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Leader

WED.,OCT. 5, 2011 VOL. 79 • NO. 7 • 2 SECTIONS •

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$1.5 million needed for GAM repairs

Fall on the river

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Report brings project costs together PAGE 3

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The man suspected of assault and vehicle theft in the Town of Blaine arrested PAGE 3

BCLRA wins award Wisconsin Idea Award goes to lakes and rivers group PAGE 3

Meet the heritage cup SPORTS INSIDE THIS SECTION, P. 18-26

Deaths

Roger Eugene Beecroft Wallace C. Erickson Ruth Ann Radke Rhoda H. Parker Lisa C. Hursh Carol L. Erickson Douglas L. Buck Barbara Peterson Obituaries on pages 18-19B

The St. Croix River Valley in all of its fall glory was captured in this photo, taken from one of the many scenic overlooks at Interstate Park at St. Croix Falls. With summerlike temperatures and fall leaves reaching their color peak, a steady stream of tourists poured into Wisconsin this past weekend. - Photo by Erik Barstow

Crystal ball theater symposium Historic 1917 SCF Civic Auditorium restoration is discussion focus by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – However you see it, the Civic Auditorium Theatre in downtown St. Croix Falls has a pretty striking profile - both visibly and historically. Poised regally on Washington Street and originally costing $18,779, the building was built and paid for

by the community and originally designed on the dream of luring Twin Cities Vaudeville entertainment, just as the motion picture was born, meaning it had to change its focus from its debut. “That money went a long way,” stated advocate Kathleen Melin, who noted the theater’s wide and varied history, and how it has always been adjusting for changing tides. The historic structure has a pedigree that includes housing everything from a temporary hospital, to a sewing factory, city offices, gymnasium, movie The St. Croix Falls Civic Auditorium has been the home to theater, and eventually, as a venue everything from a hospital to gymnasium, sewing center, city offor live arts and music.

INSIDE Briefly 3A Letters to the editor 9A Sports 18-26A Outdoors 27A Town Talk 6-7B Coming Events Back of B Currents feature 1B Behind the Signpost 5B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B Just for Laughs 3B River Road Ramblings 4B Copyright © 2011 Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Frederic, Wisconsin

fices, movie theater and most recently, as a live arts venue. -

See Auditorium, page 4 Photo by Greg Marsten

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Firefi fig ghters in action

“The Mystery of Irma Vep” on stage at Festival ST. CROIX FALLS - The 2011 Theatre Series continues at Festival Theatre, where “The Mystery of Irma Vep” opens on Thursday, Oct. 6, for a four-week run through Oct. 30. This is the company’s 22nd consecutive year of producing professional theater in the upper St. Croix River Valley. The play derives from “the theater of the ridiculous” and is unlike anything seen before on the Festival Theatre stage. “People seem to have two responses to hearing the title to this play,” says Jennie Ward, the show’s director, “they haven’t heard of it or ‘that is absolutely the funniest play I have ever seen.’” “Irma Vep” was written in 1984 by Charles Ludlum and inspired by penny dreadfuls - Victorian pulp fiction written for 19th-century teenage boys. Says Ward, “Playwright Ludlum founded the Ridiculous Theatrical Company in 1967, a company that took clowning to a previously unseen level of theatricality and seriousness. Clearly, cross-dressing, vampires and werewolves never go out of style. There is so much humor in this countryside English drawing room, but there is also a real rawness, a sensual savagery that shares more with Emily Bronte than Oscar Wilde.” “The Mystery of Irma Vep” opens on Thursday, Oct. 6, at 2 p.m., with shows Thursdays through Sundays until it closes on Oct. 30. Thursday and Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. and Thursday through Saturday evening shows are at 7:30 p.m. (Note: this show is recommended for mature teens and older). Festival Theatre is located in downtown St. Croix Falls, at 210 North Washington St. To reach Festival Theatre by phone, call 715-483-3387 or 888-887-6002. Check the Web site at www.festivaltheatre.org where tickets are available to order online. Shown in photo: Carl Lindberg and Darrell Johnston each play four roles including Lady Enid and Lord Edgar of the Mandacrest Estate. - submitted

This photo was taken as members of the Frederic Fire Department searched for 71-year-old Roger Wolfgram of Coon Rapids, Minn., the evening of Sept. 23 after Wolfgram’s rural Lewis home exploded shortly after he attempted to start his propane gas furnace. Wolfgram was located in his basement, under four feet of rubble, with a crushed hip and second-degree burns. He was airlifted to Regions Hospital and is continuing his recovery this week. Wolfgram said he kept wiggling a small stick to alert firefighters to where he was located. “They were trying to keep talking to me, and I said I gotta quit talking, I'm running out of air down here,” Wolfgram said. A sharp object missed Wolfgram by just a few inches. “I think I’m the luckiest guy in the world,” he said. “Somebody was darn well looking after me.” This photo arrived too late for publication last week. - Photo courtesy Frederic Fire Department

Going for another record

Never love a logger TAYLORS FALLS - Local author Edna Curry’s historical romance novel “Never Love a Logger,” based on the 1886 Taylors Falls logjam, has been released in both electronic and paperback formats from Whiskey Creek Press. This historical romance is set against the background of the big logjam of 1886, known as “the largest logjam ever.” It depicts life in the logging days with lots of detail about the lives of people during that time. What happens when a rough and ready logger, who wants no responsibility and thinks he doesn’t deserve a second chance at love, falls for an attractive prim and proper lady with a readymade family? The largest logjam ever occurred in 1886 at Taylors Falls/St. Croix Falls. It garnered worldwide attention and made the history books as far away as Sweden. - submitted

Chris Stevens of New Richmond stands next to a giant pumpkin growing in his backyard pumpkin patch. Last year, Stevens grew a world-record pumpkin weighing 1,810 pounds. On Saturday, Oct. 8, Stevens will bring his latest monster gourd to the Stillwater giant pumpkin weigh-off in hopes of breaking his own world record. Although physically larger than last year’s world record, Stevens believes the weight of his 2011 pumpkin will be slightly less than his world record one. - Photo courtesy Garth Olson, The Valley Wire

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OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

BRIEFLY

STATEWIDE - Division of Motor Vehicles customer service centers and phone centers throughout Wisconsin will be closed for business on Monday, Oct. 10, Columbus Day, so that all front-line customer service representatives may receive technical process and procedural updates and training. Although staff at DMV phone centers will be in training and unable to take calls, DMV’s automated phone system will remain available, so motorists can access recorded information. DMV would like to remind customers that many services do not require a visit to a service center and are available online at: www.wisconsindmv.gov. - from the DMV ••• SIREN – Coats for Kids will be distributing coats, mittens, ski pants, headgear, etc. to all children who come on Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 – 11 a.m., to the Siren Assembly of God Church. – submitted ••• BURNETT COUNTY - Just 38 percent of the population is eligible to give blood and only a fraction of those eligible actually give. This October, the American Red Cross encourages eligible blood donors double the lifesaving impact they have on the blood supply by asking a friend or family member to make an appointment to give blood with them. All blood types are needed, especially O negative, B negative and A negative. Type O negative, the universal donor blood type, can potentially be transfused to patients with any blood type. Eligible donors with these blood types can also double their impact by donating double red cells, where available, giving two units of red cells during one donation appointment. The American Red Cross Bloodmobile will be at the Moose Lodge, 7330 Hwy. 70 in Siren on Tuesday, Oct. 18, from noon to 5 p.m. and at the Swiss Town hall on Main Street in Danbury on Wednesday, Oct. 19, from 1 to 6 p.m. - submitted ••• ST. CROIX FALLS – Effective Tuesday, Oct. 11, the St. Croix River Visitor Center of the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily and closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. The St. Croix River Visitor Center is located at 401 North Hamilton St. in St. Croix Falls. It features exhibits on the river’s natural environment, the 18-minute film “The St. Croix: A Northwoods Journey,” and a bookstore. The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, a unit of the National Park System, was established by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act in 1968. It is one of a group of eight rivers in the country which first received this recognition. For additional information on the riverway, please visit nps.gov/sacn or call 715-483-2274. from NPS ••• POLK COUNTY – Local attorneys are staffing a free legal clinic the third Monday of every month for the purpose of providing general legal information to members of the community. The next free legal clinic is Monday, Oct. 17, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. It will be held in the Polk County Community Room, Polk County Justice Center, no appointment is necessary. Local lawyers will be on hand to meet with individuals for approximately 10 minutes to provide general information in the following areas of law: family law, landlord/tenant and small claims, criminal/traffic, estate planning/elder law/probate, real estate, business law and debtor/creditor. A representative from Polk County Child Support Agency will also be on hand. For more information contact Janet King at Bakke Norman, S.C., at 715-684-4545. - submitted

$1.5 million needed for Golden Age Manor repairs Report brings project costs together by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Golden Age Manor, the Polk County-owned nursing home in Amery, may need over $1.5 million in facility repairs within the next three years. The projects and estimated costs are included in a new facility assessment prepared by Johnson Controls that was presented at the county property committee meeting Monday, Oct. 3. Most of the items, labeled as “replacement priorities: years one - three,” have been identified in the past. This report brings the projects together in one list that includes current possible costs. The report was done at the request of the county’s property director, Debra Peterson. There are 10 projects on the list with an estimated price tag of $1,572,800, including a new roof, the one item on the latest county 2012 -2016 capital improvement plan recommendation. The roof, priced in the CIP at $135,000, is scheduled as a 2013 project. The most expensive project in the report, with a cost of $490,000, is for the GAM heating system. “The home is currently

served by two hot water boilers which have exceeded their useful life, as they are 53 years old,” the report says. It goes on to say that the boilers require increased maintenance and cannot operate at the increased efficiencies of modern boilers. In addition, there are heat pumps which are also at the end of their service life. It is recommended that the boiler replacement be completed within the next one to three years. A bright side is an estimated savings of $18,000 a year in energy costs. The home is not able to achieve individual temperature control for the rooms. As a result, the floor grills discharge the same temperature to each room in each of the north, east and south wings. Upgrading this is a $295,000 project. Other projects on the list include the 32-year-old air handling unit, $281,000; automating the system controls, $178,000; and improving the ventilation system, $150,000. That project includes replacing six fan coils that are at least 16 years old and adding four coils to office areas that do not have space temperature control or code-required outdoor air ventilation. Replacing the roof, which was installed in 1981 according to the GAM history booklet, is in the

current CIP. The latest CIP has an estimated cost of $10.7 million for the next three years. The new immediate projects for GAM would add $1.4 million or 13 percent to the CIP. The assessment includes additional items that need replacement beyond the next three years. The project cost estimate for years four through seven is $523,000 with an additional $438,000 required in price years eight through 10. Many of these items are described as nearing the end of their recommended service life or antiquated. Golden Age Manor has had an ongoing capital-needs list for years. Former GAM Administrator Gary Taxdahl presented a revised future capital-needs list each year. That list, revised in March 2009, included some projects such as carpets and windows that have been recently completed. The boiler replacement was not on his list but was on the list of items requiring repair or replacement that the county included in its sellers damage report during the proposed sale of GAM in January 2008. That list also includes elevator repair and asbestos removal. The last two items are not included on any other GAM project list.

BCLRA receives Wisconsin Idea Award The Burnett County Lakes and Rivers Association is the recipient of the 2011 UW Colleges and UWExtension Wisconsin Idea Award for protecting Burnett County’s lakes, rivers and attendant wildlife by working with partners through education, conservation and longrange planning. UW Colleges and UW-Extension Board of Visitors President Mark O’Connell presented the award at the institution’s annual Chancellor’s Awards Reception, Sept. 22, in Madison. The Chancellor’s Awards recognize UW Colleges and UW-Extension partners, supporters and employees for their outstanding contributions that enhance the quality of life in Wisconsin. In giving the award, O’Connell praised BCLRA for having impact at both the local and state level and also for cooperating with University of Wisconsin Extension in conserving local lakes and rivers. He further commented that BCLRA has consistently provided leadership in conservation for over 15 years. Roger Noe, current BLCRA president, recognized the existing and past board of directors. “What BCLRA has accomplished over the years is because of committed volunteers stepping up and giving their time and energy to protect some of Wisconsin’s greatest resources. I am honored to have worked with wonderful volunteers and University of Wisconsin Extension faculty in our goal of making Wisconsin a great place. Shown (L to R) front row are: Chancellor Ray Cross, Noe, Rep. Nick Milroy and Susan Wallin. Back row: Hud Gelein, Mike Kornmann and Bob Baker. - Special photo

Eighth DUI possible SCF man’s car accident triggers arrest by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – An abandoned car accident scene in St. Croix Falls led authorities to the home of Winslow Albright II, 53, St. Croix Falls, who was apparently injured from the crash and later arrested for his eighth driving while intoxicated charge. Police found the vehicle right after midnight on Saturday, Oct.

was unable to form 1, tracing the registracoherent sentences, tion to Albright, who which may or may was back home and not have been from was already being the crash. He was treated by emergency taken to the hospital medical technicians for and treated for his ininjuries he sustained in juries, and was also isthe crash. sued a citation for his “The lip thing hapeighth DUI. pened,” Albright is alAlbright was leged to have told the Winslow Albright II charged on Tuesday, police, apparently refOct. 4, with operating erencing the crash, which led to his injuries. He al- left of center and failing to keep legedly later admitted to drink- control of his vehicle. However, ing and being intoxicated at the DUI charges had not officially been filed at press time. time of the crash. The police report states that he

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The $2.4 million in improvements to the present GAM facility might need to be evaluated together with the long-range plans for the home. Polk County Administrator Dana Frey, in a May 2011 report to the GAM governing board, says that the 50-year-old facility faces eventual obsolescence. He adds that the stand-alone nursing home model may no longer be financially sustainable.

