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WED., MAY 9, 2012 VOL. 79 • NO. 38 • 2 SECTIONS •

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Frac mine leak in Burnett Co. Silt enters St. Croix River

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Barrett to face off with Walker

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New online charter school’s numbers presented to school board PAGE 5

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Taylor, 3, hung around and climbed on the monkey bars at the Webster softball field, enjoying the spring weather, which remained chilly this past week with only glimpses of summer-like temperatures. – Photo by Greg Marsten

Nye bones begin to tell their stories \Answers emerge in local archaeologic finds by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer DRESSER – Some answers have emerged from the first modern analysis of a cache of bones and fragments first recovered from a site east of Dresser almost 80 years ago. The so-called Nye Bones Collection had been held in storage for most of the years since they were discovered in the fall of 1934 at a marl harvesting site near Nye, outside Dresser. The discovery came about during the mining operation and was big news in the archaeological field at the time, and by accounts of the time, were said to include up to 1,500 specimens, recovered from a depth of between 10 to 18 feet,

Expect to see a new display, similar to this Interstate Park exhibit, at the Polk County Museum in Balsam Lake this summer. The recently returned Nye Bones Collection is nearly finished being studied by a team of Iowa scientists, with some of the bones taking up residence back in Polk County, where they were first found almost 80 years ago. - Photo See Nye bones, page 4 by Greg Marsten

If the recall election were held today, who would you vote for? 1. Tom Barrett 2. Gov. Scott Walker 3. I wouldn’t take part 4. My candidate won’t be listed on the ballot Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

Deaths

Joseph L. Snelson Brian Keith Peterson Gladys G. Sasse Kenneth L. Haug Scott R. Henschke Marian “Micky” Manion Alice M. Chelmo Elna Wambolt

Obituaries on page 19B

INSIDE Letters to the editor 9A Sports 15-22A Outdoors 23A Town Talk 6-7B Coming Events Back of B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B Just for Laughs 3B Copyright © 2012

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Spring discoveries

Congressional art competition on Facebook NORTHERN WISCONSIN - Seventh District Congressman Sean Duffy has invited the public to view his Facebook page to see the entries from Wisconsin’s 7th District in the 31st-annual Congressional Art Competition. “We have many tremendous submissions from the talented students in Wisconsin,” notes Duffy. “Be sure to ‘like’ your favorites.” The image with the most “likes” before 5 p.m., Friday, May 18, will receive the Viewers Choice Award and their artwork will be displayed in Duffy’s Washington, D.C., office for one year. Shown at right is a portrait titled “Drake” by America Hartmann, grade 12, of Chetek. - with submitted information

Dr. Sean Lewis receives national recognition LANDER, Wyo. - Dr. Sean Lewis, assistant professor of humanities at Wyoming Catholic College, has been selected as one of the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Summer Scholars. He is the son of Gordy and Maureen Lewis of Grantsburg. Dr. Lewis was picked from a national applicant pool by the NEH and will participate in a seminar titled Tudor Books and Readers: 1485-1603. The five-week program will convene in Antwerp, Belgium; and in London and Oxford, England. The endowment is a federal agency that, each summer, supports these enrichment opportunities at colleges, universities and cultural institutions, so that faculty can work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities disciplines. The approximately 419 NEH Summer Scholars who participate in these programs of study will teach over 73,000 American students the following year. Lewis grew up in a military family, living in Massachusetts, Germany, New York, Virginia, Texas and Alaska. He received his Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Dallas, then earned a Master of Studies in English from University College in Oxford, England. His master’s dissertation on Chaucer passed with distinction. He continued his graduate studies at the Catholic University of America. - with submitted information

Olsen honored by WITC CUMBERLAND - Annually since 1992, Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College has presented Distinguished Alumni awards to outstanding diploma and degree graduates. Alumni selected for the award have distinguished themselves professionally in their careers and have demonstrated extensive service to the college and their community. Jeanette Olsen of Cumberland embodies the heights that a WITC graduate can go on to reach and is being honored with the 2012 WITC-Rice Lake Distinguished Alum Award. Olsen received an associate degree in nursing from WITC in 1995. She is now an instructor in the ADN program. Olsen will be presented the award at the WITCRice Lake graduation ceremony and then will give the commencement address. The ceremony is Friday, May 11, at 7 p.m. at the UW-Barron County gymnasium. The public is invited. Olsen was nominated by fellow instructors in the nursing program, Marge Jost, Mary Nedland and Bruce Davenport, as well as current student, Candis Paul. The most common word they used to describe her is “dedicated,” – as a nurse, an instructor and as an advisor to students. - from WITC

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Van versus motor home proves fatal POLK COUNTY - A 59-year-old Barron man is dead after a near head-on collision between a minivan and a small motor home at around 3:30 p.m. on Thursday afternoon, May 3, in the village of Clear Lake. The collision occurred near 25th Avenue on Hwy. 63, when a northbound Ford Windstar driven by Terry Barber, 59, crossed into opposing traffic and struck a Chevrolet motor home, being driven by Robert Jessen, 80, Bemidji, Minn. Jessen required extrication from the motor home, while Barber was pronounced dead on the scene by Polk County Medical Examiner Jonn Dinnies.

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A passenger in the minivan, Sarah J. Barber, 29, Barron, sustained unspecified injuries in the crash and was transported by ambulance to Amery Regional Medical Center for treatment. A passenger in the motor home, Edith Jessen, 79, Bemidji, was also injured and transported to ARMC. According to Polk County Sheriff Peter Johnson, it was the fifth motor vehicle fatality of 2012, and the cause remains under investigation. Assisting the PCSD on the scene were Clear Lake Police and Fire departments, Amery Fire and both Amery and Clear Lake Ambulance. - Greg Masten

A motor home driven by Robert Jessen, 80, Bemidji, Minn., (photo at right) and a van driven by Terry Barber, 59, Barron (photo at left), collided on Hwy. 63 in the village of Clear Lake last Thursday, May 3, claiming the life of Barber. It was the fifth traffic-related fatality in Polk County thus far in 2012, the fourth to occur within the past month in the county and seventh to occur in Burnett and Polk counties in the past month. - Photos from Polk County Sheriff’s Dept. HOW TO REACH US

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BRIEFLY

MADISON - To help track the West Nile virus, state health officials have reactivated the statewide, tollfree dead bird reporting hotline at 800-433-1610. “Certain dead birds can act as an early-warning system for West Nile virus activity in an area,” said Dr. Henry Anderson, state health officer. “Finding the virus in birds indicates that West Nile virus may be present in the local mosquito population, which can be helpful in triggering special prevention and insect-control measures.” For more information on West Nile virus go to dhs.wisconsin.gov and type West Nile in search engine. - with submitted information ••• BURNETT COUNTY - Healthy individuals are needed every day to maintain an adequate blood supply for patients in need. “Donating blood is an easy way to help others and only takes about an hour of your time,” said Katie Hedlund, coordinator of Burnett County Red cross Blood Services. The next blood donation opportunity is Tuesday, May 15, at the Siren Covenant Church fellowship hall, 7686 Lofty Pines Road, Siren. – submitted •••

Business of the Year named To be honored with Citizen, Volunteer of Year this Friday FREDERIC - Frederic Grocery has been named Frederic Business of the Year and will be honored along with Citizens of the Year Dr. Larry and Linda Pederson and Volunteers of the Year, Ken and Kris Hackett, this Friday, May 11, at Hacker’s Lanes. Tickets to the banquet needed to be purchased in advance by Monday, May 7, but those wishing tickets after that date may call Rebecca Harlander at 715-3274836. Cost of tickets is $13. Dinner begins at 6 p.m. with a program following. - with submitted information

Village results posted FREDERIC - Frederic Village voters cast votes in the recall primary election Tuesday, May 8, with the following results: Walker - 98; Kohl-Riggs - 3; Huber 5; Vinehout - 4; La Follette - 1; Falk 19; Barrett - 48; Weix - 50; Mitchell 50; Robins - 15; and scattering - 2. submitted

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Frac mine leak in Burnett County Silt enters St. Croix River by Gregg Westigard, Leader staff writer BURNETT COUNTY – A leak of soil particles from a containment pond at the only frac sand mine in Burnett County has been discovered and stopped. Water containing fine sand escaped from the Soderbeck mine just off Hwy. 70 west of Grantsburg near the St. Croix River bridge and moved south into the river. The leak was first noticed by a citizen on about Sunday, April 22, and reported to DNR authorities on Wednesday evening, April 25. The mining operation was shut down by the mine operator the next morning and has been closed since while a new containment pond is built. It is not known how much seepage there was into the river, but Mike Caron, director of land use affairs for the Tiller Corporation, said the pond where the leak occurred was newly constructed and first put into use immediately before the weekend of the 22nd. It had only been in full use a few days before the problem was reported. He said the containment area was used to hold processed water used in the sand-washing operation. The water contained fine particles of sand which would settle out before the water was reused. Caron said there were no chemicals in the water. The water seeped through the containment system, according to Dave Ferris, Burnett County conservationist. The discharge then moved through the mine site along old drainage ditches, south into a large wetland north of Hwy. 70, under the highway and through the DNR camp ground in an unnamed creek that flows into the St. Croix. The creek was the color of coffee with milk, a witness reported, and a plume of discharge was visible in the river for several days. Ferris says the creek and river have now returned to their normal appearance. Ruth King, DNR storm water specialist at the Spooner office, said that the operation had a DNR issued storm water permit, but that the permit was for an internally drained pit which did not require the filing of a storm water pollution prevention program. She said that at the time the permit was issued, in May 2011, the permit applicant

This unnamed creek through the DNR campground by the St. Croix on Hwy. 70 turned the color of coffee with cream recently when sand and water seeped from a frac sand mine north of the highway. - Photo submitted picked that option. King said that the department policy has changed since then, and all future permits will require the stricter permit. She said the site will be monitored more closely as a site with active ponds. Ferris said Tiller has been very cooperative in addressing the issue as soon as it was reported and voluntarily stopped the washing operation immediately. Tiller is building a new containment pond which will be inspected before the wash operation resumes. Ferris said the Burnett County Land and Water Conservation Department has issued a nonmetallic mining permit for the operation. That permit covers the reclamation process for a mine but also oversees operations. King said that everyone involved locally, including DNR conservation warden Chris Spraight, Ferris and Paul Cook from the land and water department took very quick

action once the problem was discovered. King and Ferris say they are learning about frac sand mining very rapidly. Ferris said his department is talking to other counties where frac sand mining has been active. King said her office is changing its permit policy. “We will keep it from happening again,” King said. The DNR storm water permit was issued to Interstate Energy Partners, Minnetonka, Minn., the owner of the Soderbeck mine. Interstate hired Tiller to operate the site. Corman said that Tiller is a 65-year-old family-owned sand, gravel and asphalt company that supplies the construction industry. “Everyone at Tiller has taken this very seriously,” Corman said. “We deal in valued natural resources and often operate near other valued resources that must be protected.”

Barrett to face off with Walker Polk and Burnett voters side with state voters by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE/SIREN – Milwaukee Mayor Thomas Barrett was both the local and overwhelming statewide choice of Democratic primary voters in the Tuesday, May 8, special recall primary, earning him a ballot spot in a face-off with embattled incumbent Republican Gov. Scott Walker next month in a rematch of the previous 2010 gubernatorial election - which Walker won by about a 5-percent margin. Barrett defeated fellow Democratic challengers Kathleen Falk, Sen. Kathleen Vinehout, Secretary of State Doug LaFollette and Gladys Huber for the right to challenge Walker. Walker won his Republican primary in lopsided fashion, taking 97 percent of Republican votes, with a token anti-Walker challenger, Arthur Kohl-Riggs, garnering about 3 percent of rebel primary votes. Pundits had speculated that the true Democratic race would be between former Dane County Executive Falk and Barrett, although Barrett won by a 58- to 34-percent split statewide, Vinehout earned about 4 percent, LaFollette about 3 percent and protest challenger Gladys Huber getting about 1 percent statewide.

The percentage splits in Polk and Burnett counties for Barrett were right in line with statewide results, with 54 percent (1,561 votes) for Barrett in Polk, and 58 percent (697 votes) of the Democrat votes in Burnett County. Thomas Barrett Falk came in second in both counties, as well, earning 27 percent of the Democrat voter endorsements in both Polk and Burnett. Because Wisconsin has a so-called “open primary,” voters can cross party lines in primaries, and there had been concerns on both sides of the aisle about so-called “fake” or protest candidates, which Huber was in the Democratic primary, and Kohl-Riggs was in the Republican primary. While there was no Republican primary race for lieutenant governor on the Republican ticket, as incumbent Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch had no challenger, the same was not true on the Democrat ticket, where selfprofessed “fake” Democrat Isaac Weix of

Elmwood ran as a Democrat, just as he did last year during the Sheila Harsdorf 10th Senate District recall primary. Weix has previously run as a Republican in regional races. Weix garnered a larger percentage than ever this time around, arguably because of the “open” primary rules, where each office is considered a different race, hence allowing Republicans to vote in the Democratic lieutenant governor’s primary. Weix took in approximately 26 percent of the lieutenant governor’s vote, second to Democrat Mahlon Mitchell, a Fitchburg firefighter and former real estate agent. Mitchell took in 52 percent statewide, with Democrat Ira Robins coming in third with 22 percent, behind Mitchell and Weix. The June 5 special recall race will now be a closely watched rematch, with Walker facing the possibility of being just the third governor ever recalled, nationwide. The race is sure to be bitterly partisan and also likely to be one of the most expensive ever in the state, as partisan forces have been filling campaign coffers dramatically, with preliminary donations on both sides of the aisle already bypassing total 2010 gubernatorial contributions. There will also be four regional Senate recall elections, in Districts 13, 21, 23 and 29, with Democratic candidates decided on Tuesday, as well.

Walker raises two-thirds of campaign money from out of state by Shawn Johnson Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON - Gov. Scott Walker raised two-thirds of his campaign money from outside Wisconsin in his most recent report filed with the state’s election agency. According to an analysis from the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, more than $8 million of the roughly $13 million the governor raised this year came from individual donors living in other states. That’s

66 percent of all the governor’s individual contributions. It follows a reporting period covering late last year where the governor raised 61 percent of his money from out-of-state donors. Democracy Campaign Director Mike McCabe says it’s a huge break from the past when it raised eyebrows if a candidate received 10 percent of his campaign funds from out of state, “Clearly this is seen as a national referendum now and

wealthy donors with a national agenda see Wisconsin as a domino. And they want to make sure that that domino falls in a direction that favors them.” Among the Democrats running for governor, former Dane County Executive Kathleen Falk received the most out-ofstate money. Forty-three percent of her funding from individuals came from outside Wisconsin. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett received 13 percent of his funding

from out of state. Secretary of State Doug La Follette largely self-funded his campaign, and state Sen. Kathleen Vinehout raised a total of just $44,000. Contributions to candidates’ campaigns are just one measure of the the campaign money flowing into Wisconsin. Groups like the Republican Governors Association and the Democratic group Greater Wisconsin Committee have also been running TV ads in the governor’s race.


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Balsam Lake board gets time line on new millpond bridge Hoping to have new bridge by summer 2013 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Balsam Lake Village Board approved a proposed time line for construction of a new bridge/culvert connecting the lake proper to the Balsam Lake millpond to the south, under CTH I. The new culvert would be much larger and more elaborate than the existing structure, allowing more typical-sized boats to pass through and under the county road, for resident access and commerce. The time line was revealed by Trustee Jeff Reed at the board’s regular monthly meeting on Monday, May 7. It was necessary for the board to approve the general time line for things like permitting and coordination, and gives the first view of when the new bridge is expected to be completed. According to Reed, the plan design/review phase should be at least 80 percent complete by the end of June, with permits filed by the end of that month. The final design should then be presented by the August, with bidding documents for that final design being prepared by October or November. Bidding for the project(s) should be ready for publication by March 2013, with an April 2013 final bid approval. Construction should begin about one year from now, in May 2013, with a 30- to 40day construction window meaning the project should be wrapped up by mid-

months.

The Balsam Lake Village Board voted to change the name of this tiny street to Rabbit Trail, which is how the locals have known it for decades. – Photo by Greg Marsten June 2013. The village, county and other agencies can prepare permits when the project design is at least 80 percent complete, which is why the time line is necessary. “Nothing is set in stone,” Reed said, and he eventually noted that the entire project and property ownership would then be transferred to Polk County, once it is completed. The board gave tentative approval to the project time line, with a more extensive outline coming in the next few

In other board business: • The Balsam Lake Smart Growth Committee gave an update on several plans, including the creation of a subcommittee to determine the best possible location for new lodging, weighing impacts, location, available land and more. The smart growth group also will weigh signage at the new Cornerstone Park, at the corner of CTH I and Hwy. 46, which is currently under construction. The board also discussed adapting a version of the county purchasing policy, and using it as a “Buy Local” policy, where they would give preference to local suppliers, if the price difference was negligible. “I think it’s a great idea,” stated Trustee Caroline Rediske. • The tax incremental financing committee is following up on several issues after meeting with state Rep. Erik Severson. They are using several existing developers agreements as templates for their own agreements, so they can be ready when needed. They held a meeting with Severson recently to try and get statewide assistance for finding potential tenants for the village industrial location that is currently empty. • The board approved a name change for a small stretch of Idlewild Trail, which is a dead-end, private road on the northwest side of the village, after requests from several of the residents, who say the address is both confusing and historically inaccurate. “It was called the Rabbit Trail for many

years,” stated resident Roger Kiemele, who said the residents have offered to pay for the name change. It was unclear when the road was named, but it likely occurred during the countywide 911 emergency address process. The board agreed to do the change to Rabbit Trail and will need to register the name change with the county and other officials. • The village hired Ayers and Associates to do a lower Balsam Lake Dam inspection, at a cost of $1,850. The dam requires engineer inspections every 10 years. • The village sewer and water committee outlined a plan to contract with Veit Engineering for sewer lining for a portion of Idlewild Street, at a cost of $13,266. The committee also recommended the purchase of new well control system, from Automatic Systems, Inc. at a cost of $32,788, with $28,000 to come from the department’s cash investment fund and the remainder to be borrowed from the village general fund. The new system will allow more flexibility on remote monitoring and will eliminate the need for much of the landline telephone costs of monitoring. “If the controls we have now fail, we’re done,” stated village public works Director Darryl Ince. The board also passed a recommendation from the State Public Service Commission to adjust water rates, starting next year. The PSC rate increases are meant to help pay for system upgrades like the well controls. The new rates are yet to be determined.

Secretary of administration speaks at Grantsburg Area Chamber meeting by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg Area Chamber members and guests packed the meeting room of the Wake-Up Call coffeehouse on Thursday, May 3, awaiting the arrival of Wisconsin Secretary of Administration Mike Huebsch. Huebsch began his address by telling those in attendance he had an optimistic message for them. “Wisconsin is going to come back,” said Huebsch, smiling out at the crowd. Huebsch said the big news indicating that a comeback is already happening came out of a CEO magazine ranking of states business climates. Wisconsin rose from 41 to 24 and is now in the top 20 in the nation as seen by the nation’s top companies CEOs. Huebsch said in the first quarter of 2012, 6,500 manufacturing jobs were created, and Wisconsin is in the nation’s top 10 for creating manufacturing jobs. “We need to have jobs for our children so they can stay in Wisconsin,” Huebsch told the group. “We need to get back to the bread and butter industries of agriculture and manufacturing.” Stan Peer, representing the Grantsburg

Grantsburg Area Chamber members and guests packed the meeting room of the Wake-Up Call coffeehouse on Thursday, May 3, to hear Wisconsin Secretary of Administration Mike Huebsch speak on job creation in northern Wisconsin.

Industrial Corporation, asked Huebsch what was being done to supply manufacturing plants, such as Grantsburg’s Parker Hannifin, with trained workers. “Parker is hiring 50 new employees and can’t find enough trained people to fill them,” stated Peer. Huebsch shook his head in acknowledgement, saying there was a shortage of

trained manufacturing workers and changing that was a top priority of Gov. Walker. Huebsch said he’d like to see the state’s technical schools and even middle and high schools get back to offering basic shop classes to students. The secretary cited a survey showing a disconnect in people’s attitudes about the manufacturing industry. While the survey said 80 percent of people felt manufacturing was important, only 17 percent wanted their children to choose a career in manufacturing. When asked about the recent decision by a mining company to pull the plug on

a proposed mining project in northern Wisconsin, Huebsch said Wisconsin has valuable minerals, which could help in providing jobs. “We have to take advantage of the minerals we have to provide jobs for generations.” “There were lessons learned from the recent mining proposal decision,” Huebsch commented. “We can do mining in a way that will keep the environment pristine.” In his closing remarks, Huebsch thanked those attending for the contributions made to their community, “People like you are the backbone of Wisconsin. Thank you for doing what you are doing.”

State warns those on BadgerCare of premium increases

Stan Peer, representing the Grantsburg Industrial Corporation, talked with Secretary of Administration Huebsch in Grantsburg about the problem local manufacturing plants have in finding trained people. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer

by Shamane Mills Wisconsin Public Radio STATEWIDE - Wisconsin is sending out notices to those on BadgerCare telling them about increased premiums the federal government recently approved. In order to deal with a deficit in the Medicaid budget, state officials asked the federal government to allow cuts that originally would have affected 64,000 people. That request was scaled back considerably by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, but the agency is allowing Wisconsin to charge those on BagderCare more. Wisconsin’s Health Secretary Dennis Smith, says the changes allowed through a federal waiver will

save the state $28 million, but Wisconsin still had a shortfall of $82 million as of March, “We’ve had success. We need more successes. More than anything else, we need the economy to turn around so people are going back to work.” Smith spoke at a Madison luncheon organized by Wisconsin Health News. Smith says BadgerCare recipients affected by the premium increases will get a general notice first then a specific premium amount later. He estimates that 70 percent will be able and willing to pay the increased premium. Those opposed to the hike disagree. The Wisconsin Council on Children and Families estimates 17,000 people will leave BadgerCare or be turned away under new rules.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Applications adding up for iForward Grantsburg School Board hears report on the district’s new online charter school’s open enrollment numbers by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg School Board members eagerly awaited an enrollment report for district’s new online charter school from iForward Interim Executive Director John Jacobs. Jacobs appeared at the board’s Monday, May 7, meeting to give the board, what President Dave Ahlquist later commented as encouraging enrollment numbers. Jacobs reported to date a total of 416 enrollment applications had been received for iForward. Responding to Ahlquist’s remark, Jacobs said it was important to note, “These applications do not correlate directly into actual students. Families are still going through the decision-making process throughout the summer months.” Jacobs reminded the board students looking at enrolling in an online school

Interim iForward Executive Director John Jacobs was present at the Grantsburg School Board’s Monday, May 7, meeting to give an update on the district’s new virtual charter school’s enrollment applications.

Insight School of Wisconsin Executive Director Karl Peterson gave the Insight quarterly report to the Grantsburg School Board during the board’s Monday, May 7, meeting. Peterson reported the Insight School would close on June 29. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer can apply to up to three schools. Jacobs told the board there are also approximately 200 currently enrolled Insight School students who will be continuing on with Grantsburg’s newly renamed iForward virtual charter school. “These are currently open enrolled students of the Grantsburg District who will be remaining with the program,” explained Jacobs. “iForward’s open enrollment numbers will become more concrete as we progress through the summer and families make an educated decision as to what educational program fits their needs for the upcoming school year,” commented Jacobs. “Hopefully on day one we’ll be starting with approximately 400 students.” Jacobs told the board iForward staff would be going to various locations around the state to meet with students and their families, and exact enrollment will be better known as staff works through the summer months leading through the September third Friday count. The board approved the open enrollment applications for iForward of 325 regular education students and to deny five students who are outside of the ages the school serves. The board voted to give Superintendent

Burgin the authority to act on behalf of the board as special education and expulsion records are received and reviewed to determine applications approvals and denials. “This will allow iForward to act in a timely manner upon the receipt of records, ensuring we are nimble and responsive to families who have an interest in enrolling with iForward,” said Jacobs. Jacobs was later asked to give an overview of the iForward program. “With iForward now an instrumentality of the Grantsburg School District, we are working very hard to build additional program components beyond the traditional highquality online learning experiences most online programs provide,” said Jacobs. “These additional program components all revolve around building an opportunity for students to obtain success through engagement, relevance and 21st century readiness in an online environment. As part of the 21st century readiness, iForward, over time, will continue to develop unique opportunities for students to maximize their exposure to future career pathway courses, experiences and skills,” Jacobs added. “Technology currently transforms our society on a daily basis, and iForward is

one means of leveraging technology as a way to meet varying educational needs of families throughout Wisconsin,” said Jacobs.

In other board business: The board completed the 2012 reorganization of board committees and board officers by voting to keep the same officers and committee assignments members held in 2011-2012. The transportation committee set a date to hold transportation contract negotiations for 2012-2013 with bus contractors. Insight School of Wisconsin Executive Director Karl Peterson gave the Insight quarterly report. Peterson reported the Insight School will close on June 29. The board approved the resignation of Peter Denn as Grantsburg Elementary custodian. The board approved the WIAA contract for 2012-2013 school year. Coming out of closed session the board approved final notices of nonrenewals for 2.2 full-time employees.

Polk Highway plans its future by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Polk County Highway Committee started its strategic planning process Wednesday, May 3, when it held its first meeting after the county board elections. They will look at road ratings, miles of service, levels of service, and planning for the highway building. This was the first meeting for new committee member Tom Magnafici. Planning for the highway facility led off the process. The county has committed to a time line of resolving the facility issue by 2017, looking at the options of building new or remodeling the present site. Highway Commissioner Steve Warndahl told the committee that he had received the go-

ahead from county Administrator to Dana Frey to get things started by seeking an engineering firm to look over the previous facility studies and present a recommendation to the county board. Under the time line, a choice of options will be made in 2013 at the latest. New bonding money for the project will not be available until 2015, Frey said, but a plan should be in place by then. A new or remodeled facility, possibly on new land, would be completed by 2017, just before the 80th birthday of the present highway shop. The planning goal for road rating is to decide how good the 330 miles of county highways should be. The system has now been brought up to an average rating of 7, with a rating of 10 being the best, a “new” road. At present, 62 percent of the road

segments, by road miles, are at 7 or better. Warndahl said the present department philosophy is to follow the six-year road plan to fix the roads and keep them maintained. Frey told Warndahl that new road improvement bonding might be part of the bonding for a facility in the future, after the present debt starts to be reduced. The number of miles of county highways is an ongoing discussion. Some roads have been identified as local roads that could be turned over to town governments, while some local roads have a high volume of use and might be proper targets for county operation. An example of a road that might be turned over to a town could be CTH S, while a high-usage road the county might want to take over would be extending CTH O for a mile to the Burnett County line. The town involved

would need to accept any road spun off from the county system and Warndahl said the county would need to bring the road up to a good level before a town would take it. The issue will stay on the committee agenda for planning. Lastly, Warndahl said the committee should decide what level of service the department should aim for or is satisfied with, for example, what level of winter maintenance is desired. On the other hand, how much effort should the department put into controlling invasive species and related issues. The state is coming out with new guidelines and the county can set its standards for the department to follow. The highway strategic planning will be an ongoing topic on the highway committee agenda.

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PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Endeavors lease issue heads to county board $51,000 past due to Polk County by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The issue of the Endeavors Adult Development Center lease with Polk County had a stop at the property committee Monday, May 7, on its way to the full county board on Tuesday, May 15. And Endeavors came in for some questions and comments from committee members. After a long discussion, the property committee recommended that the lease issue be postponed until after a proposed joint meeting of the property committee and the Endeavors Board of Directors. The county board resolution gives the supervisors the option of accepting a request from Endeavors to modify their lease or rejecting the offer and reinstating a default order notice. That could lead to a lease termination. While the Endeavors lease issue has been a property committee item since 2009, this was the first time the item was

presented to three new members of the committee, Tom Engel, Harry Johansen and Warren Nelson. County Administrator Dana Frey started the presentation by saying he had received two unpleasant surprises in recent months, first that Endeavors was buying fuel from the county even though the county cannot sell taxexempt fuel to nongovernment users, and second, that Endeavors had stopped paying the county. Frey also pointed out indirect costs, such as the depreciation cost of the building, which Endeavors is not charged for. The new members all expressed concern that the issue existed. Engel said it sounds like an issue of overall management problems, and Nelson said a deadline needs to be set to resolve the problem. Committee Chair Larry Jepsen said he has heard the discussion for many years, and it is not moving forward. He said a joint meeting is needed and might be an education for the Endeavors board. Endeavors now owes Polk County $51,376 for lease payments and services going back to December 2011 according to background information provided to

the committee by Frey. That total includes credit for a $9,000 payment made by Endeavors as part of an offer from the organization to amend the lease. Endeavors had stopped making payments to the county in December after an apparent misunderstanding on their part. The county responded on April 12 with a default notice to Endeavors demanding immediate payment of $15,600, the past due rent amount of the total debt at the time. The Endeavors debt includes a balance of $9,500 for rent after deducting the $9,000 just received. The rent cost under the current lease is $2,900 a month. There is also a fuel bill of $34,655 due to the highway department and $7,221 due the county for maintenance services. The Endeavors fuel account with the county was shut off in mid-April. The Endeavors lease amount has been an ongoing issue since the spring of 2009. That was the time when Endeavors switched from Polk County Human Services to NorthernBridges as its main revenue source. The Endeavors payment to the county had included a rent amount that was billed through to the state as a

Dems press Walker to explain legal defense fund

Neumann faith healing case may go to state Supreme Court by Glen Moberg Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON – Appellate judges are asking the Wisconsin Supreme Court to hear the so-called “prayer death case,” in which a Wausau-area couple was found guilty for not seeking medical help for their critically ill daughter. Dale and Leilani Neumann were convicted of reckless homicide in separate trials for the death of their 11-year-old daughter Madeline Kara. The couple prayed for her, but did not call a doctor, as she lay in a diabetic coma. In his trial in 2009, Dale Neumann was adamant that he had the right to rely solely on prayer, even if meant that Madeline Kara would die, “And if you read the Gospels, and you read the Epistles, any mention that Jesus had, he never went to a doctor. Ever.” Marathon County Judge Vincent Howard told Dale Neumann that freedom of religion is absolute when it

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by Shawn Johnson Wisconsin Public Radio STATEWIDE - Democrats are pressing Gov. Scott Walker to explain why he’s spending money on a legal defense fund if he’s not the target of a sweeping John Doe investigation. The governor’s most recent campaign finance report showed that he transferred $60,000 from his campaign to a legal defense fund. This is permitted under state law, if a person is being investigated or charged with a violation of election or campaign finance laws. Some of Walker’s former aides when he was Milwaukee County executive have been charged with those types of crimes as part of an ongoing John Doe investigation. Walker has not been charged and has said he’s not personally under investigation. State Democratic Party Chairman Mike Tate says it begs a question; “If

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means of obtaining a higher federal reimbursement for services. The details of that arrangement were worked out by former human services director Richard Kammerud in 2002. The change to NorthernBridges stopped that arrangement. Endeavors had agreed to a lease amount of $60,000 a year for 2009 and 2010. That was reduced by agreement to $30,000 for 2011 with an agreed return to $60,000 for 2011. Last fall, Endeavors told the county that it could not afford the $60,000. The property committee in October 2011, proposed a 2012 lease amount of $34,800, and that is the amount in the 2012 budget. Endeavors, in a letter dated April 26, is asking that the 2012 payment be reduced to the previous $30,000. In the proposal, Endeavors would pay $1,000 a month from January through June and $4,000 a month the other six months. Under that plan, their $9,000 would cover rent through May. No one from Endeavors attended the property committee meeting, and their letter did not mention the $41,876 past amount for fuel and maintenance.

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Scott Walker is not a target of the John Doe investigation, as he claims, how is he legally permitted to establish and operate a legal defense fund?” The Democratic Party says it filed a complaint with the Government Accountability Board saying Walker’s use of a legal defense fund seemed to be breaking the law, and if it wasn’t, the public deserved to know more details. The party’s move came on the same day that Democratic gubernatorial candidate Tom Barrett called a press conference to highlight the ongoing John Doe investigation. Walker’s campaign issued a statement reiterating that Walker was not the target of this investigation and that this fund was set up under the guidance of the Government Accountability Board. Walker’s campaign also accused the Democratic Party of trying to win an election by engaging in a witch hunt.


Resolution would phase out most services by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The future of the Polk County Library Federation could be decided by the County Board at its Tuesday, May 15, meeting. A resolution would defund the library in the 2013 budget, find an alternative way to continue the jail reading and literacy program, and re-establish a former committee to prepare a transition plan for the other county library services. A similar resolution came within one vote of passage in December. The new resolution is a response to a new report, An Evaluation of the Polk County Library Federation, written by county Administrator Dana Frey which was released in March. The library federation is the county’s central library which provides a numbers of services to county residents and the 10 local libraries. The resolution mentions a number of reasons for closing the central library now, including changing needs for library services since its founding in 1974, new technologies and an increased county expense for debt service, energy, health care and highway materials which must be covered with a limited amount of county funds. It points out that the library federation is not a mandated program. “The central policy issue to be decided by the Polk County Board of Supervisors is simple: to what extent should taxpayers, specifically those outside of municipalities with libraries, fund library services beyond the statutorily required minimum level,” Frey writes in his evaluation. “This decision on library funding must be made in the context of severely limited resources.” The detailed 55-page study looks at the five library programs including outreach, books by mail, books to the jail, library services and technical support. Each component is evaluated as to its cost, its current need and alternative ways of being carried out. Frey says that many library programs required in 1974 when the county library was established have now been met in other ways. He says state laws and technology have changed, but the county library has not kept pace with those changes. “Smaller counties with library services and stand-alone libraries (of which Polk is effectively the last) have been left with

only two options: to abolish them or continue to inefficiently provide services,” Frey says. He goes on to say that if the county board decides to continue the library federation, it must review all its programs to make sure they fill the mission of the library and whether the services are of benefit to the county residents living in the towns since they pay the property taxes that support the library. The Polk County Library Plan for Service Committee, a required body that has not been active for several years, would be re-established to redefine the library’s mission if the board decides to continue the operation or to prepare the transition if the library is to be closed. The county board came within one vote of closing the library last December. That resolution directed the county administrator to develop a process to close the library by the end of 2012. It failed by a vote of 11 yes to 12 no. During floor debate at the Dec. 20 meeting, some supervisors said they wanted to wait until the evaluation by Frey was completed and delivered. Voting to close the library were Patricia Schmidt, Herschel Brown, James Edgell, Brian Masters, Ken Sample, Craig Moriak, Kris Kremer-Hartung, Kim O’Connell, Gary Bergstrom, Neil Johnson and Larry Voelker. The 12 votes to not order the closing at that time were cast by Harry Johansen, Dean Johansen, Kathryn Kienholz, Marvin Caspersen, Randy Korb, Russ Arcand, Warren Nelson, Jay Luke, George Stroebel, Larry Jepsen, Gerianne Christensen and William Johnson. County library programs were ranked low in a survey of county board priorities conducted last May. The supervisors ranked 75 county programs. Books to the jail was ranked the second least important program, outpaced to the bottom of the list only by gopher bounties. Technical support to local libraries ranked fifth least important and books by mail ranked seventh. The book to the jail and technical support were the two programs Frey singled out as services of value. However, he says that the services can be done far more efficiently and funded differently. Frey concludes his evaluation by saying that the library has lost its focus and has many programs that are only marginally related to its mission. He says the programs should be reviewed and ends the evaluation by stating “Given the current financial environment, it is more important than ever that this be done, and soon.”

Full library evaluation on county Web site Just posted but hidden by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The full 55-page evaluation of the county library federation, written by county Administrator Dana Frey, is now on the county Web site. But it is not easy to find. The Polk County home page is not user friendly.

However, the report can be found by following this trail: Start at co.polk.wi.us. On the home page, under County Links, click Departments. On the left margin, not in the middle of the page, click Administration. On that page, at the top, click Evaluations. The library study is there as the only choice.

MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

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Fate of county library coming to Polk County Board

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Man violates no-contact order, while walking home from jail by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – A 46-year-old Scandia, Minn., man is facing several misdemeanor bond jumping charges after repeatedly ignoring no-contact orders with a woman he is accused of beating last year. According to the initial police report, he went to woman’s home after being drunk on the morning of Sunday, May 6, and when police arrived, they even Thiele found him sleeping in her home. He was arrested later that day for violating the restraining order by calling the woman and leaving messages on her voice mail, while he was walking home

from jail. Troy E. Thiele, 46, Scandia, has longstanding no-contact orders with the female victim, after an incident over a year ago in St. Croix Falls. He has amassed no fewer than a dozen bond violations since then and has also incurred other charges of battery and disorderly conduct along the way. Thiele is awaiting court appearances on the various charges since. But when he was released on bail on May 6, he left on foot from the Polk County Jail in Balsam Lake, and within a few minutes, the former victim called police to say he had already called her and left messages, violating his no-contact orders. Police found Thiele walking just a few blocks from the jail, and while he denied making the calls, his cell phone history proved otherwise. According to the probable cause report on the latest violations, Thiele reportedly continued to threaten law officers during both incidents. His next court appearance is yet to be scheduled.

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

COMMUNITY

VIEWPOINTS

SEND YOUR VIEWS AND FEEDBACK TO: INTER-COUNTY LEADER, BOX 490, FREDERIC, WI 54837 OR E-MAIL: leadernewsroom@gmail.com

Making sure something is written

• Joe Heller •

Views expressed on these pages do not necessarily reflect the views of management or board members.

• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365 U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 312 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

• Web poll results •

To take part in our poll, go to theleader.net and scroll down to the lower left part of the screen • See front page for this week’s question

T H E

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

Last week’s question

“Even small towns need to see the good, bad and ugly,” reads a headline in the latest issue of the National Newspaper Association's Publisher's Auxiliary. Steve Andrist, publisher of the Crosby (North Dakota) Journal, reminds fellow journalists of their challenge to create responsible journalism. Andrist sets the stage in his guest editorial by quoting Brian Harden, mayor of Rockland, Me., one of four towns in that state to recently lose their newspaper. In Rockland’s case, it was a newspaper that had been published for 163 years. “I'm shocked and saddened,” Harden told the Bangor Daily News. “I loved my Courier; whether it was to read the obituaries or to see who had been arrested. A community our size needs to have a newspaper. Whether or not I liked what was written, it was important that something was written.” Andrist noted that while most news published by smaller papers can be characterized as good news, smaller papers must also publish stories that are characterized as negative. Readers, he says, want to know if someone is dumping septic waste near a stream – even if it's someone who sits next to them or in the next pew at church. They want to know if a pedophile is arrested in town and if the offender is in the same coffee klatch. He goes on to focus on conflicts in publishing negative stories that involve advertisers in the newspaper. All of his points are familiar for us here at the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, where we publish two community papers, the Leader and the Washburn County Register. Sharing Andrist’s points with our readers, while somewhat self-focused, seems appropriate. Readers are sensitive to how negative news is written, accusing us one time of portraying a man who hit a deer with his vehicle as a villain. In other instances, we’re callous in not projecting some insight into stories as to why people do the things they do that leads them to jail. Readers make excellent points and keep us pondering the best ways in which to “hold up the mirror” to our communities. The “negative” stories are derived from arrest records and officer reports that don't necessarily include all sides of the story but much of the time include a “probable cause” for criminal charges being filed. Law enforcement agencies, including the State Patrol, issue news releases now that include a disclaimer about how people accused of crimes are presumed innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Sometimes people who find themselves in the justice system and on the front page of the local newspaper feel like it's the other way around guilty until proven innocent. Perhaps rightfully so. Polk County Sheriff Pete Johnson, when offering news of his department’s activities, includes the following disclaimer about PCs - probable cause reports - which often are the media’s only source of information. “The probable cause reports are simply a report stating the 'probable cause' that the arresting officer had at the time of arrest. It is used by the district attorney, defense attorney and judges in the court's initial appearance to assist them in determining, first, whether or not there was enough 'probable cause' for the arrest; second, if the charge stated by the officer is appropriate and third, to assist the judge in setting bond. The district attorney also uses the probable cause report as a basis to complete the criminal complaint, which is the official charging document ...” A probable cause report is not the same as a criminal complaint, the sheriff noted. A probable cause report shows why the person was arrested but they are not officially charged with a crime until a criminal complaint is filed - and those charges may differ from the ones noted on a probable cause report. Just a bit of insight for those who read the police blotter and arrest stories. Although Andrist didn’t dwell on small-town criminal reporting, his thoughts apply to all news that isn’t so digestable. “We see an informed and engaged citizenry as critical to having a vital community,” he wrote. And that’s why, he concluded, it’s important that something is written whether or not everyone likes what is written.

