Page 1

Hinojosa to peform at SCFalls

RuthAnn Peterson crowned Miss Grantsburg

Underground business

Currents, page 4

Currents feature

Leader

Currents, page 13

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WED., JUNE 6, 2012 VOL. 79 • NO. 42 • 2 SECTIONS •

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Gov. Walker keeps his job

A royal hug for dad

Scores a sound victory over Barrett in historic recall election; gets 60 percent of Burnett and Polk votes by Gary King Leader editor

BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES – Gov. Scott Walker will get the chance to finish his term in office after being the first governor in history Tuesday, June 5, to survive a recall vote. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett conceded the race to Walker shortly after 10 p.m. Walker received 53.2 percent of the vote (1,331,076 votes) to Barrett’s 46.3 perAlexandra Kammeyer gave her dad, Jeff, a big hug after being crowned Little Miss cent (1,158,337 votes) and Grantsburg, Friday evening, June 1. Photos of the pageant can be found in the CurHari Trivedi’s 0.6 percent rents section. - Special photo by Carissa Kammeyer (14,332 votes). Voters in Burnett and Polk counties saw an even higher percentage of voters - 60 percent - supporting Walker, according to unofficial tallies. Only the Town of Swiss precinct, in northern Burnett Gov. Scott Walker County, saw Barrett win, 156 greets his supporters to 130. Barrett and Walker and delivers his victory each received 45 votes in the speech at the Wauke- Town of Blaine precinct. sha Expo Center in Overall, Burnett County Waukesha, - Lukas voters favored Walker by a Keapproth/Wisconsin vote margin of 4,002 (60.8

Do cancer cells grow in space?

Center for Investigative Journalism

See Walker, page 4

Fall election candidates set

Primary for Republican Senate nomination PAGE 3

Pirates hopes for state dashed by Prescott See

$1

SPORTS

Local radio club contacts American astronaut on the International Space Station

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer POLK COUNTY — Is there Internet access on the International Space Station? If the space station orbits the Earth every 90 minutes and days and nights are so short, how do the ISS astronauts know when to sleep? These are just two of the questions that, earlier this month, students at a science magnet school in St. Paul were able to ask astronaut Don Pettit of ISS Expedition 30. The contact was possible thanks to the equipment and expertise of the Polk County Amateur Radio Club. Pettit, a flight engineer, is one of two Americans on the six-member crew of Expedition 30. This past weekend he was the astronaut who opened the hatch between the ISS and the SpaceX Dragon, the first commercial spacecraft to bring cargo and experiments to the space station. The Polk County Amateur Radio Club, www.n9cha.com, was chosen to make the contact for the Farnsworth Aerospace Magnet School because the club has the necessary expertise and equipment. Two other clubs that are more local to the St. Paul school were

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Which local community has the best summer celebration? 1. Balsam Lake 2. Siren 3. Frederic 4. Luck 5. St. Croix Falls 6. Webster 7. Grantsburg 8. Milltown 9. Centuria 10. Danbury 11. Hertel 12. Clam Falls 13. Osceola 14. Amery 15. Lewis 16. Other Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

Deaths

Donnie Denotter Gerald R. Marquardt Trey William Hamilton Steven Walter Johnson LaVonne M. Jordan James Frank Gloodt Myron T. Gilbertson Ronald “Ron” Johnson

Obituaries on page 22-23B

INSIDE Chris Keezer raises a directional beam antenna, called a yagi antenna, on the roof of Farnsworth Aerospace Magnet School in preparation for contact with the International Space Station. Keezer is a member of the Polk County Amateur Radio Club. Yagi antennae were used to help focus radio signals in a specific direction while tracking the space station. — Photos courtesy of Rick Radke, president of Polk County Amateur Radio Club unable to provide the needed help. Taking place Monday, May 7, contact with the ISS at Farnsworth was only about six minutes long. Orbiting the

Letters to the editor 9A Sports 15-22A Outdoors 24A Town Talk 6-7B Coming Events Back of B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B Just for Laughs 3B Copyright © 2012

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PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

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Swollen river

Tom Petty tribute band at overlook on Friday ST. CROIX FALLS - USA’s No. 1 Tom Petty Tribute band, Free Fallin’, will perform at the Friday night music series in St. Croix Falls, Music on the Overlook - this Friday, June 8. “This is one of several highlights of the season,” says coordinator Woody McBride. “Free Fallin’ just does not cover Tom Petty songs, they bring a passion, costumes and theatrics that have earned them as a nationally recognized tribute band. We are honored they would perform for us.” Music on the Overlook happens most Friday’s in downtown St. Croix Falls at 6 p.m. “We have one of the best possible things that a person can do on a Friday in the St. Croix Valley - great food vendors, great music and family fun galore!” says McBride. Sponsors for the event are Rhett and Julie Neuman of RBC Wealth Management and The Easy IT Guys - Computer and Technical Repair and Support, both of St. Croix Falls. - submitted

Local pilot Woody Minar took this photo of the St. Croix River at Taylors Falls/St. Croix Falls on Friday, June 1. Flooding closed some parks and recreational areas along the river. This photo shows the river from the hydroelectric dam to the Interstate Bridge. A larger version of the photo can be found on the Leader Web site at www.theleader.net. - Photo by Woody Minar

Hip-hop and Latin dance sample classes RURAL ST. CROIX FALLS - Lamar is bringing Jae Haile Phillips back on Wednesday, June 13, for sample dance classes in hip-hop and L.A.-style Latin dance. Phillips is a celebrated instructor who teaches internationally and has developed rapport with local kids and adults in his seminars at Lamar during the past two years. Hip Hop for Everyone will be on Wednesday, June 13, at 6 p.m. and is recommended for family fun. L.A.-style Latin dance, also on June 13, beginning at 7 p.m., is for teens and adults. The classes are offered by donation with support from the Wisconsin Arts Board. Lamar Community Center is located at 1488 200th St., St. Croix Falls. Registration appreciated. For further information call 715-553-2116 or visit www.lamarcommunity.org. - submit-

Leader

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Jamie Cordell of Luck, with son Reese, casts her ballot in the Tuesday, June 5, recall election. — Photo by Mary Stirrat

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The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 8750-9091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $37/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $41/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $44/yr. anywhere in the United States $25/yr. for servicemen or women; $25/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.theleader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

Jean Koelz jeankoelz@hotmail.com Greg Marsten marscafe@lakeland.ws Tammi Milberg tammi@centurytel.net Marty Seeger mseeger@centurytel.net Mary Stirrat marystirrat@hotmail.com Sherill Summer sherill33@gmail.com Gregg Westigard greggw@lakeland.ws EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Raelynn Hunter rael@centurytel.net


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

BRIEFLY

ST. CROIX FALLS - Free ice cream, pop and chips will be at the St. Croix Falls Public Library, Monday, June 11. Young people who want to learn about how rewarding it is to be a volunteer at the ReStore in St. Croix Falls are being sought. It’s great work experience, great for your resume and a great way to serve the community. The ReStore in St. Croix Falls supports the work of nonprofit Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity, which builds and repairs homes for people in need. Come to the library from 7-8 p.m., enjoy a snack and learn how easy, fun and rewarding it is to volunteer at the ReStore. Please call 715-483-2700 or office@wildrivershabitat.org to learn more. - submitted ••• DRESSER - The Indianhead Chapter 1581 of National Active and Retired Federal Employee will have their June dinner meeting at the Village Pizzeria in Dresser, at noon, Thursday, June 14. All federal and retired federal employees are welcome. For reservations, phone 715327-8658, by Monday, June 10. submitted ••• CORRECTION: Contrary to information published recently in a story about the Webster Village Board, the Central Burnett County Fair will not be held July 6, 7 and 8 but will be held July 12, 13 and 14. We apologize for the error. ••• MILLTOWN - The Milltown History Center is open every Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. or by appointment by calling 715-554-7335. The center will have extended hours for the Fishermen’s Party, June 21-24. The center is located by the park, across from the bank in the former Milltown Telephone Company building. - with submitted information ••• SIREN/ST. CROIX FALLS - The St. Croix Valley Orchestra will be presenting summer concerts in this area during the second week of June. The program includes a wide variety of music from throughout the world and America. You’ll hear dances, marches, patriotic and entertaining music from theater and concert hall, all in the easy atmosphere of one of our beautiful parks. This is the orchestra’s 22nd season featuring musicians who come from more than a 30-mile radius to rehearse in St. Croix Falls and perform several sets of concerts throughout the St. Croix Valley each year under the direction of Randolph Elliott. For more information, see the orchestra’s Web site at scvorchestra.org. Summer concerts will begin on Monday, June 11, at 7 p.m. at Point Pleasant Heights assisted living home in Chisago City, Minn. Next is a return to the orchestra shell in Crooked Lake Park in Siren at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 14, or the high school in case of rain. On Friday, June 15, the orchestra will be performing at Overlook Park in St. Croix Falls at 6:30 p.m., or at the Festival Theatre in case of rain. The final concert of the season will be noon on Saturday, June 16, at North Park as part of the Crafts Festival in Amery. The public is welcome at all these locations; there will be music no matter what the weather. Bring your lawn chair or blanket, maybe something to eat or drink, and have a good time with live music! - submitted •••

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Confusion reigns in fast-paced aftermath of Siren school fire “There’s a very good chance we won’t be fully operational by the first day of school,” said district Administrator Scott Johnson. by Jean Koelz Leader staff writer SIREN—On Tuesday, May 29, an electrical fire in the ceiling of Siren School’s small gym equipment room caused damage throughout the building and forced an early end to the 2011-2012 academic year. Before sunset, cleanup efforts were already well under way. By Wednesday morning, district Administrator Scott Johnson had already met with teachers and staff, and had a plan of action prepared for the emergency school board meeting scheduled for noon that day. Johnson declared that the building would be closed for at least the remainder of the week, then recommended that the board take action to end the school year provided that the school met state requirements for minimum days and instructional hours for the year. After a haphazard and confusing calculation of school days, a discussion ensued regarding the effects of early closing on students, especially raising questions about academic fairness for students who would not be able to take finals. At least two board members raised concerns about seniors, GPAs, class rank and scholarships – apparently unaware that seniors graduated nearly two weeks before. Johnson also stressed the “need to bring some closure for the students” and suggested an all-school picnic to be held in a nearby park. In fact, he had already assembled a planning committee of teachers and was prepared to issue an all-call message to school families later that day. In providing a building assessment, board President Jeff Howe initially assured the two dozen teachers, staff and community members present that summer school was a go. However, after everyone had the opportunity to compare notes and time lines, the board realized that the air-quality assessment wouldn’t be back for at least two

A full week after the Siren School fire Tuesday, May 29, mats are still soaking water up from the gym floor and fans are still working to clear the air. Damage assessments are still being calculated. – Photos by Jean Koelz weeks, making it impossible to start summer school on time.

Thursday meeting By Thursday, May 31, at the regular school board meeting, much of the dust had settled and a firmer action plan was in place. The state superintendent’s office waived the minimum-hours requirement for Siren school, enabling administration to call an end to the year. It was determined that an all-school picnic was not the best use of time and that an open house in the restored building would be more positive for students. Summer school was canceled, except whatever could be arranged for high school students, and possibly middle school students, at the ALC. A recap of the damage caused by the fire includes: The small gym is considered a total loss, with the roof burned through; water damage in the central area of the building, in the elementary rooms and almost to the district offices on the other side of the building; smoke damage throughout the building; and some problems with the boiler system due to loss of pressure. “Just for the record,” said Howe, “the [insurance] adjustors said we have the best insurance available.”

Blue tarps cast an eerie glow through the burnt-out roof of Siren’s small gym.

Though it’s reassuring to know that repairs and replacements will be paid for, there is a daunting amount of work for everyone involved. Johnson explained that students belongings will have to be inventoried and bagged with a determination made regarding whether items will be part of the claim before being returned to students, and the staff will have to inspect every item in each room to determine if it needs to be merely cleaned, repaired or replaced. The board will need to move quickly to hire an architect and begin the construction in order to have the work completed by the start of the next school year. Finally, communications and record-keeping are problematic without access to files and offices. “Communication is a big problem right now,” said Johnson. “In an effort to be transparent, I want to give people an opportunity to find out what’s going on.” Johnson will host a weekly information conference that he described as a questionand-answer session with directors that will be open to the public. The first conference was set for Wednesday, June 6, at 9 a.m. at the Siren Village Hall. Otherwise, the best way for anyone to get information is to send an e-mail to info@siren.k12.wi.us.

Other business In other business, Principal Peggy Ryan requested that the board increase the technology budget for the 2012-13 school year by $50,000 and presented a plan that described how that money might be spent in a program that also included greater incorporation of students’ own computers and other electronic devices. Actual purchase decisions may depend heavily on what happens with the insurance claim. Johnson reported on the wage negotiations, instructing the personnel committee to reconcile the board’s proposed base wage rate agreement with the teachers’ counterproposal. “What [the teachers] are requesting is not extraordinary,” explained Johnson. “Their reasons for changing it were very good.”

Fall election candidates set August primary for Republican Senate nomination by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BURNETT and POLK COUNTIES – The filing period for the Nov. 6 election ended last Friday, June 1. There will be contests for all the federal offices, all but one of the area legislative seats and one of the local county offices. The only primary contest Tuesday, Aug. 14, will be to decide which Republican candidate will run for the open U.S. Senate seat replacing Sen. Herb Kohl. There will be nine contests on the fall ballot, from the White House to the courthouse. The candidates in the Republican Senate race are Jeff Fitzgerald, Eric Hovde, Mark Neumann and Tommy Thompson. Fitzgerald is a legislator and Speaker of the Assembly, Hovde is a business owner and first-time candidate, Neumann is a former member of Congress, and Thompson is a former Wisconsin governor. A fifth candidate apparently failed to obtain the 2,000

signatures needed to get on the ballot. The winner of the August primary will face the Democratic Party candidate Tammy Baldwin in November. Also running for the Senate are Nimrod Y. U. Allen III, an Independent, and Libertarian candidate Joseph Kexel. This area is in the 7th Congressional District where Republican Sean Duffy is completing his first term. He is being challenged by Democrat Pat Kreitlow. Most of Polk County and the southwest half of Burnett County are in state Senate District 10. Incumbent Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, Republican, and Daniel Olson, Democrat, are the candidates. The remainder of Burnett County is in Senate District 25 where Sen. Bob Jauch is halfway through his four-year term and not up for election. Burnett and Polk counties contain parts of three State Assembly districts. The largest, District 28, includes almost all of Polk and half of Burnett. First-term Rep. Erik Severson, Republican, and Adam Bever, Democrat, are running for the seat. Nick Milroy, Democrat, is running unopposed for re-election in Assembly District 73 in northern Burnett County. Assembly Dis-

trict 75 includes a small portion of the area, Roosevelt in Burnett County plus Johnstown, Beaver, and the town and village of Clear Lake in Polk County. The candidates are first-term Rep. Roger Rivard, Republican, and Democrat Stephen Smith.

The county contests Four courthouse offices are up for election in each county, county clerk, register of deeds, treasurer and district attorney. All the positions are for four-year terms. The only contest in the two counties is for Burnett County clerk where incumbent clerk Wanda Hinrichs, Democrat, is being challenged by Republican Patrice Bjorklund. The other incumbents, treasurer Joanne Pahl, register of deeds Jeanine Chell, and District Attorney William Norine are running unopposed. Pahl and Chell are running as Democrats, and Norine as a Republican. All four Polk County incumbents are running without challengers. They are county clerk Carole Wondra, treasurer Amanda Nissen, register of deeds Laurie Anderson and District Attorney Dan Steffen. All are running as Democrats.


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

Unity FFA Dairy Breakfast Saturday CENTURIA - The Unity FFA and FFA Alumni will be holding their annual Dairy Breakfast this Saturday, June 9, at the Brickhouse Getaway, three miles north of Centuria on Hwy. 35. From the Brickhouse shuttles will take people to Curtsgrove Guernseys for farm tours. This year’s hosts include Karen Christensen, Eric and Julie Christensen, and Jon and Julie Christensen and their families. In the early 1900’ CJ and Karen Christensen started farming in rural Centuria. Their son Loren and his wife, Bertha, maintained the farm and it grew. Curtis, Loren’s son, married another Karen and together they established Curtsgrove Guernseys. Cattle were exhibited at the Polk County Fair by their children, Eric

and Jon. Five generations later, Curtsgrove Guernseys are still currently being exhibited at the Polk County Fair by Jon’s children, Luke, Anna and Katie. Although the Brickhouse property had been sold for a while, in December 2008, it came up for sale, and Eric and his wife, Julie, were able to buy it and have it back in the family. Eric and Julie both work at Polaris, and between the two of them have over 30 years of employment at Polaris. They have five adult children and four grandchildren. Jon works for Jeff’s Small Engine, and his wife, Julie, works for the Luck School. Their three children attend the Luck School. Both Eric and Jon help on the farm with their mother, Karen. Karen

The Unity FFA and FFA Alumni Dairy Breakfast will be served at the Brickhouse Getaway, three miles north of Centuria on Hwy. 35. Hosts at the breakfast include Julie and Eric Christensen, owners of the Brickhouse Getaway. Shuttles will be available to C u r t s g r o v e Guernseys for farm tours.

Hosts for the Unity FFA and FFA Alumni Dairy Breakfast are Eric, Karen, Luke and Jon Christensen of rural Centuria on June 8. Farm tours will be given at Curtsgrove Guernseys with breakfast being served at the Brickhouse Getaway. Five generations of the Christensen family have been a part of their family farm. - Photos submitted works with home care. Curtsgrove Guernseys is a premier example of a true family farm, working together generation to generation. Eric also farms, and Julie has a gift shop in an old granary called The Topless Silo at their home across from the Brickhouse. Eric’s passion is farming, and Julie’s is decorating, so between the two of them they are fulfilling their dream of owning a beautiful old farmhouse for family farm vacations at the Brickhouse Getaway. The Brickhouse property also has a wonderful barn for holding large family gatherings. The home has a very warm, comfortable feel to it that gives you a wel-

come -ome feeling. The dairy breakfast includes pancakes, ham, milk, coffee, and ice-cream sundaes. There will be dairy farm tours with cows, calves, llamas and goats to see. With educational and agricultural displays there will be something for everyone. Cost of the breakfast is $7 for adults, children ages 6-12 $4 and 5 and under are free. Members of the Unity FFA, Luck FFA and Jr. Holstein Breeders will be on hand to answer questions. Proceeds from the breakfast provide premier leadership and personal growth opportunities for students and scholarships to local FFA members. - submitted

Walker/from page 1 percent) to 2,544 (38.6 percent). Trivedi received 37 votes or .6 percent. In Polk County, Walker received 10,135 votes (60.2 percent) to Barrett’s 6,593 votes (39.2 percent), with Trivedi receiving 104 votes or .6 percent.

Only 12 of the state’s 72 counties

Neighboring Washburn County saw 57 percent of those voting showing support for Walker (4,277 votes), 42 percent (3,151 votes) for Barrett, and less than 1 percent (59 votes) for Trivedi. “Tonight, we tell Wisconsin, we tell our

country, and we tell people all across the globe that voters really do want leaders who stand up and make the tough decisions,” Walker said during a victory speech Tuesday night to supporters. “But now it is time to move on and move forward in Wisconsin.” In his concession speech, Barrett said, “We are a state that has been deeply divided. It is up to all of us — our side and their side — to listen, to listen to each other.” Called the second most important race of 2012 by some political analysts, Tuesday’s

recall election was being watched closely by labor groups and by leaders in other states who have proposed limits to unions as a way to solve budget problems but who were concerned by the backlash that occurred against Walker in Wisconsin. During the winter of 2011, Walker pushed through legislation forcing state and local workers to pay more for health insurance and pensions, limited their pay raises, made payment of union dues voluntary and forced unions to be recertified every year. The measure, which Walker said was necessary to balance the budget,

Radio club/from page 1 Earth in 90 minutes, traveling at a speed of 17,500 mph, contact could only occur while the spacecraft was between horizons from the location of the school. The radio crew did a practice setup, with training for the students, about two weeks prior to the actual contact. They set up for the real contact Saturday, May 5. Fourteen students in grades six through eight asked questions of Pettit, sometimes losing the response in static. They learned that the sun and planets look pretty much the same from the ISS as they do from Earth, and that the astronauts aboard the ISS generally do a space walk about twice a year. One student asked if cancer cells stop growing in space and was told that they actually increase due to the radiation in the environment. To answer another student, Pettit said that there is no Internet connection on the ISS, so there is no web surfing. What is floating in space like? “Floating in space is amazing,” according to Pettit. Sleeping is wonderful, he answered another student, adding that he falls asleep in about three minutes. The question of when to sleep was also asked. “We orbit around the Earth 60 times a day,” answered Pettit, “so we have 60 day and night cycles every day.” The crew works on universal time, or Greenwich Mean Time, so bedtime is at the end of the day according to the clock. Fresh foods are a rarity on the International Space Station, sometimes available for a brief time after a transport ship docks. Most of the food, said Pettit, is dried or otherwise preserved. Crew members exercise daily to stay healthy, focusing on weight lifting and cardiovascular training. Hair and fingernails grow at the same rate on the space station as on Earth, according to Pettit, so astronauts need to cut

their hair while they are aboard the craft. They can’t wash their clothes, so they wear underclothing and socks for a week at a time. Pettis said he’ll wear the same shorts, which are his standard clothing, for the entire time he’s on board the ISS. “I’ve worn them now for four months,” he said, “and I’ll plan to wear them for the whole six months.” His comment was met with a grimace from the students and Greg Braun, the radio club member facilitating the questions. The most challenging thing about being on the space station and his work, Pettit said, is dealing with all kinds of tiny parts that float around all over the place. When asked how he deals with stresses aboard the International Space Station, Braun responded, “The same way you deal with stress on Earth. If it’s something dealing with a crewmate you just talk with them. If it’s something dealing with the environment you think, “How can I change my environment to make my life easier?’” Pettit’s answer to the final question, whether anything scares him about being on the ISS, was lost as the craft headed over western Europe.

ISS flight engineer Don Pettit, (L), spoke from space with students at a science magnet in St. Paul. Equipment and expertise of the Polk County Amateur Radio Club made the radio contact possible.

Shown are the uniforms worn by Farnsworth students who attended NASA’s Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala. Farnsworth is a science, technology, engineering and math magnet school for students in kindergarten through eighth grade. RIGHT: Greg Braun of the Polk County Amateur Radio Club holds the microphone for a student asking a question of astronaut Don Pettit aboard the International Space Station. – Photos by Mary Stirrat Members of the Polk County Amateur Radio Club handled the actual transmission, reception and tracking of the International Space Station during the May 7 contact with astronaut Don Pettit. In front (L to R) are Steve Jacobs, Ben Jacobs and Mark Wein. In back are Mark Stencel and Dale Braun, with Bill Tornio hidden behind Steve Jacobs.

angered Democrats and unions, who gathered nearly 1 million signatures on petitions to force the recall election. The recall was a bitterly partisan and expensive race. According to the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, $45 million was spent by Walker and supporting groups and approximately $18 million by Barrett and supporting groups. Those numbers are based on figures released by groups, which were not required by law to disclose that information. - with information from the New York Times


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Webster students consider careers by Carl Heidel Leader staff writer WEBSTER – Students in grades 5-11 in the Webster Schools got a firsthand look at what the future might hold for them in a variety of careers during a special career fair at the Webster High School Monday, May 23. In three separate sessions, each of 26 presenters spoke to small groups and told them about the work they do in their various careers, answered student questions and talked about lifelong learning. Dan Conroy from Nexen Inc. began the fair as the keynote speaker in an address

to the entire student group. He talked about the importance of a good education in grade school and high school, but he said that a high school diploma no longer qualifies individuals for the good jobs. As an example, he said that only about 12 percent of the Nexen employees have only a high school education. All the rest have college or trade school specialized degrees. Conroy told the students that in a world of continual and enormous change they must continue in college or a trade school, and be ready to be learners all life long.

Twenty-six presenters from different professions talked about their jobs to students at the Webster Schools Career Fair. Pictured are back row (L to R): Jim Taylor, retired Burnett County judge; Jaime Nelson, preschool teacher; Bridgett Getts, Webster Police; Zac Benson, chef/business owner - Fresh Start Coffee Roasters; Jim Becker, forestry tech - Wisconsin DNR; Mike Sperry, auto repair - Diamond Collision; Dawna Butler, St. Croix Casino Danbury manager; and Barb Johnson, cosmetologist. Middle row: Katie Smith, U.S. Bank branch manager; Robyn Formanek, physical therapist - St. Croix Regional Medical Center; Kate Hayman, community counselor - Families First; Erica Paffel, pharmacist -Yellow River Pharmacy; Devin Kidder, insurance agent - Jensen-Sundquist Insurance; Nikki Taylor, registered nurse - Burnett Medical Center; Norah Anderson, radiology technologist - Burnett Medical Center; and Susan Ingalls, forest and recreation coordinator - Burnett County. Front row: Carl Heidel, staff writer - Inter-County Leader; Allison Fern, Burnett County social worker; Julie Buck, professional photographer - JB Studios; Kim Campion, personal trainer – Anytime Fitness; Gene Stanchfield, high tech manufacturing/engineering - Nexe Inc.; B.J. Jacquette, athletic trainer - St. Croix Regional Medical Center; Dave Hatch, probation officer - Wisconsin Probation and Parole; and Henry Bearhart and Fairdo, canine officer - St. Croix Tribal Police. Missing from the photo: Terri Wittman, nail Dan Conroy, Nexen executive, was the keynote speaker at the career fair at the Webster tech - Hands Down Salon and Ryan Bybee, detective - Burnett County Sheriff’s Department. – Schools Monday, May 23. He told the students to become lifelong learners and to seek additional Photo submitted education in college or a professional trade school. - Photo by Carl Heidel

A great day for running in St. Croix Falls Hundreds enjoy City of Trails day by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – Saturday, June 2, was a perfect day for being out of doors and some 400 people, young and old, turned out for the eighth-annual St. Croix Falls Day of Trails runs and hikes, cheered on by hundreds more. There were three

races, a 1K event for young beginning runners, a City of Trails 5K run/hike, and the Rock ‘n River Trail 10K run/hike. And there was an age range from 4-year-old Lucy Braund to three runners in their 70s. In all, 319 finished in the three races, a record number. That includes 228 who ran the 5K route, 68 who followed the 10K route, and 23 runners in the short race. All the races started at the St. Croix Falls school campus. While the 5K race was on city streets and paved trails, much of the 10K route was through the woods follow-

ing sections of the Ice Age Trail, the National Scenic Trail that starts in St. Croix Falls and winds through the state to Lake Michigan. While many were out for the joy of being out in good company of a nice day, it was a race and there were winners. The male and female leaders in the 10K were Joseph Clifton, age 16, who ran the course in 42 minutes, 31 seconds, two minutes ahead of the second-place runner, and Kathy Mayerhofer with a time of 45:48. Jes Pedersen, 14, won the 5K with a time of

19:05 with Heather Wimer just behind him with a finish of 19:08. Trevor Lamirande was first in the kids 1K with a time of 4:30. The races were organized by the City of Trails race committee partnering with the Indianhead Chapter of the Ice Age Trail Alliance and the St. Croix Regional Medical Center. A large group of volunteers helped pull the race off, directing traffic through the city and offering direction, encouragement and water to the runners.

Sprinting Sisters set the course 54 Osceola young women race the 5K by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The Sprinting Sisters from the Osceola Schools were a big part of the St. Croix Falls trail races on Saturday. The 54 young women in their red shirts, all fellow students in grades four through seven of the Osceola middle and intermediate schools, were a visible presence before the race and the dominant group at the awards ceremony. The names of the 11-, 12- and 13-year-old girls are spread throughout the results of the 5K race. The Sprinting Sisters are part of an afterschool program at Osceola where the young students gather two days a week to

Part of the Sprinting Sisters, 54 young women from the Osceola schools who ran in the City of Trails 5K race. The school program is in its second year and very popular. – Photo by Gregg Westigard

exercise and run. There are many benefits besides the joy of running with their friends. They take part in activities that focus on healthy eating, body image, selfconfidence and team building. The program is now in its second year and has grown from 42 girls to 54 this year. Guidance counselors Kari Erickson and Amy Kraemer started the program and are helped by coaches Bryan Marks, Robin Sauve and Tammy Sjolander. The program is funded through an Active Schools grant. There is a slight downside to the Sprinting Sisters. The boys in school see all the fun and ask, “Why can’t we do it too?” They are told to find a teacher and get it started.

Trail of Myths open in Wert Park Two miles of wooded hiking and valley views by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – A new trail, the Trail of Myths, is now open and leads hikers deep into the solitude of Wert Park, the St. Croix Falls forested park on the north end of the city across from the Lions Park along the river. The trail was dedicated Saturday, June 2, as part of the City of Trails celebrations. The two-mile trail starts at a small parking area on the east side of Hwy. 87, the spot where the Ice Age Trail leaves its river route. The well-signed trail is a cleared path which branches off to the left from the Ice Age Trail a short distance from the parking area. The trail winds through the woods as it climbs 400 feet to the top of the bluff and a spectacular view of the St. Croix River basin. At the top, the trail follows an old logging road, much

wider and straighter, back to the bottom of the bluff. Hiking the trail takes about an hour and good walking shoes are recommended. The trail is a continuous loop with no side trails. The Trail of Myths is the work of Paul Kuhlman who laid out and built the trail almost single-handedly over several years, clearing the path and moving steppingstones for creek crossings. He says the trail is a place where people can go to separate from themselves, find a quiet space to know themselves and get new meaning, new myths, in their lives. Brian Blesi, the St. Croix Falls mayor, said that the city appreciates the work that Kuhlman has done, not just in building the trail but also in being involved in the acquisition, planning and development of the Wert Park from the beginning.

St. Croix Falls Mayor Brian Blesi (left) thanks Paul Kuhlman for his work in building the new Trail of Myths and for helping develop the Wert Park over the years. – Photo by Gregg Westigard


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

Watoto Choir brings sights and sounds of Africa to St. Croix Falls by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS — War, disease and hunger have left millions of African children without parents. Many more have no father, and are being raised by a mother who is dying of HIV/AIDS. Often the children themselves are the product of a forced marriage, conceived after young girls were abducted and forced into child armies. Statistics from World Hunger, UNICEF and UNAIDS Global Facts and Figures show that one-third of African children are orphaned by AIDS. Nearly 11 million children die each year before their fifth birthday. More than 20,000 children have

The Watoto Children’s Choir is comprised of Ugandan orphans, with adult mentors, who have been rescued from lives of hopelessness caused by war, disease and hunger. The choir performed at Alliance Church of the Valley in St. Croix Falls last week. – Photos courtesy of Kirk Anderson

Members of the Watoto Children’s Choir stay in host homes while on tour, and the Kirk Anderson family of rural St. Croix Falls hosted two children and their chaperone. The Andersons were able to show their guests around the area, including the St. Croix River. Shown (L to R) are Watoto leader Duncan, with Ella Anderson in front, Cade Anderson, Ronald holding Addie Anderson, Justin and Kirk Anderson.

been abducted and forced to serve as child soldiers in Uganda. The situation means that life for many young people in Uganda and other areas of Africa seems to be without hope for a better future. Watoto (www.watoto.com) is seeking to change that, bringing the love of Christ in practical ways to vulnerable women and children in order to provide the foundation for a changed Africa. Founded in Uganda in the early 1990s, Watoto seeks to raise up a new generation of Africans who are healthy and ready to become the leaders who will rebuild their nation. Based on the Bible verse James 1:27, “Religion that God the Father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to look after the orphan and the widow in their distress and to keep oneself from being polluted by the world,” Watoto provides orphans with a safe home environment in a village community. Watoto villages include schools, clinics, community centers and homes where eight orphan children live as a family with a mother. There are special centers for in-

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fants and for women who have been the victims of war, abuse and disease. To celebrate the beauty of Africa and to spread the news about the life-changing power of the love of Jesus, Watoto organizes tours of its children’s choirs. Taking school on the road, the choirs travel around the United States and the world to educate people on the work being done at Watoto. This year’s choir theme is Beautiful Africa: A New Generation. The choir performed in St. Croix Falls at Alliance Church of the Valley last week, drawing hundreds of people to hear the testimonies from children whose lives have been changed while getting a taste of the sights and sounds of Africa. The U.S. tour left St. Croix Falls for southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois, before heading back home to Uganda July 4.

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Turf and Tundra would like to thank the Fishbowl Bar for donating all of the food for our poker run. Thank you Burl, and they would like to thank all of the businesses that donated a door prize or silent auction gift. Main Store Wild River Sport & Marine Lumber Jack Larson’s Sports Four Star Log Cabin Store Gliders Best Western Oak Ridge Pour Hpouse Northwoods Inn Sweeny’s Rosenthal’s Resort Yellow River Saloon Northern Timbers Motel The Tap C.A. Gerbitz Co. Lee Sports Hill Home Center Yellow Lake Lodge Wild Waters Bar Gandy Dancer Long Branch Bar Hap’s Landing Ostrom’s Repair Holiday Boot Leggers Tom’s Bar Poodle Inn Auto Stop Moose Junction Lounge The Lodge at Crooked Lake Cozy Corner Inn Pappy’s Buckhorn View Point Lodge Danner Sales Golden Chipmunk Tousley Crystal Lake Bar Baribeau Implement The Lookout Northway Sports Circle Pines Bar Polaris Club Northern If we happened to omit anyone we apologize and thank you for your support.

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Father’s Day radio shows set at Festival ST. CROIX FALLS - Festival Theatre has been selected as a host site for the 2012 “Big River Radio Wave” tour for Wisconsin Public Radio. With two shows on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 17, audiences will have a rare opportunity to participate in the recording of a radio show that will be broadcast in August over WPR affiliate stations. Show times are at 2 p.m. or 4 p.m. and tickets are $16 for adults and $10 for youth. “Thanks to Al Ross, our WPR-Eau Claire broadcaster, St. Croix Falls was seen as a perfect venue to host the ‘Big River Radio Wave,’” said Danette Olsen, director of Festival Theatre. “We are also partnering with the Taylors Falls Scenic Paddleboats for families to have an awesome Father’s Day outing in the Falls area.” The “Big River Radio Wave” is a radio variety show that originates in Alma, and is mass communicated through Wisconsin Public Radio. Featured performers are The RiverBenders, humorist Mary Mack and author Kenny Salwey. In addition, the St. Croix Falls performance will include stories of Mary Mack the glory years of the Cushing Tigers amateur baseball team. Comedian Mary Mack will be making her first appearance at Festival Theatre during this radio show. After winning the 2005 California’s Funniest Female Contest, she went on to appear in the Vancouver Comedy Fest in 2007, HBO’s Andy Kaufman Awards in 2007, and Montreal’s Just For Laughs Festival, 2009. Mack had her national TV debut on Comedy Central’s Live at Gotham and NBC’s Last Comic Standing. A true Northerner, Mack, however, started her career in Nashville, and now splits her time between Los Angeles and Minneapolis, where she recorded her second album, “Either You Wake Up or you Don’t,” at her home club Acme Comedy Company. This album was followed with “Pinch Finger Girl: A Tragedomedy,” recorded in Madison in 2009. Mack’s endearing stage presence and off-kilter musical surprises, stemming from her background as former music teacher and polka bandleader, make her popular with a wide array of people. The RiverBenders are made up of husband and wife Mike Congdon and Patty Carlson from over Black River way, show host and overly chatty Mac Cherry and the ever-talented, semi-dangerous Brian Schellinger aka B Squat Woody. Schellinger is co-host and musical director of the show and a veteran singer/songwriter as well as a versatile musician. Adding a whole lot of color to the Father’s Day show is author Kenny Salwey, a woodsman who has spent his life in the backwaters of the Mississippi River. He is the author of “The Last River Rat” and “Kenny Salwey’s Tales of a River Rat.” He is also the narrator of the award-winning documentary “Mississippi: Tales of the Last River Rat.” A popular nature speaker since 1988, Salwey travels the Upper Midwest talking to groups. Salwey and his wife, Mary Kay, live outside Alma. Broadcasts of this season’s shows are scheduled for Friday nights, July through September, at 6 p.m. on 90.3 WHLA/La Crosse, 88.3 WHWC Menomonie-Eau Claire and 88.7 WRFW/River Falls. The “Big River Radio Wave” performs twice on Father’s Day, June 17, at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. on the Festival Theatre stage. Tickets are Flex Pass eligible. Additional concerts coming up at Festival Theatre include Tish Hinojosa, the Scottie Miller Band and Sirens of the ‘60s. Check the Web site at www.festivaltheatre.org where tickets are available to order online. Festival Theatre is located in downtown St. Croix Falls, at 210 North Washington St. To reach Festival Theatre by phone, call 715-483-3387. - submitted

JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

Six students injured in crash on Hwy. 63 by Jessica Beecroft Special to the Leader WASHBURN COUNTY - Six students from Spooner Area Schools were taken to the Spooner Hospital for treatment of nonlife-threatening injuries last Wednesday, May 30, following a two-vehicle crash on Hwy. 63 near Spooner. According to the Washburn County Sheriff’s Department, a minivan was westbound on Green Valley Road and as it entered Hwy. 63 it was struck by a southbound pickup truck. The driver of the

van, a teacher, and the driver of the pickup truck were not injured. All of the students, passengers in the van, were treated and released from the hospital. The crash, which occurred just after 11 a.m., remains under investigation by the Wisconsin State Patrol. Agencies responding to the scene included Washburn County Sheriff’s Department, Spooner Police Department and North Memorial Ambulance. – with information from the Wisconsin State Patrol

New clerk on the job at Luck by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — Voters coming into the Luck Village Hall to cast their ballot in the Tuesday, June 5, recall election likely had the opportunity to meet Kevin Kress, the new village clerk/administrative assistant. Kress, 23, came on the job Monday, May 21, following the March retirement of Kathy Hanson. Born and raised in Stillwater, Minn., he is a graduate of UWStevens Point with a double major in public administration/policy analysis and political science. He has worked for the city of Bayport, Minn., and interned with the village administrator in Plover, near Stevens Point.

Kevin Kress

www.the-leader.net

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

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A respite from the recall - then what?

• Joe Heller •

Both Gov. Scott Walker and Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett were looking to move foward following the results of one of Wisconsin’s, if not the nation’s, most historic elections, Tuesday. How we move forward and remain civil to each other has yet to be determined, but there has to be a sense of freedom following several months of intense political bitterness over the issues that led up to the recall vote and the recall itself - bitterness that even spilled over into countless personal relationships. We’ve yet to hear of a marital breakup due to the angst brought on by the differences in this political battle, but given the division this state has seen over the past year, it wouldn’t be that shocking to learn of one. One of the clues to moving forward may have come with exit polls of voters on Tuesday, as reported by the New York Times. The Times, in perhaps the most extensive reporting to date on Wisconsin’s recall election, even went as far as to have a reporter in Spooner where they talked to the owner of a tavern, a construction worker, and a bystander downing an Oreo cheesecake Blizzard at the local Dairy Queen. Not only did they include that flavor in their reporting, they captured some of the flavor of how people are feeling in general. Dick Danielson, 60, a bartender and owner of Big Dick’s Buckhorn Inn (“known for its mountings of deer, moose and bear heads and the fact that John F. Kennedy used the rest room,” noted the Times), said he is a “social liberal but economic conservative,” and has voted for both President Obama and Gov. Walker. Danielson said he waited to vote with people 10 deep in line - the biggest turnout he has seen. At a hardware store in Spooner, Jeremy Siem, 31, who works in construction, said, "This is the first week I'm back at work after three months. The last thing I want to see is more money go out of my pocket when I have less going in." After doing research online, he said, he voted against the recall. The person eating the Blizzard, Jodi Gregoire, 41, said the recall was “ridiculous it’s a waste of taxpayers money.” She chose not to vote. The Times also reported that nearly 6 in 10 Wisconsin voters said that recall elections were only appropriate for official misconduct, and another 1 in 10 said they were never appropriate, according to early exit poll results. About 3 in 10 voters said recall elections were appropriate for any reason. Democrats, younger voters, union households and those with postgraduate degrees were more likely to say that recalls are appropriate for any reason; Republicans, Tea Party supporters and those who approved of Walker's handling of collective bargaining were more likely to say recalls should only be held for official misconduct. There has already been legislation authored which would narrow the reasons required to initiate a recall - some say it’s an option that should only be used in cases of illegal activity by an officeholder. The best part of the recall effort appeared to be the educational value - from the historical to the economical - for countless voters and citizens. A common complaint by voters this past year has been why taxpayer money has to be spent to appease voters disgruntled with policy - why can’t they wait until the next general election to cast their ballot and make their voice heard. The bipartisan support of any kind of reform in recall requirements may be a first step in lowering the blood pressure of our state’s political body. Editorials by Gary King

• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365 U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

• Area news at a glance • Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 312 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

• Web poll results •

To take part in our poll, go to theleader.net and scroll down to the lower left part of the screen • See front page for this week’s question

T H E

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

Last week’s question

Local supper club destroyed in fire BIRCHWOOD - An early Sunday morning fire, June 3, destroyed a popular Northwest Wisconsin supper club. The Back to the Woodlands Supper Club in Birchwood was fully engulfed in flames around 3 a.m. yesterday when the Birchwood Fire Department crews arrived on the scene. The Back to the Woodlands Supper Club is a popular upscale restaurant in the area and was closed when the fire started. Firefighters said all that’s left of the building are the walls, but the entire inside is completely destroyed. Crews remained on the scene for 4-1/2 hours. The cause is still under investigation. - Barron News-Shield LCO College open following fire HAYWARD - Lac Courte Orelles Ojibwe Community College has reopened on a limited basis as of Monday, June 4, following a fire in the college’s easternmost wing on Friday, June 1. College Interim President Ray Burns said that because of the damage, some offices may be closed, so people should phone ahead before coming to the college. - Sawyer County Record County’s last newspaper press departs RICE LAKE - The printing press that turned out the pages of The Rice Lake Chronotype and Early Bird the past 34 years was removed last week, ending an era of newspaper printing in Rice Lake that began with the first issue of The Chronotype in September 1874. The newspaper put its press equipment up for sale late last year after deciding to contract with the Eau Claire Leader-Telegram for printing work. The six-unit Goss Community Press was jackhammered out of its concrete footings on Thursday, May 31, and loaded into trucks Friday. A press equipment broker, ONE Corporation of Atlanta, purchased the units, at least some of which will be refurbished before heading out to other printing plants. The Chronotype’s news, advertising, Web site and business operations will continue at the newspaper’s present location at 28 S. Main St. under the present ownership of the Dorrance family. Since December of last year, Chronotype and Early Bird page files have been transmitted over the Internet to Eau Claire’s state-of-the-art production facility and trucked back to Rice Lake for insertion of advertising flyers and distribution by the paper’s own circulation department. - Rice Lake Chronotype (chronotype.com)

Views expressed on these pages do not necessarily reflect the views of management or board members.

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JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

• Letters to the editor • Trust the people This letter is to the county supervisors who think our county library should be dissolved. Our Polk County Library has a variety of programs and raises significant dollars from grants. Last year, one of these grants provided multiple computers to all the local libraries in the county. There are four programs that directly affect those of us who are most likely to vote. I want to call them to your attention. If you see your role to include spending our taxes wisely, then you’ll understand that the less than 1 percent of the county budget that goes to the library is a bargain and an investment in the health of Polk County. The four programs: Books-By-Mail provides access to books and materials for those who cannot get to libraries because of their limited hours. These are people who work and have long commutes, those with multiple jobs, many disabled and the home-bound. Large-print books obviously serves those with limited eyesight. This program and Books-By-Mail both serve those who are not “computer literate.” The materials for home-schoolers and Kits for Kids programs serve concerned,

politically active families. The first-known library in downtown Charlottesville, Va., was created in 1823 by a group of citizens that included Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson said: “Whenever the people are well-informed, they can be trusted with their own government; whenever things get so far wrong as to attract their notice, they may be relied on to set them to rights.” I hope you vote to “trust the people.” Steve Schanback Town of Alden

gency/evacuation policy to ensure the safety of the children. As parents, we do not always agree with how things are done at the school, but it should give all of us great comfort to know that when it comes to the lives of our children at school, they will be safe in situations like this. Thank you Siren School, you should be proud! LeAnn Mulroy Parent of Siren student Siren

Kudos to Siren School staff

Emergency services – don’t take them for granted

I want to publicly thank the Siren School personnel for keeping our children safe during the recent fire. I was impressed with the evacuation of the school during the bomb threat but have heard that this was more impressive. After talking to some who were on the scene from the sheriff’s department, local police departments and fire/rescue who consistently said what a phenomenal job the school did, I felt it was important to encourage all our communities to look at their school’s emer-

Too often, we take for granted the services of our county emergency service providers. To be on-call with a pager 24/7, the dangers of being on patrol through our villages and towns, rushing to respond to an emergency, sitting at home when your loved one is called to offer emergency service, are immeasurable gifts from the personnel and their families. In 2011, we sponsored a service to recognize, bless, and thank the firefighters, law enforcement, ambulance and DNR person-

nel, and their families. Those who attended urged making it a traditional community event. We plan to do this in 2013. In the meantime, when we see any of the emergency providers at work, let us say thank you and offer a prayer for their safety. Churches of Danbury Arnold Enslin Danbury

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Leader encourages readers to submit letters to the editor. All letters may be edited for length, clarity, grammatical accuracy and stylistic consistency. Letters more than 400 words in length may be returned to the writer for editing. Submitted letters should include the writer’s full name, address, daytime phone number and email address (if available). E-mailed letters are preferred. Letters may be sent to the-leader@centurytel.net or mailed to Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837.

UW school hopes to address northern Wisconsin health care by Glen Moberg Wisconsin Public Radio MADISON - The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health rolled out a plan Thursday, May 31, to address the problem of health-care access in northern Wisconsin. The UW School of Medicine is collaborating with UWMarathon County in Wausau in an effort to train more physician assistants to serve the region. The 14 counties in northern Wisconsin rank near the bottom in availability of health-care providers, according to Dr. Virginia

Snyder, director of the UW physician assistant program, who spoke Thursday morning on the Wausau campus, “The initiative that we celebrate today demonstrates a pact to serve Wisconsin residents that have perhaps had to drive long distances to receive routine primary health care and other necessary procedures or have had to endure long waits or gaps in health-care visits due to limited accessibility.” Under the plan, students on the Wausau campus will be taught by UW-Madison instructors both on-site and using Web-based technology. Snyder hopes the new

physician assistants will find work with northern Wisconsin health-care providers, including ambulatory clinic, hospital, urgent care and emergency facilities, “To the community and civic leaders of Marathon County and the Wausau area, who have strongly favored this initiative, we again express our gratitude, and we extend our pledge to ensure that this partnership will thrive.” Physician assistants can practice medicine under the supervision of a physician. They are allowed to diagnose and treat illnesses, conduct physical exams, write prescriptions and assist in surgery.

Cushing convenience store burglar sentenced by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Former Grantsburg resident Dean Sunderland will serve at least five years in state prison for felony robbery and theft for a troubling convenience store theft last July in Cushing. Sunderland, 19, was sentenced on Monday, June 4, in Polk County Circuit Court by Judge Jeffery Anderson, who took testimony from several affected store employees who are still being haunted by the incident. The July 13, 2011, robbery of the Cushing Stop-A-Sec store was noted for the robber making loud threats to the clerks as the store was closing, threatening the two women from behind a blue bandana used to conceal his identity. Two suspects were eventually convicted for the crime: Sunderland and Justin Sain, 18, Woodville, who was the escape driver. The duo fled the scene with less than $300 in cash and two cartons of cigarettes. Sunderland later bragged to friends that he used a knife when he robbed the store, although his weapon use was later questioned. Sain eventually turned state’s evidence and revealed details of Sunderland’s involvement, location and more in a plea agreement to lessen his own sentence. Sunderland had an extensive criminal history, in spite of his young age, and had already served over six months in jail by the time he was a legal adult, for probation and drug violations, as well as theft from a Grantsburg retail store. At the hearing on Monday, both of the store clerks appeared in court, and one of the women noted that she “felt threatened for her life” and wondered if she would ever see her family again. She said her daughter cries when she leaves for work, wondering if it is the last time she will see her mother. The other clerk that night was too shook up to address the court, and sobbed through a portion of the impact statement time, when her manager outlined how the incident had haunted all of the employees and made other clerks leery about working at night. District Attorney Dan Steffen went into detail about the seriousness of Sunderland’s offense, and how the threats and suggested violence “paint a darker picture” of the crime and the man’s potential for violence and threats to the public. “He planned out the robbery, he knew the store closed at 10 p.m., and he waited with a co-conspirator, then he acted.” Steffen said the evidence proved the robbery was pre-

Dean Sunderland looks back and apologizes to the victims of the Cushing convenience store robbery he committed last summer. He is shown at his sentencing hearing on Monday, June 4, with attorney Brian Smestad (right). – Photo by Greg Marsten meditated, with dark glasses, bandana and hidden escape vehicle parked behind the store at the Cushing Fire Hall, “waiting for just the right moment to pounce.” There was some confusion over whether Sunderland actually used a knife in the incident, and the initial victim statements did not mention it to police, but Sunderland himself told others he used a knife to rob the clerks, and seemed proud of the claim, and used profanity on describing the two victims. “Justin Sain, the co-defendant, said that Mr. Sunderland had a knife in hand the whole time,” Steffen said with a nod. [Sain said] on their way back to Grantsburg, [Sunderland] laughed the whole way and couldn’t stop saying how easy it was.” Steffen sighed and pushed for a harsher sentence because of the violent nature. “He basically had an entire plan. He certainly knew what he was doing,” Steffen added, as he asked for at least 10 years of incarceration, with five of those years behind bars and the other five under extended supervision, which was several years more than the presentence investigation report had recommended. Sunderland’s attorney, Brian Smestad, disputed little of what Steffen said, but did say the knife claim was just that, bragging, and that it likely did not occur, that he only had the knife in his pocket. Smestad also noted his client’s troubled past, which included mental and learning disabilities, various foster homes, parental issues, drug and alcohol abuse at a very

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

early age, often provided by his father starting at age 12. “He has deep-rooted addiction issues,” Smestad said. “It’s a recipe for a kid who ends up screwed up. But he’s still a kid, a teenager, and his brain isn’t fully developed yet.” Smestad suggested 18 months’ incarceration, with five years of extended supervision and treatment. With the conviction for felony robbery with a threat of force, Sunderland faced up to 15 years in prison and/or $50,000 in fines under state sentencing guidelines. A felony charge of theft was used as a read-in only, for sentencing purposes. Sunderland did briefly apologize to the store clerks, and admitted he made lots of bad decisions, and said he’d taken responsibility for his actions, but he showed little emotion until after he was sentenced and had to sign his papers. Upon sentencing, Judge Anderson told Sunderland “life has not been good to you,” but later noted that he was a danger to society, and sentenced him to 10 years, six months of incarceration, with five of those years under extended supervision, and at least 5-1/2 in the Dodge Correctional Facility. He has already served 232 days of jail time, which will be applied to that sentence.