Captured in Colorado Escaped inmate who assaulted Town of Blaine garage attendant now in custody BURNETT COUNTY The man sought by authorities in connection with the Sept. 3 assault of a Town of Blaine garage attendant and the theft of a town vehicle, was captured this past week by authorities in Boulder, Colo. Caleb W. Smith, , 26, an escaped inmate from the Gordon Correctional Facility, was arrested after a foot chase, according to Burnett County Sheriff Dean Roland, in his weekly interview with redrockonair.com. Smith walked away from a work detail in Minong during the early-morning hours of Sept. 3. Several hours later he assaulted 82-year-old William Slipher of Danbury at the Town of Blaine garage - and fled in the victim’s truck, a 2005 Chevrolet Silverado. Slipher was transported by ambulance to a Duluth hospital for treatment. Roland said the truck Smith took has yet to be found. He said he’s hoping Slipher will be extradicted to Burnett County soon to face charges. - Gary King

Meth bust made Andrew Bruss busted by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer OSCEOLA – A pair of alleged methamphetamine buys have landed an Osceola man in jail, facing three felony charges. Andrew J. Bruss, 19, is alleged to have sold meth to an undercover officer for $225 and $300 in a recent b u y . Bruss was tracked down by Andrew J. Bruss authorities on Monday, Sept. 26, and after a brief standoff, was taken into custody, where he was found to have three separate gem bags full of meth, totaling 5.6 grams. He also is alleged to have a cutting agent and more bags on his body for sales. Bruss is charged with three felonies for the manufacture or delivery of meth and made his first court appearance on Tuesday, Sept. 27, before Judge Molly GaleWyrick, who set a $2,000 bond, and set his preliminary hearing for Nov. 1.


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Auditorium/from page 1 That history of the celebrated building is well known and led to a 2006 inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, but how to best ensure the circa 1917 theater survives another century has been a puzzling and likely expensive venture and was the subject of an Tuesday, Oct. 4, symposium of sorts. The future plans for the nonagenarian building was front and center as a presentation was held in the Civic Auditorium’s basement, now called The Elbow Room. While there were few surprises revealed, the enthusiasm for the future seems contagious, and the time line for the restoration has a zero hour of 2017, when the Civic Auditorium turns 100 years old.

Adjusting for the times

The presentation included several local and regional elected officials, Festival Theatre Board members, local advocates, theater personnel and Arts Wisconsin Executive Director Ann Katz of Madison, who noted other similar stories across the state of turning grand, artistic dreams into reality, and hopefully, economic engines of a community. Katz cited several opera houses, theaters, cultural, arts and performance venues from Wausau, Green Lake, Madison, Oshkosh and other locales, where communities lent their support and money to saving and enhancing historic venues. One of those theaters, the Bartell in Madison, has a slogan that seemed to mirror that philosophy: “Theatre creating community creating theatre.” Katz cited the locally popular Mabel Tainter Theatre in Menomonie, where in spite of several huge political and financial setbacks, “They didn’t take no for an answer.” Arts Wisconsin tries to advocate a philosophy that arts, theater, music and more, and Katz believes the venues can be not only a truly positive way to foster and celebrate local creativity, it can also be economically worthwhile investment for a community, local businesses, residents and other neighbors. “The Festival Theatre [Company] and the Auditorium Theatre is part of why St. Croix Falls is a special place,” Katz said. “It’s also what makes this a special project.”

A living landmark

Several members of the recently created Living Landmark Committee also shared various visions for the structure, playing on the successes of other city efforts to recognize, save and enhance local features of all flavors, from the Overlook Deck to the Riverwalk, even streetlights, crosswalks, sculpture and other historically, respective features of the downtown’s infrastructure. “St. Croix Falls is a model of preserving a historic town,” stated city Alderwoman Deb Kravig, who noted that preservation can be “an economic driver.” The Living Landmark Committee has three subcommittees, all with very different tasks: Strategic, building, and operational committees. UW-Extension agent and strategic committee member Bob Kazmierski an-

nounced a yearlong economic impact study that will candidly inventory the players that may or may not be benefiting from the theater and how to best adjust the future of the theater and possibly the adjacent former Falls 5 movie building to fit into that plan. “Maybe [with the results] they can work together even more,” Kazmierski said. “Then see how a renovated St. Croix Falls Auditorium Theatre could fill those gaps.” Committee member Meg Luhrs noted that long-term financial viability, as well as ways to open new funding doors, is one of the major goals of the operational committee, which is likely to include professional fundraising, using results of several studies, past and present. Building committee member Rick Vezina revealed the likely costs of long-term restoration and enhancement is likely to fall between $1.7 and $2 million, which includes heating, ventilation and air-conditioning, an elevator and enhanced accessibility, as well as updated mechanical systems, a possible catering kitchen, and even restoring the windows to the actual auditorium space. “The basic structure is in good shape,” Vezina assured. “But we hope to have the basic needs of the building fulfilled by 2017.”

That space next door

City Alderman Brian Blesi praised the city for taking the “very courageous gamble” in preserving and enhancing not only the theater, but also other historically important structures, and how he and others are hoping the lessons learned can be applied next door, where the vacant Falls 5 building is in the early stages of a guideline plan for its potential usage. “There are some cool ideas out there [for the Falls 5],” Blesi said, noting how they are likely to include setting back the corner for a more a plaza atmosphere, in line with the neighboring Auditorium, and also possibly combining several needs for the Civic Auditorium, HVAC, elevators, kitchens, etc., with whatever emerges at the Falls 5 location. “It’s about synergy of systems,” Blesi said. “ ... to really create a hub that’s not only in the spirit of the arts and historic district ... but so it becomes a driver of business.” New city Administrator Joel Peck also outlined his work to rewrite the contract between the city and the Festival Theatre, to make the relationship “better for both sides.” “The city is far better off having the Festival Theatre here than not,” Peck said. “It’s about quality of life issues ... and what sells the community.”

A funky building with lots of friends

Much of the presentation was to a crowd that was already on board and excited to see the future plans. But the huge, obvious hurdle, as in any public arts project, is money. While many of the related costs of restoration, development and enhancement have stabilized with the recent recession, and money is relatively cheap to borrow, the basic role of the theater in the

Theater advocate Kathleen Melin gave a brief hsitory of the SCF Civic Auditorium. - Photos by Greg Marsten

LEFT: Anne Katz of Arts Wisconsin spoke of other, similar arts-based structures across the state and their stories of struggle, restoration and success.

city, county and region will likely need to expand even wider in the future. “Life in the arts is a real roller coaster,” stated Festival Theatre Company Executive Director Danette Olson, who noted that attendance this summer was at an all-time high, and staffing is as lean as it has been in the last six years, which has helped the bottom line, but also made their individual responsibilities an even greater challenge. “But we’re very determined to to keep producing local theater,” Olson said, who stressed the importance of that goal, but also how the combination of volunteers, host families, actors, producers, backers

City business park groundbreaking A ground-breaking ceremony took place Thursday, Sept, 29, in Taylors Falls, Minn., for the city business park on Cty. Road 37. Pictured left to right are: city attorney Patrick Kelly, HRA-EDA board Chair Jim Stein, Councilman John Tangen, Councilwoman Mary Jo Murphy, Councilman Larry Julik-Heine, Vice Mayor Ross Rivard, state Rep. Bob Barrett, Mayor Michael Buchite, county commissioner Rick Greene, city engineer Steve Heth, public works Superintendent Mike Kriz, Chisago County Public Works Ben Utech, HRA-EDA Executive Director Chris Eng, HRA-EDA board member Jack Juve, and Josh Dresel of Dresel Contracting. – Photo by Tammi Milberg

and others is critical to the company’s success, and that their commitment to expanding into arts education for youth and local artists is one of many bold steps they should all be proud of. She also said the average audience member’s age is dropping, and that this could be one of the best financial season ever. “There’s good energy here,” she said. “Things are looking very good ... there’s lots of energy in this funky little building!”


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

Village board accepts resignation by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — The resignation of Marsha Jensen, a trustee for the village of Luck since 1999, was accepted by the village board during a special meeting Wednesday evening, Sept. 28. Jensen resigned from the board due to health reasons, and her resignation was effective immediately. There are no immediate plans to fill the position, and village Administrator Kristina Handt said that any interested people can contact the village hall. The special meeting was held primarily to begin formulating the 2012 budget, but the board also clarified a Sept. 14 decision to adjust wages for nonunion village employees. As a result of the action, permanent nonunion employees will have a temporary 5.8-percent wage increase through Dec. 31. Since August, according to Handt, Wisconsin Act 10 has required nonunion employees to make an additional 5.8-percent contribution to the Wisconsin Retirement System. Union employees will not start

Sterling Bank is making plans to build a new office here on the northeast corner of Hwy. 48 and Hwy. 35 in Luck. The Luck Plan Commission has determined that the property is appropriately zoned for a bank, and the next step for the bank is to obtain a variance to allow parking between the building and Hwy. 48. — Photo by Mary Stirrat making the required contributions until a new contract begins Jan. 1, 2012. The board’s action, said Handt, means both groups will be impacted by the re-

quired increased contributions at the same time. In other action at the Sept. 28 meeting, the board accepted a bid of $9,340 from

Graley Concrete Construction Inc. for repairs to the sidewalk on Main Street. The other bid received by the village was for $10,904. The village plan commission met Monday, Sept. 26, and determined the property at the northeast corner of Hwys. 48 is appropriately zoned to accommodate a request from Sterling Bank to construct a new bank at that location. Located just south of the Holiday StationStore, the corner is zoned light industrial, which does not list banks as a specified use. Commission members Chris Petersen, Peter Demydowich, Bob Determan and Ed Seck determined that a bank is a similar use to those specified within the light-industrial zoning district. Absent from the meeting were members John Klatt and Lori Pardun. As a next step before construction can begin, the bank must get a variance to allow parking between the Hwy. 48 right of way and the building setback line. The zoning board of appeals will meet Monday, Oct. 17, to discuss issuing the variance.

Grantsburg pool may close Operating deficit, new regulations force issue

borrowing $400,000 for the sewers and can’t afford to fix streets. He also noted that he has pleaded with the school to get involved with the pool operation since 1999. Val Johnson said times are tough for many people and adding this cost won’t fly. As to getting the towns involved, Johnson said getting agreement on the new fire station was a circus and doubted there would be any success with pool funding. Dean Josephson said that people are willing to donate for improvements but not for operating funds. And Glenn Rolloff said he sees the public interest but noted that the 2011 fundraising came up short.

by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg Village Council is considering closing the village-owned swimming pool. A combination of rising operating losses for the pool plus the added expense for required improvements could raise the 2012 pool cost to $50,000. In a tight budget year, a $15,000 increase could force the issue of keeping the pool open. Information on the pool was presented at a special council meeting Monday, Oct. 3. About 20 residents attended the hearing to express their support for the pool. Resident voices The residents who spoke were strongly in favor of keeping the pool open. David Dahlberg said there are 320 reasons to keep the pool open. That is the number of kids who have taken swimming lessons at the pool. Dahlberg, a member of the Grantsburg School Board, said the community needs to look at the option of the school district taking over the pool. He said the school now pays the cost of those swimming lessons during summer school, about $4,000 each year, and has donated an additional $10,000 for the repair projects. Russ Erickson said it is not fair for the village to bear the brunt of the pool cost when half the pool use is by kids living in the surrounding towns. He said the town governments should be asked to cover part of the annual costs. Erickson said he knows that the town boards have been asked in the past. Patti Glockzin said the pool is one of the things that attracts businesses to locate in Grantsburg. She called for the council to make a commitment to keep the pool

David Dahlberg asked the Grantsburg Village Council to consider alternative ways to keeping the swimming pool open. Some 20 residents attended the council meeting Monday, Oct. 3. - Photo by Gregg Westigard open and then work with the community to find a way to do it. “Don’t take away from us the things that make Grantsburg a pleasant place to live,” Marge Nelson said. “Once we lose the pool, we will never get it back.” There was a voice for closing the pool. A letter to the village board from Michael Downing was distributed which said in part, “I have positive things to say about the pool with one exception; cost. The money is not there.” Downing went on to say that the village taxpayers have limits. He noted water and sewer rates and a tax base with numerous vacant properties. He goes on to say that it appears the village is no longer able to financially sustain a public pool that is updated and safe and can not risk the possible harm that could come

with operating an unsafe pool. Downing closed by saying the council faces a most unenviable task.

Board response The village council has been looking at 2012 budget issues. Village treasurer Sheila Meyer and several council members responded to the residents. “We are getting less in state aid,” Meyer said. “The state is cutting $60,000 off the top for next year. We are at the levy cap and can not easily raise taxes. We have no idea what more could be cut from the budget to add the additional money for the pool.” Dale Dresel asked if the residents would be willing to raise their taxes to pay for more pool expenses. He said the village is

The figures The village has regularly paid about $30,000 a year to cover operating losses for the 31-year-old pool. That cost could be close to $38,000 for 2011. That includes an expected $32,000 loss from operations and $6,000 in special repairs that has not been covered by donations. The village expected $16,000 in donations for 2011 to pay for this year’s projects, but only $9,666 of that amount has been raised as of mid-September. The operating loss for 2012 is projected at up to $40,000, according to information presented at the meeting. In addition, federal safety regulations require the installation of a lift and steps before the pool opens in 2012. That project is estimated at $10,000 for a total 2012 cost of up to $50,000. That $10,000 might be covered by donations, but with the 2011 fund request short $6,000, the village would need $16,000 in donations to cover 2011 and 2012 costs. The village is in the final stages of preparing the 2012 budget. A decision may be made at the council meeting next Monday, Oct. 10.