Who we are

Census figures can give us insight into what path we're on or how far we’ve ad-

vanced - or in some cases, haven’t advanced - as a community, county or state. They certainly can serve as red flags. For example, in Burnett County we know that there is a higher percentage of children in poverty than many other counties in the state. Using numbers provided by the criminal justice system – as the Leader did several years ago – we were able to point out there were more child sexual abuse cases locally prosecuted than the average county in Wisconsin. Those numbers couldn't go as far as to tell us the exact reasons for such poverty, or whether the higher than average assault cases were due to better reporting and prosecution efforts, for example, but it brought us awareness and an impetus for stronger efforts to investigate as to why. Recently Leader reader and regular letter writer Rich Hess compiled census information comparing Burnett and Polk counties. Hess often offers insightful analysis of the numbers, but in this case, he simply offered the numbers to area media for publication. Readers can draw their own conclusions. Here are a few comparisons using census figures from 2000 and 2010: • Polk County (population 44,205) is 2.86 times larger than Burnett County (15,457). From 2000 to 2010, Polk County's population grew by 7 percent (approximately 3,000 people) but Burnett County's population decreased a bit – by 1.4 percent, or a loss of about 200 people. Of course, Burnett County's population continues to swell to more than 40,000 in the summer months (estimate, not census related). Statewide the population grew by 6 percent to 5.7 million residents. • People tend to be younger in Polk County where nearly a quarter of the residents are under 18. The under-18 group represents about 20 percent of Burnett County’s population. In Burnett, about a quarter (23.10 percent) of the residents are 65 or older compared to just 16 percent in Polk. • Burnett has more aging residents and more veterans, 12 percent to about 9 percent for Polk. • Median household income figures show Burnett at approximately $39,000 and Polk at $49,000. • Both counties have approached or exceeded 10-percent unemployment. • Based on 2006 to 2010 figures, Burnett County has twice the amount of people below the poverty level in terms of percentage, 18.5 percent compared to 9.6 percent for Polk. The state average during that period was 7.9 percent. It seems redundant to say it again, but jobs likely remain the key factor in keeping communities and schools growing, or at least maintaining a quality level of life. It certainly plays into some of the numbers listed above. Editorials by Gary King

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MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

• Letters to the editor • Special weeks May 6-12, is a week to celebrate both National Hospital Week and National Nurses week. This week marks the largest health-care event that focuses on hospitals history, technology and dedicated health-care professionals. The celebration of National Hospital Week began in 1921. Nine years later, the first hospital opened in Grantsburg on Nov. 19, 1930, and has enjoyed community support for over 80 years. As we recognize that everyone has a choice in health care, please know that we remain grateful for the ongoing community support we receive. On May 6, Burnett Medical Center joined with health-care organizations throughout the United States in celebrating Nurses: Advocating, Leading, Caring, as part of National Nurses Week. The purpose of the weeklong celebration is to raise awareness of the value of nursing and help educate the public about the role nurses play in meeting the health-care needs of the American people. In honor of the dedication, commitment and tireless effort of the nearly 3.1 million registered nurses nationwide to promote and maintain the health of this nation, BMC is pleased to recognize nurses everywhere on this particular day for the quality work they provide seven days a week, 365 days a year. Often described as an art and a science, nursing is a profession that embraces dedicated people with varied interests, strengths and passions because of the many opportunities the profession offers. As nurses, they work in emergency rooms, school-based clinics and homeless shelters, to name a few. They have many roles, from staff nurse to educator to nurse practitioner and nurse researcher, and serve all of them with passion for the profession and with a strong commitment to patient safety. These dedicated professionals make a positive difference in the lives of those they touch. They truly are the heart of hometown health care, delivering quality, valued, compassionate community-based care, close to home. As valued members of Team BMC, these women and men serve patients in the clinic and the hospital, as well as our residents in the community care center. I enjoin your readers to join me in publically recognizing and thanking the many hardworking health-care professionals that care enough to care for you and your loved ones. Gordy Lewis CEO, Burnett Medical Center Grantsburg

Still don’t like ObamaCare? Ms. Phernetton is understandably frustrated about fact-checking ObamaCare, aka, The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010; if you dare, check all 906 pages of it at www.gpo.gov/fdsys/ pkg/BILLS111hr3590enr/pdf/BILLS-

State programs available to help seniors, veterans and citizens As I travel around the 10th Senate District visiting with residents, I often hear of frustration with the difficulty in accessing information about Wisconsin and state programs. While technology advancements make it easier to access information online, these resources are often difficult to utilize for those without computers or reliable Internet service. This column seeks to provide some helpful information on a number of state programs that are available to residents. The Department of Health Services has recently announced a move to streamline the Board of Aging and long-term care helpline with the Medicare Part D helpline. Prior to this move, when seniors called in with questions relating to Medicare Part D, they would generally be referred to a different number, oftentimes causing confusion. By combining these re-

111hr3590enr.pdf/. Probably few have read it all, including lawmakers. Still, good facts make good politics, so check out a reliable digest of the bill, such as www.healthcare.gov/law/ index.html/. The social principle of insurance is simple: everyone pays a fair share so everyone benefits when needed. Not everyone crashes, yet auto insurance is mandatory. Everyone suffers illness or injury. Health insurance improves health; healthy people do better at school, work, raising children and avoiding violence. America can be only as healthy as its people. This is an issue neither “R” nor “D” but “A” for American; the mandate was first proposed by the conservative Heritage Foundation and Senate Republicans in the 1990s as an alternative to Clinton’s Hilarycare. If the mandate is ruled unconstitutional, expect Canadian-style single-payer insurance to be back on the table. We begin objecting to rules about age 2, first from parents, then teachers, ultimately politicians. Yet, as we mature and learn to play with others, we realize rules are necessary, not too many, just enough, for example, mandatory motor vehicle insurance, medical malpractice insurance, stop signs, speed limits, crosswalks, school attendance, child support, religious freedom, domestic violence, etc. Imagine a Packers–Vikings game without rules. ObamaCare has imperfections that need fixing, nevertheless, the American Medical Association and a majority of young physicians support ObamaCare because it’s better than what we had before. Why? Doctors see uninsured patients every day and witness the suffering; it’s heart breaking when a patient can’t afford the health care they need. Mr. Scoglio correctly guessed my work as an academic doctor, but he seems not to know I served 800 adults as primary care doctor for 42 years on the faculty of our public medical school and continue as a substitute. He also labels my words as “Madison logic,” which I assume means “liberal”; as a university and capitol town, the people of Madison are more educated and liberal than the state generally. What he doesn’t know is that I spend enough time in Siren to stay politically centered. At least he didn’t say “Madison communist logic” as my mother might have. More on Scoglio’s letter another time. Norman Jensen, M.D. Madison and Siren

A note to the teachers A teacher has 180 days to make a difference in a child’s life. With three elementary students in the St. Croix Falls School District, we were fortunate to get three amazing and wonderful teachers in the same year. We couldn’t be happier. Moreover, when you feel you have a whole school led by a fabulous group of individuals who are working together for the common good of all children and families, you want to sing their praises. We are singing. From top to bottom, our classrooms are filled with talented educators who are

Sheila

Harsdorf 10th District Senate sources, the department intends to provide seniors with improved access to counselors and overall better customer service. Seniors can access this helpline at 800-242-1060. In addition to this newly announced helpline, state agencies provide a number of resources and programs for seniors. Another program offered by DHS is SeniorCare, which provides eligible seniors with affordable prescription drug coverage. Since its creation in 2001, SeniorCare has been a popular program due to a number of factors. When compared to Medicare Part D, SeniorCare is easier and more affordable for seniors as well as being more cost-effective for taxpayers. For more information on SeniorCare access the toll-free customer service line at

doing their best each day to see that our students succeed. Our hallways are filled with art, students are sharing their music through spring concerts, and our children are exploring on field trips. Our library is bustling with activity that is carrying over into our home. The kindergarten campus at Dresser is so filled with positive energy that some days it seems the roof could “pop!” Springtime brings real live baby chicks, a hedgehog, an Arbor Day celebration and more. You have to experience the joy and love at the schools to believe it. The list of Community Education offerings is terrific. We know how hard it is getting to provide all of this in the present economy, and yet St. Croix Falls Schools carry on. We want to express our gratitude to the schools and say, “Happy Teacher Appreciation Week to all educators!” May you continue to make the difference. Proud Saints fans, Melissa Ward and family St. Croix Falls

Fundamental issue What is the fundamental issue facing Republicans, Independents and Democrats in the June 5 election? Gov. Walker’s leadership faces a judgment call. No matter how they voted, all citizens hope that their leaders will bring people together so that the state can move forward to address the serious issues it faces. Crisis times test leaders. Vision and the capacity to understand what is needed is critically important. In January of 2011 the nation was still reeling from a historic recession, most persons suffered from uncertainty or financial hardship and the state faced a critical budget deficit. Instead of asking everyone to help solve the state economic challenge, Walker rushed through an agenda that divided and polarized Wisconsin. We needed leadership that would inspire and rally Wisconsin citizens. Thoughtful dialog and a genuine respect for varied opinions was demanded. What sacrifice was required from each of us to put the state on a path to fiscal health and stability? Knowing what is best during times of crisis is very hard. But leadership that is thoughtful, respectful and tries to achieve common agreement can arrive at solutions that, although unpleasant, can be accepted by a majority of citizens. Effective leadership recognizes that our democratic system must use our governmental legislative process if careful, deliberate and wise legislation is to be passed. Walker and the Republican legislators taught us a lesson. When a radical agenda is bulldozed through a legislature there is a backlash. When the legislation tries to roll back decades of history the backfire is truly explosive. Outrage from all segments of society was directed at Madison as thousands protested. That sense of rage and betrayal finally culminated in almost a million recall signatures. The greatest disservice to our civil society was pitting public workers and teachers against taxpayers. These public 800-657-2038. To provide state residents with assistance in regards to tax issues, the Department of Revenue provides a helpline to those with questions on state taxes at 608266-2772. Inquiries on tax refunds can be made by calling toll-free 866-947-7363. In a related subject, state law also provides for an innovative program for seniors to help with their property tax bills while fostering community partnerships with schools. The Senior Tax Exchange Program is an optional program for local school districts that provides property tax credits for seniors that volunteer at public schools. Please contact your local school to see if they are participating in this program or the Department of Public Instruction at 800-441-4563 for more information. Another issue that citizens frequently contact me on is consumer protection. Unfortunately, those perpetrating scams often target seniors and other vulnerable populations. The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection is responsible for identifying these scams and assisting those that have been the target of fraud, as well as providing information on

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

servants were willing to make concessions to help the budget, but the governor made them scapegoats. Effective and worthy leadership in a democratic society does not exploit fear and suspicion and does not undermine our mutual respect for each other. In a partisan environment we especially need leaders that heal and help us work together. Walker’s divisive leadership fails that most important leadership test. Fred Kramer Spooner

Latest rhetoric I don’t understand the latest rhetoric regarding ObamaCare. It doesn’t matter what anyone thinks. It was jammed down the people’s throats by Obama and the rest of the current Socialist Party (former Democratic Party). Sixty-seven percent of the voters were against it (CBS poll done two days prior to passage). It still got pushed through without a hitch. It took Obama’s visits and promises of $2.2 billion in pork to sway any socialist senator that didn’t support it, but it went through. It’s now in the hands of the Supreme Court. This is the same group that may shift Medicare and Social Security from an insurance to an entitlement. I will predict the outcome: It will pass by a 5-4 majority. Those voting for it: Kagan and Sotomayer (both owned by Obama), Ginsberg, Breyer and Kennedy. Those voting against it: Roberts, Scalia, Alito and Thomas. Kagan should recuse herself because she in fact crafted the ObamaCare law and helped Obama circumvent constitutional laws. Never mind legal ethics with the Obama administration, there are no ethics. Anyone notice that none of the CBS, ABC, NBC or other news agencies are asking why Kagan is taking part in the discussions? The far-left liberal news media does not want Obama to start calling them Fox-type news. The WEA, We the 99 percent, Progressives, Socialist Party and other entitlement groups will be elated and jubilant that people who actually pay for things, now have to pay more. Dave Wilhelmy Siren

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Leader encourages readers to submit letters to the editor. All letters may be edited for length, clarity, grammatical accuracy and stylistic consistency. Letters more than 400 words in length may be returned to the writer for editing. Submitted letters should include the writer’s full name, address, daytime phone number and email address (if available). E-mailed letters are preferred. Letters may be sent to the-leader@centurytel.net or mailed to Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. avoiding fraudulent activity. DATCP’s consumer protection hotline is 800-4227128. DATCP also administers the state’s no-call list and those interested in adding their landline and/or cell phone number to the state no-call list can call 866-9662255. It is also important to remember that if you are on the no-call list, you will need to renew your number every two years. I recently hosted Department of Veterans Affairs Secretary John Scocos to our area for listening sessions with veterans. DVA administers a number of programs to support our veterans, including transportation to VA medical appointments, assistance to needy veterans, and the Veterans and Surviving Spouses Property Tax Credit. Those interested in more information on veterans programs can call toll-free 800-947-8387 or contact your county veterans service officer. I encourage you to make use of these resources when needed. As always, feel free to contact me for assistance on these or any other issues by calling toll-free 800862-1092 or visiting my Web site at www.harsdorfsenate.com.

N E W S P A P E R


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Ground is broken for new Habitat home to be built in Centuria First day on build is Saturday, May 12 by Jackie Thorwick Special to the Leader CENTURIA – A group of about 40 people gathered on Saturday, May 5, in a vacant lot on the edge of Centuria, to celebrate the start of a new beginning in the life of a local family. The Van Vleet family, now of Dresser, will work together with Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity to build a home for their family there. Their family has been struggling with housing for years. They are now living in a rental home that is so moldy, it is making them sick. It also keeps them struggling financially, as the heating bills are astronomical. In a few months’ time, the Van Vleet family will move into a simple but healthy and highly efficient home that they will have built together with the nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminate poverty housing and volunteers who want to help. The Rev. Diane Norstad, of Faith Lutheran Church in Balsam Lake, led the brief outdoor service. She told of her affection for the Van Vleets, who are members of her church and whom she encouraged to apply to Habitat for a home. She asked God’s blessing on the family, on the building of the home, asking for the safety of everyone who works on the home. “This home will be the result of a six-way partnership with Habitat,” said Eric Kube, executive director of the local Habitat affilliate. “Thrivent Financial is an important partner in this build,” he said, explaining they will donate over $56,000 toward the cost of building the home. “The village of Centuria is also a partner, as they donated the land for us to build on,” he said. “And the Van Vleet family is a partner, as well as the many donors and the many volunteers who will make this home a reality.” Matthew Bobick, of the Thrivent Financial office in Luck, also spoke at the ground breaking. He thanked the many people involved in working on a Habitat build and explained that Thrivent Financial invests its profits back

The children in the Van Vleet family enthusiastically broke ground for their soon-to-be-built home. – Photos by Jackie Thorwick into the communities of its members. “This is just one of many examples of how Thrivent gives back to the community.” After the ceremony, the winners for the Habitat raffle were drawn. The grand prize winner of the 50/50 raffle was Connie Aronson, of Centuria. Other winners of gift certificates to the ReStore were Laura Ritten, Greg Friend-

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Members of the community who broke ground Saturday, May 5, for the Habitat home to be built in Centuria included from left, David Markert, president of the village of Centuria, Matt Bobick of Thrivent Financial, Eric Kube, executive director of Habitat for Humanity, and the Van Vleet family – Dakota, Brian, Kylie, Sierra in front of Denise, and Keith, Brian’s father.

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shuh, David Weiss and Marceil Rogers. Kube announced the first day of the build will be on Saturday, May 12. All those interested in helping to build the home are welcome, he said. Volunteers don’t have to be an expert at it. “And we’re also always looking for those who would like to make a lunch for the workers.” Workdays will be Thursdays and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. for about three months.

Kylie Van Vleet drew a name for a raffle winner after the ceremony, helped by Eric Kube and David Porter, Habitat board member, who recorded winning names.

Reforms reach $1 billion in savings MADISON - State Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, R-River Falls, lauded last week’s announcement that $1 billion in savings have been realized since the enactment of budget reforms last year. “Local governments and the state budget are seeing the positive results from our efforts to reform government and begin bringing spending in line with what taxpayers can afford,” said Harsdorf. “The efforts to restore fiscal sanity to Wisconsin are showing to be successful, including the balancing of the state budget, a reduction in borrowing, and the payment of unpaid bills left over from the prior administration and Legislature.” Entering this legislative session, the state Legislature faced a number of challenges including an over $3 billion budget deficit, reductions in federal funding for medical assistance and other programs, and outstanding debts owed by the state, including the illegal raid of $200 million from the Injured Patients and Families Compensation Fund. Harsdorf cited the work by the state Legislature and governor in balancing the budget, paying our state’s bills and reducing borrowing that has resulted in an improved credit outlook for Wisconsin. “The latest numbers on savings to state and local governments demonstrates the state Legislature’s commitment to limiting government spending and putting taxpayers first,” said Harsdorf. “Tough decisions were made to honestly balance the budget without accounting gimmicks or pushing debt off onto future generations.” As part of the $1 billion in savings, school districts from across the state that reported competitively bidding out health insurance plans saved $220 per student per year on average. Tools provided to local governments are also allowing for greater flexibility and innovation in compensating employees and providing services. - from the office of Sen. Harsdorf


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Nye bones/from page 1

Remains of 20 to 25 animals

Hawley said Hill and the ISU team have found that the collection contains the partial remains of a variety of between 20 to 25 animals, which is a smaller number than was collected at an Interstate Park excavation a few years prior to the Nye find. That dig yielded the remains of 44 animals. Hawley also said the Nye cache is quite a bit smaller than Eddy and Jenks first reported. “As I have mentioned before, there are far fewer bones in the collection than the 1,500 mentioned in the 1935 article, but we assume broken specimens were discarded or lost,” Hawley said. “Were the whole collection still extant, there might be a few more animals.” While they knew the collection contained many dozens of partial bones and fragments, the ISU study has done more in several months than was done in all the years

since the find. All along, one of the pressing questions has always been how and why the animals died at the Nye location. Hawley, Hill and others who embarked on the return expedition in 2010 believed the location was likely a lush feeding area millennia prior, when the animals roamed. Some of the early reports of the find speculated that it may have been a “kill site” for local natives of the time, but that theory is fading fast. “The cause of mortality for these animals is not clear, but apparently did not involve human hunting,” Hawley said. “None of the bones exhibits cut marks, impacts, etc., suggesting hunting and butchering. There are young, middle aged and old animals.” While the potential for Nye being a find of ancient native hunting grounds or an encampment may have been abandoned, the ISU analysis has a few new mysteries to be answered, including about some of the Nye animals teeth, which Hawley openly wondered about in his update: “Few of the Nye bones show anywhere near the damage to tooth enamel as was found in the Interstate Park bison site bones, though we do not really understand the implications of this yet,” Hawley said. “It may be that with radiocarbon dates, it will start to make sense, but we will have to wait and see.”

Dating of collection

Hawley said Hill has completed a detailed analysis of the entire collection and has sent off samples for radiocarbon dates. “We expect these almost anytime,” Hawley said. While they have pending results on an isotopic study of the teeth, “The expectations are low ... there are also concerns this may not yield much information,” he added. The fact that the bones have never been studied with a modern eye and equipment is also revealing a few foibles of the process and also shows information gaps aplenty. “The bones were collected in a more or less haphazard fashion, and we assume this accounts for some gaps in the age ranges of animals in the collection,” Hawley said. “The discontinuous nature of the age structure may make the isotopic study less complete and valuable.” He said the teeth are still with Hill at ISU, but are eventually bound for further analysis at the Illinois State Museum, where another scientist who has been involved in the procurement and analysis, Chris Widga, may take a shot at extracting more information, but Hawley is not sure it will reveal any more information and warned that further analysis might be fruitless.

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State historical society team coming

A team of people from the Wisconsin Historical Society is planning a trip up to Balsam Lake in the coming weeks to review a proposed exhibit for some of the find at the Polk County Museum, which promises to be a landmark event locally. “The studies have taken longer than expected, and we still do not have the dates to tell us how long ago these animals died,” he said, noting that he is drafting a short review of the Nye Bones Collection process, which includes the initial research, interviews and accidental connections that led to reacquiring the cache, subsequent study and eventual results once the radiocarbon data is finalized. That short article will appear in The Wisconsin Archaeologist, and with that publication, Hawley is hoping it may inspire further interest by other scientists and officials. “We intend to incorporate the data into our monograph on the Interstate Park bison site, too. We haven’t done much with the manuscript on this site of late, partly as we have been awaiting the return of Nye and now the radiocarbon dates,” Hawley said. “The bones have been studied more intensively in the past two to three months than in the past 75-80 years!” Hawley and others are also in the early stages of planning the Balsam Lake exhibit, which they hope will be a great addition to the museum later this summer. “It might be more interesting for many if it was a ‘kill/butchery’ site, but it is a very important site in what it can tell us about the region thousands of years ago, and that is definitely a story worth telling, too,” he said. While the mystery of the bones is slowly being solved, the background, science, details and even a few new queries makes the find even more intriguing.

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and reportedly included “mostly bison bones. “ Those early reports came forth in a field study by University of Minnesota scientists Samuel Eddy and Albert Ernest Jenks, who described the find in detail for a 1935 Science magazine article. The assemblage had since been held at the Bell Museum as part of the University of Minnesota collection until just a few months ago, when they were returned to Wisconsin for study and eventual display in the state, including in the Polk County Museum in Balsam Lake. The makeup and number of bones has never really been very clear, but an in-depth study commenced over the winter in Ames, Iowa, where noted Iowa State University anthropology professor Matthew G. Hill studied the collection. Hill was one of a handful of people involved in a 2010 expedition to the original Nye marl pit site, where they attempted to work with the landowner, local historians, Polk County Historical Society and state historical officials, as well as Native American representatives and other researchers to review the Nye spot, on exploring the original dig site and possibility of a renewed dig. While a new archaeological dig is unlikely at best, the cache of bones is turning out to answer quite a few questions already, according to Marlin F. Hawley of the Museum Archaeology Program at the Wisconsin Historical Society in Madison. Hawley has been instrumental in bringing the bones out of their Bell Museum dark storage and into the light. He has been working with Hill and other scientists and local officials to bring the bone collection back to Wisconsin. In an update received just last week, Hawley outlined some of the details that have emerged from ISU’s more detailed forensic study.

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PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Polk County circuit court

Burnett County circuit court Danielle S. Lowe, 23, Luck, operate while revoked, $500.00. Amanda K. Rogers, 24, Webster, battery, probation revoked, eight-month jail sentence, Huber release for treatment, $188.00; operate while revoked, probation revoked, six-month jail sentence concurrent with above, $100.00. Travis L. Simon, 22, St. Cloud, Minn., criminal damage to property, eight-year-six-month probation, submit DNA sample, no contact with victims, no contact with co-defendants, write letter of apology, restorative justice, restitution to be determined, alcohol assessment, $107.00; burglary, eight-year-six-month probation, one-year jail sentence, Huber release and community service granted, restitution to be determined, $125.00. Kyle M. Sletner, 25, Eau Claire, bail jumping, one-year probation, $243.00. Stephen J. Stevens, 29, Grantsburg, possession of marijuana, $330.50. David W. Tomberlin, 48, Siren, possession of marijuana, $330.50.

Domestic incident likely to lead to several charges Woman dragged through the mud and even worse by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer OSCEOLA – An argument is alleged to have turned ugly and violent in rural Osceola on Sunday, May 6, and is likely to lead to several domestic assault charges, according to a probable cause report issued this week by the Polk County Sheriff’s DepartZane Foeller ment. According to the incident report, a male and female couple that had been dating for about a year got into an argument early in the morning on May 6 in Osceola, and the woman said that she went to the man’s home, and he later became very upset with her after a guest left. She said he yelled at her and became violent, shoving her against a wall and ripping her shirt and bra off, leaving her without any clothes on her upper body.

The woman claimed the man, later identified as Zane Foeller, 20, took her car keys and cell phone so she could not leave or call police, and made her stay in a downstairs bedroom. She later asked to use the rest room, at which point she grabbed a jacket, slipping out a basement sliding door. That is when Foeller is alleged to have become even more violent, chasing her outside and pushing her face into the gravel, dragging her around the yard. The report then claims that Foeller urinated on the woman’s face, which she said went into her mouth. Then, Foeller’s stepmother told him to come inside the house and quit fighting, allowing the victim to get her car keys and cell phone to leave the scene. She reported the incident to police a short time later, and they noted severe bruising, injuries and that she smelled of urine and was caked in mud. Authorities went to Foeller‘s home a short time later, where they took him into custody without incident. Foeller said he had a few drinks but was not drunk, and he registered a .054 BAC, below the legal limit, but he is not of legal drinking age. He refused to comment to police on the incident and charges are pending, according to Polk County Sheriff Peter Johnson.

Daron S. Walter, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $200.50. Marilyn J. Wilcosky, Milltown, seat belt violation, $10.00. Andrew T. Yager, Clayton, fail/yield at uncontrolled intersection, $175.30.

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Brent E. Reynolds, 28, Hayward, hit and run, probation revoked, six-month jail sentence, obtain employment and set up payment schedule for restitution, $2,396.38. Michael J. Bambery, 17, Webster, obstructing an officer, $330.50. Derek S. Churchhill, 20, Webster, bail jumping, two-year probation, obtain GED, $243.00; operate without valid license, two-year probation, $100.00; theft of movable property, twoyear probation, restitution, $1,343.00. Sandra L. Davis, 47, Webster, disorderly conduct, $330.50; obstructing an officer, $330.50. Bradley J. Demars, 19, Sarona, possession of marijuana, $330.50. Renee K. Fischbach, 22, Inver Grove Heights, Minn., possession of marijuana, $330.50. William R. Hemming, 65, Danbury, OWI, $867.50, license revoked eight months. Adam K. Java, 24, Grantsburg, speeding, $200.50. Chad E. Leggett, 41, Luck, OWI, $1,802.00, three-year probation, sentence withheld, 90day jail sentence, Huber release granted, license revoked 27 months, alcohol assessment; operate while revoked, threeyear probation, sentence withheld, $100.00.

Timothy D. Swanson, Centuria, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, $175.30. Tammy D. Todd, Turtle Lake, speeding, $175.30. Cody L. Trealoff, Centuria, speeding, not guilty plea. Brady T. Turner, Centuria, speeding, $175.30.

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Ann M. Belisleb, 40, Cumberland, OWI, $691.50, license revoked six months, alcohol assessment. William M. Cahoon, 22, Medford, speedometer violations, $175.30. Hans W. Dahlberg, 19, Siren, seat belt violation, $263.50. Matthew C. Matrious, 23, Danbury, operate while revoked, two-year probation, sentence withheld, obtain GED, obtain valid license, alcohol assessment, $243.00; bail jumping, two-year probation, sentence withheld, $243.00; posess drug paraphernalia, two-year probation, sentence withheld, $243.00. Michael J. McCollough, 27, Hertel, bail jumping, probation revoked, eight-month jail sentence, Huber release and community service at the discretion of jail staff, $246.75. Ronald W. Morse, 45, Siren, OWI, $867.50, license revoked nine months. Allan J. Mosay, 21, Webster, disorderly conduct, two-year probation, obtain GED, alcohol assessment, $243.00; possess illegally obtained prescription, two-year probation, $243.00. Amy L. Nelson, 41, Prior Lake, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Heidi D. Nordahl, 40, Grantsburg, OWI, $691.50, license revoked six months, alcohol assessment.

Robin R. Parker, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Therese M. Parker, Balsam Lake, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, $175.30. Benjamin L. Perry, Hammond, operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Candace R. Phillips, Hudson, seat belt violation, $10.00. Nicholas C. Savage, Amery, operating while suspended, not guilty plea. Scott G. Schmid, Centuria, seat belt violation, $10.00. Cody S. Schostek, Luck, fail/attach snowmobile registration decal, $162.70. Brad G. Sloper, Milltown, seat belt violation, $10.00. Randi L. Smith, Oshkosh, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Seth R. Stolpman, Osceola, fail/stop at stop sign, $175.30; failure to notify police of accident, $263.50; inattentive driving, $187.90; operating motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50.

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Bryan C. Kuhl, Turtle Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Rachel L. Lefler, Cushing, speeding, $175.30. Daniel I. Livingston, Centuria, speeding, $175.30; operating while suspended, $200.50. Karen I. Livingston, Luck, operating while suspended, not guilty plea. Ryan S. Loeffler, Osceola, failure to notify police of accident, $263.50. Christine A. Mammenga, Osceola, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, not guilty plea. Andrew M. Matter, Hager City, speeding, $175.30. Michael L. Mattson, Balsam Lake, speeding, $114.50. Richard A. Matz, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Daniel S. McDonald, Hudson, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Justin L. Nelson, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Jack E. Neumann, Frederic, seat belt violation, $10.00.

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Elija A. Hayes, Siren, nonregistration of auto, $175.30. Tyler R. Hayes, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00; operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Jerry B. Hemauer, Clear Lake, operating while revoked, $200.50. Tyler J. Hollern, Clayton, seat belt violation, $10.00. Christopher D. Holmquist, Siren, seat belt violation, $10.00 times two; operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Julie B. Holmquist, Osceola, speeding, $175.30. Shane T. Holst, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Stephanie T. Hurtubise, Balsam Lake, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Authur E. Johnston, Duluth, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Shauna R. Jorgenson, Luck, speeding, $175.30. Terrence D. Klemish, St. Croix Falls, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, not guilty plea.

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715-349-2691

559700 27ap 38Lp

Sagal A. Abdirahman, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Jerrold R. Anderson, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $295.00. Zenryu D. Anderson, New Richmond, speeding, $175.30. Robert A. Behun, Centuria, nonregistration of auto, not guilty. Madeline J. Caroon, Osceola, speeding, not guilty plea. Andrew J. Case-Allan, Brooklyn Park, Minn., operating while suspended, $200.50. Adam D. Chenal, Frederic, fail/stop at stop sign, $175.30. Brandon R. Chenal, Frederic, texting while driving, $187.90. Kenneth R. Devries, Edina, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Shannon L. Dickinson, St. Croix Falls, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, seat belt violation, not guilty pleas. Joseph J. Fultz, Centuria, speeding, $200.50. Ryan D. Gosso, Milltown, seat violation, $10.00. Cassandra A. Hatella, New Richmond, speeding, $175.30.

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

U.S. GOVERNMENT FORECLOSURE SALE

FAMILY FARMERS ARE ENCOURAGED TO BID AT THIS SALE By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure, the United States Marshal will sell at public auction at the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, on the 23rd day of May 2012, at 11 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged property described as follows: That part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NENE) and the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE-NE), lying East of the town road as now laid out and traveled, Section Thirty-four, Township Thirty-six North of Range Sixteen West, (3436-16) AND Lot Two (2) of Certified Survey Map No. 5629 recorded in Volume 25 of Certified Survey Maps on page 106 as Document No. 746544, being part of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW-NW) and part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW-NW), Section Thirty-five, Township Thirtysix North of Range Sixteen West, (35-36-16) All in the Town of Bone Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin Property address: 2478 Round Lake Road, Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin Terms of Sale: U.S. Marshal must accept from the successful bidder at the sale, a deposit or down payment on the premises, a personal check with a Letter of Credit from a banking institution, or a cashier’s check, or a certified check, for a sum not less than ten percent (10%) of the purchase price. If court enters an order confirming sale, then within ten (10) days of date of entry of that order, the balance of successful bid price must be paid by cashier’s or certified check to the United States Marshal, Western District of Wisconsin. Subject to 1) accrued and accruing taxes, existing real estate tax liens, and other federal tax liens of record, 2) existing highways, recorded easements and recorded restrictions if any. The United States Government holds a security interest in this 106-acre farm as described above. The appraised value is $143,000. Contact FSA 559899 27-28a-e 38-39r,L at 715-537-5645 for further information.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

Notices/Employment opportunities

559463 WNAXLP

WILLIAM O’BRIEN STATE PARK, MARINE ON ST. CROIX

To Apply, Call Park - 651-433-0500 Deadline May 14, 2012

560147 38Lp

Seasonal Building/Grounds

1 Permanent, Part Time: $12.90/Hr./36 Hrs./Week May - October, Rotating Shift 1 Temporary: $12.90/Hr./32 Hrs./Week May - December, Rotating Shift

SIREN SCHOOL DISTRICT

COACHING POSITION AVAILABLE W/F/S/G/L/U/SCF Girls Varsity Hockey Coach for 2012 - 13 If interested, please contact

Ryan Karsten, Athletic Director Via e-mail: ad@siren.k12.wi.us Via Phone: 715-349-2277, Ext. 310 Via Mail: 24022 North 4th Ave., Siren, WI 54872 Applications will be taken until position is filled! 559622 37-39L

Plan Committee Meeting

Virgil Hansen, Clerk

559687 38L

NOTICE TOWN OF LUCK BOARD MEETING

Be happy… be inspired… be loved 203 Wisconsin Ave. N. Frederic, WI 54837

FULL-TIME LICENSED COSMETOLOGIST WANTED 715-327-5555

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Mon., May 14, 2012, 6:30 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall

The regular Monthly Village Board Meeting will be held on Monday, May 14, 2012, at 7 p.m., at the Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Agenda will be posted at the Village Hall. Kristi Swanson Clerk

Thurs., May 17, 7 p.m. Town Hall

TOWN OF LAKETOWN

Agenda: 1. Reading of the minutes 2. Treasurer’s Report 3. Review and pay bills 5. Patrolman’s report Any additional agenda will be posted in the Luck Town Hall and Clerk’s Office. 560073 38L Lloyd Nelson, Clerk

No burning is allowed from midnight until 6 p.m. from April 1 through June 1, 2012.

(Apr. 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16, 23) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. SHAWN L. BROWN and ALANA J. BROWN husband and wife and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendants. Case No.: 11-CV-656 Code No.: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 2, 2011, in the amount of $445,549.54, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 5, 2012, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW 1/4 of SE 1/4) of Section Seventeen (17), Township Thirty-two (32) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 348 State Road 65, Town of Alden. TAX KEY NO.: 002-00433-0000. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

BURNING RESTRICTION

Patsy Gustafson Town Clerk

559685 38L

(May 9, 16, 23) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY U.S. BANK, NA as Successor Trustee to Wachovia Bank, NA fka First Union National Bank as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2000-1 Plaintiff vs. BRIAN M. LAWRENCE, et al. Defendants Case No. 10 CV 239 Hon. Robert H. Rasmussen Br. 2 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 1, 2010, in the amount of $66,504.54, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the premises described below at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens, encumbrances and payment of applicable transfer taxes. PLACE: In the Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: The East 210 feet of the North 1,000 feet of the West 1/2 of the West 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4, Section 21, Township 36 North, Range 20 West. Said land being in the Town of Sterling, Polk County, WI. ADDRESS: 3340 Evergreen Ave., Grantsburg, WI 54840. TAX KEY NO: 046-01281-0000. Dated this 24th day of April, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Cummisford, Acevedo & Associates, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff Mark R. Cummisford State Bar # 1034906 6508 South 27th St., Suite #6 Oak Creek, WI 53154 414-761-1700 Cummisford, Acevedo & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information will be used for that purpose.

559979 WNAXLP

(May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, June 6) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, WI 54703, Plaintiff, vs. Daniel M. Walker 6517 Melrose Drive North Highlands, CA 95660, Judy K. Walker f/k/a Judy K. Richards 6517 Melrose Drive North Highlands, CA 95660, John Doe, Mary Roe, and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30304 Case No.: 12 CV 52 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment and Judgment entered and filed in the above-entitled action on April 18, 2012, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: June 21, 2012, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 2136, recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, page 59, Document No. 551188, located in the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 16, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wis. (“Property”). (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 1597 210th Street, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin.) Dated: April 25, 2012. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#16011

TOWN OF MILLTOWN 559686 38L

Robert W. Andrewson, Town of Daniels, and Kelly S. Sweo, Town of Daniels, issued April 25, 2012.

558269 WNAXLP

Burnett County marriages

NOTICE OF MEETING Village of Frederic

(April 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Central Bank, a Minnesota banking corporation 304 Cascade Street Osceola, Wisconsin 54020, Plaintiff, vs. Brenda G. Johnson, through her heirs, 806 Horse Lake Lane Dresser, Wisconsin 54009, Mona L. Smith 806 Horse Lake Lane Dresser, Wisconsin 54009, John Doe, Mary Roe and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30404 Case No. 12CV181 PUBLICATION SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO BRENDA G. JOHNSON, THROUGH HER HEIRS: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that Plaintiff, Central Bank, a Minnesota banking corporation, has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. WITHIN forty (40) days after April 25, 2012, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Amended Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Polk County Clerk of Court, Polk County Justice Center, whose address is 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810, and to Plaintiff’s attorneys, Anastasi & Associates, P.A., whose address is 14985 60th Street North, Stillwater, Minnesota 55082. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Amended Complaint within forty (40) days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Amended Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Amended Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or may in the future, and may also be enforced or garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: April 10, 2012. ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. Garth G. Gavenda, #1079588 David C. Anastasi, #1027144 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 Telephone: (651) 439-2951 Attorneys for Plaintiff #16049 558623 WNAXLP

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin www.townofstcroixfalls.org PLAN COMMISSION NOTICE OF HEARING MAY 10, 2012 The Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 10, 2012, at the Town Hall at 1305 200th Street & U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. At that time the applicant will inform the Commission of their request. (THE APPLICANT MUST APPEAR AT 7 P.M. WHEN THE COMMISSION CONVENES AT THE TOWN HALL.) Written evidence, testimony or comments, if any, must be delivered in person or by mail to the Town Hall. Brent and Sara McCurdy have applied to rezone a parcel of land and therefore have applied to amend the Town Zoning Map. The applicants are proposing the zoning change from Residential to Transitional. The parcel identification number is 044-00170-000. The property is located in Section 7, T. 34N., R.18W. The address of this parcel is 1636 River Road, St. Croix Falls. Brent and Sara McCurdy have applied for a Special Exception to allow farm animals on a parcel less than 5 acres in the Transitional District. The parcel identification number is 04400170-0000. The property is located in Section 7, T. 34N., R.18W. The address of this parcel is 1636 River Road, St. Croix Falls. The Special Exception hearing will only be held if their application for a rezone is recommended for approval by the Plan Commission. James Alt, Zoning Administrator 559609 37-38L WNAXLP

INVITATION FOR BIDS ON STATE LANDS TIMBER STUMPAGE

Sealed bids will be received by the Department of Natural Resources at the DNR Forestry Office, 941 Mallard Lane #104, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 on Thursday, June 7, 2012, at 1 p.m. A timber sale prospectus, bid forms, sample contracts and detailed information on each timber tract can be obtained by contacting the Department at the above address or by calling 715-485-3518. There are 7 tracts of timber for sale on state lands covering 346 acres in Polk county. Total volumes are as follows: Oak - 868 cords, Aspen - 1,434 cords, Mixed Hardwoods - 520 cords, Basswood - 40 cords, Red Pine - 358 cords, and Red Oak - 274.7 MBF, Basswood - 31.7 MBF, Mixed Hardwood - 22 MBF, and Sugar Maple - 29 MBF. Properties include: McKenzie Creek Wildlife Area, Straight Lake Wildlife Area, InterState Park and Osceola Fish Hatchery. Workers Compensation Insurance and Certification to the Wisconsin SFI Training Standard are required. The Department of Natural Resources reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Bids will be opened publicly at the Balsam Lake Forestry Office at 1 p.m., Thursday, June 7, 2012. 559980 38-39L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF BOARD OF REVIEW Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Laketown of Polk County, will be held on Tuesday, May 15, 2012, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Cushing Community Center. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection of appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirements and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board member and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at the estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the objector using the income method; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03(2a), that the Assessor requests. The municipality or county shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph and shall provide exemptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office by the order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wisconsin Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone.

560064 38L

WNAXLP

Respectfully submitted, Patsy Gustafson, Laketown Town Clerk


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Dated: April 11, 2012. ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. Garth G. Gavenda, #1079588 David C. Anastasi, #1027144 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 Telephone: 651-439-2951 Attorneys for Plaintiff #16110 558895 WNAXLP

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 21, 2011, in the amount of $131,996.61, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 30, 2012, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The NE 1/4 of NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 20-36-19, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2840 Wilson Ave., Town of Sterling. TAX KEY NO.: 046-00453-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT Public Health Nutritionist $22.81/hr. - $24.32/hr. DOQ Part time 30 hrs./week Deadline to apply: May 21, 2012 YOU MUST COMPLETE A POLK CO. EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For application, complete position requirements and details, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employment Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk Co. Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake or Golden Age Manor, 220 Scholl Ct., Amery or by calling 715560199 38L 485-9176. Please, no faxed applications. AA/EEOC

®

Convenience Store Manager Position Webster, Wis.

An excellent opportunity! Our well-established, reputable retail company has a rewarding opportunity available for an ambitious retail professional. This full-time position challenges you to handle overall Convenience Store Operations including but not limited to: Merchandising, bookkeeping, employee relations, ordering etc. Strong customer service/people skills are essential. Evenings and weekends a must. Applicants should have 2 - 4 years convenience store management background. Stop-a-Sec Inc. offers competitive wages, a benefit package, vacation pay and employee discounts. For immediate consideration, send your resume, including references and salary requirements in confidence to:

Stop-a-Sec Inc.

Attn.: Corporate Manager P.O. Box 560, Luck, WI 54853 • E.O.E.

559654 37-38L 27atfc

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK STATE OF WISCONSIN Town of Anderson Burnett County

Pursuant to s.70.45, Wis. stats., the Town of Anderson assessment roll for the year 2012 assessment will be open for examination on May 12, 2012, at the Town Hall from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Instructional material about the assessment, how to file an objection and Board of Review procedures under Wisconsin law will be available at that time. 559843 27a 38L Jessica King, Clerk

Patricia L. Morgan, 77, Luck, died April 21, 2012. James A. Hill, 75, Town of Lorain, died April 23, 2012. Roger A Berg Sr., 75, Osceola, died April 10, 2012. Donald D. Schrock, 74, Dresser, died April 17, 2012. Dorothy L. Jantzen, 90, St. Croix Falls, died April 19, 2012. Arlene I. Fink, 91, Frederic, died April 20, 2012. Hubert G. Anderson, 91, Luck, died April 21, 2012.

(May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff vs. JULIE HANSEN, et al. Defendant(s) Case No: 11 CV 419 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 17, 2011, in the amount of $106,141.60, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: The Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 36, Township 36 North of Range 18 West, except highway right of way described in Volume 284 Records, on Page 169, Document No. 322360, in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, Laketown Township in Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1868 250th Ave., Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 030-00903-0000. Dated this 23rd day of April, 2012. Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1778082

(Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON f/k/a THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-C, Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL G. ZABEL; and DARLENE K. ZABEL, his wife, Defendants. Case No. 11-CV-517 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of said Circuit Court in the above-entitled action which was entered on February 24, 2012, in the amount of $104,313.28, I shall expose for sale and sell at public auction in the Foyer of the Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 W. Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on the 29th day of May, 2012, at 10:00 a.m., the following described premises or so much thereof as may be sufficient as to raise the amount due to the plaintiff for principal, interest and costs, together with the disbursements of sale and solicitors’ fees, to-wit: Lot 14, Block 5, First Addition to the Village of Frederic, Polk County, Wisconsin. TAX KEY NUMBER: 12600153-0000. TERMS OF SALE: 10% down cash, money order or certified check. Balance due within ten days of confirmation of sale. This property is being sold as is and subject to all liens and encumbrances. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Velnetske Law Offices, LLC 10555 N. Port Washington Road Mequon, WI 53092 262-241-9339 The above property is located at 105 1st Avenue South, Frederic, Wisconsin. Velnetske Law Office, LLC, is a law firm representing a creditor in the collection of a debt owed to such creditor, and any such information obtained will be used for that purpose.

(Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. MATTHEW T. CARSTENBROCK, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 11 CV 2 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 31, 2011, in the amount of $199,175.68, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 22, 2012. at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 12, of the Plat of Rolling Hills First Addition, a “County Plat” being a division of Lot 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 4588 recorded in Volume 20 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 140, as Document No. 685791, located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 13, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, Garfield Township, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1881 98th Ave., Dresser, WI 54009. TAX KEY NO.: 024-01300-1200. Dated this 27th day of March, 2012 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 286380

Polk County

RESIDENTS OF TOWNS OF OAKLAND, SWISS AND UNION SPRING CLEANUP -- FREE DAY The Oakland Collection Center is accepting items at no charge for one day only on:

Saturday, May 19, 2012, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

James D. Neidermire, 25, Town of Farmington, died April 24, 2012. Lillian R. Nilssen, 84, Clear Lake, died April 24, 2012. Jeremy J. West, 35, St. Croix Falls, died April 26, 2012. Dean H. Dixon, 69, Amery, died April 27, 2012.

www.theleader.net Stay connected to your community. (May 9, 16, 23, 30, June 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CENTRAL BANK, f/k/a THE RIVERBANK Plaintiff, vs. PAUL R. GABERT, DEFENDANT. Case No. 11 CV 460 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on December 15, 2011, in the amount of $30,294.14, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Thursday, June 21, 2012, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: The West 417.4 feet of the South 417.4 feet of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4), Section Nine (9), Township Thirty-four (34) North, of Range Eighteen (18) West, Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 044-00238-0000. ADDRESS: 21XX 160th Ave. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 19th day of April, 2012. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson/#1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

POLK COUNTY HOUSING AUTHORITY Monthly Board Meeting Thursday, May 17, 2012, at 9 a.m. Shoreview Apartments, Balsam Lake

NO building materials of any kind, leaves or hazardous materials will be accepted. 560130 38-39L CURRENT OCC CARD REQUIRED TO DROP OFF ITEMS RESIDENTIAL ONLY – NO COMMERCIAL BUSINESSES

Agenda: I. Call to Order. II. Minutes. III. Financial Reports. IV. Operations Report. V. Unfinished Business. VI. New 559976 38L Business. VII. Adjourn.

