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HOPE GREATER CLEVELAND FOOD BANK • ANNUAL REPORT 2016


CURRENT BOARD OF DIRECTORS

BOARD CHAIR Felton Thomas Cleveland Public Library SECRETARY Darnell Brown City of Cleveland TREASURER John Sauerland Progressive Insurance

DIRECTORS Patricia A. Ackerman ChalkDust Education Foundation Joan U. Allgood Joan U. Allgood Co., LPA Kristen Baird Adams PNC Akram Boutros, MD MetroHealth

VICE CHAIR Carrie Carpenter Gordon Square Arts District

Micki Byrnes WKYC-TV3

VICE CHAIR Anthony Rego Giant Eagle, Inc.

Reverend Jawanza Colvin Olivet Institutional Baptist Church

VICE CHAIR Ann Weinzimmer Eaton Corporation

Loren Chylla The Adcom Group

William H. Coquillette

John R. Corlett The Center for Community Solutions John Cymanski Heinen’s, Inc.

David Marrison OSU Extension Richard Maxfield Cargill Deicing Technology

Jim Francis

Cynthia Moore-Hardy Lake Health

Anita Gray Anti-Defamation League

Nick Orlando, Jr. Orlando Baking Company

Wayne Hill The University of Akron

Jeffery Patterson Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority

Dave Jenkins Cleveland Browns Terry Jenkins Key Private Bank Amy Kaplan Jewish Federation of Cleveland Howard Lewis Family Heritage Life Insurance

Gregory Stefani Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland Sheila Wright The Good Community Foundation PRESIDENT & CEO Kristin Warzocha - Listed as of March 31, 2017


Together, We Feed Our Community. Dear Friends, We can’t thank you enough for your partnership in our mission to ensure that everyone in our communities has the nutritious food they need every day. Every time we hear a story of hope from one of our partner agencies, we know that we couldn’t do it without the help of generous people like you. We recently completed a three-year strategic plan. During the first year of the plan, we’ve been able to expand our reach to connect even more families and individuals with the nourishing food they need to thrive. Your support allowed the Food Bank staff and volunteers to supply our programs and partner agencies with enough nutritious food to feed more than 250,000 hungry children, parents and seniors in our six-county service area. However, with Feeding America’s Map the Meal Gap research shows that despite signs of economic recovery, the number of people who need food assistance — 330,000 thousand in our territory — remains high. As we anticipate another year of growth in need and service to our struggling neighbors, we take heart in the compassion we see every day. There are so many donors, volunteers, organization, member agencies and corporate partners who support the Greater Cleveland Food Bank. Each makes a difference. Each ensures access to healthy food in the communities we serve. Thanks to their effort, we hope to continue to work to meet the growing need and increase the amount of food we distribute. Our goals for 2017 are ambitious — we estimate we will distribute more than 53 million meals. The food, time and money you help provide brings comfort and stability to hungry people in our community. Thank you for your ongoing compassion and partnership in the fight to end hunger.

Felton Thomas Board Chair

Kristin Warzocha President & CEO


OUR MISSION

Working together to ensure that everyone in our communities has the nutritious food they need every day. PICTURED: Corporate Volunteer from AllianceBernstein


Our Core Values Fostering Engagemen

t

Collaborating with our community and embracing diverse ideas and perspectives

Excellence Being good stewards of community resources, setting high standards and focusing on continuous improvement and innovation

Empowerment Encouraging, educating, and supporting our partners, volunteers, employees and all those touched by hunger to contribute at our fullest potential

Dedication to Service Providing leadership in the hunger relief movement while keeping the people we serve at the center of all we do

As we move forward, we are excited to feed our community and fight hunger in innovative and effective ways. We will celebrate success, communicate progress, and learn along the way. Together, with your support, we feed thousands of people every day.