Polk-Burnett hosts member appreciation open house for Co-op Month CENTURIA – Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative will host an open house Friday, Oct. 14, to show appreciation for its members and recognize National Co-op Month. Polk-Burnett members are invited to stop by the co-op office in Centuria, 1001 Hwy. 35, between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. for free brats and beverages served by the board of directors. “All 20,000 who receive electricity from Polk-Burnett are members-owners of the cooperative,” said Ed Weber, co-op board president. “We appreciate your membership and welcome you to an open house in your honor.” Co-op members are invited to use the employee parking entrance at the back of the building. Open house festivities will take place in the garage, where members can view energy displays, watch a power line safety demonstration by co-op linemen, sign up for e-bill, and learn about re-

bates and incentives from Focus on Energy and the co-op’s EnergySense program. Members will also receive

appreciation gift bags and can enter drawings for prizes. Throughout the nation, co-ops and their members will take time during October to come together for Co-op Month to help promote a better understanding of the cooperative form of business. The theme this year is “Cooperative Enterprises Build a Better World.” Cooperatives, like PolkBurnett, are unique because they are notfor-profit, democratically guided by an elected board of directors and locally owned by members, not distant stockholders. Members of a cooperative pool their assets to meet the needs of their community in the form of food cooperatives, financial service credit unions and rural utility cooperatives. The cooperative spirit is embraced by 130 million members who are served by 29,000 co-ops across the nation, explained Schmidt. “Cooperatives have a special commit-

ment to their members,” agreed Weber. “That’s because cooperatives, unlike many businesses, are locally owned and operated. Your hometown is our hometown.” “We hope you’ll join Polk-Burnett Friday, Oct. 14, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., to celebrate the cooperative difference, our proud cooperative heritage and the opportunities of cooperative membership,” added Weber. Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperatives has served the people of northwestern Wisconsin for more than 70 years, delivering reliable electricity and energy solutions to 20,000 members, and maintaining more than 3,000 miles of power line across 2,000 square miles. – from Polk-Burnett Electric Cooperative


PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Polk County awarded funds under emergency food and shelter program POLK COUNTY – Polk County has been chosen to receive $5,315 to supplement emergency food and shelter programs in the county. The selection was made by a national board that is chaired by the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency and consists of representatives from the American Red Cross, Catholic Charities, USA; National Council of Churches of Christ in the U.S.A.; The Salvation Army; United Jewish Communities and United Way of America. The local board was charged to distribute funds appropriated by Congress to help expand the capacity of food and shelter programs in high-need areas around the country. A local board made up of representatives from the following organizations: Emergency Management, the Salvation Army, the American Red Cross, United Way, local church organizations, West CAP and the county food shelves, will determine how the funds awarded to Polk County are to be distributed among the emergency food and shelter programs run by local service agencies in the area. The local board is responsible for recommending agencies to receive these funds and any additional funds available under this phase of the program. Under the terms of the grant from the

national board, local agencies chosen to receive funds must: 1) be private, voluntary nonprofit or units of government, 2) have an accounting system, 3) practice nondiscrimination, 4) have demonstrated the capability to deliver emergency food and/or shelter programs, and 5) if they are a private, voluntary organization, they must have a voluntary board. Qualifying agencies are urged to apply. Polk County has distributed emergency food and shelter funds previously to the Salvation Army, Community Referral Agency, Northwoods Homeless Shelters, Polk County Aging Program and participating Polk County food shelves. These agencies used the emergency food and shelter funds awarded to them to provide 5,505 meals and 1,080 nights of lodging during 2010. A meeting of the local board to distribute these funds has been scheduled for: Monday, Oct. 10, at 2 p.m. in the multipurpose room located at the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main St. in Balsam Lake. Public or private voluntary agencies interested in applying for Emergency Food and Shelter Program funds should contact Kathy Poirier of the Polk County Emergency Management Office at 715-485-9280 prior to the meeting. - submitted

Clear Lake man facing abuse charges by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer AMERY – Allegations have been raised against a 35-year-old Clear Lake man, stating that he grabbed and hit his live-in girlfriend, leaving bruises, and then “bear hugged” and shoved her into a closet, holding her there after he threw her cell phone in a lake when she tried to call for help. The incidents were alleged to have occurred on the afternoon of Sunday, Sept. 25, in Amery, and led to possible charges against Frederick Niebergall II, pending an investigation. According to the police report, the woman was finally able to leave the residence, but when she returned two hours later to retrieve some of her belongings,

Niebergall is alleged to have threatened her and punched her in the chest, stating that he would “seriously hurt her if she didn’t leave.” Niebergall was taken into custody without incident and has a history of run-ins with the law in several states, including domestic violence. He also has a longstanding restraining order against another woman that is still in effect for another quarter century. He is facing potential charges from the latest incident, which had not been filed by press time. However, the victim has since filed for a temporary restraining order, which was granted. The next hearing on the matter was set for Wednesday, Oct. 5, before Judge Molly GaleWyrick.

Burnett County Health & Human Services FLU INFLUENZA AND PNEUMOCOCCAL SEASON VACCINATION CLINIC

Thurs., Sept. 29, 2011 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Mon., Oct. 3, 2011 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Tues., Oct. 4, 2011 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 6, 2011 11 a.m. - Noon 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Tues., Oct. 11, 2011 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 13, 2011 4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Burnett County Government Center - Rm. 165 A & H Senior Center Siren School - Dragon Room Northland Community Center, Dairyland Webster High School Cafeteria Grantsburg Middle School Burnett County Government Center - Rm. 165

Influenza: $25 Pneumonia: $60 All insurance plans accepted

Additional clinic to be scheduled in Webster. Please check for updates by calling the Burnett County Flu Line at 715-349-7600 or online at www.burnettcounty.com, under the Health & Human Services page. If you have any questions, please call Burnett County Department of Health & Human Services at 715-349-7600. 546253 5-8L 47-49a

Unique sport shop opens in SCF ST. CROIX FALLS - The first day open was huge for the all-new Cyclova XC sport shop in downtown St. Croix Falls. Located at 125 North Washington St. Suite A, in Franklin Square, which is the former Ben Franklin Building, the new business was greeted with much fanfare and huge crowds on Saturday, Oct. 1. The store features all flavors of bikes, from fat-tired off-roaders to street cruisers, distance and racing bikes. In fact, the shop even held a bike tour/race that morning as a kickoff, along with numerous door prizes and foods from around the world. But the Cyclova XC shop will also deal

in running equipment and cross-country ski equipment, with servicing and more for the sports. The co-owners, Ben Jonjak and Frank Lundeen, have deep local backgrounds, and already have many connections as suppliers for equipment. They are also dedicated lovers of the outdoors, and Jonjak gave presentations on Saturday for his hiking treks in Peru and elsewhere, with a stunning slide show and suggestions for travelers. The store will be open year-round, and according to the owners, plans to be around for a long time. - Greg Marsten

It was a big day for the new Cyclova XC sport shop in downtown St. Croix Falls. The store opened to much fanfare on Saturday, Oct. 1, and offered door prizes, food, presentations and great deals. Cyclova XC co-owner Frank Lundeen announced the names of door prize winners as the grand opening progressed. The all-new store deals in bikes, cross-country skis and running supplies, as well as service and even more special activities, including a biathlon demonstration later this month.– Photo by Greg Marsten

Tanner Fest is Saturday CENTURIA - The annual Tanner Fest, held to raise funds to fight cystic fibrosis, will be held this Saturday, Oct. 8, from 1 to 5 p.m. at Bergmann’s Pumpkin Patch south of Centuria on Hwy. 35. The event will include a full day of fun activities including hay rides, a corn maze, haunted house, bouncy houses and raffles with prizes including a fam-

ily photo session from JB Studios Photography and two tickets to a Green Bay Packers game. Admission is $15 for a family with 100 percent of admission cost donated to the Minnesota Medical Foundation. - with submitted information

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How much rent for Endeavors? Property committee debates 2012 reduction by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Endeavors, formerly the Polk County Adult Development Center, has served the needs of adults living with disabilities since 1965. It is one of 62 state-certified community rehabilitation programs in Wisconsin and the only one in Polk County. Endeavors has had a working relationship with the county since it started. In 2003, the county built the current Endeavors building in Balsam Lake during the construction of the Justice Center campus. Endeavors has rented that space from the county since then. Part of the Endeavors program is to find meaningful employment for its clients with higher skills. That work promotes personal growth for the clients, helping them lead a more independent life. The work programs, often contracts with local employers, let the clients earn money and also provided revenue for Endeavors. The recession took a hit on Endeavors. Work product contracts with industry totaled $150,000 a year in 2005 and 2006. By 2008, contracts were just over $100,000 and hit a low of under $60,000 for 2009. It had a slight recovery in 2010 but still has less than half its former revenue. In early June, the county helped Endeavors, then under the ADC name, by reducing its rent from $6,750 per month to $3,300 per month, $39,600 per year. Last

The board of Endeavors met with the property committee to discuss rent for the adult development center. Seated (L to R) facing the camera are county Administrator Dana Frey and Mick Larsen, Becky White, Diana Manning, Vern Larson,and Tom Meister from Endeavors. With their backs to the camera are committee members Larry Jepsen, William Johnson, Neil Johnson and Ken Sample. County board members Patricia Schmidt and James Edgell look on in the background. - Photo by Gregg Westigard December, the rent was reduced another $800 per month to $2,500 per month / $30,000 per year for 2011. That December 2010 agreement was for one year and states that the rent for 2012 shall be $60,000 per year unless the county and Endeavors agree on another reduction. The year is almost up, and the 2012 Endeavors rent was a topic of discussion at the property committee meeting Monday, Oct. 3. Endeavors is requesting a continuation of the $30,000 rent for another year. Endeavors was represented at the meeting by four of its board members, Andy Kiska, Vern Larson, Tom Meister and Mick Larsen, a former county board member and property committee chair. Diana Manning, Endeavors executive director, and Becky White, the assistant director,

were also present. Four of the property committee members, William Johnson, Larry Jepsen, Ken Sample and Neil Johnson, were present. George Stroebel was absent. There was no agreement. County Administrator Dana Frey said he left Endeavors at $30,000 for 2012. He said it was a judgment call and could have been proposed at $60,000. “We cannot afford $60,000,” Mick Larsen said. “Thirty is the max.” White said that contract revenues are still down, and income from the new greenhouse business in Milltown is still less than expenses. She said that Endeavors will have a loss for the year even with the $30,000 rent. “We must justify spending taxpayers

money,” Sample said. “We were told that the greenhouse would make money and that it would be a wholesale operation, supplying plants to retailers. It is not just wholesale. It is competing with private nurseries. We should not support a retail effort. There are private businesses that are not supported.” Meister noted a long collegial relationship with the county and said, “I implore you to consider our request.” He said the greenhouse is a fantastic opportunity for the clients to develop new talents. “The finance committee approved a one-year agreement with you last year because we had questions with you in the past,” Neil Johnson said. “I have seen no efforts at Endeavor to move forward. You need a better business plan. We can’t subsidize your program. We don’t see where you are going.” The committee took two votes trying to make a recommendation on the Endeavor rent for 2012. Jepsen and William Johnson voted in favor of keeping the rent at $30,000 a year. Sample and Neil Johnson favored a rent of $39,600. That is below the $60,000 agreed to last December. The Endeavors rent will go to the county board without a recommendation from the property committee and apparently at the $30,000 amount. A request has been submitted to Frey asking why the $60,000 amount in the December 2010 resolution is not being used as the recommended rent.

Balsam Lake festivals clarified Sewer main, fire truck and well issues addressed by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – Details emerged on upcoming festival plans in Balsam Lake, including Winter Fest plans that include everything from softball on the ice to a booya feed and maybe even rides in a helicopter, if arrangements can be finalized. Chamber of commerce spokesperson Carl Holmgren went before the Balsam Lake Village Board on Monday, Oct. 3, detailing several festival plans. “A couple of folks are planning a dip in the icy water,” Holmgren said, “to help raise money for the March of Dimes.” He said the icy swimming event is being planned as a possible challenge involving local fire departments and will take place over the weekend of Feb. 3, 4

and 5, 2012. He also said they are looking into dogsled rides and possibly helicopter rides. Holmgren also gave details on an upcoming fall/Halloween decorating contest among businesses, with details available on the chamber Web site. One detail of the 2012 version of Freedom Fest was also clarified, noting it will not include bull riding, but other plans are still being solidified. The next chamber meeting is set for Monday, Oct. 24, at 5 p.m. at the Polk County Museum in Balsam Lake.