NOTICE - VILLAGE OF SIREN RESIDENTS NOXIOUS WEED NOTICE

NOTICE OF HEARING

Notice is hereby given, to each and every person who owns, occupies or controls land in the Village of Siren, County of Burnett, State of Wisconsin, to destroy all noxious weeds: Canada Thistle, Leafy Spurge and Field Bindweed (Creeping Jenny). The term destroy means the complete killing of weed plants above the surface of the ground by the use of chemicals, cutting, tillage, cropping system, pasturing livestock or any or all of these in effective, combination, at a time and in a manner as will effectually prevent the weed plants from maturing to the bloom or flower stage as required by Wisconsin §66.0407. Ann L. Peterson, Clerk/Treasurer 559283 37-38L WNAXLP

On May 22, 2012, the Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing to consider the reclamation plan for the Olive Johnson proposed gravel pit. The property affected is: Part of the SW 1/4 of the SE 1/4, Section 35/T34N/R16W, Town of Apple River. The hearing will be held in accordance to Section 15.10 of the Polk County Nonmetallic Mining Ordinance. The public hearing will begin at 10:00 a.m. in the County Boardroom located in the Government Center in Balsam Lake, WI. The reclamation plan is open for review by the public in the Land & Water Resource Department. Should anyone have questions concerning the reclamation plan, please contact Peter DeJardin: 715-485-8630. 559371 27a,d 38L WNAXLP

559977 WNAXLP

PUBLICATION SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO KATHRYN L. JOHNSON, THROUGH HER HEIRS: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that Plaintiff, Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. WITHIN forty (40) days after April 25, 2012, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Polk County Clerk of Court, Polk County Justice Center, whose address is 1005 West Main Street, Suite 300, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810, and to Plaintiff’s attorneys, Anastasi & Associates, P.A., whose address is 14985 60th Street North, Stillwater, Minnesota 55082. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within forty (40) days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or may in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property.

Alice D. Kurtz, 79, Town of Eureka, died April 12, 2012. Sharon R. Ausing, 62, Turtle Lake, died April 14, 2012. Arthur L. Hadden, 95, Town of Laktown, died April 14, 2012.

Frieda B. Donley, 90, Taylors Falls, Minn., died April 15, 2012. Jerome W. Pierson, 76, Osceola, died April 15, 2012. Garrett V. Javner, 44, Clayton, died April 18, 2012. Wilbur W. Vanberg, 90, Town of Black Brook, died April 19, 2012. Rueben Aichele, 92, Amery, died April 20, 2012. Elizabeth K. Brown, 86, Town of Georgetown, died April 21, 2012.

Daniel B. Paquette, 28, Edina, Minn., died April 12, 2012. Gretchen A. Monty, 79, Siren, died April 14, 2012.

557267 WNAXLP

Case Type: 30404 Case No. 12CV213

Burnett County

WNAXLP

John Doe, Mary Roe and XYZ corporation, Defendants.

Burnett and Polk County deaths

557343

Kathryn L. Johnson, through her heirs 2212 75th Avenue Osceola, Wisconsin 54020,

Notices/Employment opportunities

559193 WNAXLP

Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703, Plaintiff, vs.

(Apr. 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. PATRICIA J. HANSON and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Patricia J. Hanson Defendants; and MIDLAND FUNDING, LLC, Added Defendant. Case No. 11-CV-522 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

557740 WNAXLP

(Apr. 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

SPRING SPORTS

INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

Pirates softball still perfect at 15-0

Grantsburg gets an Eagle challenge last Thursday

Extra Points

Grantsburg 7, Unity 0 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Grantsburg Pirates scored just seven runs in a win on the road against West Lakeland Conference foes Unity on Thursday, May 3, and while they won 7-0, the Eagles were as sharp as just about any team the formidable Pirates have faced all season. Pirate Macy Hanson started on the mound and gave up just one hit and one walk in the win, while striking out a veritable gaggle of Eagles - 12 in total. Brittany Thomfohrda had the lone Unity hit, but even then, no Eagle passed second base on the night. Pirate junior Kylie Pewe knocked out three hits in the leadoff spot and tested Unity starter Sierra Thomfohrda with every at bat, stretching the counts out long all night. Thomfohrda may have been tagged with the loss, but was able to keep the explosive Pirates in check like few others, leading to the lowest run total by the Grantsburg girls all season, stranding a dozen Pirates on base, which is also unusual. Unity was able to hold the Pirates within reach all night, and other than one explosive inning, the game was winnable for Unity, something few teams have been able to say since the latest Bush administration. Grantsburg stays undefeated at 15-0 overall, and stays on track to win the conference handily. Unity falls to 1-2 in West Lakeland play and 3-5 overall.

Grantsburg's Jenn Schwieger drags a Unity pitch down the third base line. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Grantsburg 22, Webster/Siren 0 Grantsburg 16, Webster/Siren 3 GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg softball team dominated Webster/Siren on Monday, May 7, during a doubleheader in Grantsburg. The Pirates combined for a total of 38 runs on 33 hits, with the first game of the evening showing 17 hits. Several players had multiple hit performances with Sam Schwieger going 4 for 4 with one RBI. Jenn Schwieger, Brooke Roufs and Wendy Roberts each had two hits, and Kylie Pewe went 3 for 4 with one RBI and scored four times in the game. Other hitters included Gabby Witzany, Nicole McKenzie, Kassie Lien and Hope Tucker. Witzany batted in three runs in the game, and Roufs and Jenn Schwieger each drove in a pair of runs. Sam Schwieger was the winning pitcher in the first game, allowing just one hit and two walks with five strikeouts. Alex

See Grantsburg/page 21

Unity shortstop Shauna Jorgenson takes off to try for a Pirate bloop hit, but comes up just a bit short.

••• LA CROSSE – The UW-La Crosse baseball team earned its first Wisconsin Intercollegiate Althletic Conference title since 1978 with a two-game sweep over UW-Whitewater in April. The team is set to host the WIAC Tournament this Friday and Saturday, May 11-12, and the Falcons drew the top seed. The top four teams will advance to a double-elimination tournament, and the tournament winner will receive an autoKevin Johnson matic bid into the NCAA Division 3 Championship. Grantsburg graduate and UW-La Crosse junior Kevin Johnson has been a huge part of the Falcons success this season. The starting pitcher has a 4-0 record and leads the team with a .95 ERA, in seven starts and 47 innings pitched. – Marty Seeger with press release ••• WHITEWATER – Former Frederic athlete Zach Anderson took first place in the decathlon for the UW-Stout track team during the WIAC Outdoor Track and Field Championships in UWWhitewater on Friday and Saturday, May 4-5. Former Webster athlete and UW-Stevens Point junior Brian Thill also competed in the decathlon and joined Anderson on the podium by takZach Anderson ing third overall. The decathlon consists of 10 events including the 100-meter dash, long jump, shot put, high jump, 400meter dash, 110meter hurdles, discus, pole vault, javelin and 1,500meter run. Thill took Brian Thill second in the 1,500meter run and first in the long jump, shot put and discus. Anderson took firsts in the 400-meter dash, 110-meter hurdles and placed third in the 100meter dash, long jump, discus and javelin. – Marty Seeger ••• LUCK – Luck senior Jesse Rennicke has been accepted to play on the Augsburg baseball team, and will begin workouts with the Auggies in the fall. Rennicke also received the Scholar Athelete Award from Luck, and will major in physics at Augsburg.

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t

“If you care enough for a result, you will most certainly attain it.” – William James 559991 38L

BMC: Your hometown healthcare champions. Right here. Right now. 24/7. Making a positive difference in our community since 1930.

www.burnettmedicalcenter.com


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Storm softball picks up first conference win

Late rally by Saints not enough Webster/Siren 9, St. Croix Falls 8 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer WEBSTER – The Webster/Siren Storm softball team picked up their first conference win of the season over St. Croix Falls on Thursday, May 3. The Storm pounded St. Croix Falls with 18 hits, including a two-run homer from Webster/Siren’s Sam Perius, which broke a 5-5 tie in the sixth inning. Webster/Siren added another triple by Stephanie Keith, as well as singles from

Jessica Strabel and Ashley Dietmeier, to give the Storm a 9-5 lead heading into the top of the seventh inning. The Saints made a run at the end, however, as Jessica Theroux led the top of the seventh off with a single, and Natalie Sempf hit a two-run homer. Despite one more run, the Saints seventh ended too soon and the Storm held on for the win. The game didn’t start smoothly for the Storm in the top of the first inning, as two errors led to two Saints runs, but Webster/Siren answered back in the bottom half of the inning. Perius had the hot bat from the start as she smacked a two-RBI double to center, which tied the game 2-2. The Saints regained the lead in the top of the second inning with the help of an RBI single from Sempf, but errors in the

Shortstop Jordan Johnson of St. Croix Falls flips the ball to third for an out against Webster/Siren. – Photos by Marty Seeger

Saints catcher Natalie Sempf tags out Webster/Siren's Sam Perius at home plate during a successful relay from left field Thursday, May 3.

third inning, and singles from Strabel and Dietmeier helped Webster/Siren tie the game at four runs apiece. In the bottom of the fourth inning, Perius pulled through with another rip to center field, and score a run to put Webster/Siren up 5-4. But the Saints tied it back up at 5 again in the top of the fifth inning. It wasn’t until Perius’ homer in the fifth, and four other hits from the Storm, that they were able to take the lead for good. Perius went 4 for 4 for the Storm with

five RBIs. Abigail Mitchell and Alex Holmstrom both went 2 for 5, Raelyn Tretsven was 1 for 4, Stephanie Keith was 2 for 3, Danielle Pardun, 1 for 3, Strabel, 2 for 4, Dietmeier, 3 for 4 , and Ellora Schaaf went 1 for 3. The Saints had nine hits total, with Sempf leading the team with a 2-for-4 performance with five RBIs. Theroux and Laura Peroceski also had two hits, and Jordy Johnson, Sasha Lundgren and Rebecca Thayer each had one hit.

Unity girls outlast L/F Unity 7, Luck/Frederic 5 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The Unity Eagles were able to keep the formidable Luck/Frederic girls in check on Monday, May 7, at Frederic in a conference match that proved very evenly matched, but went the Unity way, 7-5. L/F catcher Avery Steen was the batting star for the game, going 4-4 with three runs scored, but two other L/F players, Maria Miller and Abbie Otlo, managed two hits on the night against Unity starter Hailey Olson, who was sharp in her starting role and earned the win. L/F started ace Corissa Schmidt took the loss, although the L/F defense gave up a total of eight errors on the night. Unity’s Sarah Bader went 2-3 with a run scored, but it was centerfielder Carly Ince who drove in the big runs, tallying three RBI with a bases-clearing triple in the fourth inning that ended up being the difference maker. The contest was as close as just about any this season in the West Lakeland Conference, which has the Eagles and L/F in a battle for second place behind the stellar Grantsburg Pirates.

Luck/Frederic's Maria Miller rounds first base on a hit to right field, as the Eagles charge the ball. – Photos by Jenna Clemenson

Olivia Nelson of Unity waits patiently for the pitch as Luck/Frederic infielder Tessa Clemenson does the same.

Local track teams racing through the season Frederic/Luck track at Colfax COLFAX – The Frederic/Luck track team competed in Colfax Tuesday, May 8, with the boys taking eighth place out of 14 teams, and the Frederic/Luck girls taking 11th overall. Highlights for the boys included Waylon Buck placing sixth in the 800-meter run with a time of 2 minutes, 12.40 seconds. Buck was also part of the 4x400meter relay team that took fifth overall with a time of 3:58.40, along with Tim Lund, Tony Evans and Hunter Dodds. Frederic/Luck’s Jes Pedersen placed eighth in the 3,200-meter run with a time of 11:35.20, and Adam Chenal placed second in the long jump with a mark of 20

See Track/page 19

Unity, Grantsburg and Frederic/Luck athletes compete during a meet earlier in the season at Unity. Teams are getting prepared already for the conference track meet slated for Tuesday, May 15, in Frederic.


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Saints win easily over Siren/Webster

St. Croix Falls 13, Siren/Webster 2

players had experience at the varsity level at the beginning of the season, but after making some adjustments and gaining a little bit more varsity experience, the Saints seem to be turning things around at the right time. “Kids have figured out a lot. They’ve really kind of went back to the drawing board and realized they had to double down and focus,” Jacobson said. The team is also starting to hit the ball with more consistency, and those who might have been struggling a bit early on, have been coming on strong. With the playoffs looming in a couple of weeks, Jacobson is pleased with the progress so far. “Whoever gets us in the tournament, we’ll give them a game I’m sure. As long as we field the baseball, we’ll give them a game,” said Jacobson.

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The Saints baseball team outplayed Siren/Webster on Thursday, May 3, producing 13 runs on 10 hits. Andrew Erickson, Ben Clausen and Ethan Anderson each went 2 for 4 with Anderson and Clausen knocking in two runs apiece, while Erickson also recorded an RBI. The Saints scored five runs in the top of the first inning, and put up one run in both the second and third innings. They scored another six runs in the fifth to end with the conference win. Other hitters for the Saints included Ben Kopp, Trevor Cross, Michael Chernyaev, Jacob Jacobson, Taylor Woller and Kevin Fisk. Erickson and Jacobson both pitched in the game, with Erickson going four innings and allowing one run on three hits with six strikeouts and four walks. Jacobson pitched one inning and allowed two hits, no walks and one run. “The kids hit the ball pretty well, and we had some pretty solid pitching,” said Saints coach Brian Jacobson. No game stats were available from Siren/Webster at press time.

LEFT: Saints sophomore Ben Kopp slid home safely underneath Siren/Webster pitcher Shawn Stevens as Stevens leaped into the air to pull down a wild throw home. The Saints won easily 13-2. – Photos by Marty Seeger

St. Croix Falls 12, Flambeau 2 ST. CROIX FALLS – The Saints baseball team recorded a win over Flambeau on Monday, May 7, after a busy week of baseball that featured four games over a span of five days. Noah Casterton was the winning pitcher for the Saints, going four innings and allowing three hits, two runs with no walks and five strikeouts.

Siren/Webster pitcher Shawn Stevens eyes Saints base runner Michael Chernyaev back to first in a game at Webster.

The Saints produced 10 hits against the Falcons with Ben Kopp going 3 for 4 with four RBIs. Michael Chernyaev was 2 for 4 with one RBI, and Rob Heilig went 2 for 3 while knocking in two runs. Other hitters included Jacob Jacobson, Ethan Anderson and Andrew Erickson. St. Croix Falls scored one run in the second inning, four runs in the third and five runs in the fourth. They tacked on another two in the sixth, giving their pitching staff a nice cushion to work with. First-year head coach Brian Jacobson says he’s happy with the progress of his team, particularly the pitching. “They’ve pitched well enough to keep us in games,” Jacobson said, noting that the Saints have had quite a few games decided by a single run. “Minus a mistake here or there, or a big hit here or there, we could turn the season around or have had a couple of games turn out differently,” he said. The Saints have improved considerably since the beginning of the season, which in part, is due to their youth. Only a few

Saints junior Michael Chernyaev makes the catch against the Siren/Webster baseball team on Thursday, May 3.

Pirates take season sweep over Siren/Webster Seth Coy tosses four hitless innings Grantsburg 9, Siren/Webster 3 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Pirates and Siren/Webster baseball teams met for the second time in three days, and once again Grantsburg prevailed to earn the season sweep and remain unbeaten in the conference at 7-0. Seth Coy pitched a four-inning shutout with one strikeout and one walk in facing 12 batters. Brady Thompson finished the next three innings with five strikeouts, three walks, two hits and one earned run. The Pirates scored nine runs on 10 hits, but none of the hits came easy as Siren/Webster’s Evan Oachs pitched a tough game. “Oachs did a great job on the mound for S/W. He’s a tough competitor, and gave us fits at the plate,” said Pirates coach Pete Johnson. The Pirates hit the ball hard much of the night, when they did connect, and Nolan

Hanson, Lucas Willis and Bryce Ryan each had two hits in the game. “Lucas sent a couple to the warning track,” Johnson said. Joe Engelhart, Jacob Glover, Kyle Roberts and Coy had the other Pirate hits. Oachs had a total of nine strikeouts in the game with three walks, and Siren/Webster’s only two hits of the game came in a three-run sixth inning. Aaron Dietmeier led the inning off with a double and Shay Johnson singled. The Pirates had two errors in the inning, but by that time they already had a 9-0 lead. The Pirates scored one run in the first on an RBI double by Willis, and scored five more runs in the third, with Hanson hitting a double, Willis followed with a two-RBI triple and Roberts and Coy each singled in the inning. Engelhart and Ryan both hit RBI singles in a three-run fourth inning to help seal the Pirates seventh conference win of the season.

LEFT: Siren/Webster's Aaron Dietmeier slides home safely during the late innings at Grantsburg on Monday, May 7. – Photo by Marty Seeger


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Eagle golfers showing consistency

Conference golf tournament already on horizon by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer LEADER LAND – Area golfers competed at Siren National on Tuesday, May 1, with the Eagles taking the top spot once again with a score of 165, followed by Siren and Grantsburg with 185, St. Croix Falls, 188, Luck, 191, and Frederic, 293. Unity senior Ben Bengtson shot a personal best score of 40, and teammate Reed Sorensen was the medalist with a 37. Eagles coach Larry Stencil was excited to see Bengtson shoot a personal best, especially as the playoff tournaments are on the horizon. “We all know he has the ability and the passion to excel. He is starting to play his best golf at the right time,” said Stencil. Lars Thoreson led the Pirates with a 41, Luck’s Sam Nelson scored a 45, Alex Mikl shot a 45 for St. Croix Falls, Luke Bollant and Jake Swenson scored 42 for Siren, and Frederic’s Chris Hopp shot a 47 to lead the Vikings. Scott Miller Invite HAYWARD – Both Unity and Grantsburg competed at the Scott Miller Invitational in the Hayward/Cable area on Friday and Saturday, May 4-5. Eagles coach Larry Stencil said the invite is one of the premier competitions in the north, which starts at Hayward Golf and Tennis, followed by a Saturday invite at Telemark. There were 23 teams competing last week with schools such as Virginia, Northwestern, Superior, Hudson, Eau Claire North, New Richmond, Eau Claire Memorial, Duluth Denfeld and Unity taking the top spots. Unity was ninth overall. “The caliber of talent is really strong. We did not play our best on Friday at Hayward Golf and Tennis. We had visions of

The Unity Eagles continued their success over the past week, earning two first-place finishes at the local conference meets, and a ninth-place finish at the premier Scott Miller Invitational in Hayward. shooting low and it did not capitalize. We set two goals for Saturday at Telemark ... shoot lower than Friday and move up four places,” said Stencil. The Eagles accomplished both goals with Evan Lunda shooting a 75 on Saturday and 11th overall. Senior Erik Nelson shot a 79 on Saturday. Lunda’s two-day score led the team with 158. Reed Sorensen shot a 162, Erik Nelson, 177, Ben Bengtson, 187, and Jake Engebretson, 190.

A Luck Cardinal golfer eyes up the green at an earlier golf invite this season.

The Pirates finished 20th overall, with Jake Langevin, Lars Thoreson, and Drew Alderman shooting totals of 183. Sean Handy finished with a 218.

Eagles host conference meet LUCK – The Eagles golf team hosted a conference meet on Monday, May 7, and finished with what coach Larry Stencil called their first full-team effort of the sea-

son. “Our five golfers placed in the top six individually,” said Stencil. Evan Lunda was the medalist with a 1over-par score of 37, followed by Reed Sorensen with a 39. “Evan had a couple of birdies and a couple of bogeys which made for a consistent round. His play is developing a consistency that he did not have last year. The time he has put in during the off-season is starting to really pay off,” said Stencil. Siren’s Luke Bollant came in third place with a score of 40, followed by Unity’s Erik Nelson and Jake Engebretson each with 43. Ben Bengtson took the sixth spot with a score of 44. “Teamwise, we talk so much about having consistency from match to match and developing a strong four and five player. With conference next Thursday and the tournament trial in a couple of weeks, we will keep working to achieve our goals,” Stencil said. The team scores showed Unity in first with a 162, followed by Grantsburg, 192; Siren, 202; Luck, 213; St. Croix Falls, 222; and Frederic with a 112. Frederic had three golfers competing, with Chris Hopp leading with a 46, followed by David Lindberg, 66, and Charlie Lindberg, 74. Siren was led by Bollant, followed by Jarod Emery, 52; Jake Swenson, 53; Justin Decorah, 57; and Jade Merrill, 60. Grantsburg’s Jake Langevin shot a 46, Chandler Witzany, 48, and Ben Davis, Lars Thoreson and Drew Alderman shot a 49. The Saints were led by Alex Mikl with a 50; Manny Beaver, 51; Kyle Chapman, 55; Brett Johnson, 66; and Levi Ward, 72. Luck’s Jordan Bazey finished with a teamleading 46, Brendan Fenning, 50; Tanner Nielsen, 58; Sam Nelson, 59; and Luke Christensen, 61. Golfers will compete at various events over the next week but will be preparing for the conference golf tournament on Thursday, May 17, at Turtleback Golf Course in Rice Lake.

Area golfers aren't all that far away from the conference championship meet, which takes place at Turtleback Golf Course on Thursday, May 17. – File photos by Marty Seeger

Siren golfers post success in home invite Play best round of the season by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer SIREN – The Siren boys golf team had a successful outing at their home invite on Tuesday, May 8, posting a season-best

score of 164 and coming in second place behind Unity with a score of 152. “We had a nice night for golf,” said Siren coach Brian Webster. “The team shot very well, led by Justin Decorah with a 2 over 37. Hopefully, this will continue.” Siren’s Luke Bollant shot a 39, followed by a 41 from Jake Swenson, Jade Merrill’s 47, and a 48 from Jared Emery. Unity’s Evan Lunda continued his con-

sistency with a team-best score of 35, followed by Reed Sorensen with 37. Ben Bengtson shot a 39, Jake Engebretson, 41, and Erik Nelson, 45. Grantsburg came in second place with a score of 177. Jake Langevin shot a 42, Ben Davis, 44, Lars Thoreson, 46, and Chandler Witzany, 50. St. Croix Falls scored a 182, with Kyle Chapman and Manny Beaver leading

with scores of 45, followed by Alex Mikl and Brett Johnson both with 46 and Grant Simpson shooting a 53. Luck’s Jordan Bazey shot a 46, Brendan Fenning, 47; Sam Nelson, 50; Casey Ekholm, 57; and Tanner Nielsen, 62. Chris Hopp led Frederic with a 48, Charlie Lindberg shot a 65 and David Lindberg posted a score of 74.


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Saints girls set school records

Tiger girls also break school records in Amery by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer AMERY – St. Croix Falls senior Sydney Geisness set a new school record in the triple jump on Tuesday, May 1, at a track meet held at St. Croix Central with a leap of 33 feet, 1.5 inches. She broke a record set earlier by Annie Carroll in the early ‘90s. Just a few days later in Amery on Thursday, May 3, St. Croix Falls sophomore Matti Gerlach broke the school record in the 200-meter dash, running a time of 27.06 seconds. The school record was previously set by Annie Langer in the early ‘80s. Gerlach is coming off a knee injury which required surgery for a torn ACL. Along with rehabilitation on the knee, Gerlach had to have a secondary knee surgery last year, according to coach Steph Belisle. “It is pretty exciting to return to the track and break this record! For both of these young ladies, breaking records, which have obviously stood the test of time, is quite a feat! Additionally, all of our young ladies are performing well and showing continual improvement. I am looking forward to the conference meet in a week from Tuesday, May 8, with high hopes for how they will perform at that time,” Belisle said. Highlights from the Saints meet in Amery last week included a fifth-place finish for Erica Bergmann in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:32.68. Sarah Petznick finished fourth in the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 18.04 seconds. The girls 4x400-meter relay team took fifth overall, while the 4x800-meter relay team was fourth overall.

Track/continued feet, 6 inches. Ian Lexen was seventh in the triple jump with a mark of 37-03. Eric Chenal was fourth in the shot put with a throw of 41-10.50, and Evan Armour was sixth in the shot with a toss of 40-02.50. In the girls events, Jackie LaDuke placed eighth in the 200-meter dash with a time of 29 seconds. Leah Engebretson took seventh in the 400-meter dash with a 1:06.20, and she took fifth in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:37.10. Engebretson also competed in the 1,600 with a time of 5:41.30 and a second-place finish. Emily Wells landed an eighth-place finish in the shot put with a mark of 28-02, and Julia Owens was ninth in the shot put with a throw of 27.00.

Sydney Geisness

Matti Gerlach

Haley Tiberg of St. Croix Falls finished second in the high jump with a leap of 410.00. Samantha Jorgenson was second in the pole vault with a mark of 8 feet. Geisness also took fifth in the discus with a throw of 100-04. For the boys, Mark Wampfler placed fourth in the 400-meter dash with a time of 55.37 seconds. Ryan Nussbaum was fifth in the 800-meter run with a time of 2:07.63. Henry Klein was third in the 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:46.09, and was also fifth in the 3,200 with a time of 10:26.77. The Saints 4x400-meter relay team took first overall with a time of 3:35.56. They also placed first in the 4x800meter relay with a time of 8:29.07. Cody Zelinski placed third in the triple jump with a leap of 40-01.75.

meter relay team set a school record with a time of 1:51.92. Teammates include Melissa Gustavson, Angel Christianson, Kelsey Sheffler and Ashley Irvine. The previous record was held by Gustavson, Christianson, Shaina Pardun and Kendra Spurgeon. Another school record was set in the 200-meter dash by Gustavson with a time of 25.74 seconds. The previous record was set 10 years ago by Amanda Hansen. “The coaching staff is very excited for her achieving that goal and know how hard she has worked this past year ... nice to see it pay off,” said Tigers coach Roy Ward. Other highlights included Kally Schiller, who placed fifth in the 1,600-meter run with a 5:47, as well as third in the 3,200 with a 12:28. Schiller has been battling injury as of late, but Ward is hopeful she’ll be full strength by the time the conference meet arrives in Frederic on Tuesday, May 15. Tami Quatmann tied for fifth in the 100-meter high hurdles with a time of

Webster girls break records AMERY – The Webster girls track team continued to improve at a meet in Amery on Thursday, May 3, and even broke two school records in the process. The 4x200-

18.40 seconds, and Sheffler was third in the 300 low hurdles with 51.7 seconds. The 4x100-meter relay team consisting of Gustavson, Christianson, Irvine and Christina Weis took third with a time of 53.04 seconds. The girls 4x400 relay team placed third as well with a time of 4:28.9. Making up that team are Sheffler, Irvine, Quatmann and Weis. Chelsea Larson took third in the shot put with a throw of 34-05 and was fourth in discus with 100-07. For the boys, Joey Erickson was first in 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:29.69, and second in the 3,200 with a time of 10:07.95. “Joey ran a great 1,600 and continues to set impressive goals and push himself. I like how he ran the 4x800 for the team and is willing to do whatever the coaches ask,” said Ward. Aaron Clay took first in the high jump with a mark of 5-08. The boys 4x400-meter relay team including Cullan Hopkins, Taylor Heinz, Cody Isaacson and Aaron Clay took fifth with a time of 3:48.19. The boys 4x800-relay team with Clay, Andrew Schrooten, Erickson and Isaacson took third with a time of 8:54. Isaacson also placed fifth in the long jump with a mark of 18-9.25.

Grantsburg competes at Amery AMERY – Grantsburg’s Brendan Kutz finished sixth in the 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:51.14, and Jacob Ohnstad was seventh with a time of 4:51.98. Ohnstad came in third in the 3,200 with a time of 10:17.10, and Erland Olson was sixth in the 3,200 with a time of 11:00.46. Grantsburg’s 4x100-meter relay team was fourth overall with a time of 50.02, and took fifth in the 4x200-meter relay with a 1:46.73. Adam Parker placed third in the shot put with a mark of 43-08.50, and he took fifth in the discus with a 12005.

Rice Lake Invitational RICE LAKE – Three area track teams participated at the Rice Lake Invitational on Tuesday, May 8, with the Webster girls taking third overall, followed by the Unity girls in ninth and Grantsburg in 11th out of 12 teams. Girls highlights include Unity’s Kayla Bramson taking fourth in the 100-meter hurdles with a time of 18 seconds. Ashley Irvine of Webster took second in the 100meter dash with a time of 13.51. Kally Schiller placed third in the 1,600-meter run and the 3,200-meter run with times of 5:44.22, and 12:25.68 respectively. The Webster girls 4x200-meter relay team took second with a time of 1:57.77, and the 4x100-meter relay team finished third with a 54.07. Kathryn Segner of Grantsburg finished

Webster and Frederic/Luck relay teams compete together at a recent meet.

Area track teams have been finding their groove at several different schools over the past week. Unity was in Rice Lake on Tuesday, May 8, and St. Croix Falls was in Amery last Thursday, May 3.

seventh overall in the 800-meter run. Webster’s Melissa Gustavson finished first in the 200-meter dash with a time of 26.87. Taylor Byers of Grantsburg took seventh in the 200-meter dash with 29.17 seconds. Unity’s Ashley Johnson was fifth overall in the high jump with a jump of 4-06, and she took first overall in the long jump with a leap of 15-08.50. Teammate Ashley Irvine finished fifth in the long jump with a mark of 14-04.50. Webster’s Emilie Pope took fourth in the pole vault with a mark of 7 feet, and Unity’s Danielle Mares and Jenna Christensen took fifth and sixth in the triple jump with marks of 30-02.75, and 29-00.50 respectively. Webster’s Chelsea Larson was second in the discus with a throw of 98-06, and Kourtney Collins of Unity took fourth with a throw of 88-02. Larson also took second in the shot put with a throw of 3308.75, and Unity’s Emily Gross took third in shot put with a throw of 33-08.50. The Webster boys track team took sixth overall followed by Unity in ninth, and Grantsburg in 10th place. Unity’s Xavier Foeller took second in the 110-meter hur-

dles with a time of 15.74. He also took fifth in the 300-meter hurdles with a time of 44.39 seconds. Joey Erickson of Webster took first in the 1,600-meter run with a time of 4:32.41. He also took first in the 3,200-meter run with a time of 10:13.18. Grantsburg’s Brendan Kutz took fourth and teammate Jacob Ohnstad took fifth with times of 4:43.17, and 4:44.10 respectively. In the 800-meter run, Ohnstad took fourth with a time of 2:11.74, and Kutz was fifth with a 2:11.77. Webster’s Aaron Clay took second in the high jump with a mark of 5-08, and teammate Taylor Heinz was fourth in the high jump with a mark of 5-06. Colton Sorensen finished first in the pole vault with a mark of 13 feet, smashing the nearest competitor by nearly 3 feet. Teammate Justin Bradley finished fourth with a mark of 10-06, and Webster’s Jess Peterson finished with a mark of 10-06 as well, along with teammate Austin Bork. Grantsburg’s Adam Parker took second overall in the discus throw with a distance of 117-01, and he also took third in the shot put with a throw of 43-00.


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Luck/Frederic survives late Saints rally

Tiebreaker comes in bottom of the seventh for walk-off winner Luck/Frederic 7, St. Croix Falls 6

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – Luck/Frederic pulled away with a home conference victory over St. Croix Falls on Friday, May 4, in a walk-off single from Dylan LeMay. Luck/Frederic was backed by a solid effort from junior pitcher Brodie Kunze, who went 6-2/3 innings with 11 strikeouts and just three walks. “This game was a fun one to be a part of. It was great to see Brodie Kunze throw the baseball real well, said Luck/Frederic coach Ryan Humpal. L/F appeared to have a lock on a game win late in the top of the seventh inning, with two outs and nobody on base. But two walks later and a two-RBI double by Ben Kopp quickly tied the game. Fortunately for Luck/Frederic, they were able to hold off the Saints from scoring another run on a throwing error to first base. Kopp

Brodie Kunze of Luck/Frederic hustles to first in a game he also pitched. Kunze went 6-2/3innings with 11 strikeouts and three walks. – Photo by Marty Seeger tried to score but was tagged out at home. Luck/Frederic’s Ray Kurkowski managed to walk in their first at bat in the bottom of the seventh, and Karsten Peterson moved the runner on a sacrifice bunt. Peterson was later tagged out on an attempt

to steal third, but Luck/Frederic put two more on base with a walk drawn by Jake Schrock, and Trent Strapon getting hit by a pitch. LeMay came through on two outs with the RBI single to score Schrock for the walk-off winner.

“It was great to see our guys believe in themselves at the plate to come up big ... before the inning I told them, ‘nothing is better than winning on a walk-off at home.’ That is what we did,” said Humpal. “Overall a full team effort, six different guys in the lineup scored with five guys coming up with a hit on the night. It was a great to see.” The Saints had a 1-0 lead to start the game on an RBI single from Andrew Erickson, but Luck/Frederic stormed back quickly off a LeMay single in the first, followed by a one-out walk by Jesse Rennicke. Ben Kufalk then belted a three-run homer over the wall in right center field. Jacob Jacobson hit an RBI single in the second inning to bring the Saints to within one run, but Kunze pitched solid through the next three innings. Luck/Frederic pulled ahead 6-2 in the bottom of the fifth with three more runs. The Saints had two errors in the inning and three passed balls, but scored twice in the sixth off a double from Nick DeConcini and singles from Kopp and Jacobson. Unfortunately, the Saints rally fell just short in the bottom of the seventh. “It was a tough loss,” said Saints coach Brian Jacobson. “Both teams deserved to win that game.”

Eagle boys beat Luck/Frederic Unity 10, Luck/Frederic 3 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer LUCK – The Unity Eagle boys used a pair of three-run innings to slip past the Luck/Frederic squad on the road at Luck on Monday, May 7, winning 10-3 in the West Lakeland Conference match that was anyone’s game until the later innings. The game was scoreless until the top of the second, when the Eagles used a few solid hits, stolen bases and L/F errors to score three runs. The L/F boys threatened Unity starter Nate Despiegelaere, who earned the win after going seven innings and giving up just five hits and striking out 10. L/F starter Ben Kufalk pitched strong, but had a few odd errors and miscues that plagued him on the scoreboard, including a bizarre balk that scored a run after he dropped the ball while standing on the rubber.

Grantsburg 10, Unity 2 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The Grantsburg Pirate boys were able to keep the Unity Eagles in check at their home field on May 3, winning 10-2 in the West Conference match, and giving the Pirates a solid lead in conference play that may be hard for any team to overcome. Nolan Hanson started on the mound for the Pirates and earned the win, while the Eagles threw Jacob “Bucky” Ruck to start. The contest was anyone’s game until the later innings, when the Pirates exploded for seven runs in the last two innings to seal the win. “When we play Unity, no lead is comfortable,” stated Pirate head coach Pete Johnson. “They always make me nervous.” Unity had a few bright spots, including a solo Mitch Egge home run in the third inning, but the bats had a tough time with Hanson all night, while the bottom of the Pirate order was on fire. “Our seven, eight and nine hitters combined to belt eight hits in 11 at-bats!” Johnson said, noting the play of Bryce Ryan, Jake Wald and Brady Thompson. Unity could not come back from the late inning explosion, and the Pirates held off on any outstanding errors to earn the conference win, which brings them to 7-0 in

“It was one of those nights where we could not do anything right. Ground balls were escaping us by an inch, and our boys got frustrated,” L/F head coach Ryan Humpal said. “Despite giving up 10 runs, our pitchers threw the baseball pretty well. They gave us a shot to win, but that is baseball and you always do not come out on the better side of the scoreboard.” L/F third baseman Jesse Rennicke went 3-4, including a solid double in the third inning that gave the L/F boys a shot at getting back in the game, but the Unity lineup was solid across the board, with every starter getting on base. Catcher Brady Turner scored three runs and went 2-3 with a pair of singles in the win. Unity improved to 3-3 in conference play and 6-7 overall. L/F fell to 3-4 in West Lakeland Conference play and 4-8 overall.

Luck/Frederic's Ray Kurkowski, No. 3, slides headfirst into second ahead of a tag by Unity's Justin Mooney. – Photo by Greg Marsten

Pirate boys clip Eagles

Grantsburg's Brady Thompson, No. 11 tries to bust up a Unity double play. – Photo by Greg Marsten West Lakeland play, and 15-1 overall. Unity stays in second place in the West Lakeland with a 3-3 record in conference and 6-7 overall.

Grantsburg 13, Bruce 3 GRANTSBURG – The Pirates baseball team handed Bruce only their second loss of the season on Tuesday, May 8, in Grantsburg. The Red Raiders are currently ranked ninth in the state among Division

4 teams and Grantsburg currently ranks eighth among teams in Division 3. “This was a big game,” said Pirates coach Pete Johnson. “Bruce baseball is top-notch every year.” The Pirates opened the game with Nolan Hanson on the mound, and the Red Raiders jumped on the board early with two runs on two singles in the top of the first. Bruce took a 3-0 lead in the top of the second inning off an RBI single, but the Pi-

rates responded in a big way in the bottom of the second inning, scoring nine runs on just one hit. Grantsburg walked six times in the inning with Joe Engelhart, Brandon Ryan and Hanson walking in runs, and Lucas Willis driving a run home on an RBI single. Jake Wald hit a sacrifice fly to centerfield to help drive in another run for the Pirates, and Bryce Ryan also had a two-RBI single to add to an already commanding lead. “It was a screwy game with the rain delay in the second. Bruce pitchers had to throw in tough conditions,” said Johnson. Willis drove in two more Pirate runs on a hit to the gap in left-center in the bottom of the third inning, stretching the Pirates to an 11-3 lead and eventual win. Hanson left the game in the fourth inning allowing just three hits with five strikeouts and three walks. Willis pitched the final two innings, allowing no hits with three strikeouts and no walks. The Pirates had six hits in the game and Willis led the team at the plate going 2 for 2 with three RBIs. But it wasn’t the hitting stats, or pitching stats that impressed Johnson. “Zero strikeouts is my favorite stat of the night. We had 13 batters with two strikes on them, and no strikeouts,” said Johnson. The Pirates moved to a 15-1 record on the season and remain perfect in the conference at 7-0.


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Grantsburg/continued Holmstrom had Webster/Siren’s lone hit in the game, a double in the third inning. Game two of the evening was much the same for both teams, with the Pirates scoring 16 runs on 15 hits. Witzany smacked her fifth home run of the season during a three-run second inning to help put the Pirates on top 7-0. They continued their hitting prowess with Harlei Henessey going 4 for 5 in the leadoff spot with two RBIs. She scored four times in the game. Nicole McKenzie also had a 4-for-5 performance, with two RBIs, and two doubles. Katie Miller also had a solid performance in game two, going 2 for 2 with a double off the fence in left field. Ellie Corbin, Jenn Schwieger, Grace Corbin and Christina Moore also each had a hit in the game. The winning pitcher was Grace Corbin, who allowed one run on six hits with three strikeouts. Holmstrom was 3 for 3 in the game for Webster/Siren, and Sam Perius went 2 for 3 with three RBIs. Raelyn Tretsven also had a hit for the Storm. – Marty Seeger

Grantsburg 17, New Richmond 0 NEW RICHMOND – The Pirates softball team battled their way to another victory over New Richmond during a

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nonconference game on Friday, May 4, belting out 16 hits and scoring 17 runs in the process. Sam Schwieger had a huge day at the plate going 3 for 4 with a walk, including

two home runs with four RBIs. Kylie Pewe also went 3 for 4 in the leadoff spot with one RBI. Nicole McKenzie, Macy Hanson, Kassie Lien and Jenn Schweiger each had two hits in the game. Christina Moore and Stacey McKenzie each had hits in the game, and Hanson pitched a perfect

P O R T S game over three innings despite an illness. Hanson retired the first nine batters in order with five strikeouts, allowing no hits, and no walks. Sam Schweiger pitched the final two innings allowing two hits with no walks. – Marty Seeger

Grantsburg’s Christina Moore stretches for the ball at first base as Storm player Alex Holmstrom hustles to first.

SCVR set to give 2012 a thunderous start CENTURIA – Eager to begin their first full summer of racing, officials at the remodeled St. Croix Valley Raceway are toiling away in preparation for their first racing event of the season this Friday, May 11. It’s been a tremendously busy off-season for the quarter-mile speed plant just southwest of Centuria. Fans who haven’t visited the track for several years may be surprised at the makeover. Extensive track work is nearing completion, featuring a completely redone infield and a new catch fence. Concessions for the main grandstand and the pit area have been revamped as well. With all the changes, the on-track action that has excited fans and racers for decades promises to be even better also. SCVR is kicking off the season with “Thunder in the Valley,” a UMSS winged sprint car special. This will be the first of five scheduled appearances for the winged cars at the raceway. Joining the winged sprinters will be the track’s regular classes of future fours, pure stocks,

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WISSOTA Midwest modifieds and UMSS traditional sprints and micro sprints. With three of their first four events falling to rain, defending UMSS champion Jerry Richert Jr. and the rest of the sprinter pilots are eagerly awaiting their chance to sling clay on the reshaped bullring. Track officials are also expecting a population explosion in the traditional sprint ranks. With a handful of cars competing last summer in the first year for the nonwinged class, the total number of wingless teams may climb to as high as 20 for the division’s sophomore season. WISSOTA sanctioning is back at the facility for the first time in three years in the form of the Midwest modifieds and fans of the fenders need not feel left out, with the future fours and pure stocks also set to attack the quarter-mile race track. Admission prices, including family rates, and more details about this event can be found on the track’s Web site, www.scvraceway.com, or on their Facebook page. – submitted

Grantsburg softball players collided on a short fly to centerfield. Nobody was injured, and Kylie Pewe, (far right) managed to hold onto the ball. – Photos by Marty Seeger

Mixed doubles bowling champs

The McKenzie Lanes Saturday night mixed doubles team celebrated a championship for the 2011-12 bowling season. Pictured are (L to R): Cory Cowell, Nicole Schmid, Lana McKenzie and Darren McKenzie. – Photo submitted

Youth wrestlers have success at state wrestling tourney

Luke Clark and Clay Carney from St. Croix Falls Middle School, attended Wisconsin State Freestyle and Greco Wrestling Tournament Saturday and Sunday, May 5-6, in Wisconsin Dells. Clay wrestled schoolboy and placed sixth overall in freestyle but did not place in Greco. Luke wrestled novice and took first place in both freestyle and Greco. Clay is pictured at the far left. – Photos submitted

Luke Clark (left) and Clay Carney from St. Croix Falls Middle School attended Wisconsin State Freestyle and Greco Wrestling Tournament last weekend.