Marlyce McKinney, 66, came into Frederic Nursing and Rehabilitation after a hospitalization which had a significant impact on her ability to take care of herself and family. Upon admission she required help with all her cares and was dependent on a wheelchair for mobility. Marlyce required 15 minutes to move 100 feet in the wheelchair due to intense pain and weakness. After three weeks of rehabilitation, she is now currently independent in all areas including walking and house cares. She has overcome many obstacles with multiple comorbidities such as Rheumatoid arthritis. With a positive attitude and a lot of hard work, Marlyce is discharging to home completely independent. She is planning a camping trip with her family. 562213 42L

Dean Sunderland to serve at least five years in prison

NURSING & REHABILITATION

Phone 715-327-4297

N E W S P A P E R


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

Annual Siren Ag Dairy Breakfast set for June 16 Melco Farms of Grantsburg to host BURNETT COUNTY - The 28th-annual Siren Ag Dairy Breakfast will be held at Melco Farms, south of Grantsburg on Saturday, June 16, from 6 a.m. to noon. The farm is owned and operated by the brother and sister team of Rick and Kristi Melin. Rick lives on the farm and has two grown children. His son Chris and his wife, Katie, are expecting their first child in early July. His daughter Amanda and her husband, Mike, have a 7-month-old daughter, Bryn. Besides loving his grandpa duties, Rick is active in the Grantsburg Lions Club. He spends many hours preparing Memory Lake Park for the Grantsburg Watercross event. He is a key person in putting on the fireworks display during the event. He is also vice president of the Burnett County Snowmobile Association. Kristi and her life companion, Bruce, live up the road from the farm. Incidentally Bruce was on the Allen Selander Construction crew that built the Melin barn in 1969. Kristi has spent most of her

The 28th-annual Siren Ag Dairy Breakfast will be held at Melco Farms, south of Grantsburg on June 16, from 6 a.m. to noon. - Photo submitted adult life being a Jolly H’s 4-H Club leader. She is also an active participant in the Burnett County 4-H Leaders Association. At the dairy breakfast, 4-H kids will be on hand to answer dairy-related ques-

tions and promote the 4-H organization. Both Kristi and Rick are members of Zion Lutheran Church of Trade Lake. They milk 40 Holstein cows, with the exception of one Jersey named Bunny and a

Brown Swiss named Rosemary. The love of cows doesn’t stop on the farm as Rick and sister Lauri are continuing a longstanding family tradition, spanning more than 50 years, of showing cattle at the Grantsburg Fair. Throughout the years, many nonfarm 4-H kids have shown Melco Farm cattle. Rick and Kristi volunteer countless hours working with the Grantsburg Fair, just as their parents had done. Last summer marked a summer of sadness for the family. Claire passed away June 1 and wife Dorothy followed 3-1/2 months later, on Sept. 17. Mom and Dad Melin left behind a legacy of love of the family, the farm and the community around them. They have been missed. Come and celebrate June Dairy Month with the Melin family and the Siren Ag Association on June 16. Come for the food, the cows, to see 4-H kids in action, come for the old-time bluegrass music, petting zoo and paddle wheel … just come! The farm is located on CTH O in the Town of Trade Lake. There will be plenty of handicapped parking on the main grounds. - submitted

Grantsburg looks to take the lead with new and innovative approach to learning by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – It’s called Badgestack and for 30 Grantsburg School District and Pine Tech staff members it was a name they would come to associate with a new and innovative teaching method they could use to excite students about learning. The staff attended a workshop on the new learning approach at Grantsburg High School last week and from all accounts were impressed by what the gamelike approach offered teachers as a tool for assessing skills and learning achievement. The Badgestack Web site describes Badgestack as a social learning tool which encourages the mastering of new skills and community involvement while having fun. Staring at their computer screens, the staff was busy creating digital badges they could adapt for use with existing courses or for new courses they create. Instructors using Badgestack can adapt or create lesson plans into a series of quests for students, which, when completed, earn the students badges. Assessments as the students go along on their quests measure what the students have learned. “It’s one of the most innovative and cutting edge approaches in America right now,” explained Grantsburg Superintendent Joni Burgin of the gamification-oflearning/badge-certification program. Burgin said the main reason the district will be using Badgestack is to increase student engagement. “We want to teach students through a medium/communication channel they already know and use (applications/games/etc.),” explained Burgin. “Our students are used to being highly engaged in these games. They aren’t used to learning content in the traditional fashion. “The more students are engaged in the learning, the better they learn,” said Burgin as she continued working on creating her own badges while taking the workshop. “We especially desire more engagement

Grantsburg High School Principal Stan Marczak received instruction on designing quests and badges from Badgestack presenter, University of Wisconsin-Sto ut professor and instructional designer Susan Manning.

from our online students coming to us from around the state of Wisconsin,” commented Burgin after the workshop. “High engagement in the learning objective is the goal of all teachers. Our brick-andmortar teachers are very excited about the potential, too.” University of Wisconsin-Stout professor and instructional designer Susan Manning provided the Badgestack training. “Susan is one of the best instructional designers in the nation. She is on the cutting edge with instructional design and technology,” said Burgin, who has taken several graduate courses from Manning. The Grantsburg School District is one of the first school districts in the country learning to use Badgestack. The popularity of Badgestack was evident, Burgin noted, when word of the Grantsburg workshop spread. “We could have filled the workshop threefold,” said Burgin, stating she had to turn away many educators from other towns. Kari Murto was scanning images, looking for a fun and cool-looking one to use on a badge. Murto, one of the district’s online teachers, liked what she called “Badgestack’s outside of the box from what we normally do approach.” Burgin said the staff did very well in

Thirty Grantsburg School District and Pine Tech staff members attended the Badgestack workshop last week at Grantsburg High School. Grantsburg Superintendent Joni Burgin (center), who participated with staff in the workshop, said the gamification-of-learning/badge-certification program is one of the most innovative and cutting edge approaches in America right now.

their introduction to Badgestack. “Our presenter even had to revamp her lesson agenda to keep up with our teachers! They learned very quickly,” remarked Burgin. Burgin said after Badgestack releases a new version of the program later this summer district staff would begin designing courses in the new learning format. “Several of our teachers are very eager to begin the process and apply what

Kari Murto scanned images looking for a fun and cool-looking one to use on a badge. Instructors using Badgestack can adapt or create lesson plans into a series of quests for students, which when completed earn the students badges. Murto, one of the district’s online teachers, liked what she called “Badgestack’s outside of the box from what we normally do approach.” - Photos by Priscilla Bauer they’ve learned.”

Voter 95.5

Linette Furseth and her daughter Reina, 13 months, were voters 95 – and 95.5? at the McKinley Town Hall on Tuesday for the special recall election. Assisting is poll worker Kathy Greenquist. – Photo by Greg Marsten


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Estate/Garage Sales Mystery plates lead Notices/Employment/Real Polk County marriage licenses to scrap-theft HUGE NOTICE GARAGE SALE charges Siren VFW

Grantsburg School District to serve free meals to children this summer

445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

1-1/2 miles west of Frederic

MULTIFAMILY GARAGE SALE

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST CHURCH ANNUAL RUMMAGE & BAKE SALE Saturday, June 9, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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YARD SALE IN CUSHING 2 54 5 S t a te R d . 87

F r i . , S a t . & S u n . , J u n e 8 , 9 & 10

7 a.m. to ? 562398 42Lp Lots of household items; no baby things; outside equipment; furniture and carports.

COME JOIN OUR EVERGREEN FAMILY!

Evergreen Village offers independent living in a friendly, caring and supportive community. Conveniently located near downtown Amery and the Senior Center, we connect with the new library and have shuttle service to the health-care campus. 24-hour security, helpful staff, emergency call system, laundry facilities, fireplace lounge with wireless Internet, lovely new social room, library, beauty shop, noon meal, light housekeeping, social activities and garages are included at affordable rates. Check out our Web site at www.ameryhousingauthority.org.

FOR INFORMATION CALL

715-268-6640

Or E-Mail: tschadaha@amerytel.net

HELP WANTED

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

PART-TIME COOK & PART-TIME RN At Frederic Facility Please Apply Within

715-327-4394

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. BR decor; furniture; wicker chair; lg. area rugs; bear table set; lots of household items; name-brand kids & adult clothing: girls 3T - 6; ladies 4 - XL; guys M - XL; kids games & toys. 1643 150th Ave. On Hwy. 35 1-1/2 miles south of Centuria, east on 150th Ave. 2-1/2 miles. Watch for balloons.

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!

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105 E. Oak St. Frederic

Thursday & Friday, June 7 & 8,

7520 Water Street

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NOTICE TOWN OF LUCK BOARD MEETING Tues., June 12, 7 p.m. Town Hall

Agenda: 1. Reading of the minutes 2. Treasurer’s report 3. Review and pay bills 4. Open bids chip seal 5. Discuss storm damage 6. Discuss moratorum on frac sand 7. Patrolman’s report 8. Set date for board of audit Any additional agenda will be posted in the Luck Town Hall and clerk’s office. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 562573 42L

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE Application for Retail Class B license to sell intoxicating liquors and malt beverages to the Town Board, Town of Siren, Burnett County, Wis., the undersigned: Last Call Bar and Grill Jeffrey Pavelka 7011 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class B malt beverages and intoxicating liquor license to be used from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, at the place of business located at: 7011 State Road 70 Siren, WI 54872 Dated May 31, 2012 Mary Hunter, Clerk Town of Siren

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

Application for Retail Class B License to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the Town of LaFollette, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: John A. Lawson Jr. WATERING HOLE 24653 County Road X Shell Lake, WI 54871 Hereby applies for a Class B Liquor License to sell Fermented Malt Beverages and Intoxicating Liquor from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013. Dated: June 1, 2012 Linda Terrian, Clerk Town of LaFollette

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1673 State Rd. 48

Agenda will be posted. Town of McKinley Deborah Grover, Clerk

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All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275.

8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Toys; housewares; clothing; high chair, too much to list!

NOTICE

TOWN OF LaFOLLETTE MONTHLY MEETING The Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of LaFollette Will Be Held At The LaFollette Town Hall On Mon., June 11, 2012, At 7:30 p.m. Agenda Verification of Posting Clerk’s Minutes Treasurer’s Report Resident Issues Road Items Liquor License Approval Pay Bills and look at correspondence Linda Terrian, Clerk

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Stove; refrigerator; books; movies; pictures and much, much more.

Sat., June 9,

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8 a.m. - 10 p.m.

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GRANTSBURG—Stressing the importance of offering nutritious meals to children during the summer months, the Grantsburg School District announces the sponsorship of the Summer Food Service Program. The Summer Food Service Program, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and administered by the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, provides nutritious meals to children during the summer, when free and reduced-price school meals are typically unavailable. Free meals will be made available to all children 18 years of age and under. Adults may purchase breakfast for $1.75 and lunch for $3.25. The program begins Monday, June 11, and ends Monday, July 9, but will be closed July 4. Both Grantsburg Middle School and Grantsburg Elementary School will serve breakfast from 9:30-10:15 a.m. and lunch from 12:151 p.m. Last year, Grantsburg School District served almost 7,000 free breakfasts and over 6,000 free lunches over 20 days. Meals are provided to eligible children regardless of race, color, national origin, age, gender or disability and there will be no discrimination in the course of meal service. For any questions regarding this program, contact Grantsburg’s food service director, Lara Lerud, at 715463-5165 Ext. 125. – submitted

Sat., June 9

East Main St.

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MILLTOWN - The Community Referral Agency, Inc., established in 1979 to provide services to victims of domestic violence and their children, will hold its annual meeting at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, June 26, at the Brickhouse Getaway, Hwy. 35, between Milltown and Centuria. The board will be electing new members and new officers and will act on changes to the Agencies bylaws. CRA President Chris Crowe, on behalf of the CRA Board, will make presentations to the CRA Outstanding Volunteers. CRA wishes to express its gratitude to their volunteers as they truly are the heart of CRA. Crowe will also acknowledge all CRA donors. Without the many financial gifts presented annually to CRA, the agency would not be able to deliver services to the many area victims/survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault provided throughout the year. CRA Executive Director Ann Frey will report on the status of the agency and the many activities of the past year. She will also present the draft work plan for the upcoming year. Cheri Moats, CRA financial officer, and JoAnn Phernetton, CRA treasurer, will present the CRA annual fiscal report. All members of the public, as well as current and former volunteers and board members, are invited to attend. While reservations are not required, they do encourage you to call 715-825-4414 to let them know of your plans to attend. Space is limited to the first 100 people. - submitted

MULTIFAMILY GARAGE SALE

The Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of McKinley Will Be Held On Tuesday, June 12, 2012, At 7 p.m.

LIQUOR LICENSE APPLICATION VILLAGE OF LUCK Notice is hereby given that the following application has been received by the undersigned Village Clerk for Liquor Licenses for the ensuing year ending June 30, 2013. Amanda Gumphrey for combination “Class B” Beer License and “Class B” Intoxicating Liquor License at her place of business known at LUCK-E-TAVERN & SUPPER CLUB, located at 211 Main Street, Luck, WI. Notice is further given that the Village Board, Village of Luck, will meet in session June 13, 2012, to act on the above application. Kevin Kress 562586 42L Village Clerk WNAXLP

Application for the retail sale of Class A license to sell inAPPLICATION toxicating liquors and malt FOR LICENSE beverages to the Town Board, Application for the retail sale Town of Siren, Burnett County, of Class B License to sell intoxiWisconsin. The undersigned: cating liquors and malt bevYourchuck’s Video Inc. erages to the Town Board, Town Joseph Yourchuck, of Siren, Burnett County, Wis. President The undersigned: Amanda Jo Yourchuck, Jed’s Laker Lounge Vice President Robert C. Campbell, JoAnn M. Yourchuck, President Secretary/Treasuer Jennifer K. Campbell, 24537 Hwy. 35/70 North Vice President Siren, WI 54872 24787 Clam Lake Drive Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class A malt beverages and Hereby makes application for intoxicating liquor. License to be Class B Malt Beverages and used from July 1, 2012, to June Intoxicating Liquor License to be 30, 2013, at the place of busi- used from July 1, 2012, to June ness located at: 30, 2013, at the place of business located at: 24537 Hwy. 35/70 North Section 5 24787 Clam Lake Drive Siren, WI 54872 Siren, WI 54872 Dated May 31, 2012 Dated May 31, 2012 Mary Hunter, Clerk Mary Hunter, Clerk 562647 42L Town of Siren WNAXLP Town of Siren 562649 42L WNAXLP

CRA annual meeting June 26

Jennifer M. Monette, Town of Garfield, and Lucas J. Lee, Town of Lincoln, issued May 30, 2012. Sara L. Outcalt, village of Frederic, and Adrian R. Mattson, Town of Georgetown, issued May 31, 2012. Amber M. L’Allier, city of Oakdale, Minn., and Ryan G. Filip, city of Oakdale, Minn., issued May 31, 2012. Grace E. Asmus, village of Centuria, and Robert R. Butterfield, Town of Milltown, issued May 31, 2012.

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by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – A St. Paul man stands accused of possession of stolen property after he is alleged to have stolen scrap metal in a multiperson operation. According to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, Chisago County authorities alerted local police of a truck with stolen license plates about to enter Wisconsin. The driver was suspected of being a part of a scrap-metal theft ring and was wanted for questioning. St. Croix Falls Police made the stop and took Michael Schmitt, 30, into custody. Subsequent search of the vehicle led to the discovery of over $9,000 in receipts from scrap yards in the Twin Cities, as well as various tools used for cutting catalytic converters off cars for highvalue platinum scrap. Schmitt admitted to selling the scrap, and said he was part of an operation with two other unnamed people who were hoping to split the money three ways. He admitted to having a stolen license plate on the truck, but said he found it on the interstate and had no idea how it ended up on the truck. Schmitt is now facing possession of stolen-property charges, but has yet to be charged. He may be facing criminal charges in Minnesota, as well.

Katherine M. Bocock, village of Clayton, and Jeremy M. Raffesberger, village of Clayton, issued May 27, 2012. Monica R. Weaver, Garfield, and Matthew J. Swank, Garfield, issued May 28, 2012. Karen R. Eitland, village of Balsam Lake, and John R. Hale, village of Balsam Lake, issued May 29, 2012. Nicole M. Schroeder, city of Greenwood, Ind., and Davie J. Yeske II, Town of Beaver, issued May 30, 2012.


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

Notices

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PATRICIA A. SPENGLER, et al. Defendant(s) Case No.: 11 CV 798 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 19, 2012, in the amount of $128,639.28, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 3, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, Wisconsin DESCRIPTION: Lots 3 and 4, Block 2, Plat of Vincent’s Addition to the City of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, except that portion described in Volume 163 Deeds, Page 630, as Document No. 244483. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 239 South Vincent Street, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 281-00909-0000. Dated this 23rd day of May, 2012. /s/Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719

Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1855269

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

To the Town Board, Town of Lincoln, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Sweeny’s Bar Matthew Swenson & Gary Swenson, Agents 8515 County Road FF Webster, WI 54893 Hereby applies for Class “B” Beer and Class “B” Liquor license to be used from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013. The Town Board will consider this application on June 12, 2012, at their regular meeting. Dated: June 6, 2012 Wanda Washkuhn, Clerk 562223 42L 32a WNAXLP (June 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703, Plaintiff, vs. Jesse R. Nick 229 Harriman Avenue South Amery, Wisconsin 54001, Central Bank, a Minnesota banking corporation, 2104 Hastings Avenue Newport, Minnesota 55055, John Doe, Mary Roe and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30404 Case No. 12CV124 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment and Judgment entered and filed in the above-entitled action on May 4, 2012, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DAY/DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 10, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot Thirteen (13), Block Seven (7), Original Plat of the City of Amery, being located in Government Lot One (1), Section Thirty-three (33), Township Thirty-three (33) North, Range Sixteen (16) West, Polk County, Wisconsin. (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 229 Harriman Avenue South, Amery, Wisconsin) Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#16042

The Comprehensive Planning Committee will meet monthly in 2012. Each scheduled meeting will be on the second Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. in the township hall. For Additional Information, Call: Perry Karl 715-653-4247 Brad Olson 715-327-4614

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Virgil Hansen, Clerk

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Mon., June 11, 2012, 6:30 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall

CLAM FALLS TOWNSHIP

MEETING NOTICE

The Next Meeting Of The Meenon Town Board Will Be Held On Monday, June 11, 2012, At 7 p.m., At The Meenon Town Hall Agenda to include: Clerk, Treasurer, Chairman and Supervisor reports, road discussion including ATV use on roads, ordinance discussion, approval of Liquor Licenses and approval of bills. Suzanna M. Eytcheson Town Clerk

(June 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT ST. CROIX COUNTY BRANCH 2 ROYAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff vs. NEW HORIZON HOMES, INC. KOPP PROPERTIES OF WI, LLC BERNARD J. KOPP SHIRLEY F. KOPP STEVEN F. KOPP MEGAN A. KOPP BREMER BANK, N.A. JOHN DOE #1, a/k/a JASON TURNER JOHN DOE #2 JOHN DOE #3 JOHN DOE #4 Defendants. Case No: 11CV784 Case Code: 30404 AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE By virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above-entitled action on November 21, 2011, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center in Balsam Lake, in said county, on the 10th day of July, 2012, at 10:00 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the Judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lots 6, 7, 8, 9 & 10, Kopp Addition in the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 555, 559, 563, 567 and 571 Golf Way, Amery, WI TERMS OF SALE: Cash DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check within ten days after confirmation of sale. Dated this 4th day of June, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Donald R. Marjala - Lawyer Spangler, Nodolf, Bruder & Klinkhammer, LLC P.O. Box 1165 Eau Claire, Wisconsin 547021165 (715) 830-9771 Attorneys for Plaintiff Pursuant to the Fair Debt ColLection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtained will be used for that purpose. 562427 WNAXLP

Follow the Leader

The regular Monthly Village Board Meeting will be held on Monday, June 11, 2012, at 7 p.m., at the Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Agenda will be posted at the Village Hall. Kristi Swanson Clerk 562218 42L

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

The following has applied for Class B Retailers Winery and Class B Malt Beverage license from July 1, 2012, thru June 30, 2013, in the Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis., with application now on file at the clerk’s office: Laura M. Chamberlin, Agent Chateau St. Croix Winery & Vineyard LLC 1998A State Road 87 St. Croix Falls, Wis. Application will be considered at the regular monthly town board meeting on Thursday, June 14, 2012, at the Eureka Town Hall. 562093 41-42L 31-32d WNAXLP

The following has applied for Renewal combination Class B beer and liquor license from July 1, 2012, thru June 30, 2013, in the Town of Eureka, Polk Cty., Wis., with application now on file at the clerk’s office: Marc A. Porath The EdgeTown Tavern, Inc. 2087 State Road 35 Milltown, Wis. Application will be considered at the regular monthly town board meeting on Thursday, June 14, 2012, at the Eureka Town Hall. 562095 41-42L 31a,d WNAXLP

(May 16, 23, 30, June 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. RYAN T. ELLER, et al. Defendant(s)

(June 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, as Trustee for Ameriquest Mortgage Securities, Inc., Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-R9 Plaintiff, vs. KRISTEN AYDE, et al. Defendants

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 11 CV 618 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 29, 2011, in the amount of $90,615.49, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 3, 2012, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: That part of the Southeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter, Section 33, Township 33 North, Range 16 West, City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: From the Northwest corner of said Section 33; thence East 80 rods; thence South 120 rods; thence East to a point 60 feet East of the West line of Keller Avenue; thence South along the East side of said Keller Avenue 109 feet to the point of beginning of the tract to be conveyed; thence continuing South 80 feet; thence East 253.50 feet; thence North to West side of a drainage ditch; thence Northwesterly along the West side of said drainage ditch to a point due East of the point of beginning; thence West to the point of beginning, except parcel described in Volume 259 Records, page 148 Document No. 311162. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 509 Keller Avenue South, Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 201-01004-0000. Dated this 2nd day of April, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 286571

Case No. 11 CV 623 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on December 21, 2011, in the amount of $100,356.99, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the premises described below at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: June 28, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens, encumbrances and payment of applicable transfer taxes. PLACE: In the lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in the Southeast 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, Section 14, Township 36 North, Range 19 West, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of Section 14-36-19; running North 20 rods along East line of Section 14; thence West 18 rods on a line parallel to the South line of Section 14; thence South 20 rods on a line parallel to the East line of Section 14; thence East to the point of beginning. Said land being in the Town of Sperling, County of Polk and State of Wisconsin. ADDRESS: 2501 270th Avenue, Cushing, WI 54006. TAX KEY NO.: 046-00328-0000. Dated this 17th day of May, 2012. Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Cummisford, Acevedo & Associates, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff Mark R. Cummisford State Bar #1034906 6508 South 27th Street Suite #6 Oak Creek, WI 53154 414-761-1700 Cummisford, Acevedo & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

562226 WNAXLP

(June 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs.

Plan Committee Meeting

NOTICE

562521 42L 32a

WNAXLP

Application for Retail Class “B” License to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the Town of Daniels, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Siren National Golf Course & Event Center, LLC Jeff & Sarah Schendel 8606 Waldora Rd. Siren, WI 54872 SE 1/4, Sec. 14, T38N, R17W Hereby makes application for Retail Class “B” Intoxicating Liquors and Fermented Malt Beverages License to be used from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013. Dated June 1, 2012 Elizabeth Simonsen, Clerk Town of Daniels

TOWN OF MILLTOWN

NOTICE OF MEETING Village of Frederic

560318 WNAXLP

(May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, June 6) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, WI 54703, Plaintiff, vs. Daniel M. Walker 6517 Melrose Drive North Highlands, CA 95660, Judy K. Walker f/k/a Judy K. Richards 6517 Melrose Drive North Highlands, CA 95660, John Doe, Mary Roe, and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30304 Case No.: 12 CV 52 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment and Judgment entered and filed in the above-entitled action on April 18, 2012, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: June 21, 2012, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 2136, recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, page 59, Document No. 551188, located in the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 16, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wis. (“Property”). (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 1597 210th Street, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin.) Dated: April 25, 2012. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#16011

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

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WNAXLP

562547 42L 32a

Application for Retail Class “A” to sell intoxicating liquors and fermented malt beverages. To the Town of Daniels, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Backwoods Beer & Bait Roger Wood, Agent 10561 State Rd. 70 Siren, WI 54872 NW 1/4, Sec. 19, T38N, R17W Hereby applies for a Retail Class “A” License to sell Intoxicating Liquors and Fermented Malt Beverages from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013. Dated June 1, 2012 Elizabeth Simonsen, Clerk Town of Daniels

The following has applied for Renewal combination Class B beer and liquor license from July 1, 2012, thru June 30, 2013, in the Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis., with application now on file at the clerk’s office: Kevin M. Austad, Agent KJ’s Eureka Bar, Inc. 2396 210th Ave. St. Croix Falls, Wis. Application will be considered at the regular monthly town board meeting on Thursday, June 14, 2012, at the Eureka Town Hall. 562091 41-42L 31-32d WNAXLP

562549 42L 32a

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

562401

The following has applied for Renewal combination Class B beer and liquor license from July 1, 2012, thru June 30, 2013, in the Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis., with application now on file at the clerk’s office: River Roads Wolf Creek Bar Juliette M. Haines 2387 River Road St. Croix Falls, Wis. Application will be considered at the regular monthly town board meeting on Thursday, June 14, 2012, at the Eureka Town Hall. 562089 41-42L 31-32d WNAXLP

562225 WNAXLP

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

ADVERTISEMENT FOR QUOTES VILLAGE OF LUCK

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WNAXLP

(May 23, 30, June 6) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703, Plaintiff, vs. Timothy W. Rea 2867 Eagle Valley Circle Woodbury, Minnesota 55129, Linda M. Rea 2867 Eagle Valley Circle Woodbury, Minnesota 55129, John Doe, Mary Roe, and XYZ corporation, Defendants. Case Type: 30404 Case No. 12CV158 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment, and Judgment entered and filed in the above-entitled action on May 10, 2012, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DAY/DATE/TIME: Wednesday, June 20, 2012, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Government Lot 1, Section 5, Township 35 North, Range 16 West, being in Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 283 recorded in Volume 2, page 12 of said Polk County records described as follows: Beginning at the NE corner of Lot 2 of said map; thence N 32° 55’ 35” W, 121.58 feet to a corner of Lot 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 356, recorded in Volume 2, page 85 in said county records; thence S 85° 16’ 45” W, 204.56 feet to a meander line along Bone Lake; thence Southeasterly 109.89 feet, more or less, to the North line of said Lot 2; thence with the North line of said Lot 2, N 88° 31’ 30” E 228.22 feet to the NE corner of said Lot 2; to the point of beginning. Together with all land between the described meander line and said Bone Lake. Together with a nonexclusive easement for roadway purposes over and across the East 66 feet of Lots 2, 3 and 4 of Certified Survey Map No. 283, recorded in Volume 2 of CSM, page 12, Document No. 367742, being part of Government Lot 1, Section 5, Township 35 North, Range 16 West. Together with a nonexclusive easement for roadway purposes over and across Government Lot 1, Section 5, Township 35 North, Range 16 West, over said roadway as the same is now laid out and traveled from County Trunk Highway I to said parcel of land herein conveyed. (FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 2378 108th Street, Luck, Wisconsin, or 1088 239th Avenue, Luck, Wisconsin.) Dated this 21st day of May, 2012. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#16090

Notice is hereby given that sealed quotes for the following projects will be received by the Village Administrator until 4 p.m. June 20, 2012, at the Luck Municipal Building, P.O. Box 315, 401 Main St., Luck, WI 54853. Projects include: Project 1: Foster Ave. and 5th St. Chip Sealing Project 2: 7th St. and 150th St. Crack Filling Project 3: S. Shore Dr. and 140th St. Asphalt Patch Project 4: Robertson Road Asphalt Resurfacing Copies of the specifications, instructions to bidders, forms of proposals and other contract documents are on file at the Municipal Building and may be obtained without charge. Contractors should contact the Village Administrator regarding any questions about the specifications or location of work. The Village of Luck reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any informalities in the bids received, and to accept any bid which it deems most favorable. 562585 42L

Follow the Leader

INVITATION FOR BIDS ON TIMBER STUMPAGE POLK COUNTY FOREST Sealed bids will be accepted by the Polk County Property, Forestry and Recreational Committee for timber stumpage on the Polk County Forest. This bid offering includes 5 tracts with a combined acreage of 394 acres and the following estimated volumes: 1,675 cords OAK 1,450 cords JACK PINE 1,390 cords ASPEN 615 cords RED PINE 145 cords MIXED HARDWOOD Specific information may be obtained by writing to the Polk County Forest Administrator at: 100 Polk County Plaza Suite 40, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 or calling (715) 485-9265 or visiting: www.co.polk.wi.us/forestry-landuse/timbersales.asp The bids will be opened at 1:00 P.M., June 15, 2012, at the County Boardroom on the 1st floor at the Polk County Government Center, Balsam Lake, WI. 562390 42-43L 32a,d

NOTICE OF HEARING

The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, WI. The Board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view the sites and will reconvene at 1:00 p.m. at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, WI. At that time, the applicant will inform the Board of their request. (THE APPLICANT MUST APPEAR AT 1:00 P.M. WHEN THE BOARD RECONVENES AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTER.) PAUL DUXBURY requests a modification to a previous variance granted back on August 9, 1995, from the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance, to increase the height of the original proposal by 5’, making the addition 25’ instead of 20’ tall and place a deck in front of the porch that was proposed back in 1995. The original request was necessary because of a pond located to the rear of the property. A setback of 41’ was granted to Mr. Duxbury at the 1995 public hearing. Property located: 1370 Kemah Park Trail, Pt. of Gov’t. Lot 8, Sec. 35/ T35NR17W,. Town of Milltown, Balsam Lake (class 1) and pond (class 3). BRENDA WEIERKE, MICHAEL FEIST & LOWELL DUNCAN request a Special Exception to Article 8D4 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to establish a full service equine center. Property affected: 2055 State Hwy. 46, parts of the NW1/4 of the NE1/4, SE1/4 of the NE1/4, NE1/4 of the SE1/4 & NE1/4, of the NE1/4, all in Sec. 21/T35N/R17W, Town of Milltown, Otter Creek (class 2). JOHN M. NASSEFF Jr. requests a variance & Special Exception to Article 8C4(a) and 15B1 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to build a boathouse 28’ in length and grade a slope greater than 20%. Property affected: Lot 1, CSM Vol. 6/Pg. 127, Sec. 13+14/T33N/R17W, Town of Garfield, Lake Wapogasset (class 1). THOMAS HOUGHTON requests a variance to Article 11C, Table 1 & 5C of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance to construct a dwelling less than 75’ from the ordinary high-water mark and greater than 26’ in height. Property affected: 238 West Lower Pine Lake Ct., Lot 1, CSM Vol. 23/Pg. 82, Sec. 23/T32N/R18W, Town of Alden, Lower Pine Lake (class 1). 562228 42-43L 32a,d WNAXLP

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT JOB TITLE:

Instrumental Music Teacher, Middle School and High School

JOB DESCRIPTION:

Full-time Instrumental Music Teacher for the 2012-2013 school year. Applicants with certification in Instrumental Music are strongly encouraged to apply. 100% FTE.

QUALIFICATIONS:

WI Certification or ability to obtain. Applicants must possess the dynamics to build relationships with children to create an atmosphere of learning and mutual respect. The ability to interact and be a contributing member of a talented teaching faculty is also desired. Technology skills and the ability to apply them in the classroom are also beneficial. Strong references for this position are essential.

REQUIREMENTS:

We are seeking applicants with certification in instrumental music. Applicants need to be prepared to deal with aspects of the personal, social and academic needs of middle and high school students. Applicants should possess the skills necessary to communicate effectively with parents in order to build educational partnerships. Interested applicants should be willing to take part in school and student improvement initiatives.

HOW TO APPLY:

Send letter of application, resume, credentials (three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by June 15, 2012. Please include your e-mail address.

CONTACT:

Stan Marczak, Principal Grantsburg High School 480 East James Ave., Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2531 Web site: www.gk12.net

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The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap.

Notices/Employment Opportunity 2011 Consumer Confidence Report for 64903377

FREDERIC WATERWORKS Water System Information

If you would like to know more about the information contained in this report, please contact Kenny Hackett at 715-327-8062. The Board meets the second Monday of each month at the Villge Hall at 7 p.m.

Health Information

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline (800-426-4791). Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune systems disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health-care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Envrionmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking hotline (800-426-4791).

Source(s) of Water Source ID 2 3 4 5

Source Groundwater Groundwater Groundwater Groundwater

Depth (ft.) 248 217 298 310

Status Active Active Active Active

To obtain a summary of the source water assessment, please contact Ken Hackett at 715-327-8062.

Educational Information

The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: 1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. 2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occuring or result from urban storm-water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. 3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm-water runoff and residential uses. 4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm-water runoff and septic systems. 5. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which shall provide the same protection for public health.

Number of Contaminants Required to be Tested

This table displays the number of contaminants that were required to be tested in the last five years. The CCR may contain up to five years worth of water quality results. If a water system tests annually, or more frequently, the results from the most recent year are shown on the CCR. If testing is done less frequently, the results shown on the CCR are from the past five years. Contaminant Group # Of Contaminants Inorganic Contaminants 16 Microbiological Contaminants 1 Radioactive Contaminants 3 Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides 25 Volatile Organic Contaminants 20 INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS Contaminant (units)

MCL

MCLG

Level Found

Range

ARSENIC (ppb)

10

n/a

4

1-4

NO

BARIUM (ppm)

2

2

0.038

.019-.038

NO

100

100

2

nd-2

NO

COPPER (ppm)

AL = 1.3

1.3

.32

0 of 10 results were above the action level

NO

FLUORIDE (ppm)

4

4

.1

.1

NO

AL = 15

0

3.40

0 of 10 results were above the action level

NO

CHROMIUM (ppb)

LEAD (ppb)

Sample Date Violation Typical Source of Contaminant (if prior to 2011)

.77001.3000 1.3000

NICKEL (ppb)

100

NITRATE (NO3-N) (ppm)

10

10

1.20

nd-1.20

NO

SODIUM (ppm)

n/a

n/a

4.80

4.10-4.80

NO

Contaminant (units) RADIUM (226+228)(pCi/1)

MCL

Erosion of natural deposits; Runoff from orchards; Runoff from glass and electronics production wastes. Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharge from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits. Discharge from steel and pulp mills; Erosion of natural deposits. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits; Leaching from wood preservatives. Erosion of natural deposits; Water additive which promotes strong teeth; Discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories. Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits. Nickel occurs naturally in soils, groundwater and surface waters and is often used in electroplating, stainless steel and alloy products. Runoff from fertilizer use; Leaching from septic tanks, sewage; Erosion of natural deposits.

NO

n/a

RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

Term AL MCL MCLG MFL mrem/year NTU pCi/1 ppm ppb ppt ppq TCR TT

5

MCLG Level Found 0

1.4

Range

1.2-1.4

Sample Date Violation Typical Source of Contaminant (if prior to 2011) 2/5/2009

NO

Erosion of natural deposits.

562415 42L WNAXLP DEFINITION OF TERMS Definition Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Million fibers per liter. Millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body). Nephelometric Turbidity Units. Picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity). Parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l). Parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (ug/l). Parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter. Parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter. Total Coliform Rule. Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

Notices/Employment Opportunities Burnett County marriage licenses

POSITION OPENING

TOWN OF MILLTOWN PUBLIC HEARING

Janitorial/Maintenance Part Time 32 Hours Per Week, EOW Saturdays

Applications Available 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mon. - Fri.

United Pioneer Home 623 S. 2nd Street., Luck, WI 54853

562577 42L 32a,d

NOTICE TOWN OF DANIELS

MONTHLY BOARD MEETING

The Monthly Town Board Meeting will be held Tuesday, June 12, 2012, at 7 p.m., at Daniels Town Hall.

AGENDA: Minutes & treasurer report; liquor licenses; WTA annual conference; payment of town bills and any other business properly brought before board. Agenda will be posted at Daniels Town Hall 24 hours before meeting. Visit Daniels Township Web site www.townofdaniels.org Liz Simonsen, Clerk 562545 42L 32a

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WESTCONSIN CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. THE ESTATE OF JEFFREY L. KIRKVOLD, BREMER BANK, NA, JOHN DOE TENANT #1, JOHN DOE TENANT #2, Defendants Case No. 12CV9 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage

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(May 30, June 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. as servicer for U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for the Specialty Underwriting and Residential Finance Trust Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates Series 2006-BC3 Plaintiff vs. KENNETH OELKERS, et al. Defendant(s) Case No: 10 CV 914 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 22, 2012, in the amount of $98,542.67, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: June 26, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot 18, Block 8, Original Plat to City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 209 Church Avenue, Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 201-004330000. Dated this 26th day of April, 2012. /s/Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1788292

TOWN OF MILLTOWN PLAN COMMITTEE MEMBERS

The Town is looking for any resident who would like to serve on the Plan Committee. Contact the Clerk’s Office at 715-8252494. Virgil Hansen, Town Clerk Town Of Milltown 561908 41-42L 31-32a,d WNAXLP

HELP WANTED General Laborer With CDL & Skid Loader Experience Preferred Stop In & Apply At:

LiteHouse Construction House Moving & Lifting

562129

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered in the above-entitled action on March 28, 2012, in the amount of $101,432.33, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, in said County, on the 18th day of July, 2012, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lot 65 of the plat of O.H. Steindorff and C.H. Johnson’s addition, also known as Arlington Heights addition to the City of Amery, Polk County, Wisconsin. Tax Parcel No. 2010098-0000. Property Address: 333 Arlington Blvd. N., Amery, Wisconsin. Terms of Sale: Cash. Down Payment: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check upon confirmation of sale. Dated this 29th days of May, 2012. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Attorney Christine A. Gimber Weld, Riley, Prenn & Ricci, S.C. 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway P.O. Box 1030 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715-839-7786 Attorneys for Plaintiff This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

(May 30, June 6, 13, 20) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff vs. JULIE HANSEN, et al. Defendant(s) Case No: 11 CV 419 AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on October 17, 2011, in the amount of $106,141.60, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: July 3, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1.) 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2.) Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main St., Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The Northwest 1/4 of the Northeast 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 36, Township 36 North of Range 18 West, except highway right of way described in Volume 284 Records, on Page 169, Document No. 322360, in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, Laketown Township in Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1868 250th Ave., Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 030-00903-0000. Dated this 23rd day of May, 2012. /s/Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Scott D. Nabke Blommer Peterman, S.C. State Bar No. 1037979 165 Bishops Way, Suite 100 Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 1854613

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(May 30, June 6, 13, 20, 27, July 4)

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BID NOTICE The Town of Laketown is seeking sealed bids for the following road projects: 1) Overlay 180th St. from 260th Ave. south approximately 2,234’; and 265th Ave. from 180th St. west approximately 914’ west. Project #1 is a LRIP Project. 2) Paving Bullhead Lake Lane. 3) Overlay 260th Ave. from 180th St. approximately 1/4 mile west. 562067 41-42L WNAXLP 4) Chip seal 220th St. approximately 4.5 miles. Please mark and submit your bids separately. Bids must be received by June 25, 2012, and will be opened June 26. The board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. For more information and for specifications, contact Merle Larson at 715-648-5557.

Unity Business Park 1514 190th Ave. • Unit 2C Balsam Lake, WI

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The Town of Milltown will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, June 11, at 7 p.m. at the Milltown Fire Hall, for the purpose of a zoning change for Jerry Larsen, from ag to commercial. The Regular Monthly Meeting will follow the Public Hearing. There will be discussion on the Kemah Shores Assessor Plat #1. Virgil Hansen, Town Clerk 561906 41-42L 31-32a,d WNAXLP Town of Milltown

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BIDS WANTED - Chip Seal Coating

(May 30, June 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GARY L. THOMPSON Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 12 PR 25 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth September 16, 1940, and date of death May 11, 2012, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 105 East Oak Street, Frederic, WI 54837. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is August 31, 2012. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, WI, Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar May 22, 2012 Ryan M. Benson Attorney at Law BENSON LAW OFFICE, LLC P.O. Box 370 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-5215 Bar No.: 1036463

NOTICE TOWN OF MILLTOWN

Monthly Board Meeting Monday, June 11, at 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall Virgil Hansen, Clerk 561623 41-42L 31-32a,d

NOTICE TOWN OF EUREKA Monthly Board Meeting Thursday, June 14, 2012 7 p.m. at Eureka Town Hall

Agenda to be posted: 1) Eureka Town Hall 2) Eureka Town Garage 3) Eureka Clerk’s Office. Agenda may also be posted on Town Web site: www.townofeureka.org

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

Registered Nurse $25.44/hr. Health Dept. - Home Care Program Limited Part Time Deadline to apply: June 22, 2012 YOU MUST COMPLETE A POLK CO. EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For application, complete position requirements and details, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employment Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk Co. Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake or Golden Age Manor, 220 Scholl Ct., Amery or by calling 715562670 42L 485-9176. Please, no faxed applications. AA/EEOC

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin www.townofstcroixfalls.org PLAN COMMISSION - NOTICE OF HEARING June 13, 2012 The Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission will hold a public hearing at 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, June 13, 2012, at the Town Hall at 1305 200th Street & U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Written evidence, testimony or comments, if any, must be delivered in person or by mail to the Town Hall. Annie Yang requests to obtain a Special Exception to operate a mobile food truck in the Commercial District. The address of the proposed use is 2131 U.S. Hwy. 8, and the property is located in Section 28, T34N, R 18W. The current parcel identification number is 044-00792-0000. Jim Alt, Zoning Administrator 561905 41-42L WNAXLP

www.theleader.net TOWN OF BALSAM LAKE

The following have applied for Liquor Licenses: Balsam Lake Rod and Gun Club 1472 150th Street Ted & Pat Hansen, Agents Centuria, WI 54824 “Class B” Intoxicating Liquor Class “B” Beer Ronald Stager/Deer Lake Sports 1766 U.S. Hwy. 8 St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Class “B” Beer Glenna Family Farms, Inc. Rita Glenna, Agent 1333 120th Street Amery, WI 54001 “Class A” Intoxicating Liquor

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The Town of Luck, Luck, WI, will accept bids for the following: 1. One mile on 160th St. from St. Rd. 35 to 300th Ave. 2. One mile on 163rd St. from 260th Ave. to Co. Rd. B. Bids must be received no later than June 12, 2012. Town Clerk, Lloyd Nelson Further details may be obtained by calling 715-472-2037. The Luck Town Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk

Jonathan D. Gardner, Grantsburg, and Kayla L. Miller, Grantsburg, issued May 11, 2012. Brandon B. Davis, Hinckley, Minn., and Mary M. McCorry, Hinckley, Minn., issued May 30, 2012.

Kent C. Hedeen DBA Kent’s Plants, LLC 1305 160th Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 “Class A” Intoxicating Liquor “Class B” Beer These licenses will be on the agenda for approval at the June 18, 2012, board meeting. Brian Masters, Clerk

(May 9, 16, 23, 30, June 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CENTRAL BANK, f/k/a THE RIVERBANK Plaintiff, vs. PAUL R. GABERT, DEFENDANT. Case No. 11 CV 460 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on December 15, 2011, in the amount of $30,294.14, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Thursday, June 21, 2012, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: The West 417.4 feet of the South 417.4 feet of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4), Section Nine (9), Township Thirty-four (34) North, of Range Eighteen (18) West, Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 044-00238-0000. ADDRESS: 21XX 160th Ave. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 19th day of April, 2012. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson/#1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

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The Town of West Sweden is seeking sealed bids for a T.R.I.P. Project on 315th Ave. from STH 48 to 170th St. Pave with 2” by 18’ of hot-mix asphalt. The town will be doing the shouldering of the road. Submit bids by June 19, 2012, by 6:30 p.m. Must have certificate of insurance. The Town of West Sweden reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids. For more information, contact Simon Nelson at 715-566-3055 or Kevin Taylor at 715-371-1002. Andrea Lundquist, Clerk 1535 345th Ave. 562551 42-43L WNAXLP Frederic, WI 54837

David L. Weller II, Siren, and Latasha K. Campbell, Siren, issued May 1, 2012. Daniel J. Pearson, Trade Lake, and Delaine M. Turner, Mora, Minn., issued May 10, 2012.

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burg, issued April 30, 2012.

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Dana W. Shultz, Grantsburg, and Lizabeth R. Gay, Grants-

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JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

SPRING SPORTS

INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R BASEBALL • BOYS GOLF • SOFTBALL • TRACK & FIELD

Pirates hopes for state dashed by Prescott game ended on a pop out. The Cardinals hit the ball hard throughout the game, coming up with four runs on 12 hits. Jake Hintz picked up the win going five innings, issuing just one walk. Connor Loutsch picked up the save, pitching the final two innings. It was a difficult end to the Pirates season but a good one. They finished with a West Lakeland conference championship at 8-0, earned another regional title and an overall record of 23-3. They were also one of the top five teams in the state in 2012, and graduate several solid seniors who certainly have had memorable careers. Graduating seniors include Hanson, Engelhart, Kyle Roberts, Seth Coy, Carl Palmquist and Daniel Biorn.

Grantsburg ends season in wild week of exciting baseball Prescott 4, Grantsburg 2 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer CUMBERLAND – Hopes for a return trip to Appleton were dashed on Tuesday, June 5, as the Grantsburg Pirates baseball team fell short against the No. 1 ranked Prescott Cardinals 4-2. The Pirates earned their way to the sectional championship with a 2-0 win over Chequamegon in the semifinal game earlier in the day. Lucas Willis had a stellar performance on the mound, throwing a no-hitter, but it was veteran right-hander Nolan Hanson who would face the hardhitting Cardinals during the second game of the day at Islander Field in Cumberland. Prescott played the second game of the day and was coming off a close game of their own, going nine innings against Fall Creek and pulling out the 1-0 victory. Less than an hour after Prescott’s win, they took on the Pirates, who got off to a fantastic start. With Grantsburg playing as the away team, Bryce Ryan led the top of the first inning with a walk, and Joe Engelhart hit a bomb to the gap in left center for a triple to score Ryan and give the Pirates the early 1-0 lead. Hanson then followed up with an RBI single to center and the Pirates took an early 2-0 lead. Then in the bottom of the second inning, Prescott scored their first run of the game with a two-out RBI single, but the

Extra Points

Pirate baseball players switched to rally caps in the top of the seventh inning in hopes of a comeback finish against Prescott in the sectional championship game Tuesday, June 5. The Pirates lost a tough game, 4-2. – Photos by Marty Seeger Pirates left without any further damage, in the bottom of the fourth, during an inand held the lead. The Cardinals threat- ning where Engelhart made an amazing ened again in the bottom of the third in- defensive stop with a diving catch at short ning with a one-out single, and looked as for the first out. Hanson then hit the next though they’d tack on another two runs batter and an RBI double tied the game 2with a deep fly ball to left field. Pirates left 2. Prescott then hit a sharp grounder to fielder Kyle Roberts tracked the ball down third but the ball went just under the near the warning track and made a Willie- glove of Jacob Wald, and the Cards took a Mays-style, over-the-shoulder catch to 3-2 lead. Jacob Glover came in to pitch end the inning. It was a key defensive play with two outs in the inning and the inning for the Pirates, who held a 2-1 edge head- finally ended on a pop out. ing into the bottom of the fourth. It was the last inning in which the PiThe Cardinals retook the lead, however, rates would have a lead, as Prescott’s pitching was stellar, retiring Grantsburg in order through five innings, beginning in the top of the third. Grantsburg struck out four times total in the game but still managed to hit the ball hard. They just couldn’t get hits to fall. They remained in the game until the end, getting great defensive plays along the way. Wald made a great play to end the bottom of the fifth inning, catching a rocket hit to third, and threw it back to first for the double play to end the inning. Prescott threatened one more time in the bottom of the sixth inning with two hits, including an RBI single to give them a 4-2 lead. With runners at first and third, they tried for the double steal and to tack on one more run, but a heads-up play by the Pirates infield helped tag out the Cardinal runner stealing for home to end the inning. In the top of the seventh inning, down by two runs and facing one out, Pirate outfielder Brandon Ryan launched a deep fly ball to left that looked to be heading to the wall, but an amazing over-the-shoulder catch by the Cardinal left fielder gave The Pirates escaped the bottom of the sixth without further damage by tagging out a Cardi- the Pirates just one more out to make up nal base runner at home plate. the two-run difference. Unfortunately, the

••• SIREN – The Siren summer T-Ball league is getting ready to begin, but due to the fire at Siren High School, registration for the summer league was put on hold. T-Ball will run Monday through Thursday from 1 to 2 p.m., on the weeks of June 11, June 18 and June 25. Players are instructed to meet on the Siren Schools football practice field. Cost is $25, and each child will receive a T-Shirt. – Marty Seeger ••• OSCEOLA – The annual High School Legion All-Star Game has been booked for Oakey Park in Osceola once again this summer. Teams from the north will battle teams from the south in a nine-inning game set for Thursday, July 5, beginning at 5:30 p.m. ••• FREDERIC – This summer marks the final year of the Jane Wisse Open Golf Scramble at the Frederic Golf Course. The event is set for Sunday, Aug. 12, with a shotgun start at 11 a.m. Golfers and nongolfers can share in the fun, by sponsoring a hole or a game, or donating raffle or auction items, or by volunteer during the event. Those not able to attend the event can still contribute. The four-person golf scramble costs $65 per person, or $45 per person for FGC members. Price includes golf, cart, games and dinner. Anyone with questions are asked to contact Jen at 651-260-4770, Pat, 714-327-8222 or Duane at 715-491-5200. Or check the event out on Facebook at Jane Wisse Open. Last year’s proceeds made it possible to award a scholarship in Jane Wisse’s honor to Frederic High School senior Maria Miller. ••• LEADER LAND – Leader Sports strives to follow the college careers of area athletes. If you know of an athlete playing collegiate sports in 2012 who hasn’t been mentioned, send us an email or call and we’ll take it from there. – Marty Seeger

SPORTS RESULTS DEADLINES: WEDNESDAY - MONDAY: 1 p.m. the following business day. TUESDAY: 7 a.m. on Wednesday. Missed deadlines mean no coverage that week! S P O R T S N E W S O R S C O R E S T O R E P O R T ? • P H O N E : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 2 3 6 • FA X : 7 1 5 - 3 2 7 - 4 1 1 7 • E - M A I L : m s e e g e r @ c e n t u r y t e l . n e t

“The greatest discovery of all time is that a person can change his future by merely changing his attitude.” – Oprah Winfrey 562433 42L

BMC: Your hometown healthcare champions. Right here. Right now. 24/7. Making a positive difference in our community since 1930.

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Pirates no-hit Chequamegon in playoffs Grantsburg 2, Chequamegon 0 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer CUMBERLAND – Grantsburg Pirate junior hurler Lucas Willis literally shut down the visiting Chequamegon Eagles bats in the Division 3 sectional semifinal playoff game at Cumberland on Tuesday, June 5, pitching a solid no-hitter, while striking out an even dozen Eagles and walking none in the 2-0 victory. The Pirates also used clutch hitting and heads-up baserunning to score twice and seal the victory for Willis, who made it 14 straight playoff innings without a single run scored against him. “I do believe the difference was Lucas’ pitching,” Pirate head coach Pete Johnson stated, noting that other than a hit batsman and a throwing error away on that runner at first, Willis was that close to a rare perfect game. “His pitching was very sharp,” Johnson reiterated. “Other than his plunking that guy and getting him over to third on a bad throw, you know, we lucked out.” The Eagles were without a single base runner until the hit batsman in the sixth inning. When he advanced to third on a throwing error later, they tried a one-out suicide squeeze play that ended with a pop-up to the catcher and a double-up of the runner on third, ending the inning and sealing the shutout. “We really did luck out on that one,” Johnson said. “The squeeze, the double play ... usually, with two strikes, it’s not normally a squeeze play count, but I knew they were a bunting team ... I guess it surprises me, but not totally.” Just like in the regional finale victory that brought them to Cumberland, the Pirate bats managed just three hits in the victory.

