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Guam Contractors’ Association

NEWS BULLETIN

Credibility Matters

Vol.54 Issue 7 JULY 2013


CONTENTJULY

6

S.A.M.E.

10

COMMITTEE UPDATE

14

FEATURE STORY

18

PHOTO HIGHLIGHTS

22

GARRISON REPORT

26

MEMBER BENEFITS

28

AROUND THE BENCH

32

AROUND THE BENCH II

14

Construction Headline

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2 | JULY2013

I've never eaten whale. We can make whale soup, whale keleguen, BBQ whale, deep fried whale........

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

Just make sure that however you decide to cook it, that its WHALE done!!!

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THEDIRECTORS PRESIDENT James A. Martinez, GCA PAST CHAIRMAN Robert Salas, Landscape Management Systems CHAIRMAN - ELECT Tom Anderson, Black Construction Corporation VICE CHAIRMAN - ELECT Art Chan, Hawaiian Rock Products SECRETARY/TREASURER John Sage, WATTS Constructors CONTRACTORS DIRECTORS: Narci Dimaoala, Amazon Construction Juno Eun, Core Tech International Tom Nielsen, Maeda Pacific Corporation Tom San Nicolas, dck pacific guam LLC John Robertson, AmOrient Contracting ASSOCIATE DIRECTORS: Paul Calvo, Calvo’s Insurance Underwriters Carlo Leon Guerrero, M80 Office Systems Inc. Patty Lizama, Pacific Isla Life Ray Yanger, Matson Navigation

THEEDITORIALS Guam Contractor’s Association (GCA) in conjunction with AdzTech and Public Relations, Inc. publishes the Construction News Bulletin (CNB) monthly. Reproduction of materials appearing in this publication is strictly forbidden without written permission by GCA. While we always strive for accuracy, we will from time to time overlook mistakes. In order to help us improve the quality and accuracy of this publication, we ask that you take the time to look at the information provided and notify GCA of any corrections as needed. Opinions and editorial content of this publication may not necessarily be those of the publisher, staff, GCA members, GCA Board of Directors and advertisers. For more information about advertising in the GCA Construction News Bulletin contact the advertising department at (671) 477-1239/2239 or email at adztech@teleguam.net. Distributed to GCA members or can be obtained by stopping by the Guam Contractors’ Association office located at 718 N. Marine Corps Drive, Suite 203, East West Business Center, Upper Tumon, Guam. To find out more about how you can become a GCA member contact Guam Contractors’ Association at Tel: (671)647-4840/41 Fax: (671) 647-4866 or Email: gca@teleguam.net. www.guamcontractors.org Postmaster. Send address changes to Guam Contractors’ Association, located at 718 N. Marine Drive Corps Suite 203, East West Business Center, Upper Tumon, Guam.

THETEAM PUBLISHER: James Martinez SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR: Geri Leon Guerrero AD SALES: Tom Mendiola PRODUCTION: Geri Leon Guerrero William Tenorio PHOTOGRAPHERS: Christopher “Taco” Rowland EDITOR: Adztech CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: John Robertson David F. Macaluso

Dr.Noel Silan DPM, ABMSP P.C.

Ted Garrison Shawn Gumataotao Ken Williams GCA STAFF: Francine Arceo Desiree Lizama

COVER: John Robertson at his AMOrient office in Hagatna showcasing the SAME National RVP Medal.


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SAIPAN Guam Main Office: VANCOUVER, WA Phone: (670) 235-3500/01/02 Phone: (671) 632-3424/26/27/28 Phone: (360) 694-5195 or (503) 283-3151 Chalan Lau Lau, Saipan Fax: (671) 632-2824 1701 West 31st Street, Vancouver, WA 98680 saiconwd@gmail.com conwoodguam@gmail.com vancouver@conwoodsproducts.com

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S.A.M.E.UPDATE

SAME GUAM POST GENERAL MEMBERSHIP LUNCHEON JUNE 20, 2013 June’s SAME General Membership Luncheon marked a special time of year – the installation of new officers and directors as well as acknowledging those who have made an extra effort in supporting the goals and functions of the SAME Guam Post. Post Leadership Award

CAPT JOHN HECKMANN has demonstrated outstanding leadership and accomplishment as a member of the SAME Guam Post. His leadership and direct involvement has been an inspiration to all members. While in office, CAPT Heckmann was able to align the Post Charter and Bylaws with SAME Headquarters, develop a formal budget and establish a Small Business Committee and an awards program to recognize significant contributions made by members.

Post Outstanding Support Award

SAME National RVPMedal

AMORIENT ENGINEERING, a member since 2003, has consistently supported the SAME Guam Post. Their personnel often provide logistical support for the general membership meetings and manage the Post’s business and accounting records. AmOrient also plays a large role in providing the business community with SAME information and updates. Their contributions to the Post and its Board members have been above and beyond what duty calls.

JOHN ROBERTSON, the epitome of the Guam Post, supports the SAME mission by developing and enhancing the relationships amongst uniformed services, public and private sector engineers and related professionals. John has been Post Treasurer as well as other specialty functions throughout the years. He does not hesitate to promote SAME awareness and mentor young engineers within the community.

>>>>>> SAME NATIONAL RVP COIN >>>>>

WAYNE CORNELL – As a dedicated board director, Wayne’s has committed himself to multiple committees, the successful Charlie Corn Golf Tournament and the local SAME Guam Post website. Through his work, Wayne has benefited current and prospective members as well as future engineers.

BOB SHAMBACH – Leading the Programs Committee and newly created Budget Committee, Bob’s unfailing volunteerism and leadership has made him a stand-out board director.

Post Service Award

ROBERT MARKS received this award by providing significant and faithful service to the SAME Guam Post since October 2007. He has served as the 2nd Vice President for the past two years and has filled in for President when one was not available. His consistent attendance - and guidance has significantly contributed to the Post’s recognition as one of the leading professional organizations on the island.

-

JAMES ATKINSON – Aside from being significantly involved with Board meetings and general membership meetings, James Atkinson works diligently to support the Charlie Corn Gulf Tournament, MATH COUNTS and other Guam Post outreach events.