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Frederic USBC bowling banquet at Hacker’s Lanes FREDERIC – The 2011-2012 bowling season has come to a close at Hacker’s Lanes with the Frederic USBC Bowling Association holding its annual spring banquet Thursday, May 3. Bowlers were recognized for high games, series, averages and for winning the end-of-the-year tournaments. Several leagues handed out trophies for their league winners as well. Merit award certificates from USBC headquarters will be issued to the following bowlers for the highest games, series and averages for men and women members of the Frederic USBC Bowling Association. Ed Bitler, Siren, high average, 213, and Don McKinney, Frederic, high series, 787. There is no men merit award for high game this year because Ed Bitler rolled a 300 game and received a 300 ring instead of a merit award. For women, Kelsey Bazey, Luck, had high average, 191, high series, 663, and Karen Carlson, Frederic, high game, 269. Youth high games were Kyle Hunter, Luck, 276, and Avery Steen, Luck, 222, high series Kyle Hunter, 658, and Corissa Schmidt, Frederic, 586, and high average Kyler Hunter, 185, and Corissa Schmidt, 166. National award of 11 strikes in a row this year was given to Josh Bazey, Luck, with a 290 game. On the tournament side, Frederic USBC annual championship winners in team events were A-1 Machine, Frederic, fiveperson team John Ellefson, Lyle Doolittle, Dale Johnson, Brad Schmidt and Jason Richter; and Wikstrom Construction, Siren, three-person team Bruce Wikstrom,

Cummings Lumber were the Wednesday Night league champions at the USBC bowling banquet held at Hacker’s Lanes on Thursday, May 3. Pictured are Don Swanson, Jim Murphy, Gene Hansen, Chuck Kruse and Jerry Richter. Not pictured is Jeff Cummings. Mike Sulliavan and Jim Wikstrom. Gene Ackland and Roger Tollander, Webster, doubles; A.J. Peterson, Frederic, singles; and Gene Ackland, all events. Women City Tournament team event winners were SKM, St. Croix Falls, Gail Linke, Melinda Linke, Lori Linke and Mona Renfroe; Sheila Hansen and Linda Richter, Frederic, doubles; Cindy Denn, Frederic, singles; and Gail Linke, St. Croix Falls, all events.

Champions of the annual 600 series and women’s 500 series tournaments were Ed Bitler and Linda Richter with Brett Daeffler, Frederic, winning the 700 series tournament. The champions of the annual team Tournament of Champions was Red Iron Studios, Frederic, Ed Bitler, Mike Route, Gilbert Meyer, Don McKinney and Mark Bohn.

Lauren Domagala was the recipient of the annual Adult Team Sponsor Scholarship. Scholarship winners from the youth scholarship tournament were Kyle Hunter, Luck; Josh Underwood, Frederic; Chris Hopp, Frederic; Avery Steen, Luck; and Jordan Bazey, Luck. The adult team sponsor scholarship given from the Frederic USBC Bowling Association was awarded to Lauren Domagala of Frederic. In all, the Frederic USBC Bowling Association awarded these youth bowlers a total of $1,120 in scholarships. - submitted

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL Team Grantsburg Unity St. Croix Falls Luck/Frederic Siren/Webster

Standings

SOFTBALL Conf. 7-0 3-3 3-3 3-4 1-7

Scores Thursday, May 3 St. Croix Falls 13, Siren/Webster 2 Grantsburg 10, Unity 2 Friday, May 4 Luck/Frederic 7, St. Croix Falls 6 Grantsburg 12, Siren/Webster 1 Monday, May 7 Grantsburg 9, Siren/Webster 3 Unity 10, Luck/Frederic 3 St. Croix Falls 12, Flambeau 2 Tuesday, May 8 Grantsburg 13, Bruce 3 Upcoming Thursday, May 10 5 p.m. Luck/Frederic at St. Croix Falls Webster/Siren at Unity Friday, May 11 5 p.m. Clear Lake at Luck Saturday, May 12 TBD Somerset at Unity Tournament TBD Luck/Frederic at Washburn 9 a.m. Cameron at Grantsburg 2 p.m. Prescott at Grantsburg Monday, May 14 5 p.m Clear Lake at Webster Tuesday, May 15 5 p.m. Solon Springs at Grantsburg Unity at Osceola Luck/Frederic at Prairie Farm St. Croix Falls at Shell Lake New Auburn at Siren/Webster Thursday, May 17 5 p.m. Unity at St. Croix Falls Grantsburg at Luck

BOYS GOLF

Overall 15-1 6-7 6-7 4-8 2-12

Team Grantsburg Luck/Frederic Unity Webster/Siren St. Croix Falls

Standings

Scores Thursday, May 3 Grantsburg 7, Unity 0 Webster/Siren 9, St. Croix Falls 8 Friday, May 4 Grantsburg 17, New Richmond 0

Conf. 7-0 2-2 2-2 1-4 1-5

Overall 15-0 4-3 4-5 1-7 1-10

Monday, May 7 Grantsburg 16, Webster/Siren 3 Grantsburg 22, Webster/Siren 0 Unity 7, Luck/Frederic 5 Upcoming Thursday, May 10 5 p.m. Luck/Frederic at St. Croix Falls Webster/Siren at Unity Friday, May 11 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Chetek Northwood at Grantsbug Barron at Unity Saturday, May 12 9 a.m. Clear Lake at Frederic Tournament 10 a.m. Washburn at Webster Tournament Cumberland at Grantsburg 2 p.m. Osceola at Grantsburg Monday, May 14 4 p.m. Turtle Lake/Clayton at Frederic 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Cameron Tuesday, May 15 4:30 p.m. Grantsburg at Baldwin-Woodville Osceola at Frederic 5 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Amery Webster/Siren at Clear Lake Unity at Shell Lake Thursday, May 17 5 p.m. Grantsburg at Luck/Frederic Unity at St. Croix Falls

Upcoming Thursday, May 10 9 a.m. Rice Lake Varsity Meet (St. Croix Falls, Luck, Unity) Monday, May 14 4 p.m. Luck Varsity Meet (St. Croix Falls, Frederic, Grantsburg, Siren, Unity) Tuesday, May 15 4 p.m. Grantsburg at Siren 4:30 p.m. Siren Varsity Meet (St. Croix Falls, Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, Unity) Thursday, May 17 9 a.m. Cameron at Luck Rice Lake Varsity Tournament (St. Croix Falls, Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, Siren, Unity)

Red Iron Studios were the Thursday Early league champions and winners of the annual Tournament of Champions. Pictured are Ed Bitler, Mike Route and Gilbert Meyer. Ed Bitler also had the association high game of 300, merit award for highest average and won the annual 600 series tournament.

Gene Ackland and Roger Tollander were the Frederic USBC Association Tournament doubles champions. Ackland also took first place in the association tournament all events.

TRACK & FIELD

Upcoming Thursday, May 10 4 p.m. Unity at Boyceville Grantsburg Varsity Meet (Frederic/Luck, St. Croix Falls, Siren) Monday, May 14 3:30 p.m. Frederic Varsity Meet (St. Croix Falls, Siren, Unity, Webster, Grantsburg) Tuesday, May 15 3:15 p.m. Frederic Varsity Meet (St. Croix Falls, Siren, Unity, Webster, Grantsburg)

Visit www.wissports.net for local high school scores & stats

Stotz & Company were the Thursday Late league champions. Pictures are Daryl and Rhonda Bazey, Lee Mangelsen and Bucky Nord. Not pictured are Larry Stotz, Dale Frandsen and Craig Adair.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

O UTDOOR S I N T E R! C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Nonexistent fishing opener yields handout instead

My wife texted me last Friday, on the eve of the fishing opener, simply asking if I’d be going out to the lake or river Saturday morning. If not, she’d be going grocery shopping, and I’d stay home Marty to watch our daughter Morgan. Seeger “I’m not sure yet,” was my response, but I wasn’t exactly sure The why I said it. By simply Bottom posing the question, my wife was already Line under the assumption that I was probably going fishing on Saturday. The only thing I needed was someone to tag along. Those who know me well enough understand that I’m mostly a do-it-alone type of angler, but not because I don’t like fishing with other people. Come to think of it, I’m not exactly sure why I do most of my fishing alone. It’s definitely easier, quieter, and there’s a lot more room in my little boat. Or if it’s brook trout I’m going after, there’s no need to fight over who gets to fish the next pool. But with the fishing opener, I felt it might be best shared with a friend. Only problem was, three of those friends were either working, or had their minds on other things.

I’d like to take Morgan, but she may need to wait until she’s another year older. Maybe next year. There were a number of others I could have called, but after the third person failed to show any interest, I did the next best thing to fishing on Saturday and broke out the weed whacker to do a little yard work instead. In other words, I was a little frustrated in my decision to stay home from fishing, so I took it out on the weeds around the house. All I could think of was how the steady breeze was turning the perfect walleye chop and overcast skies were lending hundreds of anglers a bounty of fish. And, how my motor was still broken down from last fall and needs repairs. “Virtually a fish on every cast,” I thought to myself. Fortunately, my trolling motor is still running and would offer a chance to fish on one of the smaller lakes in the area. I’d just need a little extra time to get to my favorite spots. Reports from several local anglers earlier this week indicated that some did have a great opener, catching everything from walleye to pike to bluegill and smallmouth bass, yet many lakes were packed with boats, and trucks and trailers littered the landings. Not that that’s a bad thing though, as the opener has always generated a lot of excitement. Wacking weeds, not so much. Avoiding the crowds was one of the poorer excuses I used to stay home but once the yard work was finally finished, I spent the rest of the day with my daughter, which turned out to be a good excuse to stay home. My uncle and I did manage to make plans to do some fishing the next day, but

While many anglers were out hammering the fish on the opener last Saturday, May, others were busy finding success hunting morel mushrooms. – Photo submitted with the heavy rains Saturday night and even more rain predicted for Sunday, we called off the plans and I opted to go out looking for morel mushrooms instead. It was a perfect day for a hike and a great opportunity to explore a tiny corner of the many acres of public land and trails in Polk County. Unfortunately, my hunt for the elusive morel mushroom was a bust and I limped home with an empty paper bag instead. The morels are definitely out there, however, as my father-

in-law was kind enough to donate more than a dozen large morels he found in Dunn County. Perhaps they haven’t arrived in full force in the Polk County area just yet, but people have continued to find them over the past few days, and probably will for the next week or so. As for the fishing, there’s plenty left to do, but I may wait yet another week to go, as another turkey season begins this week.

Baiting and feeding ban takes effect May 10 Washburn, Burnett, Polk and Barron counties included in ban MADISON – A ban on baiting and feeding white-tailed deer in Barron, Burnett, Polk and Washburn counties will go into effect on Thursday, May 10. The Department of Natural Resources is taking the action, in accordance with existing state law, due to the discovery on private land in Washburn County of a wild white-tailed deer that tested positive for chronic wasting disease. Both state and federal veterinary laboratories confirmed the finding. Later DNA testing confirmed that the deer is from the area. Barron, Burnett and Polk counties are within a 10-mile radius of the location of the Washburn County property on which

this CWD-positive deer was found. State law requires that counties or portions of counties within a 10-mile radius of a game farm or free-ranging CWD-positive deer be included in the baiting and feeding prohibition. With the addition of these four counties, baiting and feeding of deer is banned in 32 Wisconsin counties. “While we lament this news, we welcome the positive response we’ve heard from area deer hunters,” said DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp. “We held an informational meeting with local citizens, and nearly 200 showed up and stayed for hours asking good questions of our wildlife, law enforcement and wildlife health staff. In the end, my executive assistant, Scott Gunderson, asked the crowd how they felt about an immediate baiting and feeding ban, and it was overwhelmingly supported.” No changes are planned for the 2012 deer hunting season rules in the affected counties other than the ban on baiting and

feeding, said Tom Hauge, director of the DNR Bureau of Wildlife Management. Hunters will be asked to provide tissue samples from deer killed within a 10-mile radius of the CWD-positive doe for further surveillance testing. Samples will also be collected from roadkills and possibly taxidermists and meat processors. Details of the sampling and testing program will be shared widely in subsequent news releases and on the DNR Web site dnr.wil.gov, key word CWD, as the details are finalized. “Baiting and feeding of deer unnecessarily increases the risk of spreading CWD and other diseases,” Hauge said. “Animal health is important to preserving our great hunting tradition and is a foundation of

tourism and vital to local businesses.” Baiting and feeding increase risks of spreading communicable diseases, like CWD, by concentrating deer in one spot. Deer using one spot are more at risk for spreading a disease. Individuals can still feed birds and small mammals provided the feeding devices are at a sufficient height or design to prevent access by deer and the feeding device is within 50 yards of a human dwelling. This ban does not affect the use of bait for hunting bear or training bear dogs. Learn more about CWD at knowcwd.com or go to the DNR Web site and search CWD.

First turkey

Weekend activities at Crex Meadows GRANTSBURG – Looking for something to do this weekend? There is a lot going on at Crex Meadows Wildlife Area. The final spring bird tour will be Saturday, May 12, from 8 to 10 a.m., small fee and registration required. A wildflower tour leaves from the visitor center at 12:30 p.m. Go out in search of spring ephemerals, including trillium and small yellow lady slippers. No registration or cost. International Migratory Bird Day is also Saturday, May 12. Celebrate the naming of Grantsburg as a Bird City Wisconsin with walks, talks, and explorations about birds throughout the day at Memory Lake Park beginning at 8 a.m. Add your bird sighting to the species list! Other programs in May include the Wildlife Experience Weekend coming up

Saturday and Sunday, May 19 and 20. Tours will be held on Saturday at 5 p.m., and Sunday at 4 a.m. and 7 a.m. Space is limited; there are fees with the tours; please preregister. Bike through Crex Meadows on Saturday, May 26. Multiple varying-length tours are on paved roads. Preregistration and payment are required. Proceeds go toward the Endowment Fund. For more information about these and other events at Crex Meadows, please call 715-463-2739, visit www.crexmeadows.org, or find them on Facebook. Friends of Crex support these and other programs. You can support these types of programs and be more involved by joining the Friends of Crex. – submitted

Nathan Cousins, 12, of Centuria, called in and harvested his first turkey recently near the Bone Lake area, with help from his dad, Craig Cousins. The bird weighed 17 pounds 1 ounce, with a 4-1/2-inch beard and was taken with a 12-gague at 40 yards. – Photo submitted


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Notices/Employment opportunities

MONTHLY BOARD MEETING

WNAXLP

560069 38Lp 28ap

LEWIS CEMETERY ASSOCIATION Wednesday, May 16, 6 p.m. Pour House, Siren, WI

For a complete list of qualifications and to apply, visit our Web site at www.witc.edu/employ. 560077 38-39r,L 28-29a-e TTY: 711

WITC is an equal opportunity/access/employer and educator.

(April 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CITIZENS COMMUNITY FEDERAL Plaintiff, vs. SHAWN D. DENVER, DANYELLE P. DENVER, WEST BEND MUTUAL COMPANY, EAGLE VALLEY BANK, NA, REGIONAL BUSINESS FUND, INC. Defendants Case No. 11CV70 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered in the above-entitled action on April 5, 2011, in the amount of $127,701.78, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, in said County, on the 23rd day of May, 2012, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Tract I: Lot 4 of CSM 15-214, Map No. 3447, a part of the NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Section 35, Township 33 North, Range 15 West (in the Township of Clayton). Tract II: A nonexclusive easement for ingress and egress, in favor of Tract I, over the east 33 feet of Lot 3 of CSM 15-214, Map No. 3447, lying within the NE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Section 35, Township 33 North, Range 15 West (in the Township of Clayton) for access to 15th Street. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 627 15th Street, Clayton, Wis. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check upon confirmation of sale. Dated this 30th day of March, 2012. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Attorney Christine A. Gimber WELD, RILEY, PRENN & RICCI, S.C. 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715-839-7786 Attorneys for Plaintiff This is an attempt to collect a debt. any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

ANNUAL DINNER MEETING

WISCONSIN INDIANHEAD TECHNICAL COLLEGE

VILLAGE OF LUCK RESIDENTS SPRING CLEANUP DAYS Friday, May 11, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 12, 8 a.m. to noon Monday, May 14, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Dumpsters are located at the Village Shop on West 3rd Avenue. Residents must bring their refuse to the shop during the above hours. NO GARBAGE OR RECYCLABLES. $8 per appliance. $12 per air conditioner/water softener. Auto tires accepted: Car and truck (up to 18”), $2.75/ truck (20+”), $10. PREPAYMENT FOR APPLIANCES MUST BE MADE AT THE LUCK VILLAGE HALL BEFORE DROPOFF.

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Agenda to be posted: 1) Eureka Town Hall 2) Eureka Town Garage 3) Eureka Clerk’s Office Agenda may also be posted on Town Web site: www.townofeureka.org

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Thursday, May 10, 2012 7 p.m. at Eureka Town Hall

NOTICE OF THE OPEN BOOK FOR THE TOWN OF LINCOLN

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Open Book Session for the Town of Lincoln, Burnett County, will be held on Saturday, May 19, 2012, at the Lincoln Town Hall, located at 9110 Perida Road, Webster, Wisconsin, from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. This Session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF LINCOLN

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Town of Lincoln, Burnett County, will be held on Saturday, May 19, 2012, at the Lincoln Town Hall, located at 9110 Perida Road, Webster, Wisconsin, from 10 a.m. to noon. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the Assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board member and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuation; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03(2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the Assessor requests. The Town of Lincoln has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35(1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully submitted, 559372 27-28a 38-39L Wanda Washkuhn, Clerk, Town of Lincoln WNAXLP

TOWN OF MILLTOWN

Monthly Board Meeting Monday, May 14, at 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk 559280 37-38L 27-28a

NOTICE

TOWN OF LaFOLLETTE MONTHLY MEETING The Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of LaFollette Will Be Held At The LaFollette Town Hall On Mon., May 14, 2012, At 7:30 p.m. Agenda Verification of Posting Clerk’s Minutes Treasurer’s Report Resident Issues Road Items Pay Bills and look at correspondence Linda Terrian, Clerk

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Agenda: This will be to open and convene at a later date.

Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College is seeking a learning-focused, creative and dynamic individual for a full-time Occupational Therapy Assistant Instructor at the Rice Lake or New Richmond campus. The ideal candidate will demonstrate interest in and potential for excellence in facilitating student learning and development. Qualifications include: bachelor’s degree or actively pursuing a bachelor’s degree, minimum of two years’ occupational experience, current NBCOT certification, current Wisconsin state licensure and membership in state and national associations. Deadline to apply: May 25, 2012.

NOTICE

(May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff vs. THOMAS ANDERSON, et al. Defendant(s) Case No: 11 CV 463 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 14, 2011, in the amount of $94,826.53, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI. DESCRIPTION: Outlot 59 and part of Outlot 60 of the Assessor’s Plat of the Village of Dresser, described as follows: Commencing at the Southwest corner of said Lot 60; thence North on the West line of said Lot a distance of 50 feet; thence East 10 feet; thence South to the South line of said Lot; thence Westerly to the point of beginning; said lots being located in the Southwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 8, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, in the Village of Dresser, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 205 E. State St., Dresser, WI 54009. TAX KEY NO.: 116-00348-0000. Dated this 23rd day of April, 2012. Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff

559192 WNAXLP

SEARCH EXTENDED

Thursday, May 10, 2012 6:45 p.m. at Eureka Town Hall

WNAXLP

OPEN BOOK

(May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2007HE6, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-HE6 Plaintiff vs. TYRONE A. SHAFER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TYRONE A. SHAFER; ANCHORBANK; Defendants. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 11 CV 534 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 3, 2012, in the amount of $162,824.05, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 31, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Property description: Parcel 1: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 356 Recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 85 as Document No. 375846 in the office of the Register of Deeds in and for Polk County, Wisconsin, being included in Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 283 Recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 12 as Document No. 367742, all being located in Government Lot 1 of Section Five (5), Township ThirtyFive (35) North, Range Sixteen (16) West, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel 2: Lot Two (2) of Certified Survey Map No. 356 Recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps oN Page 85 as Document No. 375846, in the office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, together with a Nonexclusive EaseMent 50 Feet in Width Contiguous to the North Boundary Line of that Parcel Recorded in Volume 366 on Page 168 as Document No. 358868, being part of Government Lot 1 of Section Five (5), Township ThirtyFive (35) North, Range Sixteen (16) West, together with an Easement Over and Across Lot 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 283, Recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 12, in the office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, for lake access; all in Government Lot 1 of Section 5, Township 35 North, Range 16 West, Polk County, Wis. TAX KEY NO.: 026-00087-0000 / 026-00088-0000. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1080 240th Ave., Luck, WI 54853. Adam C. Lueck State Bar No. 1081386 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe St. Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 559195

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT INSTRUCTOR

NOTICE TOWN OF EUREKA

557269

557173 WNAXLP

(Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. CARMA J. PINGER, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 11 CV 320 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on November 16, 2011, in the amount of $282,539.76, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 22, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 3441, recorded in Volume 15 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 208, as Document No. 616517, located in part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 22, Township 33 North, Range 16 West, in the Town of Lincoln, Polk County, Wis. EXCEPTING THEREFROM: That part of Lot 1, Certified Survey Map No. 3441, located in the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 22, Township 33 North, Range 16 West, of the 4th Principal Meridian, Town of Lincoln, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the South 1/4 corner of said Section 22; thence North 00° 29’ 28” East, assumed bearing, along the West line of said Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, a distance of 930.97 feet to the point of beginning; thence continuing North 00° 29’ 28” East, 66.50 feet to the Northwest corner of Lot 1, Certified Survey Map No. 3441; thence leaving said West line, South 88° 54’ 12” East, along the North line of said Lot 1, a distance of 655.09 feet to the Northeast corner of said Lot 1; thence leaving said North line, South 00° 29’ 28” West, along the East line of said Lot 1, a distance of 66.50 feet; thence leaving said East line, North 88° 54’ 12” West, a distance of 655.09 feet to the point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 816 85th Street, Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 032-006390100. Dated this 27th day of March, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 286381

Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1778148


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

Notices/Employment opportunities Polk County marriages Penny L. Pogreba, Town of Sterling, and Jason R. Johnson, Town of Sterling, issued April 26, 2012. Megan J. Gustafson, Maplewood, Minn., and James D. Lipps, North St. Paul, Minn., issued April 29, 2012. Marsha R. Nelson, Town of Sterling, and Raymond H. Sandstrom Sr., Town of Sterling, issued April 29, 2012. Dorothy J. Blakeborough, Amery, and Gregory A. Glunz,

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

Amery, issued April 29, 2012. Jessica L. Wiedeman, Vadnais Heights, Minn., and Scott M. Rose, Vadnais Heights, Minn., issued May 3, 2012. Teresa A. Durand, Town of Farmington, and Nicholas R. Hatch, Town of Farmington, issued May 3, 2012. Mary C. Robins, Town of Alden, and Steven D. Tilsen, Town of Alden, issued May 3, 2012.

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Polk County Government Center 100 Polk County Plaza, Balsam Lake, WI County Boardroom Tuesday May 15, 2012 Regular Business Meeting 6:30 p.m. Open Session

GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT 480 E. James Avenue Grantsburg, WI 54840

Job Description: iForward is an online charter school, part of the leading Grantsburg School District serving students throughout the entire state of WI. iForward is seeking highly qualified candidates for the following positions: • Principal/Head of School • 6 - 12 Academic Counselor • Part-time Instructors (in all 6 - 12 licensure areas) • Program Coordinator For more detailed job descriptions and qualifications, please reference the district employment Web site. How to apply: Send resume, transcripts, letters of reference and credentials to: iForward Attn.: Executive Director Grantsburg School District 480 E. James Avenue Grantsburg, WI 54840 Or e-mail to: employment@iforwardwisconsin.com Job Posting: Close Date May 18, 2012 Start Date July 1, 2012 559238 37-38L

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

NOTICE OF THE OPEN BOOK FOR THE TOWN OF DANIELS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Open Book Session for the Town of Daniels, Burnett County, will be held on Thursday, May 24, 2012, at the Daniels Town Hall, from 3 to 5 p.m. This session gives the property owner an opportunity to meet with the assessor, ask questions of the assessor and look over their property assessments.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF DANIELS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Review for the Town of Daniels of Burnett County shall hold its first meeting on Thursday, May 24, 2012, at the Daniels Town Hal from 6 to 8 p.m. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or a least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files written objection that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or subject or object to a valuation; if that valuation was made by the Assessor or the Objector using the income method of valuating; unless the person supplies the Assessor all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the Assessor’s manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a) of Wis. Statutes, that the assessor requests. The Town of Daniels has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expense that is provided to the Assessor under this paragraph which provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their office or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of Wis. Statutes. The Board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully Submitted Elizabeth Simonsen, Clerk Town of Daniels 560129 38L WNAXLP

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Call to Order Evidence of Proper Notice Roll Call Pledge of Allegiance Time of Reflection - Supvr. Neil Johnson Consent Agenda Consideration of noticed agenda for May 8, 2012, meeting & consideration of corrections to the published minutes of the April 17, 2012, meeting Public Comments - 3 minutes per person- not to exceed 30 minutes total Presentation by Mary Mikula and Kasey Weber on the “Day Friends Program” Chairman’s Report Finance Report - Maggie Wickre Administrator’s Report Confirmation of Chairman’s Appointments to Boards, Committees, Etc. 2012-2014 - Supervisor Appointments , 2-year terms Polk County Economic Development Corporation Kristine Kremer-Hartung Polk County Tourism Council - George Stroebel Polk County Fair Society - Warren Nelson Gandy Dancer Trail Commission - William F. Johnson Polk County Housing Authority - Jim Edgell WITC Board Nominating Committee - -William F. Johnson Northern Region Trail Advisory Council (NoRTAC) - Larry Jepsen Arnell Memorial Humane Society - Kathryn Kienholz Polk County Library Board - Warren Nelson Renewable Energy Committee - Kathryn Kienholz, Tom Engel, Jay Luke Local Emergency Planning Committee - Kim O’Connell Aging and Disability Resource Center Board - Larry Jepsen, Kristine Kremer-Hartung, Pat Schmidt West Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Board William F. Johnson, Warren Nelson, Tom Engel WestCAP Representative - Larry Jepsen Indianhead Federated Library System - Kathryn Kienholz Revolving Loan Fund - Kim O’Connell Confirmation of Administrator’s Appointments to Committees & Boards Administrator Appointments Human Services Committee - Bill Alleva, Dr. David Markert, John Gyllen & Timothy D. Strohbusch (2-Year Term 5/1/12 - 5/1/14) Board of Health Committee - Dr. Arne Lagus, Kim Gearin & Leslie Larsen (2-Year Term 5/1/12 - 5/1/14) Veterans Service Commission Committee – Gary Johnson (3-Year Term 1/1/12 - 1/1/15) Balsam Lake Protection and Rehab. District Committee – Carl Holmgren (2-Year-Term 5/1/12 - 5/1/14) Committee/Board Reports • Highway • Finance • Personnel • Property, Forestry & Recreation/ ADRC • Extension, Land & Water, Lime • Public Protection - Jay Luke • Land Information - Kim O’Connell • Human Services Board - George Stroebel • Boards of Health & Aging • GAM Board - Rick Scoglio • Renewable Energy/Energy Independence Team Proposed Resolutions and Ordinances A. Resolution to Authorize Polk County to Pursue WDNR TRM Funding B. Resolution To Dissolve Transition Committee C. Resolution To Increase the 2012 Budget for Personnel Appropriations for the Lime Quarry D. Resolution Funding for Jail Literacy and Phase-out of the Polk County Library Federation E. Resolution to Act on Offer of Endeavors Adult Development Center To Modify Terms of Adult Development Center Lease Agreement For 2012 (Accept or Reject Offer) F. Resolution to Amend 2012 Budget – Authorization of Designation, Carryover, Transfer and Reappropriation of Specified Funds from 2011 to 2012 G. Resolution to Allow Higher Initial Leave Accruals for Recruitment of Mid-Career Professionals H. Resolution to Amend Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance I. Resolution to Authorize Grant of Easement to Lakeland Telecommunications Across Polk County Fairgrounds J. Resolution to Amend the Purchasing Policy (Policy 912) for Auction and Motor Fuel Purchases Supervisors Reports Adjourn

This meeting is open to the public according to Wisconsin State Statute 19.83. Persons with disabilities wishing to attend and/or participate are asked to notify the County Clerk’s office (715-485-9226) at least 24 hours in advance of the scheduled meeting time so all reasonable accommoda560074 38L 28a,d tions can be made.

INTERESTED IN HELPING INDIVIDUALS, YOUTH, AND FAMILIES LEARN ABOUT NUTRITION?

Cooperative Extension, UW-Extension has a nutrition educator position open serving Barron and Polk Counties (office in Polk County). Provide nutrition and food budgeting education to individuals, youth and families living on limited incomes. Previous work or volunteer experience working with low-income families, working with youth, or providing food and nutrition education is highly desirable. Training provided. HS grad or equivalent required. Must have transportation needed to fulfill position responsibilities. This is a salaried position, working 32 hours per week, with benefits. Contact Michelle Webb at michelle.webb@ces.uwex.edu or 715-537-6380 for application information and complete job description. Position closes June 8, 2012. A criminal records review will be conducted prior to employment. In compliance with the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act, convictions and pending charges will be considered only as they relate to this position. UW-Extension is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. We promote excellence through diversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply. 560144 38-39Lp 28-29a,dp

NOTICE OF MEETING OF BOARD OF REVIEW STATE OF WISCONSIN TOWN OF ANDERSON - BURNETT COUNTY Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Anderson, Burnett County, Wisconsin, shall hold its first meeting on May 19, 2012, from 10 a.m. until noon, at the Town Hall. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the board of review and procedural requirements if appearing before the board: 1. No person will be allowed to appear before the board of review, to testify to the board by telephone, or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view the property. 2. After the first meeting of the board of review and before the board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the board of review may contact or provide information to a member of the board about the person’s objection, except at a session of the board. 3. The board of review may not hear an objection to the amount or valuation of property unless, at least 48 hours before the board’s first scheduled meeting, the objector provides to the board’s clerk written or oral notice of an intent to file an objection, except that upon a showing of good cause and the submission of a written objection, the board shall waive that requirement during the first 2 hours of the board’s first scheduled meeting, and the board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to the end of the final day of the session if the session is less than 5 days with proof of extraordinary circumstances for failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and failure to appear before the board of review during the first 2 hours of the first scheduled meeting. 4. Objections to the amount or valuation of property shall first be made in writing and filed with the clerk of the board of review within the first 2 hours of the board’s first scheduled meeting, except that, upon evidence of extraordinary circumstances, the board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to the end of the final day of the session if the session is less than 5 days. The board may require objections to the amount or valuation of property to be submitted on forms approved by the Department of Revenue, and the board shall require that any forms include stated valuations of the property in question. Persons who own land and improvements to that land may object to the aggregate valuation of that land and improvements to that land, but no person who owns land and improvements to that land may object only to the valuation of that land or only to the valuation of improvements to that land. No person may be allowed in any action or proceedings to question the amount or valuation of property unless the written objection has been filed and that person in good faith presented evidence to the board in support of the objections and made full disclosure before the board, under oath, of all of that person’s property liable to assessment in the district and the value of that property. The requirement that objections be in writing may be waived by express action of the board. 5. When appearing before the board of review, the objecting person shall specify in writing the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. 6. No person may appear before the board of review, testify to the board by telephone, or object to a valuation if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method of valuation, unless the person supplies the assessor with all the information about income and expenses, as specified in the assessor’s manual under s. 73.03 (2a), Wis. stats., that the assessor requests. The Town of Anderson has an ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph that provides exceptions for persons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of their officer or by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under s. 19.35 (1), Wis. stats. 7. The board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. 8. No person may appear before the board of review, testify to the board by telephone, or contest the amount of any assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the board, or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed under s. 70.47 (3) (a), Wis. stats., that person provides to the clerk of the board of review notice as to whether the person will ask for the removal of a member of the board of review and, if so, which member, and provides a reasonable estimate of the length of time the hearing will take. 559842 27a 38L WNAXLP Jessica King, Clerk


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Notices/Employment opportunities

VOTING BY ABSENTEE BALLOT OFFICIAL RECALL ELECTION FOR PARTISAN OFFICES GOVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR JUNE 5, 2012

Any qualified elector who is unable or unwilling to appear at the polling place on Election Day may request to vote an absentee ballot. A qualified elector is any U.S. citizen, who will be 18 years of age or older on Election Day, who has resided in the ward or municipality where he or she wishes to vote for at least 28 consecutive days before the election. The elector must also be registered in order to receive an absentee ballot. TO OBTAIN AN ABSENTEE BALLOT YOU MUST MAKE A REQUEST IN WRITING. Contact your municipal clerk and request that an application for an absentee ballot be sent to you for the primary or election or both. You may also request an absentee ballot by letter. Your written request must list your voting address within the municipality where you wish to vote, the address where the absentee ballot should be sent, if different, and your signature. Special absentee voting application provisions apply to electors who are indefinitely confined to home or a care facility, in the military, hospitalized or serving as a sequestered juror. If this applies to you, contact the municipal clerk. You can also personally go to the clerk’s office or other specified location, complete a written application, and vote an absentee ballot during the hours specified for casting an absentee ballot. Town of St. Croix Falls Town of Georgetown Town of Alden Janet Krueger, Clerk Kristine Lindgren, Clerk Judy Demulling, Clerk 1305 200th St. 1913 W. Bone Lake Drive 183 155th St. St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Star Prairie, WI 54026 715-483-1851 715-857-5788 715-248-7859 Town of Apple River Gloria Stokes, Clerk 612 U.S. Hwy. 8 Amery, WI 54001 715-268-9275

Town of Laketown Patsy Gustafson, Clerk 2773 230th St. Cushing, WI 54006 715-648-5569

Town of Sterling Julie Peterson, Clerk 13308 Bucklund Rd. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-488-2735

Town of Balsam Lake Brian Masters, Clerk 1574 State Hwy. 46 Balsam Lake, WI 54810 715-554-2091

Town of Lorain Susan E. Hughes, Clerk 3340 15th St. Frederic, WI 54837 715-653-2629

Town of West Sweden Andrea Lundquist, Clerk 1535 345th Ave. Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-8650

Town of Bone Lake Darrell Frandsen, Clerk 954 280th Ave. Frederic, WI 54837-5002 715-472-8212

Town of Luck Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 1616 260th Ave. Luck, WI 54853 715-472-2037

Village of Dresser Jodi A. Gilbert, Clerk 102 W. Main St., P.O. Box 547 Dresser, WI 54009 715-755-2940

Town of Clam Falls Betty Knutson, Clerk 3335 90th St. Frederic, WI 54837 715-653-4206

Town of McKinley Deborah Grover, Clerk 2296 1st St. Cumberland, WI 54829 715-822-3864

Town of Eureka Michelle Tonnar, Clerk 2077 190th Ave. Centuria, WI 54824 715-646-2985

Town of Milltown Virgil Hansen, Clerk P.O. Box 100 Milltown, WI 54858 715-825-2494

Village of Frederic Kristi Swanson, Clerk P.O. Box 567 107 Hope Rd. W. Frederic, WI 54837 715-327-4294

Town of Farmington Debbie Swanson, Clerk 304 State Rd. 35 Osceola, WI 54020 715-294-2370

Town of Osceola Lorrain Rugroden, Clerk/Treas. P.O. Box 216 Dresser, WI 54009 715-755-3060

Town of Garfield Sue Knutson, Clerk 690 Minneapolis St. Amery, WI 54001 715-268-4857

City of St. Croix Falls Bonita Leggitt, Clerk 710 Hwy. 35 So. St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3929 Ext. 11

Village of Luck Kristina Handt, Acting Clerk P.O. Box 315 Luck, WI 54853 715-472-2221

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The deadline for making application to vote absentee by mail is 5 p.m. on the fifth day before the election, May 31, 2012. Military electors should contact the municipal clerk regarding the deadlines for requesting or submitting an absentee ballot. The first day to vote an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office is May 21, 2012. The deadline for voting an absentee ballot in the clerk’s office is 5 p.m. on the Friday before the election, on June 1, 2012. The municipal clerk will deliver voted ballots returned on or before election day to the proper polling place or counting location before the polls close on June 5, 2012. Any ballots received after the polls close will be counted by the board of canvassers if postmarked by election day and received no later than 4 p.m. on the Friday following the election.

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF JACKSON Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Jackson, Burnett County, WI, will be held on May 24, 2012, at the Town Hall, 4599 County Road A, Webster, WI, from 4 to 6 p.m. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact or provide information to a member of the Board of Review about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board of Review. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or contest the amount of assessment unless at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board of Review or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection of appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any Board member, and if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board of Review, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board by telephone or object to a valuation, if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method, unless the person supplies the assessor all of the information about income and expenses as specified in the manual under Sec. 73.03 (2a) that the assessor requests. The municipality or county shall provide by ordinance for the confidentiality of information about income and expenses that is provided to the assessor under this paragraph and shall provide exceptions for persons using the information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or of the duties of their office by order of a court. The information that is provided under this paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying under Sec. 19.35 (1) of WI Statutes. The Board of Review shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the Board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. For The Town Of Jackson 559684 38L WNAXLP Lorraine Radke, Clerk Notice is hereby given this 11th day of April, 2012.

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The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, May 22, 2012, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, WI. The Board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view the sites and will reconvene the public hearing immediately after the public hearing for the Olive Johnson reclamation plan that will begin at 10 a.m. in the Government Center, Balsam Lake, WI. At that time, the applicants will inform the Board of their request. MATHY CONSTRUCTION/MILESTONE MATERIALS request a Special Exception Permit to Section VIB5 of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance to establish a nonmetallic mine. Property affected is: E1/2 of the SE1/4, and the SE1/4 of the SW1/4 and part of the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of the SW1/4, all in Section 35/T34N/R16W, Town of Apple River. DUANE STONE requests a Special Exception Permit to Section VIB5 of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance and Article 8D8 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning ordinance to establish a nonmetallic mine. Property affected is: NW1/4 of the NE1/4, Section 35/T34N/ R16W, Town of Apple River. OLIVE JOHNSON requests a Special Exception Permit to Section VIB5 of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance to establish a nonmetallic mine. Property affected is: Part of the SW1/4 of the SE1/4, Section 35/T34N/R16W, Town of Apple River. The Board will also consider consolidating the operation times on three existing gravel pits. These pits were previously granted a Special Exception Permit with conditions. Mathy Construction is seeking a change in the operation conditions. The three gravel pits are located in: N1/2 of the NW1/4 of Section 2/T33N/ R16W, Town of Lincoln; W1/2 of the SW1/4 and the SW1/4 of the NE1/4 and the S1/2 of the SE1/4 of the NW1/4, all in Section 559240 35/T34N/R16W, Town of Apple River. 37-38L 27a,d WNAXLP

560117 WNAXLP

NOTICE OF HEARING

(May 9, 16, 23) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HARRY RASMUSSEN Deceased Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 12 PR 24 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth January 15, 1931, and date of death April 3, 2012, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1862 265th Ave., Luck, WI 54853. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is August 14, 2012. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, WI 54810, Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar May 7, 2012 Bruce Rasmussen 4643 Fox Moor Pl. Greenwood, IN 46143 317-888-2977

(Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. KANDICE MAE CHAFFEE, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 11 CV 410 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 16, 2011, in the amount of $235,508.28, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 22, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The East 330 feet of the West 990 feet of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 15, Township 34 North, Range 17 West, in the Town of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1431 150th Avenue, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. TAX KEY NO.: 006-00449-1000. Dated this 28th day of March, 2012 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 286374

2012 POLK COUNTY JOB FAIR Thursday, May 17, 12:30 - 4:30 p.m. American Legion 143

807 Pine Street, St. Croix Falls, WI

(Across from Kentucky Fried Chicken, Hwy. 8)

Employers Attending

Aurora Community Service EPC, Inc. Hammond Trucking Work Connection St. Croix Reg. Medical Ctr. Good Samaritan

NEI Electric Kapco Clean Power Westaff Stop-A-Sec and more...

Osceola Medical Center Manpower WISSCO NorthernBridges F&M Plastics

Sponsored by: American Legion 143, Bernick’s Pepsi, Central Bank, Workforce Resource Polk Co. Job Center 715-485-3115. 560132 38L 28d,e

WORKFORCE RESOURCE

MEDIA RELEASE SUMMER FOOD SERVICE PROGRAM

Stressing the importance of offering nutritious meals to children during summer school, the School District of Siren announces the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program. The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP), which is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and is administered by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, provides nutritious meals to children during the summer, when free and reduced-price school meals are typically unavailable. Free meals will be made available to eligible children 18 years of age and under. Persons over 18 years of age who are determined by a state or local public educational agency to be mentally or physically disabled and who also participate in a public or private nonprofit school program during the regular school year may receive free meals as well. The following location will be serving the free meals this summer, Siren School beginning June 11 through June 29, 2012. The serving times will be breakfast 7:45 a.m. to 8:15 a.m. and lunch time 10:45 to 11:30 a.m. Meals are provided to eligible children regardless of race, color, national origin, age, gender or disability, and there will be no discrimination in the course of meal service. This program fills a void created when school lunches are not available. “Helping parents meet the nutritional needs of their children is the strength of this program.” The School District of Siren is an equal opportunity employer/educator and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, sex, age, national origin or handicap. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights (Office of Adjudication), 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll-free 866-632-9992 (Voice). TDD users can contact USDA through local relay or the Federal Relay at 800-877-8339 (TDD) or 866-377-8642 (relay voice users). USDA is an equal opportunity pro559680 38L vider and employer.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

MINUTES OF THE

son may request a vote to determine if a matter needs to be referred to an appropriate committee for recommendation prior to action by the county board. b. Resolutions must be approved as to form by corporation counsel. Consideration for approval will only be given to properly endorsed documents, and no unlawful resolution or ordinance will be approved. The county administrator and corporation counsel shall review all resolutions and ordinances prior to introduction to the county board and shall initial each resolution or ordinance as recommended, not recommended or reviewed only. c. Any resolution or ordinance that requires funding must state an amount and source of funding or be reviewed by the finance committee before the matter will be considered by the county board. The finance committee’s role is to identify funding alternatives and impact of the same. 2. The county board chairperson shall prepare the agenda with the assistance of the county clerk and administrator. The county clerk shall circulate to all board members a copy of the agenda and all ordinances and resolutions plus related supporting documentation noticed in the agenda at least ten calendar days before the regular monthly county board meeting. 3. The county clerk shall timely publish the agenda in the legal publication of Polk County. 4. The county board shall only consider matters contained on the agenda so circulated and timely published unless a majority of the board votes to suspend these rules of order.

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS APRIL 17, 2012 - 9 a.m.

Chairman Johnson called the regular April meeting of the Polk County Board of Supervisors to order at 9:00 a.m. County Clerk informed the Chair that notice of the agenda was properly posted in three public buildings, published in the county's legal paper and posted on the county Web site the week of April 9, 2012. Corporation Counsel Jeff Fuge informed the County Board that notice satisfied the applicable provisions of Wisconsin Open Meetings Law and notice provisions of County Board Rules of Order. Roll call was taken by the Clerk, with 22 members present. Supvr. Kienholz was absent for roll call, but joined the meeting immediately after. Chairman Johnson led the Pledge of Allegiance Time was allowed for a silent moment of reflection. Judge Jeff Anderson performed the swearing-in ceremony and County Clerk Carole Wondra witnessed the signing of the oaths of the County Board of Supervisors. Chairman Johnson requested separating of the published Consent Agenda to allow for changing the agenda order. Motion (Schmidt/Jepsen) to amend the agenda by moving Agenda Item No. 9 before Item No. 8. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Motion (Masters/Brown) to approve the agenda as amended. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson announced that Resolution E, To Adopt 2011 Technical Resolution, was being removed from the agenda. Motion (Brown/Luke) to approve the published minutes from the March 20, 2012, meeting. Motion approved by unanimous voice vote. Time was given for public comments. Organizational Matters:

Article 4. Debate 1. The chairperson shall clearly state or read the resolution or motion to be debated. 2. Debate will only begin after a motion has been made and seconded to bring it to the floor. 3. Motions and amendments shall be put in writing should the chairperson or a supervisor request. 4. When any member wishes to speak in debate or deliver any matter to the board, he or she shall raise their hand and respectfully address the chairperson and shall confine remarks to the question. 5. When two or more members wish to speak at once, the chairperson shall name the person who is to speak first. 6. A motion that does not pertain to the question on the floor shall not be received. 7. A motion to close debate is out of order as long as any member who has not yet spoken on the issue is seeking recognition. 8. No member shall speak more than twice and not longer than five minutes each on the same question except by permission of the chairperson. No member shall be allowed to speak upon the same question more than once until all members have had an opportunity to speak on said question. 9. The chairperson in consultation with the corporation counsel shall decide questions of order. A majority of the board may appeal the decision. 10. The chairperson may call the vice chairperson or second vice chairperson to the chair and may debate any questions before the board. 11. The chairperson shall vote on a call. 12. A motion to adjourn shall be decided without debate.