Lucas Willis threw a no-hitter against Chequamegon during the sectional semifinal game at Cumberland on Tuesday, June 5. – Photos by Greg Marsten But the Grantsburg batters made their rare offensive success count. They scored two runs in the bottom of the third inning by taking advantage of a lead-off walk by Jake Wald, then a Brady Thompson single that ended up being bobbled in center led to runners on second and third with nobody out. Later a Bryce Ryan single scored both Wald and Thompson, giving them the victory ammo to hold on for the win.

The Pirates managed another solid hit in the next inning when Nolan Hanson crushed a third-baseline double, with a subsequent Kyle Roberts walk, but both runners ended up stranded, keeping the 2-0 lead as it was. “I guess if you’re going to only get three hits, you might as well get two of them in the same inning!” Johnson joked. Grantsburg’s solid infield defense and

Pirates coach Pete Johnson waves Brady Thompson around third base in the third inning, to help seal victory over Chequamegon. strong pitching stifled the Eagles all day, and with Willis’ steady hurling, he held on for the 2-0 victory, sealing a chance at the sectional finale later in the day against the formidable Prescott Cardinals, who slipped past Fall Creek by a 1-0 final in nine innings.

Pirate boys trap Beavers Grantsburg 2, Cumberland 0 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Pirate boys won the Division 3 Regional Championship on Thursday, May 31, at home by shutting out the Cumberland Beavers by a 2-0 final score. “Good, crisp ballgame,” stated Pirate head coach Pete Johnson. “Both Cumberland and Grantsburg have a baseball tradition. It’s good to see a tough battle.” The Pirates relied on junior hurler Lucas

Pirates right fielder Brandon Ryan makes a nice catch against Cumberland. The Grantsburg Pirates won the regional championship last Wednesday, May 30, against the Cumberland Beavers. Here the senior boys hoist up the trophy. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Pirates senior outfielder Kyle Roberts hauls in a fly ball against Cumberland.

Willis for pitching prowess, and he responded with confidence, striking out 10 Beavers and working out of the occasional trying situation with aplomb, walking only two and allowing just two hits in the 2-0 shutout. “Lucas looked pretty tough on the mound,” Johnson said. “Ten strikeouts is a very good outing.” The Pirates may not have been fireballs at the plate, but they made their few hits

count, scoring the winning run in the third inning by taking advantage of walks, fielders choices and singles by Joe Engelhart and Nolan Hanson to move Daniel Biorn. Grantsburg added an insurance run in their last at bat in the sixth inning in much the same fashion, using a walk and later error on a potential double play to get runners in scoring position enough for a Jake Wald single to score a run.

“We could only muster three hits tonight, but two of them were clutch hits to score runs,” Johnson admitted. The Pirates may not have dominated the feisty Beavers, but they kept them in check enough to win the game and hence the right to advance to sectional play four days later on the Beavers home field. “Again, we didn’t pile on the hits, but we got them at the right times,” Johnson said with a slight grin.


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Pirates sectional final set for Thursday

Grantsburg to play Elk Mound for chance to go to state Grantsburg 10, Chequamegon 1 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – At 23-2, the Grantsburg Pirates softball team has to like their chances at a possible trip to state as they’ll be taking on Elk Mound at Park Falls this Thursday, June 7, beginning at 4 p.m. The Mounders are 17-7 overall and drew the No. 1 seed and, like Grantsburg, had a first-round bye. They finished second overall in the Dunn-St. Croix Conference with three losses. It’s been two years since Grantsburg has made it to state, but the Pirates were state champions in 2009 and look to be playing some of their best ball after Monday’s June 4, game against Chequamegon during the sectional semifinal game. The first two playoff games seemed a bit sluggish for the Pirates offense, but it wasn’t apparent Monday as they banged out 13 hits for 10 runs, and drew two walks, while only striking out two times. They got off to a great start as Macy Hanson took to the mound and retired the first nine batters in order, with seven of them going as strikeouts. She totaled 10 strikeouts for the game and allowed one hit and no walks through five innings, and was backed by plenty of run support. The Pirates scored three runs in the first inning when Hanson hit a two-out double and scored moments later on an RBI double by Nicole McKenzie. Gabby Witzany then powered her way into the Grantsburg history books as she smacked a tworun homer over the left-field wall to give the Pirates an early 3-0 lead. It was Witzany’s seventh home run of the season, which is the most ever by any Pirate softball player in a season. Grantsburg scored another run in the bottom of the second with three consecutive singles from Kylie Pewe, Sam Schwieger and Hanson. With the bases loaded and only one out, McKenzie drew a walk and the RBI to put the Pirates up by four. The Pirates went relatively quiet in the third and fourth innings but came out firing again in the fifth when Stacy McKenzie hit a two-out single, and Wendy

Gabby Witzany trots home after hitting a two-run homer in the top of the first inning against the Chequamegon Screaming Eagles. This was Witzany’s seventh home run of the season, and the most ever by any Pirate softball player in one season. – Photos by Marty Seeger Roberts followed up with an RBI double. Roberts kept a hot bat going into the bottom of the sixth with a two-out RBI double. The Pirates put the game away for good in the sixth inning, scoring five runs on five hits, which started out with a leadoff double by Kassie Lien. Kylie Pewe followed up with an infield single and Sam Schwieger drove in a run with an RBI single. Nicole McKenzie then hit a deep sacrifice fly to center to score another run, with the bases loaded, before Roberts drove in the final two runs of the inning on her double.

Grace Corbin pitched the final two innings to help close out the 10-1 win for the Pirates on Monday, June 4.

Grace Corbin pitched the final two innings for the Pirates, and the Screaming Eagles managed to pick up one run on two hits and a walk. But the Screaming Eagles chance at any sort of rally in the top of the sixth was stymied by some solid defensive action by the Pirates infield. After a leadoff walk and one out, Chequamegon hit an RBI single but the Pirates turned a 3-6-4 double play that started with a hit to Roberts at first, who quickly threw the ball to shortstop Sam Schwieger for the force out at second. Schwieger then fired the ball back to first, where second baseman Pewe was waiting for the ball and the

final out of the inning. Grantsburg’s quick thinking on defense shined again in the top of the seventh, when Corbin caught a hard line drive and quickly fired to first for the final out and another Pirates victory. Batting totals for the Pirates included a 2-for-4 performance from Pewe, and Schwieger going 3 for 4 with an RBI. Hanson had one hit and both Nicole McKenzie and Witzany drove in two runs on one hit. Stacey McKenzie and Roberts each went 2 for 4 and Roberts had four RBIs. Lien was 1 for 4 at the plate.

Wendy Roberts slaps a high five with assistant coach Steve Johnson after the Pirates 3-6-4 double play.


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Erickson, Gustavson make podium at state Unfortunately, the race didn’t go as hoped for the Tigers relay team. Despite finishing sixth overall, an exchange with the baton went awry. “They had a few minutes of excitement as they saw their team in the sixth spot with another record time of 1:48.22,” said Ward. “Ashley thought she was in the exchange zone because that lane happens to have two triangles that are about 4 feet apart. It was nice to see them run a great time, but it is a big bummer that they got disqualified and didn’t get a medal they were hoping for.”

Webster’s eight state qualifiers share ups and downs by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer LA CROSSE – The Webster track team was well-represented in both boys and girls events at the state track meet in La Crosse on Friday and Saturday, June 1-2. Seniors Joey Erickson and Melissa Gustavson both made the podium in two events. Erickson took fifth overall in the 1,600-meter run on the first day, with a time of 4 minutes 23.79 seconds, which was better than the state championship time last season. “He ran a smart race and the best race I have ever seen him run. The thing about an athlete like Joey (is he) has been there and done that. He has the best distance coach (Jim Muus) and has run the best distance runners. Joey has an internal pace meter that helps him run very consistent laps,” said coach Roy Ward. Erickson saved the fireworks for his last event the following Saturday in the 3,200meter run, when he placed fourth overall with a time of 9:47.25. Despite taking fourth place, the time is faster than the championship time of 9:49.33 last year at state, which is held by former teammate Jack Taylor. Erickson will go down in Webster School history as one of the best all-time distance runners, which is a difficult feat considering the longstanding strength of both its track and cross-country programs engineered by Muus, a longtime Webster distance coach who plans retirement after this season. “The place doesn’t matter as much when you know that the performance was that good and he is one of Webster’s alltime best distance runners!” said Ward. Along with Erickson winning two state medals, so too did Melissa Gustavson, who took sixth in both the 100- and 200meter dash. In the 100-meter dash, Gustavson finished with a time of 12.90 seconds and had a time of 26.44 in the 200.

Shot put Senior Chelsea Larson ended her trip to state unable to make the finals despite another year of success. She had a throw of 33-00.50 but was seeded 35-08.00. “The unfortunate thing about the shotput ring was the surface was very slippery and most all the athletes (including Chelsea) were slipping,” said Ward. Despite a plea from coaches and the crowd about the problem, several throwers continued to compete, until one athlete slipped. The fall required 12 stitches, and the finals were moved to a different throwing ring. But that wasn’t until the finals. “Chelsea was happy to break her goal of throwing over 32 feet this year and making it to state,” Ward said. “She should be proud and it is amazing to be one of the top kids in the state no matter what the place,” Ward said.

Joey Erickson of Webster had reason to smile after a great finish at state in La Crosse. Erickson had a great career with the Tigers. – Photos submitted unless otherwise noted

The Webster girls 4x200 relay team had its ups and downs at the state track meet in La Crosse on Friday and Saturday, June 1-2. – Photo by John Reed

Webster senior Melissa Gustavson took the podium at state with sixth-place finishes in the 100- and 200-meter dash. “These two athletes (Erickson and Gustavson) have invested a lot of time and effort and it paid off for them this weekend,” said Ward. After qualifying in the 100-meter dash, Gustavson competed in her third event at the state meet along with Angel Christianson, Kelsey Sheffler and Ashley Irvine in the 4x200-meter relay. During the qualifying round, the team finished with a time of 1:49.06. “Dissecting the race, Sarah (Pickering) and I felt very good about their chances to medal on Saturday,” said Ward. “There were areas to polish and they were excited.”

High jump On Saturday of the state meet in La Crosse, senior Taylor Heinz competed in the high jump, but hit the bar in three attempts, missing his chance to compete in the finals round. “His first attempt was his best. He cleared the bar and took it off with his calves. The second attempt, he lost his footing and crossed the plane of the bar while trying to catch his balance. His last attempt, he flew through the bar and never got his height before hitting the bar,” Ward said. Triple jump Webster senior Aaron Clay finished his track career at state by competing in the triple jump, but it wasn’t his day, as he hit a mark of 39-02.75 on the second attempt. His first and third attempts were scratched. “The last jump was his nicest, but he barely scratched. Coach Pickering said that his middle phase was just not there that day,” Ward said.

Chelsea Larson, a senior from Webster, competed in the shot put at state in La Crosse.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 19

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Division 2 state track ends quietly

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer LA CROSSE – Of the eight area track athletes qualifying for state in Division 2, none managed to make it into the top 10 as finalists, but each ended a successful season overall. From Frederic/Luck, Adam Chenal qualified to state in the high jump and ended up taking 17th overall with a jump of 5 feet 10 inches. Four others also hit the mark of 5-10, and the first-place finisher hit a jump of 6-6. Unity sophomore Emily Gross placed 14th overall in the shot put with a throw of 32-08.25. She was seeded with a throw of 36-06.25. The first-place finisher in the shot put was Molly Griep of Whitewater, who threw a 42-07.75.

Colton Sorensen, also of Unity, competed in the pole vault but did not register a height in the finals. He was seeded at 1203, but had a solid year, hitting a season high of 13-03 in the finals during the conference meet in Frederic. The St. Croix Falls Saints qualified for state in two events, which included Shane Swanson in the 100-meter dash. Swanson was seeded with a time of 11.51 seconds and ran 11.30 seconds in the preliminaries, but it didn’t qualify him for the finals. The winning overall time was 10.76 seconds. The Saints 4x800-meter relay team took 16th overall out of 17 different relay teams. Athletes on the 4x800 team included Henry Klein, Alex Frey, Chris Eisen and Ryan Nussbaum. They finished with a time of 8:20.24 and were seeded with a time of 8:21.32.

Emily Gross of Unity competed in the shot put at the state meet in La Cross in Division 2. – Photos by John Reed unless otherwise noted

Colton Sorensen of Unity earned a trip in the pole vault at the state meet in La Crosse.

Shane Swanson of St. Croix Falls competed in the 100-meter dash at the state meet in La Crosse in Division 2. BELOW RIGHT: Swanson gets ready for the next heat.

The Saints 4x800-meter relay team took 16th overall out of 17 different relay teams. Alex Frey is shown in the picture above. – Photo submitted

Athletes on the 4x800 team included Henry Klein (above) Alex Frey, Chris Eisen and Ryan Nussbaum. – Photo submitted

Ryan Nussbaum of St. Croix Falls sprints down the track at La Crosse in the 4x800meter relay. – Photo submitted


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Eagle golfers finish sixth at state

Complete season in historic fashion by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – Unity’s first-ever trip to the state golf meet as a team ended on Tuesday evening, June 5, at the University Ridge Golf Course near Madison. The two-day event began on Monday, June 4, and the Eagles finished sixth place overall with a team total of 684 in some pretty stiff competition among eight other teams in Division 2. “We were hoping to finish a little bit better, as all teams do. We thought we could finish in the top four, and at the end of the first day we were in fifth,” said coach Larry Stencil. The first-place finisher was Edgerton with a score of 620, followed by Madison Edgewood, 625; Notre Dame Academy, 635; Catholic Memorial, 652, Northwestern, 682, Unity, 684; Pewaukee, 686; and Ripon, 700. Reed Sorensen used his experience at

Erik Nelson walks off the green at University Ridge Golf Course in Madison.

Ben Bengtson eyes a shot at the state meet on the University Ridge Golf Course in Madison. – Photos submitted the state meet to lead the Eagles, and finish in the top 10 overall with a score of 158. Sorensen had a goal of finishing in the top 10 and completed the goal, which ended up in a tie for 10th. Osceola’s Charlie Danielson was the state champion in Division 2, with a score of 148. “I think the biggest adjustment the kids had to make was the greens,” said Stencil. They were probably a little quicker than what we had at regionals for Bristol Ridge, but not as treacherous. If you were above the hole, it was really really difficult.” Stencil also pointed out another challenge in the number of spectators that came to watch the golfers. He said there were approximately 50 spectators for each

Evan Lunda finished strong at the state meet in Madison this week, Monday and Tuesday, June 4-5.

The Eagles golf team makes its way to University Ridge Golf Course. The team wore pink shirts to help raise awareness for breast cancer. group of golfers, only adding to the pres- course, then they started to think that sure. Stencil quickly pointed out however, maybe we did something really special,” that’s it’s like that for all the golfers. Stencil said. Sorensen’s best day came during round The Eagles are in their 50th anniversary one on the front nine, where he made par year of the golf program at Unity. They on seven holes and also birdied a par 5 earned the school its first sectional title in hole. He shot an even par score of 36, and any sport since the early ‘90s and became ended the day with a 42 on the back nine. the first golf team in school history to go During the second round, Sorensen had to the state tournament. par on five holes on the front nine and finished with a 42, and ended up with par on five holes on the back nine, along with a birdie for a score of 38. Evan Lunda completed his first competition at state in 18th place overall. He shot a score of 160 and during his two days, had par on 15 holes and birdied five times. His best day came during round 1, when he shot an even par score of 36 on the front nine. On the second day he shot a 39 on the front nine. His scores weren’t quite as strong on the back nine, as he shot a 41 on day one, and 44 on day two. Teammates Ben Bengtson and Erik Nelson both finished with a total score of 183 and took 44th overall, and Jake Engebretson shot a 193, and 49th place. “The kids played their hearts out. They all felt bad about how they finished but I Eagles senior Reed Sorensen hit a goal of think as we were driving back home and finishing in the top 10 at state. looked over their shoulder and saw the

Siren golf takes seventh at sectionals “He was driving the ball very well all day, but he was struggling with his putting on the front nine and finished with a 43. He played the best of the day, a 37, on the back nine as his putting got better,” Webster said. Swenson had several key shots including a 25-foot putt for par on hole 12, and had several 8-to 10-foot putts, according to Webster. “Jake started the back nine with a birdie on hole 10 and drove the 275-yard 18th green and birdied that hole for a convincing finish to a nice round,” Webster said. Senior Luke Bollant finished with a score of 82, as well as a great career with the Siren golf program. Bollant qualified all four years of his career to sectionals and took ninth overall this year. He also qualified for state his sophomore year. “Without the out of bounds on hole 17, Luke and Jake might have been in a playoff,” Webster said. “He had a fine golf career at Siren.” Senior Justin Decorah also had a great career with the Dragons, finishing 51st with a score of 99. Like Bollant, Decorah qualified for sectionals all four years and

Jake Swenson earns way to state as individual by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer COLFAX – The Siren golf team ended a memorable season at the sectional meet held at the Whitetail Golf Course in Colfax last Wednesday, May 30. After winning the school’s first-ever regional championship trophy a week earlier, the Dragons ended up taking seventh at sectionals with a score of 365. The score was better than the team’s season average, according to coach Brian Webster, but the competition was very tough, with Osseo-Fairchild taking first overall with a score of 329, and Chequamegon in second with score of 339. There were 12 teams total including Glenwood City, who scored 345; Cadott, 348; Eleva Strum, 350; and Bruce, 356. “Better than our season average, but we all needed to have our best rounds of the year to make it to state,” said Webster. Junior Jake Swenson shot his best round of the season in Colfax and earned himself his first-ever trip to the state level, leading the team with a score of 80.

Siren junior Jake Swenson hits from the fairway at the state meet on University Ridge Golf Course in Madison.

was a big key to the Dragons regional championship this year. Sophomore Jared Emery was the fourth golfer on the team with a score of 104, and Jade Merrill finished with a score of 108. “Jared had a good round today and Jade had been steady all year,” said Webster.

Swenson completes first trip to state MADISON – Siren junior Jake Swenson completed his first trip to the state golf meet at the University Ridge Golf Course near Madison on Monday and Tuesday, June 4-5. Swenson finished 34th overall out of 52 other individual competitors for a total two-day score of 189. Swenson finished strong on day one, particularly on the back nine, where he shot par on six straight holes before finishing the final three with bogey. His total round 1 score was a 90. He shot a score of 51 on the front nine, and just three over par for a score of 39 on the back nine. During round two, Swenson finished with a score of 50 on the front nine, and a 49 on the back nine. Swenson earned a trip to the state meet after placing fourth overall at the Colfax sectional last week, Wednesday, May 30. He was the only area competitor to compete at state in Division 3.

Hopp ends golf career at sectionals by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer COLFAX – Frederic senior Chris Hopp ended his high school golfing career at the Division 3 sectional meet in Colfax last Wednesday, May 30. Hopp finished 22nd overall with a score of 88, out of 71 competitors. The Frederic High School senior was also awarded this season with an academic all-state selection from the Golf Coaches Association of Wisconsin, which

was announced recently. According to a press release, students are nominated by GCAW member coaches if they meet the following criteria: 1) Have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5, 2) participate in at least 75 percent of their team’s varsity matches, and 3) are at least a sophomore in high school. Hopp is a student athlete who serves as a great example to others, proving that ac-

ademic and athletic successes are not mutually exclusive. The coaches association believes it is noteworthy that a record 218 male golfers from around the state have been honored this year for maintaining high academic standards in the classroom while competing in varsity golf. In fact, the average cumulative GPA of this year’s honorees is an exceptional 3.840. The GCAW was formed by high school

golf coaches in 1986 to help build Wisconsin’s reputation for developing quality junior players by promoting golf in our schools and communities. Besides honoring both boys and girls who succeed as student athletes, the association also selects an annual all-state team for boys and girls based on their playing ability. – Marty Seeger with submitted information


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

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Pirates victorious in regional title game

Macy Hanson strikes out 13 for the shutout Grantsburg 6, Luck/Frederic 0 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – For the seventh consecutive season, the Grantsburg Pirates softball team has claimed a regional championship trophy, with solid defense and great pitching from starter Macy Hanson. Despite beating Luck/Frederic handily in two earlier games this season, it wasn’t as easy the third time around, as Luck/Frederic gave the Pirates a battle. “You get down to this end of the year and everyone is at their last game, possibly, and they just bring out the best,” said Grantsburg coach Don Bjelland. “It’s good for us to have those kinds of games to find out what kind of pressure we can take. And there’s always pressure, especially when you’ve a reputation of being pretty good.” The Pirates have been more than just pretty good over the past several years and proved it once again last Thursday, May 31, against L/F. Hanson had been battling mono late this season but has been getting better, proving so on Thursday. The junior had 13 strikeouts with two walks, and allowed three hits. Hanson also had an RBI single in the bottom of the sixth to extend the Pirates lead 6-0. “She didn’t get rattled, she had a lot of 3-2 counts but still came through. She’s the real thing I think,” Bjelland said. But it was the Pirates defense that shined throughout the afternoon as well. Hanson worked through the first three innings and retired L/F in order each time. L/F got the bat on the ball only twice in the first three innings and struck out six times, but a hard liner to left field by L/F center fielder was caught on a nice play by Pirate Harlei Hennessey. In the top of the fourth inning, L/F got its first hit of the game when Avery Steen hit a scorching double off Hanson but was left stranded as Hanson struck out the next two batters. The Pirates were held in check for two innings before getting a 1-0 lead in the bottom of the third inning. Kassie Lien drew a one-out walk and took second base on a wild pitch. She moved to third on a hit by Kylie Pewe to center that was dropped for an error. Lien then scored easily on a passed ball. The Pirates threatened again in the bottom of the fourth inning when Nicole McKenzie hit a leadoff single and Stacey McKenzie drew a walk. The Pirates eventually loaded the bases with nobody out but the L/F defense held strong, getting two force outs at home plate and ended the inning with a strikeout. L/F pitcher Corissa Schmidt was strong throughout much of the game, allowing six hits, two walks and two strikeouts and only one earned run. L/F’s biggest threat in the game came in the top of the fifth, when they managed

The Pirates softball team poses with their regional championship trophy won against Luck/Frederic on Thursday, May 31. – Photos by Marty Seeger to load the bases starting with a walk by Otlo and a bunt single from Tessa Clemenson. Jaimee Buck reached on a fielder’s choice on a bunt attempt, but Pirate third baseman Stacey McKenzie made a great play, fielding the ball and throwing back to third to Sam Schwieger for the force out. Kylie Pewe then made a great play at second base for the second out and a pop out ended the inning. “Defense is super important, especially in these close games. We spend a lot of time with ball-handling stuff and Steve Johnson does a nice job with that,” Bjelland said. Grantsburg’s big inning came in the fifth when Pewe slapped an infield single and Sam Schwiger brought Pewe home on an RBI double to left. Hanson then hit a sharp grounder to third and made it safely to first as the ump ruled that Maria Miller pulled her foot off the bag on an attempt to throw back to third. All runners were ruled safe, and Nicole McKenzie loaded the bases with a walk and still nobody out. The Pirates would score three more runs in the third with the help of an RBI single by Stacey McKenzie and two runs on a L/F throwing error. “It was just a good game, and hopefully we can just gear it up one more notch,” Bjelland said. But hitting I was a little concerned about. I think we’re better hitters than that.” Despite the loss, L/F finished with a quality season with two losses in the conference and 9-3 overall. It was their first season as a combined team.

Grantsburg’s Kylie Pewe fields a grounder against Luck/Frederic.

Luck/Frederic second baseman Jaimee Buck snags a fly ball on the infield for an out.

Kassie Lien scores on a wild pitch for the Pirates first run of the game in the bottom of the third inning.


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Siren athletes complete journey to state track by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer LA CROSSE – Siren sophomore Amber Moore competed in two events at the state track meet in La Crosse that took place Friday and Saturday, June 1-2. Moore competed in the 100-meter dash where she took 12th in the preliminaries and just missed making the finals by about twotenths of a second with a time of 13.07 seconds. Moore also finished 12th in the preliminaries in the 200-meter dash with a time of 27.11 seconds, just missing an opportunity to compete in the finals. Three Siren boys competed in the discus throw, with junior Matt Larson finishing the strongest out of the three with a throw of 134 feet in the finals, which was good enough for 10th overall. Senior Will Haines took 14th overall with a mark of 121-07, and senior Murdock Smith was the third Siren competitor in the discus, but fouled out on three attempts. RIGHT: Amber Moore of Siren takes off in the 100-meter dash at the state meet in La Crosse. – Photos by John Reed FAR RIGHT: Matt Larson of Siren throws the disc at state.

Pep rally held for Tiger and Dragon track teams

Webster and Siren high schools held a combined pep assembly to celebrate the success of their state-bound track athletes. Front row (L to R): Christina Weis, Angel Christianson and Melissa Gustavson. Middle: Kelsey Sheffler, Chelsea Larson, Ashley Irvine and Amber Moore. Back: Will Haines, Matt Larson, Taylor Heinz, Aaron Clay, Joey Erickson and Murdock Smith. Webster High School extended an invitation to Siren High School to hold the pep assembly together because of the fire at the Siren School. – Photo submitted

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD BASEBALL

Team Grantsburg Unity Luck/Frederic St. Croix Falls Siren/Webster

Standings

SOFTBALL

Conf. 8-0 5-3 4-5 3-5 1-8

Scores Wednesday, May 30 (Regional final) Grantsburg 2, Cumberland 0 Tuesday, June 5 (Sectionals) Grantsburg 2, Chequamegon 0 Prescott 4, Grantsburg 2

Overall 23-3 9-12 9-13 8-14 3-15

Team Grantsburg Luck/Frederic Unity Webster/Siren St. Croix Falls

Standings

Conf. 8-0 3-2 3-2 1-5 1-7

Overall 23-2 9-4 5-7 1-8 3-17

Scores Thursday, May 31 (Regional final) Grantsburg 6, Luck/Frederic 0 Monday, June 4 (Sectional semifinal) Grantsburg 10, Chequamegon 1 Upcoming Thursday, June 7 (Sectional final) 4 p.m. Grantsburg vs. Elk Mound at Chequamegon

Visit www.wissports.net for local high school scores & stats

READ LEADER SPORTS! READ LEADER SPORTS!

Milk tournament set for this weekend More than 30 teams signed on to play this year by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer MILLTOWN – They’re probably going to need more brats and certainly more milk for the 35th-annual Hansen Farms slow-pitch milk tournament Friday-Saturday, June 8-10. The milk tournament has continued to grow since it got its start in 1977, and this year is no exception with 33 teams signed on to play. It’s the most teams they’ve ever had and games will likely go long into the

evening. If everything goes as planned, the final game on each day will begin at 10 p.m. Teams are broken down into three divisions, as well as boys and girls divisions that are in 12th grade and under. The senior division, or Division 1, includes youth in grades nine-12. There are 11 boys teams, and six total girls teams in Division 1 alone. Because of such a large turnout this year, the games will be played on both fields in Milltown located at Melgren Field. If the games continue to grow, tournament organizers are thinking of stretching the event to four days, instead of three. The first game of the tournament begins at 5 p.m. this Friday, June 8.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

O UTDOOR S I N T E R! C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Local ATV club members headed to International Falls by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer SIREN - Members of the local ATV community are ready to set out on an exciting expedition on Sunday, June 10, headed for International Falls, Minn. The group will head out from Siren and then hit the trail in Danbury for their 3day ride led by Larry Koch and Ken Nelson. After moving back to Siren after a 39year career in the recreation business, Koch wanted ways to promote the sport of ATVing. When Koch met Nelson, who shared a passion for the sport, as Koch put it, “The adventure started.” “Our first ATV adventure was from Minnesota to Michigan and across the state of Wisconsin,” recalled Koch. “We were joined by three other riders, Rick Thompson, Harold Beedy and John Kielkucki. We made the trip in 1-1/2 days.” Turf and Tundra President Rick Thompson and state of Wisconsin ATV Club treasurer Greg Olson will join Koch, Nelson, and Bill and Lyle Nelson for the ride from Siren to Canada.

Panfish aplenty Staring out from the boat landing at one of my favorite Polk County lakes, I questioned my sanity. A 30 mph wind was hurling whitecaps onto shore and heavy rains were expected to arrive in Marty the next couple of hours. More than once, Seeger my conscience cautioned me to turn back home, and feel good The about the day before, Bottom when the fishing was great and the weather Line was perfect. But when fishing is limited and opportunity knocks even for just a couple of hours, I’ve learned to take my chances. Getting wet didn’t matter, as long as there wasn’t any lightning, and it turned out that the fishing was just as good as the day before. The crappies this time around seemed larger and were vulnerable to the tube jig I dragged behind the boat. They didn’t seem to mind my struggles to keep the front end of the boat pointing north even as the trolling motor struggled to keep me pointing into the

When Larry Koch and Ken Nelson learned they shared a passion for the sport of ATVing, as Koch put it, “The adventure started.” The pair’s first ATV adventure was a trip from Minnesota to Michigan and across the state of Wisconsin. On Sunday, June 10, they will lead a group on this year’s adventure, a three-day ride from Siren to International Falls, Minn. – Photo submitted wind. As I threw my 12th crappie into the ice cooler, rain began pelting the back of my hood and suddenly, in the same breath, I felt as though I was standing idle under a gushing waterfall. By this time and to no surprise, I was the only boat on the lake. My truck and trailer sat alone at the boat landing as it did when I first arrived that morning. I couldn’t help but think of the lucky cabin folk poking fun at the idiot in his boat, while they sipped on a hot cup of coffee or read the morning newspaper. But I didn’t care. The wind had actually come to a halt because of the downpour, which made the boat a little easier to control. I tossed fish No. 13, and then another into the cooler as the rain showed no signs of slowing down and water began finding its way through my jacket and bibs. Suddenly, my back and the seat of my pants were soaked and fishing, it seemed, wasn’t as comfortable as it had been a half hour earlier. It was clear now that I would need to head for home to dry out, and probably begin searching for a new set of rain gear, but I also had dinner for the evening and there wasn’t much the rain could do to wipe the smile off my face. Fast-forward a couple of weeks to last Saturday during the free-fishing weekend, and I found myself out again, with friend Garth Olson on a different lake.

“The ride is a way to promote tourism and to help create more new employment opportunities in the towns we pass through,” explained Koch. “We will also be promoting the use of ATV trails and ATV safety.” Members will also be promoting Burnett County on their northern trek. Burnett Dairy has given the group a supply of cheese to distribute to chambers of commerce in communities they travel through, a tasty enticement to come for a visit in this area. Koch said the group plans to continue working with local chambers of commerce to create better trails and more routes, which will attract more business for local communities. Koch invited all riders interested in taking an adventurous ride to contact the group. “Our team will help lay out a route.” Koch said the club would also assist riders looking for help in opening routes from towns to towns in the county. For more information on ATV trip planning and trail routes contact Koch at 612750-6766 or Olson at 612-280-1220. – with submitted information

Anglers can expect another great summer of fishing, which typically begins with some fast-paced action for panfish. – File photo by Marty Seeger This time we were south of Hwy. 8 in search of whatever wanted to bite. We tried for walleye without success, but hooked into several different species along the way, including a small pike, multiple largemouth bass and an 11-inch perch. After trying for walleye for another hour without much success other than another largemouth or two, we switched to what was biting, and found it once again with the crappie. By now, crappie are finished spawning but are feeding aggressively again near the weedlines and can probably be found in the 7- to 12-footdepth range in most lakes. As always, the most effective lure consists of a small tube jig of just about any color tipped with a waxie, minnow or even nothing at all. This particular outing wasn’t intended

to be a trip for keeping fish, but after throwing back well over a dozen nice crappies I decided to keep a few for dinner. Both Garth and I could have had our limits of 25 but a dozen or so panfish was plenty, especially since he accompanied me on my first outing of the year in midMay, and we kept 25. About once a year I’ll go after a limit especially if the freezer has been bare for a month or more. For the rest of the summer I’ll stick to a personal minimum of a dozen panfish depending on the size, and may even go after a few small bass for eating where there’s no size limit, as well as catfish and hopefully a pike or two. For only my third time fishing since early May, the summer is shaping up to be another good one, and the bluegills are just getting started.

New ATV/UTV rules call for rear license plate as of July 1 Downloadable pamphlet details changes passed by state Legislature MADISON – A mandatory rear license plate for all ATVs and UTVs is among the new rules slated to take effect on July 1 as part of a regulation package passed earlier this year by the Wisconsin Legislature. Since first notice of these rule changes was issued in April by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, there has been some public confusion and questions. Warden Gary Eddy, also the ATV administrator for the DNR Bureau of Law Enforcement, says he has often been asked why the new state law requires the plate

and what it is supposed to accomplish. “The legislation had strong support from the ATV/UTV community and land managers; it is the DNR responsibility to implement the change,” Eddy said. “The rules are modeled after similar rules in place in Minnesota.” Like on a car, the plates will help with identification when it comes to theft prevention, complaints and questions about trail use or operation, Eddy said.

Major changes beginning July 1 include: • ATVs and UTVs are required to display a registration ID number on a rear plate. Obtaining the plate is the owner’s responsibility. Plates are not provided by the department. Plates must be a minimum of 4 inches high and a 7-1/2 inches wide. The plate has to be white and the letters and numbers black and a minimum

of 1-1/2 inches high. • UTVs will follow nearly all the ATV laws, except where specifically referenced. • UTVs will have a specific UTV registration decal and nonresident trail pass. • A new five-day ATV and UTV nonresident trail pass. • Registrations and annual trail passes will expire March 31. • A late fee will be assessed for cus-

tomers renewing their registration after the expiration date. • UTV passengers may not ride in the vehicle’s bed. • A downloadable pamphlet detailing these changes is available on the DNR Web site. For more information search ATV on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.wi.gov. – from the DNR

Great Northern Outdoors Bass Fishing League Standings Week 3 Co-sponsored by BLC Well Drilling in Milltown Standings

1. Main Dish, 32 lbs.,0 oz. 2. 46 Store, 27 lbs., 11 oz. 3. Long/Nelson, 27 lbs., 7 oz. 4. Hack’s Pub, 22 lbs., 12 oz. 4. Luck Sport Marine, 19 lbs., 5 oz. 5. Jim Duncan, 17 lbs., 15 oz. 6. Bon Ton, 17 lbs., 15 oz. 7. Dockmasters, 16 lbs., 0 oz.

8. Northern Bar, 14 lbs., 12 oz. 9. Laqua/Allee, 14 lbs. 10 oz. 10. Mosseys, 14 lbs., 6 oz. 11. Air World 13 lbs., 4 oz. 12. Brad/Cody, 13 lbs., 0 oz. 13. Milltown Dock, 12 lbs. 12 oz. 14. Cory/Jamie, 7 lbs. 6 oz. 15. Subway, 4 lbs., 3 oz. 16. Ones/Roberts, 3 lbs., 2 oz.

17. GNO, 0 lbs., 0 oz. 18. Dairy Queen 1 lbs., 9 oz Big bass/Big bag weekly winner: Big Bass: Brad/Cody, 2 lbs., 4 oz. Big Bag: Luck Sport Marine, 7 lbs., 11 oz.


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

NOTICE

2011 CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT WEBSTER WATERWORKS PWS ID 80703128 Water System Information

If you would like to know more about the information contained in this report, please contact Jay E. Heyer at 715-866-4211. The Board meets the second Wednesday of each month at the Village Hall at 6:00 p.m.

Health Information

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline 800-4264791. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health-care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe drinking water hotline 800-426-4791.

Source(s) of Water

Source ID 3 4

Source Groundwater Groundwater

Depth (feet) 242 215

Status Active Active

To obtain a summary of the source water assessment please contact Jay Heyer at 715-866-4211.

Educational Information

The sources of drinking water, both tap water and bottled water, include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include: 1. Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations and wildlife. 2. Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming. 3. Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff and residential uses. 4. Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff and septic systems. 5. Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which shall provide the same protection for public health.

Number of Contaminants Required to be Tested

  This table displays the number of contaminants that were required to be tested in the last five years.  The CCR may contain up to five years’ worth of water quality results.  If a water system tests annually, or more frequently, the results from the most recent year are shown on the CCR.  If testing is done less frequently, the results shown on the CCR are from the past five years. Contaminant Group

# of Contaminants

Inorganic Contaminants

16

Microbiological Contaminants

3

Radioactive Contaminants

3

Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides & Herbicides

23

Volatile Organic Contaminants

20

Microbiological Contaminants Contaminant

MCL Presence of coliform bacteria in >=5% of monthly samples

COLIFORM (TCR)

Count of Positives

MCLG 0

Sample Date (if prior to 2011)

YES

4

Typical Source of Contaminant

Violation

Naturally present in the environment

Inorganic Contaminants MCL

Contaminant ARSENIC (ppb) 10

Level Found

MCLG

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2011)

Typical Source of Contaminant

Violation

n/a

2

2

NO

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes

BARIUM (ppm)

2

2

.030

.019 - .030

NO

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

COPPER (ppm)

AL=1.3

1.3

.0324

0 of 10 results were above the action level

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

FLUORIDE (ppm)

4

4

.1

nd-.1

NO

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

LEAD (ppb)

AL=15

0

1.21

0 of 10 results were above the action level

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

MERCURY (ppb)

2

2

.1

.1

NO

Erosion of natural deposits; discharge from refineries and factories; runoff from landfills; runoff from cropland.

NICKEL (ppb)

100

7.3100

nd-7.3100

NO

NITRATE (N03-N) (ppm) SODIUM (ppm)

10

10

.03

.01-.03

NO

n/a

n/a

5.00

3.16-5.00

NO

Nickel occurs naturally in soils, ground water and surface waters and is often used in electroplating, stainless steel and alloy products. Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits. n/a

Radioactive Contaminants Contaminant

MCL

Level Found

MCLG

Range

Sample Date (if prior to 2011)

Violation

15

0

1.0

.4-1.0

3/24/2009

NO

Erosion of natura deposits

GROSS ALPHA, INCL. R & U (n/a)

n/a

n/a

1.0

0.4-1.0

3/24/2009

NO

Erosion of natural deposits

0

1.0

.3-1.0

3/24/2009

NO

Erosion of natural deposits

Coliform (TCR)

Health Effects Coliforms are bacteria which are naturally present in the environment and are used as a indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present. Coliforms were found in more samples than allowed and this was a warning of potential problems.

Corrective Actions Taken

Chlorinated system and retested ... everything came back safe.

Definition of Terms

Term

Definition

AL

Action Level: The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

MCL

Maximum Contaminant Level: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

MCLG

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

MFL

Million fibers per liter

mrem/year

Millirems per year (a measure of radiation absorbed by the body)

NTU

Nephelometric Turbidity Units

pCi/l

Picocuries per liter (a measure of radioactivity)

ppm

Parts per million, or milligrams per liter (mg/l)

ppb

Parts per billion, or micrograms per liter (ug/l)

ppt

Parts per trillion, or nanograms per liter

APPLICATIONS FOR LICENSES To the Town Board, Town of Swiss, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned hereby appy for licenses to be used from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, at their respective places of business: Retailer’s Combination Class B Beer and Liquor License Baum & Son Properties, Inc., G. Marie Avelar, Agent, Last Cast Tavern, 7528 Main St., Danbury; St. Croix Chippewa Indians of WI, Stuart Bearheart, Nancy Matrious, Phyllis Lowe, Agents, St. Croix Casino-Danbury, 30222 Highway 35 & 77, Danbury; The Fishbowl, Inc., Burl Gregory Johnson, Agent, Fishbowl Bar, 30799 Highway 35, Danbury; Wild Waters, Ltd., David Schoenecker, Agent, Wild Waters Sports Bar & Restaurant, 7516 Main St., Danbury; Wayne’s Star of the North Market, Inc., Wayne M. King, Agent, Wayne’s Foods Plus, 7413 Main St., Danbury; Retailer’s Class A Beer License Log Cabin Store & Eatery Co., Kristin Jackson, Agent, Log Cabin Store & Eatery, Co., 30217 Highway 35 & 77, Danbury. The Town Board will consider the applications June 12, 2012, at their regular meeting. Dated May 31, 2012 Judith Dykstra, Clerk Town of Swiss 562425 42L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF MEETING OF BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE TOWN OF LORAIN

Notice is hereby given that the Board of Review for the Town of Lorain of Polk County, shall hold its first meeting on Thursday, June 14, 2012, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Lorain Town Hall, County Road E. Please be advised of the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review, to testify to the Board by telephone or to contest the amount of any assessment of real property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the Board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact or provide information to a member of the board about the person’s objection except at a session of the board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the board by telephone or contest the amount of the assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of intent to file a written objection by appearing before the board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for the failure to meet the 48hour notice requirement and files a written objection that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will ask for removal of any board members and, if so, which member will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time that the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are subject of the person’s objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at that estimate. The board shall hear upon oath, by telephone, all ill or disabled persons who present to the board a letter from a physician, surgeon or osteopath that confirms their illness or disability. No other persons may testify by telephone. Respectfully Submitted, 562409 42L WNAXLP Susan Hughes, Clerk

VILLAGE OF FREDERIC - APPLICATIONS FOR ALCOHOL BEVERAGE LICENSE RENEWALS JULY 1, 2012 - JUNE 30, 2013

Health Effects For Any Contaminant With MCL Violations Contaminant

Notices

Typical Source of Contaminant

GROSS ALPHA, EXCL. R & U (pCi/l)

RADIUM, (226 + 5 228) (pCi/l)

The June meeting of the Village Board of Siren will be held Thurs., June 7, 2012, at 2 p.m. at the Village Hall. Agenda posted. Ann Peterson 562222 Clerk-Treasurer 42L

ppq

Parts per quadrillion, or picograms per liter

TCR

Total Coliform Rule

TT

Treatment Technique: A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminent in drinking water.

562566 42L WNAXLP

Notice is hereby given that the following have applied for alcohol beverage licenses: D&M KOEPP, INC., P.O. Box 582, Frederic, WI 54837 CLASS “B” Beer; CLASS “B” Liquor, at SKOL BAR, 135 Oak St. W. (AGENT: PAULA DOMAGALA.) DALE & JEANNE’S INC., P.O. Box 545, Frederic, WI 54837 CLASS “B” Beer; CLASS “B” Liquor, at PIONEER BAR, 119 Oak St. W (AGENT: TRACI DESJARDINS.) DOLGENCORP, LLC, 100 Mission Ridge, Goodlettsville, TN 37072 - CLASS “A” Beer, “CLASS A” Liquor at DOLLAR GENERAL STORE #11710, 211 Wisconsin Ave. S. (AGENT: GLORIA BERG.) ELIASCO, INC., P.O. Box 626, Frederic, WI 54837 - CLASS “A” Beer, at FREDERIC STOP, 215 Wisconsin Ave. N. (AGENT: DAN JONES.) FREDERIC D&H, INC., 21952 Spirit Lake Access Rd., Frederic, WI 54873 - CLASS “A” Beer, CLASS “A” Liquor, at FREDERIC GROCERY, 120 Oak. St. W. (AGENT: DAVID JOHNSON.) FREDERIC COUNTRY CLUB, 905 Wisconsin Ave. S., Frederic, WI 54837 - CLASS “B” Beer; CLASS “B” Liquor, at FREDERIC GOLF COURSE, 905 Wis. Ave. S. (AGENT: JOAN SPENCER.) HACKER’S LANES INC., P.O. Box 45, Frederic, WI 54837 CLASS “B” Beer; CLASS “B” Liquor, at HACKER’S LANES, 413 Wisconsin Ave. S. (AGENT: RICHARD HACKER.) LARSON & ANDERSON INC., 101 Oak Street W., Frederic, WI 54837 - CLASS “B” Beer, at BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE, 101 Oak St. W. (AGENT: STEVE ANDERSON.) LEIBKE TRANSMISSION, INC., 2150 140th St. N., Milltown, WI 54858 - CLASS “A” Beer, CLASS “A” Liquor, at FREDERIC LIQUOR STORE, 209 Wisconsin Ave. N. (AGENT: JOHN H. BRICKMAN.) SSG CORPORATION, 512 Second St., Hudson, WI 54016 CLASS “A” Beer, at SSG HOLIDAY, 410 Wisconsin Ave. S. (AGENT: BRIAN KOECHER.) These applications will be considered for approval at the regular Village Board meeting to be held June 11, 2012. Kristi Swanson, Village Clerk 562565 42L WNAXLP


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

September 4, 2012. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by September 4, 2012, that these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 6th day of June, 2012.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 32230..........................AAMODTl, DUANE A. 9369.......................ABEL ESTATE, ARTHUR 32105..........................ABERCROMBIE, JIM 9964............................ABRAHAMSON, F. R. 31253..............................ADAMIETZ, DAVID 34539................................ADAMS, MARK L. 18454..............................AHRENS, HAROLD 33254.......................................AIN DAH ING 33761...............................AJER, WILLIAM F. 32268...............................ALBERT, JOHN R. 32177...........................ALBERTSON, DEDO 25429....................ALBRECHT, THOMAS B. 22843............................ALDEN, WILLIAM J. 25555.........................ALFORD, RAYETTE L. 24352.......AMERICAN FEED & LIVESTOCK 24992.................AMERY MASONIC LODGE 31988.......................................AMES, DAVID 28877. . . .AMUNDSON ESTATE, HELMER R. 29605.........................ANDERSON, BONNIE 27656.......................ANDERSON, CLINTON 31132........................ANDERSON, DAVID E. 27765...................ANDERSON, EUGENE M. 27425.........................ANDERSON, GARY N. 15679..................ANDERSON, ISABELLE V. 34170.......................ANDERSON, JAMES J. 32506.......................ANDERSON, JAMES L. 7313...........................ANDERSON, JOHN R. 33772....................ANDERSON, JOSEPH G. 34090.......................ANDERSON, KRISTINE 31645....................ANDERSON, LUCILLE C. 13686.................ANDERSON, MARVILLE C. 31152.......................ANDERSON, MARYE I. 32790......................ANDERSON, ROGER L. 14453....................ANDERSON, RONALD A. 22690............................ANDERSON, TED E. 17866...................ANDERSON, THOMAS D. 9056..........ANDERSON ESTATE, DOLLIE L. 14288...............ANDERSON ESTATE, HANS 29599...........ANDERSON JR., CHARLES S. 31162..................ANDERSON-MEEDS, JILL 31287.............................ANDERT, NANCY J. 12568...........................ANDREWS, ALICE L. 10452........................ANKLAM, LAURENCE 28329..........................ANNIS, CHARLES M. 17000........................ARBOGAST, ELMER J. 31017...............ARMSBERGER, ROBERT F. 33852.....................................ASH, DAVID C. 31932....................................ASP, JANET M. 20783...........................ATHEN, HAROLD M. 25809.................................ATHEY, MARK R. 18836................................AURAND, LEONE 90524...................AUSTVOLD, MICHAEL N. 29757...........BACHMAN ESTATE, MARILYN 16081..................................BAEHR, PAUL L. 25288................................BAILEY, DAVID C. 32222........................................BAILEY, R. S. 33629...........................BAILEY, SHIRLEY A. 33197...........................BAKER III, JAMES J. 29807........................BAKER JR., JAMES J. 32925.......................BALDWIN, GILBERT L. 23663.......................................BALL, HELEN 25962...................BANBURY, JACQULYN J. 34107.................................BANKS, MARIAN 15397................BANNISTER, DOROTHY A. 22786......................BARKLIND, WALTER R. 30637......................BARNARD, DONALD C. 32180............................BARR, CHARLES A. 27523............................BARRETT, THOMAS 30703...........................BARRIGAR, JENENE 34619...................BARTHMAN, THOMAS S. 34480.........................BARTLING, SUSAN J. 23344.............................BASIL, EDWARD J. 15135........................................BATES, W. R. 8756......................BEAUCLAIRE, RALPH H. 33613...............................BEAVER, GARY R. 30275.................................BECKER, LEROY 26560........................BECKER, MICHAEL A. 31008............................BECKER, SUSAN T. 28167.....................BECTHOLD, MARVIN H. 8795...........................BEESON, WILLIAM N. 19146....................BEKOWIES, WERNER E. 32686.....................BELANGER, BONNIE M. 13464. . . . . .BELDEN ESTATE, SYLVESTER J. 24156.................................BELISLE, JON A. 29204.............................BELL, BARBARA L. 25971.......................................BELL, JERRY 33295.............................BELZER, MICHEAL 2524.....................BENGSTON, JOSEPHINE 8613........................BENNETT, WILLARD W. 4578......................................BENSON, C. A. 20483.........................BENSON, THOMAS J. 31081......................BENSON, WALLACE C. 33152..........................BERCEAU, RICHARD 34429..........................BERCEAU, RICHARD 32208..............................BERG, DONALD E. 11388................................BERG, DUANE G. 32141.....................................BERG, RANDY 34011....................................BERG, STEVEN 30971.....................BERGLUND, HERALD L. 31488............................BERTRAND, STEVE 31184............................BESELER, WILLIAM 14900..........................BETHKE, EUGENE E. 33042........................BETTENDORF, PAULA 27816...........................BEYER, RICHARD L. 29945...............................BIEDRON, JAMES 33914................................BILLER, MARK D. 10801.........................BINANE, ALBERTA M. 34375..................................BIRD, MICHAEL 21567.........................BISSON, RICHARD L. 31900..............................BIXBY, DARRYL R. 8587............................BJORK, HOWARD W. 14709.................................BLACK, JOHN D. 33415...............................BLAKE, MICHAEL

Acct. # Name 25853..........BLANKENSHIP, KATHERINE A. 34201.............................BLEDSOE, PAUL E. 21353.....................BLOOMER, ROBERT W. 24819..................BLOOMQUIST, WAYNE D. 17246................BODE ESTATE, MARIAN R. 32676.................................BOEHM, JANELL 32569..........................................BOHR, J. A. 31890...............................BOLDT, ELMER C. 14669...........BONSNESS ESTATE, MARION 33503..........................BOOHER, DANIEL R. 15013..........................BOOTH, RICHARD D. 22700................................BOREK, DAVID J. 31261...............................BORRIS, DONALD 25413..................................BOSS, RALPH F. 33732...................BOTTENSEK, TAMELA J. 32027...........................BOTTOLFSON, JEFF 8239............................BOTTOLFSON, LE R. 16119.......................BOTTOLFSON, LLOYD 29521...................................BOURN, ADA S. 34154......................BOURQUE, KATHLEEN 31219.................................BOVEE, ROBERT 33984........................BOWERS, JEFFREY A. 21597..................................BRADLEY, FAYE 28046.................BRADSHAW, CLEMENT G. 32021..........................BRADWAY, VALEREE 28030........................BRANDT, QUENTIN B. 28627...............BRANTNER, GERHARDT L. 34313............................BRANUM, EDWARD 15908...............................BRAUN, EDWARD 25863............................BRAUN, ROBERT S. 32388...........................BRENIZER, MARVIN 34414...........................BRENNA, DOUGLAS 33401.......................BRETZMAN, TERRY L. 7259........................BRIEGEL, KENNETH C. 11125...........................BRILL, RAYMOND F. 18316.........................BRISTOL, EUGENE L. 13330............BROCKMAN SR., GEORGE J. 28526..............................BRONSTAD, GREG 20104....................BROOKSHAW, HARRY F. 19204...........................BROWN, DANIEL M. 30903...............................BROWN, FRED W. 32182....................................BROWN, GARY 29832...........................BROWN, GEORGE F. 16947............................BROWN, MARIAN F. 21542..........................BROWN, ROBERT M. 24101......................................BROWN, W. J. 31507.........................BROWN, WALLACE F. 17371................BROWN ESTATE, CLARICE 30204..............................BRUNER, RUSSEL 33637................................BRUSS, BRIAN R. 25922...................BRYNESTAD, LUCILLE P. 31635.................................BUCK, MELVINIA 20028.................................BULOV, JOHN G. 28496...................................BUNDY, ELWYN 27387...................................BUNGE FAMILY 17666............................BURGER, MATHAIS 29746.....................BURNHAM, ROBERT M. 4914....................................BURNS, LYLE E. 33962......................BURRINGTON, JANE L. 34616...........................BUSCH, ROBERT R. 31137..........................BUSCHMANN, ANNA 22669................................BUSH, LEONARD 18031.........................BUTCHER, JAMES N. 32871.......................BUTENHOFF, EUGENE 34054.........................BUTLER, JEFFREY P. 25616........................BUXTON, PAULINE M. 21516..................BYERLEY ESTATE, JAY C. 34360...........................BYRAM, DONALD R. 33618.....................C. MICHAEL & CO. INC. 18207............................CAAUWE, STANLEY 32226.......CABLEVISION OF CENTRAL WS 33199........................CADWELL, BERNARD 18233...........................CAHILL, ROBERT C. 32377...................................CALIN, WALLIE 32536.............................CALO, BERNARDO 33953................................CAMPEAU, JOHN 20272......................CAMPION ESTATE, T. J. 31274.......................CANFIELD, MARVIN L. 24129...............................CARESS, JOHN E. 33178................................CAREY, KEITH D. 33459...................................CAREY, RANDY 26797.......................CARITHERS, KEVIN M. 33074.................CARLSON, CHRISTINE M. 30279..................CARLSON, CLARENCE R. 16475.................................CARLSON, EARL 14175......................CARLSON, EDWARD R. 18549...................................CARLSON, L. J. 23052........................CARLSON, LILLIAN L. 32879.......................CARLSON, ROBERT S. 5196......................CARLSON, RUDOLPH C. 23501.............CARLSON ESTATE, CARL M. 32913...............................CAROLAN, KAY L. 30816....................CARPENTER, FRANCES 28003......................CARPENTIER, JOHN R. 10739....................................CARR, JANE L. 11974................................CARR, KENNETH 28475............................CARR, WINFIELD J. 13124...................CARRINGTON, HENRY F. 25598............................CARSON, HELEN L. 33950.................................CARTER, JERRY 34023............................CARTER, KARNATZ 33855.................................CASPER, JAMES 31351.............................CASTO, MICHAL C. 33832...............................CATTON, PAUL A. 23952.........................CAVEGN, LAURENCE 32590.................................CECIL, SUSAN F. 31235..........................CERNEY, ROBERT G. 33594...........................CHALUPSKY, CHRIS 32499.............................CHANEY, FRANK F. 7046.....................................CHARLOT, L. H. 11172...................CHARTRAW SR., DAN W. 33927.....................CHASTEEN, WILLIAM F. 34040........................CHENAL, RICHARD J.