NOEL ENRIQUEZ – Largely responsible for drafting and instituting the Guam Post Awards Program, Noel is directly responsible for the Post’s streamer accomplishments for Education and Training and Relationship and Recognition with Distinction.

, 6 | JULY2013

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

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S.A.M.E.UPDATE

>>>>>> CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION >>>>>

CHRISTINE PASCUS - for her planning and execution of the SAME Guam Post 2012 IBC Fundamental Structural Workshop for Engineers JESSE PANGELINAN - for his support to the 2012 IBC Fundamental Structural Workshop for Engineers and

continuous effort to establish and activate SAME Guam Post Small Business Committee

his generous volunteerism at the 2012 IBC Fundamental Structural Workshop for Engineers

AL SAMPSON - for his continuous support and guidance on both the SAME Guam Post Awards and Small Business Committees. In addition for

MALOU CASTRO - for her continuous administrative support of the SAME Guam Post Scholarship Program

President Past President 1st Vice President 2nd Vice President Secretary Alternate Treasurer Alternate

Wayne Cornell CAPT John Heckmann PE CAPT Glenn Shepherd PE Noel Enriquez LT Russell Torgesen LT Noel Macatangay John M Robertson PE Bob Shambach

DZSP 21 NAVFAC HQ (Washington, DC) NAVFAC Marianas Brown & Caldwell NAVFAC Marianas NAVFAC Marianas AmOrient Engineering EA Engineering, Science & Tech

ELECTED DIRECTORS: Elected Director (4th year term) Elected Director (4th year term) Elected Director (Fellow) Elected Director (2nd year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (1st year term) Elected Director (Young Member)

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Bob Shambach Jay Miller Louis DeMaria PE Dave Ehlers Joe Vinch PE Tor Gudmundsen PE Art Chan Al Sampson Christine Pascus James Atkinson PE Jesse Pangelinan Pete Diaz PE

EA Engineering, Science & Tech S.E.T. Pacific DCK Worldwide (CMSgt, Ret) AAFB Deputy Base Civil Engineer, AAFB TG Engineers Hawaiian Rock Products NAVFAC Marianas HDR Inc. Chugach World Services DCK Pacific AECOM

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

OFFICERS & ELECTED DIRECTORS

OFFICERS:

JULY2013 | 7


S.A.M.E.UPDATE

APPOINTED DIRECTORS:

Margot Stephenson Steve Taylor LT Richard Diaz Scott Thompson PE Richard Stump Alfred Leon Guerrero

Threatt NAVFAC Marianas Versar NAVFAC Marianas Coffman Engineers Stanley Group Lyon Associates

LIST OF COMMITTEE MEMBERS, TASK FORCES AND SPECIAL ADVISORS Awards Committee Christine Pascus, Chair HDR Inc. Al Sampson NAVFAC Marianas Jesse Pangelinan DCK Pacific Budget Committee Bob Shambach, Chair EA Engineering Noel Enriquez Brown & Caldwell James Atkinson Chugach World Services Mary Jo Pablo AmOrient Engineering Audit Committee Jay Miller, Chair S.E.T. Pacific Louis DeMaria PE DCK Worldwide Charlie Corn Scholarship Committee Scholar Selection Subcommittee Tor Gudmundsen PE, Chair TG Engineers Scott Thompson PE Coffman Engineering James Atkinson PE Chugach Golf Tournament Subcommittee Wayne Cornell, Chair DZSP 21 James Atkinson, Co-chair Chugach J. Arthur Chan, Jr, Co-chair Hawaiian Rock Products

Membership Committee Pete Diaz PE, Chair AECOM Young Members Subcommittee Dave Ehlers (NCO Liaison) Andersen AFB NCO Liaison Subcommittee LT Richard Diaz (Young Member)NAVFAC Marianas Jecelia Llegado (Young Member) GHD Small Business Committee Jesse Pangelinan, Chair DCK Pacific Al Sampson NAVFAC Marianas Shoja Rezvani PE Watts Constructors Programs Committee Christine Pascus, Chair HDR Inc. Monthly Meetings (Jan-Nov) Shoja Rezvani PE Watts Constructors “Best Value” Seminar (±Sept ’13)

Streamers Committee Noel Enriquez, Chair Brown & Caldwell John Robertson PE AmOrient Engineering Bob Shambach EA Engineering Special Advisors: Parliamentarian Jay Miller S.E.T. Pacific Post Webmaster Outreach/Community Relations Richard Stump, Chair Stanley Group DZSP 21 MIS Department DZSP 21 General Activities Joe Vinch PE 36th CES, Andersen AFB Initiate Manila Chapter Margot Stephenson-Threatt NAVFAC Marianas Engineers Week Subcommittee: James Atkinson PE (MATHCOUNTS) Chugach World Services MATHCOUNTS Subcommittee: Steve Taylor (Manila) Versar


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COMMITTEUPDATE

Military, Government and Labor Relations Committee Update – July ‘13

By John M. Robertson

SENATE MARKUP OF THE NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FY 2014 Overview: On 14 June 2013, Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) Chairman, Senator Carl Levin (D-MI), and Ranking Member, Senator James Inhofe (R-OK), passed and completed its markup of the Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) with a vote of 23-3. The bill authorizes appropriations for FY14 of $625.1 billion for national defense including the following: $526.6 billion for Department of Defense base budget and $80.7 billion for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO). The bill fully funds the Pentagon’s $6.4 billion request to procure 10 F-35 Joint Strike Fighters for the Navy, while making cuts of $1.3 billion from Military Construction (MILCON) and $16.6 million from family housing. The House Armed Services Committee (HASC) had passed their version of the NDAA on 6 June 2013 as HR 1960. It leaves intact funding for Guam projects requested by the military but appears to remove funding for projects in Saipan related to the divert runway. Differences between the House and Senate versions will be resolved in conference committee on a date yet to be determined. Highlights of the marked up bill, reported on 20 June 2013 as S. 1197, included the following: an overall 1 percent pay raise for service members, maintenance of healthcare fees, and an annuity for special needs disabled