RESOLUTION 14-12

RESOLUTION TO ADOPT THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS RULES OF ORDER FOR THE TERM COMMENCING APRIL 17, 2012 TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, during its organizational meeting for the term commencing April 20, 17, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors has considered and debated various rules of order that provide for the smooth and orderly functioning of the business of Polk County Board of Supervisors and that provide basis for resolving questions of procedure when they arise. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopts the Polk County Board of Supervisors Rules of Order, for the term commencing April 17, 2012, as attached hereto and incorporated herein. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 17, 2012. Submitted and Sponsored by: Brian Masters. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 17, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 14-12: Resolution To Adopt The Polk County Board Of Supervisors Rules Of Order For The Term Commencing April 17, 2012, as amended, carried by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: April 27, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: April 27, 2012

Article 5. Voting 1. All questions shall be put in proper form. Those in favor say "Aye." Those opposed say the same sign. 2. The chairperson or any member may call for a roll call vote on any question. Votes shall be recorded by the clerk. 3. All roll call votes of the county board shall proceed on a rotating basis. 4. The chairperson or any member may call for a ballot vote on any question. A ballot vote has preference over a voice vote and over a roll call vote. Votes shall be recorded by the clerk. 5. Prior to discussion, a supervisor may request of the chairperson to be excused from voting for a valid cause. Supervisors who do not vote without approved abstention shall have their vote counted in the negative.

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

Article 6. Elections, Appointments, Boards, Committees 1. The election of the county board chairperson and vice chairpersons shall take place at the organizational meeting after supervisors have taken the oath of office. A county board chairperson, first vice chairperson and second vice chairperson shall be elected to serve a twoyear term. If no nominee receives a majority on the first ballot, the second ballot will include the three nominees receiving the most votes. If no nominee receives a majority on the second ballot, the third ballot will include the two nominees with the most votes. Voting will be by secret ballot. 2. The appointment and election of county board committee members shall occur at the organizational meeting. The county board chairperson and two vice chairpersons shall appoint committee and board members as indicated. The county board must approve the appointments. Election of committee members shall follow appointments. The board encourages the appointing chairpersons to not appoint the same person to both the finance and personnel committees. 3. The county administrator shall appoint citizen members to committees and boards. The county board shall approve the appointments. 4. The respective elected and appointed members of boards and committees shall be as follows:

RULES OF ORDER Article 1. Purpose The purpose of this document is to provide a procedure in which rules are designed to protect the rights of participation of members of the Polk County Board of Supervisors, to ensure equal application of those rights, to maintain order and thereby to protect also the interests of their constituents. Article 2. Meetings 1. Polk County Board of Supervisors regular business meetings will be held on the third Tuesday of each month. Meetings May through September will begin at 6:30 p.m. and meetings October through April will begin at 6:00 p.m. Exceptions will include the annual meeting in November which will conform to §59.11(1) and the organizational meeting held in April of even-numbered years which will be held on the third Tuesday of April at a time noticed by the chairperson. Special discussion meetings will be scheduled quarterly. 2. A majority of the county board supervisors at a noticed public meeting may cancel or reschedule a county board meeting. 3. County board meetings may be scheduled upon submittal of a written petition per §59.11(2)(a) by a majority of county board supervisors. 4. The county board chairperson in consultation with the county administrator may cancel or reschedule a county board meeting in case of severe weather or an emergency. 5. Two weeks’ public notice must be given of cancellation or rescheduling of a nonemergency county board meeting except as stated in number four. 6. All county board supervisors must be present unless excused for good cause by the county board chairperson. 7. A majority of the supervisors entitled to a seat on the board shall constitute a quorum. 8. Seating the county board members shall be in such an arrangement so all members face the chairperson and each other. Supervisors are to be seated by district number order. 9. The chairperson shall take the chair at the scheduled time and call the meeting to order. The clerk shall call the roll to determine if a quorum is present. The chairperson shall preserve order and decorum. 10. Public comment at county board of supervisors meetings shall be allowed after the speaker has been formally recognized by the chairperson. Each person shall go to the podium and identify themselves by name and municipality of residency before addressing the board. Each person has three minutes to make their presentation which includes distribution of handouts. The chairperson has the responsibility to conduct the public comment period in an orderly and respectful manner. Article 3. Ordinances and Resolutions 1. The county board shall consider only resolutions and ordinances that meet all of the following: a. A resolution or ordinance must be endorsed by either one or more sponsoring board members or the chairperson of the committee that recommends consideration by the full county board or by the county administrator pursuant to §59.18(5). During a meeting the chairper-

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5. As reasonably possible, each county board member shall serve on two standing committees or boards. 6. The county board chairperson may be an ex officio member of any committee or board with voting privileges when a quorum of the regular members is not present at a meeting. 7. Each committee and board is to elect a chairperson and vice chairperson at the first meeting and agree on a process for recording meeting minutes.


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012 8. The chairperson of each board or committee shall be a county board supervisor unless otherwise provided for by state statutes. 9. No member shall be chairperson of more than one standing committee or board. 10. All committees and boards shall fix regular meeting times and dates which will not conflict with other committees meeting times and dates. 11. When two committees or boards are to meet jointly, the committee chairpersons are to establish a joint meeting date. Whenever possible, the meeting shall coincide with a regularly scheduled meeting of one of the committees involved. 12. The duties and responsibilities of the respective boards and committees shall be those ascribed in Polk County Policy 0010, Duties and Responsibilities of Governing Committees. 13. Minutes shall be recorded of all committee and board meetings and given to the county clerk within five business days of scheduled meetings. The clerk shall retain a copy of all recorded minutes and shall place copies in supervisors mailboxes or send via electronic mail as each supervisor prefers.

Article 3. Ordinances and Resolutions Motion (Masters/Edgell) to strike the last sentence under No. 1 (c). Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Motion (Kienholz/Stroebel) to change the wording in No. 1 (c), second line, from or to and. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Article 4. Debate Upon consensus of the Board, Move No. 11 "The chairperson shall vote on a call." To Article 5 Voting as No. 6 Chairman called for a 5-minute break. The Board reconvened. Motion (Brown/ Kienholz) Under Article 4. Debate, No. 1, to add "prior to voting." Following the word debated at the end of the 1st sentence. Motion (D. Johansen/Brown) Under No. 3, to insert "at the request of" between writing and the chairperson and striking the word "should." Motion carried by voice vote. Article 6. Elections, Appointments, Boards, Committees Motion (Jepsen/H. Johansen) to change wording in No. 1 first sentence, by striking: “after supervisors have taken the oath of office" and adding "and after the County Board Rules of Order have been adopted." Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Motion (Scoglio/Masters) to strike "and second vice chairperson" from the second Sentence in No. 1. Motion to strike, failed in a roll call vote of 7 Yes/16 No. Motion (Luke/Jepsen) to keep the list of standing committees as they are currently in place as shown on the chart under No. 4. - Motion withdrawn. Upon consensus of the Board, No. 8 should read: The chairperson of each board or standing committee shall be a county board supervisor unless otherwise provided for by state statutes. 12:15 p.m. Chairman called for a lunch break and to reconvene at 1:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. back in Session. Chairman announced the opening of the Public Hearing on the Proposed Amendment to Ordinance 01-12: Ordinance to Create Appraisal Committee for Sale of Tax Delinquent Lands. Time was allowed for public comments - none were offered. Return to the business of completing the Rules of Order.

Article 7. Duties of the County Board Chairperson 1. The county board chairperson shall preside at county board meetings. 2. The chairperson shall transact all necessary county board business as required by §59.12(1). 3. The chairperson has the authority to appoint ad hoc and advisory committees. 4. Vacancies on the county board shall be filled by the county board chairperson and ratified by the county board. Recommendations may be submitted from town, village or city boards located within the supervisory district. Any vacancy on the county board shall be filled no later than thirty one days after the occurrence of any such vacancy. 5. The chairperson shall provide a monthly report to the county board that will include a report on travel taken and meetings attended with a summary of issues addressed, as well as travel and meetings planned in the future. 6. The chairperson shall develop an orientation meeting for newly elected supervisors prior to the organizational meeting. 7. The chairperson shall develop an annual county board budget report detailing total number of per diems, total mileage reimbursement and total expenses for training and seminars for each supervisor.

Article 7. Duties of the County Board Chairperson No. 3 should read: The chairperson has the authority to appoint ad hoc and advisory Committee members. Article 9. Compensation and Reimbursement Motion (Luke/Nelson) to add paragraph: If a noticed meeting is canceled because of lack of quorum, per diems will be paid. Motion carried by a roll call vote of 14 Yes/9 No. Vote on Motion (Brown/Masters) to adopt Resolution 14-12, as amended, carried by unanimous voice vote.

Article 8. Administrative Committee 1. There shall be an administrative committee of five members consisting of the county board chairperson; the first vice chairperson; the second vice chairperson and 2 members elected from the county board. 2. The county board chairperson shall be the chairperson of the administrative committee. 3. The fundamental purpose of the administrative committee shall be advisory to special-needs situations. When conflict exists between committees, the administrative committee shall mediate and recommend solutions prior to the matter being referred to the full county board. 4. The administrative committee serves as the county's ethics board. 5. The administrative committee shall consider revisions to the rules of order and provide recommendations to the county board. 6. The administrative committee shall have other duties and responsibilities as determined through resolution adopted and amended as appropriate by simple majority of the county board. 7. The administrative committee shall conduct the annual performance review of the county administrator. In addition, the committee shall review with the administrator his or her goals and objectives for the coming year. Recommendations shall then be forwarded to the county board for consideration.

Election of County Board Officers: Chairperson Johnson stepped down from chair, Second Vice Chair Dean Johansen stepped in to preside over that portion of the election of officers to allow for William Johnson to participate in the election of the county board chairman. The Board received nominations for county board chairperson as follows: William Johnson & Kristine Kramer-Hartung. Acting Chair Johansen declared nominations closed. Each candidate addressed the Board. Acting Chair Johansen called for the vote on the election of chairperson. Voting results: Supvr. Johnson received 15 and Supvr. Kramer-Hartung received 8. Supvr. Wm. Johnson IV was elected as chairman of the Board of Supervisors. Chairman Johnson resumed chair. Chairman Johnson received nominations for first vice chairperson as follows: Larry Jepsen, Dean Johansen & Kristine Kramer-Hartung. Nominations were declared closed. Chairman Johnson called for the vote. Voting results: Supvr. Jepsen 9, Supvr. D. Johansen 4 and Supvr. Kramer-Hartung 10. Chairman Johnson called for a second vote on account no nominee received a majority. Upon cast of second ballot between Supvr. Jepsen and Kramer-Hartung, the results were: Supvr. Jepsen 9 and Supvr. Kramer-Hartung 14. Supvr. Kristine Kramer-Hartung was elected as first vice chair. The following people were nominated from the floor for second vice chair: Dean Johansen and Herschel Brown. Nominations were declared closed. Voting results: Supvr. Dean Johansen 14 and Supvr. Brown 9. Supvr. Dean Johansen was elected second vice chair. Chairman closed the Public Hearing on the Proposed amendment to Ordinance No. 01-12. Committee Nomination/Selection, Appointment and Confirmation: Members of the county board were offered 3 different options for use in selecting their committee choices. 1. Nominating and electing by ballot as done in the past 2. Selection by seniority of returning members 3. Selection by self-nomination, as proposed by D. Johansen Motion (Bergstrom/Luke) to adopt option 3, the Johansen proposal for nominations. Motion carried by a roll call vote of 13 Yes/10 No. Changes to the option would evolve as it worked through the process. Chair called for a 10-minute break. The board reconvened.

Article 9. Compensation and Reimbursement 1. The county board shall consider revisions to the compensation and reimbursement of members of the county board of supervisors at its annual meeting of odd-numbered years and there fix the compensation of board members to be next elected by two-thirds vote, consistent with Wisconsin Statute Section 59.10(3)(f). 2. The county board chairperson, first vice chairperson and second vice chairperson shall receive compensation as set by said county board resolution 3. County board members shall receive per diem plus travel mileage, meals and lodging expenses as established by policy through resolution adopted and amended as appropriate by simple majority of the county board. 4. All county board reimbursement requests shall be presented monthly to the county clerk for review and approval by the county board chair. The county board chairperson’s reimbursement requests shall be approved by one of the vice chairpersons. Article 10. General 1. County board members shall conduct themselves in a respectful manner at all functions of Polk County interest. 2. County supervisors are subject to the Polk County Code of Ethics, adopted pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 19.59. 3. In the event that any provision of these rules of order is in conflict with federal, state or local law, such provision shall be null and void without affecting the validity of the remaining provisions of these rules of order. 4. All past rules in conflict with these rules of order are hereby rescinded. 5. In all questions relating to parliamentary procedure on the county board, the latest edition of Robert’s Rules of Order shall be the final authority. 6. Polk County Board of Supervisors Rules of Order shall be determined by a majority vote at the organizational meeting of a newly elected county board. After that time, amendments of these rules of order shall require a two-thirds vote of the county board of supervisors present at a properly noticed meeting except as provided within. 7. These rules of order shall be printed and each current and newly elected supervisor shall receive a copy. It will be the duty of the county board chairperson to maintain and update the rules of order as called for by the county board. 8. These rules of order shall be in force and effective after being accepted by the Polk County Board of Supervisors on April 17, 2012.

Appointment and Confirmation of Committee Membership: Highway 5 members needed Nominated (7): Warren Nelson, Marvin Caspersen, Craig Moriak, Jay Luke, Dean Johansen, Rick Scoglio and Tom Magnafici. Voting by ballot - Top 4 votes received went to Supvr. D. Johansen with 21, Supvr. Luke 19, Supvr. Moriak 18, Supvr. Caspersen 14. Supvr. Magnafici and Supvr. Nelson each with 13 votes. Voted a second ballot to break tie between Supvr. Nelson and Supvr. Magnafici. Supvr. Magnafici received 13 votes and Supvr. Nelson 10. Highway Committee: Supvr. D. Johansen, Luke, Moriak, Caspersen and Magnafici. Finance 5 members needed Nominated (6): Gary Bergstrom, Neil Johnson, George Stroebel, Brian Masters, Kathryn Kienholz and Kristine Kramer-Hartung. Voting by ballot Votes received went to Supvr. Bergstrom with 22, Supvr. Kramer-Hartung 22, Supvr. N. Johnson 20, Supvr. Stroebel 18, Supvr. Kienholz 16 and Supvr. Masters 10. Finance Committee: Supvr. Bergstrom, Kramer-Hartung, N. Johnson, Stroebel and Kienholz. Personnel 5 members needed Nominated (6): Russell Arcand, Tom Engel, Warren Nelson, Jared Cockroft, James Edgell and Pat Schmidt. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. Arcand 20, Supvr. Schmidt 19, Supvr. Engel 18, Supvr. Edgell 18 and Supvrs. Cockroft and Nelson each with 14 votes. Voted a second ballot to break tie between Supvr. Cockroft and Nelson. Supvr. Cockroft received 13 votes and Supvr. Nelson 10. Personnel Committee: Suvpr. Arcand, Engel, Cockroft, Edgell and Schmidt.

Res. 14-12 - Resolution To Adopt The Polk County Board Of Supervisors Rules Of Order For The Term Commencing April 17, 2012. Formulation and Adoption of the County Board Rules of Order. Motion (Brown/Masters) to adopt the Rules of Order as proposed by Supvr. Schmidt. Chairperson Johnson clarified the Board would consider amendments to the proposed rules offered by Supvr. Schmidt. The board considered the following amendments to the proposed Rules of Order: Article 2. Meetings Upon consensus of the Board, Strike last sentence in No. 1. Motion (Jepsen/Edgell) to insert a new No. 2: To create a Committee of the Whole and/or a Planning and Informational Meeting to be scheduled as needed. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Motion (Masters/Stroebel) to change wording on No. 5 from Two weeks to 10 days. Motion carried by voice vote.

Property 5 members needed Nominated (6): Larry Jepsen, Harry Johansen, William Johnson, James Edgell, Warren Nelson and Tom Engel. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. Jepsen 17, Supvr. H. Johansen 23, Supvr. Wm. Johnson 21, Supvr. Warren Nelson 16, Supvr. Engel 18 and Supvr. Edgell 12. Property Committee: Supvr. Jepsen, H. Johansen, Wm. Johnson, Engel and Nelson.

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Extension, Land & Water and Lime 4 members needed Nominated (5): Larry Jepsen, Dean Johansen, Wm. Johnson, Rick Scoglio and Herschel Brown. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. Jepsen 20, Supvr. D. Johansen 21, Supvr. Wm. Johnson 20, Supvr. Brown, 19 and Supvr. Scoglio 9. Extension, Land & Water and Lime Committee: Supvr. Jepsen, D. Johansen, Wm. Johnson and Brown.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29 Public Protection 5 members needed Nominated (7): Kathryn Kienholz, Brian Masters, Jared Cockroft, Gary Bergstrom, Kim O’Connell, Jay Luke and Rick Scoglio. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. Cockroft with 21, Supvr. Bergstrom 17, Supvr. O'Connell 18, Supvr. Luke 19, Supvrs. Kienholz and Masters each with 12 and Supvr. Scoglio with 8. Voted a second ballot to break tie between Supvr. Kienholz and Masters. Supvr. Kienholz received 12 votes and Supvr. Masters 11. Public Protection Committee: Supvrs. Cockroft, Luke, O'Connell, Bergstrom and Kienholz.

• Sign documents; and • Take necessary action to undertake, direct and complete the approved project. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Parks Department will comply with state or federal rules for the programs to the general public during reasonable hours consistent with the type of facility; and will obtain from the State of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources approval in writing before any change is made in the use of the project site. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 17, 2012. Submitted by: William Johnson and Larry Jepsen. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed only and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 17, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 15-12: Resolution For Outdoor Recreation Aids, carried by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 15-12 - Resolution For Outdoor Recreation Aids. Motion (Kienholz/ Stroebel) to approve. Motion to approve Resolution 15-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

Land Information 5 members needed Nominated (6): Kim O'Connell, Herschel Brown, Craig Moriak, Warren Nelson, James Edgell and Brian Masters. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. O'Connell with 18, Brown 21, Moriak 17, Edgell 21, Nelson 16 and Masters 13. Land Information Committee: Supvr. O'Connell, Brown, Moriak, Nelson and Edgell. Golden Age Manor Board 3 members needed Nominated (4): Harry Johansen, Neil Johnson, Rick Scoglio and Brian Masters. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. H. Johansen with 21, Supvr. Scoglio 19, Supvr. N. Johnson 17 and Supvr. Masters 8. Golden Age Manor Board: Supvrs. H. Johansen, N. Johnson and Scoglio. Remaining committees were filled by the board members and did not require a vote to complete. Human Services Committee: Supvrs. Arcand, Stroebel, Caspersen, KramerHartung and Masters. Board of Health: Supvrs. Schmidt, Magnafici, Masters and Scoglio.

RESOLUTION 16-12

AUTHORIZE 2012 HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS WHEREAS, the improvements of the County Trunk Highway System are of great importance to the residents of Polk County; and WHEREAS, the County has a responsibility to keep and maintain the County Trunk Highway system in repair; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Highway Committee has approved projects for FY 2012; and WHEREAS, the Highway Committee and the County Board has approved a budget to affect measured improvement on the projects approved by the Highway Committee for FY 2012; and WHEREAS, the County’s purchasing policy requires the County Board to take action and approve any and all public works projects over $150,000. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Highway Department to proceed on the following projects: CTH S1 - Ultrathin Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .325,600.00 CTH EE1 - Overlay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .141,900.00 CTH A1 - Chip Seal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87,700.00 CTH T1/T2/T3 - Chip Seals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101,000.00 CTH A3/A2 - Prep Work for 2013 Construction . . . .93,000.00 CTH E1 - Pulverize/Pave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1,090,000.00 BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that in the event the approved project costs exceed the estimated project cost, the Board authorizes the department to eliminate projects to meet budget constraints. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, those projects eliminated may be moved to future funding years. Funding amount: $1,839,200.00. Funding source: 2012 Highway Budget. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 17, 2012. Submitted at the request of the Polk County Highway Committee: Marvin Caspersen. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed only and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 17, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 16-12: Resolution To Authorize 2012 Highway Construction Projects, carried by a voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 16-12, Resolution To Authorize 2012 Highway Construction Projects. Motion (Luke/Moriak) to approve. Highway Commissioner, Steve Warndahl addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 16-12 carried by voice vote.

Administrative Committee 2 members needed Nominated (5): Brian Masters, Herschel Brown, Jay Luke, George Stroebel and James Edgell. Voting by ballot - Votes received went to Supvr. Masters with 5, Supvr. Brown 6, Supvr. Luke 13, Supvr. Stroebel 15 and Supvr. Edgell 8. Administrative Committee: Supvrs. Stroebel and Luke and Chairman Johnson, First Vice Chair Kramer-Hartung and Second Vice Chair D. Johansen. Motion (Brown/Nelson) to approve committees as selected. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Administrator’s report was given by Administrator Dana Frey. Motion (Hartung/Brown) to reconsider the Rules of Order and add a provision that stated that the start of every board meeting shall include the Pledge of Allegiance and Time for Reflection, with the Time for Reflection rotating to each board member. Order carried by voice vote.

ORDINANCE 01-12

AMENDMENT TO ORDINANCE NO. 01-12: ORDINANCE TO CREATE APPRAISAL COMMITTEE FOR SALE OF TAX DELINQUENT LANDS TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, On January 19, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors Ordinance No. 01-12, titled Ordinance to Create Appraisal Committee for Sale of Tax Delinquent Lands; and WHEREAS, said ordinance establishes a process for determining the appraised value that is used for selling at public sale properties which the county acquires through tax delinquency; and WHEREAS, said ordinance was proposed to utilize the flexibility afforded in Wisconsin Statute Section 75.69(1) in determining the appraisal value of such lands; and WHEREAS, in consultation with the Office of Corporation Counsel, the County Administrator has determined that the process established by the ordinance unduly restricts the flexibility in determining the appraised values of tax delinquent lands and the authority of the Polk County Property, Forestry and Recreation Committee to direct the sale of tax delinquent lands. NOW, THEREFORE, the Polk County Board of Supervisors does ordain to amend Ordinance No. 01-12, titled Ordinance to Create Appraisal Committee for Sale of Tax Delinquent Lands as follows: 1. Tax delinquent lands acquired by the county shall be sold pursuant to the direction of the Polk County Property, Forestry and Recreation Committee consistent with Section 75.69(1). 2. The Appraisal Committee Workgroup is created for the purpose of developing recommendations concerning determining the appraisal value of tax delinquent lands. 3. The Appraisal Committee Workgroup shall be composed of the county administrator, the county treasurer and the director of parks, forestry, buildings and solid waste. 4. The County Treasurer Appraisal Committee is authorized to contract with a certified real estate appraiser, as defined under Section 458.01(7), or another professional, as it the Appraisal Workgroup deems necessary, to develop recommendations concerning for making a determination of appraised value. 5. All costs and fees for such professional services shall be paid out of the tax deed expense account. 6. The Polk County Property, Forestry and Recreation Committee may shall sell such lands at the appraised value as determined and recommended by the Appraisal Committee Workgroup. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Date Submitted to County Board: March 20, 2012. County board action: Approved by unanimous voice vote. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Submitted and Sponsored by: Ken Sample, William Johnson and George Stroebel. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 17, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors enacted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 01-12: Ordinance To Create Appraisal Committee For Sale Of Tax Delinquent Lands. Approved by unanimous voice vote. Dated: April 27, 2012 William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: April 27, 2012 Ordinance 01-12 - Ordinance To Create Appraisal Committee For Sale Of Tax Delinquent Lands. Motion (Jepsen/Brown) to approve. Upon consensus of the board, in line 11, in the first WHEREAS clause, insert the word "adopted," between Supervisors and Ordinance. Motion to approve Ordinance 01-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Amendment to Ordinance adopted.

RESOLUTION 17-12

RESOLUTION TO CONSENT TO AND TO AUTHORIZE ISSUANCE OF ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY WITH ST. CROIX CHIPPEWA INDIANS OF WISCONSIN AND THE BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, the St. Croix Tribal Council is currently moving forward with a long-range transportation plan that includes adding to its Inventory local roads used by Tribal People, including, state, county and township roads; and WHEREAS, the goals of said initiative are to ensure that these roads are maintained to a satisfactory standard and to assist in funding and repairs through cooperative agreements with the governing entity; and WHEREAS, the process for adding a road to inventory involves required, among things, the consent of with Polk County to give the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin the authority to utilize an acknowledgement of public authority responsibility, or (APAR) agreement, for the purposes of generating funding through the Bureau of Indian Affairs for roads; and WHEREAS, the necessary consent and APAR does not transfer jurisdiction or responsibility to maintain any road from Polk County to the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 66.0301(2), Polk County is authorized to extend such consent. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 66.0301(2), the Polk County Board of Supervisors does consent to and authorize the issuance of an acknowledgment of public authority (APAR) between the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, Polk County, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), as attached hereto an incorporated herein. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that in accordance with Wisconsin Statute Section 66.0301(5)(b), any road or highway work that will be funded through Bureau of Indian Affairs moneys shall commence only after approval has been obtained from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Wisconsin Department of Transportation, the Polk County Board of Supervisors and the respective town board of the town in which such road or highway is located. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: April 17, 2012. Submitted and sponsored by: William Johnson. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed only by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on April 17, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 17-12: Resolution To Consent To And To Authorize Issuance Of Acknowledgement Of Public Responsibility With St. Croix Chippewa Indians Of Wisconsin And The Bureau Of Indian Affairs, by a simple majority vote of 23 in favor and 0 against. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: April 17, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: April 17, 2012

RESOLUTION 15-12

RESOLUTION FOR OUTDOOR RECREATION AIDS WHEREAS, the Polk County Parks Department is interested in developing lands for public outdoor recreation purposes as described in the application; and WHEREAS, financial aid is required to carry out the project. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Parks Department understands that matching funds and in-kind labor will be raised from noncounty sources; and HEREBY AUTHORIZES the Parks Director of the Polk County Parks Department to act on behalf of Polk County to: • Submit an application to the State of Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for any financial aid that may be available; • Complete reimbursement claim along with necessary supporting documentation with 6 months of project completion date;

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF PUBLIC AUTHORITY RESPONSIBILITY This Acknowledgement of Public Authority Responsibility is between the St. Croix Chippewa Indians of Wisconsin, Polk County, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA); and


PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Russell J. Karnes Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1054982 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719

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TAX KEY NO.: 048-00858-0000. Dated this 23rd day of April, 2012.

Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1777901

WHEREAS, the routes listed in attachment A. in Polk County are important to the TRIBE in that they serve the tribal community, tribal business and tribal members homes; and WHEREAS, the routes listed in attachment A. will continue under the jurisdiction of Polk County and open to the public for travel; and WHEREAS, the Tribe has an interest in ensuring these routes are maintained and in adequate repair. NOW, THEREFORE, the parties agree that: A. When and if adequate funding for needed improvements become available and the route numbers listed attachment A become approved projects for the Tribe and the Town, County, the Bureau of Indian Affairs may fund needed improvements to the County routes listed in the attachment under a separate cooperative funding agreement; and B. If needed improvements to the town’s routes are completed under a cooperative agreement between the Tribe, the County and the BIA, and Indian Reservation Roads funds participate in the project cost, the County will continue to own these routes and be responsible for the maintenance of these routes. C. This agreement is binding upon the signatories hereto not as individuals, but solely in their capacities as officials of their respective organizations and acknowledges proper action of County, Tribe and BIA to enter into the same. D. This agreement will become effective as of the last date of signature below. POLK COUNTY William Johnson, County Board Chairperson

By: ______________________________________

Date: ______________

Res. 17-12 - Resolution To Consent To And To Authorize Issuance Of Acknowledgement Of Public Responsibility With St. Croix Chippewa Indians Of Wisconsin And The Bureau Of Indian Affairs. Motion (Brown/Jepsen) to approve. Jeff Fuge, Corporation Counsel, addressed the resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 17-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Supervisors Reports were given Motion (Masters/H. Johansen) to adjourn. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned 4:25 p.m.

STATE OF WISCONSIN COUNTY OF POLK

) )

I, Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk for Polk County, do hereby certify that the foregoing minutes are a true and correct copy of the County Board Proceedings of the Polk County Board of Supervisors Session held on April 17, 2012. Carole T. Wondra Polk County Clerk

Date: April 17, 2012

Date: ______________

(April 25, May 2, 9) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. RIGGS FLOM, et al Defendant(s) Case Number: 11 CV 436 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 7, 2011, in the amount of $141,773.85, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 23, 2012, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in Outlot 42 of the Outlot Plat of the Village of Osceola, described as follows: Commencing at the East corner of Outlot 42 of the Outlot Plat of the Village of Osceola, as the same appears of record in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Polk County, Wisconsin; thence in a Westerly direction along the Northeasterly line of said Outlot, a distance of 80 feet; thence in a Southwesterly direction parallel to the Southeasterly line of said Outlot to the Southwesterly line of said Outlot; thence along the Southwesterly line of said Outlot to the Southeasterly line of said Outlot; thence in a Northeasterly direction to the place of beginning, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 607 Chieftain Street, Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 165-00402-0000. Dated this 13th day of April, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 287164

BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS

ST. CROIX CHIPPEWA INDIANS OF WISCONSIN By: ______________________________________

www.theleader.net

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PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1269 300th Avenue, Frederic, WI 54837.

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Default Judgment and Judgment entered and filed in the above-entitled action on March 29, 2012, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DAY/DATE/TIME: Thurs., June 7, 2012, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot Thirteen (13) of Certified Survey Map No. 3685 Recorded in Volume 16 of Certified Survey maps, Page 198 as Document No. 632322, being a part of Lot Nine (9) of Certified Survey Map No. 3661 Recorded in Volume 16 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 34 as Document No. 650638 located in the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 of SW 1/4), Section Thirty-Two (32), Township Thirty-Three (33) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 638 170th Street, Osceola, Wis.) Dated this 16th day of April, 2012. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#15803

(Apr. 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16, 23) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S&C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Daniel R. Johnson, Individual and Sole Proprietor, d/b/a Swedes Masonry, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 09 CV 929 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Molly E. GaleWyrick PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered April 26, 2010, in the amount of $181,175.54, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 31, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. PLACE: Foyer Area of Polk County Justice Center, West Main St., Suite 900, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. TERMS:10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. DESCRIPTION: The Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin, Except Commencing at the Southeast corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin, thence North along the forty line 300 feet; thence West parallel to the South line of said forty 500 feet; thence South parallel to the East line of said forty to the South line of said forty; thence East to the place of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2155 190th Street, Centuria, WI 54824. The common address is for reference purposes only. /s/Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, PLLP Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) Daniel P. Bakken (#1063925) 430 Second Street Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-3733 Attorneys for Plaintiff Eckberg Lammers is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you are currently in bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this is not an attempt to collect the debt from you personally.

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DESCRIPTION: A Parcel of land in the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 36, Township 37 North, Range 17 West, Town of West Sweden, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of said forty, thence West 544.5 feet, thence North 462 feet, thence East 544.5 feet, thence South 462 feet to the point of beginning. ALSO DESCRIBED AS: A Parcel of land in the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 36, Township 37 North, Range 17 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of said forty; thence West 544.5 feet; thence North 462 feet; thence East 544.5 feet; thence South 462 feet to the point of beginning, Polk County, Wisconsin.

(April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16, 23) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703, as assignee of The RiverBank, a Minnesota banking corporation, P.O. Box 188 304 Cascade Street Osceola, Wisconsin 54020 Plaintiff, vs. Pamela L. Fangmeier 638 170th Street Osceola, Wisconsin 54020, John Doe, Mary Roe and XYZ Corporation, Defendants. Case No. 11CV596 Case Type: 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

558333

PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI.

Notices/Employment opportunities

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TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances.

(Apr. 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. KATHRYN EMILY KAHLECK A/K/A KATHRYN E. HALLSTEIN, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 11 CV 452 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 17, 2011, in the amount of $102,499.37, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 29, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 5 of Certified Survey Map No. 2168 recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps on page 92 as Document No. 553482, located in part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 21, Township 33 North of Range 18 West; also being part of Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 1001, Volume 4, page 248, this being Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2074, Volume 9, Page 222; Town of Osceola, in Polk County, Wisconsin. AND The South 100 feet of Lot 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 2168 recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps on page 92 as Document No. 553482, located in part of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 21, Township 33 North of Range 18 West; also being part of Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 1001, Volume 4, page 248, this being Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2074, Volume 9, Page 222; Town of Osceola, in Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 862 218th St., Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 042-00448-0500. Dated this 30th day of March, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar # 1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 286565

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PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 23, 2011, in the amount of $87,318.88, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: May 30, 2012, at 10:00 a.m.

WNAXLP

Case No: 11 CV 473 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE

(Apr. 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb f/k/a S & C Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Harvey Jacobsen, Unknown Spouse of Harvey Jacobsen, Scott A. Jacobsen, Joel L. Jacobsen, Lisa Gunter, Amy Jacobsen, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 11CV163 Case Code: 30404 Judge: Jeffery L. Anderson PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered on February 3, 2011, in the amount of $39,129.46, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: May 31, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS:10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. The balance is due within 10 days of court approval of the sale. The purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Foyer Area, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main, Street, Suite 900, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. DESCRIPTION: Lots Five (5), Six (6), Seven (7) and Eight (8), Block Six (6), also a parcel of land in Lot Nine (9), Block Six (6) described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of said Lot 9, Block 6 of the Original Plat of the Village of Balsam Lake, thence 10 feet due South, thence West parallel with the North line of said Lot 9, 140 feet, thence due North to the Northwest corner of said Lot 9, thence East 140 feet to the place of beginning, all in the Original Plat of the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, located in the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW 1/4 NE 1/4), Section 10, Township 34 North, Range 17 West. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 605 Old Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, PLLP Joseph A. Larson (#1087685) Attorney for Plaintiff 430 Second Street Hudson, WI 54016 715-386-3733 Eckberg Lammers is attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you are currently in bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this letter is not an attempt to collect the debt from you personally. 557883

(May 2, 9, 16) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. GARY E. TSCHUMPERLIN, et al. Defendant(s)

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MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

National EMS Week: More than a job. A calling.

May 20-26 is National EMS Week, with the theme More than a job. A calling. Members of the North Land Municipal Ambulance volunteer crew, along with crew leaders, gathered for a photo at the Frederic Rural Fire Association building. Shown (L to R) are: Devin Douglas, Dr. Ben Watters, Regions EMS; Dan Morth, RN, EMT-P, Regions EMS; Vern Knauber, Andy Chartrand, Linda O’Donnell, Brent Hostrup, Kevin Douglas, Scott Douglas, Chad White, Jeremy Kwolek, Lisa Lehrke, RaeAnn Allen, Brenda Douglas, Kelly Belisle, Jennifer Arjes, Lonna Coddington, Sue Ames-Lillie, Sherman Lillie and Lori Hostrup. Not shown: Will Bartlett, Paul Burritt, Jordan Coddington, Adrianna DeBoer, Mike DeBoer, Cassie Dehmer, Debbie Fredericks, Ken Hackett, Bill Hallanger, Jennifer Haraldson, Candice Hicks, Brent Johnson, Leonard Knauber, Luke Knauber, Corey Laqua, Erin Liljenberg, Jeremy Lindner, Robin Lundblade, Brian Michael, Jennifer Mikl, Kirk Miller, Harry Newville, Dennis O’Donnell, Rick Penberthy, Tony Peterson, Clint Pfluger, Leanne Richter, Sharon Reidman, Lisa Robbin, Pete Runnels, Alissa Steiner, Melissa Thompson, James Tinman, Kurt Vail and Tracy Vail. The North Land Municipal Ambulance Board of Directors expressed gratitude to all the volunteers and their families for “everything they do for our community.” - Photo by Becky Amundson

Burnett Dairy expansion

Work has been steadily progressing on Burnett Dairy’s $7 million expansion, which, when completed will include a larger retail cheese store, more cheese inventory storage space, equipment upgrades, as well as other plant improvements. Completion is set for mid-June. - Photos by Priscilla Bauer

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PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - MAY 9, 2012

Governor promotes tourism; drops a fi fisshing line

Governor’s Fishing Opener 2012 held at Bay Park Resort on Trego Lake

by Jessica Beecroft Washburn County Register WASHBURN COUNTY - Gov. Scott Walker was in Trego this past weekend for the 47th-annual Governor’s Fishing Opener on Saturday, May 5. “He could have been anywhere, but he chose to spend the opener with us to promote tourism in northwestern Wisconsin,” said Peter Drake, president of Wisconsin Indian Head Country and emcee of the Friday night banquet in Spooner that kicked off the event. Washburn County Executive Director of Tourism Michelle Voight was smiling as Stephanie Klett, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Tourism, announced that Washburn County has had an increase of more than $1 million over last year. “You are up $1 million,” she said. “That’s huge! Tourism is a multibillion industry, and it was great to have the governor here today. It went from $14.8 billion to overall expenditures of $16 billion. It’s been a really wonderful year, and a lot of that has to do with fishing!” Walker said the event is a great way to promote tourism in Wisconsin. “Every year we have almost 400,000 people come in to fish. They come in from outside of our state’s borders, and they spend more than a quarter of a billion dollars on retail. So, it’s an important part of tourism.

Gov. Scott Walker shows reporters the size of the fish he expected to catch on Trego Lake last Saturday morning, May 5, during the Governor’s Fishing Opener event. He tested the observation of the media to see if they noticed the size indicated by fingers on his right hand. - Photos by Jessica Beecroft “You go to get away from it all,” Walker continued. “You go to get away from business, away from work, away from politics. On the lake it’s just a good time to enjoy yourself, and that’s what I hope people are out here doing as well.” The Bay Park Resort and Campground on Trego Lake hosted the event this year. Co-owners Dan and Anita Frase enjoyed hosting the opener. They had several guides available for people who attended. Local and state government officials, along with several local business leaders, including Jack Link and Jake Leinenkugel, came out to enjoy the event.

“Sales always go up for the fishing opener,” said Leinenkugel of the Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing Company based in Chippewa Falls. While the governor didn’t get a fish into the boat, he did get some nibbles, according to his local guide, Tom Ricci. Before they left the dock to fish Ricci said,

Co-owners of the Bay Park Resort on Trego Lake, Dan and Anita Frase, hosted the Governor's Fishing Opener 2012. “We’re going fishing. I don’t know if we’ll catch anything, but we’re going fishing.” Although Walker continued the governor’s fishing opener streak and didn’t catch a fish this year, he says it’s never a bad day when you are on the water. Brief video of governor’s comments from Trego Lake can be seen at www.theleader.net

Colorful sky

Gov. Walker was able to escape the pressures of political life, if even for just a few hours, as he dropped a line in Washburn County’s Trego Lake last Saturday morning, May 5. His guides for the morning were Washburn County Supervisor Tom Ricci, District 6 (far right), and his son.

A double rainbow made for a dramatic sky scene near Amery earlier this week. - Photos by John Reed Cathy Stepp, secretary of the Wisconsin DNR, Stephanie Klett, secretary Wisconsin Department of Tourism, and Gov. Scott Walker enjoyed the Friday night banquet at the Northwoods Sports Complex in Spooner before the opener.


WED., MAY 9, 2012 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

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Honorary chairs of ACS walks have positive stories Feeling like a survivor “She’s pretty amazing” Six-year-old survivor leads Frederic cancer walk by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer FREDERIC — Karli Bartlett has the mixed blessing of being the youngest honorary walk chairperson that Frederic has ever had. Now just 6 years old, the daughter of Chris and Beth Bartlett of rural Luck underwent more than two years of chemotherapy before being declared cancer-free last September. Nearly three years ago, in June 2009, Karli woke up one morning with what her parents thought might be symptoms of a bladder infection. Within hours, she was at Children’s Hospital in Minneapolis, with a diagnosis of leukemia. Judy Erickson She spent six days in the hospital, undergoing intense rounds of chemotherapy. Erickson began to have pain around the Once a week, for the next six months, surgical incision, only to discover she had Karli traveled to Minneapolis for treata staph infection. In addition, because the ment. After that, it was once a month. lymph nodes had been removed, her body Throughout the entire time, she was given was retaining fluid and her ankles were chemotherapy medications at home every swelling. day. “I was scared at the momentum with “She did really good,” said her mom, which everything was occurring,” she Beth. “It made her tired, but she didn’t said, “as well as a lack of medical support get really sick from it.” for dealing with the psychological effects Friends and family were indispensable of my own mortality and during the months of treatthe cancer.” The Luck and Frederic ments. During the first Erickson asked her doc- American Cancer Society week, when Beth and Chris tor what would happen if walk/run events will be were in Minneapolis with she chose not to undergo held this Saturday morn- Karli, friends came over to any treatment. “She very clean the house so the fambluntly said I would die ing, May 12, rain or shine. ily would not need to think anywhere within two about housekeeping for the months to two years, at the most,” was the first few days after coming home. response. For the first six months, these same Because she still had the staph infection, friends and family members organized a Erickson’s daughter asked whether it meal rotation, so that meals were prowould be better to resolve that issue be- vided to the family at least three nights a fore starting treatment, but the doctor said week. that treatment must be started immediThe chemo treatments weakened Karli’s ately. immune system, making her more vulnerTwo treatment options were given. One able to sickness. was a clinic study with Avastin, a biologic Anytime her temperature went up, the antibody designed to bind a protein, in- Bartletts needed to call the hospital, often terfering with the growth of tumors by needing to take her in to have the fever blocking the growth of new blood vessels. treated. “After much thought and review of the Karli has an older sister and a younger side effects and length of time required for brother. Brent was only 1-1/2 years old the clinical trial,” she said, “I opted for the when Karli was diagnosed, and Kaitlin most extensive chemotherapy offered.” was 7-1/2. “I chose not to go with the study that “They spent a lot of time at was available as I would have been put in Grandma’s,” said Beth. “They dealt with a lottery for the treatment I would receive it pretty good. Our family and our friends along with the drug Avastin,” she said. were very supportive through the whole “Avastin was being used for breast cancer thing.” at that time. I did not want to risk not getIt was their family, friends and faith that ting the best treatment possible.” helped the Bartletts through what she Avastin, she noted, has since been dis- called some dark and hard times. Knowcontinued as a treatment for breast and ing she has a God to trust, who loves unovarian cancer. conditionally, and listens to prayer, she The treatment Erickson chose was mul- said, is something she will always be tipronged. Drugs were delivered through grateful for. ports in Erickson’s chest and abdomen, One of the side effects of the chemotherfollowed by injections and water. apy was a tightening of the ligaments, muscles and tendons in Karli’s ankles. See Erickson, page 4 This meant regular physical therapy, as

Karli Bartlett well as leg braces for a while. Her balance was also affected, and Karli is still working to regain the coordination and strength she is lacking due to the treatments. Although the Bartletts have good insurance through Chris’ work at the village of Frederic, there were uncovered expenses for the family. In order to allow Karli to be home, given her weakened immune system, the couple agreed that Beth should give up her work at a day care, so their income was reduced. “It was worth it to be able to stay home with her,” said Beth. Friends and family organized a benefit for Karli, held in September of 2009 at Coon Lake Park. About that same time, she was recognized by the American Red Cross when a blood drive was held in Frederic in her honor. In 2010, a friend helped write a referral to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and Karli’s wish was granted. Her wish was to go to Disney World, and in June 2010, a year after her diagnosis, her wish came true. The entire family went to Florida for a week, staying at Give Kids the World, a nonprofit “storybook resort” for kids fighting illness and their families. The family received passes to Disney World, where Karli was able to meet and have breakfast with princesses. They went to the beach and saw the ocean, and just enjoyed time together as a family. Beth says that she and Chris plan to “pay it forward,” by returning to Give Kids the World to volunteer, bringing family and friends along to help, too. That way, she said, other children and other families can enjoy the same experience they were able to have. Another great support they found was in Hope Kids, an organization that provides special events for children fighting illness. These events are free, and include group birthday parties, a day at a water park and many other special activities.