Acct. # Name 30087............................CHENNAUX, SALLY 29625............................CHITWOOD, TERRY 22721............CHMAROWSKI, BERNARD J. 34467..........................CHMIELAK, RUTH A. 32833.....................CHOUINARD, CAROL J. 30356...............CHOVICKOWICH, DUSHAN 32784...............CHRISTENSEN, ANGELA R. 14171. . . . .CHRISTENSEN ESTATE, GLADYS 28102....................CHRISTENSON, DALE E. 28625.........................CHRISTENSON, O. E. 33702..............................CHRYST, BRIAN R. 12334............................CLAM RIVER CAMP 32401..................CLAPP TRUST, MERLE R. 8712.............................CLARK NORMAN R. 14411.........................CLASEN, MAHLON C. 26531......................CLEVELAND, MICHAEL 15812..................................COEN, DONALD 32944...........COEN ESTATE, ELIZABETH A. 33029............................COLBY, RONALD K. 31776............................COLE, SUZANNE R. 32239..............................COLEMAN, BETTY 14115..............................COLLINS, PAUL D. 33341..................COMSTOCK, ROBERT W. 25193...........................CONDON, FRANK H. 32954.............................CONE, RICHARD T. 28094..............................CONLAN, FRED B. 31674.............................CONLAN, SHARON 9116....................CONNOLLEY, ELIZABETH 13927.....................CONNORS, RICHARD J. 34624......................................COOK, DIANE 26431..................................COOK, ROBERT 33279..............................COOK, STEVEN D. 29161.............................COOK III, JOHN W. 34697........................COPELAND, TERRI D. 24289.....................CORNELL, CHARLES H. 11914............CORPORAAL ESTATE, HAME 31052............................COSBY, STEVEN W. 20122..........................................COX, GENE 1734...........................COX ESTATE, ELMER 11990...................................COY, LESTER J. 23505.....................COY ESTATE, DANIEL J. 32153.................................COYLE, JOHN D. 10954........................CRIST ESTATE, IRENE 27864...............................CROWE, KEITH J. 33206......................CRUMP, JOSEPHINE L. 11892.....................CULLEN, ELIZABETH J. 33011...............................CULVER, DAVID J. 12036....................CULVER, MARGARET A. 26032.........................CUMMINGS, JEAN M. 16021...........................CURREY, JAMES W. 33221....................CZEBOTAR, EUGENE M. 29588....................DABROWSKI, CHARLES 17509.....................DAGESTAD, RONALD A. 12833................................DALE, LESTER N. 32157....................DANIELSEN, ROBERT E. 30423..............................DARWIN, ARTHUR 33237............................DAVIN, STANLEY B. 20654.....................................DAVIS, DAN A. 29014................................DAVIS, DONNA E. 34672...................................DAVIS, ELLERY 30872.................................DAVIS, JAMES L. 27935..............................DAVIS, RUFORD T. 14752................................DE JAGER, JOHN 33745.......................DEAN, ALEXANDRA R. 29876....................................DEARING, L. L. 9270.......................................DEETZ, RAY L. 32621........................DEHMER, ADOLPH C. 33324................................DEITCH, JOHN C. 19567...............DELANDER, LAWRENCE E. 6511................................DENECKE, HENRY 11593.....................DENSMORE, JAMES M. 32822.....................................DEPPA, TERRI 32110...........................DERRICK, BEVERLY 32994....................DES JARDINS, SHERRIE 33822..................................DETAR, PAUL R. 32287..............................DEWAR, CRAIG M. 33355..................................DEXTER, JERRY 29017...........................DIERS, KENNETH H. 30936..................................DIX, ROBERT C. 32411.............................DIXEY, WILLIAM B. 12551.......................DIXON ESTATE, MARY 26840...........................DOBOSZ, BRUNO C. 31679.....................DOBRAVA, RICHARD D. 33309.........................................DOIG, JOHN 20303......DOMRESE ESTATE, JERROLD E. 34267...............................DOOLITTLE, JEFF 32964................................DORIOTT, DON E. 11582.......................DORIOTT, STANLEY E. 26644...........................DORNSEIF, JUNE G. 32626............................DOWNS, DENNIS A. 32291..........................DRAVES, RONALD J. 15869.........................DRINKWINE, LYNN E. 29927...................DRUDICK, KATHLEEN M. 33244........................DU FRESNE, BETTY J. 18448...................DUBEC ESTATE, STEFAN 29243................................DUFF, EUGENE J. 13908................................DUFFY, BETTY H. 17754.............................DUNN, CHANEY C. 34392.........................DUPEY, RAYMOND H. 32234...........................DUTILLY, ROGER M. 34119.................................EATON, DEBBEE 33730. . . . .EAU CLAIRE SCREENGRAPHICS 16648.....................EBERHARD, ROBERT J. 32922................................EBSEN, JULIE M. 32526............................ECKBERG, JOAN L. 31475...........................ECKLUND, TYRONE 32801...............................EDGETT, GARY C. 20432...................................EDLER, GRACE 26052......................EDSTROM, ROBERT G. 32082..........................EFFERTZ, JUDITH A. 29884....................................EGAN, JOHN V. 12450...................EGELAND, RAYMOND H. 19939............................EHLKE, ARTHUR R.

Acct. # Name 33050...............................EICHTEN, NANCY 7315.......................EINERSON, ELWOOD L. 24809.....................ELDRIDGE, GEORGE H. 29412...............................ELFSTRUM, ALAN 23144.......................ELLINGSON, DINAH L. 33533.....................................ELLIOT, MARK 33061...................ELLIS ESTATE, MICHAEL 30160................................EMERY, EDWARD 31942.................................EMERY, RUBY L. 5796.............................ENG, MARGARET K. 32479......................ENGLERT, WILLARD W. 31773............................ERICHSEN, BRUCE 17838...................ERICKSON, KENNETH G. 29028.....................ERICKSON, ROBERT C. 30492.....................ERICKSON, RONALD N. 24547........ERICKSON ESTATE, GERALD L. 31077..........................ERICSON, ROGER C. 19987........................ESPELIEN, ANGELINE 11836............ESPELIEN/GILES, ANGELINE 15576.........................ETTEN, MATTHEW G. 30217.................................ETTER, WILLIAM 17829.....................................EWEN, RITA E. 33403........................................EWER, KYLE 31930......................FARMERS HOME ADM. 19258.......................FARRELL, MILDRED A. 12061...................FARRINGTON, JAMES M. 34237...................FASCHING, ROLLAND C. 32948............FASHINGBAUER, ROBERT P. 17334.......................FASTNER JR., FRED E. 32945. . . . .FBS MORTGAGE CORPORATION 29166.....................FEATHERSTON, LYLE E. 33987...........................FIELDS, JEFFREY D. 34627....................................FINN, PATRICK 31634........................FINSTAD, RANDALL J. 32653..........................FISCHER, CURTIS R. 15245..................................FISCHER, ELSIE 17497................................FISHER, JOHN E. 33235.......................FJORDEN, JODEEN R. 32957...................................FLAVIN, CAROL 18178......FLEISCHHACKER JR., FRANK R. 32624...................................FLORES, JOHN 9164................................FOLEY, ROBERT J. 24249...........................FONTAINE, DONALD 34013................................FORD, LESLEY J. 23853.........................FORKES, HARRIET E. 32312..........................FORREST, BRYON N. 32976.......................FORREST, MICHAEL L. 33275.....................................FOSMO, DE S. 18535..............................FOSTER, AUDRI J. 24443...........................FOSTER, ROBERT J. 30652..........................................FOX, DAVID 29542...................FRANTZEN, MICHAEL A. 21324..........................FREBERG, LLOYD S. 32468..........................FREDERICKS, DAVID 26572..............FREDRICKSEN, RANDAL K. 30487................FREDRICKSON, JAMES M. 23485.............FREILING ESTATE, SHIRLEY 31861......................FRETHEIM, RONALD L. 32649.........................................FREY, GREG 32273................................FRICK, FRANCES 33155.............................FRIEL, MICHAEL A. 33079........................FRIESEN, FRANCIS C. 17890........................FROEMING, EDWARD 32771....................................FROID, JON M. 33588.......................FROKJER, CLARENCE 15677....................................FROST, VIVIAN 30842.......................................FRY, PAUL R. 31711...............................FULLER, JOHN C. 30301....................................FULLER, RETA 32765.......................................FUNNE, TOM 27329..........................FURUHOLMEN, LILA 30814...............................GAITHER, DANIEL 32996.................................GALL, MARTY R. 34159...............................GALL, THOMAS L. 26103..........................GALLUP, RONALD G. 31717.............................GANZ, MICHAEL L. 32838.......................GAPPINGER, CARL M. 30813..............................GARDNER, BETTY 33113........................GARRITY, THOMAS B. 32904..........................GATLIN, RICHARD A. 18596..........................GAUVIN, ROBERT D. 25627............................GEHRKE, SCOTT H. 34481.........................GEHRKE, SHARON F. 32573.........................GEHRMAN, DIANE M. 32286.............................GEHRMAN, JAMES 17131..............GEHRMAN ESTATE, MINNIE 22811..........................GEIGER, GEORGE E. 19790........................GENGLER, NICHOLAS 27340.............................GEORGE, KARL W. 31437..............................GERGEN, JOHN E. 31863.................................GERLACH, PAUL 30526..................................GERMAIN, ERIC 34363...........................GESKE, MICHAEL J. 33148............................GETTA, MATHEW V. 23838..............................GIBLIN, KATHRYN. 25439.............................GIBSON, JAMES D. 18798............................GILBERT, LLOYD S. 18866..............................GILBERT, LOUIS P. 32378.....................................GILL, ALVIN R. 33666................................GILLEN, ARTHUR 90578..................GILLSTROM JR., PAUL R. 31858..........................GILMORE, DARNELL 33560................................GLASGOW, VICKI 3147..............................GLAUBITZ, MERLIN 4357.........................GLOWACKI, HENRY S. 34215...........................GLUNZ, DONALD H. 33795..........................GOERKS, DANIEL M. 34254...............................GOKEN, TERRY L. 26234...................GOLDBERGER, EMMA L. 7694.............................GOMULAK, JOHN V. 32727..........................GORDON, HYMEN S. 22137..............................GRANDE, ARLENE 31838...................................GRANT, JAMES

562344 42L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 7628...............GREB ESTATE, RAYMOND J. 21354...........................GREEDER, SALLY J. 3388.................................GREEN, KERMITT 33451..........................GREEN, STANLEY N. 32708................................GREEN, THOMAS 32343......................................GREEN, VICKI 34371............................GREENLEE, FRANK 32620..........................GREENLEE, JOHN R. 33072.......................GREINER, SYLVESTER 24584........................GRENIER, WILLIAM J. 31070..................GRIESBACH, ROBERT W. 27208............................GRIFFIN, BARBARA 21631.........................GRIFFIN, PATRICK M. 28066..............................GRISHAM, RICK E. 32318.............................GROSSMAN, ANDY 30006...............................GROTH, ADELE E. 21573......................GRUNEWALD, FRED L. 32481...............................GUICE, HENRY W. 34257................................GULDIN, NICOLE 32898......................GULLICKSON, DIANNE 33612......................GUNTHER, THOMAS J. 33847...............................GURROLA, DAVID 34100................................GUYETTE, DAVID 24840.....................GYDESEN, GORDON W. 32517..........................................HAAS, TOM 31641.............................HAATVEDT, DUANE 12162........................................HACKEN, ED 30282.........................HACKER, ROBERT E. 31245...............HACKLER SR., THOMAS M. 14217.............................HAFNER, RALPH J. 4036.................................HAGEN, CLARA J. 25912.....................................HAGEN, JUNE 33004.............................HALL, RICHARD D. 32852.......................HALLERMANN, JERRY 28592.............................HALMSTAD SALES 18703........................HALVERSON, FERN P. 32768.................HALVERSON, RICHARD B. 25276............................HANISCH, PHILIP J. 20373...................................HANSEN, JUNE 32101.............................HANSEN, KEITH R. 34439.................................HANSEN, KELLY 34162........................HANSEN, LAWRENCE 29980................................HANSEN, RON E. 14463............HANSEN ESTATE, DENNIS D. 34659................................HANSON, ANN M 33088..........................HANSON, BONNIE K. 33576.............................HANSON, DAWN E. 34252..............................HANSON, ERIK M. 33417............................HANSON, LUCINDA 32780...............................HANSON, LYNN L. 30981...........................HANSON, ROGER D. 32878.............................HANSON, TODD R. 1520..........................HANSON, WARREN A. 33597...........................HANSON, WAYNE L. 24254.............................HARDEN, DONALD 33697.......................HARER, MARSHALL H. 32006..............................HARER, ROSETTA 26835...............HARE-STRENKE, BETTY A. 34091....................HARGROVE, ROBERT B. 32659.......................HARMON, GORDON T. 34061..................................HARPER, MARK 18744..................HARPER SR., WILLIAM T. 32276................HARRINGTON, VINCENT J. 27153..........................HARRIS, DONALD D. 32827..................................HARRIS, KAY H. 30115.................HART ESTATE, JOSEPH E. 15637.............................HARTWIG, EVELYN 32561..........................HARVEY, ELIZABETH 45771...........HARVEY ESTATE, PATRICK A. 34455......................HARVIEUX, FRANCIS J. 23509..............................HASKIN, DAVID W. 34401............................HASTY, PATRICK W. 32281............................HAUBLE, LEROY M. 30527..............................HAVATONE, MYNA 15144...........................HAWKINS, JAMES F. 31869....................................HAYLE, BUD H. 28309..................HAZELDEN FOUNDATION 17650................HAZEN ESTATE, LEONA G. 30828.......................................HEALY, JOHN 33704.................................HEGGE, MIKE D. 34048.........................HEIDTKE, DANIEL W. 33161..........................HELLER, DONALD R. 31531.................................HELME, STEVEN 25148...............HENDRICKSON, DOUGLAS 15104.......................HENDRICKSON, RUTH 24818............HENDRICKSON, THOMAS O. 19414.....................HENNINGS, WILLIAM H. 32965..................................HENRY, JOHN F. 30642............................HENRY, WILLIAM A. 32795.............................HERLACHE, MARY 15756.....HERMANSON ESTATE, HAZEL M. 10002..............................HERZOG, JOHN C. 27917.................HESTDALEN, GORDON A. 30163..................HETCHLER JR., HAROLD 30117...................................HEXOM, DAVID 30772...................HEYDMANN, WILLIAM H. 30721.....................HEYWOOD, THOMAS R. 34550..........................HIBBARD, SUSAN A. 27512........................................HICKEY, F. J. 34492.....................................HILL, DAVID J. 23773.....................................HILL, JOHN D. 29247...............................HILL, MICHAEL E. 32505...............................HILL, THOMAS W. 31592.........................HILLBECK, PHILIP D. 11245. . . . . . .HINKFUSS ESTATE, WALTER W. 15605.............HINTERTHUER, HOWARD R. 27908.............................HIRSCH, JAMES A. 32355.....................HOCHSTETLER, ROY V. 33142...................HOCHSTETLER, TERESA 34570.............................HODGES, KARIN L. 34092......................................HOEHNE, KIM 32715...............................HOEMBERG, PAM 32883...................................HOFF, RONALD


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

September 4, 2012. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by September 4, 2012, that these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 6th day of June, 2012.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS Acct. # Name 31066...................................HOGAN, DAWN 29697...........................HOGLUND, JOHN C. 16549.................................HOILAND, ROSE 34296.....................HOLLAND, RANDALL S. 17840....................HOLMBERG, ALBERT E. 21989........................HOLMBERG, ELLEN I. 4716.............................HOLMBERG ESTATE 33032.......................................HOLT, HAL P. 28140...........................................HOLT, JON 27137...................................HOLT, RALPH T. 29128...............................HOLTER, JOHN C. 32165.......................HONERBRINK, RANDY 34670...............................HONTS, MELISSA 15697......................................HOOD, DORIS 30273............................HOOPLE, BRADLEY 14589..........................HOOVER, LINNEA N. 22828...........................HOPKINS, MILDRED 20257..................................HOPPE, MAYSIE 23723...............................HORSLEY, SUE M. 32100........................HORSMANN, LYNN M. 29094.............................HOUSE, DENISE R. 20865..........................HOWE ESTATE, N. W. 34827................................HOWLAND, MIKE 15265..............................HRON, ROLAND L. 24262.........................HUEBNER, KAREN A. 19644............................HUFF SR., EDDIE L. 33846.......................HUISMAN, THOMAS J. 15864.......................HUMMEL, CONRAD A. 90456......................................HUNTER, TED 7146..............................HURLEY, JAMES M. 33963.....................HUSTVET, KENNETH M. 32576..................................HUTSON, DUKE 32837......................HYLAND, LORRAINE R. 12452................................HYLLE, ORLAF B. 31504..........................................IMAN, LOIS 33056...................................INSILCO CORP. 33700.......................................IRWIN, JOHN 24591.............................ISAKSON, KEVIN L. 28714.........................IVERSON, DANIEL M. 31742.......................................JACK, CHRIS 13242....................JACKSON, WALLACE M. 33875..............................JACOBSEN, CARL 34658.......................JACOBSON, BRENT E. 14771........................JACOBSON, JOHN W. 34622............................JADWIN, KENNETH 14556...................................JAGUSCH, BUD 21326.......................JAMISON, MICHAEL J. 34544............................JANSEN, CAROL A. 33262..................................JANSEN, DAVID 11182......................JANSSEN, EDWARD C. 11940.............................JANTZEN, HARVEY 33794.......................JASKEN, BARBARA M. 32052.......................JASPERSON, DONALD 16341...................................JAVA, LARRY E. 26976........................JECHOREK, JERRY F. 21657.....................JENNINGS, WILLIAM M. 34432............................JENSEN, BRADLEY 29630..............................JENSEN, DAVID E. 30380.............................JENSEN, JAMES L. 32235............................JENSEN, KAREN R. 5958................................JENSEN, SOLVEIG 11070.............JENSEN ESTATE, WINIFRED 11918.............................JENTZSCH, HAZEL 2995.......................................JOHN, ARDEN 29883.....................JOHNSON, ANNETTE R. 33773........................JOHNSON, BONNIE L. 30373............................JOHNSON, BURT A. 30894................................JOHNSON, CARL 29346....................JOHNSON, CLIFFORD P. 31478....................JOHNSON, CLIFFORD T. 25417........................JOHNSON, CURTIS L. 33447..............................JOHNSON, DAN J. 16771........................JOHNSON, DURELL F. 1280...............................JOHNSON, ELMER 9749.........................JOHNSON, ERNEST A. 32473.................JOHNSON, FREDERICK A. 33387...........................JOHNSON, GENE A. 34042..........................JOHNSON, GEORGE 29960.......................JOHNSON, GERALD A. 20238......................JOHNSON, GORDON J. 1472................................JOHNSON, HAZEL 3281...........................JOHNSON, HELEN M. 23020..........................JOHNSON, JAMES J. 33676......................JOHNSON, JEANNIE P. 34078.......................JOHNSON, JERILYN C. 32699.......................JOHNSON, JEROME P. 32648................................JOHNSON, JODY 31911............................JOHNSON, JOHN E. 28043................................JOHNSON, JUDY 29266....................JOHNSON, LENNART G. 31663............................JOHNSON, LOLA G. 34580..................................JOHNSON, M. L. 28522............JOHNSON, MARGUERITE M. 34035..........................JOHNSON, MARK R. 29107..................JOHNSON, MARSHALL F. 5746.............................JOHNSON, MARYAN 25575.....................JOHNSON, MILDRED E. 6379...........................JOHNSON, PEARL M. 34026.........................JOHNSON, PETER C. 18339.....................JOHNSON, RICHARD V. 13833......................JOHNSON, ROBERT C. 27235.......................JOHNSON, STEVEN W. 26395..........JOHNSON #311853, ROGER L. 3787...........JOHNSON ESTATE, INGVAR H. 34493.......................JOHNSTON, FRANCES 33625...............................JONAS, JAMES R. 25827........................................JONES, AVIS 9293........................JONES ESTATE, BELLE 16274..............JORGENSEN SR., WILLIE D. 26889........................JORGENSON, RENEE’ 33269...........................JOSEPHS, THOMAS 33979...........................JUETTEN, CYNTHIA 14331.........................KAASE, JOHANNE H.

Acct. # Name 29981...................................KACZUR, GEZA 34500.................KADLUBOWSKI, DONALD 29506...................................KAHL, GEORGE 34795.............................KAHL, ROBERTA J. 22589.............................KAHOUN, WILLIAM 32974......................KAMMERUD, JEFFERY 19463.......................KANER, MARSHALL S. 10001.....................KARINEN, RAYMOND S. 24611..................................KARL, RHONDA 23603..............................KARR, ROBERT A. 20488..........................KASTORFF, HILDA H. 25030...............................KAUL, ROBERT A. 23736...................KAWALSKE, MILDRED A. 31128...................................KEENAN, JOHN 32703............................KELLER, KENNETH 32121.................................KELLY, FRANK L. 31550.................................KENDALL, JOHN 30590.............................KENDALL, MILTON 23526...............................KESTER, CARL R. 29892....................KETTERLING, PERRY H. 29752.............................KEYES, DONALD J. 18297...............................KIDDER, GLADYS 24107.........KIEFFER ESTATE, ELEANOR A. 29932..................................KIEREN, BARRY 22748..................................KING, JAMES L. 9359................................KINGSBURY, LE R. 33353...............................KINZEL, WARREN 33327...........................KIPER, CHARLES E. 16650........................KIRKEBY, GEORGE H. 32469.................KITTLESON, DEBORAH E. 11215...........................KLEMANN, JUNE O. 30907..................................KLINGLER, KEN 32887...............................KLOCKE, GENE J. 21087........................KLOPOTEK, DAVID R. 34135................................KNAPP, PERRY J. 18808.............................KNAUF, ROBERT F. 27673................................KNOTT, DAVID A. 28473.........................KNUTSON, VIOLET A. 34024....................KOHNEN II, MICHAEL P. 34751.........................KOLANDER, DEAN E. 34233..............................KOLLER, HAROLD 32984............KOLLER, HAL PROSTAR INC. 12849..........................KOMAROMY, ENDRE 32839......................KOOPMAN, HILMAN D. 26082......................KOPACEK, GORDON J. 33198.........................KOSLOSKI, JAMES T. 31944..............................KOSTER, ROBERT 34676...........................KOUTEK, DOUGLAS 12351.........................KOWSKI, GEORGE A. 15990.............................KRAFT, DAYTON E. 33287..................KRANCEVIC, MONICA M. 16783...........................KRENCISZ, ROBT. J. 14473........................KRINGLE, CLARENCE 11874..........................KROENING, GLEN L. 34099...............KROGMANN, DEBORAH K. 29862............................KUBES, EUGENE L. 33851..............................KUEHN, RUSSELL 31356...........................KUESTER, EDWARD 31927..........................................KUHL, TOM 14484......................KUMMEROW, CARL W. 15870...................KUNTZ SR., MICHAEL M. 33186...............KURKOWSKI, CHARLES N. 24038...........................LA FAVOR, ROBERT 28371....................LA FOREST, FRANCIS P. 30886...........................LA MAR, ROBERT L. 18709..........................L’ALLIER, MURIEL C. 28304...........................LANCETTE, PAUL B. 8180........................................LANG, MARIE 25728.......................LANGEVIN, RAYMOND 19067.................LANGNESS, DONOVAN D. 33509.................................LARDY, DAVID E. 32684........................LARKENS, JANICE M. 31828................................LARKIN, JOHN N. 31068......................LARSON, BERNARD R. 33077............................LARSON, BRUCE J. 3364.........................LARSON, DELORES E. 33334...............................LARSON, DENNIS 14725...........................LARSON, ELMER W. 7113.............................LARSON, LESLIE W. 33998.............................LARSON, MARK K. 34084....................LARSON, THEODORE N. 29155..............................LARSON, WALTER 31950.......................LARSON SR., MARK E. 28678..............................LAUB, MICHAEL J. 5918......................LAURE ESTATE, LINNEA 34060.............................LAURSEN, DARRIN 19257.................................LAURSEN, DEAN 22610...................................LAW, VIOLET E. 33351...........................LAWRENCE, JAMES 33399..................LAWRENCE, MICHAEL A. 23941...................LAWRENCE, RONALD C. 31781...................LE BLANC JR., HARRY T. 21535.........................LEBAHN, ARTHUR C. 32421................................LEDIN, SONJA G. 30748........................................LEE, BERNIE 28484...............................LEE, KENNETH E. 23530................................LEE, RANDALL J. 34767................................LEE, RICHARD L. 29793.....................................LEE, THOMAS 23656........................LEHMANN, DOROTHY 20034....................................LEISCH, DAVID 22523.........................LEISCH ESTATE, LEO 33784.................................... LEISZ, DEENA 10164..................................LENARD, LOUIS 18119...............................LENZ, JOSEPH M. 18632.............................LENZ, MILDRED S. 30784......................LEONARD, WILLIAM E. 33900.....................................LESLIE, TODD 32539..................................LETZTER, EDNA 33978...............................LEWIS, JAMES W. 25499.......................LEXVOLD, EDWARD A. 10554........................L’HERAULT, ETHEL M. 31753.....................................LIEDER, JULIE

Acct. # Name 29255...................................LIND, JAMES A. 27427..................................LIND, PEGGY M. 4866.................LINDAHL ESTATE, HAROLD 2922................LINDBERG JR., WILLIAM C. 28178.......................LINDEMANN, MARY E. 7287...................................LINDQUIST, PER 33026.......................LINDSEY, DOUGLAS A. 29730..................LINDSTROM, THOMAS G. 33361..........................LINKLETTER, MARIA 33682...............................LINS, CATHERINE 33843.....................LIPSCHULTZ, MICHAEL 20100..........................LIVINGSTON, RALPH 33818.....................LIVINGSTON, RICHARD 33382..................LLEWELLYN, LARSON M. 33172.....................LOFGREN, CHARLES S. 17047..........................LOFQUIST, WARD M. 31853...........LOFQUIST ESTATE, HOWARD 10020..........LOFSTROM ESTATE, ALICE M. 32819........................................LOGER, SUN 24471..............................LOHR, DELMAR A. 8564..........................LOKKEN, GEORGE M. 32985...........................LOMKER, HELEN M. 34325..................................LUKA, JACKY L. 32820..............................LUND, RONALD C. 30862......................LUNDBERG, EILEEN A. 26250......................LUNNEBORG, ARLENE 24874.........................LUSIAN, RICHARD A. 24709.............................LUTZ, CHARLES O. 30004.........................LUZAICH, CASTLE G. 32510................................LYMAN, RONALD 34108.....................................LYNN, CANDIS 31808....................MAC DONALD, GEORGE 31126............................MADDEN, WILLIAM 30691..........................MADISON, PETER R. 32793......................MADSEN, BARBARA E. 23979......................MAGALSKA, JAMES M. 8585....................MAGNUSON, AMANDA S. 28015..........................MAGNUSON, CATHY 30566........................MAGNUSON, KARL R. 26472..................MAGNUSON, THOMAS R. 18332............................MAIER, EDMUND P. 34161.................................MAKI, NANCY A. 29643...............................MALIN, ROGER D. 33616..................................MALUM, TERRY 33204.................................MANBY, JOHN E. 8574...................................MANION, CLARE 30474.........................MARKGREN, EARL L. 11198.......................................MARLOW, ED 14946................MARQUARDT, WILLARD K. 31139......................MARQUESEN, JOHN L. 32119....................................MARS, BRUCE 31733..................MARSHALL, CHARLES A. 33724..............................MARTIN, DAVID R. 30611..................................MARTIN, DIANA 34324.........................MARTIN, EDWARD H. 27568................................MARTIN, PAUL R. 33039................MARTINSON, BERNARD A. 28303.............MASER ESTATE, DONALD A. 33255...............................MASON, CAROLE 25900......................MATEYKA SR., PAUL J. 34760.....................MATTHEWS, DEBORAH 32544...........................MATTSON, WADE A. 31030.......................MATTSON SR., FRANK 34384..............................MAUNU, RALPH L. 23667..............................MAY, BERNERD E. 29347.....................................MAY, WILLIAM 33709............................MAYER, JOSEPH A. 28914..................MC ARTHUR, HAROLD L. 30602........................................MC AULIFFE 7713..........................MC BRIDE, EUNICE S. 34075...............................MC CAIN, DENISE 34640........................MC CAIN, JEROME W. 31394.............................MC CAIN, VALERIE 31965......................MC CALL, CHARLES J. 33302..........................MC CALL, HARRY M. 31673........................MC CLELLAND, EARL 30231...................MC CLINTOCK, ROBERT 33371..............MC DONOUGH, WILLIAM J. 32224..............MC ELHANEY, BARBARA A. 26576..............MC FARLAND, ELENORA E. 31931.........................MC GAUGHEY, GENE 33090......................MC GREGOR, MARK J. 30027..............................MC INTIRE, DORIS 4902............................MC KENZIE, EARL E. 25040.........MC KENZIE ESTATE, WILFRED 34582....................MC KINLEY, ELIZABETH 4510...........MC KNITE ESTATE, LORRAINE 28559...................MC MANIGLE, ALLAN W. 29716...........................MC PHEE, DAVID M. 30291........................MEISSNER, MICHAEL 15536...................MELLSTROM, ERLING J. 33918.................................MELTON, DARYL 28849.......................MELVILLE, ROBERT E. 34420....................................MENDLIK, JON 23904..............................MERRILL, GLORIA 33733........................MERRILL, WILLIAM V. 25552.....................MERRILL, LYNCH REAL 30717...........................MERRITT, SUSAN E. 32697.........................MERRITT, WALTER R. 2724...................................METTLER, GLEN 24989..............................MEYER, JAMES A. 19522...............................MEYER, MARIE L. 28930............................MEYER, WALTER C. 23245...........................MEYER, WILLIAM J. 25701.............MEYER ESTATE, WESLEY C. 30594............................MICK ESTATE, TOM 30026...............................MILLER, AUDREY 31056.....................MILLER, CATHERINE R. 32764.............................MILLER, DANIEL L. 29787..............................MILLER, DAVEY G. 28531...........................MILLER, DONALD P. 30346...............................MILLER, GEORGE 34745...................................MILLER, KIM E.

Acct. # Name 17827...........................MILLER, ROBERT H. 33299..................................MILLER, SCOTT 26097..............................MILLER, VANCE L. 33231.....................................MILLER, W. M. 17339.........................MILLER SR., JOHN E. 26326............................MILNER, WAYNE W. 28086...............................MINOR, DAVID M. 33511.......................................MINOR, JEFF 31952..............................MINTON, DONALD 31590.........................MISHLER, STEVEN G. 8352............................MITCHELL, WILLIAM 25833..................................MOCH, DEAN G. 33860.....................................MOE, JULIE A. 21851...............................MOE, WILLIAM H. 19824.....................................MOHS, HELEN 29173.........MONTEITH ESTATE, SUSAN H. 32418.................MONTGOMERY, DARRELL 32779...............................MOODY, ANDREA 30152.................................MOORE, BESSIE 34704...................................MOORE, ERNIE 20017............................MOQUIST, EARL W. 34373.......................MORAVEC, JOSEPH E. 14832..............................MORAVEC, WIN S. 33547..................................MORGAN, VICKI 32429..............................MORRISON, GARY 17108...........................MORSE, HAROLD D. 30672.............................MORSE, MARLENE 33539....................MORTENSON, JERRY S. 4419......................MORTLOCK, RAYMOND 32803.................................MOSAY, JANEEN 31612...........................MOSAY SR., WAYNE 31854........................MOSSEY, CHARLES J. 23645.................................MUELLER, PAUL 33267..............................MUELLER, RALPH 17594...................MUELLNER, RICHARD J. 34529..............................MULLER, DEAN R. 27381...........................MULLER, NANCY A. 31947................................MULROY, LAURA 22275........................MUNSON, SAMUEL N. 34491............................MURDOCK, SCOTT 3207.................................MURRAY, EARL J. 32644.....................................MYERS, GARY 30024..............................NASSAU, ROBERT 15246......................NAUGHTON, JAMES A. 15224............................NAYLOR, CALVIN E. 11487....................................NEAL, FRED L. 32589.............................NEFS, PATRICIA D. 21047.........................NEIHART, HAROLD F. 33169.................................NEITZKE, MARK 30444..................................NELSON, ARVID 25734................................NELSON, BRUCE 33456.........................NELSON, DONALD O. 33686...................................NELSON, JACK 23837............................NELSON, JIMMIE L. 32760......................NELSON, KATHLEEN J. 29745........................NELSON, LAWRENCE 31281.............................NELSON, LINDA K. 15777..............................NELSON, NATALIE 12331........................NELSON, NEWMAN A. 4941...............................NELSON, NORMAN 25494............................NELSON, SCOTT B. 15929.............................NELSON, SHARON 20045...............NELSON ESTATE, CLARICE 16016......NELSON ESTATE, FLORENCE M. 18958.........NELSON ESTATE, KENNETH D. 6685........................NELSON ESTATE, M. H. 33214...............................NERBY, RICHARD 23239......................NERLING, BARBARA F. 14023....................................NESS, PAUL M. 34304..............................NEUMAN, SHELLY 33814............................NEWARK, ORION J. 31409..........................NEWBERG, WILLIAM 33306.......................NEWTON, PATRICIA A. 24358..................................NICHOLS, MITZI 25650........................NICHOLSON, EARL G. 33372........................................NICK, DIANA 29149...............................NICK, ROBERT A. 17457..................................NICKA, JOHN J. 31199....................NICKESON MOTOR INC. 30571.........................NICKUM, FLORENCE 32037.....................NIENHAUS, PATRICIA J. 15862...................NIERENHAUSEN, LLOYD 33200..........................NOHAVA, DONALD J. 20817.............................NORD, DONALD M. 29335...................NORDQUIST, HARRIET J. 18847....NORDSTROM ESTATE, ELMER W. 23401......................NORGREN, GEORGE P. 29954.........................NORTON, DONALD J. 34637....................NYQUIST, MARJORIE M. 34005.........................O’CONNELL, CARRIE 14691..............................O’DONNELL, LYLA 28690..............O’FLANAGAN ESTATE, DON 32457..............................OGREN, JAMES C. 23073...........................OLSON, DONALD G. 32657.........................OLSON, DOUGLAS A. 22376..............................OLSON, EDWIN G. 33731..................................OLSON, GARY I. 25051.........................OLSON, HARLAND C. 13702...........................OLSON, HOWARD P. 24642..............................OLSON, JOANN C. 24943......................OLSON, KATHERINE E. 32685...............................OLSON, MICHAEL 33790..........................OLSON, MICHAEL D. 22854...........................OLSON, MILDRED F. 20618...........................OLSON, ROBERT W. 32283.............................OLSON, ROGER C. 12776...........................OLSON, VIRGINIA K. 2834............................OLSON, WALDEMAR 25358 ...........................OLSON, YVONNE L. 6231.................OLSON ESTATE, ELAINE M. 28118................................O’MALLEY, JOHN 34700.......................................O’NEIL, MIKE 28901..............................OPHUS, MICHAEL

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WNAXLP Acct. # Name 9387...............................OPPEL, GERALD F. 25788...................................ORME, RUTH J. 28856...................................ORR, VADAH C. 27420...........................OSBORN, NANCY J. 9328............................OSBORNE, DORIS E. 32521..................OSELL ESTATE, SHIRLEY 25977..............................OSGAR, MICHAEL 20931.............................OSLUND, LEON W. 16049..............................OSTBY, ARCHIE G. 33996........................OSTENSON, MELISSA 31436............................OSTENSON, TAMMI 31819.........................OSTROWSKI, BRUCE 34681.......................................OTIS, SUSAN 34881....................OUELLETTE, ROBERT J. 17955....................................PALM, DALE C. 28123................................PALMER, LOREN 1385.........................PALMSTEEN, CECIL C. 25012........................PARENT, KENNETH J. 32274..................PASCIAK SR., ROBERT A. 31040...........PASDERETZ ESTATE, EMIL G. 10716....................................PATSY, EMIL T. 34628..............................PATSY, ROBERT R. 15096...........................PECHMANN, JOS H. 14712.............................PECINA, ELMER E. 32488..................PEDERSON, RICHARD H. 34067.........PEDERSON ESTATE, PETER K. 19109...............................PEEL, ROBERT C. 33935..........................PENARD, LYNNETTE 13578..............................PEPERA, GEORGE 32243.................................PERRY, DAVID A. 26260.........................PETERS JR., CARL G. 27880.......................PETERSEN, DARYL W. 33755........................PETERSEN, JAMES A. 20232.............................PETERSEN, RAY E. 2085........PETERSEN ESTATE, MARTHA M. 21247.......................PETERSON, ETHEL W. 8088.......................PETERSON, GLADYS L. 9622............................PETERSON, JACK A. 34130.......................PETERSON, JAMES R. 18356............................PETERSON, JERRY 33931.............................PETERSON, JIM A. 31648...............................PETERSON, JO A. 30401............................PETERSON, LARRY 14161..........................PETERSON, LESTER 22300......................PETERSON, MARIAN V. 27607........................PETERSON, PANSY L. 20440.................PETERSON, REYNOLD W. 17369...................PETERSON, RICHARD A. 32774.....................PETERSON, ROBERT G. 34706.........................PETERSON, STACY J. 32927.........................PETERSON, TAMARA 14926....................PETERSON, WILLIAM C. 33729.....................PETERSON, WILLIAM J. 28733...........PETERSON ESTATE, DOREEN 8189............PETERSON ESTATE, HELEN L. 13921........PETERSON ESTATE, HENRY M. 23258. . . . .PETERSON ESTATE, MICHAEL T. 21870............PETERSON ESTATE, PAUL E. 32389............................PETITT, ROBERT C. 33811............................PETTIS, LUTHER R. 33816...............................PHILLIPS, WAYNE 6428.................................PIEPER, HAROLD 23692........................PIERCE, CLIFFORD C. 15716.........................PIERCE, RICHARD W. 32186.............................PIKUS, JEROME G. 17691.............................PIRKL, GERALD W. 33321..............................PLOSZAY, VICTOR 14696...........................PLOURDE, WILLIAM 33185......................................PLUTH, DAVE 33435......................POPE JR., MICHAEL R. 30992..............................POWERS, RICK D. 22390........................PRATHER, LORRAINE 32070..............................PREISLER, ETHEL 26069............................PRESTON, CHAS H. 32229........................PRESTON, JEANINNE 12679................................PREUS, DAVID H. 28034..................................PRICE, LARRY I. 9171...............................PRIEBE, BERNARD 30183..............................PRINGLE, JEANNE 32593..................PROVENCIAL, ROBERT J. 32338.......................................PRUNTY, TIM 30353...............................PUCKETT, TERRY 25845.....................................PUETZ, DAVID 33444......................................PULFER, R. L. 14578.............................QUAST, HAROLD J. 30933........................................QUEE, JACK 9013.............................QUIGLEY, JAMES B. 34774...........................RADMAN, GRACE E. 19796.....................RANDOLPH, LAURETTA 32051.......................RAPPLEY, WILLIAM C. 33057.........................RASMUSSEN, CLARA 20266........................RASSETT, FLORENCE 33982..........................RATHBONE, JOHN L. 33383......................................REED, JAMES 33997......................................REED, SUSAN 33492.............................REEVE, LORRAINE 33942..........................REIGOTTIE JR., BILL 34285....................REINECCIUS, ROGER E. 32277..........................REMLEY, VERNON A. 14439................................RESH, JOSEPH F. 34147...................................RHODES, JACK 8751............................RICHARD, HELEN M. 29900...............RICHARDSON, WILLIAM B. 29962.....................................RICHERT, J. D. 33801.........................RICHERT JR., JAMES 15367.........................RIDDELL, GERALD R. 21095. . . . . .RIDGEWOOD PROPERTIES INC. 29822..................................RIEDELL, EDITH 32422.............................RIEKEN, SCOTT M. 21670................................RILEY, DENNIS L. 12111...................................RILEY, EUGENE 31424...............RINDAL ESTATE, LLOYD M. 14226.........................RINGOLD, DOUGLAS


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

Notices/Employment opportunities

NOTICE - SIREN SANITARY DISTRICT TOWN OF SIREN BOARD MEETINGS

Burnett /Polk County deaths Burnett

Birdene G. Paquin, 89, Town of Oakland, died May 17, 2012. Jesse R. Priem, 59, Plymouth, Minn., died May 17, 2012.

Polk

Martina F. Maslow, 79, Frederic, died May 12, 2012. Lester W. Kurtz, 78, Town of Eureka, died May 13, 2012.

Irene M. Jorgensen, 91, Luck, died May 18, 2012. Suzanne R. Luke, 74, Town of Lincoln, died May 18, 2012. Lorraine H. Schultz, 83, Amery, died May 19, 2012.

The Siren Sanitary District will hold their monthly Board Meeting on Thurs., June 14, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Siren Town Hall. Immediately following the Sanitary District Meeting the Town of Siren will hold their monthly Board Meeting at approximately 6:45 p.m. The agenda will be posted. If you wish to be on the agenda, please call Mary Hunter, Clerk. Mary Hunter, Clerk, 715-349-5119 561672 41-42L WNAXLP

RN POSITION AVAILABLE

NOTICE OF POSITION OPENING UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

BUS DRIVERS WANTED

Part-Time Evenings and Overnight

Position: Unity School District is accepting applications for bus drivers. This position is for regular route drivers (morning and afternoon route). Requirements: Commercial driver’s license (CDL) with school bus endorsement required. Training and assistance to obtain license are available to interested applicants. Qualified applicants will be given first consideration. How to Apply: Qualified, interested persons should apply by sending a letter of interest, District application (available at www.unity.k12.wi.us), and letters of recommendation to: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator Unity School District 1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North Balsam Lake, WI 54810-7267 Deadline: June 15, 2012 E.O.E. - Unity School District does not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, race, color, national origin, religion, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual 561517 40-42L 30-32a,d orientation or physical, mental, emotional or learning disability.

Don’t Miss This Opportunity! Apply Today!

Please apply online at good-sam.com 750 Louisiana E. • St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 AA/EOE/M/F/VET/HANDICAP, DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE All Faiths Or Beliefs Welcome 562264 31a,d 42L

562190 31-32a-e 42-43L

NOTICE OF FORFEITURE OF FUNDS HELD BY POLK-BURNETT ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE UNLESS CLAIMED BY OWNER Pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 185.03(10), you are hereby notified that Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative, of Centuria, Wisconsin 54824, has in its possession unclaimed funds belonging to you. You can claim these funds by contacting the Cooperative and furnishing proof of your legal interest in such funds on or before

Acct. # Name 33405.............................ROBERTSON, ORV 34083.............................ROBOTTI, LUKE M. 4090..............................ROCKAWAY, LEWIS 30789.............................RODRIGUEZ, PAUL 17486...............................ROE, NORMAN C. 10532...........................ROEBEN, STELLA E. 16598......................ROESSLER, MARTIN D. 32834...............................ROGERS, CHUCK 32359....................................ROGERS, JEFF 34666....................................ROGERS, TOM 30311........................ROHRICHT, MICHAEL 33310.......................ROLLHEISER, DENNIS 18717.......................................RONNEI, E. F. 10166.........................RONYAK, WILLIAM T. 31067.....................................ROSE, ROBBY 28018...........................ROSENBUSH, JUNE 34334.........................................ROTH, JEFF 31992................................ROTT, JOSEPH L. 32607..................ROUND LAKE POW WOW 30723..........................ROWLAND, DAVID A. 34273.......................................RUD, DANIEL 34440.............................................RUD, KIM 32314....................................RUDE, LYLE W. 34027...............................RUDEEN, DENISE 33711...............................RUDEEN, LARRIE 30798...............................RUDESILL, DIANE 34169......................RUSSELL, DARLENE K. 25037.................................RYAN, JAMES D. 28620........................................SABO, GENE 30811....................SACRANIE, SHAZEEN S. 32066.......................................SAFE, WILLIS 21383.................SANDBECK, GREGORY N. 10783............................SANDBERG, IDA M. 28626...........................SANDERS, EUGENE 33837............................SANDVE, JAMES H. 32102.....................................SAROS, RUBY 30965................................SAUER, GEORGE 32097. . . .SAVAGE COMMUNICATIONS INC. 27019. . . . . .SAVSTROM ESTATE, LORENE E. 32805...................................SAX, ROGER G. 33592................SCANLON JR., WILLIAM L. 28848........................SCHAAK, PATRICIA A. 16452.......................SCHABERT, MYRON F. 31687..........SCHAFENACKER, ROBERT C. 20279...............................SCHAFFER, EBBA 32190......................SCHARBER, JUDITH A. 32107...............................SCHEDIN, GLENN 25695..........................SCHEITEL, BEVERLY 31881....................SCHEMBER, GEORGE F. 8643...........................SCHERLING, SIDNEY 29824................SCHILF ESTATE, MARIA A. 27640...............................SCHLAPPER, KIM 5436..................................SCHLIEF ESTATE 12434.......SCHMALZBAUER EST., JOHN J. 33118...........................SCHMIDT, DAVID M. 31441........................SCHMIDT, DENNIS W. 30804.......................SCHMIDT, DONALD C. 28553.....................SCHMIDT, GREGORY C. 28506................................SCHMIDT, KELLY 33083.......................SCHMITT, MICHAEL R. 34673....................SCHMOLL, WALLACE P. 15937..............SCHNEIDER, ELIZABETH A. 34354..................SCHNEIDER, MICHAEL J. 33126...............................SCHNELL, JERRY 33810.........................SCHOECK, DANNY J. 32698.......................SCHOLL, BRADLEY R. 31556..............................SCHOLL, JOANNE 29150........................SCHREINER, JOHN G. 6070.....................SCHUESSLER, ADELE G. 14502.....................SCHULTZ, BLANCHE A. 14040....................SCHULTZ, CLARENCE F. 23271.......................SCHULTZ, GENEVIEVE 11999.............................SCHULTZ, JOHN A. 30585............................SCHULTZ, ROBERT

September 4, 2012. You are further notified that unless you do claim such funds and provide satisfactory evidence of your right to receive the same by September 4, 2012, that these funds will be forfeited to the Cooperative. Published this 6th day of June, 2012.