10 | JULY2013

dependent children through the Survivor Benefit Plan, the integration of military uniforms amongst branches and stricter guidelines when sexual assault is involved. The bill also aims to boost oversight of the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program by requiring the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) to report to Congress regarded the plans to use these ships, as well as how survivable the ships are for missions, due to the programs inability to demonstrate its mission. S. 1197 calls on Government Accountability Office to review the program development, test sea frames and mission models, and study ship’s requirements and technical capabilities. In the Committee report for S. 1197, SASC included numerous items of special interest that they considered as they put together the markup of the FY14 NDAA. These included: Navy Readiness Funding Increases: The FY14 budget request included $39.9 billion in Operation and Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which the following amounts and recommended increases were allocated: $4.9 billion for mission and flight operations (recommended increase of $32.5 million), $1.8 billion for fleet air training (recommended increase of $11.2 million), $3.8 billion for mission and other ship operation (recommended increase of $99.5 million), $734.8 million for ship operations support and training (recommended increase of $61.4 million), $5.1 billion was for ship depot maintenance (recommended increase of $5.7 million), $1.3 billion was for ship depot operations support (recommended increase of $126.2 million), $2.6 million was for depot operations support (recommended increase of $660 million), and $1.9 billion was for facilities sustainment, restoration, and modernization (recommended increase of $100 million). Readiness Concerns under Sequestration: Given the tremendous cuts implemented under the Budget Control Act of 2011 and the sequestration cuts

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

experienced by the military, the Committee recognizes the negative impact on force readiness and training. The Committee believes that sequestration cuts to the Department of Defense (DOD) are arbitrary and irrational, noting that these cuts jeopardize the DOD’s ability to defend our Nation. Military Personnel Funding Changes: The Committee recommends a decrease of $150 million in Military Personnel funding to reflect the recent trend of the services underexecuting their Permanent Change of Station (PCS) travel funding due to efficiencies resulting from longer tour lengths, fewer moves, and lower disbursement rates. The Committee also recommends a decrease of $120 million in Military Personnel funding to reflect the services’ under-execution in various accounts relating to the drawdown and the redeployment of forces from Afghanistan. SEC. 2203. IMPROVEMENTS TO MILITARY FAMILY HOUSING UNITS In this section of S. 1197, the Committee recommends a provision that would authorize funding for Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) to improve existing Navy family housing units. SEC. 2204. AUTHORIZATION OF CERTAIN MILCON APPROPRIATIONS, NAVY In this section of S. 1197, the following are authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years beginning after 30 September 2013 with a total amount of $2.2 billion, as follows for the Department of the Navy; $1.2 billion for military construction projects inside the United States, $360.8 million for military construction projects outside of the United States, $19.7 million for unspecified minor military construction projects, $89.8 million for architectural and engineering services and construction design, $73.4 million for construction and acquisition, planning and design, and improvement of military family housing and facilities, $389.8 million for support of military family housing, and $24.9 million for an Explosives

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SEC. 2232. REGIONAL BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE (a) FINDINGS.—Congress makes the following findings: (1) In the introduction to the Ballistic Missile Defense Review of February 2010, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates wrote that ‘‘I have made defending against near-term regional threats a top priority of our missile defense plans, programs and capabilities’’. (2) In describing the threat of regional ballistic missiles, the report of the Ballistic Missile Defense Review stated that ‘‘there is no uncertainty about the existence of regional threats. They are clear and present. The threat from short-range, medium range, and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (SRBMs, MRBMs, and IRBMs) in regions where the United States deploys forces and maintains security relationships is growing at a particularly rapid pace’’. (3) North Korea has hundreds of regional ballistic missiles, including short-range Scud missiles and medium-range Nodong missiles. North Korea also has publicly displayed, but not flight-tested, intermediate-range Musudan missiles. These regional missiles can reach United States forces and allies in South Korea and Japan, and perhaps Guam. In the spring of 2013, North Korea made public threats to use nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles against South Korea, Japan, and Guam. (4) In response to these threats from North Korea, the United States deployed Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense ships, armed with Standard Missile– 3 interceptors, to the waters near the Korean Peninsula, and a Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) battery to Guam. It also deployed the Sea-Based X-band missile defense radar into the Pacific Ocean to enhance United States missile defense capabilities. On March 15, 2013, Secretary of Defense Hagel announced a series of planned steps to enhance missile defense, including the deployment of a second AN/TPY–2 missile defense radar in Japan to improve regional and homeland defense against North Korean missiles. As part

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of their response to the provocations of North Korea, South Korea deployed vessels equipped with Aegis missile defense radars, and Japan deployed its Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense ships, equipped with Standard Missile– 3 interceptors. (5) Iran has the largest inventory of regional ballistic missiles in the Middle East, with hundreds of missiles that can reach as far as southeastern Europe and all of the Middle East, including Israel. Iran is improving its existing missiles and developing new and longer-range regional missiles. (6) In September 2009, President Barack Obama announced that he had accepted the unanimous recommendation of the Secretary of Defense and the Joint Chiefs of Staff to establish a European Phased Adaptive Approach (EPAA) to missile defense, designed to protect deployed United States forces, allies, and partners in Europe against the large and growing threat of ballistic missiles from Iran. SEC. 2402. AUTHORIZED ENERGY CONSERVATION PROJECTS Using amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations in section 2403(6) and available for military construction projects inside and outside the United States as specified in section 4601, the Secretary of Defense may carry out energy conservation projects under chapter 173 of title 10, United States Code, in the amount of $150,000,000. SEC. 2403. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS, DEFENSE AGENCIES Funds are hereby authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years beginning after September 30, 2013, for military construction, land acquisition, and military family housing functions of the Department of Defense (other than the military departments) in the total amount of $3,313,284,000. Subtitle C—Provisions Related to Asia-Pacific Military Realignment SEC. 2821. REALIGNMENT OF MARINE CORPS FORCES IN ASIAPACIFIC REGION. (a) RESTRICTION ON USE OF