See Bartlett, page 4

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by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — It took more than a year after being declared free of cancer, but the honorary chair for the Luck American Cancer Society Walk/Run now believes it when she says, “I am a cancer survivor.” 2012 honorary chair Judy Erickson and her husband, Donald, have had a lake home on Bone Lake since 1981. With help from Judy’s stepson, Dan, and his wife, Dawn, the couple built the home with 40,000 pounds of logs, “like tinker toys,” she said. They later sold it to Dan and Dawn in order to build their own “little hideaway” on the property. It was in June 2010 that Erickson, now 72, was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. “I felt like it was a death sentence,” she said. “It was totally unexpected.” Since a hysterectomy in the 1980s, Erickson had experienced continued problems with ovarian cysts. Each time she had the blood test for ovarian cancer, however, the cancer indicator was always within the normal range. June 10, 2010, she went in for what was planned as a simple laparoscopic surgery to remove her ovaries. Because the cancer indicator was always normal, the surgery was expected to be a simple procedure. “The doctor noticed some irregularities,” she recalls, “and decided to send my ovaries in for testing. One of them had burst during the procedure and did not look normal.” Erickson waited for the results, but never anticipated that the doctor would call and tell her she had at least stage one ovarian cancer. She was referred to an oncology surgeon and another surgery was scheduled for July 7, which was the soonest that it could take place following her initial recovery. Anything inside the abdomen that wasn’t needed, including the appendix, all the lymph glands and any cancer cells the doctor could find, were removed. “They removed a 3.5-centimeter tumor and scraped the bones to remove any lingering cancer cells,” said Erickson. “The doctor said she removed a number of silky stringlike strands which were cancerous, and weren’t the type of cancer she normally sees when she goes in to do the surgery.” The doctor confirmed that the cancer had spread, and that it was a stage three cancer. A port was inserted in Erickson’s abdomen for the treatment they would recommend. “I sure didn’t feel like there was much hope,” she said. Erickson had still more to deal with. Four days after leaving the hospital, she suffered a partial obstruction and had to return for emergency treatment. “I thought I had the flu and was reluctant to go back to the hospital,” she said. “I was experiencing extreme abdominal pain and vomiting. I had to stay in the hospital for three days until they were sure the obstruction had been cleared.” Once again released from the hospital,


PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

FFA draft horse exhibition

Luck

Dennis O’Donnell, of Frederic, gets ready to hook his horses and Robert Hendricks’ horse up to a disc during the annual FFA draft horse competition held Saturday, May 5. Spectators watched demonstrations of early plowing techniques when horsepower meant exactly that.

Russ Coen guides his team of Percherons as he demonstrates an early model plow. At right, Luck resident Josh Hawkins rides along with his uncle, Leon Hawkins, who provided wagon rides during the FFA draft horse demonstrations.

Teams of draft horses were put to a good workout Saturday as part of a demonstration on how farmers of yesteryear relied on work horses to work their fields. The demonstration was sponsored by the local Future Farmers of America chapter. - Photos by Becky Amundson

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Three women

MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

Just for

were out clubbing, and they spotted a club that said, “Women Only.” Since they were Joe Roberts without their boyfriends and husbands, they decided to go in. The first floor had a sign on the door that read, “All men here are short and ugly.” The women laughed and continued up to the second floor. The sign read, “All men here are tall and ugly.” Still this wasn’t good enough, and the women proceeded to the third floor. A sign said, “All men here are short and handsome.” The women still wanted more and went to the fourth floor, where the sign read, “All men here are tall and handsome.” The girls thought this was perfect and the women were preparing to go in, when they realized that there was still one more floor. They went up one floor and read the sign. “There are no men here. This floor is built only to prove that there is no way to please a woman.”

Laughs

Leader reader

Would you like a place to share a thought, an observation or a funny story? Would you like to have input in the life of the Send reflections to: community by just the-leader@centurytel.net making a comment, not writing a signed, more lengthy letter to the editor? This is your chance. Submit your short comments, funny stories, etc., by mail or e-mail to Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 or the-leader@centurytel.net, attn: Reflections

Reflections

Frederic awards program Monday FREDERIC - An Evening of Excellence senior awards program will be on Monday, May 14, at 8 p.m. in the performance center gymnasium at the Frederic Area 6-12 School. Scholarships and other awards will be presented. Members of the community are welcome to come and support this year’s graduates. - submitted

Grantsburg choir pop concert is Friday

GRANTSBURG - Choirs from grades seven through 12, as well as the CLC After School Choir, will join on Friday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m., in the Grantsburg High School auditorium for the final concert of the year, “This Is Why We Sing.” The concert will be followed by an ice-cream social in the commons. The music being performed is popular, folk, and show tunes from many different eras, featuring songs from the movies “Singin’ in the Rain” and “The Wizard of Oz” to current songs by Sugarland and Katy Perry. There will be something for everyone. Performing are the fourth- through sixth-grade CLC Choir, seventh- and eighth-grade choir, Swingin’ Sisters and the Lil’ Bros, ladies swing choir, Travelers, vocal jazz ensemble and, of course, the high school choir. Audience members are invited to join the choirs in the commons after the concert for root-beer floats or ice-cream sundaes. The high school choir will be asking for a donation as a fundraiser for a future choir tour. The GHS senior quilt display and art show will be available in the gym before the concert. - submitted

An honest fisherman

Cold Turkey

When Jesus went about Israel in search of some disciples he avoided doctors, lawyers and presidents of major corporations beJohn W. Ingalls cause he was looking for character. That is why he chose fishermen. I can’t really say what went through his mind when he picked the tax collector but apparently it worked out OK. Fishermen have what it takes to make the world a better place. When confronted with a project that needs to be completed before we can go fishing, we attack it with purpose and determination. The other endearing quality of a true fisherman is honesty. I know there are fishermen, fisherwomen, fisherchildren and probably even transgender fisherpeople out there but for the purposes of this discussion “fisherman” or “fishermen” is inclusive of all who wet a line in pursuit of slippery, scaled water dwellers. Having a broad definition for fishermen however may lead to entirely different stories about the same event which would seem to be contradictory. You must also realize that there are casual fishermen, weekend fishermen and true-true fishermen. Depending on which category a person is in could also determine the mar-

I once took a bus from Kenya

Letters from

to Tanzania. The bus was overcrowded. The paved road ended after a few miles and the road we traveled was under construction. There was no air-con- Carrie Classon ditioning, so we had to keep the windows open. Everyone on the crowded bus was covered in sweat and soon became covered in red dust. Eventually, we came to the border crossing as we exited Kenya and got our passports stamped. We reboarded the bus and bumped along for another half hour before we got out and had our passports stamped again as we entered Tanzania. I never knew where I was for that half hour between borders, but I feel like I have been between borders for a while now. Being neither in nor out of a relationship is an awkward place to be. Admitting that there is a space between “me” and “we” is hard. Figuring out where the boundaries are is tricky. The temptation to ignore the warning signs in order to keep the peace, maintain the status quo, enjoy one more day together, is powerful. I had to roll along a dusty road for quite a while before I finally conceded that Daniel and I were no longer in “we,” but I had crossed the border into “me.” Added to the discomfort was the feeling that I had to explain the sudden disappearance of someone who had been an integral part of my columns for more than two years. If this was fiction, I would create a snazzy finish in which the “Daniel” character disappeared (perhaps to pursue a movie deal or to star in a series on another network). I would have his car careen off a cliff after a high-speed chase, have him kidnapped by the mafia, or contract a rare but terminal disease (which would in no way affect his

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leading-man looks). Fortunately for both Daniel and my karma, I have never wished any of these fates on the real Daniel. But after spending a bit of time in the country of “me,” a funny thing happened. Both Daniel and I realized how much we missed and valued our time in “we.” A return visit confirmed it. So we are traveling together again. There is of course a risk in saying too much too soon. But I decided some time ago that there was nothing in my life that was so remarkable that most people would not have gone through something similar. Writing honestly about my private life is just an admission that I am going through the messy and imperfect process of being human. Daniel says we learn the biggest lessons while in a relationship and I think he is right. I have certainly learned a lot in this one. I came into the relationship with a little baggage and so did he. Little did we suspect that we would end up with matching luggage. It may be that neither of us was quite as ready for a serious relationship as we thought. But, like a lot of journeys, if I waited for the perfect time I would never go anywhere. Daniel and I started out with some preconceptions, some misconceptions, and a whole lot of imperfections. Somehow, we survived it all by doing just one thing well. We talk. Conversation makes the journey from “me” to “we” easier and the border less forbidding. I would be foolish to say I know how this journey ends so I will end here. And we’re still talking. Till next time, —Carrie

Luck School and Community Expo and Talent Show set LUCK - On Thursday, May 24, Luck School will host an evening of educational fun and entertainment. From 5 to 6:45 p.m., the school commons will showcase a wide variety of interests for school families and community members alike. There is no cost to attend, and there will be drawings for door prizes. For more information or to claim a space for your organization or business, please contact Luck Community Ed. director, Amy Aguado, at 715-472-2152 Ext. 103 or e-mail amya@lucksd.k12.wi.us. At 7 p.m., the second-annual talent show, sponsored by the Luck National Honor Society, will take place in the elementary gym. Entries are welcome from students in grades 6-12 in the area school districts of Frederic,

Siren, Grantsburg, Unity, St. Croix Falls and Luck. There is a $10 entry fee which will be used as prize money for first, second and third places. Any remaining proceeds will go to the Luck NHS fund. Spectators are encouraged to come and enjoy a funfilled evening. Admission fee for the talent show is only $2. There will be a bake sale during intermission. Entry forms for the talent show are available at the high school offices for the schools listed, or go online and click on the link at www.lucksd.k12.wi.us. For more information, contact Luck NHS advisor Mrs. Renee Gavinski at 715472-2152 Ext. 140 or e-mail reneeg@lucksd.k12.wi.us. submitted

Senior center partners with UCare for membership drive ST. CROIX FALLS - The St. Croix Valley Senior Center, located downtown St. Croix Falls, is partnering with UCare in a membership drive. Five free memberships are due to be given away to first-time members, along with a free lunch for all on Tuesday, May 15, beginning at 11 a.m.

Along with lunch, those who are interested will also receive a free blood pressure check. Senior citizens are welcome to come and enjoy the friendship, fine facility and yummy food. If you have questions regarding this event and/or renting the facility for your own use, call the senior center at 715-483-1901. - submitted

Mother's Day plant sale set

Johnson-Magraw concert postponed

WANDEROOS – Need some plants to fill in those bare spots where plants didn’t winter-over this year? Looking for some different plants to try? Wanting to start a new garden project? Have we got the answer for you. Check out the Polk County Master Gardener Volunteers fifth-annual plant sale held in conjunction with the Wanderoos Fire Department’s annual Mother's Day pancake breakfast at the Wanderoos Fire Department Hall on Sunday, May 13, from 8 a.m. through 1 p.m. - submitted

gin of error in any story. A casual fisherman tends to be more precise whereas a true-true fisherman would tend to estimate. Someone at the boat landing might ask “How many fish did MD you catch?” The true fisherman would respond, “A pail full” if the fishing was poor. Of course we don’t know the size of the pail either. The weekender would reply “A few” and the casual fisherman (son or daughter of the true fisherman) would say “We only caught three.” If the fishing was great then the true fisherman would likely say “We got a couple.” Many fishermen stop counting after 10 anyway unless they happen to be barefoot so exact numbers are always estimates. Numbers of fish caught and the size of the fish caught are both subject to inflationary pressure. This isn’t a distortion of the truth but rather a normal process. If you put some money into an interest-bearing account (these aren’t available anymore) you would expect the balance to increase with time. It is the same with fishing. Fish brought into the boat have a slower growth rate than those that were just close to the boat. Many fishermen now practice catch and release which is good for the fishing resource. It is al-

ST. CROIX FALLS - Due to a variety of circumstances, the Saturday, May 12, concert at the Festival Theater in St. Croix Falls is being postponed and will be rescheduled for fall 2012. Ticket holders can get an immediate refund or hold their tickets until the fall concert. - submitted

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/intercountyleader ways better to release them about 4 feet from the boat because these are the largest fish. I have had many fish caught and released over the years that have grown to respectable sizes but only those released about 4 feet from the boat were true trophy caliber. I am sure some of them were near world records. Paul Quinnett, noted psychologist, author and fisherman, commented on this phenomenon. He realized that fishermen never lie, they just “round up.” The idea that successful anglers are secretive about their best spots is actually a misunderstanding by the general public. A true fisherman is always willing to reveal his or her secret locations, especially to those novices wishing to graduate to the next level. “Where did you catch ‘em?” The casual fisherman would logically give driving instructions along with the GPS location but the true fisherman would simply respond, “Potato Lake.” The true angler isn’t lying. “Potato Lake” is the name he has bestowed on all the good spots and after a few years it is very likely that he doesn’t remember the original name anyway. An honest fisherman is a conundrum to some and an oxymoron to others but the truth as spoken by a true fisherman should never be questioned. Remember, true fishermen always round up.


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Erickson/from page 1

Treatment began in August. “Fortunately,” she said, “I had a neighbor who is also a nurse, and she came over to administer the fluids and injections.” One of the drugs affected her kidneys, and after the third round of treatment, this was changed to a different drug. She describes the treatments as “excruciating,” particularly the shots she needed to administer to help her bone marrow replace white blood cells. “This made my joints ache terribly,” she said, “After the first treatment I thought to myself, ‘I don’t know if I can do this.’ But with determination and the support of my wonderful family, friends, neighbors, and my belief in God, I made it through.” Her oldest daughter, Julie, was at every chemo treatment, said Erickson, and kept an ongoing journal of her mother’s journey. “My husband and her were my constant companions,” she said. “My son, daughter-in-law, and daughter would come over to the house and play cards or just visit. I have a sister who lives close, so she would bring food and visit occasionally.” All in all, though, it was a long four months, she said. Erickson completed her treatments Nov. 25, the day before Thanksgiving. She is in the minority — due to the discomfort and the side effects, less than 20 percent of the women who undergo this treatment are actually able to

See a spark, light a fire When Steven Spielberg was eight, like many young boys, he loved to torture his sisters. Once, caught in the passions of creativity, he cut off the head of a doll, put it on a plate of lettuce, and proudly displayed it around the house. According to Leah Adler, his mother, life with young Spielberg was often unsettling. Instead of therapists and drugs, however, Adler was patient. When he was 12 Spielberg received his first Super 8 video camera and he was off. He’d found his spark. Have you seen that spark in a child you know? Do you know a child still searching for theirs? Picture for a moment, a young person – preferably one you know well. See this youth clearly in your mind’s eye. Got it? Great. Now let me ask you one simple question: What is your highest aspiration for this child? Is it to ace a standardized test? Get a good job? Be safe? Make lots of money? Stay out of trouble? Probably not. We don’t use this kind of language to describe our dreams for our kids. No, for this we use words like joy, love, compassion, excitement. We want our kids to fall in love with life. We want them to be generous and passionate with their contributions. In short, we want our youth to thrive. The problem, according to Peter Benson, former longtime CEO of Minneapolis-based Search Institute, is that only a quarter of our youth are actually on a path to thriving. Which means one in three of our kids, aren’t living with purpose, engagement and joy, but with isolation, emptiness and confusion. The solution? Benson believed it’s all about something he called “spark” – that feeling we get when we’re engaged in something that gives us a sense of unique and energizing purpose. We’ve all felt it. The key, says Benson, is to help kids identify their sparks, and then support their exploration of it. After interviewing close to 10,000 middle and high school students, The Search Institute has discovered some interesting things:

Bartlett/from page 1 finish. Her first PET/CT scan, done in December, showed she was clear of cancer. This was later confirmed at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. “My comment was, ‘You have to be kidding.’ I never expected that it would be clear, and I didn’t know if I could take any more treatments. “What a relief and reprieve. I had lost all my hair and about 20 pounds during the treatment.” Erickson has had three PET/CT scans since, including one just last month, and all have been clear. “It’s always a cross-your-fingers-and-toes time before the scan,” she said, “but I’m feeling very grateful for the reprieve I have had. “I know they continue to come up with new treatments and someday, I sincerely hope, there will be a cure for cancer.” Erickson says she was told on more than one occasion that she had a very good attitude throughout the ordeal. “Maybe that does help,” she said, “but I feel you need more than that going for you.” She credits her recovery to faith, persistence, family support and determination, and is grateful that she can now say that she is a cancer survivor. “My heart goes out to all cancer victims,” she said. “Hang in there, and chose life.”

We teach, we learn Chris Wondra

• Kids get it. When explained to them, 100 percent understand what spark is. They know if they have it and can point out kids that are missing it. • Two-thirds can immediately name for themselves at least one spark. Another 20 percent can name a spark after a bit of encouragement. • Barely half say that someone in their family recognizes their spark. One-third say someone at school recognizes it, and one-quarter say someone else in the community can see it. According to Benson, child needs three things in order to thrive:

• A spark • Three spark champions who see it, name it, and support it, and • Opportunities to express it. Today, more than ever, our youth need us to see them – to see their unique gifts, to recognize, name and nurture their sparks. It’s a shift from our traditional focus on test scores, college prep, and career readiness. But it’s vital that we begin to realize the genius within each of us – and that creative innovation comes from the inside (of a person) out, not the other way around. “Our youth are fires to be lit, not vessels to be filled,” Benson says. Our job is to recognize and nurture that unique spark, that inner fire, emerging within each young person today. Our future depends upon it. Chris Wondra is a Wisconsin middle school teacher and founder of We Teach We Learn, a platform for educators and parents to connect over conversations about effective teaching and learning. Learn more at www.weteachwelearn.org or find We Teach We Learn on Facebook or Twitter.

“It’s been really nice,” said Beth. “Without my income we’ve still been able to do things as a family.” Chris and Beth had been warned by the doctors that Karli’s illness could have a strong impact on Kaitlin and Brett. Kaitlin especially recognized the attention that Karli was receiving, but came through those months strong, said Beth. A key factor, she said, was in making sure that Kaitlin always felt safe talking to her parents about how she was feeling. Beth also had a place to process her thoughts and to record everything that happened, and that was at CaringBridge. She established a Web page, updating friends and family on what was going on and giving them an opportunity to encourage her, Karli and the rest of the family. In November 2009, during the months of weekly chemotherapy treatments, Beth reflected on some of the things she was learning through the process. She wrote: “I have had lots of opportunities this weekend to realize how dominant love can be in a family. I have spent many moments just watching my kids play and have fun. I have also looked at my husband and realize how proud I am of him. Love is a powerful thing, and I love my family more than words could ever describe. It is hard to imagine my life without them. They also have shown so much compassion and love toward each other. Karli is going through a rough time right now, but she still finds compassion for her siblings. She asks Kaitlin how school was every day when she gets home. If Brett takes a digger, she asks him if he is OK. She is an amazing little girl, so let’s take a lesson from her today. I challenge everyone to show compassion and love toward someone today.” Beth acknowledged that, at times, life seemed very hard and the future looked very dark. But Karli’s illness caused Beth and Chris to prioritize their lives, and they found themselves noticing more of what their children were doing and of the world around them. “We would just stop and watch the kids more, pay more attention to every little thing,” she said. Beth describes the 2-1/2 years as “a blurr.” She remembers specific things but not specific days. “My husband and I have talked about how we lived day by day,” she said. “We always had our suitcase packed in case Karli got sick and we needed to go to the hospital.” Last September, when Karli was declared clear and her treatments were completed, Children’s Hospital had a party to celebrate the occasion. They had another party at home to mark when she took her last in-home medication. She is now in kindergarten, involved in dance, soccer and T-ball. She is learning to read and loves making new friends. Each month, for the next five years, she will need to have her blood counts checked. By that time, Karli will be almost 11 years old. By that point, after five years, research shows that recurrence is much less likely. After that, said Beth, there is a much smaller chance that the cancer will come back. The monthly blood checks are a good thing, said Beth. “It eases our worry quite a bit,” she said. Karli will say a few words at the start of the 2012 American Cancer Society Walk/Run in Frederic Saturday, May 12. This will be the third year her family has participated by organizing a team. “She’s really excited she gets to be a leader this year,” said her mom. “She’s a very compassionate little girl and understands a lot more than most kids her age. “She’s pretty amazing.”

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MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

Marlene "Molly" Olson honored by statewide health-care program

Do you remember?

GRANTSBURG - “Little did I know 30 years ago, I was training to care for my aging husband at home,” states Molly Olson, a certified nursing assistant at the continuing care center in Grantsburg. “These comments express Molly’s dedication to lifelong learning and her heartfelt commitment to her chosen profession of health care” said Burnett Medical Center CEO Gordy Lewis. Olson was recently recognized and published by The Wisconsin Health Care Employee Pride Program, sponsored by the Wisconsin Hospital Association. This pride program is designed to celebrate the health-care workforce and recognize the outstanding contributions they make to the health of their communities, according to WHA President Steve Brenton. “Wisconsin’s reputation for having high-quality health care was built by the dedicated professionals who staff our organizations,” Brenton said. “Whether they are on the front lines, or supporting those who deliver patient Marlene “Molly” Olson, certified nursing assistant at Burnett care, every health-care employee contributes to making Medical Center (center), is congratulated by Burnett Medical our communities safer and healthier places to live and Center CEO Gordy Lewis and Carol Ahlquist, continuing care work.” center administrator. - Photo submitted Employees were asked to describe what led them to choose an occupation in health care. Olson’s submission meetings, my education is ongoing. Fortunately, as I age the equipment improves, from the early days of crankincluded the following: “I have learned perseverance and patience. I have up Hoyer lifts to E-Z lifts and stands with push buttons. worked with many behaviors, health issues and person- We have better methods of transfers, and we practice a alities of all ages. I have found that a sense of humor “low lift” policy, saving our backs. “I plan to retire in 2-1/2 years. Until then, I will “hoe with co-workers and residents helps set the mood. “I have welcomed new staff and encouraged them as my row to the end.” - with submitted information they adjust. Through our monthly PEAK topics and staff

50 Years Ago

Compiled by Sue Renno

Men's ministry donates to Siren Senior Center Recently, the Siren Covenant Men’s Ministry made a donation of $400 to the Siren Senior Center. Pictured are Judy Johnson, treasurer, holding Angel, and Barb Geske, president of the senior center, and Jerry Tjader for the men’s ministry. – Photo submitted

The Stokely-Van Camp cannery at Frederic would be restored, after go-ahead from company headquarters in Indianapolis was given. The warehouse would be rebuilt and the plant would look much the same as it had before the fire.-A fire destroyed the home of the Art Woodman family in the Town of Lorain.-Mary Ann Hill was Frederic’s prom queen and Jerry Huser was king. A separate photo showcased the crown bearers – Charvey Spencer, MaryLyn Thor and Bryan Weinzierl.H.D. Klein of Big Rock Creek Farm, two miles north of St. Croix Falls, had two 90-foot poles, each with a 5foot wagon wheel attached to the top, set up on his land to attract nesting bald eagles. Eldo Bengtson, Frederic, was hired to raise the poles.-Thirty-nine seniors would be graduating at Siren. Valedictorian was Virginia Icard and salutatorian was Sheri Grindell.-Officers elected for the Fishbowl Coin Club were Wally Shramek, president; John Hanson, vice president; and Father Joseph Kelchak, secretary-treasurer.-A fire at the farm of Raymond Stauter, Grantsburg, destroyed three buildings and killed 4,000 chickens.-Dennis Langkos was presented the Honor Athlete Award at the Unity athletic banquet.-Falun Day would be May 12, with a noon meal, prizes and music, sponsored by local businesses.

40 Years Ago The health screening bus, which had made stops all over Polk County, was being held over for another week because of high demand, stopping in Amery, Milltown and Frederic. It offered free chest X-rays, blood pressure measurements and blood chemistries.Well-known Luck businessman Theodore Pagh died suddenly, on May 9.-Valedictorian at Frederic was Brad Harlander and salutatorian was Kevin Louden.Milton Stellrecht, a dairy farmer from the Town of Rusk, was one of five people in the state honored by the UW College of Agriculture for their contributions to rural life.-Twelve students and two chaperones from Grantsburg, traveling by bus, had reportedly reached Mexico and were on their way to its capital on a Mexico or Bust trip.-Grantsburg home ec students were presenting a “style convention” on May 11. Their platform: Make America beautiful … learn to sew! Balance the budget … learn to sew! Boycott Paris originals … learn to sew!-Seven young people were confirmed at Zion and Grace churches, Trade Lake and West Sweden. They were Kae Anderson, Laryn Larson, Pauline Schultz, Fay Soderberg, Nylene Johnson, Brian Lundeen and Bevin Sandstrom.-New officers were elected for the NW Regional Writers Club. They were Shirley Olson, president; Anne Foltz, vice president; Loretta Kemp, secretary; and Edith Anderson, treasurer. Ruth Christiansen was reappointed research chairman and Jean Schmidt was corresponding secretary.

20 Years Ago Webster High School’s prom king and queen were Matt Halseth and Janel Mollenhoff.-The prom king and queen at Siren High were Corey Brunclik and Rebekah Root.-The Siren Fire Department had a pancake supper to celebrate their 60th year.-Clyde Kunze was retiring as baseball coach at Luck and Jim Roaldson would succeed him.-Leona Cummings was named Frederic Citizen of the Year, and Caroll Fischer was Volunteer of the Year.-Polk-Burnett Electric announced the winners of their Citizen-Scholar Awards. Local winners included Peggy Lee and Thomas Quimby, Grantsburg High School; Stephanie Moats, Frederic; Jennifer Summer, Webster; and Kelly Tietz, Osceola.-The 11thannual dairy breakfast was going to be held on the farm of Allan and Beth Lawrence, between Siren and Shell Lake.-The Jose Cole Circus performed in Luck and Webster.-Frederic‘s girls track team was placing well at meets, with Katie Grindell, Tanya Tschumperlin, Beth Lundquist and Karla Brunberg consistently winning firsts in their events. For Webster, the stars were Miki Budge, Kerrie Main and Stephanie Zmuda.Jenny Summer won a gold medal at the state forensics competition and Angel Jackson and Carl Olson won silvers. They were all from Webster High.-Rep. Harvey Stower, D.-Amery, was proposing a five-year phaseout of the state lottery and dog-track betting in an attempt to reduce problem gambling.

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PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER

Happy Tails Await Arnell Humane Society of Polk County Wally is a 3-year-old Lhasa apso with large, round, brown eyes and a silly dance. When Wally came to the shelter as a stray, he was a matted ball of fur. There was so much matted hair that it was hard to make out his head, feet or tail. He was a large, round fur ball; he looked like an Ewok. In fact, that is what we called him at first. His to-the-skin grooming revealed a cream-colored Lhasa apso and left Wally feeling a bit exposed. Wally is a happy little dog. He enjoys people and likes to take them on long walks, showing them his favorite spots around the shelter. Wally is OK with other dogs and children but is intimidated by rough play. He really likes being in your lap or running around our exercise pen at top speeds. His ears flap in the wind as fast as his stubby little legs will carry him. Wally has been neutered and comes equipped with his very own microchip for easy identification. He is a honey. It is garage sale season! The signs are popping up everywhere. It is true, one man’s or woman’s trash is another man’s or woman’s treasure. If you have lightly used or never-used garage sale items cluttering up your garage or basement, why not donate them to the Arnell Humane Society for our annual garage sale fundraiser? All proceeds from the sale go directly to helping the animals at the shelter. The Arnell garage sale is Saturday, June 9. We are taking donated items at the shelter Monday through Saturday. Our sale includes something for everyone but does not include TVs, clothes, refrigerators

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YAPpenings Sadie as he really is a great guy! This week I’m going to feature Swoosh, he is a really cute little terrier around a year old. I mean just look at his little face and tell me you can’t fall in love with this guy. Swoosh is mostly James black and chestnut colored with some white on his chest. Great dog if you’re looking for a small one to be part of your family. On the cat side there is the handsome and regallooking black kitty named James. This 2-year-old kitty is very friendly and loving and just because he’s black, doesn’t mean he isn’t a great kitty. They have wonderful personalities and dispositions just like the other kitties so please don’t pass him by because of his color. The same would be for Katie who is also black and was surrendered along with James, Moto and Minnie. We’d really love our cats to find their forever homes, for that matter the dogs as well. or items that need recycling if not sold. That means that knickknacks, sporting equipment, linens, kitchen supplies, children’s toys, gardening tools, pet supplies and artwork are all welcome. Donations are acWally cepted during business hours or by appointment; all donations to the shelter are tax deductible. The ticks are especially heavy this year and that means your dog is susceptible to Lyme disease. It is one of the most common tick-transmitted diseases in the world. The most common clinical feature in dogs is recurrent lameness due to inflammation of the joints. There may also be a lack of appetite and depression. More serious complications include damage to the kidneys, and rarely heart or nervous system disease. Each year, we hear from people who are looking for a new dog to replace the one they lost to the effects of Lyme disease. Many dogs with Lyme disease have lameness due to inflammation of the joints. Others may develop acute lameness that lasts for only three to four days but recurs days to weeks later, with lameness in the same leg, or in other legs. Better known as “shifting-leg lameness,” this condition is characterized by lameness in one leg, with a return to normal function, and another leg is then involved; one or more joints may be swollen and warm; a pain response is elicited by feeling the joint. Some dogs may also develop kidney problems. If left untreated, it may lead to an inflammation and

Siren news

Frederic Senior Center Dave Peterson

We got more much-needed rain but it remains cool. The winners for Spades were Lorna Erickson, Carmen Marek, Ellis Erickson and Willis Williams. The winners for 500 were Tim Abrahamzon, Lorna Erickson, Dave Peterson and Ralph Groves. The nine-bid winners were Larry Anderson and Bill Ihrig. Our president, Marlyce McKinney, is at the Frederic nursing home. Remember that we play Spades at 1 p.m. on Monday, 500 at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Pokeno at 1 p.m. on Wednesday and Friday, and Bingo from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Hope to see you at the center.

accompanying dysfunction of the kidney. Eventually, total kidney failure sets in and the dog begins to exhibit such signs as vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, weight loss, increased urination and thirst, fluid buildup in the abdomen and fluid buildup in the tissues, especially the legs and under the skin. The bacteria responsible for Lyme disease is transmitted by slow-feeding, hard-shelled deer ticks. However, infection typically occurs after the tick has been attached to the dog for at least 18 hours. There are many causes for arthritis and lameness. A veterinarian will be able to diagnose Lyme disease or other inflammatory arthritic disorders. If the diagnosis is Lyme disease, your dog will be treated as an outpatient, unless its health condition is severe. Antibiotics are the routine medication prescribed for treatment of canine Lyme disease. Unfortunately, symptoms do not always completely resolve in some animals. In fact, long-term joint pain may continue even after the bacteria has been fully eradicated from your dog’s system. So prevention is your dog’s best friend. If possible, avoid allowing your dog to roam in environments where deer ticks are common. In addition to grooming your dog daily and removing ticks by hand, there are a number of spot-on topical products to kill and repel ticks. A vaccine is available for dogs; talk to your veterinarian about its availability and whether it is right for your dog. Learn to recognize the signs of lameness, walking with a stiff gait, sensitivity to touch, lack of appetite and fever as possible signs of Lyme disease in your pet. Lyme disease is preventable and easily treated with early detection. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, Amery, 715268-7387 or online: arnellhumane.org.

Karen Mangelsen

Hank and Karen Mangelsen visited Inez and Arvid Pearson Monday morning. That evening, Dick Quinton called on Karen and Hank. Clam River Tuesday Club met at Lakeview Church May 2. Several ladies brought food for the lunch. The next meeting will be June 6 at 1:30 p.m. at the home of Kay Krantz. Nancy and Steve Hagen visited Nina and Lawrence Hines Friday and stayed overnight. Donna and Gerry Hines went to Maple Grove, Minn., Friday and stayed with Brian and Jane Hines and family. On Saturday, they went to Mankato, Minn., for the college graduation of grandson Justin Hines. Gerry and Donna came home Sunday. Lida Nordquist went to Frederic Saturday to the home of Jan and Jim Schott for the birthday party of granddaughter Hannah Schott. On Sunday, Lida attended Hannah’s dance recital in Frederic. Ethan and Dylan Longhenry and Daya Lawrence were Saturday visitors of Ronda and Maynard Mangelsen. Hank and Karen Mangelsen went to Tracks Saturday afternoon to attend an open house/pig roast for Cecil Scribner in honor of his 80th birthday. That evening, Hank and Karen visited Nick and Esther Mangelsen at their cabin near Siren. Duane and John Otis and Maynard and Ronda Mangelsen attended the confirmation service for Tony Otis at Trade Lake Lutheran Church Sunday. Later, they all visited at the home of Dennis and Laura Formanek near Webster to congratulate Daniel Formanek on his confirmation. In between, Ronda and Maynard called on Mike and Nancy Longhenry and family. Nina and Donna Hines and Karen Mangelsen went to Timberland Lutheran Church Sunday afternoon for the ladies spring banquet. The Barron area women’s singing group, Mood Swing, provided entertainment and testimony before and after the salad luncheon.

Orange

Fran Krause

LaVonne O'Brien

Spring is here for sure. The orioles, hummingbirds and rose-breasted grosbeaks are back. Sympathy to the family of Alice Chelmo, former Webster resident now of Texas, whose funeral was Saturday at the Lutheran church in Webster. Cleanup day at the Orange cemetery was held over the weekend. The 15th-annual academic letter dinner and awards was held Friday evening. Over $46,000 was given out to Webster seniors. Mark, Dee, Brad and Fran Krause attended the dinner. Jack and LaVonne O’Brien were shoppers in Duluth on Tuesday. Dinner guests of Jack and LaVonne on Sunday were Mike O’Brien and Teresa and Dave Childers. After dinner, Teresa and LaVonne attended a wedding shower for Stefani O’Brien at the Siren Senior Center. Stefani and Brandon Root will be married June 16 in Balsam Lake. On Thursday, Mike and LaVonne O’Brien attended the Frederic band and choir spring concert.

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Bev Beckmark

tadpoles, water and all, went into the ice-cream pail and back to the pond or swamp. They were set free to grow up with the rest of the frogs. There is a war raging in bear country. Seems a woodchuck has taken up residence under one of hubby’s sheds. Hubby has been stalking it for over a week now and no luck. I swear it hears the garage door open and heads to safety. Guess the next thing will be a live trap. It’s going to be a long summer as both are determined. Sympathy to the family of Julieann Bearheart who passed away April 30. For those of you who give blood, mark your calendars for Tuesday, May 15, at the Siren Covenant Church from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. To set up an appointment to give call 800-733-2707. Don’t forget Mother’s Day is coming up on Sunday, May 13. Why not give that special lady in your life a day to remember; even a call will make her day. My mom has been gone for over 17 years and I still wish her a happy Mother’s Day each year. Last Sunday the United Methodist Church Sunday schoolers enjoyed breakfast and a meeting of their secret pals. Breakfast was enjoyed by all. Congratulations to all the Siren 2012 grads. You have made it to graduation. Follow your dreams. My wish for you all is, wherever your dreams take you, success will be there waiting. Walk into your life and enjoy every moment of each day, make them the most special, they will be your memories later. Congratulations to elementary student Kelsey Douglas, middle schooler Tanner Lee and high schooler William Barr III, for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. What a great bunch of kids, you rock.

Dewey LaFollette

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Bear country is being serenaded most late afternoons and evenings these days, the woods seem to be alive with what I’m guessing is tree frogs. There are no ponds, potholes or swamps nearby for the regular frogs. Their music brings back memories of days gone by when my two children were small. As they played in the yard toward evening they would be the first to hear the spring music of the frogs. Then came the words, “Mom, it’s frogging time, can we go?” With an ice-cream pail and the lid in hand, off we went to either the swamp or a nearby pond to hunt for frog eggs. After we collected a glob of eggs in their jelly-like protection, we headed home with our prize. Once home, they were put in a fishbowl set on the dining room table. Oh, how big their eyes would get as the tadpoles wriggled and squirmed to get free of the glob and swim free. Once they had hatched we would repeat the process. The

My friend Jenny tells me that with all the dogs at the shelter right now, we are getting quite low on food for them. If you can help, that would be great - we generally feed them Purina Dog Chow. Jenny also says we Swoosh could use some more bleach and paper towels. Any and all help is greatly appreciated by all of us. Well: now that the spaghetti dinner fundraiser was such a big success, we’re starting to plan our wine- and cheese-tasting event at Clover Meadow Winery on Saturday, June 16. For those of you that don’t know them, Clover Meadow has organic wines and I have it on authority that they are yummy; at least that’s what Mom says! Mark your calendars; it is a fun and relaxing event and we’d love to meet you. Well-phrased signs: On a fence: “Salesmen welcome, dog food is expensive.” In a veterinarian’s waiting room : “Be back in five minutes. Sit, stay."” Until then, have a wonderful week. Licks and tailwags! The Humane Society of Burnett County is saving lives, one at a time. 7346 Midtown Road, Siren. www.hsburnettcty.org, 715-866-4096, license No. 267335-DS. We’re on Facebook too, why don’t you like us there!

CLIP & SAVE

Greeting neighbors, hope everyone is well and that all is right with your world! Mom finally got home from visiting Granny so things are starting to get back to normal. At least whatever normal is! I have to think that if one is normal then it must be boring; it’s much more fun to keep my humans guessing. Sure does keep them on their toes. Everything is much the same at the old homestead with Eli still afraid of Thunder and Maya barking for attention when I ignore her. She gets right in my ear and just about deafens me - she really is a persistent little miss pain in the you know what at times. Did you happen to notice how bad the ticks are? Hopefully all my four-footed friends out there are getting their monthly dose of Frontline or Advantix, which ever you use. It’s not fun having a tick-borne disease and having to take medicine for it. Mom gives us a monthly dose of Advantix as well as heartworm pills. Well the shelter has just been crazy with all the animals we currently have housed. Hopefully people will stop by and fill out an adoption application for some lucky pooch or kitty. Right now there are a total of 32 animals being sheltered right now - 22 dogs and 10 cats. A number of strays have arrived at the shelter with only one being reclaimed by their owner. If you’re missing a dog or know someone who is, don’t forget to look on the Web site. Their pics are also on our Facebook page. Adoptions have slowed down, with only Isabella being adopted, but her sister Megan is waiting to be picked up by her adopter, as is Iris. Poor Charlie Brown is sure missing his brother; I just don’t understand why this young guy hasn’t been adopted

(Just East of Wal-Mart)

715-483-3257

THANK YOU

Thank you for your cards and good wishes and for coming to my 80th birthday party. Thanks to you, it was a special day and I appreciate you all. May God richly bless you.

Mark Dahlberg Micah 6:8

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MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Birth announcement Born at St. Croix Falls Medical Center:

A girl, Zoe Mae Cassandra Cayabyab, born April 12, 2012, to Gabriel Cayabyab, Amery/Clayton. Zoe weighed 7 lbs., 2 oz. ••• A girl, Maeve Laney McDonough, born April 12, 2012, to Erin and Patrick McDonough, St. Croix Falls. Maeve weighed 7 lbs., 9 oz. ••• A boy, Coen Broderick Davis, born April 14, 2012, to Christine and Matt Davis, Amery. Coen weighed 6 lbs., 15 oz. ••• A girl, Savannah Rae Saf, born April 25, 2012, to Crystal Holland and Dominic Saf, Lindstrom, Minn. Savannah weighed 7 lbs., 10 oz. ••• A boy, Luke Edmond Frenette, born April 26, 2012, to Lisa and Gary Frenette, Dresser. Luke weighed 8 lbs., 14 oz. ••• A boy, Theodore Merlin Powell, born April 27, 2012, to Brittany Hollan and Troy Powell, Grantsburg. Theodore weighed 6 lbs., 4 oz. •••

A boy, Sawyer Daniel Schmitt, born April 28, 2012, to Mary McFarlane and Buck Schmitt, Luck. Sawyer weighed 9 lbs., .84 oz. •••

Born at Burnett Medical Center:

A girl, Naomi Marie Scheider, born May 1, 2012, to Maria and Jeremy Scheider. Naomi weighed 6 lbs., 10 oz. and was 20-1/2 inches long. Siblings include Cerenity, Matthew, Mikel and Levi. Grandparents are Bruce and Coke Scheider of Grantsburg and Matt and Sue Mager of Nowthen, Minn. Great-grandparents are Donna Mitzel of St. Francis, Minn., LaVerne Scheider of Grantsburg and Jerry and Sharon Marek of Grantsburg. ••• A girl, Summer Storm Erickson, born May 2, 2012, to Travis and Crystal Erickson, Webster. Summer weighed 6 lbs., 7 oz. and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Candy and LeRoy Hanson of Webster and Virginia Erickson of Webster. Great-grandparent is Evie Heartwig of Webster. •••

Larsen Family Public Library Master Gardner volunteers

We are very lucky to have two Master Gardeners to help at the library with the beautification of the landscape. They are Carol Titel and Pat Beetcher. They have completed the Master Gardner Volunteer program at the Spooner Agricultural Center. Part of becoming a Master Gardner is to complete at least 24 hours of volunteer service. We really appreciate their help.

Food for fines

We had such a great success during November and December with our Food For Fines program that we have decided to try it again this summer. During the last week of May, June, July and August, we will accept nonperishable food in place of fines on materials. The food will be given to the local food pantry.