UNCLAIMED CAPITAL CREDITS

Acct. # Name 31914...........................SCHULTZ, STANLEY 12596..................SCHUWEILER, JOSEPH J 16060...............SCHWARTEN, RICHARD D. 33340..........SCHWARTZBAUER, MICHAEL 30534...............SCHWARTZLOW, DORIS B. 31101.........................SCHWEITZER, DAVID 24742.................SCHWEITZER, DONALD J. 9696..................SCHWEPPE ESTATE, EMIL 19228........................SCHWORER, GLADYS 32582...........................SCOTT, RICHARD B. 29997............................SCOTT, RONALD M. 32785....................................SEARS, CATHY 1878........SEDERLUND ESTATE, HERBERT 33658...............................SEEVER, CHERYL 31206.................................SEIM, STEVEN J. 19202..............................SELVIG, ABNER O. 8342........................SENKLER, CHARLES F. 29788.......................SERMEUS, WILLIAM T. 30644.............................SEVERIN, ROLAND 32732..................SEVERSON, RAYMOND L. 18610..........................SHANLEY, CHARLES 12486...........................SHEARER, BRENDA 34442..............................SHEASBY, WENDY 31529........................SHELWICK, LEROY S. 33101.............................SHIELDS, HAROLD 28972...............................SHONG, JOHN M. 33023....................SHOWERS, MICHAEL C. 32223..........................SIBINSKI, PHILLIP J. 29274......................................SIECK, KEITH 13581...............................SIEVERT, ALVIN P. 31745........................SIGSWORTH, DENNIS 32357.......................SIGSWORTH, VERNON 31296............SIGSWORTH JR., GEORGE V. 22428.................................SILESKY, BARRY 20581.......................SIMMONS, GERALD E. 22785...................SIMMONS, RAYMOND D. 32498..................................SIMON, MILO E. 15964............SIMONSON ESTATE, NORMA 17704.......................SIMPSON, ROBERT W. 32115.....................................SIMS, NORMA 31221.................................SISCO, DONALD 32586........................SITTER ESTATE, A. W. 18868..........................SIVANICH, PETER W. 26304.............................SKINNER, JOHN V. 21739............................SKYDIVE OSCEOLA 19397............................SLAMA, JOSEPH G. 32916....................................SLATE, JAMES 32719.........................SLATHER, KIMBERLY 18244...................SLAUGHTER, LORRAINE 29754...............................SLAVIK, FRANCIS 25017...............SLEGL ESTATE, ESTHER L. 32986..........................SMITH, BARBARA E. 34300...........................SMITH, BARBARA P. 32978....................................SMITH, FRANK 30838................................SMITH, HELEN D. 30441...............................SMITH, JAMES R. 34428..................................SMITH, JOSEPH 22852............................SMITH, PATRICIA L. 33938............................SMITH, RICHARD L. 9461.......................SMITH ESTATE, AIDA C. 6966......................SMITH ESTATE, EARL G. 15734.............................SNAVELY, JOHN M. 29387...............................SNEEN, JAMES H. 26764.......................SNIPSTEAD, RICHARD 34535................................SNOREK, DUANE 27785....................SODERQUIST, RICHARD 32897.................................SOLINGER, TOM 34176......................SORSOLEIL, VIVIAN M. 32835.....................................SORUM, PAUL 9960.........................SOUDER, RICHARD G. 32341........................SOURDIFF, JERALD E. 22392.........................SOUTH, REBECCA S. 34499..........................SPAFFORD, JOHN R. 32733....................SPANGLER, DONALD D.

Acct. # Name 11769................................SPANGLER, RITA 32455...............................SPENGLER, MIKE 9464.................................SPERL, WINFRED 32619.....................................SPIES, KAREN 33542............................SPOUSTA, GARY G. 25492.........................SPRAGUE, DUANE A. 28213......................SPRINGER, BERTHA A. 28414........................SPRINGER, ROGER L. 10771......................SPRINGER BROTHERS 32872........ST. CROIX CTY. ABSTRACT CO. 33803..................ST. CROIX VALLEY BANK 7215.........................STACK ESTATE, OLIVE 23582...........................STADLER, ARBEL J. 28396..................................STADLER, JOEL 21007........................STARIHA, STANLEY R. 12637...................................STARUP BROS. 34045.......................STAUFFER, WENDY A. 33475.............................STEINES, DELORIS 18353.....................STENSLAND, CARROLL 15189............................STEPHAN, DARWIN 33893......................STERNER, MICHAEL D. 16590.........................STEVENS, ALBERT R. 33582.............................STEVENS, BERTHA 32895................STEVENS SR., THOMAS H. 32292.........STEWART ESTATE, LOWELL G. 33137................................STOCK, WILLIAM 34423............................STOFFEL, HARRIET 2060..................................STONE, LUCILLE 33835....................................STRAIT, PAULA 29430.......................STRANDLOF, WILLIAM 4921...............................STRENKE, ALBERT 22670...............STROMBERG, SUSANNE J. 12959...................STROMEN, SHERMAN K. 34190...............................STRUCK, JOEL R. 21296...............................STUB, ROBERT T. 33649.........................STUBER, ROBERT W. 30046...................................SUMMER DAZE 33881............................SUMMERIL, TERRY 33216...........................SWAGGER, CONNIE 12642...............................SWANK, DONALD 30837...........................SWANSON, BONNIE 32812............................SWANSON, DANIEL 7996..................SWANSON, LAWRENCE R. 4727.......................SWANSON, LUCILLE M. 32361................................SWANSON, MIKE 29012.................................SWANSON, O. H. 26712.......................SWEARINGEN, BOB C. 33752.....................SWENSON, ANDREW S. 17253.........................SWENSON, WILLARD 13532.....................SWIONTEK, ARTHUR R. 25235......................SWONGER, GERALD E. 33739....................SWONGER, TIMOTHY A. 30609......................SYCHOWSKI, JEROME 33968........................SYVERSON, RUSSELL 17553...........................TANGEN, ROBERT I. 33015..................................TATGE, IRENE L. 24050........................TAYLOR, BEATRICE S. 33016...........................TAYLOR, DONALD J. 31652...................................TAYLOR, IRENE 33261.........................TAYLOR, SHIRLEY M. 25374...............TAYLOR ESTATE, DARRELL 11913..................TEICHNER, RAYMOND B. 30953...................................TERRY, DENNIS 31812..............................TESMER, JOHN A. 31917.............................THESENGA, JON P. 30330............................THIEMER, DONALD 33407.........................THODE, ROXANNE L. 16730.........THOENNES ESTATE, NORMAN 30908..............................THOMAS, LEROY 33734.......................THOMAS, STEPHEN R. 26282........................THOMAS, WILLIAM A. 27647......................THOMPSON, CRAIG M. 33207.........................THOMPSON, DEBBIE 19434..........................THOMPSON, DON E.

Acct. # Name 23046........................THOMPSON, EUGENE 32598.......................THOMPSON, JERRY L. 11757.............................THOMPSON, M. M. 11867....................THOMPSON, MARVIN D. 31698.........................THOMPSON, STEVEN 20967...........................THOMSEN, ESTHER 32482.....................THOMSEN, WARREN A. 30632....................THORNBURG, BETTY R. 11146......................THORNBURG, JOSEPH 16694......................THORNTON, JAMES O. 20128...............THRONGARD, MICHAEL B. 10830................................THRUN, ROBERT 33241...........................TIDMAN, RAYMOND 28395..................................TIETZ, MARK H. 14997............................TOTH, LEONARD E. 32018.................................TOTTEN, WM. M. 24002.........TOURTILLOTTE, ESTAISABELL 34416...........................TOURVILLE, LORI A. 9572........................TRAVIS, ELIZABETH D. 31328.....................................TRI, KENNETH 33512...........................TSCHIDA, JAMES G. 29560...................TSCHIDA, MARCELLA C. 33242....................TUNGSETH, THOMAS G. 29855.........................TURNER, GEORGE B. 32637........................TURNER SR., JOHN L. 33031.............................TURNQUIST, GARY 33003..................TURNVALL, MITCHELL B. 34426.................................TVETEN, DONNA 12481...................TWIN CITY SALVAGE PL. 19851............................ULRICH, EVELYN G. 7003............................................UTOFT, ALF 14641......................UTOFT ESTATE, EVALD 16488............................VALLANT, BENIGNA 11858................VAN DE WALKER, ESTLEO 31426..........................VAN NEVEL, GARY F. 32921............................VAN OSS, THOMAS 33767...........................VAN PELT, CRAIG W. 28051....................VAN RUDEN, DENNIS M. 33665........VAN RUDEN ESTATE, SALFRED 17560.....................VAN STONE, DEBORAH 33738...............VAN VONDEREN, JEFFREY 33531.............................VANGEN, LARRY F. 33889....................VELAZQUEZ, MAUREEN 30358........................VERNON, RICHARD L. 17223..................VETTE ESTATE, FRANK J. 32995...................................VILLA, ANDRES 1086........................VOGT ESTATE, MARTIN 31731.....................................VOLK, JANICE 14245.......................................WADE, REBA 34321..............................WADE, ROBERT L. 14452..............WAHLSTRAND, HAROLD D. 17200.............................WAKEMEUP, FRED 27294......................WALBERG, FLORINE F. 30368..........................WALBERG, VERNON 30799..............................WALDELAND, JON 28171..................WALDRON, DOROTHY M. 32048......................WALKER, DEBORAH L. 34541..............................WALKER, JOSEPH 32595...............................WALKER, TINA M. 14864.............................WALLACE, JENNIE 34150....................WALLANDER, RICHARD 17465............................WALSH, GERALD A. 33815.......................WALTERS, GEORGE F. 34057.............................WALTHER, DENISE 17324.............................WANG, WARREN L. 33140........................................WARD, PETE 25572...........................WARLAND, JOHN L. 33196...................WASHBURN, PATRICK D. 31804...........................WATSON, CHARLES 33307..........................WATSON, DANIEL W. 7634.................................WATSON, ELOISE 34438.......................WATTERS, ROBERT N. 29120........................................WEEKS, RAY 20454........................WEGNER, WILLIAM C.

562346 42L

WNAXLP Acct. # Name 32572.......................WEHKING, KATHLEEN 23785...............................WEIK, DONALD R. 32067..........................WEISZEL, ANTHONY 25697....................WELLMAN, MICHAEL A. 28296...........................WELS, CHARLES W. 24108.......WENDELSCHAFER, DONALD W. 32374..........................WENDLANDT, MARK 23621...........................WENDT, HOWARD F. 27980.................................WENNER, LOUIS 32335..........................WERNLUND, BRENT 24122....................WERTSCHNIG, BETTE J. 31924........................WESNER, JOSEPH W. 12514...........................WESTLUND, VALE I. 9660..................................WESTPHAL, W. E. 33468...................................WHEELER, JOE 32808....................................WHITBY, CARL 31913....................................WHITE, TRACY 13478..............WHITE ESTATE, DONALD A. 32540...............WHITESIDE ESTATE, MARY 6012.........................WICHELMAN, WALTER 23672........................WICKER, WILLIAM M. 29464........................WICKLUND, MARY M. 6175...................WIECHMANN, PEARLE M. 10587...............WIENCEK ESTATE, BRUNO 9014................................WIENKE, ARTHUR 30425..........................WILCHER JR., JOHN 15309......................WILDHAGEN, DAISY B. 5344..............................WILLE, GEORGE W. 34069...............................WILLES, MARK H. 25924..................................WILLIAMS, C. D. 31695..................................WILLIAMS, C. T. 32092........................WILLIAMS, DANIEL H. 33103........................WILLIAMS, GLORIA A. 29044.......................WILLIAMS, JOSEPH B. 21130......................WILLIAMS, LORRAYNE 32642.......................WILLIAMS, MARLYS A. 17134.........WILLIAMS ESTATE, WILBUR R. 33677.............................WILSON, MICHAEL 32147........................WILSON, RICHARD S. 90426..........................WILSON, ROBERT B. 34382..................................WILSON, ROBIN 30686................................WILSON JR., TED 34543................WILTERMUTH, PATRICK G. 32364.....................WINCHELL, ROLAND H. 21327...............WINEGARDEN, MARCELLA 22207........................WINSLOW, ERNEST L. 33786.........................WINSLOW, TRACIE L. 12267.........WINSLOW ESTATE, NEVILLE J. 11224..........................WINTER, GEORGE A. 9416..................................WINTON, CRANE 34039.....................WOHLFEIL, WILLIAM C. 31910..............................WOLDEN, SIDNEY 31658...............................WOOD, ELMER L. 32675.................WOODARD, DOROTHY M. 32939...........................WOODS & ROBISON 32559...............................WORKMAN, JO C. 29213....................................WRUCK, GARY 29539............................WULF, JACKLYN M. 28974.......................YAEGER, RICHARD M. 33036.....................YANKOVEC, KATHLEEN 31402.................................YATES, MARNEY 32937...............................YERKE, CAROL A. 21107.........................YOUNG, BERNICE M. 33504................................YOUNG, JODIE P. 34213............................YOUNG, LESTER A. 32963.........................YOUNG, WAYLEND J. 23677.........................YURICK, STEPHEN J. 32736................................ZAHLER GARY A. 15977.................ZARICH JR. ESTATE, SAM 23768..............................ZEHM, ROBERT L. 4232......................ZETTERBERG, ROSALIE 27820..............................ZEUG, EDWARD F. 29776.....................................ZIESKA, RETA 33534................................ZILLMER, ALLAN


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

MINUTES OF THE

RESOLUTION 19-12

RESOLUTION TO DISSOLVE TRANSITION COMMITTEE TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK:

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, the Budget Repair Bill, 2011 Wisconsin Act 10, and as amended by the State of Wisconsin biennial Budget Bill, 2011 Wisconsin Act 32, presented Polk County with state mandates to address certain personnel issues; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors created the Transition Committee, an ad hoc committee which was charged with the purpose of developing new county personnel policies regarding work rules and a grievance procedure in conformity with the state mandates contained the Budget Repair Bill; and WHEREAS, the Transition Committee caused to be developed and provided recommendations on the Workplace Discipline and Safety Appeal Policy (Grievance Policy), the Interim Personnel Policy and the Interim Administrative Policy; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors has adopted such county personnel policies, successfully responding to the personnel issues raised in the Budget Repair Bill; and WHEREAS, having reviewed its charge and having determined that its responsibilities have been fulfilled, the Transition Committee has recommended dissolution of the committee; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Polk County Policy 010, Duties and Responsibilities of Governing Committees, the Personnel Committee has the responsibility as a standing committee to provide policy direction, advice and recommendations with respect to the development and implementation of personnel policies. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors dissolves the Transition Committee. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: May 15, 2012. Submitted and sponsored by: Kris Kremer-Hartung, Herschel Brown, Jay Luke and Patricia Schmidt. Reviewed only by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 19-12: Resolution To Dissolve Transition Committee by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: May 23, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: May 23, 2012 Res. 19-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 19-12, Resolution To Dissolve Transition Committee. Motion (Masters/Hartung) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote. Motion to approve Resolution 19-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

MAY 15, 2012 - 6:30 p.m.

Chairman Johnson called the regular May 15, 2012, meeting of the Polk County Board of Supervisors to order at 6:30 p.m. Chairman Johnson recognized Carole Wondra, County Clerk, for purposes of receiving evidence on proper notice. County Clerk informed the County Board that notice of the agenda was properly posted in three public buildings, published in the county's legal paper and posted on the county Web site the week of May 7, 2012. Chairman Johnson recognized Corporation Counsel, Jeffrey Fuge, for purposes of receiving legal opinion with respect to sufficiency of notice. The County Board received the verbal opinion of Corporation Counsel that the advance written notice posted and published as described by the County Clerk satisfied the applicable provisions of Wisconsin Open Meetings Law and notice provisions of County Board Rules of Order. Chairman Johnson recognized the County Clerk for purposes of taking roll call. The County Clerk took roll: 22 members present. Chairman Johnson announced that the Chair had granted Supvr. H. Johansen leave and that his absence was excused. Chairman Johnson led the Pledge of Allegiance. Supvr. N. Johnson led the Board in time for reflection. Chairman Johnson informed the Board that Resolution I, Resolution To Authorize Grant Of Easement To Lakeland Telecommunications Across Polk County Fairgrounds, was withdrawn from the order of business. Motion (Schmidt/Brown) to approve the consent agenda, as published and with the noted withdrawal of Resolution I. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion approved by unanimous voice vote. Time was given for public comments. There was no presentation given on the Day Friends Program. Chairman Johnson presented the Chairman's Report. Chairman Johnson recognized Maggie Wickre, Finance Manager, for purposes of receiving the County Finance Report. The County Board received the County Finance Report presented by the Finance Manager. Chairman Johnson recognized County Administrator Frey for receipt of the County Administrator's Report. The County Board received the County Administrator's Report presented by the County Administrator. Chairman Johnson presented the list of Supervisor appointments and requested any changes to the published list. Supvr. Kremer-Hartung requested her removal from the list as prospective appointee to the ADRC Board. Supvr. Magnafici requested self-nomination as prospective appointee to the ADRC Board. Supvr. Brown requested self-nomination as prospective appointee to WestCAP Representative. Chairman Johnson granted requests for self-nomination. Chairman Johnson called for a ballot vote with respect to the appointment to WestCAP, noting the challenge to offered appointee as Supvr. Jepsen, incumbent. Vote on ballot resulted with Supvr. Jepsen receiving nomination for appointment: Supvr. Jepsen receiving 12 votes; Supvr. Brown receiving 10 votes. Supvr. Masters requested self-nomination as appointee to the LEPC. Supvr. O'Connell requested removal from consideration as prospective appointee to the LEPC. No other changes were offered to the published list. Motion (Kienholz/Brown) to confirm the Chairman's appointments with the noted changes in nomination for appointment. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson recognized County Administrator Frey for the purposes of considering confirmation of appointments offered by the County Administrator. County Administrator Frey presented the offer of appointments as noticed, noting there were more to come. Motion (Masters/Jepsen) to confirm the appointments offered by County Administrator. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Chairman Johnson called for a 15-minute recess. The Board stood in recess at 7:45 p.m. Chairman Johnson called the Board to order. The Board reconvened at 8:00 p.m. Chairman Johnson recognized the respective committee chairpersons for purposes of receiving the committee reports. The Board received the committee reports as noticed.

RESOLUTION 20-12

RESOLUTION TO INCREASE THE 2012 BUDGET FOR PERSONNEL APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE LIME QUARRY

RESOLUTION 18-12

RESOLUTION TO AUTHORIZE POLK COUNTY TO PURSUE WDNR TRM FUNDING COUNTY OF POLK WHEREAS, the Polk County Land and Water Resources Department desires to receive Targeted Runoff Management (TRM) grant funding from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) pursuant to ss. 281.65 or 281.66, Wis. Stats., and chs. NR151, 153 and 155, Wis. Adm. Code, for the purpose of implementing measures to control nonpoint source water pollution; and WHEREAS, the Landowner agrees to contribute the local share (also called the “match”) needed for projects that are ultimately grant funded by the WDNR. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Polk County Conservationist to submit a signed grant application to the WDNR; and The Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Polk County Conservationist to submit a signed Environmental Hazard Assessment form to the WDNR, if applicable; and The Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Polk County Conservationist to sign a grant agreement between Polk County and the WDNR; and The Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Polk County Conservationist to submit signed quarterly and final report forms to the WDNR; and The Polk County Board of Supervisors authorizes the Polk County Conservationist to submit signed grant reimbursement requests to the WDNR. Funding amount: $0.00. Funding source: Staff Allocation LWRD Budget. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: May 15, 2012. Approved as to form: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. Submitted and sponsored by: Polk County Land Conservation Committee: Dean Johansen Herschel Brown, Larry Jepsen and Ted Johnson. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Malia Malone for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 18-12: Resolution To Authorize Polk County To Pursue WDNR TRM Funding, County Of Polk by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Res. 18-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 18-12, Resolution To Authorize Polk County To Pursue WDNR TRM Funding. Motion (Jepsen/D. Johansen) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson recognized Land and Water Director, Tim Ritten, to address the resolution. Land and Water Director Ritten addressed the resolution. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion to approve Resolution 18-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

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TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, the Polk County Lime Quarry provides essential materials for the support of the agricultural industry in Polk County as well as materials for road construction and recreational trails; and WHEREAS, the demand for agricultural materials has greatly and consistently exceeded expectations from that level forecast at the time the 2012 budget was prepared; and WHEREAS, this high demand for agricultural materials will result in greater revenues from their sale, but also will require additional employees to meet this demand; and WHEREAS, these additional revenues can be applied to hiring part-time labor to assist with meeting this demand without detrimental effect on the overall Polk County budget. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors amends the 2012 budget for the Polk County Lime Quarry, follows: Under Revenues, Public Charge for Services, strike “$525,300” and insert “$563,300”; and Under Expenditures, Personnel, strike “$209,008” and insert “$247,008.” Amend the totals accordingly. Funding amount and source: Lime quarry revenues. Finance Committee Advised: May 9, 2012. Finance Committee Recommendation: Outstanding Upon Distribution to County Board. Polk County Lime Quarry Committee: May 9, 2012. Polk County Highway Committee Recommendation: Outstanding Upon Distribution to County Board. Date Submitted to County Board: May 4, 2012, for the May 15, 2012, meeting. Effective date: Upon Passage. Submitted by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Malia Malone for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 20-12: Resolution To Increase The 2012 Budget For Personnel Appropriations for The Lime Quarry by a unanimous voice vote. Dated: May 23, 2012 William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: May 23, 2012 Res. 20-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 20-12, Resolution To Increase The 2012 Budget For Personnel Appropriations For The Lime Quarry. Motion (D. Johansen/Jepsen) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson recognized Lime Quarry Manager, Dave Peterson, to address the resolution. Lime Quarry Manager Peterson addressed the resolution. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion to approve Resolution 20-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 21-12, Resolution Funding For Jail Literacy And Phase Out Of The Polk County Library Federation. Motion (Brown/Hartung) to approve said resolution. Motion (Nelson/Kienholz) to postpone action on Resolution 21-12 until the June 19, 2012, County Board meeting. Chairman Johnson called for a roll call vote. Motion to postpone until June carried by a roll call vote of 12 Yes/10 No. (Voting Yes: Supvrs. Kienholz, Caspersen, Engel, Moriak, Luke, Nelson, Jepsen, O'Connell, Bergstrom, N. Johnson, Cockroft and Wm. Johnson. Voting No: Supvrs. Brown, D. Johansen, Schmidt, Edgell, Masters, Scoglio, Stroebel, Magnafici, Kremer-Hartung and Arcand.) Consideration on Resolution 21-12 postponed until June 19, 2012, meeting. Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 22-12, Resolution To Act On Offer Of Endeavors Adult Development Center To Modify Terms Of Adult Development Center Lease Agreement For 2012 (Accept or Reject Offer). Motion (Masters/Kienholz) to approve said resolution. Motion (Kienholz/ Jepsen) to postpone action on Resolution 22-12 until the June 19, 2012, County Board meeting. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion to postpone until June carried by unanimous voice vote. Consideration on Resolution 2212 postponed until June 19, 2012, meeting.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29

RESOLUTION 23-12

for a comparable period. The employee relations director may also authorize an advance in sick leave not to exceed five days for such an employee.

RESOLUTION TO AMEND 2012 BUDGET - AUTHORIZATION OF DESIGNATION, CARRYOVER, TRANSFER AND REAPPROPRIATION OF SPECIFIED FUNDS FROM 2011 TO 2012

Renumber the following sections accordingly. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Polk County Personnel Committee: May 10, 2012. Polk County Personnel Committee Recommendation: Outstanding Upon Distribution to County Board. Date Submitted to County Board: May 4, 2012, for the May 15, 2012, meeting. Submitted by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Malia Malone for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 24-12: Resolution To Allow Higher Initial Leave Accruals For Recruitment Of Midcareer Professionals by a voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: May 23, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: May 23, 2012 Res. 24-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 24-12, Resolution To Allow Higher Initial Leave Accruals For Recruitment Of Midcareer Professionals. Motion (Brown/Luke) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson recognized County Administrator Frey for the purpose of addressing said resolution. County Administrator Frey addressed said resolution. Motion (Scoglio/Schmidt) to amend Resolution 24-12 by replacing the wording of line 16 “of two years' experience” to “of 10 years' experience.” Chairman Johnson called for roll call vote. Motion to amend Resolution 24-12 failed in a roll call vote of 5 Yes/17 No. (Voting Yes: Supvrs. Schmidt, Edgell, Scoglio, O'Connell and N. Johnson. Voting No: Supvrs. Brown, D. Johansen, Kienholz, Caspersen, Engel, Masters, Moriak, Luke, Nelson, Stroebel, Magnafici, Kremer-Hartung, Jepsen, Bergstrom, Arcand, Cockroft and Wm. Johnson.) Motion (Hartung/Kienholz) to amend Resolution 24-12 by replacing the wording of line 16 “of two years' experience to “of five years' experience.” Chairman Johnson called for roll call vote. Motion failed in a roll call vote of 9 Yes/13 No. (Voting Yes: Supvrs. Schmidt, Edgell, Masters, Scoglio, Moriak, Kremer-Hartung, Jepsen, O'Connell and N. Johnson. Voting No: Supvrs. Brown, D. Johansen, Kienholz, Caspersen, Engel, Luke, Nelson, Stroebel, Magnafici, Bergstrom, Arcand, Cockroft and Wm. Johnson). Motion to approve Resolution 24-12, with no changes, carried by voice vote. Resolution adopted.

TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: WHEREAS, events occur after the adoption of the Annual Budget that affect various program activities and their appropriations for a given budget year; and WHEREAS, some of the programs, projects and activities that were planned for the 2011 budget year did not take place, were not completed or are ongoing, and it is appropriate and necessary to carry over the appropriation for same into the next budget year; and WHEREAS, the Finance Manager has compiled a list designating those programs, projects, activities and corresponding 2011 funds that should be carried forward and reappropriated in the 2012 budget; and WHEREAS, the Finance Committee and the County Administrator have reviewed the requests and recommend that the designation carryover and reappropriation requests be approved; and WHEREAS Wisconsin statutes and county policies authorize and require that the county board take official action to authorize the designation, carryover and reappropriation of funds; and WHEREAS, sound financial practice requires that such carryover designations be recorded in the official books of the County; and WHEREAS, any additional items or adjustments that may be required at the completion of the County's external audit will be brought to the County Board in a separate resolution at the conclusion of the fieldwork of the external audit. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Polk County Board of Supervisors that the following appropriations from the contingency fund in 2011 that were unexpended on December 31, 2011, be assigned and reappropriated for the year ending December 31, 2012, and that the 2012 budget be amended accordingly: Employee Relations: $20,000 remaining from the $20,000 appropriation for professional services for a compensation study; and Department of Administration: $18,249 remaining from the $20,000 appropriation for professional services for new financial software. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the following appropriations from the General Fund that were unexpended on December 31, 2011, be assigned and reappropriated for the year ending December 31, 2012, and that the 2012 budget be amended accordingly: Law Enforcement: $77,310 for professional services for communications software maintenance; and

RESOLUTION 25-12

Buildings: $9,000 to the county building equipment replacement account for capital equipment for a vehicle purchase. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the adopted 2011 budget for the Public Health Department bioterrorism account be amended as follows: Under Expenditures, Personnel, strike “$128,777” and insert “$152,927” and amend the totals accordingly.

AMEND TELECOMMUNICATION TOWERS, ANTENNAS AND RELATED FACILITIES ORDINANCE WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors previously adopted the Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance on January 26, 1999, by Resolution 4-99 and amended December 16, 2003, by Resolution 156-03; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Land Information Committee held a public hearing on May 2, 2012, and approved the Ordinance as amended and recommends adoption by the Polk County Board of Supervisors. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors hereby approves the following amendment to the Polk County Telecommunication Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance (addition in italics) Article IX A.2.f Copies of letters informing contiguous landowners by certified mail and class 2 publication of notice in the County's newspaper of record as appointed by the County Board. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Submitted and sponsored by the Land Information Committee: Kim A. O’Connell, Craig Moriak, Herschel Brown, Warren Nelson and James Edgell. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Malia Malone for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 25-12: Resolution To Amend Telecommunication Towers, Antennas And Related Facilities Ordinance by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: May 23, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: May 23, 2012 Res. 25-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 25-12 Resolution to Amend Telecommunications Towers, Antennas and Related Facilities Ordinance. Motion (O'Connell/Moriak) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson recognized Supvr. O'Connell for purposes of addressing said resolution. Supvr. O'Connell addressed said resolution. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion to approve Resolution 25-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the remaining capital project fund balance from the 2008 bond issue of $1,767.94 be transferred to the debt service account in the General Fund and that the 2012 budget be amended appropriately. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Finance Manager is directed to record such information in the official books of the County for the year ended December 31, 2011, and for the year ending December 31, 2012, as may be required. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the County Clerk caused to be published in conformity with state statutes a Class 1 notice of amendment to the 2012 budget as herein authorized, in the Inter-County Leader within 10 days following adoption. Funding amount and source: Carries over the amounts specified from the 2011 budget to the 2012 budget and amends the 2012 annual budget as stated. Date Finance Committee Advised: May 9, 2012. Finance Committee Recommendation: Outstanding Upon Distribution to County Board. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication pursuant to Wisconsin Statute Section 65.90(5)(a). Date Submitted to County Board: Distributed on May 4, 2012, for the May 15, 2012, meeting. Submitted by Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Malia Malone for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 23-12: Resolution To Amend 2012 Budget - Authorization Of Designation, Carryover, Transfer And Reappropriation Of Specified Funds From 2011 To 2012 by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: May 23, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: May 23, 2012 Res. 23-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 23-12, Resolution To Amend 2012 Budget - Authorization Of Designation, Carryover, Transfer And Reappropriation Of Specified Funds From 2011 To 2012. Motion (Masters/Schmidt) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson recognized County Administrator Frey for the purpose of addressing said resolution. County Administrator Frey addressed said resolution. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote. Motion to approve Resolution 23-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 26-12

RESOLUTION TO AMEND THE PURCHASING POLICY (POLICY 912) FOR AUCTION AND MOTOR FUEL PURCHASES TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK:

RESOLUTION 24-12

RESOLUTION TO ALLOW HIGHER INITIAL LEAVE ACCRUALS FOR RECRUITMENT OF MIDCAREER PROFESSIONALS TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY BOARD OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, the policy of Polk County is to attract and retain high-quality employees to provide the most efficient and effective service to citizens; and WHEREAS, current policy allows new employees one week annual leave after six months and an annual leave accrual of two weeks per year after one year and a sick leave accrual of one day per month; and WHEREAS, although this accrual rate is appropriate for most new employees, prospective employees may include midcareer professionals who in current employment have far higher annual leave accrual rates and a sick leave balance; and WHEREAS, annual leave accrual rate and the availability of sick leave are significant considerations in deciding whether to accept a position; and WHEREAS, it is appropriate to allow the hiring authority some flexibility in authorizing a higher accrual rate while maintaining internal consistency with other County employees. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that Polk County Board of Supervisors amends the Interim Administrative Policy, as follows: Page 4, after paragraph 7(f), insert a new paragraph to read: g. Initial benefits. The employee relations director may authorize a higher annual leave accrual rate for a new employee who has a minimum of two years' experience in a similar position with another employer. This accrual rate may not exceed the lesser of the annual leave accrual rate in that employee's previous position or the accrual rate he or she would have received had he or she been employed by Polk County

562422 42L

Ladies and Gentlemen: WHEREAS, the policy of Polk County is to purchase necessary goods and services at the lowest possible price with the greatest transparency and opportunity for competition; and WHEREAS, purchase of used equipment through auction can provide significant savings but also incurs some risk relating to the purchase of faulty equipment; and WHEREAS, adequate steps can be taken to minimize this risk through the use of third-party inspections; and WHEREAS, the regular sealed bid process does not necessarily result in the lowest price for motor fuels due to price volatility and limited number of vendors willing to participate in a sealed bid process; and WHEREAS, fuel is an interchangeable commodity for which the lowest price can be determined easily at the time of purchase ensuring the lowest cost. THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors amends Policy 912 (Purchasing Policy), as follows: Page 11, amend the first paragraph in the section “auctions” as follows: Purchasing agents may purchase goods at auction only if the vendor offers protection against purchasing defective or erroneously described merchandise, or prior inspection of merchandise, and that or if the vendor allows for refunds, if necessary, after a physical inspection of the goods received. If the vendor does not allow for refunds or offer protection against purchasing defective or erroneously described merchandise, then the purchasing agent must obtain a prior third-party inspection for all goods with estimated value greater than $7,500. If the estimated value is less than $15,000, the results of this inspection may be transmitted verbally to the purchasing agent; if the estimated value is greater than $15,000 the results of this inspection must be in writing and include a review of all mechanical systems, analysis of oils and fluids for motorized equipment, evaluation of service records and an overall determination that the goods are as described. Page 11, after “Auctions” insert a new paragraph to read:


PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - JUNE 6, 2012

Notices/Employment opportunities

Eligible applicants should be culturally competent and respectful of Native American beliefs and values. Full job description available upon request. Native American Preference Employer. Please mail or fax your resume to the St. Croix Tribal Health Clinic, attention Health Director.

CESA #11 HEAD START

Polk County Early Learning Center To be considered for an interview, applicants MUST submit an agency application along with references, letters of recommendation, transcripts and verification of degree/license.

TEACHER

QUALIFICATIONS Associate Degree in Early Childhood Education required. Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education and a DPI teaching license preferred. RESPONSIBILITIES Provide educational services to 3-year-olds (may include some 4- or 5-year-olds) in a classroom setting, home visits and leadership to teaching team. HOURS 40 hrs./wk., 186 days/yr. WAGE RATE Associate Degree: $11.96/hr. 4-Year Degree: $13.12/hr. DEADLINE TO APPLY Thursday, June 14, 2012, 4 p.m. INTERVIEWS IN TURTLE LAKE Monday, June 25, 2012 To obtain an application, detailed job description or for more information on other employment opportunities, please visit our Web site at www.cesa11.k12.wi.us/hs/Employment.cfm, call Head Start Central Office at 715-986-2020 or visit your local Job Service Center. Please send application and credentials to: CESA #11 Head Start Attn.: Human Resources 225 Ostermann Drive Turtle Lake, WI 54889 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

561792 30-31a,d 41-42L

562652 42-43L 32-33a

562650 42L WNAXLP

We are growing!! Join a dynamic team that is focused on person-centered health care.

Application for retail Class B license to sell intoxicating liquors and malt beverages with no seating limit restrictions, to the Town Board, Town of Siren, Burnett County, Wisconsin. The undersigned: Yourchuck’s Video Inc. Joseph Yourchuck, President Amanda Yourchuck, Vice President JoAnn Yourchuck, Secretary/Treasuer 24467 Hwy. 35/70 North Siren, WI 54872 Hereby makes application for Class B beverages and intoxicating liquor. License to be used from July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, at the place of business located at: Lakeview Event Center 24467 Hwy. 35/70 North Section 5 Siren, WI 54872 Dated May 31, 2012 Mary Hunter, Clerk Town of Siren

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT

562588 42r,L

MOTOR FUELS lowest price available at the time of purchase. At least three vendors should be contacted and either a price quote or a refusal to bid noted in the bidding documentation. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Finance Committee Advised: May 9, 2012. Finance Committee Recommendation: Outstanding Upon Distribution to County Board. Polk County Highway Committee: May 7, 2012. Date Submitted to County Board: May 4, 2012, for the May 15, 2012, meeting. Effective date: Upon Passage. Submitted and sponsored by: Marvin Caspersen, Dean Johansen, Craig Moriak and Tom Magnafici. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Malia Malone for Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on May 15, 2012, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 26-12: Resolution To Amend The Purchasing Policy (Policy 912) For Auction And Motor Fuel Purchases by a unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: May 23, 2012 Dated: May 23, 2012 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk.

May 25, 2012 Job Title: Fifth-Grade Teacher Job Description: 100% FTE Qualifications: Appropriate Wisconsin Certification: Elementary Education Requirements: Elementary experience preferred. Individual should have the skills to teach in an active, hands-on and student-centered approach. Background of teaching with guided reading, using a balanced literacy approach desired. Having the knowledge to differentiate instruction is a must. Being comfortable utilizing technology, including iPads and interactive boards, during a lesson is highly desired. Ability to work as a team is necessary. How to Apply: Send letter of application, resume, credentials (three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by June 15, 2012. Previous applicants for our 4thgrade position need not reapply, as your paperwork will be considered. Contact: Brad Jones, Principal Grantsburg Middle School 500 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2455 The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap. 562278 42-43L

as assignee of The RiverBank, a Minnesota banking corporation, P.O. Box 188 304 Cascade Street Osceola, Wisconsin 54020 Plaintiff, vs. Ashley L. Cross, a/k/a Ashley L. Abrams 463 Lookout Lane St. Croix Falls, WI 54024, Jordan A. Cross 463 Lookout Lane St. Croix Falls, WI 54024, Bank of America, National Association a/k/a Bank of America 101 South Tryon Street Charlotte, NC 28202, U.S. Bank National Association a/k/a U.S. Bank 425 Walnut Street Cincinnati, Ohio 45202, Citibank, National Association f/k/a Citibank (South Dakota), N.A. 701 East 60th Street North Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57104, John Doe, Mary Roe and XYZ Corporation, Defendants. Case No. 11CV632 Case Type: 30404 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that by virtue of that certain Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law, Order for Judgment and Judgment entered and filed in the above-entitled action on April 27, 2012, the Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell the following described real property at public auction as follows: DAY/DATE/TIME: Thurs., June 28, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to Sheriff at sale in certified funds, with the balance due and owing on the date of confirmation of the sale by the Court. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 17 OF SMITH’S ADDITION TO THE VILLAGE OF OSCEOLA ACCORDING TO THE RECORDED PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTER OF DEEDS, POLK COUNTY, WISCONSIN. (For Informational Purposes Only: Plaintiff believes that the property address is 504 Seminole Avenue, Osceola, Wisconsin.) Dated this 7th day of May, 2012. Peter Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI THIS INSTRUMENT WAS DRAFTED BY: ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 651-439-2951 Garth G. Gavenda/#15829

Res. 26-12 - Chairman Johnson called to the floor Resolution 26-12 Resolution To Amend The Purchasing Policy (Policy 912) For Auction And Motor Fuel Purchases. Motion (Caspersen/Masters) to approve said resolution. Chairman Johnson recognized County Administrator Frey for the purpose of addressing said resolution. County Administrator Frey addressed said resolution. Chairman Johnson called for voice vote. Motion to approve Resolution 26-12 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted. Chairman Johnson recognized each supervisor for the purpose of receiving Supervisor's Reports. The Board received Supervisor Reports. Chairman Johnson requested motion to adjourn. Motion (Luke/Nelson) to adjourn. Chairman Johnson called for a voice vote. Motion to adjourn carried by unanimous voice vote. The Polk County Board of Supervisors stood adjourned at 9:10 p.m.

STATE OF WISCONSIN COUNTY OF POLK

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) )

I, Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk for Polk County, do hereby certify that the foregoing minutes are a true and correct copy of the County Board Proceedings of the Polk County Board of Supervisors Session held on May 15, 2012. Carole T. Wondra Polk County Clerk

561668 WNAXLP

APPLICATION FOR LICENSE

(May 30, June 6, 13) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Royal Credit Union, a federal credit union, 200 Riverfront Terrace Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54703,


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

Siren Lions kids fi fisshing contest

The weigh-in station was the place to be at the annual Siren Lions Club Fishing Contest at the Clam Lake Narrows on Sunday, June 3. Boats started coming in off the lake as the contest’s noon deadline neared, and young anglers produced an impressive amount of fish in the alloted three-hour time period mostly northerns and crappies. Participants fished from the shore on both sides of Hwy. 70 where Upper and Lower Clam lakes meet. Zach Bowen, who lives in Illinois, (photo lower left) found the fishing in Wisconsin to his liking. A young girl eyed the trophies before the awards were handed out (photo below). The Lions Club provided free brats and refreshments for the kids and Mike Henricksen of Big Mike’s sporting goods store at the Narrows helps produce the event each year. – Photos by Gary King

La Crosse Promise program aims to benefit students and community by Maureen McCollum Wisconsin Public Radio LA CROSSE - A La Crosse group wants to make it more affordable and easier for students to receive education after high school, while at the same time improving the area economically. The initiative is called the La Crosse Promise. It involves city and county officials and the area’s higher education and business leaders. It will unfold in two phases. First, organizers will open “future centers” this fall in the district’s high schools. Staff will try to increase the number of students that

go on to postsecondary education and will help families access scholarships. La Crosse Promise Interim Director Jerry Kember says high school students will be better prepared for universities, technical colleges or cosmetology schools, “What I would like to see in the future of La Crosse students is to get a great education after high school and then return to La Crosse so their children will receive the same benefit when they were in school.” For the program’s second phase, organizers want to provide scholarships to families who pledge to live in the city of La Crosse. Essentially, the longer a student

lives in the district, the more money he or she could receive. La Crosse County Administrator Steve O’Malley says in turn, middle and low-income families will redevelop the city’s core neighborhoods “so that we can capture new tax base, reinvestment that’s not

happening now through education as a means for meeting the needs of students and families and meeting their expectation for the future.” Organizers are still unsure what the program’s final price tag will be.

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Music on the Overlook

Roe Family Singers musician Adam Wirtzfeld drew lots of attention with his accomplished saw playing on Friday.

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Derek Shores and 9-month-old nephew A.J. get ready for some music in downtown St. Croix Falls on Friday, June 1. – Photos by Greg Marsten

This duo of dancing gals seemed to enjoy the Dancers of all ages and styles made the Music on the Overlook kickoff a rhythmic Roe Family Singers at the 2012 Music on the Overlook series debut last Friday, June 1. success Friday.

One lucky road

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Assembly Road neighbors came up winners in the annual Big Gust Apple Race Saturday morning at Memory Lake in Grantsburg. All the winners hail from Assembly Road south of Grantsburg. Winners pictured (L to R): Cilla Bauer, Gerald Johnson and daughter Pam Gaspar with her son Travis. - Special photo


WED., JUNE 6, 2012 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

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Underground farming

Frederic girl operates business in her basement

by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer FREDERIC — What does an industrious 12-year-old girl do to make some money? Maybe baby-sit or mow lawns? Not Greta Johnson of rural Frederic. For two years now, Greta has been farming worms in her basement, wholesaling them to local bait stores to supplement the income she gets from doing her chores. “It’s another way to get pocket money,” she said. Although it varies widely, the “pocket money” gets fairly substantial sometimes. One week she made $90, and followed her formula of putting half of it into the bank to save for college. One quarter of it is for spending. The final quarter is also for spending, unless she has needed to hire her mom to help with some of the chores. The idea for Greta’s Worm Farm came when Greta was 10 years old, after she told her mom, Sue Johnson, that she’d like to do something to make a little more money. The two, along with Greta’s dad,

At right are full-grown night crawlers ready for sale. At left are young worms and, on Greta Johnson’s palm close to her middle finger, a worm egg.

Greta Johnson, 12-year-old businesswoman and owner of Greta’s Worm Farm, shows the plastic bins where her night crawlers mate, lay eggs, hatch and grow. When they get to be 3 inches long she counts them out and puts them in topsoil in blue containers (foreground) to sell. – Photos by Mary Stirrat

Some containers of European night crawlers for sale at The Bottle Shop in Luck. The worms are also available at Monty’s in Milltown and Great Northern Outdoors in Frederic.

Dale, looked through some books and hit upon worm farming. The worm that Greta settled on is the European night crawler, a smaller species of night crawler that is relatively new to the market. “It’s the ideal size crawler,” said Tony Peterson of Great Northern Outdoors in Frederic, where Greta’s Worm Farm crawlers are sold. “They have a lot of action.” They stay lively on the hook, said Peter-

Greta Johnson sprinkles some chicken feed on a washtub holding her European night crawlers.

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son, adding that it’s one of the best worms for pan fish. “They’re selling pretty good this year,” he said. The worms are gaining in popularity, agreed Kent Petersen of The Bottle Shop in Luck. They keep well, whether in the refrigerator or not, so they can withstand a day in the hot sun. Besides being used as bait, Greta sold a batch of 2,000 worms to a Milltown man who is starting an organic farm. She reinvested the revenue in new stock. Timing is important, Greta indicated, since the worms must be at least 3 inches long before they can be sold. She uses her middle finger as the measuring stick to determine which are of salable size. It takes about four months to get from the egg stage to 3 inches, said Sue. Greta’s Worm Farm is a great example of creating a business out of everyday materials. Greta used old aluminum washtubs for her first worms, filling them with topsoil from a discount store. As the farm grew, she added some clear plastic bins. The worms are composting worms — they eat compost, and create compost. “They love coffee grounds,” said Greta. “They can’t eat chocolate or onions, sort of like a dog, or oranges. They eat eggshells, newspapers, not so much grass, some chicken feed.” This species of worm cannot crawl out of the bins, like the Canadian night crawlers Greta once added to the bins. Members of the Canadian variety attempted to escape in the night, tumbling to the cement floor where they were found, dead and dried, in the morning.

There are specific things that Greta needs to be watching in order to keep her worms healthy and active. One of these is making sure that the soil doesn’t get too acidic, which occurs where there is too much of the worms’ own compost and not enough nutrients. When that happens, said Sue, Greta takes out the worms and skims off the top layers of soil where the worm eggs are. She mixes this with new topsoil and, once again, the worms thrive. She also has to make sure that the worms have food — not too much, and not too little — and that the food, itself, has not begun to compost. And each Sunday, to keep the soil aerated, Greta turns the dirt in each bin by hand. European night crawlers, besides being very active bait, have a tough skin that holds together well on a hook. It also makes them harder for bait-stealers to take. The worms are able to stay alive and remain active underwater, an added bonus for attracting panfish. Greta’s Worm Farm worms can be found at Great Northern Outdoors in Frederic, The Bottle Shop in Luck, and Monty’s Sportsman’s Haven in Milltown. You can purchase them in containers of 18 worms or 30 worms. You can also contact Greta directly at 715-327-4770. When you get worms from Greta’s Worm Farm, you not only stand a good chance of catching a good-sized sunny, you are also helping a local entrepreneur get to college. “If you want something, you have to work,” said Greta’s mom. “And how else is a 12-year-old going to get money around here?”

Greta Johnson made her first investment in earthworms two years ago, using these washtubs to hold her stock. She has since expanded her business, and has already sold 5,100 worms so far this year.


PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

Burnett County’s beauty captured Animals and photography are a good mix for 23-year-old Kacey Lamphere of Webster as these photos, taken in various spots of Burnett County, show. “Photography is a fun, relaxing activity for me when I’m off work,” noted Lamphere, who works at Wayne’s Foods Plus in Webster. All of the photos were taken with a Fuji Hs20. The photos of the sunset and Blanding’s turtle were taken at Crex Meadows Wildlife Area at Grantsburg. - Photos by Kacey Lamphere

Students learn aerodynamics through kite-building exercise

by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG - The day couldn’t have been windier, perfect for Grantsburg Middle School students to try out their homebuilt kites. The students kite-flying day was meant for fun but it was also the last of the fourth-graders “problem solver” exercises of the year. And now it was time to test out the aerodynamics of their creations. The problem-solving exercise required students to build a homemade kite, not one from a kit. Students were given a couple of kite patterns to use or they could come up with their own designs. “The students were encouraged to look on the Internet and in books to come up with a plan and pattern,” said fourthgrade middle school teacher Wendy

Fourth-graders Ellie Duncan and Hannah Smestad tied strings to their kite before getting it airborne.

Grantsburg Middle School student Jillian Seeger showed off the letters FORE on her kite, the acronym’s meaning: For Our Real Event. Seeger seemed to be having some real fun as did her classmates during the kiteflying afternoon.

Raisa Jensen smiled as she was caught trying to hang on to her homemade kite during the Grantsburg Middle School’s windy day of kite flying. Photos by Priscilla Bauer Ryan Willey got ready to launch his homemade kite during the Grantsburg fourthgraders kite-flying fun day in May.

Hoefs. Students were told to test their kites out before the kite-flying day to see if their kite would actually fly. “Several students said they’re glad they tested them, because the first kite they made didn’t fly,” commented Hoefs. “I was impressed to hear some students made a couple of kites in hopes one of them would fly.” And fly they did, the strong winds taking kites way up high, making for a fun learning experience for both students and staff. - with submitted information


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

My elderly par-

Just for

ents have both been experiencing declining memories. One day my dad said to my mom,"Do you Joe Roberts want some ice cream?" "Sure."she replied."But you'll probably forget the ice cream when you get in the kitchen." My dad got angry and says,"My memory isn't that bad! Your the one with the bad memory." "Oh NO!" mom scolded back. "You'll forget the ice cream the minute you get into the kitchen." Dad marched into the kitchen and a few minutes later comes back with a plate of scrambled eggs. "See!" Dad shouts. "I didn't forget!" My mom looks at the eggs, smiles and says,"So where's the toast?"

Laughs

Leader reader

Would you like a place to share a thought, an observation or a funny story? Would you like to have input in the life of the Send reflections to: community by just the-leader@centurytel.net making a comment, not writing a signed, more lengthy letter to the editor? This is your chance. Submit your short comments, funny stories, etc., by mail or e-mail to Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 or the-leader@centurytel.net, attn: Reflections

Reflections

74th Sterling Settlers Picnic set CUSHING – Mark your calendars for Sunday, June 24. Every June, on the Sunday following Father’s Day, is the time for the old and new settlers (friends and families) to gather at the Cushing Community Center. They are a group that gathers to reminisce, to share and hear stories of the area. They wish to hear your stories. This year’s speaker will Pastor Dave Alquist from Grace Baptist Church in Grantsburg. Special music will be provided. The Settlers Picnic has celebrated longer than any other celebration in the area. It started in 1939 and was held outdoors near the Old Settlers Cemetery by Cowen Creek. They now have an indoor facility at the Cushing Community Center. The Sterling, Eureka, Laketown Historical Society will have the museum open on the second floor of the center with historical items, photos and demonstrations of early crafts. They are interested in any photos or memories that people would like to share as they are collecting extras to commemorate 75 years next year. The celebration starts at noon with a potluck dinner with music and a brief program. There will be some special acknowledgements such as oldest person, youngest person, married the longest, and the over-80 gang, followed by goodies and cake and ice cream. Bring your favorite picnic-type dish to share and your appetite and share your stories. We all have one!

Becoming a medical jargonaut

Cold Turkey

Preparing for a visit with a physician can be intimidating, esJohn W. Ingalls pecially if it involves a new visit with a specialist. It may involve inconvenient scheduling and confusing travel instructions in another city. It could also include an in-depth interview for a complicated problem. Prior to the visit you may have also received a history form where you can describe your affliction in details that you don’t normally consider. In addition to all of that you may have many questions and sometimes these go unasked or unanswered because you may feel intimidated. Don’t fear going to the doctor. He or she is just like everyone else. We have the same fears and worries and we get afflicted with the same illnesses and injuries as anyone else. We may know the healthy choices but we don’t always make them. Doctors may have huge amounts of education that the general public doesn’t have but that doesn’t mean we always heed our own advice. The big difference between doctors and patients is the fact that doctors know and use big words that most other people don’t know. Learning a few of those big words before going to the doctor may be helpful in trying to understand your affliction. Memorizing a few medical words may help you impress your friends at dinner parties or late-night trivia games, but actually learning the prefixes and roots and endings will help you make up your own medical words. No need to spend 15 years of intense study, in a very short time you too can practice medical jargon on your own family.