In other board action: • The board voted to go forward with a sewer main repair on Idlewild Court, going with the low bid of $10,500 from EJM Pipe Service. Four bids were received on the repair, with a high of over $18,000. The village crew recommended the collapsing sewer main be fixed now instead

of some time down the road as a more expensive emergency repair. “It’s got to be fixed,” stated Trustee Jeff Reed. • Discussion on fire protection coverage and equipment needs were discussed, including possibly working with the Town of Balsam Lake for a new primary pumper truck for the Balsam Lake Fire Department. The current lead truck is a 1990 model, with a 1970 truck as the primary backup. Estimates for a new truck range as high as $400,000, although the department is considering trying to find a used truck to buy them more time. The department currently has $39,000 in a capital improvement fund, and receives $29,000 annually from the town. The board took no action but was in general agreement to work with the department and town to solve the pumper truck issue.

Collaborative including Luck School awarded $355,000 for physical education LUCK — Luck School District along with four other schools that are members of New Paradigm Partners have been awarded a three-year, $355,135 grant to enhance physical education and nutrition education at their schools. New Paradigm brings together the school districts of Luck, Birchwood, Shell Lake, Northwood, and New Auburn to collaborate on a variety of projects. The U.S. Department of Education announced Friday, Sept. 30, that New Paradigm is one of 76 education agencies and communitybased organizations across the country to receive a physical activity/nutrition grant

through the Carol M. White Physical Education Program. Grant recipients must implement programs that help students make progress toward meeting their state standards for physical education. Programs must include instruction in healthy eating habits and good nutrition as well as incorporate physical fitness activities that promote a lifelong healthy lifestyle. Rick Palmer, Luck School District administrator, said that the funding will be used to educate teachers and students in ways to be active throughout the day and to achieve better health and wellness

through exercise and diet. Some of the dollars will be used for training and to purchase equipment and materials. Other grant recipients in Wisconsin are the school district of North Fond du Lac, $478,270; Wausau School District, $785,237; Turtle Lake School District, $300,425; Royall School District, $768,257; and Whitewater Unified School District, $359,943. The 76 grants that were awarded amount to more than $35 million. — Mary Stirrat with information from Luck School District

• The initial public protection budget for 2012 of $112,000 includes the addition of a 24-hour/week part-time employee, as well as a shotgun, camera, software and projector. The shotgun was requested for animal control. The board approved a bid of $6,174 by Brian Cox for well No. 2 repair. The submersible pump is failing. One other bid was almost $2,000 higher. • The board tabled any action on noparking signs on CTH I, near the Paradise Landing restaurant, as they will attempt to solve parking issues with the business owners. Apparently, the cars can be dangerously packed into the area between the roadway and the parking lot during some events, making ingress and egress difficult. They will address the issue again in November. • The board approved the high bid of $2,676.77 from Sunnyside Marina for the village’s old dump/plow truck. Two other bids were significantly lower.

Americorps volunteer introduced

Lakeview cemetery improvements TOWN OF DANIELS – Visitors to Lakeview Cemetery at Mudhen Lake in the Town of Daniels have witnessed a number of changes over the past year, all intended to improve the appearance of the cemetery and provide a better maintained final resting place for residents of the town. The changes include removal of most of the decaying perimeter fence, extensive tree trimming, removal of overgrown shrubbery, realignment of many headstones and releveling of sunken graves. A secondary purpose of the work was to streamline mowing and grass-trimming operations by eliminating inappropriate vegetation and gravesite decorations. Improvements will continue to be made during the coming months. To help ensure that the appearance of the cemetery does

not again deteriorate, an ordinance describing the dos and don’ts of gravesite use and care has been created (Town of Daniels Ordinance 3-2010, dated July 13, 2010). Key provisions of the ordinance include: Information regarding plot ownership or owner permissions required as a prerequisite for use of a plot; No placement of flagpoles, wooden boxes, wire containers, jars, bottles, toys, cans, solar lighting, personal items and other memorabilia on or near gravesites; No planting of flowers and the placement of potted plants on the ground at gravesites. However, potted plants and artificial flowers may be placed in elevated pot holders in line with headstones during the summer months. All potted plants and artificial flowers must be removed by Oct.

15 of each year; A requirement that town board or sexton approval be obtained before new shrubs or trees are planted; An allowance for additional floral decorations in celebration of Memorial Day and the winter holidays. Such decorations must be removed by June 30 and Jan. 15, respectively. Town employees will enforce Ordinance 3-2010 as necessary. However, cemetery patrons and visitors are asked to observe the above rules and other requirements of the ordinance. The ordinance, together with a great deal of cemetery and towns information, is available on the town’s Web site, www.townofdaniels.org. - submitted

Kalea Zenisek was introduced Monday, Sept. 26, to members of the Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention Coalition at their meeting at the Burnett County Government Center. Zenisek will work part time as an Americorps volunteer for the AODA prevention office and part time at the Family Resource Center. Part of her responsibility is to put in time at both the Grantsburg and Webster schools during after-school hours Mondays through Thursdays. Zenisek is from Green Bay. - Photo by Nancy Jappe


PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

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As another National Newspaper Week (Oct. 2-8) rolls around, it’s important to reflect on our role in the community - and how we attempt to achieve it. Pragmatic is a word that springs to mind. Deadlines need to be met, stories have to be written, proofread and put on a page in a way that’s sensible and perhaps palatable to our readers. We need to pay the bills. So when we’re asked what’s in store in the coming years for local newspapers as ink slowly gives way to digital - we really don’t have an answer. It’s clear only that our service is still sought, as opposed to, perhaps, the postal service, which now sees the writing on the wall, or if you prefer, the blogspot. People still want to know what their local school board is discussing, who hit the home run, who started up the new business on Main Street and all the passages, from birth to death, that affect the town in which they live or grew up. We provide the news on paper - and that isn’t going to change anytime soon. But today you might learn about the breaking local news via our e-mail updates or our Facebook page, which in turn directs you to our Web site, which in turn reminds you to see the entire story or followup in our weekly printed version, a replica of which is available on a computer via our e-edition. Your response to this form of news delivery tells us simply you are ready to be informed - and expect to be informed - instantly when possible and not just once a week and not just via ink and paper. Today’s technology not only allows us to better serve our readers but it also helps us in ways to become more efficient. What might not fit in our newspaper can be placed on our Web site. Newspapers are far from being immune to the economy. Like most newspapers we’ve made cuts in most areas of production over the past few years - while trying not to affect the quality of our product. That quality includes “keeping government honest” as some would say. Even smaller papers play a role in this - and while we honestly don’t see a lot of blatant crookedness in local government, we know there’s a need to remind local officials of open meetings laws and their obligation to explain in public every procedure, expenditure and tax hike they approve. The Leader is far from perfect in meeting all expectations for all readers - but our staff members understand people still look to their newspaper - not bloggers to provide the most authoritative and credible reporting. It’s with that purpose we keep trying to be the leader, literally, in keeping our readers informed - on paper and through every wired technology that’s feasible. You get our best efforts each week - all for less than the price of a bottled water. We hope our readers find that to be a good deal. Editorials by Gary King

• Area news at a glance • Man sentenced for vehicular homicide

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Last week’s question

PINE COUNTY, Minn. - A Pine County man will spend nearly five years in prison after being sentenced on Friday, Sept. 30, for the May 2010 accident that killed a 17-yearold girl. Walton Snyder was charged with criminal vehicular homicide. He pleaded guilty Friday in Pine County Court and was sentenced to 58 months in prison. Snyder was driving a car with three other passengers when it crashed into a tree and started on fire. Snyder and two other passengers escaped the car. The third passenger, Agnes Mattinas, didn’t escape. After an investigation, authorities learned that Snyder drank 15 to 20 beers and vodka throughout the night of the crash. The car Snyder was driving was stolen. - redrockonair.com

ATV accident is fatal

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• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365 U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

T H E

Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 6 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

RUSK COUNTY - A 47-year-old man who was found dead Monday, Sept. 26, in Rusk County after an ATV rolled on top of him has been identified as John Wolf of Dayton, Minn. Rusk County Chief Deputy Gary Hahn said Wolf was dead when first responders and deputies arrived at a property in the Town of Rusk in southwestern Rusk County in response to a 4:10 p.m. report that a person was trapped under his all-terrain vehicle. A preliminary investigation indicated that Wolf was removing brush from a hillside on his property when the ATV tipped over, ejected Wolf and rolling on top of him. It is the second ATV fatality in the county this month. Angelique M. Frederic, 40, Turtle Lake, died Sept. 17, after an ATV she was riding on as a passenger struck a deer along Basty’s Road in northeastern Rusk County. - Barron News-Shield

School district growing

NEW RICHMOND - The New Richmond School District continues to grow. According to unofficial numbers taken earlier this month, New Richmond’s overall enrollment is up 57 students. According to Morrie Veilleux, district administrator, the incoming kindergarten classes are continuing to get larger. Enrollment numbers are determined by counting all students and then subtracting the students who open enroll in other districts. New Richmond is currently still working to identify all those students. The numbers were recorded on Friday, Sept. 16. Total enrollment was 3,155, including early childhood and 4K. That’s compared to the 2010 total of 3,098; the district only budgeted for 3,129 students. The district lost six students from kindergarten to fifth grade from last year, lost nine in early childhood, gained 29 in 4K, gained 40 in grades six to eight, and three in grades 9-12. - rivertowns.net

Grave marker metal stolen for scrap

SUPERIOR - Ellie Hanson’s humor softens the cruel fact that in May, it was discovered that someone pried the brass plaque off her future grave in Superior and probably sold it for scrap. Knowing she’ll probably never find out who would “stoop so low” to steal from a cemetery, she recently tried to put an ad in the local newspaper. “It was going to say: Whoever stole the marker on my grave, I’d like to have it back. I plan on dying soon.” “Something goofy like that,” the 87-year-old Superior resident said this week while talking about the unmarked slab of concrete that now holds her place in the St. Francis Church section of Nemadji Cemetery. It’s next to the military veteran plaque of her husband, Dewey, who was buried there in 1990. “He appreciated my wit,” Hanson said wryly. There is frustration behind the humor when it comes to the lengths to which people seeking cash for scrap metal will go. “Nowadays, nothing is sacred,” Hanson said. - Superior Telegram

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OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

• Letters to the editor • Class warfare? So now the president’s proposal to adopt the Warren Buffet proposal that the very wealthy be taxed at no lower rate than the middle class is “class warfare” according to GOP leaders. How do you think the 400 highest income Americans increased their combined income from $16.9 billion in 1992 to $90.9 billion by 2008 while reducing the percentage they paid in federal income tax by 16 percent? I wonder if that wasn’t class warfare, a class warfare that was waged quietly by well-placed campaign contributions and well-paid lobbyists. My tax accountant informs me that I paid 18.9 percent of my income in federal income taxes last year. Buffet, whom I admire, paid 17.4 percent of his and many of the super rich paid an even lower rate. State and local tax obligations take a much smaller percentage from the upper income earners than does the federal income tax. I’m not complaining about mine, but I do object to being labeled a class-warfare soldier for backing an increase in those making over a million a year to equal mine. Someone has to pay for the unnecessary wars and tax preference giveaways, and it ought not be left up to our grandchildren. Eiler Ravnholt Luck

Praise On Friday, Sept. 23, at about 6:40 p.m., our neighbor’s home at 958 353rd Ave., Frederic, was destroyed by a gas explosion. We would like to praise all of the emergency responders, fire, rescue, police, ambulance and power company teams, who performed their work with the great-

est competence, courtesy and compassion. They arrived at the scene quickly and removed the owner, who was in the basement of the home at the time of the explosion, with the greatest care. Thanks to their efforts, he is now recovering at Regions Hospital in St. Paul from second-degree burns and a crushed hip. Also, I would like to extend gratitude to them for responding to the concerns of the victim’s friends and neighbors with the greatest patience and courtesy. Having such wonderful emergency services available to us in Polk County gives my wife and I a great sense of security. These men and women deserve our highest admiration and gratitude. Jo and Cheryl DeGeer Lewis

United Way effort United Way St. Croix Valley has kicked off what we hope will be our biggest and best community fund drive. We are extremely proud and thankful to have Jason Davis, host and executive producer of KSTP Eyewitness News’ “On the Road” series, as our honorary campaign spokesperson. We filmed Jason’s visits to several of United Way’s partner agencies in Polk, Pierce and St. Croix counties. In each community, he talked with people whose lives have been improved through the services provided by these agencies. The resulting video is touching and clearly communicates both the need and the help available right here in western Wisconsin. We invite everyone to view this extraordinary video by visiting the United Way St. Croix Valley home page www.unitedwaystcroix.org and clicking on 2011 Campaign Film. While on the site, you can also learn more about how United Way and our partners meet basic and

emergency needs, strengthen children and families and improve health and independence. United Way is about many people giving a little bit to help our communities become stronger. After viewing the video, even if you have not contributed to United Way in the past, we invite you to click on “Give” and invest in your community. There are many easy ways to give: online, by mail, at work or through estate planning. Remember to designate our United Way if you donate through an employer campaign in the Twin Cities. Whichever way you choose, we thank you sincerely for “Living United.” Linda Robertson and Warren Schneider 2011 campaign chairs United Way St. Croix Valley Hudson

The poor rich Last week, Mark Pettis, former Republican state representative, tried to convince us federal taxes were unfair to the rich. He says lower-income folks pay 15 percent and the $1 million folks pay 29 percent, and rates should be changed to “even out federal tax percentages. Just to be fair.” I am concerned that his kind of “evening out” is more like “rubbing out” the middle class. The richest 20 percent of Americans already own 84 percent of all of U.S. wealth If we divide $1 million among 100 people the way our country’s wealth is now, 20 of them average $42,000 each and the other 80 average $2,000 each. Some folks are very rich, some medium rich, and 80 percent of folks are barely getting along, most of them working hard and going backwards. Pettis says the $2,000 folks should pay more taxes so the $40,000 folks can pay less “just to be fair.” He is repeating what