FUNDS.—Except as provided in subsection (c), none of the funds authorized to be appropriated under this Act, and none of the amounts provided by the Government of Japan for construction activities on land under the jurisdiction of the Department of Defense, may be obligated to implement the realignment of Marine Corps forces from Okinawa to Guam or Hawaii until each of the following occurs: (1) The Commander of the United States Pacific Command provides to the congressional defense committees an assessment of the strategic and logistical resources needed to ensure the distributed lay-down of members of the Marine Corps in the United States Pacific Command Area of Responsibility meets the contingency operations plans. (2) The Secretary of Defense submits to the 13 congressional defense committees master plans for the construction of facilities and infrastructure to execute the Marine Corps distributed lay-down on Guam and Hawaii, including a detailed description of costs and the schedule for such construction. (3) The Secretary of the Navy submits a plan to the congressional defense committees detailing the proposed investments and schedules required to restore facilities and infrastructure at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma. (4) A plan coordinated by all pertinent Federal agencies is provided to the congressional defense committees detailing descriptions of work, costs, and a schedule for completion of construction, improvements, and repairs to the non-military utilities, facilities, and infrastructure, if any, on Guam affected by the realignment of forces. (b) RESTRICTION ON DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE.—If the Secretary of Defense determines that any grant, cooperative agreement, transfer of funds to another Federal agency, or supplement of funds available in fiscal year 2014 under Federal programs administered by agencies other than the Department of Defense will result in the development (including repair, replacement, renovation, conversion, improvement, expansion, acquisition, or construction) of public infrastructure

CONSTRUCTION NEWS BULLETIN

MAY2013 | 11 JULY2013

COMMITTEUPDATE

Handling Wharf.


COMMITTEUPDATE

on Guam, the Secretary of Defense may not carry out such grant, transfer, cooperative agreement, or supplemental funding unless such grant, transfer, cooperative agreement, or supplemental funding is specifically authorized by law. (c) EXCEPTIONS TO RESTRICTION ON USE OF FUNDS.—The Secretary of Defense may use funds described in subsection (a) to: (1) Complete additional analysis or studies required under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.) for proposed actions on Guam or Hawaii; (2) Initiate planning and design of construction projects at Andersen Air Force Base and Andersen South; and, (3) Carry out any military construction project for which an authorization of appropriations is provided in section 2204, as specified in the funding table in section 4601. (d) DEFINITIONS.—In this section: (1) DISTRIBUTED LAY-DOWN.The term ‘‘distributed lay-down’’ refers to the planned distribution of members of the Marine Corps in Okinawa, Guam, Hawaii, Australia, and possibly elsewhere that is contemplated in support of the joint statement of the United States–Japan Security Consultative Committee issued April 26, 2012, in the District of Columbia (April 27, 2012, in Tokyo). (2) PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE.The term ‘‘public infrastructure’’ means any utility, method of transportation, item of equipment, or facility under the control of a public entity or State or local government that is used by, or constructed for the benefit of, the general public.

12 | JULY2013

SEC. 4601. MILITARY CONSTRUCTION (In Thousands of Dollars)

Budget Request

Senate Authorized

ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION Hawaii – ARMY Ft Shafter Command and Control Facility—Admin

$75,000

$75,000

Kwajalein – ARMY Kwajalein Atoll – Pier

$63,000

$63,000

Worldwide – ARMY Classified Location Company Operations Complex Unspecified Minor Construction Unspecified Worldwide Planning and Design Unspecified Worldwide Host Nation Support

$33,000 $25,000 $41,575 $33,000

$33,000 $25,000 $41,575 $33,000

SUBTOTAL, ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

$1,119,875

$1,119,875

NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION Hawaii – NAVY & MARINE CORPS Kaneohe Bay Armory Addition and Renovation Kaneohe Bay 3rd Radio Battalion O&M Complex Kaneohe Bay Aircraft Maintenance Hangar Upgrades Kaneohe Bay Aircraft Maintenance Expansion Kaneohe Bay Aviation Simulator Modernization/Addition Kaneohe Bay Mv–22 Parking Apron and Infrastructure Kaneohe Bay Mv–22 Hangar Pearl City Water Transmission Line Pearl Harbor Drydock Waterfront Facility Pearl Harbor Submarine Production Support Facility

$12,952 $25,336 $31,820 $16,968 $17,724 $74,665 $57,517 $30,100 $22,721 $35,277

$12,952 $25,336 $31,820 $16,968 $17,724 $74,665 $57,517 $30,100 $22,721 $35,277

Guam - NAVY Joint Region Marianas BAMS Forward Operational & Maintenance Hangar Aircraft Maintenance Hangar—North Ramp Modular Storage Magazines X-Ray Wharf Improvements Emergent Repair Facility Expansion Dehumidified Supply Storage Facility Sierra Wharf Improvements

$61,702 $85,673 $63,382 $53,420 $35,860 $17,170 $1,170

$61,702 0 $63,382 $53,420 $35,860 $17,170 $1,170

Japan - NAVY Yokosuka Communication System Upgrade Camp Butler Airfield Security Upgrades

$7,568 $5,820

$7,568 $5,820

Worldwide – NAVY Unspecified Minor Construction Unspecified Mcon Design Funds

$19,740 $89,830

$19,740 $89,830

SUBTOTAL, NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

$1,700,269

$1,614,596

ACTIVE SERVICIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

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Budget Request

Senate Authorized

ACTIVE SERVICIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION Hawaii – Air Force Joint Base: Pearl Harbor - Hickam C–17 Modernize Hangar 35, Docks 1&2 $4,800

$4,800

Guam – Air Force Joint Region Marianas Par—Tanker Gp Mx Hangar/AMU/Sqd Ops Par—Fuel System Hardened Bldgs Par—Strike Tactical Missile Mxs Facility Prtc Red Horse Airfield Operations Facility Prtc Sf Fire Rescue & Emergency Mgt

$132,600 $20,000 $10,530 $8,500 $4,600

0 0 $10,530 $8,500 $4,600

Mariana Islands – Air Force Saipan Par—Maintenance Facility Par—Airport POL/Bulk Storage Ast Par—Hazardous Cargo Pad

$2,800 $18,500 $8,000

$2,800 $18,500 $8,000

$192,700

0 [–$192,700] 0 [–$63,000] $20,448 $11,314

Worldwide Air Force Unspecified Worldwide KC–46a Mob #1 Facility Projects Air Force Requested Change Worldwide KC–46a Ftu Facility Projects Air Force Requested Change AF Unspecified Minor Construction AF Unspecified Worldwide Planning & Design