I spent the weekend helping

Letters from

Daniel paint his spare bedroom. This was the bedroom his son lived in until he moved off to college. It was painted to look like an aquarium— from the Carrie Classon fish’s perspective. While I am sure the concept was striking and original in theory, returning the room to some semblance of normal required three coats of paint. As I applied the second coat of primer, I resisted becoming annoyed because I remembered a particular shade of lime green, circa 1980, that covered my bedroom walls and wondered how many coats of primer my parents required after I moved off to college. The point was, and is, that tastes evolve. Lime green did not remain my favorite color forever, and I imagine Daniel’s son may have decided that living in a simulated aquarium is an experience he does not need to relive. While some preferences remain fixed – I was always fond of eating my vegetables and remain so – others are more fluid. At 4, my favorite name in the world was Pamela. Naturally, when I was given my very own puppy, I told my father that her name was Pamela. My dad took a skeptical look at our tiny new Boston terrier and told me that we would just call her Boots “for now.” Boots lived to be 16 years old. Lately I’ve been noticing that my tastes continue to evolve and but not necessarily independently. Daniel and I have acquired a fondness for pinot noir, cheap pinot noir to be precise. We both like finding new, inexpensive offerings. We’ve been trying pinot noirs for well over a year, and we now have one that we both consider our favorite. I don’t see how this is possible. Certainly, with all the dozens of pinot noirs we have tried, it is not possible or even likely that we could both have settled on the same one as our favorite, yet that is what seems to have happened. Skeptical, I arranged a blind taste test. I took this favorite pinot noir, another one that we also like very

Home

much and a third that we had never tried before. I tasted them alone and agreed with our assessment as to which was first, second and third. When Daniel came to dinner he was presented with three unmarked glasses of wine. “Which one do you like best?” I asked. Daniel tried the first one. “This is good,” he said of our second favorite. “This is not as good,” he said, correctly identifying the new contender. He tasted the third. “This is the best one by far,” he declared. Our favorite pinot noir remains our favorite, and I cannot quite understand how this happens, but it is so. Somehow, through spending time together our tastes have merged, or we have associated a taste with a good experience, or we have become accustomed to a certain taste ... I do not have the answer. While I still don’t understand how this works, I am happy that it does. And now when I look at couples who are wearing the same jacket and riding the same model bike or motorcycle, couples with the same tennis shoes or, somewhat alarmingly, the same haircut, I am more understanding. These tastes do not appear all at once. Tastes evolve. And when you are with someone, tastes can evolve together. It seems to me a wonderful gift that I can continue to discover new favorite things. Even more fun is discovering these new favorite things with a favorite person. Till next time, —Carrie Classon will perform an evening of selected columns called “Solstice Sun” on Friday, June 22, at 7:30 p.m., at Café Wren in Luck. Tickets may be purchased at Café Wren or any Inter-County Leader office. Subscribers to the Leader receive a $2 discount. Seating is limited.

Polk County Salvation Army receives bouncy kettle A large bouncy kettle was given to the Polk County Salvation Army. The kettle stands 23 feet tall and 25 feet wide. Children of all ages will enjoy jumping in the kettle at civic events through the summer. Watch for them in your community and come join the fun. Pictured with the bouncy kettle are Ray Chupp, Allen Foxwell, John Kallevig and Forest Clark. – Photo submitted

The first word to learn is generic, although it really isn’t a big word and technically it isn’t a medical word. Generic is important if you are concerned about cost. Doctors only use the MD word generic when talking about drugs. We don’t like to talk about generic illnesses. Generic illnesses are problems that most people acquire at some time in their lives. If you come into the office with a stuffy nose, perhaps a low-grade fever and a cough you might think you have a cold. A cold is a generic illness and if we call it a cold we can’t charge as much. The proper terminology is viral rhinitis. If it is a bad cold we might call it a viral mucopurulent rhinosinusitis. You don’t want to tell your friends and family that you went to the doctor for just a cold so learn the big doctor words and impress them. It may be enough to get you some extra sympathy and a day off work. If you don’t have insurance or you have a large deductible then it is worth asking about generic illnesses. They tend to be cheaper but not always. Brand-name diseases are usually much more expensive and serious, especially if the disease happens to be named after you personally. Rash is another generic medical word you should try to avoid. We all know a rash when we have it but you should learn the proper word, which is dermatitis. Dermatitis means inflammation of the skin. You can then add important descriptive words to make the rash more virulent if necessary. A raised, itchy rash becomes a “generalized pruritic maculopapular cutaneous eruption.” If it only itches for a short time we say it is “self-limiting” but if you have a seven-year itch we would call that a “perennial pruritic personal

problem.” See how easy it is? Next learn some of the suffixes or word endings. Something-ectomy means to cut out something such as an appendectomy (removal of appendix). Something-ostomy means to make an opening, such as colostomy. Something-otomy means to make a surgical opening and just look around, then close it up. An example of this would be a laparotomy, where the surgeon makes an incision in the abdomen to fix something internally. Usually these get combined. You likely would have a laparotomy to have an -ectomy and you could end up with an -ostomy. Be sure to read the fine print before you sign on the dotted line There is one other word worth knowing, idiopathic. It is one of the most important and most frequently used medical words. If you break the word apart it can help you understand the actual meaning. Pathos is Greek for disease or suffering, from which we get the word pathology or the suffix -pathy or -pathic. Idio- is the tricky part because it means “one’s self or within” but in actual use it means “without knowing” because we don’t know. If we don’t know, we say it came from within (such as, it’s all in your head). Idiois also the root word for idiot. However just because your doctor may not know the reason you are suffering, it doesn’t imply that he or she is an idiot and saying idiopathic doesn’t imply that you are an idiot either. Now when the doctor says you have an idiopathic maculopapular dermatitis combined with a mucopurulent rhinosinusitis you can just relax. Based on your extensive medical knowledge, you will already know that you have a common cold and a rash. Just have some chicken noodle soup, take two aspirins and in a few days you will feel better.


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Tish Hinojosa to play Festival June 22 ST. CROIX FALLS - Singer-songwriter Tish Hinojosa will play just two Midwest concert dates before heading back to Europe. Her Friday, June 22, concert at Festival Theatre in downtown St. Croix Falls begins at 8 p.m. following Music on the Overlook. “Tish made her first concert appearance at Festival in 2007 and she was virtually unknown to many in the audience. Folks have been clamoring to have her back and I’m really pleased that she’s eager to perform again in our intimate, acoustically marvelous theater,” said Danette Olsen, director at Festival Theatre. “Plus, Tish’s music is filled with so much depth – of stories, of perspective – and layers of gorgeous instrumentation, both vocally and on guitar. This is definitely a not-to-miss concert.” A distinctive cross-cultural style offers audiences enchantment, enlightenment and pure entertainment. In the process of growing as an artist, Hinojosa has become one of the most acclaimed and beloved musicians in the contemporary Latin and folk scene. With a purity of voice and a vision that also embraces pop, rock, tejano and international styles into her music, she reflects modern America’s multicultural richness with sincerity, heart and a winning musicality. With many influences to draw upon, Hinojosa’s journey in music began in San Antonio, as the daughter of immigrant parents, listening to Mexican music on her mother’s kitchen radio. “I was always fascinated by that as a child,” she recalls, “although I sure didn’t know it would lead me to where I am now!” In high school she was drawn to folk Mass celebrations

This is your brain on jazz What do you get when you cross a

science nerd with a jazz saxophonist? Apparently, a researcher with enough curiosity, talent and intelligence to actually video, in real time, the brain functions of people at their most creative. Using advanced MRI scans, Charles J. Limb, M.D., and his pals at Johns Hopkins University, have recently taken some pretty interesting pictures of the human brain during intense periods of creativity. Their mission: To measure the difference between a brain in a normal state and one rocking out during a creative jam session. In a report published recently in Public Library of Science ONE, the scientists say they are interested in what’s going on in the brain during the “almost trance-like state jazz artists enter during spontaneous improvisation.” “When jazz musicians improvise, they often play with eyes closed in a distinctive, personal style that transcends traditional rules of melody and rhythm,” said Limb, who is also a trained jazz saxophonist. “It’s a remarkable frame of mind during which, all of a sudden, the musician is generating music that has never been heard, thought, practiced or played before. What comes out is completely spontaneous.” So, being both a cool musician and a geeky researcher, Limb had access to all the fancy gizmos necessary to accurately compare the brain activity of a person playing a memorized scale of notes, for example, to the brain activity of that same person in the creative flow of an improvised blues melody complementing a jazz quartet. What they found was pretty interesting. While improvising, the parts of the musician’s brain responsible for tasks like self-censoring showed a sharp decrease in activity, while activity in the area responsible for self-expression increased. “Jazz is often described as being an extremely individualistic art form. You can figure out which jazz musician is playing because one person’s improvisation sounds only like him or her,” says Limb. “What we think is happening is when you’re telling your own musical story, you’re shutting down impulses that might impede the flow of ideas.” I know what you’re thinking. That’s

Singer-songwriter Tish Hinojosa will play just two Midwest concert dates before heading back to Europe. Her Friday, June 22 concert at Festival Theatre in downtown St. Croix Falls begins at 8 p.m. following Music on the Overlook. – Photo submitted

and learned guitar. “Those girls who sang at the folk Mass, they were the first ones who ever really told me I had a voice, that I could sing,” she says. Family, music and a multicultural perspective were hallmarks of Hinojosa’s years growing up in San Antonio, where she began performing as a teen. Alongside the traditional Mexican songs she inherited from her parents, she was inspired by the pop and rock artists she and her older siblings listened to along with the folk revival of the early 1960s. Performing in her hometown as well as doing stints in Taos and Nashville, she eventually landed in the renowned Austin, Texas, music scene. Her debut album, “Homeland,” found Hinojosa weaving all the threads of her musical ethos into a stunning tapestry that immediately put her on the international musical map. With her release “Culture Swing,” Hinojosa won the NAIRD Award for Best Folk Album. all well and good for brain geeks and supertalented musicians. But what’s that got Chris Wondra to do with me? Let’s bring this out of the lab and into the real world for a minute. As parents, teachers and organizational leaders, what can we take away from all this? In other words, when we need creative solutions, what can we do to encourage it? I’ve got two words for you: Creative environment. The area of the brain that shuts down during the highest levels of creativity is responsible for self-censoring, which is just another way of saying “inhibitions.” Clearly, if we want to be creative, we have to encourage a frame of mind that won’t hold back. No fear. So the first order of business should be to nurture a safe environment. If we want people to be creative, they have to feel comfortable taking risks. The next thing to consider is the area of the brain that fires up during creative bursts. Remember, this part of the brain is linked to self-expression, and helps with activities requiring a personal touch (tasks that relate individuality) such as telling a story about oneself. You can encourage creativity then, by giving a person the freedom to find and express a solution in her own unique way. When it comes to spontaneous creativity and quick thinking, clearly our brains have very little use for fear, but plenty of use for the uniqueness of personality. If you value creativity, and are interested in supporting it, you must nurture an environment rich in two basic freedoms: freedom of expression and freedom to fail. Founder of WeTeachWeLearn.org, Chris Wondra is neither a scientist nor a jazz musician. He’s just another Wisconsin public school teacher. Contact him at mrwondra@weteachwelearn.org where teachers, parents and other VIPs are exploring the nuances of effective teaching, learning, growth and change.

We teach, we learn

“I went [to Austin] as a folksinger,” says Hinojosa, “sitting in the corner of the bar and playing songs. Pretty soon I saw I was going to have to do more than that to support myself, and I had met some musicians up there, so we formed a band to play country music, which I had never really sung before. I fell in love with music by Linda Ronstadt, Rodney Crowell and Emmylou Harris ... I also started listening to some of the mountain music, real heartfelt stuff like Hazel Dickens and Patsy Cline.” This gave Hinojosa the insight to begin songwriting. “My career up until then had been singing other people’s music,” she says, “but I realized I had this whole bag of experiences and influences, going back to that Mexican kitchen radio, that I had never heard expressed in song.” She also had a way to try them out. “I’d hide them in dance sets,” she recalls, “put a two-step beat on them, and figure the dancers wouldn’t notice that much.” Soon, though, she was ready for a wider challenge and she began working the college circuit, “making it the real main thrust of doing my own music. Kinda reluctantly at first, it was scary, but I got confidence as I saw I could play and write and sing at least as well as the other people who were doing those clubs.” Over a dozen albums and countless tours of North America and Europe, Hinojosa developed a loving and loyal audience and has explored a wide range of musical expression. Her music and social activism have won her numerous awards and accolades, including recognition by Fox TV’s Bravo Honors and a Las Primeras (The Firsts) Award from MANA, the largest organization of Latina women. Hinojosa is frequently asked to appear at events, make cultural contributions and work on behalf of children, bilingual education, civil liberties, immigration, farm

Hazardous waste collections to take place Burnett and Washburn Counties will

be hosting their first set of hazardous waste collections on Tuesday, June 12. This is a free collection for residents. Washburn County collections will be held in Minong, at the transfer station, from 10 a.m. – noon, and Shell Lake, in the Shell Lake School parking lot, from 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. Collections will also in be held in Burnett County, in Webster, at the fairgrounds, from 10 a.m. – noon, and Grantsburg, at the fairgrounds, from 3 – 4:30 p.m. This collection reflects Northwest Regional Planning Commission and Recycling Control Commission’s continued effort to deflect as much waste as possible away from our landfill, while protecting this wonderful place we call home. This program is extremely valuable and all residents are encouraged to take advantage, clean out your garage, basement and attic, and ask elderly or homebound neighbors if you can take something to the collection for them. Do as much as you can to collect as much as you can and I guarantee it will make you feel great that you’re helping the environment. Your family and neighbors will thank you, the Earth and animals will thank you, and I thank you. Some examples of items considered hazardous are: oil-based paints and stains, old gas and antifreeze, corrosive cleaners, acids, pesticides, fluorescent lightbulbs and many other items. Items

workers, multicultural organizations, and other humanitarian causes. Recent examples include: the National Bilingual Educators conference; the National Council of La Raza’s conference, including performances at the event recognizing Latinas; the National Latino Children’s Agenda, honoring the work of Latino legislators; a Capitol Hill reception publicizing the plight of Latino children during Hispanic Heritage Week, in Washington, DC; the Hispanic Women in Leadership’s national conference; local spokesperson, PSAs, and events for Any Baby Can which provides aid to families of children with chronic illness or handicaps; a reception at the MAFO (farm worker organizations coalition) conference. She performed at the Hispanic Gala and at other events at the 1993 inauguration of the president of the United States and for the National Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Conference. Tish was also invited to perform at The White House for President and Mrs. Clinton. Linda Ronstadt has recorded Hinojosa’s songs among many others. She has recorded with Lucinda Williams, Joan Baez, Dwight Yoakum, Kris Kristofferson, Albert Lee and Nancy Griffith to name just a few. Along the way, Hinojosa has performed with various eminent symphonies throughout the United States. Her albums have been favorites on radio stations around the world, consistently winning critical praise and making annual Top 10 lists both nationally and internationally. Her appeal reaches both Anglo and Hispanic listeners. Since 1996, She has forged a separate career as a children’s music artist with the release of “Cada Niño” (Every Child) CD and illustrated songbook in Spanish and English. The 2005 release of “A Heart Wide Open” has added to her stature as an American musical treasure. Additional concerts making up the 2012 Music Series include: The Scottie Miller Band, Ann Reed, Ring of Kerry, Randy Sabien and Monroe Crossing. Flex Pass ticket packages offer patrons great savings and can be used for both the Music Series and Theatre Series. Tickets cost more at the door so order them in advance for the 8 p.m. Friday, June 22, Tish Hinojosa concert. For more information, to order tickets or join the Festival Theatre mailing list, call 715-4833387 or 1-888-887-6002. You may also send an e-mail to boxoffice@festivaltheatre.org. - from Festival Theatre

Earth

Notes Jen Barton such as fluorescent and CFL lightbulbs and oil filters require a minimal fee for disposal. Chemicals are free of charge to dispose of for residents however businesses will be charged a fee and must register by contacting Jen at 715635-2197 or jbarton@nwrpc.com. Area farmers wishing to dispose of hazardous agricultural chemicals are invited to attend these events as well. The services is free to farmers, for up to 200 pounds of products, but they are also asked to register. If you have any questions regarding the above collections please contact Jen. Also, as a reminder, no waste oil, electronics, appliances, latex paint, Freon, recyclables, asbestos, alkaline or vehicle batteries, explosives, and medical (including medications) or radioactive waste will be accepted at the above events. Latex will be accepted by your waste hauler if properly dried out and placed with regular trash. Please note that later this summer there will be collection events in Siren, at the county highway shop, Saturday, Aug. 4, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. and Spooner, at the hazardous waste facility, Saturday, Sept. 8, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. At the Saturday collection events only, residential pharmaceuticals, appliances and electronics will be accepted free of charge. Please watch papers for further details.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

The teens are coming!

by Jackie Thorwick Special to the Leader POLK COUNTY - On July 8, a horde of about 300 teenagers will descend on Balsam Lake, where they will set up a base camp. For the entire week, the teens will make daily “raids” into our neighborhoods, attacking certain homes that have already been selected – attacking them with paintbrushes, that is. The group will be painting homes in Amery, Balsam Lake, Centuria, Cushing, Frederic, Grantsburg, Luck, Osceola, Siren and St. Croix Falls. The youth will be painting the homes of people who are unable to do it themselves out of a desire to help others by being the “hands, feet and voice for Christ, ” as it is stated on the Web site of the organization making this happen. The teens are attending a camp called TeenServe, which is being hosted by Wild Rivers Habitat for Humanity of St. Croix Falls. “This is an amazing way to bring a community together,” said Eric Brian Van Vleet, future Habitat homeowner, worked with volunteers to construct the Kube, executive director of WRHFH. foundation of his family’s home in Centuria with volunteer Dick Nelson on Thursday “We’re so excited to host this group, May 31. With a just a handful of volunteers the entire foundation was put up in a day.

- Photos by Jackie Thorwick unless otherwise noted

The Habitat home rehab in Milltown is nearing completion. Keith Anderson, left, Bob Robinson and Diane Schweitzer (not pictured) painted inside walls Friday, June 1. Finish carpenters are needed now to install trim and cabinets. Please call Habitat at 715-483-2700 if you can help for a day, or email office@wildrivershabitat.org.

which is jump-starting our A Brush With Kindness program in a huge way.” Habitat completed 13 painting and repair projects since launching the program last summer. Kube said about 40 homes will be painted in the one week that the TeenServe group is here. There have been over 180 applicants for the home painting and repair program, and Habitat will continue to work on other homes with local volunteers after the TeenServe group is gone. They hope to complete about 100 projects this year in total, working with other local volunteer groups. “There is a great need in this community,” Kube said, “And we need the help of the community to make this successful.” Volunteers are being sought for a variety of jobs in support of the group. Also, the nonprofit is still seeking donations to cover the cost of materials needed for home repairs. Habitat is about three-quarters of the way toward the goal of raising $15,000. The funds raised will be spent at local businesses, giving the local economy a boost as well. Kube noted that Valspar Paint is donating over $20,000 worth of paint for this project. There are many ways to support this project. Those interested may review the list below, then call 715-483-2700 to let Habitat know how you can help. A more complete list is available online at www.wildrivershabitat.org, and those wanting to sign up may also e-mail office@wildrivershabitat.org.

Ways to help: • Loan a ladder for a couple of weeks. Many step and extension ladders are needed. • Use your semi-tractor to move a semitrailer away from the dock at Unity School and back to it on the afternoons of Tuesday, July 3, and Friday, July 13 • Prep homes for painting. Teen volunteers will do the prep work on many of the homes they paint, but some homes will need power washing, scraping or painting of high peaks before they get here. • Provide a meal for TeenServe staff during setup week, Monday, July 2 through Saturday, July 7, at Unity Denise Van Vleet, left, and friend Val Stryker, Balsam Lake, carry a foundation wall School. to the spot where it will be set in place. Habitat homes are built by volunteers in • Help unload the TeenServe semi order to keep costs down, along with a family who needs a home. Over 500,000 Habi- on Tuesday, July 3. tat homes have been built and over 2.5 million people helped since the program • Deliver paint and materials to the began in 1976. Individuals and groups are welcome at Habitat builds, as well as those work sites the week prior to the WorkCamp (July 2-7). who can provide a lunch for a work group. • Pick up and deliver borrowed ladders before WorkCamp, and return them afterward. Week of camp, July 9 – 14 • Coffeehouse staff will help serve in the coffeehouse at Unity during evening free time immediately following the program. (Must be 16 or older.) • Kitchen help will assist paid staff with the preparation of meals for the campers and clean up the cafeteria after meals. Two shifts: 6 to 9 a.m. and 3 to 7 p.m. • Troubleshooters will travel to work sites daily during the week to deliver materials and assist with projects and questions. Truck or van desirable to transport ladders or materials. • Tear-down volunteers will help TeenServe staff pack up, load the semi, and clean the school on Saturday, July 14, at 9 a.m. until done • Unfinished Projects Team will help finish any projects that were started during the WorkCamp and A group of youth volunteers painted this home in Frederic last summer through could not be completed by the crews.

Habitat’s A Brush With Kindness program. About 40 homes will be painted in one week this summer. - Photo submitted

Do you remember? Compiled by Sue Renno

50 Years Ago Game Warden Russ DeBrock of Siren was pictured holding a tiny fawn which was taken to a deer farm after people picked it up, believing it to be abandoned, and called him. The headline said, Leave those fawn deer alone!-Frederic got 8.26 inches of rain during the month of May, with rain falling 18 days out of 31.-Miles F. Johnson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Johnson, West Sweden, received his Master of Science degree from the University of Wisconsin.-Many building projects were planned or already under way in the Frederic area. They included a new warehouse at Stokely’s, a new house for Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Pederson, a store at Carol Peterson’s resort on Spirit Lake, a fellowship lodge at Whispering Pines Camp, a new sewage treatment plant, and a new church building for St. Dominic’s.-Other new college graduates featured in this paper were: Nancy Huser, of Frederic, from Eau Claire State College, with a Bachelor of Science in comprehensive social studies and language arts. Wayne Lindberg, Frederic grad, Bachelor of Science in history from Superior State College. Bruce Seastrand, son of former Pilgrim and Grace Lutheran pastor, a Bachelor of Arts from Gustavus Adolphus, with plans for a stint in the Peace Corps and then seminary.-First prize in the poppy poster contest went to Peggy LeDoucer and Irene Erickson.-About 350 people attended an allschool reunion at the Wood Lake School, including 18 of the former teachers. A program was presented, with several short talks and music on accordion and saw.

40 Years Ago Contestants for the title of Miss Frederic 1972 were Dana Anderson, Karen Early, Connie Erickson, Janice Java, Sally Nelson, Dorothy Tschumperlin and Arlene West.-Construction for the Louise fountain, funds donated by Lew Lawson as a memorial to mothers, would soon be under way, having been delayed by the high water level of Coon Lake, Frederic.-An American Cancer Society cartoon showed a young horse being told by an older horse, “If anyone offers you a cigarette, say ‘Nay, nay.’”-Edwin Anderson of Frederic won a frozen pig at Milltown Co-op Services when he guessed its weight at 203 pounds, 4 ounces; actual weight 203 pounds, 8 ounces.-Mrs. Earl Murray of Webster, Head Start coordinator for five years, was leaving her post and Mina Copeland was chosen to replace her.-The Inter-County Leader was offering a fiveyear free subscription to the person who could guess closest to the actual weight of a roll of newsprint. The roll would be on display at their office during Family Days, Friday only.-Carl Kramer, 1968 Frederic grad, graduated from the University of Tampa with a degree in industrial arts education and would be teaching at Palmetto High School, Palmetto, Fla., in the fall.-Dr. Laurence Johnson, a Luck High School graduate and son of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson, Rt. 2, Frederic, was honored by the USDA for his research work in developing a successful technique to freeze boar semen.

20 Years Ago Unity’s boys and girls track teams won the Division II regionals.-Births at SCVM Hospital included Kyle Robert to Michelle and Lawrence Miller, SCF; Roger Robert to Ron and Kelly Steen, Luck; Heather Allison to Tina and Tyler Davison, Grantsburg; and Jordan Daniel to Richard and Holly Hall, Luck.-Todd Java was hired as a full-time police officer for the village of Frederic.-A Memorial Day weekend mud rally on the Leonard Johnson farm just south of Hwy. 8 was closed by Polk County deputies as 125 vehicles had turned out for the event and people were driving trucks through navigable waters and protected wetlands.-The engagement of Gail Langel and Nathan Hibbs, both of Luck, was announced.-The nine girls vying for Miss Frederic were Sara Houston, Heidi Carlson, Katie Grindell, Jessica Wondra, Annie Lauritsen, Melissa Wyss, Heather Weeks, Tanya Tschumperlin and Brenda Hinrichs. There were 20 candidates in the contest for Little Miss Frederic.-In the same week that “tax protestor” Paul Ekblad was released from jail, having served 90 days for contempt of court for refusing to vacate his farm, his friend Walter Lundeen Jr. had a small claims complaint filed against him for refusing to allow a milk inspector into his barn at 7 a.m., without prior notification. Lundeen planned to contest the case.

Brought to you by

OLSEN & SON DRUG

Serving the community since 1882

24106 St., Hwy. 35 • Siren, WI Phone 715-349-2221 • Fax 715-349-7350

Tom Moore, Owner Brian Johnson - RPh


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Brena’s “Tail of Two Kitties” Hi folks! My name is Brena, pronounced “Brenya,” and I am a 7-year-old Boston terrier. I was asked to fill in for Shelter Yappenings, but since I am such an expert on cats, I thought I’d change it up a bit for this article. You see, I am outnumbered in my family, one dog versus five cats. We have one in-house cat named Lucky, two outside feral cats that my owners rescued and “fixed” named Momma and Orange; and two little rescue kittens in the porch that my owners are fostering and waiting for a condo to open up at the shelter so they can have a chance at a new “leash” on life, Ping and Pong. OK, so let me give you a “ruff” background on myself. I am a military brat as my original owner, Shane, was deployed three times and I was sent to live with his parents. Because I spent more time with Dad and Mom, and also because Dad is retired and we live on a lake and I get to go almost everywhere with Dad, Shane decided I would be better off staying with Dad and Mom. I really like going with Dad when he splits wood. He calls me his “Log Dog!” However, when Shane comes to visit, I go crazy because he will always have my heart. So, I’m going to take a stab at writing this – which is kinda hard since I don’t have any thumbs to hold a pen. I guess I’ll have Mom type for me while I bark. I am going to focus on pairs of cats that are available for adoption. Thus, “Tail of Two Kitties.” Because my dad and mom are spending so much time with the two kittens they are fostering, not to mention that I have to look at them every day through the patio door of our porch, I’ll start with Ping and Pong. I have to admit that they are pretty hisssssterical to watch. Ping and Pong came to us

Happy Tails Await Arnell Humane Society of Polk County Dusty is an older gentleman black Lab. He has all the Lab qualities we have come to know and love; he is friendly to everyone, enjoys any and all outdoor activity, on leash or not, and he has an enthusiastic lust for life. He came to the shelter as a stray but he looks to be at least 9 or 10 years old. He is obedient and attentive, an oldie but goodie. He is housetrained, good with other dogs and kids. Dusty would make a great first dog for a growing family. This week the shelter has two fundraisers. On June 8, a Friday night meat raffle at Ben’s Northern Bar in Luck begins at 6 p.m. On Saturday, June 9, our annual Arnell Garage Sale begins at 9 a.m. at the shelter. Volunteers are outdoing themselves, working double time to make each event a standout. Attend the one that fits in your schedule or both. All proceeds from these events help to support

715-349-2964 Bears, bears and more bears. Bear country has seen them come in, or the results of them coming in, almost nightly this past week. Monday morning saw the usual mess in the bird yard at dawn, later in the day Bruiser showed up on the scene for a look around for, I’m sure, something to eat. Wednesday, over lunch, daughter Tammy said, “There’s a big bear in your feeder.” Sure enough, a new one, about 250 to 300 pounds. I named this one Jingles as he had so many burdocks stuck to his coat that they shook as he walked just like the Indian gals jingle dresses at the powwows. After several shouts from hubby, he disappeared into the trees. Thursday morning I woke about 5:30 and, as usual, looked out into the bird yard to find a sow with

Shelter

YAPpenings Brena pretty scared and unsocialized, but are slowly coming around and are pretty cute, as far as cats go. There are no condos available at the shelter, but that doesn’t mean that these two can’t still be adopted. I’m sure my dad or mom would be happy to bring them in for viewing if someone was interested. The next pair of kittens I’d like to yap about is Flopsie and Mopsie. They are pretty little, but were really little when they first came to the shelter. The staff and volunteers cannot believe they haven’t been adopted yet because they are meowvelous kitties. Flopsie and Mopsie would really like to stay together if they have any say in it. They said they’d promise to give you hours of entertainment! If you like beautiful, sleek, longhaired cats, have I got the purrrrfect duo for you - Minnie and Katie! Those two, along with two other cats, were surrendered to us when their owner was moving but couldn’t take them with. A little birdie told me that Minnie and Katie are offered free to adopters over 55 years old. They are sweet cats that are a bit shy and a little older so have been overlooked because the younger cats take center stage with visitors. Finally, Chai and Frappe are also on the list free to adopters over 55 years old. They have both been fostered by a volunteer to help bring them out of their shells. Chai and Frappe’s foster mom said it didn’t take long for them to greet her at the door and snuggle. (You can read her novel about these the animals at the Arnell shelter. You might win a choice cut of meat or take home a special knickknack treasure. Either way, you and the animals win. Kittens, kittens and more kittens. Kitten season is in full bloom and the Arnell shelter Dusty is just the place to find your next healthy, happy, frisky kitten. Our kittens have come by way of a box on the Gandy Dancer Trail, an old dead tree on the side of the road and numerous sheds and woodpiles across the county. Please come to adopt a kitten in waiting so our kittens in foster homes can take their turn in the adoption room. All of our kittens have been socialized, wormed and received first shots. We have tabbies and torbies, calicos and torties. They will entertain you and win your heart. Rico is a handsome 2-year-old black Lab mix, size extra-large. He is smart, active and knows some commands. He has a large, blocky head

Siren news not one, not two, but three little ones. After a closer look I knew it was my old gal of 5 years, Miss Prissy. My how she has grown, not as big as Big Bertha though. Big Bertha’s yearling cubs are big for their age. Guess they will take after their mom in size. There’s going to be some mighty big bears in bear country in a few years. Let’s hope they have mom’s temperament too. Back to Miss Prissy’s young’uns. A noise from the window and those three little black balls bolted up the trees. They must either be born with the instinct to tree or they are taught this not long after they are out of the den. Wonder when Samson or Goliath will be showing up, they usually do during breeding season.

Dewey - LaFollette Hank and Karen Mangelsen visited Gene and Carlotta Romsos Wednesday evening to wish Gene a happy birthday. Garry Crosby is home again after being in the hospital in Eau Claire for several days. He broke his hip recently and is now recuperating. He is wished a complete and speedy recovery. Karen and Hank Mangelsen went out to eat with Larry, Jake, Holly, Hannah and Grace Mangelsen and Mary and Gale Erickson Friday evening. Gale and Mary are Holly’s uncle and aunt from Rochester, Minn., and they were celebrating their 54th-wedding anniversary. Donna, Gerry, Lawrence and Nina Hines went to Maple Grove, Minn., and Vadnais Heights, Minn., Saturday. They attended graduation open houses

Karen Mangelsen

for two of Gerry and Donna’s grandsons, Bryton Hines and Bryce Sweet. Saturday visitors of Hank and Karen Mangelsen were Jake, Grace, Hannah and Larry Mangelsen and Jason Romsos. Kris Fjelstad’s sister, Pat Kage of Eau Claire, visited Kris and Bob over the weekend. Lida Nordquist went with Jan and Hannah Schott Saturday to the graduation open houses for Bryton Hines and Bryce Sweet in the Twin Cities. That night, Lida stayed with Joleen and Richard Funk. On Sunday she helped Richard celebrate his birthday. Karen and Hank Mangelsen visited Doris and Steve Schmidt Sunday afternoon. They live near Pine City, Minn.

two on the shelter’s Web site.) Although these two didn’t come in together, they became fast friends and hope that they can stay together too, if possible. They are “litterally” like peas and carrots! I don’t want to scare you off by hinting that the pairs of cats I’ve mentioned would like to be adopted together. They can be adopted separately too. All they care about is finding a “furever” home soon. Did I mention that all cats are half-priced? This was offered the month of May and is continuing the month of June. I know we dogs are popular, but cats need homes too. You cannot beat half price on all cats or the select group of cats offered free to people over 55 years old. These are cats and kittens that have been spayed/neutered and gotten their shots. Look no further for your new family member than the Humane Society of Burnett County. So folks, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it. If you were looking to read about dogs, you are barking up the wrong tree this week. The Shelter Yappenings will resume next week. But maybe someday I’ll be asked to write the article again. In the meantime, you are welcome to go to the Web site at http://www.hsburnettcty.org/ to see all the available animals. If you are an animal lover who is unable to adopt but wants to help, donations are tax-deductible. The Humane Society of Burnett County is a not-forprofit 501(c)(3) organization. They do not receive financial assistance from the county. They rely on donations, memberships, and fundraising to keep them up and running. (I sound pretty professional, don’t I?) When you write that check, tell them Brena sent you! The Humane Society of Burnett County is saving lives, one at a time; www.hsburnettcty.org, 715866-4096, license No. 267335-DS. We’re on Facebook too, why don’t you like us there! with expressive eyes that plead for attention. What a guy. Winslow is a wonderful springer spaniel mix, neutered male of 8 years. Winslow is looking for a home with a quiet retirement in mind. He loves to check out the chipmunk and squirrel smells in the yard but enjoys watching them instead of chasing them. Let the young pups waste their energy on such frivolous behavior; Winslow would rather share the breeze with you. Tippy is a 3-year-old black Lab mix family dog. Tippy was surrendered by his loving family when they moved. He is housetrained, great with kids and dogs. This tall, dark and handsome fellow is full of backyard fun. He is wireless fence and obedience trained. Tippy is a people dog. He especially likes a belly rub after a long day. Bella is a 1-year-old apricot and white shih tzu. She is adorable and likes to play with balls and Frisbees. Bella is good with kids but tends to torment cats. A ride in the car makes her day. She is the perfect size to fit in your lap. Stop by the garage sale on Saturday and visit the animals while you’re there. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, Amery, 715268-7387 or online: arnellhumane.org.

Bev Beckmark Sunday found hubby and me headed to Cambridge, Minn., for a long overdue lunch with my youngest sister, MaryLou, and her husband, Mark Olson, of Sartel, Minn. Over lunch we caught up on family goings-on. We also discussed the paper mill fire in Sartel and Siren’s school fire. The 28th-annual dairy breakfast is coming up on Saturday, June 16, at the Melin farm in Grantsburg. Breakfast starts at 6 a.m. until noon so come enjoy some of the famous Uncle Jack’s wild rice pancakes, ham, cranberry juice and lots of good, old Wisconsin dairy products. Adults just $6, kids 12 and under just $3. The Melin farm is on CTH O in Grantsburg, just follow the dairy cow signs. The Burnett Dairy Co-op will once again be hosting its Dairy Day Friday, June 8, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Lots of events going on all day – tractors on display, FFA brat and bake sale, a farmers market, plus lots of things for the kiddies to see and do, a bouncer, face painting, games, a pedal tractor pull at 3 p.m., a visit to the animal zoo is a must for kids old and young from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Congratulations to elementary student Trevor Stanford, middle schooler Kodie Anderson, and high schooler Hattie Koball for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. What a great bunch of kids. Way to go.

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A Waiting Child

Daveonno and Evonte Oct. 23, 2002

March 18, 2004

Daveonno and Evonte would greatly benefit from a family that is open to keeping contact with their “grandma,” who is their foster mother. They would also benefit from a family who is willing to work through the hard times while praising the easy times. They would benefit from having older siblings to look up to. The boys are eager to find security and structure in a forever family. Daveonno is a 9-year-old African-American boy who loves to be around people and tries to please them. He enjoys playing basketball and being active outside. Daveonno likes to be fashionable and takes pleasure in picking out matching outfits for himself. In the fall, Daveonno will be starting third grade and has an individual education plan. He attends his specialized speech class but may need extra help in math, reading and writing. Daveonno responds well to rewards and praise as well as loss of privileges. Evonte is an 8-year-old African-American boy who loves being around people, especially if they are paying attention to him and want to do activities with him. He likes to play basketball and be active outside but also likes to be inside drawing and coloring. Evonte enjoys going shopping to pick out new, matching outfits. In the fall, Evonte will be starting second grade, and has an individual education plan in place. He tends to act out in class, not follow directions and is hyperactive. Evonte, again like his brother, responds to rewards and praise as well as loss of privileges. For more information about Daveonno and Evonte or other Wisconsin children waiting for adoptive homes, call Adoption Resources of Wisconsin at 414475-1246 or 800-762-8063 or visit the Web site at www.wiadopt.org.

Frederic Senior Center Dave Peterson

We sure had nice weather for the weekend. The winners for 500 were Larry Anderson, Dave Peterson, Darlene Groves and Bob Peterson. The nine-bid winner was Mildred Ihrig. Larry Anderson furnished ice cream for the players. Remember that we play Spades at 1 p.m. on Mondays, 500 at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday. Pokeno at 1 p.m. on Wednesday and Friday and Bingo from 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday. We are still looking for more pool players. We play most days at 9 a.m. All ages are welcome for our activities.

Grantsburg Public Library Summer reading program, June 13

Join us on Wednesday, June 13, 1:30 p.m., as we kick off the summer reading program. Families will find themselves in stitches as they’re entertained by comedic magician Amye Scharlau's. Scharlu’s performance is one-of-a-kind with her handmade props and hilarious antics. Prizes, pizza and ice-cream coupons will be awarded throughout the summer program.

Green thumb wanted

The library is seeking volunteers to help maintain grounds around the library. If you are interested, please inquire at the library.

Library hours and information

Monday noon – 6 p.m.; Tuesday noon – 6 p.m.; Wednesday 10:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Thursday noon – 6 p.m.; Friday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. – noon. The contact information for the library is 715-4632244; Web site is grantsburg.wislib.org and now you can follow the library on Facebook.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Larsen Family Public Library New bicycle rack

We hired Tiger Manufacturing, the Webster high school shop class, to make a beautiful bicycle rack for the library during the school year, and they delivered it Wednesday, May 30. It holds seven bicycles and will certainly come in handy this summer vacation. Thank you, Tiger Manufacturing, for a job well done.

Men’s book club

We are finally getting out of the planning stages and will be forming a new book club for men. There will probably be a different topic/theme each month, like Western, suspense, mystery, history or science fiction, depending on what the members agree on. If you are interested in joining us this summer, we plan to start in July, please call the library at 715866-7697 and leave your name and phone number.

Summer reading program

Registration forms have been sent to both the Webster and Siren elementary in anticipation of our Dream Big...Read! 2012 summer reading program. Join us every Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. June 13 through Aug. 1. Registration forms are also available in the library.

Preschool story time

We meet every Wednesday all year long at 10:30 a.m. for good stories, companionship and fun.

Book Club

The book club meets Tuesday, June 26, in the Nexen Community Room. The title to be discussed is “Private Life” by Jane Smiley. Margaret Mayfield is nearly an old maid at 27 in post-Civil War Missouri when she marries Capt. Andrew Jackson Jefferson Early. He’s the most famous man their small town has ever produced, a naval officer and a brilliant astronomer, a genius who, according to the local paper, has changed the universe. “Private Life” is a beautiful evocation of a woman’s inner world: of the little girl within the hopeful bride, of the young woman filled with yearning and of the faithful wife who comes to harbor a dangerous secret. But it is also a heartbreaking portrait of marriage and the mysteries that endure even in lives lived side by side; a wondrously evocative historical panorama; and, above all, a masterly, unforgettable novel from one of our finest storytellers. Everyone is welcome, even if you haven’t read the book and just want to listen to the discussion.

Mystery Mayhem Book Club

The Mystery Mayhem Book Club meets Monday, June 11, at 10 a.m. June’s theme is Passport to Murder - International Intrigue. Pick up a brochure in the library, which lists the intriguing titles to be

discussed.

Adult fiction books

• “As the Crow Flies” by Craig Johnson • “The Columbus Affair” by Steve Berry • “Stolen Prey” by John Sandford • “Fifty Shades of Grey” by E.L. James • “The Last Boyfriend” by Nora Roberts

Adult nonfiction books

• “Historic National Road Yard Sale Cookbook: Vol. III - Still Hungry?” by Patricia McDaniel • “Rez Life” by David Treuer • “Lots of Candles and Plenty of Cake” by Anna Quindlen • “DK Eyewitness Travel: Norway” by Snorre Evensberget • “DK Eyewitness Travel: China” by Donald Bedford • “Chilton’s Import Car Repair Manual 19951999” • “Chilton’s Auto Repair Manual 1964-1971”

Young adult books

• “Underworld” by Meg Cabot

Children’s books

• “Tick Tock Clock” by Margery Cuyler • “Mooshka: A Quilt Story: by Julie Paschkis • “Yucky Worms” by Vivian French • “Insect Detective” by Steve Voake • “If Kisses Were Colors” by Janet Lawler (Board Book) • “Fire in the Forest: Lego City” by Samantha Brooke • “Theodore Boone: The Accused” by John Grisham • “Chloe” by Peter McCarty

DVDs

• “One for the Money” • “The Grey” • “Ancient Civilizations: Timbuktu”

Audio books

• “11th Hour” by James Patterson • “Stolen Prey” by John Sandford

Large-print books

• “Behind the Seams” by Betty Hechtman • “Scarecrow Returns” by Matthew Reilly • “Kill Switch” by Neal Baer

Hours and information

Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. For more information contact the library at 715-866-7697, Web site: webster.wislib.org. Online catalog: merlin.nwls.lib.wi.us/search.

Birth announcement Born at Burnett Medical Center: A boy, Noel Clayton Ainley, born May 29, 2012, to Timothy and Rachel Ainley, Grantsburg. Noel weighed 6 lbs., 8 oz. and was 19-1/2 inches long. Siblings are Ryan, Cody, Dylan, Brittany, Logan and Audree.

Grandparents are Randy and Sue Hess of Grantsburg and Linda Ainley of Springfield, Tenn. Great-grandparents are Leroy and Carrie Hess of Grantsburg and William and Ethel Plachetka of Tomahawk. •••

Siren Senior news I have been out of town on a bus trip to Washington, D.C., so have not sent in any news. I have tried, but my computer decided to crash, so hope things will go through this time. We extend gratitude to Barb Murphy for the box of hardcover books she donated. We certainly are glad to get some new books.

Fran Krause

Evelyn Marek donated a flag to the center. We appreciate receiving gifts. Nice to have the community remember the people at the center. Winners at 500 were Susie Hughes, Bea Godin, Steve Wenthe, Butch Connor and Dwaine Bentley. Remember to check out the farmers market on Saturdays, 1 until 3 p.m.

Orange

Nancy Krause's daughter and son-in-law, Leslie and Jim Leaf, have been visiting them and touring the area - canoeing on the St. Croix River from Hayward on down. They also visited relatives and toured the Fort, returning to Marquette, Mich., last week. On Wednesday afternoon Tom, Becky and LaVonne O'Brien enjoyed the Twins ballgame in the Cities. Congratulations to Tom and Becky for being in business at Cashco Lumber yard for 10 years. On Saturday they served lunch for their patrons. Reeny Neinstadt and Sharon Proffit drove to Duluth on Wednesday to celebrate Sharon's birthday by

Nona Severson

LaVonne O'Brien

shopping and going out to lunch. Brianna and Brendon Bray celebrated their June birthdays over the weekend. They each invited eight friends over for a sleep-over and party. Their cousin, Brittany Johnson, from Eau Claire got to come. Grandma Reeny helped out. Harmony HCE club met at Adeline Ingalls on Tuesday morning. They made plans for their fair booth. Brad and Deanna Krause drove to UW - Stevens Point Sunday afternoon for an orientation for freshmen on Monday and Tuesday.

The Leader Connect to your community

Borderline Deloris Schirmer of Cloverton was without Internet connection until the Tuesday after Memorial Day. When she tried to call the repair service, she ended up connected to Internet Help. After she explained that everyone in the area had no Internet access, the lady hung up on her. Deloris says it brings back memories of the Ma Bell monopoly over phone service; there is no choice of Internet service providers around here. Fran Levings and Dave Baker had a couple of really enjoyable social engagements recently. Dave’s son Nick was up to visit on the Memorial Day weekend. They managed to bypass local flooded roads and take a trip to Duluth to the Great Lakes Aquarium. They finished the day with dinner at the Green Mill in Canal Park. The following Friday, Dave and Fran went to the St. Croix Casino – Danbury with Don and Marlene Mishler, and Jeanne and Gordon Larsen. The occasion was that all three of the women have recent birthdays. Tom Kurhajetz of Willow River was the guest speaker at the May meeting of the Pine County Wanderers. He gave an informational talk about Lyme disease, as May was Lyme Disease Month. There were 25 people at the meeting. Cheryl and Gene Wickham brought the birthday cake and door prize. Dave Baker was the door prize winner. He got six cute solar lamps and two packages of licorice. May birthdays were Jim Yaekel, Jeanne Larsen, Marlene Mishler and Gene Wickham.

Bob Brewster

Marlene and Don Mishler, Sandy and Dave Drake, Bev and Ed Carlin, Shaun and Mike McCullen, Maurene Pallow, Dianna and Sally Mishler, Patrice Winfield, Tracy and Sam Erickson, Paul Raymond, Fran and Dave Baker, plus five wonderful children cooked and served the annual pancake breakfast for the Duxbury Volunteer Fire Department this year. It was a huge success. Last Saturday, Peg and Clint Coveau of Markville, Minn., and Jim Coveau of Webster, drove to Cameron to celebrate the graduation of Grant Gill, the grandson of Ron and Sharon Proffit. Grant carried a 4.0, and was the speaker at commencement. He is going to attend Winona State this fall. A full brunch was served in Grant’s honor. On Wednesday, Reeny Neinstadt of Webster treated Sharon Proffit to a birthday dinner at the top of the Radisson in Duluth, Minn. The top of the building rotates, and it took about one hour to go around once. Afterward they went shopping, and ran into Barb Fall and Marion Dyson. Last Thursday, Ron and Sharon went to Elk Mound, to attend the eighthgrade graduation of grandson Lucas Kinblom. Frank and Mary Schaaf went to Duluth, Minn., recently to see the doctor. Mary has been dealing with a case of sciatica lately, and got a shot for it. Last weekend, Frank saw a bear in his yard in broad daylight around 9:30 in the morning. Despite yelling at it and harassing it, it knocked down all of his bird feeders one by one before excusing itself.

Academic news Kelly Conroy, daughter of Dan and Maureen Conroy of Spooner and granddaughter of Esther Conroy of Webster, graduated with her doctorate in Foreign Language Education from the University of Texas at Austin on May 19. Conroy accepted a position teaching Spanish linguistics at Northern Illinois University beginning in the fall. Kelly and her husband, Austin Lundeby, will be relocating to the area this summer. - submitted ••• ST. PETER, Minn. – The spring semester dean’s list at Gustavus Adolphus College has been released. The list comprises students who have earned a 3.7 grade-point average, based on a scale in which 4.0 equals an A, or higher for the semester ending in May 2012. The following local students were named to the dean’s list at Gustavus Adolphus College: Osceola Lauren Pauley. - submitted ••• ST. PETER, Minn. – The following local individual(s) were among the 543 students to graduate with Bachelor of Arts degrees from Gustavus Adolphus College during the school’s annual commencement exercises on Sunday, May 27: Amery Brittany Barkholtz, music honors. - submitted ••• SUPERIOR The University of Wisconsin-Superior has named local students to the dean’s list for academic achievement during the spring 2012 semester. To be named to the dean’s list students must have completed 12 degree-seeking semester credits and achieved at least a 3.50 grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale). Amery Joseph Rubenzer and Nicholas Stewart; Balsam Lake Nina Allison; Danbury Catherine Mahlen; Frederic Emily Didlo and Aaron Surbaugh; Grantsburg Patricia Bonneville, Emily Cole, Darryl Richter and Carissa Skifstad; Milltown Amber Ogren; Osceola Marissa Boucher, Gabrielle Ford, Kristen Jasperson and Rebecca Pfannes; St. Croix Falls Steven Gebhard, Mara Martinson and Tashina Martinson; Siren Jolene Holmes; and Webster Lynn Stubbe. - submitted ••• WHITEWATER - The University of WisconsinWhitewater announced more than 2,700 students were named to the spring 2012 dean’s list. To be eligible for the honor, students must have a 3.4 semester grade-point average with a minimum of 12 semester credits and no grades lower than a C. The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, founded in 1868, is the fourth largest campus in the 26-cam-

pus UW system. Amery Emily Lamusga. - submitted ••• EAU CLAIRE - Commencement exercises for 1,452 students at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire were Saturday, May 19, in Zorn Arena. Local students who received degrees and their fields of study are: Amery Cassandra Klatt, Bachelor of Science, Education and Human Sciences, kinesiology; Scott Morfitt, Bachelor of Arts, Arts and Sciences, journalism and English; Jacob Vanheuklom, Bachelor of Science in Environment Public Health, Nursing and Health Sciences, environmental public health; Balsam Lake Angela Berthold, Bachelor of Science, Arts and Sciences, geology; William Hinshaw, Bachelor of Arts, Arts and Sciences, history and political science; Shila Meyer, Bachelor of Arts, Education and Human Sciences, English; Centuria James Zahler, Bachelor of Science, Arts and Sciences, philosophy; Clear Lake John Buhr, Master of Business Administration, Business, business administration; Brent Kaczmarski, Bachelor of Science, Education and Human Sciences, special education; Aimee Ray, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Arts and Sciences, art. Dresser Audra Haas, Bachelor of Science, Arts and Sciences, biology; Katherine Weinberg, Bachelor of Science, Education and Human Sciences, kinesiology; Grantsburg Jennifer Anderson, Bachelor of Science, Education and Human Sciences, kinesiology; Hertel Bethanna Petersen, Bachelor of Science, Arts and Sciences, mathematics; Luck Kyle Johansen, Bachelor of Business Administration, Business, business finance; Milltown Charity Moore, Bachelor of Arts, Arts and Sciences, history; Osceola Daniel Gjerning, Bachelor of Business Administration, Business, accounting; Elizabeth Peterson, Bachelor of Science Nursing, Nursing and Health Sciences, nursing; Amanda Richert, Bachelor of Arts, Arts and Sciences, communication; McKenzie Scholz, Bachelor of Arts, Arts and Sciences, mass communication; Timothy Whittenberger, Bachelor of Business Administration, Business, business finance; Siren Caitlin Flanigan, Bachelor of Science, Arts and Sciences, psychology; St. Croix Falls Megan Gust, Bachelor of Arts, Arts and Sciences, sociology; Sara Palmer, Bachelor of Business Administration, Business, business administration; and Ian Virchow, Bachelor of Science, Arts and Sciences, computer science. - submitted


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

LIBRARY NEWS Balsam Lake Public Library The library has a new look

shine Kennels, 11 a.m. Aug. 15 – Final party, 11 a.m.

Summer reading begins June 16

Story time

Remodeling is done. Stop in to see our new look.

Theme is Dream Big – Read. Programming info and dates. All programming is free. June 16 – Remarkable reptiles with Jim Gerholdt, 10 a.m. June 20 – Artsy Smartsy with Tiffany, 11 a.m. June 27 – Dinosaurs, 11 a.m. July 11 – Frogs with Randy Korb, 11 a.m. July 18 – Owls with Barb from Interstate Park, 11 a.m. July 25 – Beach Party at Balsam Lake Beach, canceled if bad weather), 11 a.m. Aug. 1 – Festival Theater Workshop, 11 a.m. Aug. 8 – Therapy and Service Dogs with Sun-

Bring the little ones to the library for story time every Wednesday at 11 a.m. for stories, crafts and snacks. All ages welcome to join our lively group.

Hours

Balsam Lake Library, (under the water tower) at 404 Main St., Balsam Lake. Hours are Monday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Tuesday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. E-mail: library@balsamlakepl.org. Web site: www.balsamlakepubliclibrary.org., 715-485-3215. Like us on Facebook for updated information.

Centuria Public Library The Centuria Public Library is now beginning to take registrations for the upcoming summer reading program beginning Saturday, July 1, and continuing through July 31. The theme of the summer reading program is Dream Big – Read! The reading program is for children of all ages and abilities. The library cares about your children and has planned programs to keep them reading and learning all summer long. The program is free to all participants. Visit the library soon and pick up the registration form to become involved in a fun reading program

that will include reading Bingo, summer arts and crafts, games, prizes and just a lot of fun. A schedule of events is available at the library.