Republican Party politicians are saying in their determined effort to protect and further enrich the few at the top. Jesus was clear about the rich. “Verily I say unto you, that a rich man shall hardly enter into the kingdom of heaven. And again I say unto you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.” Let’s help the rich get into heaven by sharing a little of their wealth here on Earth. Russell B. Hanson Cushing

“No Guns Allowed” Posting No Guns Allowed signs in public buildings and private businesses – I agree that keeping these places free of guns may be justified, but the sign only affects law-abiding people that have received training, a background check and a permit to carry concealed. All others are banned without the sign, as they can’t legally carry anyway. By complying with the sign I must leave my gun in my car or saddlebag. This causes a much greater danger to the public. I must draw my gun, in public, to place it in my car and handling the gun increases the chance of accidental discharge. Also, the gun is much less secure in the car as the car can be broken into and the gun stole, and now in the hands of a criminal. The two most secure places for a handgun are in my holster or gun safe. Please consider these facts as you decide whether to place a sign on your building. John Warnest Grantsburg

Jauch makes statement on Senate Mining Committee Northern lawmaker one of seven senators appointed to serve MADISON — State Sen. Bob Jauch, DPoplar, has been appointed to serve as a member of the newly created Senate Mining Committee. The group will be charged with reviewing Wisconsin’s current mining laws, as well as making recommendations for possible reforms and improvements. The committee will consist of four Republican and three Democratic members. It will be chaired by Sen. Neil Kedzie, R-Elkhorn. “I have been calling for the creation of this committee since last May following the effort to rush a controversial bill draft written by and for the mining company through the legislative process. Mining is a complicated and controversial topic that

deserves full public participation in a thoughtful dialogue on potential changes to the mining permitting process. Our current mining laws were the result of extensive public discussion that led to consensus on policies that resulted in the permitting of the Ladysmith mine. “The public has a right to be frustrated when special interests attempted to ram a bill that weakens our environment through the Legislature without adequate public input. Another group of citizens are legitimately concerned that a dysfunctional Legislature might deny the chance for changes to current law to be considered at all. An issue of this importance must be deliberated away from closed doors, and the establishment of a committee should assure full transparency and public involvement. “This committee will not decide the fate of any specific mining proposal. Mining is an allowable economic activity and the ul-

timate decision on a mine rests with state, federal and tribal authorities who will review permits based on existing water and air quality standards. “However, the committee can begin a thoughtful public discussion about whether or not our state’s current mining permitting process is fair and thorough. I remain convinced that the review will dispel some of the myths about the Wisconsin mining laws and demonstrate that the time taken to permit a mine is not dramatically different from the time line in a state like Minnesota. “Recent statements by Assembly Republican lawmakers have suggested that they have the votes to pass a mining permitting bill. Perhaps the Assembly lawmakers should reveal this plan to the public, so that the public can learn what policies the politicians have in their back pocket regarding this important issue. Revealing their bill would also enable an op-

portunity for comparison between the Senate and Assembly proposals. “Participating in a committee does not constitute a commitment to a particular time table or outcome. I will work with committee members in a serious attempt to conduct a comprehensive review of the permitting process that will include public hearings outside of Madison. I remain open to constructive suggestions; however, these must not diminish our environmental standards, erode local control or weaken public input. Above all, the recommendations should assure that the mining permitting process ultimately serves the public interest. “I have spoken with Senator Kedzie and am confident that he will approach this issue in a thoughtful and deliberative way.” — from the office of Sen. Jauch

Fall special session to continue focus on jobs MADISON - The governor has announced his intention to call the Legislature into special session in order to continue efforts to encourage economic growth in Wisconsin. Upon making this announcement for a Back to Work Wisconsin special session on jobs, state Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, R-River Falls, expressed support for the special session, citing the critical need for job growth in the state. “It is critical that jobs continue to be a top priority as we work to reverse the effects of the economic downturn and put people back to work,” said Harsdorf. “We need to build on the initiatives we acted

on earlier this year.” The bills passed in the earlier special session allowed Wisconsin to foster a friendlier business climate and created incentives for job creation in the private sector. Since the passage of the special session bills from the beginning of this year, Wisconsin’s business climate ranking jumped 17 points from to 24th from 41st according to one business publication. The agenda for the fall special session includes legislation to improve access to capital, support workforce development, streamline regulations, and address trans-

portation and infrastructure concerns. Included among the proposals and legislation up for consideration during this special session are bills authored by both Democrats and Republicans. “I believe legislators from both parties recognize the essential need to revitalize our economy,” said Harsdorf. “I look forward to working with my colleagues to enact legislation that job creators have cited as needed to improve Wisconsin’s economy.” In announcing the Back to Work Wisconsin special session, 26 bills or proposals were listed as part of the special

session’s agenda. Work on some of these proposals has already begun as various committees are holding public hearings and voting on bills. As a member of the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Forestry and Higher Education, Harsdorf voted for one of the bills on the special session agenda earlier this week. This bill, Senate Bill 40, seeks to address a concern of job creators by encouraging further business collaboration in providing advanced manufacturing skills training. Senate Bill 40 was approved by the committee on a bipartisan 7-0 vote. - from the office of Sen. Harsdorf

Walker to look at unemployment comp benchmarks by Chuck Quirmbach Wisconsin Public Radio MILWAUKEE - Gov. Scott Walker says he’s looking at whether people on unemployment compensation are trying hard enough to make a quick return to the workplace. Walker met with business executives in Milwaukee at one of the governor’s new

by-invitation-only jobs forums. Several executives told Walker that they have job openings, but contend some people who are out of work would rather take unemployment comp for as long as they can rather than get hired. Walker says he supported the recent extension of unemployment benefits, but wants to see if people who get the aid are meeting enough of the

requirements of the compensation program. A laid-off factory worker from Kenosha says it’s a slap in the face to hear employers say they can’t find enough people to fill jobs and then blame the unemployment compensation system. Scott Page says making the jobless hit another benchmark to get an unemployment check

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would be wrong, Page says he sometimes comes to meetings of the labor-backed Wisconsin Jobsnow Coalition, which attracted about 40 people to a sidewalk protest outside Walker’s appearance in Milwaukee.

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PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

C.I.A. is a student achievement ncentive program tendance and by requiring that positive behavior be one of the cornerstones of the C.I.A. program. We are the Luck High School community – a community where “every student can and will learn,” where every student can and will graduate, where every student can and will celebrate excellence as he/she climbs the ladder toward academic success.

Class of 2012 Gold Cards Taylar Anderson, Julie Franzel, Michael Jenssen, Laurie Jorgenson, Maia Lehmann and Krystal Ouellette. Red Cards Tony Aguado, Tyler Anderson, Shardae Garcia, Brandon Holdt, Summer Johnson, Ben Kufalk, Caitlin Ledin, Morgyn McGinnity, Spencer Nelson, Jesse Rennicke, J. P. Richey, Jake Schrock, Andrew Sund, Michelle Tomlinson and Hunter Wilson. Cardinal Cards Clint Gage, Michael Keenan, Nick Otlo and Jessie Harrison. Class of 2013 Gold Cards Evan Armour, Eric Blaser, Katelyn Dinnies, Cole Engstrand*, Taylor Joy, Hannah Karl, Geoffrey MaidenMueller and Alex Richey. Red Cards Sonja Anton, Jordan Bazey, Jaimee Buck, John Denny, Ashley Dexter, Brendan Fenning, Kelly Fitzgerald, Gabe Hendrickson, Austin Holdt, Kyle Hunter, Dylan LeMay, Leah LeMay, Logan Potvin, Matt Sanford, Avery Steen, Matt Thompson, Lena Ueke-Foster and Kelcie Wilson. Class of 2014 Gold Cards Megan Bartylla, Tessa Clemenson, Haley Dikkers, Samantha Harvey*, Jillian Klatt, Camille Marsten, Noah Musial, Isabella Nelson, Karsten Petersen, Whitney Petersen and Alicia Sund. Red Cards Casey Ekholm, Samantha Gore, Austin Holm, Darian Ogilvie, Brianna Schaar and Dylan Skow. Cardinal Cards Austin Hillman-Baker* and Isaiah Tretsven. Perfect Attendance – 4th quarter Class of 2012 Tony Aguado, Taylar Anderson, Shardae Garcia, Jessie Harrison, Michael Jenssen, Summer Johnson, Laurie Jorgenson, Michael Keenan, Nick Otlo, Jesse Rennicke and Billy Schallenberger. Class of 2014 Samantha Gore, Karsten Petersen and Brianna Schaar. Perfect Attendance – 2nd semester Class of 2012 Michael Jenssen Class of 2013 Kyle Hunter, Taylor Joy, Hannah Karl and Lena Ueke-Foster. Class of 2014 Brianna Schaar

Luck’s Cardinal Intelligence Agency first-time card earners, Cole Engstrand, Austin Hillman-Baker and Samantha Harvey. – Photo submitted

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LUCK – The Cardinal Intelligence Agency was created at Luck High School 20 years ago as a program to recognize and reward academic excellence and student achievement. This means that it is a student achievement incentive program. Its concept is to recognize students with short-term, tangible incentives; just as is done in the world of business with employees. The incentives are earned on a quarterly basis. Depending upon a student’s grades from the previous grading period and his/her behavior during those nine weeks, the student who has chosen to be a part of this program may be enrolled as a member at one of four levels. Gold CARD = This full-time regular education student has earned an A(3.666) or above grade-point average during the preceding quarter, has one or fewer disciplinary notices, has no failing grades or incompletes, has no unexcused absences or unserved detention time, no extracurricular code violations, and no suspensions. Red CARD = This full-time regular education student has earned a B(2.666) or above grade-point average during the preceding quarter, two or fewer disciplinary notices, has no failing grades or incompletes, has no unexcused absences or unserved detention time, no extracurricular code violations and no suspensions. CARDINAL CARD = This full-time regular education student has earned a C- (1.666) or above grade-point average during the preceding quarter, has one or fewer disciplinary notices, has no failing grades or incompletes, has no unexcused absences or unserved detention time, no extracurricular code violations and no suspensions. C.I.A. CARD: Students earning this card are full-time regular education students who have earned less than a C(1.666) grade-point average; however, they have improved their quarterly grade point average by 0.5 or more from their previous quarterly average. In addition, they can have no extracurricular code violations, no unexcused absences, no suspensions and no unserved detention time. The number of students at any particular level may vary widely from quarter to quarter; however, once a student has chosen to participate in the C.I.A., he/she retains the right to be a member until he/she graduates. This program offers recognition to top scholars, while serving as an incentive for all of the students at Luck High School. History has shown that the majority of students who are currently earning Cardinal or C.I.A. cards will move up to Red and/or Gold cards in the future. This program seeks to move all of the students toward the pursuit of academic excellence. According to the district motto, “Luck Schools prepares lifelong learners and responsible citizens.” The Cardinal Intelligence Agency attempts to promote this goal by recognizing students perfect at-


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Trooper honored for courageous action and exceptional service Trooper Patrick Kaetke of Shell Lake honored in Madison ceremony MADISON — Thirteen members of the Wisconsin State Patrol received special awards for saving lives and other exemplary service at a ceremony on Wednesday, Sept. 28, at the state Capitol in Madison. Trooper Patrick Kraetke, Shell Lake, for his dedication and outstanding work, received the Commendable Service Award based on the incident when he received information that a vehicle at a residence in Minnesota was being used to transport drugs on Jan. 7, 2008. Kraetke drove to an area close to the state border to detect the vehicle if it traveled into Wisconsin. After observing the vehicle in Wisconsin and based on information previously received, he initiated a traffic stop. He obtained information from the driver that resulted in a lengthy and extensive drug investigation. Kraetke took the initiative to locate the

Trooper Patrick Kraetke (left) received the Commendable Service Award from state patrol Superintendent Stephen Fitzgerald. — Photo submitted vehicle and then assisted the Wisconsin Department of Justice’s Division of

Criminal Investigation in a two-yearlong investigation. By digging deeper

into the investigation and working cooperatively with numerous law enforcement agencies, Kraetke set in motion the largest federal and state drug conspiracy case in the history of Burnett County. The investigation concluded with more than 40 individual arrests. Many of those convicted received lengthy sentences of more than 10 years in federal prison. Kraetke’s traffic stop and ensuing actions helped law enforcement agencies to remove gangs and drugs that had been destroying lives and communities for many years. State Patrol Superintendent Stephen Fitzgerald said, “All members of the state patrol make our highways and communities safer through their professional and tireless dedication to traffic and public safety. But the members of the state patrol who received special awards have demonstrated exceptional expertise and courage under extremely stressful conditions. Their achievements go well above and beyond their normal duties.” — from WSP

Barron Electric celebrates 75th anniversary with a special guest by Diane Dryden Special to the Leader SPOONER - Gov. Scott Walker was the special guest invited to address the crowd as the pubic gathered for the traditional boxed lunch and dividend check dispersal Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Barron Electric Cooperative’s facility in Spooner on Paulson Road. “Every year we’ve invited the sitting governor, dignitaries and legislators,” said board President Selmer Nelson, “and 25 years ago Dave Obey showed up in Spooner and Dave Gunderson attended the same Capital Credit Day in Barron, so we were hoping that this year, seeing it’s our 75th year in business, Gov. Walker would attend, and he did.” Walker’s visit was a surprise to the 750 Spooner co-op people who picked up checks totaling over $750,000 this year that was paid out between the two locations. Many were surprised when Walker came through the doors near the beginning of the event at 11 a.m. and after officially speaking a few words about how important it is to have an abundance of cost-effect supply of

electricity for Wisconsin’s growing economy, he presented a plaque to Dallas Sloan, Barron Electric’s general manager, proclaiming it Public Power Week. Walker did not rush off but after his short presentation but met with the crowds for almost an hour that asked questions of him and got answers. Walker was quoted as saying that 40,000 new jobs were created in the private sector during the first six months of this year and defended his Budget Repair Bill citing the losing battle neighboring states are having with their current budgets. “This bill creates stability for employees and it was the best alternative for Wisconsin.” He also said that he was also going to have a $10,000 cut in his own paycheck, so Wisconsin residents were not alone. He also said that “Being unemployed is worse than paying more and having a job.”