$63,000 $20,448 $11,314

SUBTOTAL, AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION $1,156,573 SUBTOTAL, DEFENSE-WIDE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION $3,985,300 SUBTOTAL, ACTIVE SERVICES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION$7,962,017 SUBTOTAL, NATL GUARD MILITARY CONSTRUCTION $440,615 SUBTOTAL, RESERVE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION $252,695

$964,196 $2,930,659 $6,629,326 $440,615 $252,695

TOTAL, MILCON MAJOR ACCOUNTS

$8,655,327

$7,322,636

SUBTOTAL, ARMY FAMILY HOUSING O&M SUBTOTAL, ARMY FAMILY HOUSING SUBTOTAL, NAVY FAMILY HOUSING O&M SUBTOTAL, NAVY FAMILY HOUSING SUBTOTAL, AIR FORCE FAMILY HOUSING O&M SUBTOTAL, AIR FORCE FAMILY HOUSING SUBTOTAL, DEFENSE-WIDE FAMILY HOUSING O&M SUBTOTAL, DEFENSE-WIDE FAMILY HOUSING SUBTOTAL, DOD FAMILY HOUSING IMPROVEMENT FUND

$512,871 $556,879 $389,844 $463,251 $388,598 $464,958 $55,845 $55,845 $1,780 $1,542,713

$512,871 $540,279 $389,844 $463,251 $388,598 $464,958 $55,845 $55,845 $1,780 $1,526,113

TOTAL, FAMILY HOUSING

Some Observations: • The Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act is not all bad news for Guam, although it is not the full amount requested by the DoD. In total, the military requested $11,011,633,000 and the Senate authorized $9,662,342,000, a ±14% reduction. The House of Representatives version is organized somewhat differently and indicates the military requested $11,222,710,000 of which they authorized

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$10,838,192,000 for reduction of ±3.5%. • The Navy budget for Guam was reduced by $85,673,000 and the entire amount stems from not authorizing the Aircraft Maintenance Hangar—North Ramp at Andersen AFB which was intended for use by visiting Marine Corps aircraft. The Air Force budget for Guam was reduced by $152,600,000 for fueling systems at Andersen AFB. With the Senate version of the NDAA, Guam is set to have $256,334,000 in military construc-

tion in FY2013 instead of the $494,607,000 mentioned in last months’ report. The worldwide budget for Energy Conservation is set at $150 Million and Guam should receive a share of this amount. • The conditions set for resuming the Realignment of Marine Corps Forces in the Asia Pacific Region is clearly stated under Sec. 2821 above. These conditions are scheduled to be met for appropriation and start of construction in FY2015. • The Senate Armed Services Committee now recognizes that federal funding will be needed to support off-base infrastructure construction. See Sec 2821.b – RESTRICTION ON DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE herein above. This provision could eventually be used to finance construction projects for Guam’s utilities, roadways, airport and seaport. This subject was brought up in the Industry Forums that preceded the earlier false start to the military buildup but the idea was rebuffed. It is pleasing to see that the idea is now on the agenda but GovGuam agencies will need to initiate action to establish the requirements and justification for federal financing.

The Military, Government and Labor Relations Committee is open to all members of the association. Contact the GCA office for time and place of meetings.

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JULY2013 | 13

COMMITTEUPDATE

SEC. 4601. MILITARY CONSTRUCTION (In Thousands of Dollars)


BY: DAVE MACALUSO

AmOrient Engineering and its President Win SAME Awards

by David F. Macaluso


Prior to World War l architectural, engineering and construction firms and individuals in both the public and private sector united together, their goals were to help prepare for and overcome natural and manmade disasters, acts of terrorism and to improve security at home and abroad. That goal grew especially after the United States entered WW l from April 6, 1917 until the war's end on November 11, 1918. During that time more than 11,000 civilian engineers were called to duty. When the soldiers returned home from the war, many feared that this collective knowledge and the cooperation between both the public and private sectors would be dissolved. People felt that this collaboration proved vital for the United States’ combat success, so industry and military leaders decided to capitalize on the technical lessons learned from their battlefield experiences and formed SAME in 1920. Nearly one hundred years after SAME was formed, it still is known for its world-class program for professional development and networking opportunities between the public and private sectors. In addition, SAME also guides the future of the engineering profession and its contribution to protect our national security. AmOrient Engineering received the Post Outstanding Support Award for their dedicated support to SAME. According to Captain John Heckmann, Guam Post President for SAME, the organization would have accomplished very little without AmOrient’s support. “AmOrient Engineering has been a member since 2003. Their personnel routinely provides logistical support for the monthly membership meetings, handle the Post’s financial accounts, manage its business and accounting records, and prints numerous documents to support its functions,” said Heckmann. “AmOrient’s contribution is above and beyond what is expected from members of SAME.” In addition, AmOrient’s President Robertson was honored by receiving the SAME National RVP Medal. Robertson also has been an active member since 2003. For the last number of years he has taken a fairly broad leadership role in the society.

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Robertson held several different offices which includes the 2nd Vice President and is currently the Treasurer. He is also the one who sends out all the notices for the meetings and served on numerous special SAME committees. Robertson said, “Both of these awards means a lot to AmOrient and to myself. Its not just from the local Guam chapter, but its from the national office from Washington D.C. The award was given by Regional Vice President Captain Bill Grip who oversees the Pacific Region which comprises of Guam, Hawaii, Japan, Korea and Alaska. This is a significant award and I feel very honored.” Robertson feels its important to give back to the island community, it’s something he's been doing since he moved on Guam 14 years ago and part of that has been through SAME. He’s on the Board of Trustees for the Guam Contractors Association’s Trades Academy, on the Board of Directors for the Guam Symphony and is also on the Board of Advisors for the University of Guam (UOG) School of Engineering. Their intention is to build a facility at UOG for that particular school. Robertson has been attending meetings for the planning process for that project. He is actively involved with SAME’s scholarship program for college students pursuing a career in engineering. Robertson feels it’s important to help students reach their goals. “This scholarship program started long before I came to Guam. We have an annual golf tournament to help raise money and last year we earned $35,000 for our scholarship program,” said Robertson. “In the past this program was used for students who would attend school at either UOG or another learning institution in the mainland. But over the last 2 years we decided to focus on students attending UOG’s engineering program, making it possible for our local engineers to attend college right here on the island.” When Robertson was a child growing up, he knew he would be heading toward the engineering field. As a kid he always liked to fix things, in his teenage years he use to go around with a small screw driver in his pocket, looking for things to fix. Instead of being outside with the other kids playing and enjoying himself, he got his pleasure out of fixing locks and other things.