Small-area hearing loop

Our library recently received a grant provided through a Library Services and Technology Act Grant, a federal grant program available to public libraries to improve services to patrons with hearing loss by installing a small hearing loop system at the circulation desk. The hearing loop provides a magnetic, wireless signal that is picked up by the hearing aid when it is set to T-coil or Telecoil setting. This results in improved speech understanding because the listener receives a clear signal without any background noise. If a patron does not have hearing aids or if the hearing aid does not have a Telecoil, the library has a headset plugged into a loop receiver to achieve the same effect.

Book club

Join us on Tuesday, May 22. at 10 a.m., in the Nexen meeting room for a discussion about the book “Animals in Translation: Using the mysteries of autism to decode animal behavior” by Temple Grandin and Catherine Johnson. “Temple Grandin draws upon a long, distinguished career as an animal scientist and her own experiences with autism to deliver an extraordinary message about how animals act, think and feel. She has a perspective like that of no other expert in the field, which allows her to offer unparalleled observations and groundbreaking ideas. People with autism can often think the way animals think, putting them in the perfect position to translate ‘animal talk.’”

Preschool story time

We meet every Wednesday all year long at 10:30 am for good stories, companionship and fun.

Mystery Mayhem Book Club

• “Aunt Dimity and the Village Witch” by Nancy Atherton • “Deadline” by Fern Michaels • “The Wind Through the Keyhole” by Stephen King • “Into the Dreaming” by Karen Marie Moning • “The Body in the Boudoir” by Katherine Hall Page • “Deadlocked” by Charlaine Harris • “One Perfect Shot” by Steven F. Havill • “Robert B. Parker’s Lullaby” by Ace Atkins • “Spilled Blood” by Brian Freeman • “The Seeker” by Ann H. Gabhart

Adult nonfiction

• “Wisconsin Day Trips By Theme” by Mary M. Bauer • “Encyclopedia of Native American Tribes” by Carl Waldman

Young adult books

• “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins • “Catching Fire” by Suzanne Collins • “Mockingjay” by Suzanne Collins • “The Serpent’s Shadow” by Rick Riordan • “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth • “Divergent” by Veronica Roth

• “Chomp” by Carl Hiaasen • “Wolves of the Beyond: Spirit Wolf” by Kathryn Lasky • “The Night Before Preschool” by Natasha Wins • “Lola Loves Stories” by Anna McQuinn • “One Frog Sang” by Shirley Parenteau • “Owlet’s First Flight” by Mitra Modarressi • “Magic Puppy: School of Mischief” by Sue Bentley • “Magic Kitten: Sparkling Steps” by Sue Bentley • “Splat the Cat Takes the Cake” by Rob Scotton • “Splat the Cat and the Duck with No Quack” by Rob Scotton • “Mittens, Where is Max” by Lola Schaefer • “Mia and the Dance for Two” by Robin Farley • “Marley: The Dog Who Cried Woof” by Susan Hill

• “The Spy Who Jumped off the Screen” by Thomas Caplan • “The Diva Haunts the House” by Krista Davis • “Betrayal” by Robert Fitzpatrick

DVDs

• “Lonesome Dove Collection” (six DVDs)

Memorial Day

Hours and information

• “Under a Vampire Moon” by Lynsay Sands • “Crystal Gardens” by Amanda Quick

I enjoy spring and wait for all the plants to appear. Now the lilacs are blooming and their fragrant smell is one of the most enjoyable. Tuesday started with our exercise session followed by Skip-Bo. In the afternoon, games were played. Bill McGrorty and Russ Adams were the winners in Hand and Foot. Ione White, Steve VanHousten and Delores Benson were the winners in Dominos. The winners in 500 were Dave Anderson, Norma Lundgren, Roger Greenly and Don Benson. Thursday, we had our exercise session. In the af-

ternoon, Cribbage was played. In the evening, 500 was played with the winners Charlie Mevissen, Harold Richardson, Don Benson, Sue Lundgren and Chuck Magnusson. This weekend new carpet was laid at the center. Tuesday, May 15, is our membership drive. Do you want to become a member? Would you like to check us out? Come for a free luncheon at 11:30 a.m. In the afternoon, games will be played with prizes. Let’s get acquainted. Come and enjoy an enjoyable day with us.

Grantsburg Public Library Improved library services to patrons with hearing loss

Grantsburg Public Library recently received a grant to improve services to patrons with hearing loss by installing a small area hearing loop system at the circulation desk. A hearing loop provides a magnetic, wireless signal that is picked up by the hearing aid when it is set to the telecoil setting. The result is improved speech understanding because the listener receives a clear signal without the background noise. The grant is provided through a Library Services and Technology grant, a federal grant program available to public libraries.

Events

• Local author Susan Segelstrom’s book signing is Saturday, May 26. Segelstrom is the author of “A Lasting Legacy: Canute Anderson” and “The Wood Lake Village.” Both books offer insight into the history of Northwest Wisconsin. • Canceled, the Melissa Horozewski book signing, Friday, June 1. • Friends drawing for the quilt raffle, Saturday, June 2. Purchase raffle tickets for the beautiful handmade quilt at the library. • After-school reading program, Tuesdays and Thursdays after school. Contact your child’s teacher for a referral. • Preschool story time is Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. • Youth chess club is Wednesdays at 3:30 p.m.

View Walt Fluegel’s art exhibit titled “A Close Look at Pixels” at the Grantsburg Public Library. – Photo submitted

Library hours and information

Monday noon – 6 p.m.; Tuesday noon – 6 p.m.; Wednesday 10:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Thursday noon – 6 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. – noon. The contact information for the library is 715463-2244; Web site is grantsburg.wislib.org and now you can follow the library on Facebook.

SAVE!

SA L E !

7TH-annual

TENT SALE Thurs., May 10 thru Noon Sat., May 12

Large print

Audio books

Adult fiction books

Marian Edler

Children’s books

The theme for the Monday, May 14, book discussion at 10 a.m. is “Police Line: Do Not Cross.” A pamphlet with 10 selections to choose from is available at the library. Telephone us at 715-866-7697 or drop in to pick up your mystery club book.

The library will be closed in observance of Memorial Day on Monday, May 28.

St. Croix Senior Center

• “The Innocent” by David Baldacci • “Unnatural Acts” by Stuart Woods • “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson

ODDS & ENDS Windows, patio doors, exterior and interior doors, misc. cabinets and countertops & bargain bin lumber.

ALL AT CLEARANCE PRICES!

JOHNSON LUMBER COMPANY

Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. For more information contact the library at 715-866-7697, Web site: webster.wislib.org. Online catalog: merlin.nwls.lib.wi.us/search.

Follow the Leader

715-689-3400

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Serving The Area Since 194 2 10350 State Rd. 70 in Falun, Wisconsin

SALE SAVE SALE SAVE SALE SAVE 387139 24a


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Academic news EAU CLAIRE - One hundred University of WisconsinEau Claire seniors have been selected for 2011-12 to receive the Outstanding Senior Award and to appear in the 2012 edition of “Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities & Colleges.” Campus nominating committees and editors of the Who’s Who directory have included the names of these students based on their academic achievement, service to community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for continued success. Outstanding students have been honored in the annual

directory since it was first published in 1934. Following is a list of students in your area who have been selected to receive the Outstanding Senior Award. Amery Cassandra Klatt, kinesiology, daughter of Jeffrey and Wendy Smith, Sean Klatt, spouse; Balsam Lake Angela Berthold, geology, daughter of Mary BertholdJohnson. - submitted

THANK YOU

Regional Hospice would like to thank all of the businesses and people who donated to our 13th-Annual Spring Fling event at the Lakeview Event Center in Siren. Everyone who came enjoyed a wonderful dinner by Adventures and entertainment by the Bill Bittner Memorial Jazz Band. The Silent Auction had a great array of items to bid on and the other games and raffles were enjoyed by all. The proceeds will provide funds to help cover expenses that are not covered by insurance and Medicare.

Kathy and Jerry Hansen Lake of the Torches Casino Lakes Gas Larsen Auto Link Bros. Link Stop Log Cabin Store Longbranch Saloon and Eatery Louie’s Finer Meats Lynnette Kasinskas Main Street Café Making Memories Mark Canfield McNally Ind., LLC Michael & Barbara Keefe Milwaukee Brewers Minnesota Ballet Minnesota Twins Minnesota Wild Mud Hut Country Gifts Nancy and Steve Rogers Norske Nook Northwind Book and Fiber Northern Clippers Salon Northwest Sports Complex Odds ‘n’ Ends HCE - Jan Frazee Olsen and Son Drug P & L Corner Bar Pamida Pat Neeley Peggy’s Fashion Rack Potter’s Shed Pour House Prime Bar & Family Dining Ray Knutson Robert Schmidt Robin and Dana Olson Schmitz’s Economart Shared Medical Technical Inc. Shell Lake State Bank Shell Lake Woodcrafters Siren Lions Club Skol Bar Spooner Bake Shoppe Spooner Dairy Queen Spooner Eye Care Spooner Golf Club Spooner Golf Pro Shop Spooner Market and Grill Spooner Mercantile Spooner Outlet Sportsmen Headquarters St. Croix Casino Subway Grantsburg Susan Morgan Syren General Store T & T Tool Inc. Taffy’s Hallmark Tammi’s Wildlife Rescue & Wellness Center Taylor Funeral Homes The Gallery The Lodge at Crooked Lake The Pizza Place - Siren/Grantsburg The Rose Garden Thistle Bee Candles Timbers Theatres Tom Twining Tony’s Riverside Town of Madge Town of Roosevelt Town of West Marshland Tracks Restaurant Trego Dinner Bell Vikki Amundson Village Floral Village of Grantsburg Wal-Mart Wanell Hansen Wayne’s Foods Plus Wild River Sport & Marine Wolverine Tire and Auto Care Women of the Moose Chapter 1819 Yellow River Pharmacy Zellers Variety

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A J Open Arms - Anita & Mark Baker Ace Hardware Acorn Pantry Adventures Allied Waste Andrew Savas Angie Shafer Antiques Association Arrow Building Center Austin Lake Greenhouse Auto Stop Avalon Avion Accounting Bank of the West Bargain Bill’s Bashaw Valley Greenhouse Benson Thompson Real Estate Best Western Lodge Burnett Dairy Cheese Bush and Gilles Cabin Fever Pottery Car Quest Caring Hands Massage Carol Stage Cave of the Mounds Cenex Station Chattering Squirrel Chieftain Wild Rice Company Chris Hoffman Christa Kilen Community Bank of Northern WI Crystal Hills Tree Farm Cumberland Federal Bank Daeffler’s Quality Meats Dahl Funeral Home Dahl’s Home Store Dahlstrom’s Lakeside Market Dairy Queen Dale and Judy Johnson Dave Basten Dave’s Hardware Hank Dells Boat Tours Denelie’s Pizza Diane Pettis Dr. Brad Harlander Dr. Steve Tesch Dreamers/St. Croix Bar and Grill Duluth-Superior Symphony Orchestra Edling Funeral Home Elaine Walker Faith Lutheran Women of the ELCA Fond Du Lac Band of Superior Chippewa Foxxy’s Bar and Grill Frederic Design & Promotions Frederic Grocery Store Frederic Hardware Gail Stencil Gliders Up North Bar & Grill Grace United Methodist Church Women Grand Casino Hinckley Hair’s What’s Happening Heartwood Resort Hensons IGA Hi Ho Silver Holiday Station Indianhead Credit Union Indianhead Eye Care Indianhead Floral Inter-County Leader James Pearson Jan and Mike Bauer Jane Wilcox Jeanette Laqua Jeanne Laqua Jensen-Sundquist Insurance Jerry & JoLouise McNally Jerry and Bonnie VanDomelen Joan Snell Joe Muench Johnson Bank Johnson Lumber Judy Hodell Karen Kaufman Karen Klink

ACS event is Saturday

Frederic Area Walk/Run is Saturday, rain, or shine

FREDERC - The Frederic Area American Cancer Society Walk/Run will take place on Saturday, May 12, regardless of weather conditions. If there should be inclement weather to walk in, that is nothing compared to what a cancer patient endures while fighting the disease. Registration for the Frederic walk will be from 8-8:45 a.m. at the Birch Street Elementary School. Arrive early enough to register, receive a T-shirt (if $60 is raised), and have team pictures taken. Refreshments provided by local businesses and individuals will be available before the walk. Cancer survivors are urged to register and receive a “survivor” flower. Cancer survivors are asked to line up behind the honorary chair at the ribbon cutting at the beginning of the walk. Karli Bartlett is the honorary chair of the Frederic walk/run; she is a 6-year-old leukemia survivor. Team pictures will be taken in the gym this year before the walk so proceed to the gym after registration. Team captains are urged to register all team members early to allow time for all team pictures to be taken before 9 a.m. so the walk can start on time at 9:15 a.m. Sponsors for the Frederic ACS Walk/Run again this year are Larsen Auto Centers and Amery Regional Medical Center, and a new sponsor is the St. Croix Regional Medical Center. The Kinetico Company is supplying water for the walk again this year. Frederic walkers may choose a 2-, 3- or 5-mile route. Route signs are posted along the way. Also posted along Hwy. 35 in Frederic are Signs of Hope that have been purchased by area businesses to support the walk. The Frederic Area Ambulance will be available if needed.

The Frederic walk will be selling tribute flags. Forms for the flags are available at the banks in Frederic or may be purchased the day of the walk for minimum of $5. The flags will be on display near the registration areas of the walk. Betty and Bob MacKean have created and donated a quilt as a fundraiser for the ACS Walk/Run. Quilt raffle tickets are $1 each or six for $5. Tickets may be purchased the day of the walk or prior to the walk from the U.S. and Bremer banks, Luck Medical Clinic, The Medicine Shoppe, from Betty MacKean or walk/run committee members. The drawing for the quilt will take place just before the walk begins at 9:15 a.m. A silent auction is being held for an autographed Green Bay Packer football. The football is on display at the Bremer Bank this week and bids may be made there and the day of the walk at the elementary school prior to 9:15 a.m. The Frederic Golf Course is offering a buy one, get one free round of golf for every run/walk participant. The golf course is also donating a round of golf for four people. The free round of golf will go to the individual who raises the most money for the walk. For further information on the Frederic Area ACS Walk, contact Elvira Schmidt at 715-653-2684. Join the fight against cancer on Saturday, May 12. If you are unable to walk, sponsor a walker, or purchase a tribute flag in honor or memory of a friend or loved one. The ACS walks are about having fun, coming together as a community, and doing something positive to help cancer research, education, advocacy and service. The ACS offers hope, progress and answers. Together we can make a difference. Persistence is the key to finding a cure for cancer - the ultimate goal of the walk/run. - submitted

GHS Improv Comedy Company's fi firrst show Sunday

Grantsburg High School’s newly organized improv comedy company will present their first show ever this Sunday, May 13, at 7 p.m. in the GHS commons. GHS choir students (and a couple of siblings) have been rehearsing since January and are ready to present their first-ever improv comedy show. The group, which is calling itself May Contain Nuts, has been doing games and exercises and would like to try performing in public. “Every rehearsal is great fun, because we laugh so much at each other, it will be fun to have an audience,” one member noted. Because the show is on Mother’s Day, there will be moments to honor/laugh with moms in the audience. The show will be in a similar format to “Whose Line is it Anyway?” with some audience participation, and it will require the students to think on their feet, and go with the flow. Choir and theater director Linda Benge started rehearsing the group for several reasons. She explains, “Grantsburg students get lots of financial support from the community to support programs. Everyone buys things, and maybe we don’t need more frozen food and wrapping paper, but we buy it anyway, because we love kids. The choir is getting ready to travel again, and when we looked at fundraising ideas, we didn’t want to sell more things. One thing Grantsburg is sometimes limited in is live entertainment. I have some very funny and talented students - so why not use their talents to provide something the community is lacking?” Tickets are available from company members or at the door. The cost will be a freewill donation. Concessions will also be available. - Photo submitted

Follow the Leader


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Luck band receives grant for new marimba

Post-prom

Luck

Tony Aguado, Karsten Petersen, Noah Musial, Jenni Holdt and Sam Nelson watch as parent Pam Klatt deals Travis Muller his cards for Blackjack during Luck’s post-prom party at McKenzie Lanes Saturday, April 28.

Luck Schools band director Jennifer Gilhoi recently wrote and received a grant, made available through the St. Croix Valley Foundation, to purchase a new marimba for the Luck band department. “I’m thrilled to have received this grant. There are so many talented music students in our school. It’s nice to have quality equipment that they can use to achieve even more success,” said Gilhoi. This year, two marimba solo and ensemble events advanced to the state contest in Eau Claire using the new marimba and received first ratings. In addition, Tanner Nielsen earned an exemplary rating, Best in Site, on his marimba solo at the state contest. Above, Tanner Nielsen and Laurie Jorgenson perform their marimba duet. - Photo by Lori Nelson

Webster garden buddies At the beginning of the school year, Webster garden buddies set a goal to grow petunias as May Day presents. In January, fourthgraders planted the seeds and then tended the growing plants. Last week, the kindergartners walked to the Webster Senior Center and delivered the petunias along with a couple of songs. – Photo submitted

Brandon Holdt, Avery Steen, Jordan Bazey and Kyle Hunter watch as parent Ron Steen helps with a dice game during Luck’s post-prom party at McKenzie Lanes. – Photos by Lori Nelson

Luck Post Prom 2012

Webster celebrates Cinco de Mayo

We would like to thank everyone who helped make the 7th-Annual Luck Post-Prom Party a Great Success. The kids enjoyed a safe evening following prom, which included bowling, food, games and prizes. We are excited to start planning for next year!

WEBSTER – On Wednesday, May 2, the Webster Elementary third-graders celebrated Cinco de Mayo. Julie Yezek, the nutrition education educator from the UW-Extension Office, came in to help the kids prepare a healthy meal for their parents. - submitted

Access, Inc. Acorn Pantry Anderson Law Office Art Anderson Realty Balancing the Elements Bella Salon & Day Spa Joe & Connie Bibeau Bon Ton Café Wren Cardinal Accounting Cardinal Shop Chattering Squirrel Coffee Café Creation Station Creative Memories - Sue Rivard Dresser Trap Rock, Inc. Expressions Coffee House Flying Pie Pizza Frandsen Bank & Trust Flowers Forever Hap’s Jewelry - Heidi Radman Larsen Auto - Frederic Jenell’s Main Dish Lakeland Communications, Inc. Lia Sophia - Anjuli Simon Luck-E Luck Golf Course Luck Pharmacy Luck School

Webster third-grade students and their families enjoyed a festive family-style Cinco de Mayo feast Wednesday, May 2. – Photos submitted

Keep up with local breaking news:

Zumba Fitness - Eileen Gutzmer Junellyn Anderson Aren Gerich Mark Gobler Marney Hendrickson Pam Klatt Deb Kunze Doug Kunze MJ Nelson Vicki Nelson Chad Ogilvie Rick Palmer Alicia Miller Bonnie Musial Michael Rozumalski Kelly Steen Ron Steen Monte Tretsven Debbie Wickstrom

We would also like to thank everyone who supported us by purchasing a 50/50 raffle ticket at Luck home basketball games. Thank you Jeff & Jackie Brenizer Brian & Sheri Hacker Al & Eileen Tomlinson

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RIGHT: Isabella Moen, Hannah Janssen and Trittan Benjamin shredded plenty of cheese for the meal.

Making Memories & More Renae McGinnity Homes by Renae McKenzie Lanes Mud Hut New Wave Salon Northwoods Bakery Café Norwex - Kelly Steen Nouveau Park Avenue Salon Parts Plus of Luck Peper Tire & Alignment Pizazz Polk-Burnett St. Dominic’s Council Of Catholic Women Stampin Up Denielle Knauber Sterling Bank Syren General Store The Bottle Shop The Lodge at Crooked Lake The Scoop The View TL Enterprise Van Meter Meats Wal-Mart W.I.N.G.S. Foundation, Inc.

Find us on Facebook 2,019 friends and counting

facebook.com/intercountyleader


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

FHS students do well at state music festival

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On Saturday, May 5, Frederic High School musicians performed at UW-EC at the state solo ensemble festival. Both high school handbell choirs received first ratings as well as Ian Lexen with his musical theater vocal solo. Emily Byerly also performed, receiving a second on her vocal solo. Music instructors Pat Anderson and Greg Heine presented congratulations to all on their outstanding performances. Members of the bell choirs are Chris Hopp, Cori Schmidt, Lauren Domagala, Michael Tesch, Erik Stoner, Bradley Knauber, April Halverson, Emily Wells, McKenna Cook, Kendra Mossey, McKenna Rognrud, Natalie Phernetton, Ben Kurkowski, Tylyn O’Brien, Rachael Poirier, Abigail Brightbill, Abigail Pickard, Zane Matz, Zach Williamson, Mark Olson, Zach Schmidt, Mya Rivera, Olivia Schauls and Lara Harlander. - Photo submitted


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

Thai students share culture with Grantsburg Elementary by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Dressed in the traditional costumes of their country, seven Thai students shared a bit of their culture with Grantsburg Elementary classes during their visit to the school on Thursday, May 3. The Thai students began their presentation by explaining the origins of the costumes they were wearing, telling students that colorful and beautiful dress is worn for festivals, dances and on special occasions. The Thai students told elementary students meeting them was indeed just such a special occasion. Elementary students then heard about the various regions of Thailand, learned Thai phrases and sang a song in Thai. Thai students also performed traditional dances, much to the delight of the

Students of the Santisuk English School in Bangkok, Thailand, and churches in Converge Worldwide Missionaries, gave a presentation on their country to Grantsburg Elementary students on Thursday, May 3.

A Thai student, Ploy, played a northeastern Thai bamboo flute during the group’s visit with Grantsburg Elementary students last week.

elementary students. The visiting young people, all students of the Santisuk English School in Bangkok, Thailand, and churches in Converge Worldwide Missionaries, ended their presentation by inviting GES students to join them in a traditional dance. The group’s three-day visit to Grantsburg and Burnett County was made possible through scholarships raised through U.S. churches and individual donations. During their stay, the Thai students stayed with host families and enjoyed visits to Crex Meadows, Burnett Medical Center, Burnett Dairy, Diversified Industries in Siren, St. Croix Falls Interstate Park and other area points of interest.

Grantsburg Elementary students Zayden Anderson and Cashton Kapp learned some traditional Thai dance moves from Thai visitor Nan during the group’s presentation at the school last week. Thai students Kong and Kwang performed the traditional Kapi coconut dance using coconut shells as instruments for Grantsburg Elementary students during their visit to the school last week. Chompo, one of the Thai students, took the opportunity to capture the moment during their visit with Grantsburg Elementary School classes.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Grantsburg Elementary student Kaitlyn Rombach learned Thai phrases with a Thai student during a special program presented at the school by visitors from Thailand.

Kwang, one of the Thai students, performed a traditional Thai dance for Grantsburg Elementary students during a special program by Thailand students at the school on Thursday, May 3.

Nan was one of the Thai students wearing a traditional Thai outfit worn for festivals, dances and on special occasions. The Thai students told elementary students meeting them was indeed just such a special occasion.


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Spring Art Tour

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The work of more than two dozen artists from Northwest Wisconsin were on display May 5 and 6 as part of the annual Spring Art Tour, sponsored by Earth Arts of the Upper St. Croix Valley. The tour featured paintings, sculpture, pottery, photography and artwork involving glass, metal and wood. Participating artists were featured in stops in Lindstrom and Taylors Falls, Minn., Frederic, Amery, St. Croix Falls, Luck, Osceola, Turtle Lake and Siren. The tour is meant to “create and support beautiful art throughout the Upper St. Croix Valley.” At left is a painting by Sharon LaCasse Wheel-thrown stoneware, blown glass, and original watercolors and mixed-media paintings are among the of The Newberry House on products of Lurhs/Bjornson Artworks. Leif Bjornson (left) and Meg Luhrs (right) are the resident artists who opMain Street in Taylors Falls. erate the shop on the north end of Main Street in St. Croix Falls. Three Sisters Studio, located on Butternut Avenue in Luck, is owned and operated by three sisters and their mother (shown in photo at left (L to R) Ann Fawver and daughters Hannah Fawver Roode, Sarah Cook and Emily Fawver Karl) and features a gallery of fine and functional artwork including clothing, painting, sculpture and jewelry. The women have combined their energies and talents to build a business that “will allow them to be creative, to promote the wonder and magic of art in their community.” The gallery is open every Thursday, Friday and Saturday. See threesisterstudio.com for more information.

Wedding

Frederic-based artist Win Herberg displayed her works at her home on Polk Avenue during the Spring Art Tour this past weekend. Herberg operates Winterboo Pottery (poetrypottery.com) and creates functional and decorative tiles, bowls, platters, goblets, buttons, canoes and lake contour platters with colorful food-safe glazes.

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Visit our Web site www.iccpa.cceasy.com

At-risk teens finding hope through nature photography is the goal behind Northwest Passage’s “In a New Light” project. Photos were on display at the Frederic Arts building during the Spring Art Tour. Kaitlyn Haese, who helped compile the photographs into a display and a book, welcomed visitors to the display.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Pop concert and music awards

Frederic

Frederic High School’s annual pop concert, held Thursday, May 3, offered performances by the choir, show choir, band and bell choirs and an opportunity for music instructors Greg Heine, Pat Anderson and Patti Burns to offer recognition to outstanding music students. At right, vocal music instructor Greg Heine presents Allison Martin the National School Choral Award, the highest honor for high school choral performers. It recognizes the dedication and musical achievement of the top male and female choral students. At left, the high school choir performs.

The bell choirs, under the direction of Pat Anderson, performed several selections at Thursday’s spring pop concert.

Photos by Becky Amundson

Audience members were invited to play the milk jug during the band’s performance of “The Great Steamboat Race.” Jarvas Warwas received a certificate of appreciation from Greg Heine for his “timeless effort and constant support” of Frederic music activities.

The National School Choral Award is the highest honor for high school choral performers. It recognizes the dedication and musical achievement of the top male and female choral Brittani Hughes received the Marine Corps’ Sem- students. Vocal music instructor Greg Heine presented Erik per Fi Award, given for musical excellence. Director Stoner with the award at Thursday’s concert. Patti Burns presented the award.

Bradley Knauber received the Most Valuable Player Award from band director Patti Burns.

FULL SERVICE GARDEN CENTER Beauty since 1928

• • • • • • Allison Martin received the John Philip Sousa Award. Created in 1955, the award honors the top student in a high-school band and recognizes superior musicianship and outstanding dedication. Band director Patti Burns is shown presenting the award.

Locally Owned, Independent Garden Center Beautiful Selection Of Annuals, Trees, Shrubs & Perennials Great Selection Of Gifts New Plant Introductions Landscape Design & Installation Very Knowledgeable & Friendly Staff 3 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU BETTER

ST. CROIX FALLS: 1257 State Rd. 35 St. Croix Falls, WI 715-483-3040

SCANDIA: 20021 St. Croix Trail Scandia, MN 651-433-2431

STILLWATER: 2100 Tower Dr. Stillwater, MN 651-439-2140

www.abrahamsonnurseries.com

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Happy Mother’s Day


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Siren Lions tree planting by Larry Blahauvietz Siren Lions Club secretary SIREN – Lions International President Wing-Kum Tam of Hong Kong set a goal last July for the 1.4 million Lions worldwide to plant a million trees. This goal has been achieved and more, with over 7 million trees planted thus far, including 23 planted by the Siren Lions Club on Wednesday, May 2. The Siren Lions Club, in cooperation with the village of Siren and Wood River Garden Store, planted popple, linden, oak, Japanese lilac, flowering crab and river birch trees in the Village of Siren. Most trees were planted along the boulevard of Hwys. 35/70 as well as some in Crooked Lake Park and Clear Lake Park. Many trees were lost in the village in June 2001 due to the tornado, and the Lions chose this project to help replace the loss. The planting of trees is one way the

Lion John Carlson readies the final tree. Lions can show appreciation to the Siren area for their support of the club’s proj-

ects.

Lions Zeke Saugstad and Lyle Nelson work with Siren Village Administrator Marty Shutt during the first tree planting. – Photos submitted

There were 15 Lions involved in the tree planting in the village of Siren.

Backfilling for the final tree on Main Street are Lions Don Carlson, John Carlson, Lyle Nelson, Les Lindquist and Larry Blahauvietz (not pictured).

Lion Mark Fox adds compost to the hole for the first tree.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

Frederic Middle School honors breakfast

The Frederic Middle School honored students and parents during the school’s honors breakfast, held Wednesday, May 2. Students that have been on the honor roll at least one quarter of the 2011-2012 school year were invited to attend. Students were presented certificates indicating their achievements. – Photo submitted

Mad City Money comes to Luck It’s not just fun and games LUCK – On Wednesday, April 18, Mad City Money came to Luck High School to give the seniors a taste of reality. Mad City Money is a simulation of real-life budgeting of money and resources. Students learned how to manage money, use a debit card, write checks, deposit money into a checking and saving account and understand the purpose of saving money. Diana Rohlik of Spooner Indianhead

Credit Union was the facilitator of this event. Many local business members ran the various merchant stations for sale of homes, cars, groceries, child-care needs, furniture, personal-care needs, electronics, entertainment and banking. Gratitude is extended to all the volunteers and to Luck staff members who helped make this event a success: Rachel Berg, Nancy Hunter, Amy Aguado, Renee Gavinski and Kristi Fenning. - submitted

Luck seniors Taylor Hacker and Hunter Wilson pay for the items they were purchasing from the My Closet clothing store salespeople during Luck’s Mad City Money learning activity Wednesday, April 18.

Laurie Jorgenson and Taylar Anderson discuss their options while patiently waiting their turn as Luck seniors Tony Aguado and Shardae Garcia make their first payments on the homes they chose to buy or lease from the “realtors” during Luck’s Mad City Money learning activity. RIGHT: Kid Care child-care providers discuss the costs of children with Luck seniors Matt Pennington and Clint Gage during Luck’s Mad City Money learning activity Monday, April 18. – Photos submitted

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• Full Line Of Trees, Shrubs & Perennials Along With Our Greenhouse Plants Milltown • Full Line Of Landscaping Supplies • 4 Colors Mulch Hours: Mon. - Sat. 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Location: 3 miles north of Balsam Lake on Hwy. 46, east on 200th Ave., east of VFW, 1/8 mile on the right. 715-825-2202 Business • 715-554-2542

• VFW Hwy. 46

Phone: Shirley, 715-419-1129 Becky, 715-553-0546

MOTHER’S DAY BASKETS & SPECIALS

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Turtle Lake Market Fair May 19: 9 am. - 3 p.m. Natural Alternative Food Co-op Memorial Day Weekend Sale May 25: Noon - 5 p.m. May 26: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Luck Lions Park June 1: Noon - 5 p.m. June 2: 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Amery Arts and Crafts in the Park June 16: 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

LAKESIDE LANDSCAPING & GARDEN CENTER

200th Ave. Lakeside Landscaping & Greenhouse Balsam Lake


PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Grantsburg Honor Roll Students who earned a 4.0 grade-point average qualified as academic all-stars Academic all-stars Freshmen Laura Drohman, Kelsey Fiedler, Ethan Henneman, Marissa Jensen, Anneka Johnson, Kathryn Miller, Taylor Olson, Christopher Parker, Carolyn Peterson, Desirae Rasmussen, Richard Schneider, Heidi Schoettle, Kathryn Segner, Jeremiah Stevens and Alyssa Taylor.

Sophomores Rebekah Curtin, Austin Handy, Gustav Johnson, Haley Larsen, Nathan Lewis, Whitney Oachs, Wendy Roberts, Brooke Roufs and Hope Tucker. Juniors Stephanie Anderson, Jenna Michel, Connor Myers, Kylie Pewe and Jacob Radtke. Seniors Amanda Lindus and Kyle Roberts.

Deusen.

Sophomores Macy Hanson, Jacob Ohnstad, Tiffany Peterson, Damon Roberts, Katharine Rod, Bethany Segner, Abigail Stevens, Austin Thoreen, Lars Thoreson and Keith Vollendorf. Juniors Liliana Benge Briggs, Elizabeth Corbin, Grace Corbin, Melissa Dahl, Sean Handy, Nicole Johnson, Catherine LeMere, Aimee Lerud, Kassandra Lien, Dakota Linke, Stacey McKenzie, Scott Morley, Jennifer Schwieger, Samantha Schwieger, Bradley Taylor, Hannah VanSlyke and Jacob Wald. Seniors Daniel Larsen, Christina Moore, David Ohnstad, Damien Rasmussen, Nicole Ticknor and Gabrielle Witzany. B honor roll

A honor roll

Freshmen Drew Alderman, Sarah Coppenbarger, Audrey Lauer, Carter Lee, Clara Leonard, Brittney Luedtke, Matthew Miller, Sarah Morley, MacKenzie Omer, Chelsea Pitts, Alexis Jo Plunkett, Nathan Swenson and Lydia Van

Freshmen Dylan Belkholm, Trevor Brewer, Avery Buggert, Andrew Coy, Andrea Dumas, Tatianna Eckstrom, Keaton Garnatz, Lora Glover, Joshua Glover, Bryan Hoffman, Sawyer Morgan, Corey Sandberg, DJ Scherer and Victoria Vitale.

Sophomores Brody Bonneville, Jaicee Bowman, Brittany Butler, Jake Carlson, Tyler Choronzy, Jaden Cook, Joseph Dumas, Matthew Gorman, Heidi Horky, Rheanna Johnson, Mary Ludden, Jonas Miller, Erland Olson, Raelyn Pochman and Austin Swenson. Juniors Shepard Berreth-Doran, Jasmine Cady, Jessica Glover, Jacob Glover, Chelsey Goepfert, Jonathan Haley, Tyler Hayes, Seth Ilgen, Paige Johnson, Tiffani Moyer, Adam Parker, RuthAnn Pedersen, Clay Poeschl, Brandon Roufs, Brady Thompson, Colton Tretsven and David Workman. Seniors Anika Ames, Zackery Arnold, Cody Benedict, Daniel Biorn, Haley Burkhardt, April Campana, Benjamin Davis, Rachel Diffee, Joseph Engelhart, Kali Fleischauer, Matthew Hamann, Nolan Hanson, Lucas Henneman, Brent Johnson, Jack Kard, Jeffrey Konz, Thomas Labatt, Brandi Lee, Paul Lewis, Kaelah Maslow, Devin McDaniel, Nicole McKenzie, Kelsey Meyer, Kaitlyn Muellner, Cora Olson, Carl Palmquist, Isaac Peterson, Hannah Rod, Mathew Swenson, Matthew Van Deusen and Craig Vollendorf.

Grantsburg announces 2012 valedictorian and salutatorian has been an academic all-star, meaning she received a 4.0, 13 times and was on the A honor roll twice. She has represented her class as class president one year, vice president two years, Winterfest queen and prom court. She has served as a National Youth Leader, National Honor Society member, and has been part of the LINK group for four years. Her hobbies include volleyball, basketball, softball, swimming and knee boarding. Witzany is looking forward to attending the University of MinnesotaDuluth in the fall and majoring in exercise science. submitted

Daniel Larsen

Gabrielle Witzany

Melody Witzany. She has been involved in a number of activities throughout her high school career, especially in the area of athletics. Witzany has been a three-year letter winner in volleyball, a four-year letter winner in softball and a two-year letter winner in basketball. She has been selected for all-conference volleyball, all-conference softball and all-region softball and was a captain for volleyball, basketball and softball teams. Witzany enjoys coaching younger volleyball girls in her spare time. Academically, Witzany has excelled. She

LAURITSEN CHIROPRACTIC OFFICE Family Practice MOST INSURANCE ACCEPTED Mon., Wed., Fri. & Sat. (715) 635-6969 214 Spruce St. Spooner, WI Turtle Lake Office (Hwy. 8 & 63N) Tuesday and Thursday (715) 986-4600 www.LauritsenChiropractic.com

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH???

Menu LOCATION

MAY 14 - MAY 18

MONDAY

TUESDAY

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Pizza dippers, dipper sauce, green beans OR chicken-strip salad.

BREAKFAST Omelet/sausage. LUNCH Turkey stacker, chips, raw veggies, dip OR Oriental salad.

BREAKFAST Yogurt/granola. LUNCH Mini corn dogs, baked beans, pretzels OR turkey salad.

LUNCH Chicken burger w/fixings, chicken noodle soup, crackers, mini carrots, sliced pears, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes, gravy, dinner roll, steamed broccoli, mandarin oranges, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUCK

BREAKFAST Cereal/French toast sticks. LUNCH Italian dunkers, dipping sauce, green beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hot dog, 712.

SIREN

FREDERIC GRANTSBURG

Each building will have their own breakfast menu.

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITY WEBSTER

Cinni-mini.

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY Pancakes.

BREAKFAST

FRIDAY Combo bar.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Pizza, raw veggies, dip OR chickentaco salad.

LUNCH Nachos, refried beans, corn OR ham salad.

LUNCH Sloppy joe, french fries, corn, fresh strawberries, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Scalloped potatoes, ham slice, sliced carrots, applesauce, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Pizza dippers, marinara sauce, baked rice, baked beans, fresh grapes, apples, oranges, bread basket.

BREAKFAST Cereal/donut holes. LUNCH Turkey gravy, mashed potatoes, peas, fruit sauce. Alt.: Pizza, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/waffles. LUNCH Cardinal burger, potato, corn, fresh fruit. Alt.: Chicken patty, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/long john. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, rice, mixed vegetable, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hamburger, 712.

BREAKFAST Cereal/cinnamon roll. LUNCH Chili, chicken noodle soup, grilled cheese, fresh veggies, fresh fruit. Alt.: Chicken nuggets, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Cheese quesadilla, Mexican rice, shredded lettuce, refried beans, apples. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Muffins, juice and milk. LUNCH Hamburger on a bun, potato babycake, green beans, veggies, kiwi, oranges. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH BBQ chicken on a bun, shredded lettuce, beans, corn, applesauce. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Pancake & sausage on a stick, juice & milk. LUNCH Spaghetti hotdish, peaches, peas, lettuce salad. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Peanut butter rice, sandwich, yogurt, Pizza dippers, corn, carrots, string assorted veggies. Alt.: celery,cheese, pineapple tidbits, banana. Cook’s choice. Alt.: Cook’s choice.

BREAKFAST Scrambled eggs w/ham & cheese, 1 slice of toast. LUNCH Chicken patty, potato wedge, carrots, mixed fruit. Alt.: Hamburger.

BREAKFAST Cheese omelet, potatoes, toast. LUNCH Hot turkey sandwich, mashed potatoes, mixed vegetables, peaches. Alt.: Ham & cheese, potato soup.

BREAKFAST Pancake and sausage. LUNCH Baked potato bar, ham, cheese sauce, broccoli, applesauce. Alt.: Beef stroganoff.

BREAKFAST Blueberry muffins and yogurt. LUNCH Cheeseburger, spicy fries, green beans, pears. Alt.: Spicy chicken patty.

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Sloppy joe, french fries, corn, mandarin oranges. Alt.: Hot dog.

BREAKFAST

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Meatball subs, steamed broccoli and fruit.

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Chicken a la king w/biscuits or potatoes, peas and fruit.

BREAKFAST French toast. LUNCH Hamburger, potato wedges and fruit.

BREAKFAST Lumberjacks. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, rice and fruit.

LUNCH Country breakfast, hash browns, strawberries, bananas.

LUNCH Cook’s choice OR grilled cheese, tomato soup, salad, applesauce.

LUNCH Sloppy joe, bun, scalloped potatoes, green beans, peaches.

LUNCH Chicken fillet, bun, fresh veggies, fresh fruit.

Omelets.

Waffles.

Cook’s buffet.

LUNCH

LUNCH Italian dunkers, salad OR turkey a la king, biscuits, peas, mandarin oranges.

559690 38L

GRANTSBURG – Grantsburg High School is pleased to announce Daniel Larsen as the 2012 valedictorian. He is the son of Kevin and Terri Larsen. Larsen has earned many awards and recognitions during his high school career including homecoming king, senior class president, academic decathlon A level, Rotary student of the month, football team captain, all-conference honorable mention, Sentinel all-area team, most valuable player on the JV basketball team, and has earned A honor roll recognition every term in high school. He was selected to interview for UW-Stout’s Chancellor’s Excellence Scholarship, the top scholarship the UW-Stout offers. He also placed in the top 10 percent in the nation in the Moody’s Mega Math Challenge. In his free time, Larsen enjoys hanging out with friends, playing sports, snowboarding, playing ping-pong, playing foosball, swimming, making movies, studying the Bible, doing mathematics, listening to music and working out. Larsenwill be attending the University of Wisconsin-Stout as an honors student in the fall, studying plastics engineering. In 10 years, he plans to have a master’s degree in engineering and a stable job in engineering management. He hopes to have a family and make a difference in the community where lives. Gabrielle Witzany is the 2012 salutatorian at Grantsburg High School. She is the daughter of Chris and


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

Writers gather at Siren; Sutton honored with volunteer award

Boyd Sutton won the first Volunteer of the Year Award at the Wisconsin Writers Association Spring Conference held at The Lodge at Crooked Lake in Siren on Saturday, May 5. Sutton (center) is shown with the Yarnspinners, a WWA charter club to which he belongs. In the photo with him are Jim Bakken, Carolyn Marquardt, Dot Lund, Kristie Kringle, Mary Jacobsen, Sally Bair and Denis Simonsen.

Polk County Genealogy Society sets May meeting LUCK – The Polk County Genealogy Society will hold their monthly meeting on Monday, May 21, at the Luck Historical Museum, Main Street Luck, at 7 p.m. Guest speakers will be Dorothy Adams speaking on Preparations for a Genealogy Trip and Muriel Pfeifer on Civil War Research. Refreshments to follow. The PCGS membership will staff the

Luck Historical Society Museum every Monday 1 to 4 p.m., for the summer months of May, June, July and August of 2012 to assist guests looking for Polk County family history. In addition, during each Monday afternoon session, help will be available to understand the 1940 Federal Census Indexing Project. submitted

Eighty people attended the annual spring conference of the Wisconsin Writers Association at the Lodge in Siren Friday and Saturday, May 4 and 5. The state organization sponsors two conferences a year, as well as several contests. This year, through a grant given by Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, several local middle and high school students attended the conference. Denis Simonsen was the local chairman for the conference. - Photos/text by Carolyn Marquardt

Blood donation sites

POLK COUNTY - Every day, patients in local communities are helped by blood donors who give at blood drives coordinated by generous volunteers. This summer, the American Red Cross Live Life. Give Life. summer promotion is helping to raise awareness of the constant need for blood and to encourage regular donations. Presenting donors between May 21 and Sept. 5 will be entered automatically into the Live Life. Give Life. and the chance to win prize packages to GiftCertificates.com. Visit redcrossblood.org/GiveWin to learn more. Following are blood donation opportunities in Polk County: Monday, May 21, 2:30-7:30 p.m., Bethany Lutheran Church, 415 Bridge Ave., Star Prairie; Tuesday,

May 22, 12:30-6:30 p.m., Lutheran Church, Main St., Milltown; Wednesday, May 23, noon6 p.m., Fristad Lutheran Church, 510 Hwy. 35, Centuria; Thursday, May 24, 1-7 p.m., St. Luke Methodist Church, 100 Linden St. W., Frederic; Friday, May 25, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., St. Luke Methodist Church, 100 Linden St. W., Frederic; and Wednesday, May 30, 12:30-6:30 p.m., American Legion Post 143, 807 Pine St., St. Croix Falls. - with submitted information

Certain Times In Life Require A Personal Touch

ANGEL HANDS MINISTRIES OF FREDERIC is pleased to present

“Family Days Extreme Car Makeover”

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A local business owner, who wishes to remain anonymous, donated a 2000 Chrysler Town & Country minivan. This van will be donated to a local deserving family during Family Days festivities.