Artist at work

Artist Jackie Flaten was among artists showing their works at the St. Croix Falls Autumnfest held this past weekend in St. Croix Falls. - Photo by Rob Harrison

Gov. Walker and Barron Electric’s general manager, Dallas Sloan, looked like two farmers discussing crops instead of businessmen talking shop. - Photo by Diane Dryden

Groups strategizing for possible Walker recall by Rich Kremer Wisconsin Public Radio EAU CLAIRE - Planning sessions are being held across the state to coordinate the recall of Gov. Scott Walker. A group called the Wisconsin Recall Task Force is strategizing the most opportune timing for a recall erffort. A handful of Democratic activists met at the University of Eau Claire Tuesday night, Sept. 27, to brainstorm the most effective way to launch a recall against the governor. Though press was not allowed in the meeting, the group shared documents that outlined pros and cons for beginning the recall process on Nov. 5, the soonest possible date, or holding off. One reason listed for starting early is keeping up momentum from this summer’s recall elections. One of the reasons for waiting is having extra time to raise money and organize. Nan Lambert of River Falls was heavily involved in the failed recall effort against Republican state Sen. Sheila Harsdorf. She says no matter when a recall committee is filed or when the election happens, there will be plenty of support for ousting the governor, “The biggest question about a Walker recall is timing, when? When do we pull the trigger? Do we go with the soonest date possible? Do we wait and coordinate with other political election efforts? That’s what I’m here to find out.” Nathan Timm is a representative of the Wisconsin Recall Task Force, which is holding eight of these recall planning meetings across the state over the next week and a half. He says they’ve learned from the past and there’ll be a whole new approach to the Walker recall, “Sometimes on the left we have been more impulsive than we have been thoughtful, and this is an effort to try to balance that with maybe some more strategic thinking, some more thoughtful elements.” Timm says meeting-goers are also making suggestions for candidates to run against the governor if an election is called.


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Frederic Class of 1950 The Frederic Class of 1950 celebrated their 61st class reunion at the Pour House in Siren on Wednesday, Sept. 21. Attending were back row (L to R): Mark Dahlberg, Lyle Johnson, Jim Glockzin and David Anderson. Middle row: Jean Jorgenson Flanigan, Liz Colvin Johnson and Joan Jorgenson Anderson. Front row: Claudia Denn Wagner, Delores Lindfield Wilcox, Rayola Anderson Edling and Helen Fischer Weinzierl. - Special photo

Burnett County circuit court

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Erin R. Bearheart, Webster, underage drinking, $389.50, 6month license suspension and order for assessment. Dana C. Burnham, North Branch, Minn., issue worthless check, $127.50. Jacob J. Chell, Webster, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $200.50. Richard D. Hegquist, Ham Lake, Minn., issue worthless check, $405.50. Tommy R. Jewell, Grantsburg, operating a motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Donald W. Larson, Knapp, fail/obey traffic officer, $127.50. Jason K. Palme, Sandstone, Minn., fail/stop at stop sign, $175.30. Jesse J. Retzlaff, Spooner, disorderly conduct, $265.60. Melissa G. Rowe, Eau Claire, speeding, $127.50. Robert R. Snyder, Eau Claire, disorderly conduct, $365.60. Andrea M. Arcand, Webster, disorderly conduct, $793.00. Ryan G. Ballard, Danbury, battery, $4,382.25. Burnett Dairy Co-op, Grantsburg, violate Class B hwy. weight limits, $295.00. Jose M. Chavarria, Siren, possess drug paraphernalia, $330.50. John W. Damushes, Lansing, Ill., speeding, $250.90. Joshua W. Guyer, Shell Lake, battery, $3,771.33. Aaron S. Holmstrom, Colby, operate motor vehicle w/o valid license, $500.00. Steven R. Katz, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Daniel K. Krzebetkowski, Hayward, operating motor vehicle while revoked, $500.00. Christiana H. Larson, Wayzata, Minn., speedometer violations, $175.30. Chad D. Lundmark, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Marie A. Robinson, Danbury, speeding, $200.50. John P. Segelstrom, Grantsburg, OWI, $867.50, 8-month license revocation and order for assessment. Emily M. Stigall, Fridley, Minn., speeding, $150.50. Eric D. Anderson, Eau Claire, disorderly conduct, $100.00; violate restraining order, $100.00. Jacob J. Chell, Webster, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Troy A. Green, Minong and Shell Lake, inattentive driving, $708.50; possess open intoxicant in motor vehicle, $249.00. Dakota R. Mulroy, Siren, take and drive vehicle without consent, $1,530.17. Steven L. Vaurio, Burnsville, Minn., OWI, $741.50, 6-month license suspension and order for assessment. Kay L. Adams, Manheim, Penn., speeding, $175.30. All Season Tree Service, Cottage Grove, Minn., vehicle equipment violation, $175.30. Mark A. Anderson, Askov, Minn., seat belt violation, $10.00. Jenna M. Anderson, Webster, underage drinking, $263.50, order for assessment. Linda M. Armstrong, Danbury, speeding, $175.30.

Alton C. Barber, Siren, operating while revoked, $100.00. Rochelle M. Beckman, Webster, dog running at large, $187.90, twice. Jasmine R. Belisle, Webster, operating while suspended, $200.50. Joseph Bell, Webster, delinquent dog license, $152.50. Michael R. Belland, Webster, ATV-intoxicated operation, $452.50. Erin E. Binder, Chesterfield, Mo., speeding, $175.30. Lucan K. Bjorlie, Edina, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Alycia R. Bonse, Grantsburg, seat belt violation, $10.00. Celeste L. Bour, Eagan, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Jasper E.A. Bowers, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Gaylen T. Brown, Grantsburg, speeding, $175.30. Kayla W. Bubendorf, Luck, operating while suspended, $200.50. Margaret M. Bucko, Columbia Heights, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Norberto Burciaga Jr., South St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $175.30, twice; operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Carin M. Busse, Hampton, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Jacob T. Butzer, St. Louis Park, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Adrian Carr, New Hope, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Lori A. Casper, Ramsey, Minn., speeding, $175.30; operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Michael P. Cellitti, Estero, Fla., speeding, $175.30. Zachary M. Christenson, Elk River, Minn., operating boat-towing skier w/o observer, $175.30. Teresa L. Cimfl, Cumberland, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Christopher A. Clayton, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Daniel C. Clover, Grantsburg, nonregistration of auto, $175.30. Amanda A. Coen, Siren, speeding, $175.30. Kenneth R. Cook, Webster, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00; seat belt violation, $10.00. Steven D. Cornwell, Rosemount, Minn., speeding, $127.50. Jason D. Cross, Apple Valley, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Debbra J. Dekarske, St. Paul Park, Minn., operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Walter G. Den Hoed, Frederic, permit violation, $310.40. Brittany R. Dennis, Hayward, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. David E. Dines, Wayzata, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Michelle L. Dirtzu, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Don Doriott, Shell Lake, delinquent dog license, $152.50, three times. Joseph C. Dye, Grantsburg, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $200.50; fail/yield right of way from parked position, $175.30. Eric W. Erickson, Grantsburg, inattentive driving, $187.90.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

Polk County circuit court Louis A. Abramowski, Minneapolis, speeding, $250.90. Randy L. Alling, St. Croix Falls, operating while suspended, $200.50. Thomas J. Anderson, Granger, Iowa., speeding, $175.30. Christopher J. Armstrong, Osceola, speeding, $358.00. Kimberly J. Bainbridge, Milltown, speeding, $175.30. Linda L. Balk, Becker, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Kimberly J. BeachSweeney, Andover, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Scott B. Benson, Luck, dog at large, $263.50. Cassandra A. Bethell, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $175.30. Robert J. Biedler, Luck, operating while revoked, $200.50. Hunter L. Bjornson, Centuria, speeding, $175.30. Kelly C. Bornhoeft, Merrill, speeding, $175.30. Ryan N. Boyd, Savage, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Patricia M. Casagrande, Afton, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Alan B. Clemons, Frederic, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Darren E. Croes, Clear Lake, OWI, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, operating left of centerline, operating w/PAC > = 0.15, not guilty pleas.

Jason D. Dario, Woodbury, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Vicki L. Datt, Hudson, speeding, $200.50. Melissa M. Deeg, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $225.70. John A. Defiel Jr., Shafer, Minn., possession of marijuana/drug paraphernalia, $269.50. Joshua A. Denetz, Frederic, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Bryoni L. Eggenberger, Hudson, speeding, not guilty plea. Anthony R. Evans, Lewis, disorderly counduct, $150.00. Peter J. Fanum, Cambridge, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Jacob M. Farah, Milltown, operating while suspended, not guilty plea. Robert D. Ferris, Verona, speeding, $175.30. Rachel K. Freedland, St. Louis Park, Minn., operate personal watercraft w/o valid safety certificate, not guilty plea. Cory W. Gebhard, St. Croix Falls, failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.10. Mark E. Gerich, Santa Monica, Calif., speeding, $225.70. Janet R. Gray, Hastings, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Megan J. Hansen, Milltown, fail to stop/improper stop at stop sign, $175.30.

Perry L. Hochstetler, Luck, disorderly conduct with motor vehicle, $263.50; obstruct an officer, $263.50. Sandra L. Hoff, Frederic, operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50; operating while revoked, $200.50. Christopher P. Hoolihan, Roberts, speeding, $183.30. Michael E. Hurd, New Richmond, speeding, $175.30; seat belt violation, $10.00. Kathleen G. Iwaszko, Osceola, automobile following too closely, $200.50. Richard H. Janssen, Ames, Iowa, speeding, $175.30. Etta M. Johnson, Balsam Lake, speeding, $175.30. Thomas A. Johnson, Grantsburg, speeding, $200.50. Richard J. Juelich, Stillwater, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Kimberly A. Kellogg, Clayton, speeding, $225.70. Harvey A. Kern, New Brighton, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Ross F. Kitson-Mactoggart, Balsam Lake, jet ski violation slow-no-wake reqmt., $187.90. Kamie J. Knothe, Hammond, speeding, $250.90. Adam L. Kobernick, Osceola, speeding, $225.70. Richard G. LaBlanc, Clayton, permit unauthorized person to drive, not guilty plea.

Nicholas Lafreniere, Corsicana, Texas, speeding, $200.50. Charles E. Langeness, Ormond Beach, Fla., speeding, $175.30. Jonathan L. Larsen, Centuria, operate personal watercraft w/o valid safety certificate, $162.70. Matthew S. Lodermeier, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Thomas E. Mathias, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $225.70. David J. Meyer, Cottage Grove, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Steven M. Minn, Milltown, speeding, not guilty plea. Jaziel Moreno Ramirez, Dresser, speeding, not guilty plea; operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, not guilty plea; operating a motor vehicle w/o valid license, $200.50. William L. Mork, Eagan, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Jackie L. Moser, Webster, seat belt violation, $10.00. Marliss J. Mustonen, Siren, inattentive driving, $187.90. Ashley A. Nelson, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $200.50. Jessica L. Nelson, Centuria, operating while suspended, $200.50. William S. Nelson, Wauwatosa, speeding, not guilty plea.

Amber L. Neuberger, New Richmond, speeding, $225.70. Kenneth L. Perzichilli, Somerset, speeding, $200.50. Angela F. Peterson, Amery, nonregistration of auto, $175.30; operating a motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. James H. Pittelko, Vadnais Heights, Minn., speeding, $250.90. James R. Proulx, Centuria, speeding, $175.30; operating while suspended, not guilty plea; unsafe cutting in when passing, $232.00. Luis G. R Ramirez Romo, Clear Lake, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Andrea J. Richardson, St. Croix Falls, automobile following too closely, $200.50. Travis J. Richison, Dresser, nonregistration of auto, $175.30. Joel T. Route, Eagan, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Joseph L. Ruegemer, Dresser, speeding, $200.50. Robert J. Sanberg, Edina, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Douglas K. Sarchet, Amery, speeding, $175.30. Samantha J. Schill, Centuria, speeding, $200.50. Susan C. Schommer, Frederic, speeding, $175.30. Jeffrey H. Severseike, Hubbard, Iowa, speeding, not guilty plea.

