase in

skills. To succeed, these professionals also need experience

starting salary to a range of $75,640–$103,000 in 2017.

in wide-ranging areas like software development, advertising and marketing, psychology, user research, and information

Are you ready to embrace UX design but not sure where to

architecture. Nobody can be an expert in all these fields,

start? Read on to learn more about the career path and how

but the broader your knowledge base, the more you bring to

you can add UX design to your skill set.

the role.

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DIVE INTO THE EXPERIENCE

Besides picking up basic skills, you can learn about the latest user experience trends, developments and best practices.

Because this field is still relatively new, there’s no single

Such events are also great for meeting other creative pro-

degree or typical career path for gaining UX design skills.

fessionals, which is essential when making a career move.

That’s good news for professionals without a lot of digital experience, as they can pave their own way. Here are some

You can discover what courses they recommend, where to

tips for getting started:

look for UX design jobs and which companies are hiring entry-level talent. The more you network with insiders, the

1. THINK DIFFERENTLY

smarter — and better known — you’ll become in the field.

The world of user experience can mean a change of workplace culture, as it tends to be more collaborative than print design.

4. BUILD SOMETHING

If you enjoy being part of a team, this may be an ideal role for

What do employers look for when hiring UX designers? Our

you. Start getting more involved with collaboration around

survey finds the top two factors they consider are previous

the user, the product requirements and the user’s journey.

experience (37 percent) and the content of their portfolio (26 percent). If you don’t have the former, focus on the latter.

UX designers are constantly modeling, testing usability,

How? Do some pro bono work for a nonprofit company looking

gathering feedback and making adjustments. This is also a

to create a mobile app. If you’re a freelance designer, offer

field that doesn’t reward perfectionism. Instead, designers

to revamp a favorite client’s website — at a reduced rate.

adopt a “fail fast” philosophy that’s common in startups: make rough sketches and wireframes; test, break and learn

A UX design portfolio is not just any digital portfolio. The

from them; and then move on to the next prototype as

chief difference is that it focuses on case studies rather than

quickly as possible.

end products. Aim to showcase three to five projects, each of which tells the story of how you arrived at the final design.

If you start taking this iterative approach to your current work,

What was the initial concept and vision? Describe the user

you’re one step closer to having the mindset of a UX designer.

(Persona) and the main business challenge? How did you create the solution and the prototypes? What methodology

2. LEARN NEW SKILLS

did you use for gathering user feedback? The design managers

As mentioned earlier, UX design is an interdisciplinary role,

reviewing your application and portfolio are interested in the

which means you may have to add several new tools to your existing skill set. There are several ways to go about acquiring

process that led you to the final design. They want to know if you have the broad skills necessary to create a seamless

the requisite knowledge and experience.

and satisfying experience for the user.

According to our survey, 36 percent of creative professionals

Without a doubt, the UX design field is rewarding — both

said they are most likely to take online courses or webinars to learn about UX design. Countless internet-based options exist from providers like Lynda.com and Udemy as well as major universities.

creatively and financially — and ideal for innovative thinkers who are passionate about solving problems. If you’re ready for a professional challenge, dip your toes in the water. You may end up loving the experience.

Our research shows other popular methods for gaining UX design proficiency are reading industry publications and blogs,

DIANE DOMEYER is Executive

as well as enrolling in UX bootcamps (short, intensive

Director of The Creative Group, a

“crash” courses).

specialized staffing service placing

3. MAKE CONTACT

interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals with a variety of firms.

While many designers gain their UX expertise through online

For more information, visit

content, don’t dismiss in-person seminars and conferences.

roberthalf.com/creativegroup

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