will stand for along time. Here on Guam that is very important because of our high wind load and seismic activity. Things on Guam are built to last.” He graduated from Virginia Tech in 1961 earning a Architectural Engineering degree and has over 50 years of experience in the field. Robertson came to Guam to work for Billingham Construction. Billingham had an office on island and did a lot of work around Guam over the years. While Robertson was in Saudi Arabia in 1999, he got a call from the Billingham office asking if he was interested in coming to Guam. He previously worked for that company in Hawaii and that’s why they called him. He accepted the position because it was intended to be a permanent job. But because of the downturn of business Billingham was forced to close its doors on Guam in 2001. The company eventually closed other offices around the world and shortly after that it went bankrupt. Robertson adds, “In the construction industry sometimes you have good jobs and bad ones, but usually they average out and the company will be alright. But Billingham had two jobs that went very wrong; a highway tunneling project in New Zealand and a highway project in Turkey.” Billingham’s bankruptcy gave Robertson an opportunity to start AmOrient on Guam. AmOrient Engineering was a company that Robertson began in Houston back in 1981. The majority of the work that was being done was overseas in Saudi Arabia and other places closer to home like California and Nevada. Soon after Billingham folded. He started his own business and brought back the company he founded in Texas to Guam. Today AmOrient still does business in Saudi Arabia, India, Thailand, Taiwan, and Guam. As a Texas corporation, Houston remains its home base although the principal office and headquarters have been on Guam since 2002.

When it came time to go to college he had to make a decision between either electrical or architectural engineering. He selected architectural engineering.

“Most of the projects we’ve done over the years, since we’ve opened the office has been for the U.S. military (Navy and Air Force). Our scope of work has been planning, design cost estimating, and putting together request proposals that go out to the contractors,” said Robertson. “One of the projects that we’ve prepared was the Joint Region Marianas Headquarters in 2008. And the job was completed in 2010 by DCK Worldwide.”

Robertson adds, “I felt architectural engineering was broader. I like the idea of putting things together into a structure that

Robertson adds, “The last 2 years we have not had as much business with the military, we have some jobs, but not much. But

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FEATURESTORY

Guam’s architectural landscape has gradually been changing and growing over the past ten years. And one of the reasons why is due mostly to the talented pool of Engineers on island. Earlier this month AmOrient Engineering and its President John Robertson were recognized by the Society of American Military Engineers (SAME) for serving the island community during those changing times.


FEATURESTORY

we are one of several engineering firms helping and preparing the designs for the improvements to Guam’s Seaport.” AmOrient’s part has been designing lighting for the existing container yard. The older lights were changed out with more efficient lighting (liquid sodium) which will help improve the working conditions and that project was completed by DCK. AmOrient designed the Container Freight Service (CFS) Building, that’s currently under construction and the contractor for that project is Pro Pacific. AmOrient prepared the package for the demolition of a number of building and facilities including warehouse number 2 , a very large structure built by the Navy in the early 1950’s. The building became a causality to modern world freight, because today everything is shipped in containers, so warehouses are no longer needed to separate and sort things out. Instead items go from the factory floor straight to the vendors warehouse in one container. This makes the over operation much more efficient. In addition, AmOrient is working on an extension to the eastern side of the container yard to allow more freight to pass through the port and a new terminal gate is being installed. Other scopes of work include building a substation which includes all the

16 | JULY2013

electrical work inside of It, erecting high mast lighting, each mast tower will have 30 light fixtures on it so it will illuminate the entire yard. Part of the design for the mast towers will be to withstand the high wind loads of sustained winds of 170 mph. On the west side of the port, AmOrient is developing the break bulk freight area used for oversized military or construction items that arrive outside the containers. Robertson said, “This is a very exciting field to be in. I would not want to be in any other field or do anything else.” Robertson and I are colleagues for Guam Contractors Association Magazine. He has been writing articles about the construction industry for a number of years. Now he is being recognized in this month’s issue for his accomplishments in this field. Before this interview was over, I couldn’t help myself to ask these last two final questions. Being a writer for GCA’s magazine for over three years, how do you feel being recognized for your accomplishments? And how do you feel having someone interview you?

to answering questions, I’m always afraid of messing up. I’m actually honored to interviewed for GCA’s magazine. I’ve also enjoyed being a writer for it for all these years, so yes this is an honor.” John pauses briefly, “ We at AmOrient are all honored to be recognized by SAME. This is a significant award and we feel very honored. I would like to take this time to thank my staff for all their hard work. Its been a real pleasure working with them throughout the years. I really have a great staff of workers from my admin to my staff of engineers. I also would like to say I am very proud of them for winning the Post Outstanding Support Award.” The staff and writers from Guam Contractors Association Magazine would like to Congratulate AmOrient Engineering for winning SAME’s Post Outstanding Support Award and to John Robertson, our friend and colleague for being honored with the SAME National RVP Medal. Congratulations and a job well done!!!