Harold P. Shores, Osceola, speeding, $200.50. Justin E. Shrout, Centuria, disorderly conduct, $262.50. Maranda L. Sirek, Dresser, retail theft, $263.50. Daniel P. Stelter, Osceola, speeding, $200.50. Ryan J. Stineman, Frederic, speeding, $175.30; operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. David J. Stokes, Rice Lake, speeding, $200.50. Jonathon D. Struck, St. Croix Falls, excessive noise, $187.90. Terry R. Swagger, Summit Lake, speeding, $175.30. Linda M. Vanguilder, Cottage Grove, Minn., speeding, $175.30. William D. Waltz, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Kimberlee O. White, Burnsville, Minn., speeding, $200.50; operate motor vehicle w/o license, $200.50. Thomas A. Wajciechowski, Washburn, speeding, $175.30. Jeffrey P. Wolf, Osceola, speeding, $225.70. Maxx J. Zacho, Chisago City, Minn., speeding, $250.90. Anthony M. Stelton, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $175.30.

Parks Street at 6:35 p.m. Linda L. Oberpriller, 62, Minneapolis, Minn., was cited for speeding at 6:50 p.m. on Hwy. 35/70 and Parks Street. Eric D. Jones, 24, Webster, was cited for operating after suspension during a stop on Hwy. 35/70 and North Shore Drive at 11:10 p.m. Sept. 28: An accident was reported in the Siren School parking lot at 8:10 a.m. A vehicle driven by Casey Christianson, 31, Siren, was stopped at the parking-lot entrance, facing

south, waiting for traffic to pass. A second vehicle, driven by Ronald Heller, 59, Siren, was westbound on CTH B, attempting to turn north into the parking lot. The report indicated that Heller didn’t turn sharply enough to avoid hitting the Christianson vehicle. Oct. 1: At 3:45 p.m., a warrant was served on Jonas Bearhart at his Siren residence. Bearhart was taken to Burnett County Jail.

Siren police report Warning from Siren Police Chief Chris Sybers: People in the area have been receiving scam phone calls and letters again. The phone calls might be from a grandchild, citing an emergency and asking that money be sent to some address or saying that the recipient has won the lottery. The letters (Sybers has three of them on his desk right now) include a check which people are asked to cash, keep a portion of the money and send the rest to a specified address. According to Sybers, they

are all scams, and people should not in any way respond to them. Note from Siren PD: Victoria Drohman started work Friday evening, Sept. 30, as the administrative assistant for the department, replacing Patricia Nelson, who was pictured recently in the Leader. Drohman will be working 24 hours a week, starting on a regular basis in a couple of weeks. In the meantime, she will be working some night hours.

Aug. 10: Linda M. Armstrong, 58, Danbury, was cited for speeding on CTH B and Fourth Avenue. Galen T. Brown, 47, Grantsburg, was cited for speeding on CTH B and Fourth Avenue at 5:36 p.m. Benjamin R. Stewart, 32, Siren, was cited for speeding on CTH B and Fourth Avenue at 5:49 p.m. Aug. 25: A hit-run accident with damage under $1,000 for both parties was reported to have occurred in the Siren Skate

Park at 4:05 p.m. Aug. 31: At 2:20 p.m., an accident was reported in the drugstore parking lot. A vehicle driven by Elaine D’Jock backed out into a parked Jeep owned by Dona Alderman, Spooner. Sept. 2: Allen G. Casler, 48, Webster, was cited for operating without insurance following a traffic stop on Hwy. 35/70 and Works Progress Street at 5:47 p.m. Sept. 8: Nancy L. Olinger, 57, Centuria, was cited for speeding on Hwy. 35/70 and

Burnett County circuit court Ericson Trucking Llc, Minong, vehicle equipment violation, $246.30. Elianne M. Farhat, New Brighton, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Richard Feeney, Shell Lake, delinquent dog license, 152.50, three times. Rory V. Fish, Grantsburg, inattentive driving, $187.90; operating while under influence, $389.50. Leigh C. Gice, Minneapolis, Minn., operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Alexander M. Gill, Edina, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Darlena K. Glonek, Grantsburg, seat belt violation, $10.00. Grounded Air Inc., Fridley, Minn., vehicle equipment violation, $238.30. Dennis G. Guyer, Shell Lake, disorderly conduct, $505.00. Frederick W. Haberman, Edina, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Michelle L. Hagel, Apple Valley, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Hans T. Hagen, Danbury, disorderly conduct, $330.50. Michael Hageny, Rice Lake, raw forest product overweight violation, $870.00. Janette L. Hamilton, Milltown, speeding, $200.50. Lindsey L. Hammond, Danbury, seat belt violation, $10.00. Nicholas M. Handberg, Maple Grove, Minn., failure to keep vehicle under control, $213.10. Rick T. Hanson, Turtle Lake, operate ATV away from summeruse ATV trail, $154.50. Hal R. Hawkinson, Spooner, vehicle equipment violation, $238.30; nonregistration of vehicle, $200.50. Jade C. Helene, Webster, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00; seat belt violation, $10.00. Donald O. Hempel, Cable, OWI, $804.50, 7-month license revocation and order for assessment. Marc D. Hobbie, Siren, speeding, $127.50. Amy C. Hughes, Billings, Mont., speeding, $175.30.

Randi Hunter, Webster, delinquent dog license, $152.50. Sandra B. Johnson, Corcoran, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Eric D. Jones, Moncks Corner, S.C., operate motor vehicle w/o valid license, $200.50. Shawn P. Kelly, Princeton, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Seth D. Keske, Coon Rapids, Minn., fail to carry boat flotation devices, $162.70. James A. Koll, Brooklyn Park, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Dwight M. Kraemer, Webster, violation of child safety restraint, $175.30. Gregory E. Larson, Eden Prairie, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Mona R. Larson, Maple Grove, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Thane G. Larson, Grantsburg, underage drinking, $263.50, order for assessment. Steven J. Lee, Frederic, nonregistration auto, $175.30; operating motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50; speeding, $175.30. Jeffrey A. Lehnen, Taylors Falls, Minn., speeding, $250.90. Aaron D. Long, Webster, speeding, $225.70. Mike Longhenry, Grantsburg, delinquent dog license, 152.50, twice. Christopher J. Lozier, St. Croix Falls, operate motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50; operating motor vehicle w/o valid license, $200.50. Clifford A.P. Machimity, Turtle Lake, speeding, $175.30. Michael V. Marsh, Siren, operating while suspended, $200.50. Leeann Mason, St. Croix Falls, seat belt violation, $10.00. Johnny L. Massey, Grantsburg, operating while suspended, $200.50. Christopher G. McMurrin, New Brounfels, Texas, issue worthless checks, $643.82. Alexander M. McGruder, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $225.70.

Have a voice in your local cooperative. You are invited to become a shareholder of Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association.

A share gives you one vote at our annual meeting. The cost is only $5.

To become a shareholder, you must have a paid subscription to the Inter-County Leader or Washburn County Register. Limit one share per paid subscription. To subscribe call our home office at 715-327-4236 To purchase your share, please fill out the form below, enclose a payment of $5, and send to: ICCPA, P.O. Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837 www.iccpaonline.com I would like to become a shareholder of ICCPA. I have a subscription to:

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PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Burnett County sheriff’s report Arrests and citations Sept. 28: Keith W. Boutin, 45, Shell Lake, was arrested on a Burnett County warrant. Sept. 28: Myles J. Benjamin, 26, Sandstone, Minn., was arrested on a Burnett Co. warrant.

Oct.1: Sarah J. Anderson, 34, Grantsburg, was arrested on a Burnett County warrant. Oct. 1: Jacob H. Joachim, 37, Grantsburg, was arrested on a Burnett County warrant.

Oct. 1: Jonas A. Bearheart, 31, Siren, was arrested on a Burnett County warrant. Oct. 1: Charlene O. Sutherland, 34, Siren, was arrested on a Burnett County warrant.

Other incidents Sept. 26: An AT&T service technician reported copper taken from a cell tower in the Town of Dewey. The incident is under investigation. Sept. 27: Russell E. Barnes,

Siren, reported a motor taken from a pontoon boat. The incident is under investigation. Sept. 27: John Vodacek, New Auburn, reported an LP tank taken from a hunting cabin.

Oct. 1: Timothy H. Franklin, Roberts, reported three lawn mowers, a snowblower, 100pound propane tanks and a weed whip taken from his property. The incident is under investigation.

Milo C. Merrill Jr., 27, Luck, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Teana M. Merrill, 30, Shell Lake, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Timothy S. Nelson, 20, Frederic, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Aleana D. Peer, 26, New Richmond, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Douglas A. Peters, 60, Grantsburg, failure to pay fines, Sept. 26.

Jolene K. Pirila, 46, Webster, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Myrna J. Roberts, 55, Hinckley, Minn., failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Jared D. Tober, 26, Grantsburg, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Richard D. Weber, 43, Webster, failure to appear, Sept. 28.

Burnett County warrants Patrick A. Decorah, 30, Webster, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Shirley I. Harper, 64, Pine City, Minn., failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Troy A. Hill, 36, Hinckley, Minn., failure to pay fines, Sept. 26.

Polk County marriage licenses Abigail L. Corbett, Town of Apple River, and Andrew D. Williamson, Town of Georgetown, Sept. 25, 2011. Corinne A. Hardenbergh, Seattle, Wash., and Joel L. McNielly, Seattle, Wash., Sept. 26, 2011. Christy L. Carlson, Centuria, and Dana R. Drinkman, Centuria, Sept. 26, 2011. Abbey R. Jolly, Osceola, and Dustin L. Wheeler, Garfield, Sept. 26, 2011.

Janet R. Larson, St. Croix Falls, and Bryan M. Puffer, St. Croix Falls, Sept. 26, 2011. Elizabeth K. Lopez, Dresser, and Michael P. Hagen, Dresser, Sept. 27, 2011. Laura J. Thompson, Clayton, and Anthony M. Harris, Clayton, Sept. 28, 2011. Meredith L. Nelson, Minneapolis, Minn., and Nicholas J. Uram IV, Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 29, 2011.

www.the-leader.net

Katie J. Anderson, Luck, and Ethan E. Bergstrom, Luck, Sept. 29, 2011. Sereena J. Olson, Grand Forks, N.D., and Nicholas J. Fisher, Grand Forks, N.D., Sept. 29, 2011. Jessica J. Letsch, Clayton, and Cody C. Beaulieu, Clayton, Oct. 1, 2011. Ashley R. Simon, Osceola, and Eric N. John, Osceola, Sept. 21, 2011.

Bryon T. Hobscheid, 42, Minong, failure to pay fines, Sept. 26. Jeffrey P. Hugdahl, 30, Altoona, failure to pay fines, Sept. 26. William L. Jones, 29, Danbury, failure to pay fines, Sept. 26. Claudette L. Matrious, 33, Danbury, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Michael J. McCollough, 26, Hertel, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27.

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All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 547097 7L

Real Estate/ Notices

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(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, as Trustee for HSI Asset Securitization Corporation Trust 2007-OPT1, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-OPT1 by American Home Mortgage Servicing Inc., its attorney-infact Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS E. WRIGHT and DIANNA L. WRIGHT husband and wife and SAND CANYON CORPORATION f/k/a/ OPTION ONE MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC. and STATE OF WISCONSIN, Defendants. Case No. 11-CV-131 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 6, 2011, in the amount of $99,680.23, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 8, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The Westerly 90 Feet of Outlots 145 and 146 of the Outlot Plat of the Village of Osceola, according to the recorded plat on file in the office of the Register of Deeds, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 606 River St., Village of Osceola. TAX KEY NO.: 165-00560-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

www.theleader.net (Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff vs. MICHAEL M. TETZLAFF; BRENDA K. TETZLAFF; GHERTY & GHERTY; CURRENT OCCUPANTS OF 137 NELSON AVENUE, DRESSER WI 54009; Defendant. NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 90 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on July 19, 2011, in the amount of $129,929.72, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 10, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Survey Map No. 4608 recorded in Volume 20 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 160 as Document No. 687366, a Division of Lot 4, Plat of Margaret Park located in the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 7, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, Village of Dresser, Polk County, Wisconsin. TAX KEY NO.: 116-00297-1042. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 137 Nelson Avenue, Dresser, Wisconsin 54009. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

545990 WNAXLP

Loren B. Burton, 54, Grantsburg, failure to pay fines, Sept. 26. Kelvin J. Buskirk, 36, Danbury, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Melani C. Carlson, 20, Markville, Minn., failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Lisa Daniels, 31,Webster, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27.

545913 WNAXLP

Kenneth W. Alm Jr., 57, Stanley, failure to pay fines, Sept. 26. Lauren L. Arnold, 21, Minneapolis, Minn., failure to pay fines, Sept. 27. Laurence W. Barber, 53, Hayward, failure to pay fines, Sept. 27.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

WISCONSIN HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Applications for the 2011-2012 Wisconsin Home Energy Assistance Program heating season will be taken at Polk County Department of Human Services Department, 100 Polk County Plaza, Suite 50, Balsam Lake, Wis., on following dates and times:

DATE Wednesday, October 5, 2011 Wednesday, October 19, 2011 Wednesday, November 2, 2011 Wednesday, November 16, 2011 Wednesday, December 7, 2011 Wednesday, December 21, 2011 Wednesday, January 4, 2012 Wednesday, January 18, 2012

TIME 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m. 9 a.m. - Noon & 1 - 3:30 p.m.