Meet Ms. Washington. Since 2008, Carruthere Washington has regularly visited the Bishop William M. Cosgrove Center’s produce distribution: "It helps with my produce, with the different foods we get that I can use. That way, I can pick out what I want because now there’s a certain way I have to eat." Carruthere is diabetic, yet, for the past six months, she’s medication free. Long term health outcomes for our hungry neighbors are poorer than their food secure counterparts. For someone with diabetes like Ms. Washington, a balanced diet high in fruit and vegetables is required to maintain healthy blood sugar levels and blood pressure. Unfortunately, for people struggling with food insecurity, eating a healthy diet is often not possible and has serious health consequences. A staggering 39% of the senior households we serve have a family member with diabetes. Many seniors have to make

tough decisions regarding the choice between food, medicine, and housing due to financial insecurity. Through our hunger relief efforts and your generosity, we try to make this choice a little easier. After her diagnosis a year and a half ago, Carruthere decided to take control of her health and weight by changing her diet. The produce and perishable food from the Bishop Cosgrove distribution helped her lose over sixty pounds since last June. She now limits her starches, and eats a well-balanced diet full of vegetables and proteins. We know that increasing access to fresh produce has a positive effect on the health of our clients. Carruthere, like all our neighbors benefiting from produce distributions, thanks donors like you: "The produce is important, it’s helpful, it saves you, and it’s healthy—it’s a blessing. Keep up the good work!"


"The produce is important, it’s helpful, it saves you, and it’s healthy—it’s a blessing. Just keep up the good work!" PICTURED: Ms. Carruthere Washington, a client at Bishop William M. Cosgrove Center, a Greater Cleveland Food Bank agency


HERE’S THE WORK YOU MADE POSSIBLE IN FY2016

Providing More Meals More than 330,000 Northeast Ohioans are food insecure, meaning they don’t always know where they will find their next meal. To meet the need, we are increasing the meals we make possible in the community.

18.5 million pounds of fresh produce were distributed

50.3 million meals were made possible in FY2016

27.3 million pounds of perishable food distributed


26.8%

SNAP Outreach

How We Provide Meals

73.2%

Pounds Distributed

We provide access to nutritious meals through both food distribution and our SNAP outreach efforts. This year, our SNAP Outreach efforts provided access to 13.4 million meals.

MEALS MADE POSSIBLE

20%

What We Distribute 62% of what we distributed in FY16 was perishable food, which includes fresh fruits, vegetables, and prepared meals. By 2018, two-thirds of what we distribute will be healthy perishable food.

Perishable Food

42%

Fresh Produce

38% Other

POUNDS DISTRIBUTED


Focusing on the Most Vulnerable HERE’S THE WORK YOU MADE POSSIBLE IN FY2016


IN FY2016, WE SERVED:

Children About one-third of the people we serve are children. In fact, Cleveland has one of the highest rates of child poverty in the U.S. This year, through programs such as Kids Cafes, Backpacks for Kids, and School Markets, we served more kids than ever before.

7,613

Children

Seniors Food insecurity has a significant negative impact on the health of seniors. To better serve Northeast Ohio’s growing senior population, we’ve established Senior Nutrition Initiatives. These include our Senior Meals program, which delivers meals to community centers and homebound seniors, and our Senior Markets, which brings healthy, nutritious food to low-income seniors living in larger apartment and housing complexes.

3,361 Seniors

Clients with Health Challenges One-third of the households we serve include a member with diabetes, and twothirds have a member with high blood pressure. In response, our Food as Medicine Initiative aims to connect our clients to more nutritious food, health care facilities and nutrition education. This eliminates some key barriers to improved health and well-being, such as lack of access to healthy food.

2,228

Clients with Health Challenges


Addressing the Root Causes of Hunger We know hunger isn’t an isolated issue. National research shows challenges with employment, housing, and healthcare are the main contributors to food insecurity. Of the Northeast Ohioans we serve:

23% of households have at least one member in poor health

64% had to choose between paying for food or utilities

75% had incomes below the federal poverty level


Connecting Clients to Resources This year we’ve forged relationships with several healthcare and community partners, connecting our clients with the resources they need to avoid lines at their local food pantry.