John Chuckles, “When being interviewed, I’m always afraid of saying something a little on the stupid side. I find it much easier write things down, that way I can say what I am thinking and feeling. But when it comes

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PHOTOHIGHLIGHTS

GCA Luncheon June 19, 2013 Westin Resort & Spa

18 | JUNE2013

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GARRISONREPORT

Best Value Procurement

Earlier this year, Garrison Report #2013-1 provided eight questions that contractors and designers should ask themselves regarding strategy. If you haven’t read that report, I strongly suggest you review it before reading this one. While many companies within the construction industry have adopted innovative approaches to their businesses, it is still true that virtually every contractor and designer could further improve its performance and profitability by putting to use the practices found in Construction 3.0™ Strategies. To assist in this effort, Garrison Reports #2013-3 through #2013-6 discuss each of the four critical practices that make up Construction 3.0 ™ Strategies. These practices and their scheduled reports are as follows: • Blue Ocean Contracting (TGR #2013-3) • Integrated Project Delivery (TGR #2013-4) •

Lean Construction (TGR #2013-5)

• Best Value Procurement (TGR #2013-6) Best Value Procurement Professor Dean Kashiwagi of Arizona State University developed the Best Value Procurement (BVP) concept as part of his Performance Based Studies Research Group (PBSRG) efforts to assist buyers of construction services in selecting the contractor that would provide the best value on their projects. 22 | JULY2013

However, these concepts can also be used to select project team membersboth companies and individuals.

make a subjective decision. The problem is every time you do this, it increases your risk of future problems.

Jim Collins in his best-selling book Good to Great referred to this as getting the right people on the bus in the right seats. This is important because the wrong people often cause tremendous harm to projects. It’s not their fault, though. They just lack the capability to understand the unique constraints of the project and consequently are forced to make decisions, increasing the project’s risk. What does this mean?

Every time you guess instead of knowing, the risk increases. It may be an educated guess, but it is still a guess. Obviously, the greater the individual’s knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception, the better will be the guess. The ideal situation is to have enough of those things to avoid guessing. The problem is no one knows all the answers.

Simply, information measurement theory explains that the people who have sufficient expertise in an area or a project can always see the future outcome. They can identify the risk that they do not control and create transparency to minimize that risk. They do not make subjective decisions; they interpret the information and come to the logical conclusion. For many this seems like an absurd statement because they believe they are paid to make decisions. That is untrue.

There are a few options when this occurs. The first option for many people is to obtain more information. The problem is the less knowledgeable, experienced, wise, and perceptive an individual, the more likely he is to obtain a large amount of irrelevant information that will only making the decision-making process more complicated and difficult. Instead of simplifying the problem, it worsens. Of course, sometimes the right person simply needs very specific information that will make the choice obvious. In that situation, this an effective approach.

People are paid for their expertise, for their ability to know what to do given a set of initial project conditions and constraints. Those people know it is the conditions and constraints, not the people that control the final outcome. However, when you are confronted with a situation where you are forced to choose among options, you are in a situation where you don’t know the answer. This forces you to

The second option is to find a person who knows the answer. Failure to do this is one of the primary reasons for problems in the construction industry. Often the person who will actually be doing the work knows exactly what needs to be done, but often the buyers and designers make all those decisions and issue the drawings without consulting the contractors. The Integrated Proj-

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ect Delivery (IPD) approach attempts to correct this problem by bringing all the stakeholders together so the right people who have sufficient knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception can provide the right course of action. The final option is the most complicated because it addresses the unknown. The construction industry is always attempting to do things that have never been done before; that is the nature of the business. When there is no information and no one with the necessary knowledge to provide the answer, the solution is to experiment. Experimentation, or trial and error, is at the heart of innovation. However, even this approach relies on the concepts of Best Value because it’s essential to select the team members that have the most knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception and allow them to develop the simplest experiment to fill in the necessary information to indicate the solution. The wrong people will make the process too complicated or seek the wrong information, resulting in added costs and time. In the low-bid environment, decisions are made and minimum standards (plans and specifications) are established, but this typically doesn’t result in the lowest cost for the project. The Best Value environment, according to Dean Kashiwagi in an NCS Radio interview, “replaces management inspection with the utilization of expertise and replaces minimum standards with

proven quality.” The Best Value team has the knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception to properly plan a project. As Kashiwagi stated in another NCS Radio interview, “Pre-planning will reduce costs by at least 10 percent by eliminating changes that are caused by surprises.” This is at the heart of the IPD and LEAN approach to construction. Since most people have trouble evaluating a contractor’s value in the form of knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception, they often make the mistake of assuming that the lowest bid price provides the best value. That’s a costly mistake. What’s needed is a system to evaluate value, which is what the BVP process does. The process starts by examining past performance. Past performance is an indication of experience and knowledge, in other words expertise. It forces the contractor to identify its expertise in terms of metrics, analyzing how successfully it has implemented its expertise with unique results. The Best Value approach also ensures that an expert contractor has no technical risk. The only risk that an expert vendor has is what they do not control, and even then, the expert would know the best way to mitigate that risk. The expert is the only party who can mitigate the risk, because no one else can see into the future like the expert. Expert vendors always act in the best interest of the client. The expert can also add greater value at minimal cost.

While no system is fool proo the track record that PBSRG has expe rienced is remarkable. After nearly tw decades and hundreds of project invol ing hundreds of millions of dollars, th results are 98 percent of their projec have satisfied customers, with less tha 1 percent contractor-caused deviation Compare this to studies indicating th nearly 70 percent of low-bid projec have a problem with one or more quality, schedule or budget—let alon change orders.

If you would like to learn more abo BVP, you can listen to three interview with Dean Kashiwagi on NCS Radio b going to the following links: Best Value Contracting Strategy:

www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WCON Kashiwagi1.cfm

Best Value Client Benefits:

www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WC N.Kashiwagi2.cfm Best Value Contractor Benefit:

www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WC N.Kashiwagi3.cfm


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GARRISONREPORT

ect Delivery (IPD) approach attempts to correct this problem by bringing all the stakeholders together so the right people who have sufficient knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception can provide the right course of action. The final option is the most complicated because it addresses the unknown. The construction industry is always attempting to do things that have never been done before; that is the nature of the business. When there is no information and no one with the necessary knowledge to provide the answer, the solution is to experiment. Experimentation, or trial and error, is at the heart of innovation. However, even this approach relies on the concepts of Best Value because it’s essential to select the team members that have the most knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception and allow them to develop the simplest experiment to fill in the necessary information to indicate the solution. The wrong people will make the process too complicated or seek the wrong information, resulting in added costs and time. In the low-bid environment, decisions are made and minimum standards (plans and specifications) are established, but this typically doesn’t result in the lowest cost for the project. The Best Value environment, according to Dean Kashiwagi in an NCS Radio interview, “replaces management inspection with the utilization of expertise and replaces minimum standards with www.guamcontractors.org