Hours

Monday, noon – 5 p.m.; Tuesday, noon – 7 p.m.; Wednesday, noon – 5 p.m.; Thursday, noon – 7 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – noon. Contact information: 715-646-2630, centuriapl@ifls.lib.wi.us or www.centurialibrary.org.

Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative to hold 74th-annual meeting Friday, June 15 CENTURIA – Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative will hold its 74th-annual meeting at Frederic High School on Friday, June 15. Registration and a pie and icecream social with the co-op’s board of directors will take place from 6 to 7 p.m. in the cafeteria. Co-op employees will also be on hand to answer member questions and offer energy solutions. The meeting will begin in the auditorium at 7 p.m. The agenda will include reports from board President Edward Weber and the board treasurer, Mike Morris. The co-op will announce bylaw changes and results of the 2012 election for board directors in Districts 7, 8 and 9. General manager Bill Schmidt will conclude the meeting with a question-and-answer forum for co-op members.

“A significant advantage of co-op membership is member participation,” said Schmidt. “Since our beginning in 1938, Polk-Burnett has been owned by its members, and they have a voice in the way the electric cooperative operates. We will ask for member input throughout the meeting and I invite you to attend.” The first 150 members to register will receive a free pound a cheese from the Burnett Dairy Cooperative, plus all in attendance will have the opportunity to win a $50 credit on their electric bill; 20 names will be randomly selected at the end of the meeting for this attendance prize. For more information call 800-421-0283 or visit www.PolkBurnett.com. – from Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative

Watercolor winner to be announced at SCRMC Salad Luncheon

ST. CROIX FALLS – The winner of a watercolor painting by artist Mary Ann Rivard will be announced at 1 p.m., at the SCRMC Salad Luncheon … and more. Raffle tickets for the painting and for a hand-crocheted afghan by Jackie Hillman, will be available at the luncheon. The luncheon, a fundraiser to purchase direct patient medical equipment for St. Croix Regional Medical Center, is Friday, June 8, at the SCF High School between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Luncheon tickets, available at the door, are $8 for adults and $3 for children 10 and under. Monies earned will buy an iPro continuous blood glucose monitor for $2,000 and as many Pigg O Stats, at $4,359 each, as money earned will allow. A Pigg O Stat helps position infants for X-rays and will be used at SCRMC Community Clinics. Funding is supplemented by Thrivent for Lutherans, Polk - Burnett Chapter. The luncheon also receives generous support from area businesses, and SCRMC’s Volunteer Partners are happy to be working together with the community for their cause. The salad luncheon ... and more includes a bake sale featuring a big variety of home-baked items, jams and jellies. The book fair will offer discounts up to 70 percent off retail prices with a wide selection of books for children and adults. The

Polk County Library Federation

2012 Teen Poetry Contest Conclusion was held at the Amery Public Library on April 30. Front row (L to R): Melodie Tourville, eighth-grader from Amery, first-place winner and Kelly Granger, ninth-grade from Clear Lake, first-place winner. Back row: Debbie Trantow (judge); Parker Cox, seventh-grader from Clayton, third-place winner; Elaine Meyer from the Amery Public Library and Colleen Gifford Foxwell from the Polk County Library Federation. – Photo submitted AMERY – The 2012 Teen Poetry Contest winners are: Melodie Tourville, first place, eighth-grader at Amery Middle School. Here is her winning poem:

Soar through the sky, forget your fears, and listen to my lullaby, For all of those who committed suicide.

Suicide Lullaby

If there’s one thing I could have told you, It would be how much I love you.

It’s too late to say goodbye, All because you had to go and die. There are lessons in life we’re still learning, All about deaths with so many warnings. Like the rain my tears are pouring, All around me people are mourning, And I’ll cry out my lullaby, For all of those who committed suicide. Hush my angel don’t you cry, Everything will be alright, On this cold December night. Rest your head upon a cloud, Even though the weeping may be loud. Spread your wings, wipe your tears. Soar through the sky, forget your fears, And listen to my lullaby, For all of those who committed suicide. Out of the ashes you’ll rise, While everyone else slowly dies. Like a fire you burn, oh so wild. Why did you have to go you, you’re just a child. Remember me, in your time of need, and listen to my lullaby, for all of those who committed suicide. Hush my angel don’t you cry, Everything will be alright, On this cold December night. Rest your head upon a cloud, Even though the weeping may be loud. Spread your wings, wipe your tears.

Hush my angel don’t you cry. Everything will be alright, on this cold December night … – In loving memory of Eli James Krueger Also in first place was Kellyn Gragner, ninth-grader at Clear Lake High School. Here is her winning poem:

My Life is a Stage

My life is a stage, The world is my theater. I am the star With no understudy. My home is the chorus For they back me up And together great harmony Between us weaves. My family is my straight man And I crack the jokes. My audience cries In mirth as the roses fly. But for all my companions In my life’s production, I am alone In my dramatics, So I ensure that they don’t ever end. For the loneliness Is far worse than stage fright And so I go on. I wear many masks And sing many tunes For the delight of my Audience of humanity. Beneath each mask is another, more fantastic. But I have worn them so long That my fellow actors Have forgotten The shape and form

Of my features, As I too have done. As the troop travels, My life becomes The set and my person The characters dear: Smoke and mirrors, Impossible dreams And death In their own extremes. I live for applause, I thrive on laughter. Approval is the line to my existence, Though myself I have lost. Critics adore me, But who am I? How can I tell When I’m always acting? I’ve grown so used to A staged life. That I no longer Know anything else. My shape is unformed, My identity lost. I can no longer live without A role to play. But what does it matter? My audience loves me And their love is all that is left Of me. Second-place winners were: Kendra Erickson, eighth-grader of Frederic for her poem “Imagination”; and Kayla Klugow, 12thgrader at Amery for her poem “Waldosia.” Third-place winners were: Parker Cox, seventh-grader of Clayton for his poem “The Fightings Stopped”; and Wesley Sigworth, 10th-grader of Amery for his poem “Enemy of the Sun.” Honorable mentions were: Brianna Cran, 10th-grader of Amery for her poem “Simple Things”; and Kendra Erickson, eighth-grader of Frederic for her poem “Winter.”

Village Players Community Theatre to hold summer production kickoff potluck

Artist Mary Ann Rivard holds the watercolor painting she has donated to St. Croix Regional Medical Center’s 46th-annual salad luncheon on Friday, June 8. – Photo submitted gift shop will also show their fine wares. submitted

WEBSTER – The Village Players Community Theatre will hold its summer production kickoff potluck on Thursday, June 7, at 4:30 p.m. at the Voyager Village Community Center (Stables). This summer VPCT will be producing the play “Steel Magnolias,” by Robert Harling, with permission by Dramatist’s Play Service, directed by Ginna Erickson. The production will run July 26 through Aug. 4, Thursday through Sunday performances at the Voyager Village Community Center. “Steel Magnolias” is a comedy–drama about the bond between a group of Southern women in northwest Louisiana. The play, based on the death of play-

wright Harling’s younger sister, is filled with complex relationships and emotions of the six women characters, who utilize humor and lighthearted conversations to cope with the seriousness of underlying situations. Bring a dish to share and come to enjoy entertainment and a preview of this summer’s production. Everyone is invited to the kickoff potluck to celebrate the start of VPCT’s summer theater season. The new VPCT T-shirts are here and will be available for sale at the potluck kickoff. See ad in this edition for T-shirt discount coupon. - submitted


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Summer bell-ringing campaign for the Salvation Army

Help is needed

BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES - With summer upon us, and most of the schools wrapping up classes this week, one may find it hard to think about the red kettles that are oh so familiar at Christmastime at storefronts. But, this July, those red kettles will once again be stationed at various businesses throughout Polk and Burnett counties in somewhat of a Christmas in July Red Kettle campaign. With the current state of the economy and the slow recovery process, the Salvation Army has found that the need is greater than ever. Beginning June 28, and going throughout July, you will see red kettles located around the counties. When you are out and about and walk by a person standing with a bell and a red kettle, know that your donation you put in the kettle will help families and individuals in your own community who are struggling throughout the year. The Salvation Army in Polk and Burnett counties provides rent assistance, utilities, transportation and medical assistance to fami-

lies and individuals in need. The Salvation Army also provides milk coupons to the food pantries in Polk County that are redeemable at a local merchant along with the highly utilized Happy Kids Backpack Program which provides over 600 families throughout Polk and Burnett counties with a backpack full of food once a week who are currently on the free or reduced lunch program. The Salvation Army also assists in the Annie’s Lunchbox program held in Amery throughout the summer. That program allows children to receive a free home-cooked meal every weekday throughout the summer. Lunch is served at First Baptist Church in Amery every day at 11:45 a.m. beginning in July. They will also be providing lunch during the summer in the Luck School District. The Salvation Army in Polk and Burnett counties also operates one mass shelter in Balsam Lake called Serenity Home. Currently the home is housing 17 individuals and there is always a waiting list. There is also a family shelter located in Osceola that can provide housing for one family. This year the Salvation Army’s goal is

Residents plant fl flo owers

to raise as much money as possible to assist in these programs and more. Everyone’s help is needed to accomplish this goal. Donations are being taken at any red kettle throughout the county and they can be found at:

St. Croix Falls: Wal-Mart MarketPlace

Siren: Fourwinds Market

Grantsburg: Burnett Dairy Store Webster: Wayne’s Foods Plus If you are unable to get to a red kettle this holiday season you can mail your taxdeductible donation to: Salvation Army, 200 Polk Plaza, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. If you are able to volunteer a couple of hours of your time this summer, the Salvation Army is currently seeking help for bell ringers. You can volunteer a twohour shift at any of the locations listed and know that you are helping your friends and neighbors in need by donating just a couple of hours of your time. Plus by volunteering during the summer months, you get the joy of not having to ring bells in the cold weather. If you are interested in helping in this way, contact: 715-4851221 to set up a time to ring. - from the Salvation Army

Amery: Dick’s Market ALCO Osceola: Dick’s Market Clear Lake: Nilssen’s Super Valu Turtle Lake: Becker’s Super Valu Luck: Wayne’s Foods Plus

ABC Express Preschool graduations

ABC Express Preschool celebrated their preschool graduation on Tuesday, May 22, at Luck Lutheran Church with songs and finger plays for parents, relatives and friends, with Margie Nelson accompanying. Following the program, graduates received certificates from teachers Paula Hischer and Marigen Kastelle. Shown (L to R) front row: Tanner Morley, Jadyn Thaemert and Josh Pouliot. Second row: Samirah Zwieg, Daisy Roehm and Gavin King. Third row: Jack Gingras, Claire Nelson and Ayden Appel. - Photo submitted

Residents enjoyed planting flowers at Frederic Nursing and Rehab. Pictured are Michelle, activities director, in back, and Marian, Edna, Ruthie and Georgia with spades in hand. – Photo submitted

THANK YOU

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Jon E. Cruz, DDS 24164 State Road 35 Siren, Wis.

Betty Knutson, Proprietor

Machine Embroidery • Screen Printing Heat Transfers • Promotional Items Trophies • Plaques • Engraving Hand-Knit Sweaters, Mittens, Hats, Baby Apparel 101 Oak St. W. 562148 31a 42L P.O. Box 99 Frederic, WI 54837 Hours: Tues. - Fri. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Phone: 715-327-4807 Sat. 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. E-mail: tincup06@centurytel.net or by appointment.

Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Open Some Fridays

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME

JON E. CRUZ, DDS

* Preventative Care * * Crowns, Bridges, Cosmetic Dentistry * * Dentures, Partials, Relines * * Fillings, Root Canals and Extractions * GENTLE DENTAL CARE FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

715-349-2297

RCU Checking Plus

comes with $50! • No minimum balance • No monthly charge • Free RCU Check Card • Free online access • Convenient Direct Deposit • Plus $50!

$50 will be deposited into account at opening. Available to Members 16 years or older with no checking relationship. $50 charge will be assessed if account is closed within 6 months or if Direct Deposit is not established. If account was closed within last 24 months you may not be eligible for $50. Visit www.rcu.org for details. Offer may be subject to change.

Call 1-800-341-9911 or visit RCU today!

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Thanks again, Marty

SIREN DENTAL CLINIC

FREDERIC DESIGN & PROMOTION

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A big “Thank-You” to all of you that came to my benefit at Gliders. For the show of support for me with your best wishes, prayers and kindness. Also, to all of those who donated items for the auctions and the paddle wheel auction. I am so, so overwhelmed with the number of people that came to show their support for me. I know that “no one fights alone” as you have shown me.

Sign up for e-mails of breaking local news @ www.the-leader.net

Your savings federally insured to $250,000 National Credit Union Administration, a U.S. Government Agency


PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

Special Olympians get covered

W.I.N.G.S. Foundation donates for event tent by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Special Olympics athletes rarely toot their own horns or complain, but it seems the local chapter of Olympians have endured a pretty basic foible in recent years: It seems they have never had any protection from the elements during their athletic events. “Very few teams don’t have a tent,” stated Mike Hansen, whose 16-year-old son, Alex, has been competing with the Polk County team - and occasional bad weather - while trying to better his own performances. “When we go to district [competitions] we can never really go into the schools, so we’re usually outside, which means rain, snow, even hail sometimes!” stated head coach Carol Fougner. Fougner’s daughter, Crystal, is one of those Polk County athletes who not only has a habit of not complaining, but has quietly been competing with a giant smile at the Special Olympics Nationals for the past four years, often competing with Mother Nature.

Polk County Special Olympians as they departed for the Winter Games from Unity School last January. Pictured (L to R): Tim Eggers, Ryan Pierce, Heather Erickson, Jason Neidermire, Crystal Fougner, Jordan Warwas, Jarvis Warwas, Randy Anderson and Christopher Richter. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Anyone who has been to a high school track meet knows about the team tents; they are not only meant to protect competitors from the elements, but also serve as a home base of sorts - a gathering place, a spot to keep your gear, relax, stay out of

the wind or sun, or maybe let loose some harbored emotions in private. The tents are often the only protection an athlete has from many of the struggles of competition. And the Polk County Special Olympians were about the only local squad without that luxury. Enter several local supporters, including Craig and Cathy Miles, whose W.I.N.G.S. Foundation - Whatever Individual Needs Gear or Support - took notice. The W.I.N.G.S. Foundation has followed a basic philosophy of helping young people in nine local school districts, and generally promoting kindness, in the name of their late son, Mark. The group has become a machine for unique fundraising, providing everything from tennis shoes and musical instruments to scoreboards, safety equipment and more for individuals or groups that often don’t have the means to raise their own funds. It seems the tent purchase follows that broad philosophy to the letter. Craig Miles was on hand last week at

Unity Middle School where he and former Unity Principal and supporter Bill Alleva helped Carol Fougner and Mike Hansen with a little basic engineering and assembly - on a brand-new, blue, 10-by-10-foot portable event tent, with removable sides and even a little trailer assembly to transport it easily. The structure is valued at over $800. “I’m just glad we can help,” Miles said with a casual wink in an understated style. “And I think they can use it.” Carol Fougner was a bit overwhelmed as she and Hansen learned how to setup and collapse the new tent, “It’s all a shock to me!” she admitted. “I’m just so thankful.” The tent may seem like just a bit of sewn fabric and collapsible aluminum poles to most folks, but for the Special Olympians, it will likely mean so much more, because they now have what all the other teams have had for some time. Sometimes, that’s plenty. To learn about or donate to the W.I.N.G.S. Foundation, go to www.wingsontheweb.org

Craig Miles and Bill Alleva helped assemble and collapse the new tent for the Olympians.

Please Join Us To Celebrate

Jay & Joyce Bergstrand’s 50th Wedding Anniversary

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday, June 16, 2012, 1 - 7 p.m. 1631 S. White Ash Trail, Balsam Lake 715-268-9523 No gifts please

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Craig Miles (left) of the W.I.N.G.S. Foundation hands over a new event tent to local Special Olympians. Accepting the gift was coach Carol Fougner, parent Mike Hansen and supporter Bill Alleva.

Thank You

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St. Croix Falls, Store - 2145 U.S. Hwy. 8

715-483-3257

Chief Tom Howe and the Siren Fire Department would like to thank everyone who helped during our recent fire at Siren school on Tuesday, May 29, 2012. We would like to thank all of the area Fire Departments from Frederic, Grantsburg, Webster, St. Croix Hertel, as well as our own fire personnel. We’d also like to thank the Burnett County Sheriff Department personnel; the Siren Village Crew and the Siren Village Police; the St. Croix Tribal Police; the Wisconsin State Highway Patrol and the North Ambulance personnel. Food was provided by Fourwinds; the Pour House and Julie Dalsveen, for which we were very thankful. We would also like to thank the Siren school staff and students for leaving the building in an orderly fashion. Your initial evacuation steps helped us immensely. Again, we, of the Siren Fire Department, thank you all for a job well done, and if we missed anyone, we sincerely apologize. 562630 42L

NORTH MEMORIAL AMBULANCE

announces an upcoming

EMT CLASS

North Memorial Ambulance is currently recruiting people who may be interested in becoming an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and working for the local ambulance service. With ambulances located in Grantsburg, Webster, Danbury, A & H and Spooner, we hope to recruit additional EMTs to fill open positions. North Ambulance currently has both paid and “oncall” positions available. North Memorial Ambulance will reimburse 100% of the expenses of the course upon successful completion of the class and subsequent employment with our service.

For those who may be interested in becoming an EMT, the following EMT basic course will be held in the area:

TOWN OF SCOTT TOWN HALL

Starting Tuesday, September 4, 2012, finishing December 27, 2012. Held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 6 - 10 p.m. To register contact WITC at 1-800-243-9482, extension 5221 or visit www.witc.edu for further information. If you have questions regarding North Memorial Ambulance, please call 715-866-7990, ask for Mark or Joe.

Come and join our team!

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JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

Grantsburg High School scholarships and awards

GRANTSBURG - Monday evening, May 14, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $76,825 at the Grantsburg Schools auditorium. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards.

Anika Ames – DFS, $1,000 Arik Ames – DFS, $1,000 Zackery Arnold – DFS, $1,000 Cody Benedict – DFS, $1,000 Cody Benedict – Terri Kammeyer Memorial Scholarship, $500 Daniel Biorn – DFS, $1,000 Daniel Biorn – DFS - Principal Character Recognition, $500 Daniel Biorn – E&M Machine II, $250 Haley Burkhardt – DFS, $1,000 Haley Burkhardt – Carlyle Sherstad Memorial, $500 April Campana – DFS, $1,000 April Campana – Brenda Fallstrom Memorial, $125 April Campana – Claire Erickson Memorial, Farmers Independent Phone Co., $1,000 Seth Coy – DFS, $1,000 Seth Coy – Glen Johnson Memorial Scholarship, $500 Benjamin Davis – DFS, $1,000 Benjamin Davis – Outstanding Biology Student, $1,000 Rachel Diffee – DFS, $1,000 Rachel Diffee – Edling Funeral Home Scholarship, $500 Benjamin Dorff – DFS, $1,000 Benjamin Dorff – American Legion Brask-FossumJanke Post 185, $500 Benjamin Dorff – Grantsburg Rod and Gun Club, $250 Benjamin Dorff – Impact Your World, $400 Benjamin Dorff – Lions Schinzing Memorial, $500 Benjamin Dorff – Whitetails Unlimited, $250 Joseph Engelhart – DFS, $1,000 Breanna Fickbohm – DFS, $1,000

Breanna Fickbohm – Burnett County Association for Home and Community Education, $250 Kali Fleischauer – DFS, $1,000 Kali Fleischauer – Indianhead Credit Union, $500 Kali Fleischauer – Rotary In Honor of Merlin Johnson, $500 Kali Fleischauer – St. Croix Regional Medical Center, $1,000 Kali Fleischauer – Walter and Marion Jensen Memorial, $1,000 Matthew Hamann – DFS, $1,000 Nolan Hanson – DFS, $1,000 Nolan Hanson – Glenn Nelson Memorial, $500 Angela Heinecke – DFS, $1,000 Lucas Henneman – DFS, $1,000 Lucas Henneman – Grantsburg Rod and Gun Club, $250 Lucas Henneman – Masons, $500 Lucas Henneman – U.S. Bank, $500 Andrew Jones – DFS, $1,000 Jack Kard – DFS, $1,000 Jeffrey Konz – DFS, $1,000 Brendan Kutz – DFS, $1,000 Thomas Labatt – DFS, $1,000 Thomas Labatt – Scholarship in Memory of Nick Karels, $250 Daniel Larsen – DFS, $1,000 Daniel Larsen – Buccaneer Club, $150 Daniel Larsen – DFS - Principal Character Recognition, $500 Daniel Larsen – E&M Machine II, $250 Daniel Larsen – Grantsburg Fire Association, $100 Carly Larson – DFS, $1,000 Darian Larson – DFS, $1,000 Darian Larson – McNally Industries, $500 Darian Larson – Terri Kammeyer Memorial Scholarship, $500; Brandi Lee – DFS, $1,000 Brandi Lee – Burnett Dairy Co-op II, $750 Paul Lewis – DFS, $1,000

These Grantsburg seniors received scholarships or awards on Monday, May 14. – Photo by Priscilla Bauer Paul Lewis – Burnett Medical Center, $500 Nicholas Lindgren – DFS, $1,000 Amanda Lindus – DFS, $1,000 Amanda Lindus – American Legion Auxiliary Edna McCann, $500 Amanda Lindus – Burnett Dairy Co-op II, $750 Kaelah Maslow – DFS, $1,000 Kaelah Maslow – Community Bank Will Lauer Memorial, $500 Kaelah Maslow – McNally Industries, $500 Kaelah Maslow – Siren Dental Clinic Scholarship, $250 Devin McDaniel – DFS, $1,000 Nicole McKenzie – DFS, $1,000 Nicole McKenzie – Burnett Dairy Co-op, $1,250 Nicole McKenzie – LaVonne Seeman Scholarship, $1,000 Kelsey Meyer – DFS, $1,000 Stephanie Miklya – DFS, $1,000 Stephanie Miklya – Burnett Dairy Co-op, $1,250 Stephanie Miklya – Norine Scholarship, $1,000

Christina Moore – DFS, $1,000 Christina Moore – NUE Vo-Tech, $300 Kaitlyn Muellner – DFS, $1,000 David Ohnstad – DFS, $1,000 David Ohnstad – Burnett Medical Center, $500 David Ohnstad – Claire Erickson Memorial, Farmers Independent Phone Co. $1,000 David Ohnstad – DFS Principal Character Recognition, $500 David Ohnstad – Kenneth Abrahamsen Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 David Ohnstad – Walter and Marion Jensen Memorial, $1,000 Cora Olson – DFS, $1,000 Carl Palmquist – DFS, $1,000 Isaac Peterson – DFS, $1,000 Isaac Peterson – American Legion Brask-Fossum-Janke Post 185, $500 Isaac Peterson – Burnett Dairy Co-op, $1,250 Isaac Peterson – DFS Principal Character Recognition, $500 Isaac Peterson – E&M Machine, $500

Isaac Peterson – George Carpenter Memorial Scholarship, $250 Isaac Peterson – Lions Scholarship, $500 Isaac Peterson – Walter and Marion Jensen Memorial, $1,000 Damien Rasmussen – DFS, $1,000 Damien Rasmussen – Caspers Memorial Scholarship, $500 Kyle Roberts – DFS, $1,000 Kyle Roberts – Burnett Dairy Co-op II, $750 Kyle Roberts – Carlyle Sherstad Memorial, $500 Kyle Roberts – Claire Erickson Memorial, Farmers Independent Phone Co., $1,000 Kyle Roberts – E and M Machine, $500 Kyle Roberts – Mary Ann Erickson Memorial, $1,000 Hannah Rod – DFS, $1,000 Hannah Rod – DFS - Principal Character Recognition, $500 Hannah Rod – Grantsburg Women Working Together, $500 Hannah Rod – InterCounty Cooperative Publishing Association, $750 Samantha Scribner – DFS, $1,000

Samantha Scribner – Caspers Memorial Scholarship, $500 Samantha Scribner – McNally Industries, $500 Samantha Scribner – Red Cross Student Bloodmobile Coordinator, $250 Mathew Swenson – DFS, $1,000 Mathew Swenson – Lions Scholarship, $500 Mathew Swenson – Loyle Erickson Memorial, $100 Nicole Ticknor – DFS, $1,000 Nicole Ticknor – LaVonne Seeman Scholarship, $1,000 Nicole Ticknor – Mabel Thor Scholarship, $600 Nicole Ticknor – Mary Ann Erickson Memorial, $1,000 Matthew Van Deusen – DFS, $1,000 Emily Virgilio – DFS, $1,000 Craig Vollendorf – DFS, $1,000 Craig Vollendorf – U.S. Bank, $500 Gabrielle Witzany – DFS, $1,000 Gabielle Witzany – NUE College, $300 Brandon Woodrich – DFS, $1,000. – submitted

Webster High School scholarships and awards WEBSTER Friday evening, May 4, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $31,500 at the Webster High School. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards. Mackenzie Koelz – Saunders Family, $10,000 Mary Arnold – Roberto Pearson Memorial, $500 Mackenzie Koelz – American Legion Auxiliary, $500 Matt Elmgren – American Legion Auxiliary, $500 Chelsea Larson – American Legion Auxiliary, $500 Joey Erickson – American Legion Post 96, $500 Josh Baer – American Legion Post 96, $500 Brittany Maxwell – Bremer Bank, $500 Alyce DeBlase – St. John’s Our Lady’s CCW, $250 Audrey Mulliner – Danbury Fire and Rescue, $500 Olivia Kopecky – Danbury Fire and Rescue, $500 Mackenzie Koelz – Danbury Fire and Rescue, $500 Matt Hophan – Danbury Lions Club, $650 Josh Baer – Danbury Lions Club, $650 Mary Arnold – Danbury Lions Club, $650

Matt Hophan – Diamond Collision, $250 Mary Arnold – Diamond Collision, $250 Matt Hophan – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Josh Baer – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Mary Arnold – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Olivia Kopecky – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Austin Bork – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Mackenzie Koelz – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Audrey Mulliner – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Brad Krause – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Ashley Irvine – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Matt Elmgren – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Chelsea Larson – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Melissa Gustavson – Webster Scholarship Committee, $300 Leslea Wiggins – Federated Co-ops, Inc., $200 Austin Bork – Federated Co-ops, Inc., $200 Austin Bork – Grateful graduate, $1,000 Brittany Maxwell – Indianhead Credit Union, $500

The 2012 Webster seniors who received scholarships or earned awards were honored Friday, May 4, at the Webster High School. – Photo submitted Joey Erickson – InterCounty Co-op Publishing Association, $750 Joey Erickson – Log Cabin Store and Eatery, $250 Matt Hophan – Myrtle Ketel Memorial, $500 Melissa Gustavson – Myrtle Ketel Memorial, $500 Brittany Maxwell – Clendenning Memorial, $1,000 Audrey Mulliner – Clendenning Memorial, $1,000 Leslea Wiggins – Women of the Moose, $150 Josh Baer – Matt Erickson Memorial, $1,000

Mary Arnold – Matt Erickson Memorial, $1,000 Ashley Irvine – Matt Erickson Memorial, $1,000 Josh Baer – Danbury Area Chamber, $250 Matt Elmgren – Burnett County Moose Lodge 1194, $250 Josh Baer – Nexen Group, Inc., $750 Mackenzie Koelz – Nexen Group, Inc., $750 Brad Krause – Bill and Jennie Sperling, $1,000 Ashley Irvine – St. Croix Regional Medical Center, $1,000

Sarah Nyberg – Webster Lions Club, $500 Olivia Kopecky – Webster Lions Club, $500 Audrey Mulliner – Webster Lions Club, $500 Matt Elmgren – Webster Lions Club, $500 Chelsea Larson – Webster Lions Club, $500 Olivia Kopecky – Webster Lioness Club, $300 Mackenzie Koelz – Webster Lioness Club, $300 Chelsea Larson – Webster Lioness Club, $300 Brad Krause – Whitetails Unlimited, $250

Matt Hophan – Wonderland Snow Trails, $500 Josh Baer – Wonderland Snow Trails, $500 Brad Krause – Webster/Siren Rotary, $750 Olivia Kopecky – PolkBurnett Electric, $1,000 Brad Krause – Polk-Burnett Electric, $1,000 Mackenzie Koelz – PolkBurnett Electric, $1,000 Sarah Nyberg – Northwest Passage-Scott G. Treichel, $500 Melissa Gustavson – Northwest Passage-Scott G. Treichel, $500 Sarah Nyberg – Cozy Corner Trails Snowmobile/ATV Club, $200 Mary Arnold – Band Secretary Award, $150 Chelsea Larson – Burnett Dairy Co-op, $1,250 Alyce DeBlase – Shinler Family Memorial, $500 Leslea Wiggins – Larry Java Music Memorial, $500 Brad Krause – Siren Dental Clinic, $250 Melissa Gustavson – Garlie Family, $200 Josh Baer – Seitzburg Family Football Memorial, $300. – submitted


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

LUCK Wednesday evening, May 9, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $48,000 at the Luck Schools auditorium. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards. Anthony Aguado – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Taylar Anderson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Tyler Anderson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Brett Bartylla – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Jesse Erickson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Lindsey Erickson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Julie Franzel – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Clint Gage – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Shardae Garcia – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Taylor Hacken – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Jessie Harrison – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Brandon Holdt – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Michael Jenssen – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Summer Johnson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Laurie Jorgenson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Michael Keenan – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Benjamin Kufalk – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Jacob LaDuke – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Caitlin Ledin – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Maia Lehmann – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Cain Lindquist – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Morgyn McGinnity – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Danielle Nelson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Spencer Nelson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Nicholas Otlo – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Krystal Ouellette – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Matthew Pennington – Luck Community Graduate

Luck High School scholarships and awards Fund, $125 Morgan Pullin – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Jesse Rennicke – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 John Richey – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Blake Rust – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Billy Schallenberger – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Jacob Schrock – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Andrew Sund – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Michelle Tomlinson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Hunter Wilson – Luck Community Graduate Fund, $125 Tony Aguado – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Maia Lehmann – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Morgyn McGinnity – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Danielle Nelson – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Caitlin Ledin – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Michael Jenssen – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Morgan Pullin – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Michelle Tomlinson – Business Education Scholarship, $150 Tony Aguado – Bone Lake Foundation, $300 Morgyn McGinnity – Rod Kennedy Memorial Writing Award, $500 Summer Johnson – Harvey and Hazel Dueholm Scholarship, $1,000 Tony Aguado – Allied Waste Services, $500 Maia Lehmann – Allied Waste Services, $500 Brett Bartylla – American Legion, $500 Caitlin Ledin – American Legion Auxiliary, $500 Tony Aguado – VFW, $500 Morgan Pullin – VFW Auxiliary, $500 Julie Franzel – Amery Regional Medical Clinic Scholarship, $500 Tony Aguado – Bryce Hacker Memorial Scholarship, $500 Maia Lehmann – Bryce Hacker Memorial Scholarship, $500 Jacob Schrock – Burnett County Sentinel, $500 Hunter Wilson – Frandsen Bank and Trust Scholarship, $500 Ben Kufalk – Frandsen Bank and Trust Scholarship, $500 Lindsey Erickson – Indianhead Credit Union, $500 Michael Jenssen – Jerome Robert Larson Education, $500 Brett Bartylla – Luck Telephone Company, $500

Members of the Luck High School Class of 2012 received their scholarships and awards on May 9. – Photo by Greg Marsten Tony Aguado – Lakeland Communications WSTF, $1,500 Shardae Garcia – Luck Alumni, $500 Summer Johnson – Luck Alumni, $500 Brett Bartylla – Luck Alumni, $500 Morgyn McGinnity – Sterling Bank Scholarship, $1,000 Shardae Garcia – Sterling Bank Scholarship, $1,000 Taylor Hacker – Sterling Bank Scholarship, $1,000 Summer Johnson – Luck FFA Alumni Scholarship, $1,500 Clint Gage – Luck FFA Alumni Scholarship, $300 Maia Lehmann – Luck Lions Club Scholarship, $500 Tony Aguado – Luck Lions Club Scholarship, $500 Krystal Ouellette – Luck Lions Club Scholarship, $500 Brandon Holdt – Luck Snowmobile Club, $500 Danielle Nelson – Schoolto-Work Business Scholarship, $500 Krystal Ouellette – Schoolto-Work Business Scholarship, $500 Ben Kufalk – School-toWork Business Scholarship, $500 Morgan Pullin – School-toWork Business Scholarship, $500 Julie Franzel – School-toWork Business Scholarship, $500 Tony Aguado – School-toWork Business Scholarship, $500 Spencer Nelson – Schoolto-Work Business Scholarship, $500 Michael Jenssen – Schoolto-Work Business Scholarship, $500 Taylar Anderson – Terry Van Himbergen, $700 Michael Jenssen – Burnett Dairy Cooperative, $750 Summer Johnson – Burnett Dairy Cooperative, $750 Hunter Wilson – InterCounty Cooperative Publishing Association, $750 Jesse Rennick – Joe and Margaret Schauls Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Brett Bartylla – Luck Teachers Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Morgyn McGinnity – Luck

Siren High School scholarships

SIREN - Friday evening, May 11, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $11,000 at the Siren Schools auditorium. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards. – Carl Heidel Rachel Gloodt – Lund Brown American Legion Post 132, $250 Andrew Brown – Siren Dental Clinic, $250 Felicia Paulzine – Burnett County Women of the Moose, $150 Paige Kelley – Burnett County Loyal Order of the Moose, $250 Amber Hall – Siren Lions Club, $300 Paige Kelley – Siren Lions Club, $300 Andrew Brown – Siren Chamber of Commerce, $500

Evan Oachs – Community Bank of Siren, $500 Evan Oachs – Indianhead Credit Union, $500 Rachel Gloodt – Bremer Bank, $500 Leanne Pigman – St. Croix Regional Medical Center, $1,000 Isaac Wegner – American Red Cross, $125 Christina Lunda – American Red Cross, $125 Andrew Brown – Moms for Kids, $500 Amber Hall – Moms for Kids, $300 Luke Bollant – Moms for Kids, $150 Isaac Wegner – Moms for Kids, $150 Felicia Paulzine – Maurer Power, $100 Andrew Brown – Siren Education Association, $500 Rachel Gloodt – Siren Education Association, $500

Evan Oachs – Jane Wisse Wellness, $1,000 Evan Oachs – Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, $750 Rachel Gloodt – Lake Country Riders Snowmobile Club, $500 Evan Oachs – Whitetails Unlimited, $250 Luke Bollant – S Club/Bernick’s Pepsi, $250 Rachel Gloodt – S Club/Bernick’s Pepsi, $250 Tricia Kopecky – Sam’s Motor Express, $125 Luke Bollant – Sam’s Motor Express, $125 Taylor Hagen – Sam’s Motor Express, $125 Amber Hall – Sam’s Motor Express, $125 Taylor Hagen – Siren-Webster Rotary, $750 Taylor Hagen – St. John’s/Our Lady’s CCW, $250.

Teachers Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Danielle Nelson – St. Croix Regional Medical Scholarship, $1,000 Taylor Hacker – Schaffer Manufacturing, $1,500 Maia Lehmann – WINGS Foundation, $250 Michael Jenssen – Academic Excellence Scholarship Award, $2,250 per year/4 years Julie Franzel – Scholastic Award Krystal Ouellette – Scholastic Award Tony Aguado – Perfect attendance Michael Jenssen – Perfect attendance Michael Jenssen – Academic Letter Award Maia Lehmann – Academic Letter Award Morgyn McGinnity – Academic Letter Award Julie Franzel – Polk-Burnett Washington, D.C., Tour Delegate Michael Jenssen – National Honor Society Recognition Tony Aguado – National Honor Society Recognition Taylar Anderson – National Honor Society Recognition Julie Franzel – National Honor Society Recognition Maia Lehmann – National Honor Society Recognition Morgan McGinnity – National Honor Society Recognition Taylor Anderson – FCCLA Recognition Shardae Garcia – FCCLA Recognition Tony Aguado – Business Award Jesse Erickson – Business Award Lindsey Erickson – Business Award Taylor Hacker – Business Award Michael Jenssen – Business Award Michael Keenan – Business Award Caitlin Ledin – Business Award Maia Lehmann – Business Award Cain Lindquist – Business Award Morgyn McGinnity – Business Award

Danielle Nelson – Business Award Spencer Nelson – Business Award Nick Otlo – Business Award Morgan Pullin – Business Award Michelle Tomlinson – Business Award Michael Jenssen – Keyboarding Hall of Fame, 63 wpm Krystal Ouellette – Keyboarding Hall of Fame, 63 wpm Michelle Tomlinson – Keyboarding Hall of Fame, 82 wpm Maia Lehmann – Keyboarding Hall of Fame, 88 wpm Jesse Erickson – Keyboarding Hall of Fame, 98 wpm Lindsey Erickson – Cloverleaf Award Taylor Hacker – Cloverleaf Award Michael Keenan – Cloverleaf Award Maia Lehmann – Cloverleaf Award Morgyn McGinnity – Cloverleaf Award Danielle Nelson – Cloverleaf Award Morgan Pullin – Cloverleaf Award Michelle Tomlinson – Cloverleaf Award Jake LaDuke – Cloverleaf Award Krystal Ouellette – Cloverleaf Award Danielle Nelson – Concessions Award Michael Jenssen – Concessions Award Jake LaDuke – Concessions Award Morgyn McGinnity – Drama Club Award - Certificate Maia Lehmann – Drama Club Award - Certificate Mike Jenssen – Drama Club Award - Certificate Matt Pennington – Drama Club Award - Certificate Michelle Thompson – Drama Club Award - Certificate Brett Bartylla – Drama Club Award - Certificate Nick Otlo – Drama Club Award - Certificate Michael Keenan – Drama

Club Award - Certificate Michael Jenssen – Drama Club Award - Cup Morgyn McGinnity – Drama Club Award - Cup Matt Pennington – Drama Club Award – Cup Maia Lehmann – Drama Club Award – Cup Michael Jenssen – Rod Kennedy Memorial Drama Award Morgyn McGinnity – Rod Kennedy Memorial Drama Award Matt Pennington – Rod Kennedy Memorial Drama Award Maia Lehmann – Rod Kennedy Memorial Drama Award Matt Pennington – Forensics Award Morgyn McGinnity – Forensics Award Maia Lehmann – Forensics Award, all three years of exemplary performance Michael Jenssen – Forensics Award, four years going to state Morgan Pullin – U.S. Army Reserve National Scholar Athlete Hunter Wilson – U.S. Army Reserve National Scholar Athlete Morgan Pullin – U.S. Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award Tony Aguado – U.S. Marine Corps Distinguished Athlete Award Michael Jenssen – Lakeland Conference Academic Award Maia Lehmann – Lakeland Conference Academic Award Taylar Anderson – Lakeland Conference Academic Award Morgyn McGinnity – Lakeland Conference Academic Award Maia Lehmann – WIAA Scholar/Athlete Award Jesse Rennicke – WIAA Scholar/Athlete Award Julie Franzel – Senior Athlete Recognition Ben Kufalk – Senior Athlete Recognition Maia Lehmann – Senior Athlete Recognition Tony Aguado – Senior Athlete Recognition Jesse Rennicke – Senior Athlete Recognition Morgyn McGinnity – Senior Athlete Recognition Jake LaDuke – Senior Athlete Recognition Brandon Holdt – Senior Athlete Recognition Morgan Pullin – Senior Athlete Recognition Spencer Nelson – Senior Athlete Recognition Hunter Wilson – Senior Athlete Recognition Jacob Schrock – Senior Athlete Recognition Maia Lehmann – Senior Athlete of the Year Award Jesse Rennicke – Senior Athlete of the Year Award. – submitted

American Legion Auxiliary presents scholarship Pictured is Amanda Vondrasek (L) receiving a state American Legion Auxiliary Scholarship for $1,000. She is sponsored by Unit 145, St. Croix Falls, where she is a member. Presenting is Mary Chapin, unit president. Vondrasek graduated from Unity and will attend college for interior design. – Photo submitted


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Miss Grantsburg pageant

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The 2012 Grantsburg royalty just kept smiling for all the flashing cameras of friends and family wanting photos of the newly crowned court., at the close of the Miss Grantsburg pageant during Big Gust Days.

Newly crowned Miss Grantsburg 2012 RuthAnn Pedersen gave the traditional royal wave to her loyal subjects at the Miss Grantsburg queen pageant held June 1 at the Grantsburg High School auditorium. Miss Grantsburg 2011 Stephanie Miklya remembered her year as Miss Grantsburg, fondly recalling special times with her court and thanking her parents and sponsors for their support. Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Miss Grantsburg candidates Arikka Davison, RuthAnn Pedersen and Lea Chute entertained the pageant audience with their lively opening number of the popular Kenny Loggins song, “Footloose.”

Alexandra Kammeyer gave a happy wave after being crowned the 2012 Little Miss Grantsburg at the Miss Grantsburg pageant on Friday evening.

ABOVE: Little Miss Grantsburg contestants Gabrielle Erickson, Brittany Fickbolm-Goepfert and Kylie Blakeslee showed off their dance moves performing to “Wake Me Up” by Wham! with other little miss candidates at the Miss Joe Dumas and Gus Johnson gave a moving performance Grantsburg Pageant last Friday evening. of the Guns-n-Roses song “Every Rose Has Its Thorn” during Miss Grantsburg contestants enterthe Miss Grantsburg pageant Friday evening, June 1, in the tained the pageant audience with a variGrantsburg High School auditorium. ety of musical performances during the talent portion of the Miss Grantsburg pageant. Lea Chute did a toe-tapping, audience clapping, clogging routine to “If You Want My Love.” RuthAnn Peterson sang and played guitar to Sugarland’s “Baby Girl.” And contestant Arikka Davison gave a fine vocal performance to “The Only Exception” by Paramore.

Jeffrey Miklya gave a blushing look as he waited The 2012 Little Miss Grantsburg court, Second Princess Carpatiently to escort his aunt, Miss Grantsburg 2011 ley Gross, Little Miss Grantsburg Alexandra Kammeyer and First Stephanie Miklya, across the stage at the Miss Princess Ashlin Olson, took center stage after being crowned Grantsburg 2012 pageant. during the Miss Grantsburg pageant.


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

Big Gust Days

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The Big Gust Days antique tractor show was once again a crowd pleaser. Richard Roubinek of Pine City, Minn., was especially interested in this old tractor. “I’ve got one just like it at home,” said the Farmall fan. Derek Paulson found a tractor just to his size and liking at the Big Gust Days tractor show in Grantsburg last weekend. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer

The Big Gust Days antique tractor show had a variety of tractors to see.

Cycle enthusiasts enjoyed checking out all the shiny machines on Main Street at the annual Big Gust Days motorcycle show in Grantsburg Saturday morning.

A parade of tractors making their way down Main Street was quite a sight to see at the Big Gust Days celebration in Grantsburg Saturday morning, June 2.

This Twin City Tractor model 27-44 is serial No. 26 out of 839 late units made from 1926-1930. This tractor is the oldest surviving unit from the 839 late ones made. There are only 20-35 known in Wisconsin at the present time. Twin City tractors were a well-built expensive tractor and many of them were still hard at work well into the 1970s. A brute of a road builder, people hardly live long enough to wear one of these great old pieces of history out.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

Big Gust Days

Fireman Bob Barnard stacked ‘em to bring to the hundreds of hungry folks coming to the annual Big Gust Days Grantsburg Fire Department pancake breakfast.

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Having fun at their first official appearance as the newly crowned 2012 Grantsburg royalty, Second Princess Lea Chute, First Princess Arikka Davison and Miss Grantsburg Ruth Ann Pedersen served up pancakes and smiles at the annual Big Gust Days Grantsburg Fire Department pancake breakfast on Saturday, June 2. Photos by Priscilla Bauer Grantsburg Lions Club members Bruce Benedict and Carol Zeiler asked people coming to the Grantsburg Fire Department pancake breakfast to say “Yes, I will” to being organ donors. The Lions Club members spent Saturday morning registering people for the Yes, I Will Wisconsin organ donor program to help the 1,500 people in Wisconsin waiting for organs.

Grantsburg firemen Gene McLain and Joel Klatt flipped flapjacks during the annual Big Gust Days fire department pancake breakfast.

Pigtailed Gracie Larson of Rock Creek, Minn., took a turn at tractor pedaling at the Big Gust Days celebration in Grantsburg Saturday morning.

A young fan of fire engines checked out the antique toy used to collect donations at the annual Grantsburg Fire Department pancake breakfast fundraiser held during Big Gust Days on Saturday, June 2.


PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

Big Gust Days

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Big Gust Days apple race winners posed with their prized apples. Winners (L to R): Third place, Melissa Johnson; first place, Cilla Bauer; fifth place, Gerald Johnson; fourth place, Pam and Travis Gaspar; and second-place winners, Justyce Wedin, Mya Kuhlmann and Zaidyn Wedin. – Photo submitted

Grantsburg 2012 royalty, Second Princess Lea Chute, Miss Grantsburg Ruth Ann Pedersen and First Princess Arikka Davison, showed their silly side before Saturday’s Big Gust apple race at Memory Lake in Grantsburg. The royal trio then started the race, pouring the apples into the river for a float to the finish line. Photos by Priscilla Bauer unless otherwise noted

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There were plenty of games and other fun activities at Big Gust Days in Grantsburg Saturday morning for the kids to try. Donevan Benson, Travis Gaspar and Lane Hennessey found the warm June weather just right for some water play.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

BALSAM LAKE – Monday, May 14, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $60,000 at the Unity High School. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards. Steven Anderson – Milltown Fire Department, $500. Jade Baerg – Amery Farmers Union Co-op, $160 Jade Baerg – Balsam Lake Ellis Hagler American Legion Auxiliary Unit 278, $300 Jade Baerg – Milltown Fire Department, $500 Jade Baerg – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Jade Baerg – Unity FFA Alumni Scholarship, $200 Jade Baerg – Falcon Scholarship, UW-River Falls, $6,000 Jade Baerg – State FFA Degree Ben Bengtson – American Legion George Melby Post 254 Milltown, $500 Scott Bever – Badger State Boys Representative Award Brittney Bublitz – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Brittney Bublitz – Unity FFA Scholarship, $50 Brittney Bublitz – Presidential Distinction Scholarship, Concordia, Moorehead, $6,400 Brittney Bublitz – Adolph Timm Post 346 American Legion Citizenship Award Zach Cardot – State FFA Degree Faith Christensen – American Red Cross, $375 Faith Christensen – Amery Farmers Union Co-op, $160 Faith Christensen – United VFW and Auxiliary Post 6856, $500 Faith Christensen – Unity FFA Scholarship, $50 Jenna Christensen – Mark Palmberg Memorial, $1,000 Jenna Christensen – Outstanding English Scholar12th Olivia Coen – Outstanding English Scholar-10th.