Healthcare Partners: •• Cleveland Clinic •• MedWorks •• MetroHealth •• St. Vincent Charity Medical Center •• University Hospitals

THIS YEAR BY THE NUMBERS:

15,726

SNAP applications were submitted, providing 13.4 million meals and assisting 23,431 clients

1,559

other public benefit applications were submitted, assisting 3,559 clients

27,107

clients were linked to outside resources


Strategic Plan Progress

YEAR ONE: ACTUALS

MEALS

47.8 million

50.3 million

PRODUCE

16.8 million

18.5 million

24.9 million

27.3 million

FOOD (POUNDS)

(POUNDS)

BASELINE: FY2015

PERSHIABLE

A Year to Year Comparison

Below is a look at the organization more than 58 million meals to No


nal goals we’ve set for our 2016-2018 Strategic Plan. By 2018, we plan to serve ortheast Ohioans in need!

S

YEAR TWO: GOALS

YEAR THREE: GOALS

n

53.0 million

58.8 million

n

19.2 million

20.4 million

n

28.8 million

30.9 million


Strategic Plan Progress A Year to Year Comparison Outside of serving more meals, the Food Bank has made it a priority to better serve the most vulnerable populations in our community - seniors, children, and people with health challenges. In total, we hope to serve 10,000 more children, 8,500 more seniors, and 7,000 clients with health challenges by 2018. This chart provides a breakdown of the number of clients we hope to assist each year.

YEAR ONE: ACTUALS

Additional Low Income Children Served

7,613

Additional Low Income Seniors Served

3,361

Additional Low Income Clients with Health Challenges Served

2,228


S

YEAR TWO: GOALS

YEAR THREE: GOALS

+3,308

+4,244

+4,075

+3,785

+2,920

+3,090


Financials FY16 Operating Revenue Excludes the Value of Donated Food

12.8%

14.1%

0.6%

13.6%

58.9%

Member Agency Handling Fees

2,592,826

12.8%

Purchase Food Program

2,953,240

13.6%

Contributions and Grants*

12,785,307

58.9%

3,052,916

14.1%

131,023

0.6%

Government Reimbursements & Administrative Fees All Other TOTAL

$21,699,133

* Includes three-year gift totaling $1,050,000 from St. Luke’s Foundation


FY16 Operating Expenses Excludes the Value of Donated Food

11.0% 5.6%

1.4%

9.8%

59.2%

12.9%

Programs

12,317,713

59.2%

Purchased Food Program Cost of Good Sold

2,689,290

12.9%

Harvest for Hunger Food & Grants

2,048,477

9.8%

1,171,091

5.6%

2,285,150

11.0%

291,848

1.4%

Administrative Costs Fundraising Volunteer Services & Product Resource Development TOTAL

$20,803,569


Statement Of Activities & Changes In Net Assets YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 FOOD PROGRAMS REVENUE VALUE OF FOOD RECEIVED Value of Food Donated Value of USDA and OFFP Food Received

$36,444,652 31,116,584 67,561,236

FOOD REVENUE Purchased Food Program Total Food Programs Revenue

2,953,240 70,514,476

OPERATING REVENUE Greater Cleveland Food Bank Kitchen Member Agency Handling Fees Federal and State Government Reimbursements and Administration Fees Contributions and Grants Other Total Operating Revenue Total Revenue from Food Programs and Operations

1,640,228 1,136,419 3,052,916 12,785,307 131,023 18,745,893 $89,260,369

FOOD PROGRAMS EXPENSE VALUE OF FOOD DISTRIBUTED Value of Donated Food Distributed, including Scrap Value of USDA and OFPP Food Distributed, including Scrap

$35,600,555 31,147,711 66,748,266

FOOD COST OF GOODS SOLD Purchased Food Program, including Scrap

2,689,290

Harvest for Hunger Food Purchases and Grants

2,048,477

Total Food Program Expenses

$ 71,486,033


OPERATING EXPENSES PROGRAM EXPENSES Operations Greater Cleveland Food Bank Kitchen Community and Government Programming Total Program Expenses