proven quality.” The Best Value team has the knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception to properly plan a project. As Kashiwagi stated in another NCS Radio interview, “Pre-planning will reduce costs by at least 10 percent by eliminating changes that are caused by surprises.” This is at the heart of the IPD and LEAN approach to construction. Since most people have trouble evaluating a contractor’s value in the form of knowledge, experience, wisdom, and perception, they often make the mistake of assuming that the lowest bid price provides the best value. That’s a costly mistake. What’s needed is a system to evaluate value, which is what the BVP process does. The process starts by examining past performance. Past performance is an indication of experience and knowledge, in other words expertise. It forces the contractor to identify its expertise in terms of metrics, analyzing how successfully it has implemented its expertise with unique results. The Best Value approach also ensures that an expert contractor has no technical risk. The only risk that an expert vendor has is what they do not control, and even then, the expert would know the best way to mitigate that risk. The expert is the only party who can mitigate the risk, because no one else can see into the future like the expert. Expert vendors always act in the best interest of the client. The expert can also add greater value at minimal cost.

While no system is fool proof, the track record that PBSRG has experienced is remarkable. After nearly two decades and hundreds of project involving hundreds of millions of dollars, the results are 98 percent of their projects have satisfied customers, with less than 1 percent contractor-caused deviations. Compare this to studies indicating that nearly 70 percent of low-bid projects have a problem with one or more of quality, schedule or budget—let alone change orders. If you would like to learn more about BVP, you can listen to three interviews with Dean Kashiwagi on NCS Radio by going to the following links: Best Value Contracting Strategy: www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WCON. Kashiwagi1.cfm

Best Value Client Benefits: www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WCO N.Kashiwagi2.cfm Best Value Contractor Benefit: www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WCO N.Kashiwagi3.cfm Ted Garrison, president of Garrison Associates, is a catalyst for change. As a consultant, author and speaker he provides breakthrough strategies for the construction industry by focusing on critical issues in leadership, project management, strategic thinking, strategic alliances and marketing. Contact Ted at 800-861-0874 or Growing@TedGarrison.com. Further information can be found at www.TedGarrison.com."

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JULY2013 | 25


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and also ankle pain. Spurs can also occur in the talus or tibia. These spurs usually cause pain the front of the ankle and limits the range of motion. Stiffness in the morning and pain walking upstairs or hills is a common complaint. Bones ossicles can also affect the insides of the ankle. Os trigonum is a bone that hasn’t fused with the primary bone of its origin. It will usually irritate the inside/medial aspect of the ankle and at times radiate to the big toe. At times the symptoms of this may mimic posterior tibial tendonitis or even tarsal tunnel syndrome. This may cause a nagging persistent pain in the inside of the ankle exacerbated with certain shoe gear and or activities. Nerve injuries can happen to the foot that course along the ankle. Cutaneous nerves can get damaged from ankle sprains, something heavy dropping on the foot or maybe from tight shoegear. The nerves affected can have a sharp or burning sensation exacerbated by certain movement and or showear. More serious injuries like anterior or posterior tarsal tunnel syndrome can result from compression, crush or a laceration. These can be diagnosed with a nerve conduction study. Diabetes, sciatica, disc herniation, spinal stenosis and arthritides must be ruled out whenever numbness/tingling is a symptom.

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Tendon strain can occur either in the front or back part of the foot. Excess pull or stress causes an inflammation of the tendon sheath. This is usually from overuse but can result from work or sports injury. Posterior tibial tendonitis is the most common and the pain/swelling occurs in the medial part of the ankle. This may be congenital and having flatfeet is more common in these injuries. Achilles tendonitis is one of the more common injuries of the foot and ankle. It usually is painful in the back of the ankle along the cord of the tendon. It can though also cause calf cramps and it can also be painful at its insertion on the calcaneus. RICE is the mainstay for all acute injuries. Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. This should be done within the first 24-48 hours. Swelling is a symptom that may persist after an injury for several months and is non-specific for if and when you should see the doctor. Pain that persists 1-2 weeks thereafter is a more accurate indicator as to when to seek medical attention.

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AROUNDTHEBENCH

TERMITES Ken L. Williams, Director Top End Pest Control Guam Email: manager@tepcguam.com Phone: (671) 487-5657

M

ost of us cringe when we hear the words "you have termites." All that comes to mind is "damage" and "repair costs." Termites do serve a useful purpose in nature, they help break down wood and other cellulose materials which are helpful to the ecosystem by creating fertile soil. Let us take a short journey and learn more about three varieties of termites. Subterranean termites, as their name implies, live in large colonies underground. This type of termite is a random forager and tunnels to search for food. As the subterranean termites reach the surface they build mud tubes as they prefer a moist and dark environment. There are three castes in a termite colony; workers, soldiers and reproductives. Dry wood termites nest within cellulose based materials such as lumber, wood siding or wood trim. Dry wood termites will also attack wooden ďŹ&#x201A;oors and books. The telltale sign of dry wood termites is "frass." Frass is the termites ex30 28 | JULY2013

crement and is granular in nature. Frass is often mistaken for sawdust. Damp wood termites locate their colonies in moist decaying wood. An ideal situation consists of moist rotting wood laying on moist soil. How do we rid our homes of termites? There are many proven techniques for ridding your property of termites. Observation is the ďŹ rst step, look for telltale signs of termite activity; mud tubes, frass and blistering paint on baseboards to name a few. Developing a treatment plan is the second step. Whatever treatment plan you choose remember the idea is to take down the queen. The third step is maintenance. Many of us just fail to maintain the treatment plan we have selected. When building the best way to protect your investment is with a physical and chemical barrier. There are innovative technologies available to accomplish this without damaging the soil and contaminating the aquifer.

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Termite Mud Tube

Termite Activity

Termite Frass

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by: Shawn Gumataotao

32 | JULY2013

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GCA Construction News Bulletin July 2013  

Guam Contractors' Assn. Monthly Construction News Bulletin is Guam's official construction news publication.

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