Unity High School scholarships and awards Aaron Cousins – Amery Farmers Union Co-op, $160 Aaron Cousins – Centuria Women’s Club, $250 Aaron Cousins – American Legion George Melby Post 254 Milltown, $500 Xavier Foeller – Milltown Community Club Scholarship, $500 Xavier Foeller – SCRMC Health Care Scholarship, $1,000 Xavier Foeller – Unity Booster Club, $200 Xavier Foeller – Unity Education Assn., $350 Justin Forster – Bishop Fixtures and Millwork, $500 Justin Forster – Clarence and Dola Somonsen, $300 Justin Forster – Valona Memorial, $300 Justin Forster – State FFA Degree Paige Gurtner – Randy Walker, $500 Paige Gurtner – Van Gundy Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Paige Gurtner – Falcon Scholarship, UW-River Falls, $6,000 Paige Gurtner – Outstanding Math Scholars Award Gary Gustafson – United VFW and Auxiliary Post 6856, $500 Ashley Johnson – Adolph Timm American Legion Post 346/Auxiliary Scholarship, $250 Ashley Johnson – Amery Luck Regional Medical center, $500 Ashley Johnson – River Place Dental, $500 Ashley Johnson – SCRMC Volunteer Partners Scholarship, $500 Ashley Johnson –Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Etta Johnston – InterCounty Publishing Assn., $750 Etta Johnston – National Honor Society, $100. Mitchell Johnston – Amery Farmers Union Co-op, $160 Mitchell Johnston – Balsam Lake Rod and Gun Club, $500 Mitchell Johnston – Frank

2012 Unity scholarship recipients included: Row 1: Connor MacKinnon, Faith Christensen, Cassie Sturgul, Ashley Johnson, Brittany Thomfohrda and Kaitlyn MacKinnon. Row 2: Randy Juleen, Justin Forster, Gary Gustafson, Emily Petzel, Jenna Christensen and Paige Gurtner. Row 3: Brittney Bublitz, Elizabeth Thuerkoff, Etta Johnson, Luke Peterson, Steven Krueger and Jenny Vlasnik. Row 4: Sami Palmquist, Steven Anderson, Brady Turner, Alec Larson, Xavier Foeller and Aaron Cousins. Row 5: Reed Sorensen, Ben Bengtson, Mitchell Johnston and Jade Baerg. – Photo by Jeanne Alling Reynolds Memorial, $100 Mitchell Johnston – Indianhead Sheep Breeders Association, $250 Mitchell Johnston – State FFA Degree Randy Juleen – Calvin Anderson, $500 Randy Juleen – American Legion George Melby Post 254 Milltown, $500 Neil Kline – Outstanding Social Studies Scholar Award Josh Kreft – State FFA Degree Josh Kreft – State Star in Agribusiness Finalist Award Steven Krueger – Unity Education Assn., $350 Steven Krueger – Adolph Timm Post 346 American Legion Citizenship Award. Alec Larson – PA Hauge, $500 Alec Larson – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Connor MacKinnon – Balsam Lake Ellis Hagler American Legion Auxiliary Unit 278, $300 Connor MacKinnon – Unity Student Council Spirit of Unity Scholarship, $150 Connor MacKinnon – Leadership Award Kaitlyn MacKinnon – Bal-

sam Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, $250 Kaitlyn MacKinnon – American Legion George Melby Post 254 Milltown, $500 Kaitlyn MacKinnon – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Kaitlyn MacKinnon – Unity Education Assn., $350 Kaitlyn MacKinnon – Unity Lions Club, $500 Kristy Mikl – Marcel K. Lynum Scholarship, UWRiver Falls, $1,000 Amanda Minke – Most Improved Science Scholar Award Amanda Minke – Leadership Award Shay Nelson – Badger State Girls Representative Award Alisha Nutter – SCRMC Volunteer Partners Kathy Nesgoda Scholarship, $1,000 Samantha Palmquist – Unity FFA Scholarship, $50 Luke Peterson – Balsam Lake Rehab and Protection District Scholarship, $500 Luke Peterson – Kolstad Family Funeral Home Scholarship, $500 Luke Peterson – Diversity Scholarship, UW-Barron

County, $300 Emily Petzel – Amery Farmers Union Co-op, $160 Emily Petzel – Balsam Lake Rod and Gun Club, $500 Emily Petzel – Burnett Dairy Co-op Scholarship, $750 Emily Petzel – Polk County Farm Bureau, $500 Emily Petzel – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Emily Petzel – Unity FFA Alumni Scholarship, $100 Emily Petzel – Indianhead Sheep Breeders Association, $250 Emily Petzel – Ag Source Polk County, $500 Emily Petzel – Dorothy Strong, UW-Madison, $400 Emily Petzel – Collegiate FFA Scholarship, $300 Emily Petzel – NUE Outstanding Student Emily Petzel – State FFA Degree Emily Petzel – Outstanding Science Scholar Award Emily Petzel – State Star Farmer Finalist Award Reed Sorensen – Dahlberg Memorial, $500 Kaina Zygowicz – Badger State Girls Representatives

Award Mitch Stage – State FFA Degree Cassandra Sturgul – American Red Cross, $375 Cassandra Sturgul – Amery Farmers Union Coop, $160 Cassandra Sturgul – Balsam Lake Rod and Gun Club, $500 Brittany Thomfohrda – Unity Booster Club, $200 Brittany Thomfohrda – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Brittany Thomfohrda – Unity Leos Club, $250 Brittany Thomfohrda – W.I.N.G.S. Scholarship, $250 Brittany Thomfohrda – Caroline Erickson Scholarship, UW-Superior Foundation, $2,500 Brittany Thomfohrda – Honor Athlete and Outstanding Athlete Award Brady Turner – Adam Peterson Memorial Scholarship, $250 Brady Turner – Balsam Lake Area Chamber of Commerce, $250 Brady Turner – Burnett Dairy Co-op Scholarship, $1,250 Brady Turner – John Peper Memorial Scholarship, $500 Brady Turner – UHS Class of ’65, $500 Brady Turner – Unity Education Scholarship Foundation, $750 Brady Turner – Richard O. Klatt Scholarship, $500 Brady Turner – W.I.N.G.S. Scholarship, $250 Brady Turner – Outstanding Athlete Award Brady Turner – Honor Athlete Award Elizabeth Thuerkoff – Believers, $100 Jenny Vlasnik – National Mutual Benefit, $1,000 Jenny Vlasnik – River Valley Physicians, $1,000 Amanda Vondrasek – American Legion Auxiliary State Merit and Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Ben Zahler – Outstanding English Scholar, 11th. – submitted

Frederic High School scholarships and awards FREDERIC – Monday evening, May 14, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $25,000 at the Frederic High School. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards. Chris Hopp – Citizen Scholarship Foundation of Frederic Scholarship, $1,000 April Halverson – C.J. Franseen Merit Award, $1,000 Allie Lundblade – Dan Gabrielson Memorial Scholarship, $500 Kali Otte – Karl Ludvigson Educational Scholarship, $1,000 Lauren Domagala – Donna and Roman L. Weinzierl Scholarship, $1,500 Lauren Domagala – Donna Struck LeFurgy Weinzierl Memorial Scholarship, $1,500 Erik Stoner – Donna Struck LeFurgy Weinzierl Memorial Scholarship, $1,500 Waylon Buck – Bremer Bank–Frederic Branch Scholarship, $1,000 Michael Tesch – InterCounty Cooperative Publishing Association, $750 Jamie Taft – Rowe Funeral Home Scholarship, $500 Alex Miller – Lioness Club Scholarship, $500

Megan Amundson – Family of John & Rose Shull Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 April Halverson – Harlan Shull Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Shabana Mishler – Community Education Scholarship, $500 Erik Stoner – Carl & Hilda Ahlgren Education Scholarship, $1,000 Chris Hopp – Henry Lawrence Ahlgren Educational Scholarship, $1,000 Allison Martin – Luck Medical Clinic / A Branch of ARMC, $1,000 Brittani Hughes – Jean Lang Memorial Scholarship, $200 Ashley Kurkowski – Marcella (Sally) Surbaugh Memorial Scholarship, $300 Danielle Swanson – Marilyn and Phil Knuf Educational Scholarship, $500 Leah Engebretson – Marilyn and Phil Knuf Educational Scholarship, $500 Dayton Rivera – Timothy R. Carlson Memorial Scholarship, $350 Tina Marcyan – Burnett County Moose Lodge Scholarship, $250 Maria Miller – Jane Wisse Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 Brandy Gravelle – Marty Niles Technical College Scholarship, $250

The 2012 Frederic seniors who received scholarships were honored Monday, May 14, at the Frederic High School. – Photo by Becky Amundson Sara Underwood – Marty Niles Technical College Scholarship, $250 Leah Engebretson – Marty Niles Athletic Scholarship, $500 Bryce Williamson – Marty Niles Athletic Scholarship, $500

Nicole Coulter – Charles E. Lewis Scholarship, $500 Emily Byerly – Kaye LaRayne Heine Memorial Scholarship, $500 Brenna Jensen – Janell Fellrath Memorial Scholarship, $300 Jordyn Siebenthal – Frederic Arts Inc. Excellence in

The Inter-County Leader

the Arts Scholarship, $250 Ashley Wendelboe – Frederic High School Class of 1972 Scholarship, $200 Tabitha Java – James R. & Suzanne Zeiler Scholarship, $200 Michelle Jensen – Indianhead Credit Union, $500

Connect to your community

Autumn Schmidt – River Valley Physicians Scholarship, $1,000 Corissa Schmidt – St. Croix Regional Medical Center, $1,000.– submitted


PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

St. Croix Falls High School scholarships and awards

ST. CROIX FALLS – Wednesday, May 9, graduating seniors received a generous series of scholarship awards that totaled more than $127,999 at the St. Croix Falls High School. Listed are the scholarships, the recipients and the amounts of the awards.

Taylor Ader – Dollars for Scholars, $500 Cyrus Aluni – Dollars for Scholars, $250 Ethan Anderson – St. Croix Falls/Taylors Falls Lions Club, $1,200 Haley Anderson – St. Croix Falls teachers, $500 Haley Anderson – St. Croix Valley Health Care Foundatoin, $400 Haley Anderson – Trap Rock Quarry, $1,000 Jessica Berganini – Steve Skemp Memorial, $500 Alexander Bertram – Almelund Legion/Blaine Hunter Memorial, $500 Samson Blesi – Dollars for Scholars, $250 Benjamin Clausen – RVMC Physicians Group, $1,000 Benjamin Clausen – American Heart Association, $250 Benjamin Clausen – Boys Booster Basketball, $200 Benjamin Clausen – Dresser Lions Club, $500 Benjamin Clausen – Trollhaugen, $500 Chad Cochran – Former Amery Farmers Union, $500 Nicholas DeConcini – Former Amery Farmers Union, $500 Christopher Eisen – Fred Yarolimek Memorial, $500 Alexis Erickson – Girls Booster Basketball, $200 Alexander Frey – Kohl Scholarship, $1,000 Alexander Frey – S-Club, $150 Alexander Frey – Trap Rock Quarry, $1,000 Alexander Frey – NUE Outstanding Student Award, $500

The St. Croix Falls seniors who received scholarships or earned awards were honored Wednesday, May 9, at the St. Croix Falls High School. – Photo by Linda Sandmann Elliott Frokjer – Dollars for Scholars, $500 Alicia Gravesen – American Heart Association, $250 Alicia Gravesen – John Nelson Memorial, $500 Alicia Gravesen – American Legion Americanism, $400 Robert Heilig – Bob Sawyer Memorial, $500 Ahna Hoefler – Dollars for Scholars Chili Cook-off, $500 Ahna Hoefler – Agnes Carlson-Peterson, $250 Ahna Hoefler – Miss St. Croix Falls, $500 Ahna Hoefler – Alora Breault Memorial, $250 Zachary Horn – Dollars for Scholars, $500 Queen Jacobs – Dollars for Scholars, $250 Emily Johnson – St. Croix Regional Medical Center,

$1,000 Emily Johnson – Alora Breault Memorial, $250 Erin Kessler – Frandsen Bank and Trust, $500 Erin Kessler – American Legion Citizenship, $400 Lauren Koschmeder – Arlene Gullikson Memorial, $300 Lauren Koschmeder – Hazelden, $600 Daniel LaForte – Travis Webb Memorial, $1,000 Preston Larson – Bud and Larry Jensen Memorial, $250 Brenna Loen – MarketPlace Foods, $1,000 Brenna Loen – Brittany Buss Memorial, $250 Sasha Lundgren – S-Club, $25 Sasha Lundgren – Former Amery Farmers Union, $500 Allyson Mahler – Lewwjohn, $250

Allyson Mahler – S-Club, $25 Allyson Mahler – St. Croix Falls Lioness, $250 Alexander Mikl – MarketPlace Foods, $1,000 Alexander Mikl – St. Croix Valley Men’s Golf League, $250 Alexander Mikl – River Valley Hockey, $250 Samuel Nichols – Dollars for Scholars, $500 Dylan Norgard – Former Amery Farmers Union, $500 Alissa Norlander – Dollars for Scholars, $250 Ryan Nussbaum – St. Croix Falls Teachers, $500 Nolan O’Brien – Dollars for Scholars, $250 Caitlyn Olson – St. Croix Valley Women’s Golf League, $250 Caitlyn Olson – Central Bank, $250

Caitlyn Olson – Girls Booster Basketball, $300 Caitlyn Olson – Brittany Buss Memorial, $250 Sarah Petznick – Jeanette Ramstrom Memorial, $500 Sarah Petznick – S-Club, $50 Sarah Petznick – Girls Booster Basketball, $100 Sarah Petznick – Bob Jacobson Memorial, $350 Sarah Petznick – Cushing K-3 Defense Fund, $100 Cassandra Rasmussen – Zack Foeller Memorial, $500 Joseph Reddy – Dollars for Scholars, $500 Lauren Richter – Curtis Gaylord Memorial – $500 Matthew Rude – InterCounty Cooperative Publishing Association, $750 Erik Segelstrom – Falls Orthodontist, $500

Nicholis Siltberg – Donald Yunker Memorial, $500 Grant Simpson – S-Club, $25 Grant Simpson – Lakeside Foods, $2,500 Grant Simpson – Roland Krueger Memorial, $250 Barbara Swenson – Dollars for Scholars Chili Cook-off, $500 Erik Swenson – Bob Williams Memorial, $500 Jessica Theroux – Cushing Fire Department, $250 Jessica Theroux – American Legion Auxiliary, $300 Jenna Van Soelen – Viking Coca-Cola, $350 Jenna Van Soelen – SCRMC Volunteer Partners – TeBina Boomgarden, $500 Jenna Van Soelen – St. Croix Falls Lioness, $250 Brett Wendorf – Dollars for Scholars, $250 Brittany Whittier – Jeanette Ramstrom Memorial, $500 Amanda Swenson – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Kirk Baker – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Zachary Christenson – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Rebecca Wampfler – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Alicia Chelberg – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Allison Swenson – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Megan Yunker – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Marcus Campbell – Dollars for Scholars Alumni, $350 Heather Gilbert – Alora Breault Memorial Alumni, $250 Kirk Baker – Alora Breault Memorial Alumni, $250. – submitted

Meagan Doll named 2012 regional Coca-Cola Scholar

Nation’s most prestigious scholarship program awards Osceola student $10,000 for college

OSCEOLA – Meagan Doll, an exceptional senior at Osceola High School in Osceola, has been recognized as one of the country’s most outstanding high school seniors by the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation and has been awarded a $10,000 scholarship for college. As a member of the 24th class of Coca-Cola Scholars, Doll has demonstrated a commitment to academic excellence and civic engagement in school and in the community. The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation, a joint effort of

Coca-Cola bottlers across America and the CocaCola Company is one of the largest corporate-sponsored, achievement-based scholarship programs of its kind in the United States. In Osceola, the foundation is supported by the financial commitment of Viking Coca-Cola Bottling and the Coca-Cola Company. “Meagan Doll is part of a diverse group of extraordinary high school seniors that have shown a steadfast commitment to educational excellence, leadership and service to the school and community,” said Claude Nielsen, chairman of the board of the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation and president and chief executive officer of Coca-Cola Bottling United Inc. Company in Birmingham, Ala. “The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation is proud to name Miss Doll as a 2012 Coca-

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award amount, participated in seminars, toured local landmarks and participated in a community service project, painting recycled syrup concentrate drums donated by the Coca-Cola Co. to be used as rain barrels by the Atlanta community. The Coca-Cola Scholars program is one of the most recognized and respected corporate-sponsored scholarships in America. The program was created in 1986 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of CocaCola and to establish a legacy for the education of tomorrow’s leaders through college scholarships. - submitted

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JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

Webster Arts and Crafts Extravaganza

20 12

Travis Gaspar was having a fine time eating his big bag of kettle korn as he and his family strolled the Webster craft fair on Saturday morning.

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Donnie Holmes posed for a photo on his first day and very hectic, day of duty as a Webster police officer. Holmes managed to keep smiling while tasked with directing the traffic as hundreds came into Webster for the Chamber’s annual craft extravaganza on May 26.

Perfect pets! Some very sturdy and stationary animals requiring little care could be picked out to adorn your lawn at the Webster craft Two year-old Elizabeth Schmid was ready for any rain as she and her fair Sunday, family paraded through the over 100 Webster Arts and Crafts Extravaganza May 26. booths Saturday morning, May 26. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer


PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

Local inventor's award-winning hay feeder hits the market

ST. CROIX FALLS - Bill and Barb Kurtz, owners of JSI Innovations LLC of St. Croix Falls, announced recently the signing of a manufacturing and distribution agreement for Bill’s JSI Waste Less hay feeder. The agreement is with Paul and Karla Kastenbauer, owners of Dal-Kor-Corp. and K & H Construction in Mora, Minn. Bill and Paul met at the Minnesota Horse Expo several years ago. Kurtz is founder and sole inventor of all the JSI inventions and has developed many products over the years, many of which were exhibited at the Minnesota Inventors Congress and elsewhere. He also served on Inventors Network in the Twin Cities for many years and resigned as vice president a couple of years ago. The hay feeder was exhibited at the Minnesota Inventors Expo where it was awarded a silver medal. It also received an international award from International Federation of Inventors Association in 2007. In 2008, the Minnesota Inventors Congress chose five inventions to take to an expo in Bangkok, Thailand. Kurtz’s mass-transit plan was one of the five and it was awarded a bronze medallion. In 2010, the University of Minnesota evaluated nine horse hay feeders and the Waste Less feeder lived up to its name, recording the least waste of all nine feeders. Since that study was put on the Internet, Kurtz has received e-mails from as far away as Melbourne, Australia, wanting more information. The feeders are all-steel construction except the twoby-sixes on the sides. They come with a roof and are built to last. Kurtz has been using the same feeder for five years and has only replaced one cable twice and plans to use it many more years and then sell it to someone else.

Bill Kurtz (right), owner of JSI Innovations LLC of St. Croix Falls, along with his wife, Barb, is shown with Paul Kastenbauer, owner of Dal-Kor-Corp and K & H Construction in Mora, Minn., along with his wife, Karla. - Photo submitted Bill and Barb still maintain a herd of registered black Angus cattle and go by Kurtz Angus Farm which was started in 1970. Bill Kurtz’s award-winning Waste Less hay feeder. - Photo “There’s never a dull moment around here,” Kurtz submitted noted. More information is available at the Web site teamjsi.com or persons can contact Kurtz by e-mailing be contacted at 320-980-2317, by e-mail at bill@teamjsi.com or call 715-483-3866. Kastenbauer can paulkhcon@gmail.com or the Web site, dalkorcorp.com. - with submitted information

Grantsburg Chorale summer rehearsals begin

GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Chorale will begin rehearsing for this summer’s performance on Sunday, June 10, in the high school music room. The first rehearsal will begin at 7 p.m., and last about one hour. All singers who are high-school age or older are wel-

GRANTSBURG - The Grantsburg Christian Women will be meeting on Tuesday, June 19, at 9 a.m. at the Grantsburg Senior Center. Join them to hear Barb Mal-

come to join this singing group, under the direction of Linda Benge. There is no audition. The chorale will be preparing music for a summer concert of show tunes and other lighter music. This concert is tentatively set for July 29.

Christian women to meet

one, Escanaba, Mich., speak on “Keep the Goal in View.” Music by Lori Gustafson. Village Floral will be their feature, talking about hanging containers. Reservations

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JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

Students visit one-room schoolhouse

Webster

The one-room schoolhouse took place at the old Orange schoolhouse outside of Webster. It was on Friday, May 18. It involved the second-grade classes of Robin Hallanger, A.J. Salquist and Rachel Derosier. – Photos submitted

ABOVE: Trae Widiker, Lucas Schaaf and Chase Cadotte begin their adventure at the one-room schoolhouse by walking to school. LEFT: Kaylee Weiser with her lunch pail ready to experience her first day at the one-room schoolhouse on Friday, May 18.

Josephine Johnson does her schoolwork on a slate. A.J. Salquist rings the bell to start the beginning of the school day. – Photos submitted

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PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

CHURCH NEWS

Perspectives Sally Bair

Hermit crabs I met a young boy who keeps hermit crabs for pets. The hermit crab offers some light into human nature. Called a hermit because it lives in a shell, it gives the sense that fear motivates its actions. Its fragile body prompts it to retreat into its shell at the slightest provocation of danger. As it grows, it climbs out of its crowded shell and crawls into a larger one that it has found somewhere on the beach. We humans are like hermit crabs when we crawl into our self-made emotional shells, perceiving danger. As we mature, we find larger shells to use as perceived safety. Some of us remain fragile throughout life, always afraid to take risks, always vulnerable to outside threats of danger. Others, like Stephen who followed Jesus, relied on the strength of God rather than on his own strength. Stephen was “full of faith and power, and did great wonders and signs among the people,” Acts 6:8. Jewish leaders and others argued with him but “were not able to resist the wisdom and the Spirit by which he spoke.” (verse 10) They stirred up people against him and brought him to the authorities because of his socalled lies. Stephen would not be deterred. He spoke passionately about how Jesus fulfilled the Jewish prophecies as the Messiah. Stephen, consumed with following God’s will, answered his tormenters, trusting the Holy Spirit to empower him as he spoke. His determination to please God gave him the strength to face stoning. Stephen was no hermit crab. He had no fragile psyche but the strength of God. He had no desire to cower in a shell of fear but exhibited, through the Holy Spirit, boldness and strength. Stephen’s message is considered the most hard-hitting message in the New Testament letters. He went so far as to ask God to forgive his assassins, following in the example of Jesus, our forgiver. The result was astounding. As he gazed into heaven, he “saw the glory of God, and Jesus standing at the right hand of God.” (verse 55) Jesus, who is seated at God’s right hand, stood—perhaps to honor Stephen for his sacrifice and to meet him face to face. Do we trust in the power of God’s Spirit? Or do we trust in our self-made, crablike shells that ultimately grow too small and ineffectual for a victorious life? Lord, help us be more like Stephen, unafraid, willing to trust your Spirit’s power to help us through any situation at any cost. In Jesus’ name, amen. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com.

The Truth Project to be shown at New Hope Lutheran GRANTSBURG – Focus on the Family’s “The Truth Project,” an in-depth Christian worldview experience, will be shown at New Hope Lutheran Church in Grantsburg each Wednesday evening this summer, except for July 4, beginning on Wednesday evening, June 13, at 6:45 p.m. The Truth Project consists of 12 videos, each onehour long, which is designed to build a systematic and comprehensive biblical framework by studying God’s blueprint for all of life. Each video will look at one of the following topics: What is Truth, Ethics, Who Is Man, Who Is God, Science, History, Family, God’s Relationship with Man, Law, Morality, Creation and Community. Each session should conclude by 8 p.m. For more information you may call 715-463-5700. The public is invited to attend. - submitted

Peace Lutheran Church to hold fi firrst-annual 5K run/walk, Saturday, June 23 DRESSER – Peace Lutheran Church, Dresser, is organizing a 5K run/walk for Saturday, June 23, to raise money for a mission trip to Wilmington, N.C., in July. Thirtynine youth and eight adults will be taking their bus for 10 days to help elderly residents with repair and weatherizing their homes. Participants can register in advance online at active.com or on the day of the event. There will be a free kids run following the 5K. Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the run, which begins at 9 a.m., leaves from the parking lot of Peace Lutheran. - submitted

Bone Lake Lutheran Church news

On Sunday, May 20, the Bone Lake Sunday school children presented a pageant on Noah’s Ark to the congregation as their finale for the year. The story of Noah centers on God’s promises and blessings. That was a good message for high school graduates Tony Aguado, Waylon Buck and Jennifer Vlasnik to hear as they were recognized during worship the same day.

High school graduates Tony Aguado, Waylon Buck and Jennifer Vlasnik were each given a prayer blanket and received a special blessing as they head off to college.

On Sunday, May 27, four families joined Bone Lake Lutheran Church. Shown (L to R): Mike and Talena Davis and their children, Raegan and Alex; Isaiah and Mary Miller and their child, Claire; Joey and Errin Schleusner and their children, Trapper and Ella; and Carter and Leora Dueholm. Also during worship babies Alex Davis and Ella Schleusner were baptized into the Christian faith by Pastor Mary Ann Bowman. Bone Lake Lutheran Church invites you to worship on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. The church is located at 1101 255th Ave., five miles east of Luck on Hwy. 48 and south one-half mile on CTH I. – Photos submitted

Cemetery of the Innocents coming to Frederic FREDERIC - The Cemetery of the Innocents will be on display on the grounds of St. Dominic Catholic Church between the dates of June 8 and June 18. The Cemetery of the Innocents is called a “silent message” because there are no rallies, no speeches and no talks at all. The message is in the 400 4-foot-tall crosses which represent the 4,000 abortions– 10 for each cross– done in the U.S. every day. This is a very simple message spoken in the silence of each person’s heart. Along with this display of crosses will be a display of how a baby grows in the womb. There are 13 doll-like models of a baby’s growth from creation to birth. This display is suitable for all ages. The Knights of Columbus invite the public to view this display in the St. Dominic parish center. Viewing hours are as follows: Sunday June 10, 10 a.m. to noon; Monday through Thursday, June 11 to June 14, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Saturday, June 16, 2 to 6 p.m.; Sunday, June 17, 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. The Cemetery of the Innocents is being sponsored by the Knights of Columbus, along with various local churches. - submitted

OBITUARY Donnie Denotter Donnie Denotter, 74, Siren, died May 31, 2012, at Spooner Health System Hospital. Visitation will be Thursday, June 7; 4-7 p.m., at Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Siren. Funeral will be Friday, June 8, 11 a.m., with visitation 10 – 11 a.m., at Lakeview United Methodist Church, Hertel. A full obituary will be published at a later date. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Siren, was entrusted with arrangements.

389 State Road 70 Grantsburg, WI

715-463-2994

THANK YOU

The family of Christina L. Olsen would like to give special thanks to members and staff of Crosswalk Community Church for their prayers and support; preparing and serving lunch; memorial gifts and flowers, and providing their facility for Christina’s memorial service. A special thanks to Pastor Greg Lund for his wonderful and meaningful sermon; Susan Morgan for taking time to provide music and support during the service; Class of 1996 for their flowers and cards and memorial gifts; friends and family who attended the service and all their generous gifts and floral arrangements. A special thanks to Smith Funeral Chapel for their support, understanding and preparation.

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Leonard and Marsha Olsen (Matt and Ruth) Cheryl and Michael Winberg (Taylor and Ryan)

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Eternal


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

OBITUARIES Garon “Gary” R. Sage

Gerald R. Marquardt Gerald R. Marquardt, 82, Siren, passed away on May 29, 2012, at Countryside Acres Assisted Living in Webster. Jerry was born on July 29, 1929, to Walter and Hazel Marquardt in Cayuga, N.D. On October 26, 1968, he married Carolyn Wolf in Wilmette, Ill. After graduating from North Dakota State University in Fargo, N.D., Jerry served in the Army, stationed in Okinawa as a part of Army intelligence during the Korean War. Following his tour of duty, he earned a master’s degree in mathematics at the University of Iowa before joining IBM as a systems engineer. After IBM, he moved to Minneapolis, Minn., to work for Control Data in long-range planning and the University of Minnesota implementing a medical records system. He finished his career operating a computer disaster recovery center in St. Paul, Minn. Since 2001, when he moved to a home on Viola Lake, Jerry enjoyed visits from his family along with fishing and boating on the lake. He also enjoyed gatherings with his church family at Siren Assembly of God. Jerry is preceded in death by his daughter, Kymberlee Johnson. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn; his children, Kurt (Sandra) Marquardt, Kenneth (Marilyn) Marquardt, Caryn (Nathan) Schmitt and Philip (Allyson) Marquardt; grandchildren, Isaac, Katrina, Joshua, Briana, Amanda, Brett, Lindsay, Tori, Riley, Summer, Hunter, Roark and Colton; great-grandsons, Nolan and Caleb; brother, Walter Marquardt; sisters, Lois Miller and Geraldine Schwartz; and many nephews and nieces. Funeral services were held on Monday, June 4, at Siren Assembly of God with Pastor Andrew Bollant officiating. Interment will be at Northern Wisconsin State Veterans Memorial Cemetery of Spooner, following the service. Memorials are preferred to Foundation for Ichthyosis and Related Skin Types, Inc., 2616 North Broad Street, Colmar, PA 18915. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Certain Times In Life Require A Personal Touch

Trey William Hamilton Trey William Hamilton, 13, passed away Friday, May 25, in Lexington, Ky. Trey is the son of Sarah Bibeau of Robbinsdale, Minn., and Troy Hamilton of Lexington, Ky. He is also survived by his sister, Reide Bibeau and brother, Alec Hamilton; maternal grandparents, Sandy and Tref Bibeau; his aunts, Shelly Bryant, Gina Robertson and Eric; Uncles, Matt Bibeau and Chrissie, James (Chucky) Bibeau and Shannon; also his many cousins; paternal grandparents, Beatrice Bruton and William Hamilton; uncles, Derek, William and Brean.

Steven Walter Johnson Steven Walter Johnson, 69, St. Croix Falls, died Thursday, May 31, 2012, at Bethesda Hospital in St. Paul, Minn., from early-onset Alzheimer’s. Steve was born on his mother’s birthday at Swedish Hospital in Minneapolis, Minn., on April 23, 1943, to Opal and Walter Johnson. He grew up and attended school in St. Croix Falls and graduated from River Falls College with a teaching degree in mathematics. He spent an adventurous year backpacking and working in Europe during his sophomore year of college. Steve was a gifted athlete, holding the St. Croix Falls record for discus more than 40 years and was selected as an all-state football player at River Falls. Steve was proud of his military service during the Vietnam era and served as a young naval officer on the aircraft carrier U.S. Midway. After his commitment to the Navy, Steve returned to St. Croix Falls to run the family business, Johnson’s Feed Mill. After it closed, Steve began a new career as an insurance agent and returned to teaching school. Steve loved reading books, hunting, fishing, Green Bay football and his cabin in Minong. He had a special connection and love for dogs. He served St. Croix Falls as a volunteer fireman, was a strong advocate for Pheasants Forever, the Republican Party and supported the renovation of the Kennedy Mill. He is survived by his brother, Dave (Penny) Johnson of Seeley Lake, Mont.; his sisters, Dianne (John) Linn of Trego, Mont., and Laurie (Bill) Parks of Golden Valley, Minn. He is also survived by his nephews, Trevor (Nichole) Johnson, Drew (Mallory) Johnson, Graham (Sarah) Linn, and Mike and Dan Parks; and niece, Brook (Landon) Swafford; great-nephew, Jackson Swafford. A celebration gathering is being planned for Sept. 29. Memorial would be welcomed by the St. Croix Volunteer Fire Department or Alzheimer’s reseach. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with arrangements.

We Turn Feelings Into Flowers

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• Prearrangements • Traditional Services • On-Site Crematory • Cemetery Monuments • Online obituaries can be seen at Swedberg-Taylor.com

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916 Badger Drive Balsam Lake, WI 54810

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James Frank Gloodt, 59, a resident of Siren, died Thursday, May 31, 2012, at Indianhead Medical Center in Shell Lake. He was born Aug. 24, 1952, to Henry and Elaine (DeKoker) Gloodt in Cook County, Chicago, Ill. Jim was the eldest of four children. As a child growing up, he spent time working in his grandfather’s hot dog stand, taking trips with his family and summer fishing trips with his beloved Grandpa Jolly Jay. Jim graduated from UW-Platteville with a degree civil engineering. Most of his career was spent with the Wisconsin Department of Transportation in both Superior and Spooner. In April 1989, he married Jill Anderson of Siren. They moved back to Siren in 1990 to raise their family. Daughter Rachel was born in 1993 and son Alexi in 1997. In 2000, they built their home in the country and called it Cobble Hill Farm. Jim spent some of his happiest years walking their dogs through the woods, gathering and stacking firewood, Canadian fishing trips with buddies and cheering for the Packers while enjoying a cold Leinenkugel’s. Jim was active in the Siren community, serving as the president of Communities United in Education, freely giving his engineering knowledge as the Town of Daniels Zoning Committee was restructuring, was a member of the Siren School Parent Teacher Committee and the Bethany Lutheran Church Board. Jim was most proud of his children. He was a loving, involved and supportive father, reading to them every night. He never missed an opportunity to cheer them on in whatever they did. Jim was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2005. The Mayo Clinic and Shell Lake staff provided excellent medical care, but by mid-May of 2012, all efforts were exhausted, and Jim came home to be with his family and attend Rachel’s Siren High School graduation May 18. He was admitted to Indianhead Hospital in Shell Lake’s Hospice Memorial Day, and passed away late Thursday night. Jim was preceded in death by his parents, Henry and Elaine Gloodt; two nephews, Ben and Paul Anderson; and great-nephew, Caleb Anderson. He is survived by his wife, Jill; daughter, Rachel; and son, Alexi; brothers, Bob (Rhonda) and Peter; sister, Jean Carey (Bill); as well as many nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. A funeral service for Jim was held Tuesday, June 5, at Bethany Lutheran Church with Pastor Andrew Hinwood officiating. Interment followed immediately at the Lakeview/Mudhen Lake Cemetery. Casket bearers were Joe Anderson, Babe Anderson, Jeff Simpkins, Nate Hudek, Jon Ruud, Wayne Koball, Rick Anderson and Tom Anderson. Honorary casket bearers were Peter Gloodt, Bob Gloodt and Jean Gloodt-Cary. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

Myron T. Gilbertson Myron T. Gilbertson, 84, went home to the Lord on May 25, 2012. He was born in Fulda, Minn., on May 6, 1928. He was preceded in death by his son, Stuart. He is survived by his loving wife, Kathleen; daughter, Christie; and sons, Randy and Brian Gilbertson; daughter, Susan Nicol (Mike); son, David Westgard (Tina); and grandchildren, Lynsie Oswald (Josh), Mathew Nicol, Kelley Nicol and Jamie Westgard. Myron was a loving husband, father, grandpa and friend. Myron will be tremendously missed by his family, many friends and his church community. Myron’s celebration of life will be held on Friday, June 8, at 11 a.m. at Crosswalk Community Church in Frederic, with visitation beginning at 10 a.m.

Ronald “Ron” Johnson

BALSAM LAKE

Swedberg Taylor Family Funeral Homes and Crematory Grantsburg: 715-463-6700 Siren: 715-349-4800 Webster: 715-866-7131

James Frank Gloodt

Garon “Gary” R. Sage, 53, Town of Sand Lake, died May 27, 2012, at this home. Gary was born Oct. 19, 1958, in Waukegan, Ill., to Robert and Edithmae Sage. He married Brenda Swanson on Oct. 19, 1976, and they were blessed with two daughters. Gary drove semi truck for about eight years before starting his job at Jack Link’s in October 2011. He had many friends who loved him and was always willing to lend a helping hand. In his free time, Gary enjoyed fishing. Gary was preceded in death by his parents. He is survived and will be sadly missed by his daughters, Tracy Sue and Tanya Lee; grandchildren, Codie, Jayden, Caleb and Calla Ann; his siblings, Robert L. (Wendy) Sage, Linda M. (Franklin) Lewis, Thomas E. (Karleen) Sage, Ella L. Livingston and Merrill L. Sage; nieces, nephews, other relatives and his many friends. Funeral service were Saturday, June 2, at SwedbergTaylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, with Pastor Steve Ward officiating. Casket bearers were Will Jackson, Travis Morris, John Numsen, Dave Conrow, Lance Williamson, Lyon Chapman and Carl Sage. Online condolences can be made at www.scalzo-taylor.com. The Taylor Family Funeral Home, Spooner, was entrusted with arrangements.

Ronald “Ron” Johnson, 69, Webster, died June 4, 2012, at Spooner Health System Hospital. Private family service to be held. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. A full obituary will be published at a later date. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, was entrusted with arrangements.

In Loving Memory Of

Howard T. Amundsen

He Passed Away On June 11, 1991

“Gone But Not Forgotten” Sadly Missed By Vera, Judi, Juli & Bob

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LaVonne M. Jordan, Blaine, Minn., passed away peacefully Saturday, May 26, 2012. Her spirit unites the hearts of her family and friends who loved her. LaVonne was born Aug. 3, 1928, in Danbury, to Elwin and Vera (Cornwall) Thayer. She married Leonard Jordan Sr. on June 4, 1946. She was proceded in death by parents; husband, Leonard Jordan; brothers, Wayne and Basil Thayer. She is survived by children, Jan (Tom) Lokensgard, Lenny (Suzy), Dennis, Debbie Cherry, Mark (Karla), Teresa (Bill) Hayes, Kevin (Lisa) and Jodi (Jeff) Mora; sister, Diane (Michael) Myers; 22 grandchildren and 24 great-grandchildren. Visitation will be held Monday, June 11, 10 a.m., and the memorial service will follow at 11 a.m., at Lakewood Cemetery Chapel, 3600 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. A luncheon will follow the service. Interment will be in Danbury. In lieu of flowers, memorials preferred for her Danbury flower garden. The Gearty-Delmore Funeral Chapel, Minneapolis, Minn., was entrusted with arrangements.

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PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

CHURCH NEWS

With husband overseas, couple’s problems are unresolved Q: My husband was recently deployed to Afghanistan. Just before he left, I discovered that he was having an affair. I want to try to repair the damage to our relationship, but it’s difficult to communicate with him now that he’s overseas. What can I do? Jim: I’m sorry to learn of your terrible predicament. Infidelity deals a terrible blow to any marriage, and this period of separation adds another layer of difficulty. Until your husband returns, there isn’t much you can do to deal with this directly. But Focus on the Family’s counseling team recommends some proactive steps you can take in his absence. First, a vital part of the healing process can be found in consultation with a counselor. Contact Focus on the Family for an initial consultation, as well as help in locating a licensed counselor in your area with whom you can discuss your hurt and disappointment. When your husband returns, get involved in joint counseling as soon as possible. Second, while your husband’s deployment lasts, stay in touch with him to the

Jim Daly

Focus on the Family

Juli Slattery

best of your ability. You don’t need to address his infidelity in your letters or emails, in fact, military experts advise against this because on-base disclosures can affect security. Instead, supply him with detailed information about you and your kids, if you have any. Keep the lines of communication open even when he doesn’t respond in kind. This will remind him of your love and commitment to the marriage until he returns. Once he comes home, you’ll have the opportunity to talk face-to-face about the affair and to discuss the future of your marriage. May God grant you grace during this trying time. ••• Q: My husband and I have two small children. We don’t want them to be in day care, but we can’t agree about who should stay home with them. I always assumed that I would be home with my kids, but my job pays more than my husband’s. How do we resolve this? Juli: First of all, I applaud your desire

to be home with your children. While some parents don’t have a choice about child care, it’s wonderful when parents are able to be with their young children during the day. Thirty years ago, this question was a no-brainer. Practically everyone thought that mom should stay home and dad should bring in the paycheck. Now, there are many different opinions. Stay-athome dads are on the rise, and many couples are finding ways to co-parent, with both mom and dad taking less demanding jobs so that each can contribute substantially to parenting. The key issue is that you agree with the plan you decide upon. While finances are important to consider, they should be low on the list compared to unity. I’d encourage you as a couple to wrestle through two important questions: First, “What is best for the kids?” Normally, but not always, moms are better equipped to handle the day-to-day interactions with young children. A woman’s body is designed to nurse, and her hormones are geared toward nurturing and greater patience. Second, “What is best for our marriage?” In some families where dad stays at home, his wife may feel resentful that she’s not able to be at home with her kids and has to take on the financial burden for the family. Likewise, the husband’s

"Drawn to the Word" coming to SCF church ST. CROIX FALLS – The public is invited to attend a “Drawn to the Word” worship and artistic experience where artist and Pastor Paul Oman will paint a larger-thanlife-sized mural of the Parable of the Mustard Seed right before your eyes. This will be happening at the First Presbyterian Church, 719 Nevada St. in St. Croix Falls. The exciting event will be on

confidence may take a hit when he’s not providing financially. Don’t ignore these underlying basic drives as you make your decision. I know my answer isn’t exactly politically correct. However, when making important decisions for your family, look beyond what’s trendy and consider what you might possibly regret 10 years from now. ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, cohost of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2012 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

Brought to you by:

Luck and St. Peter’s Lutheran Churches

Confi firrmation Sunday at Wolf Creek

Sunday, June 24, at 10 a.m. The story will unfold artistically, musically, narratively and scripturally during the event. The congregation would love to welcome you. To learn more about Pastor Paul, you can visit his Web site at paulomanfineart.com. Or for more information call Pastor Brooks at 715-483-3550. A freewill offering will be taken. - submitted

Wolf Creek United Methodist Church celebrated Confirmation Sunday on May 6. Pictured (L to R): Pastor Mike Weaver, Felicia Fisk, Sadie Rau, Brooke Swenson and Amelia Fisk. – Photo submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475

Duane Lindh

HAULING

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

ALPHA BASS LAKE LUMBER • Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP

1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Dan Dowling, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 715-689-2467

WEBSTER

LUCK

CUSHING

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

VAN METER’S MEATS

CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies

Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

WILD RIVER FLAGS Jerry & Pat Willits 2815 285th Ave. Sterling Township St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-488-2729

Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

SIREN

Churches 1/12

FREDERIC

OLSEN & SON

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES 10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.


JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 25

Church Directory ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY

1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elder: Cliff Bjork, 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS)

Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Nanette Hagen-Hinck 9:30 a.m. Sunday Worship (begins May 27)

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 www.newhopelutheranchurch.org 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Wed. Wor. 6:30 p.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays www.facebook/OurRedeemerWebster

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Melissa Carmack Sun. Wor. 9 a.m., Wed. Wor. 7 p.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Worship - 10:.30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. Worship - 8:30 a.m,; Sun. School 9:45 a.m.

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

Pastor Peter Rimmereid, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.; Sunday Traditional Service 10 a.m.; Outdoor Serv. 6/24, 7/29 & 8/26, 10 a.m.

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws

Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, 8:30 a.m. Adult Bible Study; 9:30 a.m. Worship; 10:30 a.m. Fellowship Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS)

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630; 715-327-4461 www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Worship 10:15 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Communion 1st Sun.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 Traditional Worship - 8:30 a.m.; Contemporary Worship - 11 a.m.

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-416-3086, 715-327-8384 Pastor Theresa Riewestahl Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter - 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod) ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sun. Wor. 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sun. Wor. 8 & 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra, Myron Carlson and Danny Wheeler Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (LCMC)

5 miles E. of Frederic on W, 2 miles south on I; Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Bible Class 9:30 a.m. Worship Serv. 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & Last Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sunday School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

Pastor Father Frank Wampach, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m. Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 10:30 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola, 715-294-2243 Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home ASSEMBLY

ASSEMBLY

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-8223001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Ralph Thompson - 715-472-8424; 510 Foster Ave. E.; Office 715-472-2605; www.lucklutheran.org (June- Aug.) Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m. Mon. Wor. 6:30 p.m.

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Theresa Riewestahl 715-327-8384, 715-416-3086 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

LUCK LUTHERAN

METHODIST

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Pastor Bill Schroeder Sat. Worship 7 p.m.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

METHODIST

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available) 290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

SIREN COVENANT

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE

Pastor Dan Pearson Sunday School 8:45 a.m.; Worship 10 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Frank Wampach 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

EVANGELICAL

EVANGELICAL

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery, 715-268-2176 Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

HOPE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH

Pastor Dave Williams 933 248th St., Osceola Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School Sept.-May 8:45 a.m. Children’s Church & Nursery provided

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. 1816 108th St., CTH I Pastor Gabe Brennan, 715-857-5411

www.eastbalsam.org Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun. School-10:30 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sun. School - 10 a.m.; Wor. Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Reg. office hours: Tues.-Thurs. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Associate Pastor Sun. Serv.: 9 a.m.; All ages Sun. Schl. 10:30 11:30 a.m.; Nursery available

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

Pastor Merrill Olson, Interim Pastor 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago City, MN, www.holyx.net Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN CHURCH

2390 CTH A, 1/8 mi. east of A&H intersection Pastor Tryg Wistad, 715-635-9222 crossroadschurch@gmail.com Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982 Sunday Wor. 9:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.

Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m. Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER

Church Phone 715-866-4111 Pastor Tim Quinn Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastor Scott Petznick Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WOR. GROUP

715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

ST. CROIX UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 1st, 2nd & 3rd Sunday, 10 a.m. in the St. Croix Falls Library community room.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

ST. ANNE PARISH

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

“Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

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JUNE 6, 2012 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 27

Luck Talent Show Second-annual National Honor Society showcase event LUCK – The Luck National Honor Society hosted their second-annual community talent show on Thursday, May 24, at the Luck High School auditorium. Over a dozen students of all ages and grades performed in a variety of interesting routines - from magic to music to dancing, juggling and more, culminating in a surprise performance by Tanner Nielsen, who played a ragtime standard on the piano, while upside down and hanging from the gym’s climbing ropes. It was all meant to help raise money for the National Honor Soci-

20 12

ety and several programs, including Ruby’s Pantry, the Backpack program and various community cleanup projects. Luck sophomore Abbie Otlo hosted the event, with judges Dan Valentine, Karl Wicklund and Spike Maiden-Mueller. The overall winner was Nielsen and his inverted piano routine, followed by Haley Dikkers in second place for a self-penned song she sang and played on guitar, with Camille Marsten taking third place for a vocal and guitar cover of Tracy Chapman’s “Fast Car.” Prior to the show, there was a community fair in the school commons, with entertainment from a barbershop quartet, numerous snacks and booths with several local businesses. - Greg Marsten

The Luck Community Talent Show winners struck a pose after their Thursday, May 24, show at the Luck High auditorium. Pictured (L to R): Haley Dikkers, second place; Tanner Nielsen, first place; and Camille Marsten, third place. The event had over a dozen local performers and was sponsored by the National Honor Society, with funds going to support several causes and activities. Gymnasts Laura Bartylla (left) and Kelsey Paulson performed an acrobatic dance routine. Photos by Greg Marsten

They even had a barbershop quartet at the Luck Community Fair, along with local business booths, photographers, food and agencies.

Kyle “Catfish” Hunter turned water into ice, and other magic for his act at the honor society showcase event T h u r s d a y, May 24.

Karsten Petersen juggled basketballs for his talent.

Billy Lipoff played his version of several rock riffs as his talent. Luck sophomore Abbie Otlo emceed the talent show and pushed to be considered in the final judging. “You can vote for me, you know,” she joked.

John Dikkers played drums in a band with Jordan Jones and Derek Rennicke. They played a tune they cowrote called “Unborn Soldier.” Brooklyn Petersen performed a medley of several piano numbers.


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - JUNE 6, 2012

JUNE

Coming events

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities Peace Lutheran Church, 6:30 p.m., 715-755-2515.

Grantsburg

THURS.-SAT./7-9

• Hazardous waste collection at the fairgrounds, 34:30 p.m., 715-635-2197.

Dairyland

Luck

• Support Our Troops rummage sale at Cozy Corner Inn, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.

• Music by Jim Armstrong in Triangle Park, 6:30 p.m.

Webster

THURSDAY/7

• Hazardous waste collection at the fairgrounds, 10 a.m.noon, 715-635-2197.

• Karner blue butterfly field trip at Crex Education Center, 10 a.m., 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

WEDNESDAY/13

Grantsburg

Grantsburg

Siren

• Flight in the Open, butterfly catch at Crex Visitor Center, 6-7:30 p.m., 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org.

• Northwoods Flyers EEA Club meets at the Burnett County Government Center, Rm. 165, 7 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

St. Croix Falls

• Hip hop and latin dance sample classes at Lamar, 6 p.m., 715-553-2116.

• Interstate Park land management meeting at the Ice Age Visitor Center, 6-7 p.m., 715-483-3747.

THURSDAY/14

Webster

• Kickoff potluck for Village Players Community Theatre summer production at the Stables, 4:30 p.m.

Centuria

• Adult grief support group meeting at Holy Trinity Church, 6:30 p.m., 715-483-3363.

FRI.-SUN./8-10

Dresser

Milltown

• Indianhead Chapter NARFE meets at Village Pizzeria, noon. RSVP by June 10, 715-327-8658.

• Youth Slow-pitch Milk Tournament at Melgren Field, 715-825-2494.

FRIDAY/8 Balsam Lake

• Poco Penners meeting in the library building, 2 p.m., 715-483-9738.

Grantsburg

• Moth capture field study north of Crex on CTH F near boat launch, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., crexmeadows.org, 715-4632739. • Dairy Day at Burnett Dairy, www.burnettdairy.com, 10 a.m.-8 p.m.

Luck

• Meat raffle for Arnell Humane Society at Ben’s Northern Bar, 6 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• SCRMC salad luncheon at the high school, 11 a.m.1 p.m. • Free Fallin’ performs at Music on the Overlook, 6 p.m.

SAT. & SUN./9 & 10 St. Croix Falls

• Fete Des Fleurs, art fair and festival at Chateau St. Croix Winery, 715-483-2556, www.chateaustcroix.com.

SATURDAY/9 Amery

• Ruby’s Pantry at Congregational Church. Doors open 8:30 a.m. Dist. 9 a.m., $15 donation, 715-268-7390. • Garage sale fundraiser at Arnell Humane Society, 9 a.m., 715-268-7387. • The Great Adventure Family Band at Balsam Lutheran, 7 p.m., 715-268-9291.

Balsam Lake

• Art & craft sale, bake sale & lunch at Our Lady of the Lakes Church, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Cumberland

• Celebration of Arts & Crafts at Tourist Park, 9 a.m.-

Milltown

A wild iris at Phantom Lake in Crex Meadows Wildlife Area. - Photo by Susan Steffen 4 p.m.

Danbury

SUNDAY/10

• Clay oven class at the Fort, 8 a.m., 715-866-8890, www.theforts.org. • United Methodist Church rummage and bake sale, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

• Music by Doug & Mike at Skonewood Christian Retreat Center, 6:30 p.m.

Frederic

Grantsburg

• Petting zoo at Tammi’s Wildlife Rescue, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-327-4774.

Grantsburg

• Crex Meadows Nature Photography Club meets at Crex, 10 a.m.-noon, 715-463-2739. • Karner blue butterfly field trip at Crex Education Center, 10 a.m., 715-463-2739, crexmeadows.org. • Squirrels Unlimited banquet at the Rendezvous. Social 5 p.m., dinner 6:30 p.m., raffle 7:30 p.m., 715-4632322.

Luck

• Luck Lutheran Church rummage sale, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

Spooner

• Aquatic invasive species workshop at the ag station, 9 a.m.-noon, 715-468-4653 to register.

St. Croix Falls

• Hingepoint meeting for men battling sexual addictions, at River Valley Christian Church, 9 a.m.-noon, 715483-5378. • Summer reading program kickoff at the library, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. • Sexton to answer questions/verify ownership, etc., at St. Croix Falls Cemetery, 8-11 a.m.

Webster

• Used book sale at the library, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-8667697.

Garden of Eating

Cushing

• Grantsburg Chorale begins rehearsal at the high school, 7 p.m.

Siren

• Head injury support group at Siren Covenant Church, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8985. • Don Seitzberg golf scramble at Siren National Golf Course, noon, 715-866-8270 Ext. 177.

Spooner

• Car show, swap, craft & flea market at the fairgrounds, 715-456-8450, 715-639-5114.

MONDAY/11 Amery

• Weight-loss surgery education and support at the medical center, 5-6 p.m., 715-268-0597.

Luck

• Danish Brotherhood Society meeting at Chuck & Carol Adleman residence, 2455 110th St., 5 p.m.

TUESDAY/12 Amery

• Cancer support group at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-6722 or 715-268-7290.

Dresser

• Chronic illness/disability support group will meet at

• Friends of the Library meeting, 6:30 p.m., 715-8252313.

FRI.-SUN./15-17 Frederic

• Family Days, Fri. variety show, Sat. dance, games, food, Sun. parade.

FRIDAY/15 Alpha

• Trinity Lutheran Church’s brat sale at Burnett Dairy, 10 a.m., 715-488-2932. Proceeds go toward Grantsburg food shelf.

Frederic

• St. Luke’s cafe, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Webster

• Dinner at the Fort fundraiser at Forts Folle Avoine, RSVP by June 3. 5:30 p.m. wine tasting, 6:30 meal.

SATURDAY/16 Amery

• Women’s Club Art and Craft Fair at North Park, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Frederic

• Pork roast fundraiser at the fire hall, 2-8 p.m. • Strawberry shortcake at the depot, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Grantsburg

• Dairy breakfast at the Melco Farm on CTH O, 6 a.m.noon. DairyDaysofSummer.com.

Luck

• Bake sale at United Pioneer Home, 8 a.m.-noon.

Shell Lake

• Wine and cheese fundraiser at Clover Meadow Winery for humane society, 715-866-4096.

Siren

• Arts Alive on 35 event at BAAG Art Center, 10 a.m.-

ONGOING Every Day

AA &/or AlAnon, Polk & Burnett counties, 715-931-8262 for time/location. Amery, 715-268-8431.

Divorce care support group at Apple River Community Church, 715-268-8360, 715-268-2176.

Every Monday

Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the Balsam Lake old courthouser, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202. Baby and Me class - Amery Medical Center, 1-2 p.m. Grief Share support group at Centennial Hall, Amery, 715-268-2176 or 715-268-8360. Moms In Touch International, First Baptist, Amery, 2 - 3 p.m., 715-268-5408, www.momsintouch.com

Partners of Veterans women’s support group, Counseling Associates, Siren, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8575. Play group for children and caretakers at the Burnett County Family Resource Center, 10 - 11:30 a.m.

Every Tuesday

Bingo - Burnett County Moose Lodge, Siren, 6 p.m. Survivors of domestic violence & sexual assault support group, Polk Co., 800-261-7233, 6-7:30 p.m. Anger management group at Amery Regional Medical Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 715-268-4094.

Every Wednesday

Women of Hope, cancer support group, at SCRMC, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., 715-483-0431. Free playtime with your toddler at Our Lady of the Lakes Catholic Church,10-11:30 a.m., 715-557-0630.

Every Thursday

The Webster Elementary Tiger Territory Garden of Eating held its spring plant sale. Available were houseplants, annuals, ornamental perennials and strawberries. They are appreciative of the community support. The sale raised more than $400. Proceeds will be used to support the continuation of the garden program. Their big project this summer will be to power wash and stain the garden fence. – Photos submitted

Breastfeeding support group at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center, 2-3:30 p.m., 715-483-0431.

Play group for children and caretakers at the Burnett County Family Resource Center, 10 - 11:30 a.m.

Every Saturday

AA meets at the West Denmark Lutheran Church, rural Luck, 9 - 10 a.m.

June 6 Leader  

weekly newspaper

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