$10,411,520 2,038,137 395,347 12,845,004

SUPPORT SERVICES Fundraising Volunteer Services & Product Resource Development Administration Total Support Services Total Operating Expenses Total Food Program and Operating Expenses Change from Operations

2,310,746 292,158 1,221,059 3,823,963 16,668,967 $88,155,000 1,105,369

OTHER REVENUE Realized and Unrealized (loss) Gain on Investments, Net

294,168

Interest & Dividends

172,963

Total Other Revenue

467,131

Change in Net Assets

$1,572,500

Net Assets, Beginning of Year

17,954,618

Net Assets, End of Year

$19,527,118

The Statement of Activities and Changes in Net Assets reflects activity from October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016. The complete audited financials from October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016 are available for review on our website at GreaterClevelandFoodBank.org or by calling the Greater Cleveland Food Bank at 216.738.2052.


Statement Of Financial Position AS OF SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents Investments, at Fair Value

$

– 4,557,640

RECEIVABLES Agency Receivables, Net Government Administrative Fees/Reimbursements Operating Pledges, Net Current Portion of Cold Storage Expansion Pledges

222,971 920,449 916,708 2,000 2,062,128

INVENTORY Contributed Product

2,474,782

Purchased Product

518,622

USDA Product

1,061,915

Ohio Food Purchase Program Product Greater Cleveland Food Bank Kitchen Purchased Food

1,054,754 38,177 5,148,250

Prepaid Expenses and Other Deposits Total Current Assets Property and Equipment, Net

466,214 12,234,232 9,610,150

OTHER ASSETS Cash, Board Designated for Endowment

142,971

Investments Held as Endowment

1,710,087

Capitalized Pledges, Net

370,000

Capitalized Software, Net

190,273

Deposits Total Assets

1,816 $24,259,529


LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts Payable - Operating Accrued Expenses Line of Credit Harvest for Hunger Credits

$1,425,920 822,146 500,000 1,444,630

Agency Grant Commitments

469,715

Deferred Revenue

70,000

Total Current Liabilities

4,732,411

Total Liabilities

4,732,411

NET ASSETS Unrestricted

6,837,158

Net Investment in Plant & Equipment

9,800,423

Total Undesignated

16,637,581

Board Designated for Endowment Total Unrestricted

1,756,986 18,394,567

NET ASSETS – TEMPORARILY RESTRICTED Time Restricted All Other Total Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted - Endowment Total Net Assets Total Liabilities and Net Assets

908,282 141,469 1,049,751 82,800 19,527,118 $24,259,529

This Balance Sheet is as of September 30, 2016. The complete audited financials from October 1, 2015 through September 30, 2016 are available for review on our website at GreaterClevelandFoodBank.org or by calling the Greater Cleveland Food Bank at 216.738.2052.


Thank You! Click on the lists below to see the many generous donors who made our work possible in FY16. MONETARY DONORS

VOLUNTEER GROUPS

MONETARY MONTHLY DONORS

FOOD DONORS

MONETARY UNITED WAY AND FEDERAL CAMPAIGN

FOOD DRIVES PROGRAMS & AGENCIES

TOMORROW’S HARVEST

STAFF

TRIBUTES & BEQUESTS

HARVEST FOR HUNGER KITCHEN CABINET MEMBERS

100 PLUS VOLUNTEER HOURS


Together, we feed our community.


Do you know someone in need? Call our Help Center at 216-738-2067

216.738.2265 GreaterClevelandFoodBank.org

15500 South Waterloo Rd. Cleveland, OH 44110

The Greater Cleveland Food Bank works to ensure that everyone in our communities has the nutritious food they need every day.

Member of:

Local coordinator:

Greater Cleveland Food Bank Annual Report FY2016  
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