Nominations Requested by May 31, 2012

Each business and church (no individuals, please) with a Frederic/54837 ZIP code may nominate one family by filling out the nomination form online at www.AngelHandsMinistries.org. If you don’t have Internet access, you may call Stacy at 763-213-7005. We are asking businesses & churches to pitch in monetary donations to pay for a few repairs. A special thank-you to True Quality Auto Body for donating the auto inspection and to United Methodist Women for donating toward the repair cost. 560192 38Lp 28ap

Jack Swedberg, Monument & Marker Sales Patrick L. Taylor, Owner, Director Dennis W. Christianson, Director

We can help with

• Prearrangements • Traditional Services • On-Site Crematory • Cemetery Monuments • Online obituaries can be seen at Swedberg-Taylor.com

Swedberg Taylor Family Funeral Homes and Crematory Grantsburg: 715-463-6700 Siren: 715-349-4800 Webster: 715-866-7131

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CLIP & SAVE

EVERY MON. Amery Senior Center

EVERY TUES.

EVERY WED.

• Wii golf, 9 a.m.

Frederic Senior Center • Spades, 1 p.m. Luck Senior Center Siren Senior Center 715-349-7810

St. Croix Falls Senior Center

EVERY THURS.

EVERY FRI.

EVERY SAT.

Overeaters Anonymous, 6:30 p.m., 715-268-6605 • Pokeno, 1 p.m.

• 500, 6:30 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Open 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Dime Bingo, 1 p.m. • Monthly Senior Meeting, 3rd Tues. • Exercise, 10-11 a.m. • Skip-Bo, 11 a.m.-Noon • 500 Cards & Dominoes, 12:30-4 p.m.

• Cribbage, a.m. • 500 Cards, 1 p.m.,

• Dining at 5, Every 1st Thursday, no meal in April

• Spades, 1 p.m.,

• Exercise, 10-11 a.m. • Skip-Bo, 11 a.m.-Noon • 500, 6:30-10 p.m.

• Bridge, 10 a.m.-Noon • Bingo, 1st & 3rd Friday, 1-3 p.m.

Webster Senior Center

• AA Meeting, 7 p.m.

• Senior Monthly Meeting, 3rd Tues.

• Dime Bingo, 12:30 p.m.

• Cards & Pool, 7 p.m.

Food Shelf

• Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • SCF, 1-4 p.m., 715-483-2920

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-327-4425 • SCF, 9 a.m.-Noon

• SCF, Noon-6 p.m. • Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

• Frederic, 2-6 p.m. • SCF, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

• Siren VFW Aux., 2nd Wed., the hall, 7:30 p.m.

• Frederic Legion Aux. 249 Every 3rd Thurs., Golden Oaks, 7 p.m.

• Pokeno, 1 p.m.

• Bingo, 1 p.m.

715-866-5300

VFW Aux./Legion Aux.

TOPS

EVERY MON.

• Good Sam, St. Croix Falls, 5:45 p.m., 715-483-3666

EVERY TUES. • Webster Lioness At Last Call, 6 p.m.

Meat Raffles

EVERY WED.

• Webster Chamber At The Tap, 5:30 p.m.

EVERY MON.

• First Baptist Church, Webster, 9:30 a.m., 715-349-2332

EVERY THURS. • Cushing Legion At Suzy Q’s, 6:30 p.m. • Siren Lions At Midtown Tavern, 5 p.m.

EVERY TUES.

• Luck Senior Center, 5:30 p.m., 715-472-2341 • Balsam Lake Municipal Building, 3:45 p.m., 715-485-3002

EVERY FRI. • Fishbowl Sportsmen’s Club At Sweeny’s Bar, 5 p.m. • Snowciables At Thirsty Otter, 6 p.m. • Grantsburg Legion, 6:30 p.m. • Humane Society, Yellow River Saloon, 5 p.m. • Hockey Assoc., Dreamers, 6:30 p.m. • BYHA At Zia Louisa, 6 p.m. • BYHA at Frederic Golf Course, 5:30 p.m.

EVERY TUES.

• Trinity Lutheran Church, Osceola, 8:30 a.m., 715-755-3123

EVERY FRI. • Siren Lions At Jed’s Laker Lounge, 5 p.m. • Lake Country Riders At The Pour House, 5:30 p.m. • Webster Lions At Gandy Dancer Saloon, 4:30 p.m. • S.N.O.W.S., Skol Bar, Frederic, 5:30 p.m.

• Ruby’s, Siren, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

EVERY WED.

• Frederic, 9 a.m.-Noon

EVERY THURS.

• Comforts of Home, Frederic, 5:30 p.m., 715-327-8063

• Overeaters Anonymous, Amery Senior Center, 6:30 p.m., 715-268-6605

EVERY SAT.

EVERY SUN.

• YLRA At Yellow Lake Lodge, Webster, 3-5 p.m. • Siren Moose At Robert’s Road House, 4 p.m. • Wild About Education At Wild Waters, Danbury, 5 p.m. • Siren Lions At Whiskey Joe’s, 3 p.m.

• Wonderland At Yellow Lake Golf Course, 4 p.m.


PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Eternal

Perspectives Sally Bair

Blades of grass While mowing the lawn for the first time this season, I zipped through some areas of grass as sparse as an old man’s whiskers. Other areas, thick as the hair on a bear’s forelegs, caused me to push for all I was worth with my battery-operated mower that is not self-propelled. The sparse area looked like it hadn’t even been mowed. Conversely, the thick grass looked luxurious and inviting. Our lives work that way, too. When we work hard at something, it brings us a deep sense of satisfaction for having done a job well. When we fly through a task, the result is often boredom or the sense of being unfulfilled. Think of intelligent schoolchildren who are not challenged to learn new and more lessons. Often, boredom brings the desire to start trouble, refuse to follow rules, or skip school. Some even drop out of school. Some take the initiative, however, to strive for excellence and growth by doing extra-credit work or seeking new, independent ways of learning. Of course, many children—and adults—would rather do the minimum amount of work. Like the sparse lawn, they barely get by in most areas of their life. We can apply this analogy to our spiritual life, too. Many Christians are content to attend church once a week, depending on their spiritual leader to spoonfeed them with a short dose of the Word. Some may throw a handful of change in the Christmas kettle, believing they’ve done their Christian duty. Such a sparse life, like the thin grass, will be prone to disease when drought or flood come. Its shallow roots can easily allow weeds to take over. “I am the vine, you are the branches. He who abides in me, and I in him, bears much fruit; for without me you can do nothing.” (John 15: 5) God, our spiritual gardener, can cause our immature, thin roots to grow. All we have to do is become willing to follow His instructions. A daily dose of His Word is full of the growth-enhancing minerals we need to become flourishing plants. A constant attitude of praise, thanksgiving, and humility as well as a desire to learn more about His works and wonders will bring richness to our mind and spirit. Lord, we don’t want to languish like sparse patches of grass, content to take the easy way out. We want to flourish with the fruit of your Holy Spirit, unafraid of the effort it may involve. Help us to abide in you, to desire nothing so much as to depend on your grace and love for our growth. In Jesus’ name, amen. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com.

Secret Pal breakfast

CHURCH NEWS News from the Pews FREDERIC – In spite of the inclement weather this past Sunday, May 6, several members showed up early with their work clothes on and tools in hand ready to perform the ritual of spring cleaning of the outside of the church. Inside the church in the kitchen, students, Brennan Koball, Sophie Fredericks and Adam Menke, were busy learning how to make unleavened bread and made preparations to take their first Communion. During 10:30 worship services these students and family members were gathered at the altar to take Holy Communion. Also during worship, age-appropriate Bibles were given to Royce Anderson, 3, and Brennan Shafer, 3. Several older students were presented with their own copy of “The Adventure Bible” and they were Makenna Engen and Gavin Fredericks. After worship, there was a special congregational meeting to discuss and decide on a new, updated and more energy-efficient boiler system for the church, which will be installed during the coming months. After the meeting, many members stayed for a potluck lunch and then finished the spring cleaning. On Wednesday, May 9, the women of the church will be enjoying a potluck spring salad buffet with serving to begin at 6 p.m. The women are asking the men to serve the food and clean up afterward. At 7 p.m., the special program "The Many Hats We Wear" will be presented by local storyteller Leona Cummings, complete with all her wisdom and humor. Pilgrim will again be having a team in the Frederic Area American Cancer Society Walk/Run which takes place on Saturday, May 12. On Sunday, May 13, during worship, there will be special recognition and celebration of the 11 graduates from Pilgrim that will graduate from high school on Sunday, May 20. Since May 13 is Mother’s Day, the evangelism committee felt it was appropriate to also celebrate the women of Pilgrim who are 90 years of age or older. They

Pictured (L to R) are Brennan Koball, son of Wayne and Kathie; Sophie Fredericks, daughter of Megan Grindell and Adam Menke, son of Jim and Judy, these students were busy learning how to make unleavened bread and also making preparations to for their first communion. – Photo submitted will be recognized with a corsage and those women are Vera Amundson, Alice Anderson, Carmen Marek and Alice Velander. Pilgrim invites everyone to join them for any and all events and especially for Sunday morning worship which begins at 10:30 a.m. Confirmation class meets right after worship, led by Pastor Andrew in the Upper Fireside Room. For more information about the church or coming events, please call the church office at 715-3278012. The church secretary is in the office on Monday morning from 9 till noon and Thursday or Friday morning depending on the workload each week. You can also go to their Web site at pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org or check out other activities on Facebook. - submitted

Five confi firrmed at Bethany Lutheran Church The congregation at Bethany Lutheran Church in Siren celebrated Confirmation Sunday with five young people and their families on Sunday, May 6. Shown (L to R): John Dalsveen and Sophie Vasatka. Back row (L to R): Pastor Andrew Hinwood, Daniel Formanek, Nathan Martin and Bryce Highstrom. Several talented seamstresses from Bethany spent time sewing dozens of “pillow case dresses” to send to Bethany’s sister congregation in Malawi, Africa. The colorful dresses were displayed and blessed during the Sunday church services, before they make the journey to Malawi. Photo submitted

Confi firrmation and altar donation at St. Peter's St. Peter’s Lutheran Church donated their portable altar to New Hope LCMC Church in Minong. Don Olson, Dennis Olesewski and Dan Deardorff came to North Luck to receive their new altar. They have formed a new congregation and will be opening their new church building in May. Sunday, May 6, the Siren United Methodist Sunday School held its annual Secret Pal Breakfast. For the past few years the church has had a secret pal for each of the Sunday school students, to give them gifts for certain holidays and birthdays, pray for them and give them notes throughout the year. They do all this in secret, then at the end of the Sunday school they have a breakfast for the kids to meet their secret pal and socialize while they eat. It is a fun time for all. Photo above: Annie Schultz with Hazel Hahr and Cameryn Ritchey with Ruth Stickland. - Photos submitted

Cordell Fischer with Dionne Girard enjoy breakfast together.

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church confirmed Franki Wilkinson on Sunday, May 6. Pastor Robert Lubben gave the confirmand the power of light candle after the confirmation ceremony. – Photos submitted


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

OBITUARIES Joseph L. Snelson

Brian Keith Peterson

Gladys G. Sasse

Joseph L. Snelson, 60, passed away on Wednesday, May 2, 2012, at his home. He was born Oct. 20, 1951 in St. Paul, Minn. Joe married the love of his life, Diana, on Feb. 18, 1995. They made their home in Frederic. Joe was a man who lived life to the fullest. He was a member of Boy Scout Troop 39, which met at Hamline United Methodist Church in St. Paul. He attained the rank of Life Scout and was a member of Order of the Arrow. Joe was a former president of the St. Paul and Minneapolis Sitzmark Ski Club. He organized ski trips to Switzerland, Germany and France as well as trips here in the U.S. Joe skied down the Matterhorn! During one of his trips to Colorado, he participated in a Nastar Downhill Ski race where he earned the nickname “Mad Bomber.” He had placed in the race. Joe will also be remembered for his robot costumes. Besides the flashing lights, sounds and synthesizer, it had a drinking finger connected to a pump. Joe won awards with it and traveled around several states. It was powered by a car battery that his brother, Jack, carried around behind him. Joe loved to travel with his wife, Diana. They took many trips to Florida. Disney World, Epcot and Universal Studios were some of his favorite adventures. Joe also had many exciting trips with his 750-4 Honda motorcycle. But perhaps his favorite thing to do was running his 1950 Chris-Craft Cruiser on the St. Croix River. He was known for his margaritas and needed an industrialstrength blender. Joe worked in many different jobs in his life: LoPrice Supermarket, Onan Corporation (he designed their electronics manufacturing floor), Pawn Shop, Meninger Homes and for Alion-McNally’s Center for Product Technologies. Joe was a key designer and builder of the Enhanced Mobile Rapid Aerostat Initial Deployment project for the military. This device would detect where IED’s were being placed and warned our soldiers of impending danger. Joe’s device has saved countless lives and limbs of those serving our country. The Army has since taken over the project and has used it in Iraq and Afghanistan. Joe was a mechanical genius. Joe will be remembered for many things, but to those who knew him we will never forget that if you needed something, he was always ready to help. Joe requested that his body be cremated and set free. He is survived by his wife, Diana (Roodell-Rickeard); stepchildren, Diona Green, Marc Rickeard and Raven Rickeard; four grandchildren; four brothers, Dan Snelson, Jack Snelson, Fred Snelson and Pete Snelson; sister, Marilyn Snelson-Temple; and many nieces and nephews. Joe was preceded in death by his parents, Joseph E. and Iva L. (Lowrie) Snelson; his brother, Patrick Snelson; many aunts, uncles and grandparents. A Service of Remembrance and Celebration of Joe’s life will be held on Saturday, May 12, at 11 a.m. at the Northwoods Crossing Center, Hwy. 70/35 and CTH B, in Siren. In lieu of flowers, please donate to your favorite charity. Condolences and memorials may be directed to his family. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com or www.wicremationcenter.com . Please continue to check these Web sites for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-327-4475. Rowe Funeral Home of Frederic and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown have been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Brian Keith Peterson, 63, of Lakeside, Navajo County, Ariz., passed away peacefully on April 24, 2012, at his home. Brian, the youngest of six children, was born to the late Vernon and Gwendolyn (Johnson) on March 17, 1949, in Grantsburg. Brian was raised in the Town of Siren and attended and graduated from Siren Schools in 1967. The town was so small that all grades K-12 were held in the same building. Following his graduation, he worked for the Burlington Northern Railroad in the Twin Cities for a short time. In 1968, he enlisted in the United States Navy and served during the Vietnam War before being honorably discharged in 1972. Following his time in the service, he moved back to Siren where he became a partner with his father and brother in the farming industry. Brian also owned and operated, with his brother, the Peterson Sawmill in Siren before selling his partnership and beginning his employment at the Capeside Cove Good Samaritan Center in Siren, where he worked for 24-1/2 years as an environmental engineer. Following his time at Capeside, he worked with the mentally challenged for the Catholic Charities in Siren. On June 11, 1971, he married the love of his life, Mary Funck, in Pacific Grove, Calif., and they enjoyed nearly 41 years together. Brian had loving parents and he was extremely close to his mother. Because of his time spent with his mom, he learned how to cook at a young age and was excellent in this trade. He is survived by his wife, Mary Peterson of Lakeside, Ariz.; son, Richard (Emily) Peterson of Seoul, South Korea; three brothers; one sister; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; a son, Keith; a brother, John; niece, Jean; nephew, David; and a greatniece, Heather. Committal service was held on April 30 at the National Memorial Cemetery in Phoenix, Ariz.

Gladys G. Sasse, 100, formerly of Manitowoc, and also formerly of rural Webster, entered into eternal life on Thursday, May 3, 2012, at Shady Lane Nursing Care Center in Manitowoc. Gladys was born on April 11, 1912, in Milwaukee to the late Walter and Mary Trzecrakowski Swiantczak. In December of 1934, Gladys married Carl J. Sasse in Eagle. Carl preceded her in death on June 22, 2011. She had been employed at Sperry Candy in Wisconsin and also had worked with her brother at a barbershop in Chicago. Gladys enjoyed being outdoors, fishing, hunting, snowmobiling and spending time with her family and friends. She was a lifetime member of American Legion Auxiliary in Webster. She is survived by two daughters and sons-in-law, Alice and Jerry Seibel of Manitowoc and Monica and John Ford of Campbellsport; seven grandchildren; 10 great-grandchildren; two great-great-granddaughters; also nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. Gladys was preceded in death by her parents; husband, Carl; one great-grandson, James; and five brothers and sisters. A life celebration event for Gladys and Carl Sasse will be held at the Harrigan Parkside Gathering Center, 620 N. Water St., Manitowoc, on Saturday, May 12. At 1 p.m., there will be a dinner provided for relatives and friends with a social hour starting at noon. Cremation has taken place at the Harrigan Parkside Crematory and Chapel and burial of their cremated remains will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, June 22, at Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Spooner. Online condolences may be sent to www.harriganparksidefuneralhome.com. The family would like to extend their gratitude to the staffs of Shady Lane Nursing Care Center and Aurora VNA Hospice for the care and compassion they provided to both Gladys and her family. The Harrigan Parkside Funeral Home in Manitowoc was entrusted with arrangements.

Kenneth L. Haug, 89, Frederic, and formerly of Dairyland, passed away on May 1, 2012, at Spooner Health Systems Hospital. Kenneth was born Sept. 26, 1922, to Torsten and Marie Haug in Minneapolis, Minn., and raised on the original Haug homestead in Dairyland. He attended high school in Superior, before joining the Marines in 1945 where he was stationed in China. In 1947, Kenneth was honorably discharged from the Marines as a private first class and moved back to Dairyland to raise his family on the homestead. During his life, he lived in Arizona and Missouri before building a home in Siren. Kenneth enjoyed working with his hands and doing woodworking at his wood mill at his home in Siren. Kenneth was preceded in death by his parents; sister, Eleanor; brothers, Glen, Clarence and Marvin. He is survived by his children, Daniel Haug, Linda (Richard) McIvor, Kathleen (Michael) Blochinger and Jeffrey (Sherry) Haug; his children’s mother, Patricia Sperling; 10 grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; sisters, Marian (Allen) Andersen and Ethel Petersen; brother, Thor (Karen) Haug; special friend, Elva Wilson; along with many nieces, nephews other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Friday, May 4, at SwedbergTaylor Funeral Home, Webster, with Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt officiating. Interment was at River Hill Cemetery in Dairyland. Pallbearers were Jeffrey Haug, Jason Haug, Steve McIvor, Travis McIvor, Brian Haug and Chris Campbell. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. Alice M. Chelmo, 81, a resident of Robbinsdale, Minn., The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, and formerly of the Webster area, passed away on April was entrusted with arrangements. 30, 2012, at St. Therese Home in New Hope, Minn. Alice was born on Sept. 23, 1930, to Peter and Nellie Chelmo in Webster. She spent her whole life teaching at Lutheran Christian Day Schools in Minnesota and Wisconsin. She volunteered many hours throughout her lifetime in various fields serving others. Alice is survived by her brother, Walter (Lois) Chelmo; two nieces, step-nieces, step-nephews and many close We would like to thank everyone for the many friends. thoughts, prayers and phone calls that were Funeral services were held on Saturday, May 5, at Our extended to our family on the loss of our mother. Redeemer Lutheran Church, Webster, with Pastor Gerald Heinecke officiating. Music was provided by Margel Thank you so much to Pastor Mary Ann for such Ruck. Interment followed at the Chelmo Lutheran Cemea beautiful service and to Sue Saarem for her tery in town Town of Meenon. Online condolences can music. Thank you so much to Bone Lake Church be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. for the lunch that was served (the ladies did a great The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, job). Thank you for all the cards and memorials, was entrusted with arrangements.

Alice M. Chelmo

Thank You

Elna Wambolt Elna Wambolt, 73, Siren, died May 7, 2012, at Frederic Nursing & Rehab. Memorial service will be held Thursday, May 10, at 11 a.m., with visitation from 10-11 a.m., at Bethany Lutheran Church in Siren. A full obituary will be published at a later date. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

they are greatly appreciated. And to the Amery Regional Medical Center nurses & doctors who were so wonderful in our time of need. Thank you Rowe Funeral Home and, most of all, to all who came to pay respects to our mother.

The family of Lois Grambow, Robert, Debra & Michael 560099 38Lp

Scott R. Henschke Scott R. Henschke, 51, resident of Minneapolis, Minn., died Saturday, May 5, 2012. Private services are being planned. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com or www.wicremationcenter.com. Please return for updated information or call Bruce Rowe at 715-472-2444. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown have been entrusted with funeral arrangements.

Marian “Micky” Manion Marian C. “Micky” Manion, 79, of Baker, Mont., passed away Saturday, April 28, 2012, at the Fallon County Nursing Home and Medical Center. A celebration of life open house for Marian will be held on Saturday, May 12, 2012, at Stevenson Funeral Home in Baker with Micky’s family receiving friends from 2 to 5 p.m. In lieu of flowers please make memorials in Micky’s honor to the Baker After-School Program in care of the Fallon County Recreation Department, P.O. Box 1512, Baker, Montana 59313 or the School of Promise, 204 7th Ave. Southwest, Bowman, N.D. 58623.

ROWE FUNERAL HOME AND CREMATION SERVICES Luck – Frederic

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Bruce Rowe Or Ray Rowe Generations Of Trusted Service

715-327-4475 Or 715-472-2444

560120 38L

Kenneth L. Haug


PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

CHURCH NEWS Girl’s sadness over lack of prom date reflection of culture Q: My teenage daughter wasn’t asked to the prom, and she’s devastated. As a father, what can I do to encourage her? Jim: First of all, try to avoid making a big issue of her disappointment. Prom night is one of the most overhyped experiences of adolescence. Your daughter’s friends, the media and the prevailing culture have all told her that she’s missing out on the biggest evening of her life, and it probably won’t do much good to try to convince her otherwise. But it’s just as unhelpful to say or do anything that might foster or prolong her melancholy mood. That’s not to say that you should ignore or make light of her feelings. The emotions she’s going through are very real, and they have nothing to do with the intrinsic value of the prom. They’re primarily related to her sense of selfworth. So be sensitive. Don’t try to apply a quick-fix solution. Give her time to be sad and withdrawn. Back off if you get the impression that she’s unwilling to discuss the matter.

Jim Daly

Focus on the Family

Juli Slattery

When she does come to the point of opening up, take time to listen. Reaffirm her as a person, reinforce the importance of character as opposed to mere popularity and social standing, and remind her that she will have something to offer a fortunate young man when the time is right. And as opportunities arise, help her gain a more realistic view of events like the prom. On a more practical level, you might consider recommending an alternate activity for the evening. If some of her friends are free, host a movie night. If everybody else is at the prom, propose a “Dad date” at a location of her choosing. If she decides to stay home, encourage her to call a friend far away (and don’t worry about the minutes). And whatever you do, take pains to reassure her of your love. ••• Q: Our 7-year-old is negative all the

time. He’s the youngest of four boys, and we always try to encourage him and build up his self-esteem. Nothing seems to be enough. How can we help him to be more positive? Juli: Helping your son become more positive may have less to do with making him feel better about himself and more to do with how he interacts with the rest of the world. The positive-thinking, self-esteem movement has shown, in many cases, to be doing more harm than good for kids. Building a child’s self-esteem only through encouragement can feel like blowing up a balloon that has a hole in it. No matter how much air you put in, it will still leak out. Try getting your son involved in helping and encouraging others through a family mission trip or volunteering at a local nonprofit organization. This will do two things that build genuine self-esteem and self-respect: instill gratitude and show him that he can make a difference. When your son sees others who have difficulties greater than his own, it will help him realize how much he has to be grateful for. Meeting people who live with much less than he does is far more powerful than words that encourage gratefulness. You can’t really complain about having brown eyes when you meet

someone who is blind. Your son will also see that his efforts to help others are a unique contribution to the world. You won’t have to persuade him that he is talented or smart. Seeing that he’s helped someone less fortunate will be enough to convince him that his life can make a difference. ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, cohost of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2012 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

Brought to you by:

Faith Fellowship Luck

75th-annual Lilac Day service is May 20 at St. Luke United Methodist Church FREDERIC - “Lilac Day” has become a tradition at St. Luke United Methodist Church since 1937 when Mrs. Mabel Areson experienced it somewhere and was inspired to start the service in Frederic 75 years ago. It has been held ever since. Lilac Day is not a program, not a festival, not a style show but a service of worship to the glory of God. Setting the day always presents a question: “Will the lilacs be ready or will they be gone by that day?” This depends on the weather and can vary several weeks from year to year, but through many years, give or take a week, they are still lovely, even if a few petals drop. Volunteers gather the lilacs on Saturday morning and people start to do the decorating as soon as they arrive. Arrangements are done in huge baskets and some smaller ones, with different colors of lilacs. The church has window vases which Dr. Arveson made and they are hung on the windows and baskets are placed by the doors and everywhere possible. The church youth will be part of the service, bringing

forth baskets of lilacs. The altar is a bank of lilacs. There are stands which hold rectangular “tanks” about 2 feet long, which are put behind the altar rail and filled with lilacs. In front of the rail there are big baskets of flowers, also. When Lilac Day first began, people who had canaries would bring them to the church for this day. When the music started, the birds would sing, too. The church will be honoring graduates on Lilac Sunday, also. The public is invited to join the congregation for the 75th-annual Lilac Sunday worship service, May 20, at 10:30 a.m. with coffee and fellowship following. - submitted

Lilacs are placed near the altar for the annual celebration of Lilac Day at St. Luke United Methodist Church in Frederic. The special service will be held Sunday, May 20. - Photo submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475

Duane Lindh

HAULING

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

ALPHA BASS LAKE LUMBER • Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP

1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Dan Dowling, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 715-689-2467

WEBSTER

LUCK

CUSHING

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

VAN METER’S MEATS

CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies

Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

WILD RIVER FLAGS Jerry & Pat Willits 2815 285th Ave. Sterling Township St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-488-2729

Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

SIREN

Churches 1/12

FREDERIC

OLSEN & SON

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES 10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.


MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

Church Directory ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY

1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elder: Cliff Bjork, 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS)

Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Nanette Hagen-Hinck 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship (begins May 27)

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 www.newhopelutheranchurch.org 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Wed. Wor. 6:30 p.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays www.facebook/OurRedeemerWebster

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Melissa Carmack Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Worship - 10:.30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. Worship - 8:30 a.m,; Sun. School 9:45 a.m.

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

Pastor Peter Rimmereid, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.; Education Hour 9:45 a.m. (Starts 9/18/11); Sunday Traditional Service 10:45 a.m.

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws

Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, 8:45 a.m. Prayer; 9 a.m. Sun. Schl. & Adult Bible Study; 10:30 a.m. Worship; 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS)

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630; 715-327-4461 www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Worship 10:15 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Communion 1st Sun.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Worship - 8:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship - 11 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-416-3086, 715-327-8384 Pastor Theresa Riewestahl Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter - 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA

CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Pastor Bill Schroeder Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN

Pastor Ralph Thompson - 715-472-8424; 510 Foster Ave. E.; Office 715-472-2605; www.lucklutheran.org Sun. Wor. 8 &10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl 9 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod) ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m. Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sun. Wor. 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sun. Wor. 8 & 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra and Myron Carlson Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (LCMC)

5 miles E. of Frederic on W, 2 miles south on I; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Bible Class 9:30 a.m. Worship Serv. 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & Last Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sunday School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

Pastor Theresa Riewestahl 715-327-8384, 715-416-3086 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola, 715-294-2243 Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home ASSEMBLY

ASSEMBLY

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 10:30 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Pastor Father Frank Wampach, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-8223001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available) 290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

SIREN COVENANT

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE

Pastor Dan Pearson Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Frank Wampach 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

EVANGELICAL

EVANGELICAL

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery, 715-268-2176 Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

HOPE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH

Pastor Dave Williams 933 248th St., Osceola Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School Sept.-May 8:45 a.m. Children’s Church & Nursery provided

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. Pastor Gabe Brennan, 715-857-5411

www.eastbalsam.org Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun. School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sun. School - 10 a.m.; Wor. Service - 11 a.m.

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

Pastor Merrill Olson, Interim Pastor 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago City, MN, www.holyx.net Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

NONDENOMINATIONAL

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m. 131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Reg. office hours: Tues.-Thurs. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Associate Pastor Sun. Serv.: 9 a.m.; All ages Sun. Schl. 10:30 11:30 a.m.; Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN CHURCH

2390 CTH A, 1/8 mi. east of A&H intersection Pastor Tryg Wistad, 715-635-9222 crossroadschurch@gmail.com Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY

Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982 Sunday Wor. 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastor Scott Petznick Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WOR. GROUP

715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER

ST. CROIX UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE

Church Phone 715-866-4111 Pastor Tim Quinn Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

1st, 2nd & 3rd Sunday, 10 a.m. in the St. Croix Falls Library community room.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

ST. ANNE PARISH

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

“Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

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MAY 9, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

Mason Williamson has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. He is the son of Lance and Stephanie Williamson and is in kindergarten. Mason is a great kid and is always happy. He is a great friend and helper. He loves to read and write and play with Legos. He wants to work at Carquest when he grows up, just like his dad.

Layne Heitz has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. He is in seventh grade and the son of Judy Ollikain. He enjoys playing outside and video games. He is a good reader, is kind and caring and is a good friend.

Ian Lexen has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. He is a junior and the son of Kyle and Kathy Lexen. He participates in track, basketball and football. Other activities he is involved in include Wisconsin Covenant, National Honor Society, solo and ensemble, honor roll and show choir. He sings his way through school and even sings about prepositional phrases. He works hard and music is definitely in his bones.

Samantha Kichler has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in second grade and the daughter of Betsy Gerde and Jeff Kichler. She has worked hard all year to get stronger in reading and writing. She has worked extra hard on her own time at home to make sure she reaches her goals. She loves the games with friends at recess and painting in art. Her favorite subject is math.

LUCK

Kiran Ogilvie has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Dawn Ogilvie. She likes to play basketball, ride on four-wheelers and play with her little sister. She is an excellent student and a hard worker. Her favorite subject is reading. She likes to read Big Nate books. She is looking forward to going to camp this summer.

Nathan Lewis has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. He is a sophomore and the son of Maureen and Gordy Lewis. Nathan is a highquality musician who is a positive and valuable contributor to the band. He has made spectacular gains throughout his musical career and continues to grow each day. He is always kind, courteous and hardworking. He values being a focused person and being kind to others.

ST. CROIX FALLS

Samantha Lindberg has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. She is in eighth grade. She is a student who always has a positive attitude, does what is required of her and more. She takes negative situations and turns them positive. In her spare time, she enjoys mudding, reading, snowmobiling and spending time with family.

Jaimee Buck has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. She is a junior and the daughter of LeRoy and Susan Buck. She is on the honor roll. She shows great leadership skills, is responsible, hardworking and willing to assist with projects before she is asked. She is involved in FCCLA, NHS, Kinship, Cloverleaf staff, dance, church youth group and works at the Milltown Drive Inn. She is involved in basketball, volleyball and softball.

Marley Harrison has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in second grade. She has a twin sister, a younger sister who is 6 and a 4-year-old brother. At home, Marley likes to play teacher with her sisters. She also likes to read, play games and ride bikes. At school, she loves to read and really loves the "Olivia" series. When she grows up, she wants to be a teacher because she thinks school is fun.

Makenna Ross has been chosen St. Croix Falls Middle School’s student of the week. She is in fifth grade and the daughter of Vanessa and Aaron Ross. She has one brother, Logan. She is going to join soccer next year and enjoys art, sketching and playing. Her favorite subject is Spanish because it's very interesting and fun to learn. Makenna is an outstanding writer. Her stories are full of energy, exciting and vivid.

Stephanie Melin has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. She is a junior and the daughter of Scott and Amanda Melin and has a younger sister, Samantha. Steph enjoys reading, drawing and writing and is involved in Kinship, softball and volleyball.

WEBSTER

SIREN

Ciera Oiyotte has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in kindergarten. She is a very hardworking student and always does her best. She enjoys school and is always ready to learn. She is a very good friend to her classmates, always making sure she includes others and makes them feel accepted, and is a great help to her teacher. She enjoys math stations and writer's workshop. She loves to play Red Rover and on the monkey bars during recess.

Edward Clover has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. He is in sixth grade and the son of Andrew and Aimee Clover. He has a genuine kindness and care for the other students and for the school itself. He volunteers to help at lunch time. He is really making strides and it is reflected in his grades. Edward can be very proud of the progress he has made this year. He enjoys football and chess club.

Aubri Larson has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of Rick and Carol Larson. Aubri is currently in eighth grade and is an active member of the choir and band. She recently performed in the Shell Lake Indianhead Arts Center middle-level honors choir in the advanced choir. She also plays alto saxophone in the band. She is involved in sports and is currently involved in the middle school track season where she throws discus. She values her family and friends above all else.

Graham Hall has been chosen Siren High School’s student of the week. He is a sophomore and the son of David and Julie Hall. Graham has a good attitude and gets along well with everyone he meets. He has put more effort into his schoolwork during the fourth quarter and his grades are improving. Graham plays third base and catcher on the baseball team. He also works a part-time job at Adventures Restaurant.

Ellah Jacobs has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of John and Leah Jacobs. Ellah is kind, positive, a hard worker and a great friend. At school, she likes reading books. While at home, she enjoys watching movies and playing with her sisters. When Ellah grows up she wants to be a mommy.

Andrew Moritz has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. He is in sixth grade and the son of Lee Moritz and Dara Wolf. He always tries his best. He puts his work first even if there is something else he would rather do. Andy is a polite and friendly student. He has a new baby brother who he enjoys watching grow and learn new things. His hobbies are fishing, hunting and riding his fourwheeler.

Ashley Starks has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Rosanna Starks. She takes pride in her work and is always cooperative in class. She is extremely polite and friendly. Ashley is always willing to lend a hand to students or staff whenever needed. She is concerned with others well-being and likes to lift them up when they are feeling down. She is involved in cheerleading and track.

UNITY

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Courtney Allison has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Nina and Michael Hutton and James Allison. Courtney was chosen because she works very hard and she is a great class leader. She is kind to others and has a great work ethic.

Xavier Foeller has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. He is a senior and the son of Greg and Tara Foeller. He participates in track, football and baseball. He enjoys fishing, hunting and weight lifting. His favorite class is social studies. He plans to attend UW-River Falls next year and is planning to become a nurse. He resides in Milltown.


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - MAY 9, 2012

Coming events

MAY

Siren

• Month senior meeting at the senior center, 9:30 a.m. • Blood drive at Siren Covenant Church, 11:30 a.m.5:30 p.m., 800-733-2707.

THURS.-FRI./3-11 St. Croix Falls

St. Croix Falls

• The elementary and middle school Spring Art Exhibition in the elementary lobby, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. weekdays.

• Luncheon at the senior center, 11:30 a.m.

Webster

THURS.-SAT./10 -12

• Burnett County Democrats meeting at Whitetail Wilderness Resort. Dinner 6 p.m., meeting 7-9 p.m. • Meeting at the senior center, 1 p.m., 715-866-5300.

Siren

• Sale with proceeds to cancer society at 6402 Midtown Rd. Thurs. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Fri. 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.-?.

WEDNESDAY/16

THURSDAY/10

Dresser

• Baccalaureate ecumenical service for area graduating seniors at Peace Lutheran, 7 p.m.

Amery

• NARFE dinner meeting at Village Pizzeria at noon. RSVP by Mon., May 7, 715-268-8618.

THURSDAY/17

Centuria

Luck

• Adult grief support group meeting at Holy Trinity Church, 6:30 p.m., 715-483-3363.

• American Legion & Auxiliary 255 meeting at the village hall, 7 p.m.

Grantsburg

St. Croix Falls

• Ag Society Fair pasture sale at fairgrounds, 6:30 p.m.

• Diabetes support group at the medical center, 6-8 p.m., 715-483-0431.

St. Croix Falls

FRI. & SAT./18 & 19

• Annual casserole supper at United Methodist Church, 5-7 p.m.

Webb Lake

FRI. & SAT./11 & 12

• Community club rummage sale at the town hall, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Balsam Lake

SAT. & SUN./19 & 20

• Holy Trinity United Methodist Church thrift sale. Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-noon.

Grantsburg

FRIDAY/11

• Wildlife Experience Weekend at Crex Meadows. Sign up for tours, Sat. 5 p.m., Sun. 4 & 7 a.m., 715-463-2739.

Balsam Lake

• Poco Penners meeting at the justice center, 2 p.m., 715483-9738.

Frederic

• Citizen/Volunteer of the Year banquet at Hacker’s. RSVP by May 7. 6 p.m., 715-327-4836.

Grantsburg

• Pop choir concert at the high school, 7:30 p.m., with art display preceding.

Milltown

• Music for Mom event at the library, 5 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• Solar seminar/workshop at Lamar Community Center. RSVP by Mon., May 7, 715-553-2116, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. • American Legion Post 143 fish fry at the Legion, 5:307:30 p.m.

SATURDAY/12 Amery

• Ruby’s Pantry at Congregational Church. Doors open 8:30 a.m. Dist. 9 a.m., $15 donation, 715-268-7390.

Cushing

• 100-bird shoot fundraiser for Burnett County Wrestling Club at rod & gun club, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 715-205-8472.

Frederic

• American Cancer Society Walk/Run team and individual check-in, and late registration 8-9 a.m. Walk begins at 9:15 a.m., 715-653-2684.

Fox Creek

• ELCA youth fundraiser hotdish buffet at Eagle Lounge, 5-8 p.m.

Grantsburg

• Crex Meadows Nature Photography Club meets at Crex, 10 a.m.-noon, 715-463-2739. • Spring birding tour at Crex. Registration required, 810 a.m., 715-463-2739.

A gosling succeeds in keeping up with its mom at a pond they’ve claimed as home near Frederic. - Photo by Becky Amundson • Migratory Bird Day at Memory Lake Park, 8 a.m.-?, 715463-2739. • Dry run for Adventure Triathlon beginning at Memory Lake Park. Register at 8 a.m. Start at 9 a.m., www.fitnat.org or www.bikepaddlerun.com. • Freewill offering pancake breakfast at Luther Point Bible Camp, 8-11 a.m., Break in the Lake at 11 a.m. • Wildlflower tour at Crex Meadows, 12:30-3 p.m., 715463-2739.

Luck

• ACS walk/run, starting at the high school. Preregister by May 8 or sign up that day, 715-472-4114. • Democrats Jefferson-Jackson-Dueholm Dinner at Hog Wild, 5:30 p.m., 715-472-2728.

• Learn to build a clay oven, class at Forts Folle Avoine. Register: 715-866-8890, 8 a.m., all day.

SUNDAY/13 Grantsburg

• High school group May Contain Nuts improv comedy show at the high school, 7 p.m.

Siren

• Head injury support group at Siren Covenant Church, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8985.

Wanderoos

• Plant sale and Mother’s Day pancake breakfast at the fire department hall, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

Milltown

MONDAY/14

Siren

• Weight-loss surgery education and support at the medical center, 5-6 p.m., 715-268-0597.

• Unity Area Ambulance pig roast, raffles and food at the garage, 4 p.m.-?, 715-825-4444. • Mixed Sampler Quilt Guild celebrating 25 years at the senior center, 10 a.m. • Lion/Lioness yard sale donation drop-off day at their building, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-349-2400.

St. Croix Falls

• Hingepoint meeting for men battling sexual addictions, at River Valley Christian Church, 9 a.m.-noon, 715483-5378. • Guided birds walk at Interstate Park, 7-9 a.m.

Webster

• Used book sale at the library, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-8667697.

Amery

Webster

• Area chamber of commerce spring dinner at Ike Walton Lodge. 5 p.m. social, 6 p.m. dinner, 715-866-8644.

TUESDAY/15 Clam Falls

• Coffee hour at Clam Falls Lutheran Church, 9 a.m.

Milltown

• The Compassionate Friends Chapter of the Northwoods meet at Milltown Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715553-1152, www.compassionatefriends.org.

Unity students provide county with new podiums On Friday, April 27, the Polk County Justice Center received two custom-made birch podiums from the Unity High School technology education independent woodworking class. Retired Principal Bill Alleva made all the arrangements and Judges Molly GaleWyrick and Jeff Anderson accepted delivery. The podiums were made by Jenny Vlasnik and Faith Christianson under the direction of their teacher Neil Larson. They will be a daily reminder of the generosity and community spirit of Bill Alleva and Unity High School. - Photo submitted

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities

SATURDAY/19 Dresser

• Yard & garden sale & concessions at Bethesda Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

McKinley

• Garage sale at Trinity Lutheran Church, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

Osceola

• 5K for Life at Tri-County Life Center, 9 a.m., 715-7552229. • Ride for the Cure at Auggie’s, 11:30 a.m., 715-294-4220.

Shell Lake

• Evening with the Stars Gala at Shell Lake Arts Center, 5:30 p.m., 715-468-2414.

Siren

• Siren’s Lilac Fest communitywide garage sale, 8 a.m.4 p.m., 715-349-8399. • Frukost breakfast and bake sale at the Methodist church, 8 a.m.-?. • Farmers market at Lakeview Event Center, 1-3 p.m., 715-349-5845. • Lilac sale at Lakeview Event Center, 715-349-8386.

St. Croix Falls

• Fun/pleasure horse show at the fairgrounds, 8:30 a.m., 715-554-0748.

SUNDAY/20 Amery

• Little Timmy’s heart benefit at Balsam Lutheran Church, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., 715-268-9291.

ONGOING Every Day

AA &/or AlAnon, Polk & Burnett counties, 715-931-8262 for time/location. Amery, 715-268-8431.

Divorce care support group at Apple River Community Church, 715-268-8360, 715-268-2176.

Every Monday

Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the Balsam Lake Government Center, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202. Baby and Me class - Amery Medical Center, 1-2 p.m. Grief Share support group at Centennial Hall, Amery, 715-268-2176 or 715-268-8360. Moms In Touch International, First Baptist, Amery, 2 - 3 p.m., 715-268-5408, www.momsintouch.com

Partners of Veterans women’s support group, Counseling Associates, Siren, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8575. Play group for children and caretakers at the Burnett County Family Resource Center, 10 - 11:30 a.m.

Every Tuesday

Bingo - Burnett County Moose Lodge, Siren, 6 p.m. Survivors of domestic violence & sexual assault support group, Polk Co., 800-261-7233, 6-7:30 p.m. Anger management group at Amery Regional Medical Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 715-268-4094.

Every Wednesday

Women of Hope, cancer support group, at SCRMC, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., 715-483-0431. Free playtime with your toddler at Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church,10-11:30 a.m., 715-557-0630.

Every Thursday

Breastfeeding support group at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center, 2-3:30 p.m., 715-483-0431.

Play group for children and caretakers at the Burnett County Family Resource Center, 10 - 11:30 a.m.

Every Saturday

AA meets at the West Denmark Lutheran Church, rural Luck, 9 - 10 a.m.

Leader 5 9  

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