When applying you must provide the following items: * Social Security cards for all household members if you have not applied for energy assistance or other public assistance in the last three (3) years. * Heat and electric costs for the previous 12 months. * Name of heat and electric companies and your account numbers. * Proof of gross income received in the three (3) calendar months prior to the month of application. * Picture ID for new applicants.

INCOME GUIDELINES FOR THE 2011-2012 WHEAP HEATING SEASON HOUSEHOLD SIZE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

3-MONTH COMBINED HOUSEHOLD INCOME $6,080.00 $7,950.00 $9,821.00 $11,692.00 $13,563.00 $15,433.00 $15,784.00 $16,135.00

If you are unable to come in on one of these dates, please call 715-485-8480 and leave your name, phone number and address and an application will be mailed to you. If you are a new applicant, you are required to apply in person. If you need directions to our office or need to schedule a phone interview, call 715-485-8486. 546069 5-7L

(Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY EVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY V. LINDMEYER and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Nancy V. Lindmeyer; and STATE OF WISCONSIN, c/o Attorney General; Defendants. Case No. 11-CV-160 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 29, 2011, in the amount of $81,028.05, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 1, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: That part of Outlot Twenty-six (26) for the Outlot Plat of the Village of Osceola, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of said Outlot 26; thence along the Westerly line of said Outlot 26, South 28 45’ 10” West 70.09 feet to the point of beginning; thence South 60 00’ 41” East, 124.59 feet; thence North 30 39’ 14” East 44.87 feet; thence parallel with the Northerly line of said Outlot 26 South 47 38’ 35” East, 74.05 feet to the Easterly line of said Outlot 26; thence along said Easterly line of Outlot 26, South 29 00’ 00” West 65.02 feet to the Southeast corner of said Outlot 26; thence along the Southerly line of said Outlot 26, North 57 38’ 12” West 200.07 feet to the Southwest corner of Outlot 26; thence along said Westerly line of Outlot 26, North 28 45’ 10” East, 14.91 feet to the point of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 719 North Cascade Street, Village of Osceola. TAX KAY NO.: 165-00380-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

TOWN OF EUREKA Monthly Board Meeting Thursday, Oct. 13, 2011, 7 p.m., at Eureka Town Hall

Agenda to be posted: 1. Eureka Town Hall 2. Eureka Town Garage 3. Eureka Clerk’s Office Agenda also posted on town Web site www.townofeureka.org

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The Comprehensive Planning Committee will meet monthly in 2011. Each scheduled meeting will be on the second Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. in the township hall. For Additional Information, Call: Perry Karl 715-653-4247 Brad Olson 715-327-4614

(Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY RURAL AMERICAN BANKLUCK, Plaintiff, vs. FREDERICK A. JENDERNY, Defendant. Case No. 11 CV 90 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on May 13, 2011, in the amount of $45,517.35, I will sell at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Tuesday, November 15, 2011, at 10 o’clock a.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to-wit: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2878 recorded in Volume 13, page 132, Document No. 589077 in the office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin. Said parcel is located in part of the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 23-3517. And a parcel of land in the SE 1/4 of SE 1/4, Section 1435-17, described as follows: Beginning at the NW corner of Lot 1 in Certified Survey Map No. 2878 and recorded in Volume 13 CSM, page 132, Doc. No. 589077; thence East along the South line of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4 210 feet; thence North parallel to the East 40 line 32 feet; thence West parallel to the South 40 line approximately 215 feet to the Southeasterly right of way of Dau Road (public highway); thence curving Southwesterly and continuing to the South line of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4; thence East along said South line to the point of beginning. The grantor estate hereby reserves for itself, its successors and assigns and adjoining landowner a perpetual easement running with the land and described as follows: A parcel in the SE 1/4 of SE 1/4, Section 14-35-17, de-scribed as follows: Commencing at the NW corner of Lot 1 of CSM No. 2878 as recorded in Volume 13, page 132, Document No. 589077; thence West along the South forty line 10 feet to the point of beginning; thence North parallel to the East forty line 32 feet; thence West parallel to the South forty line to the Southeasterly right of way of Dau Road (public highway); thence curving Southwesterly and continuing to the South line of said SE 1/4 of SE 1/4; thence East along said South forty line to the point of beginning. PIN: 040-00609-0100. STREET ADDRESS: 1332 Dau Drive, Milltown, WI 54858. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: 10% of amount bid by cash or certified check. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 16th day of Sept., 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

BONE LAKE MANAGEMENT DISTRICT Commissioners Meeting Georgetown Hall Sat., October 8, 2011 9 a.m. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

AGENDA Call meeting to order. Reading of minutes Treasurer’s report Review of Lake Management Plan Appointment of Committee Chairs Committee reports Old business New business 547212 7L Adjournment

(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, One South Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606; Plaintiff, vs. PATRICIA J. HANSON and JOHN DOE, unknown spouse of Patricia J. Hanson 1636 Lafond Avenue St. Paul, MN 55104 Defendants. Case No. 11-CV-522 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 Honorable Molly E. GaleWyrick FORTY DAY SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO: PATRICIA J. HANSON and JOHN DOE unknown spouse of Patricia J. Hanson 2840 Wilson Avenue St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after September 21, 2011, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Street Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to O’Dess and Associates, S.C., Plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is: O’Dess and Associates, S.C. 1414 Underwood Ave., Ste. 403 Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 53213 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: M. ABIGAIL O’DESS Bar Code No. 1017869

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AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 20, 2010, in the amount of $297,109.97, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 12, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A Parcel of Land in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4), Section Thirteen (13), Township ThirtyThree (33) North, Range Nineteen (19) West, in Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of said Southeast Quarter; thence South along the West Line of said Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 OF SW1/4), 345.0 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence due East 264.0 feet; thence

CLAM FALLS TOWNSHIP

NOTICE

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Case No. 10-CV-445 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00

NOTICE

547231

vs. DOUGLAS A. NEIDERMIRE and LORI A. NEIDERMIRE, husband and wife and THE RIVERBANK Defendants.

Notices

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due South 165.0 feet; thence due West 264.0 feet to the said West Line of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 OF SW1/4); thence North along said West Line 165.0 feet to the Point of Beginning; Excepting the right of way of the Town Road Extending along the said West Line of said Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4); AND A Parcel of Land in the SouthEast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4), Section Thirteen (13), TownShip Thirty-Three (33) North, Range Nineteen (19) West described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of said Southeast Quarter thence South along West Line of said Southeast Quarter 510 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence due East 264.0 feet; thence due South approximately 30 feet to the Border of Private Road as it is presently travelled; thence West along North Border of said Road 264.0 feet to the West Line of Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4); thence North along said West Line to the Point of Beginning; Excepting the right of way of the Town Road Extending along said West Line of said SouthEast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4); being approximately 0.18 acre. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 916 248th St., Town of Osceola. TAX KEY NO.: 042-01029-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

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Stay connected to your community.

(Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ND Plaintiff vs. MARK C. BABCOCK A/K/A MARK BABCOCK; DENA M. BABCOCK A/K/A DENA BABCOCK; U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION ND; Defendants NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case No. 10 CV 69 Case Code No. 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 25, 2011, in the amount of $199,988.50, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 27, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax from the proceeds of the sale. PLACE: Lobby of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Lot Three (3) of Certified SurVey Map No. 5315 Recorded in Volume 23 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 222 as Document No. 725655, of Part of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4 of NE 1/4) of Section Thirty-Two (32), Township Thirty-Three (33) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. TAX KEY NO.: 024-00648-0000 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 692 E. 1st Street, Amery, Wis. 54001. Gunar J. Blumberg State Bar No. 1028987 Attorney for Plaintiff 230 W. Monroe, Ste. 1125 Chicago, IL 60606 Phone: 312-541-9710 Johnson, Blumberg & Associates, LLC, is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 544933

www.the-leader.net

POST OFFICE ADDRESS: 1414 Underwood Ave., Ste. 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.


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Students take part in Conservation Day

BURNETT COUNTY - Although the day started out overcast and damp, it turned into a beautiful sunny day, on Tuesday, Sept. 27, when Webster, Siren and Grantsburg students attended the annual Conservation Day for fifth-graders.” This is a daylong event sponsored by the county natural resources committee and the county land and water conservation department. This event was held at Crex Meadows Wildlife Education and Visitor Center in Grantsburg. The day began at 9:30 a.m. when 167 students, teachers, chaperones, bus drivers, presenters and staff converged at the center. The students were provided with introductions to the presenters and instructions on the day’s events. After breaking into seven groups, the kids rotated from session to session to learn about different conservation topics: water quality; wildlife habitat; soils and erosion; trees; geology, forest fire safety; and aquatic invasive species. The sessions were presented by staff from the LWCD, DNR and Natural Resources Conservation Service. During the lunch hour, a presentation was given by Chris Spaight, a DNR conservation warden from the Grantsburg area. After lunch, the students participated in a scavenger hunt with the topscoring school winning the highly coveted traveling silver lunch box stuffed full of candy. Webster won the hunt this year and will hold the lunch box until next year. Students then completed a quiz on the

Grantsburg students Isabelle Aragonez and Charli Siebenthal looked over some of the waterfowl displays at the Crex Wildlife Education Center during the annual Conservation Day held on Tuesday, Sept. 27, for Grantsburg, Siren and Webster schools fifth-graders. – Photos by Priscilla Bauer unless otherwise noted sessions, and the top-two-scoring students from each school were awarded prizes. The top two from each school were Lane Crex DNR wildlife educator Heidi Rusch showed students a display of snakeskins during her Johnson and Ashley Bistram, Grantsburg; Elle Emery and Robert Jarrell, Siren; and presentation on Wisconsin wildlife. Jack Washburn and Jamin Wilson, Webster. Lane and Jamin won the overall competition for having the best quiz score and answering the question, “What does conservation mean to me?” Students then completed a quiz on the sessions and the top-two-scoring students from each school were awarded prizes. -

Grantsburg Fire Control forestry technician Jim Ulmaniec talked to students about fire safety and showed them the equipment used by firefighters to control and stop fires.

Conservation specialist Paul Cook played The Water Game with Grantsburg, Siren and Webster fifth graders as a fun way for students to learn the facts about water quality. Natural Resources Conservation Service Conservationist Tom Frederickson gave students a demonstration on soils and soil erosion during the Sept. 27 Conservation Day at the Crex Meadows Education Center. submitted

Ashley Bistram and Lane Johnson were the Grantsburg students, who were winners of the quiz. – Photo submitted

Jamin Wilson and Jack Washburn were the Webster students who won the quiz on the sessions during the annual Conservation Day for fifth-graders held at Crex on Tuesday, Sept. 27. – Photo submitted

Robert Jarrell and Elle Emery were the two Siren students who scored highest on the quiz about the different sessions they had learned about during the Conservation Day. – Photo submitted

Lane Johnson and Jamin Wilson won the overall competition for having the best quiz score and answering the question, “What does conservation mean to me?” – Photo submitted


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 17

Crex Fall Festival

Grantsburg

DNR wildlife educator Chris Cold showed a barred owl and other birds of prey at the Crex Fall Wildlife Festival last Sunday, Oct. 2, in Grantsburg. Teri Brooks and Nancy Stinnett from Hudson got ready for a hike during the Crex Fall Festival at the Crex Wildlife Education and Visitor Center on Oct. 2.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

Colton Miroslaw found it fun feeling all the animal furs on display at the Crex Education Center. The 4-year-old and his family came from Danbury to the Crex Fall Festival held last weekend in Grantsburg.

Two-year-old Sawyer Spaight showed off the pinecone and peanut butter bird feeder he made during the annual Crex Fall Wildlife Festival held last Sunday in Grantsburg.

James Novak and his father, Mark, looked over the turtle shells at the Crex Education and Visitor Center. This was the first visit to Crex Meadows for the Novak family who came from Wausau for the center’s fall festival.

Alan Roelfs showed Greg and Mari Kosin of Star Prairie some prairie grasses found on the Crex Meadows. Roelfs and other educators set up displays for visitors coming to the Crex Fall Wildlife Festival last weekend in Grantsburg. Carson Spaag from Winona, Minn., and Ryan Stenson from Chicago Lakes, Minn., took aim on the archery course set up for visitors during the Crex Fall Festival.

Binoculars positioned for viewing, Joe Conley of Mounds View, Minn., stood on the boardwalk behind the Crex Education and Visitor Center last weekend. “I try never to miss the fall festival here,” Conley remarked as he hiked off down the trail.

Jan Menge showed Nancy Jo Thieret of Winona, Minn., the death angel mushroom, one of the most deadly of fungi. Menge and her husband, John, showed a variety of mushrooms to visitors coming to the Crex Fall Wildlife Festival last Sunday, Oct. 2.


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FALL SPORTS

INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R CROSS COUNTRY • GIRLS GOLF • FOOTBALL • TENNIS • VOLLEYBALL

Steen makes it three straight at state

Luck golfer finishes top two at regional in Amery

Avery Steen of Luck putts the ball to the cup during the Amery Regional last week. Steen earned her third consecutive trip to the state meet after her performance at the sectional on Tuesday, Oct. 4, at the Pheasant Hills Golf Course. – Photo submitted finished with a 32 on the front nine and 34 on the back nine for a score of 66. She will be eyeing her third consecutive Division 2 state championship after winning it all during her freshman and sophomore golf seasons.

Senior Caitlyn Olson of St. Croix Falls tees off in an earlier golf meet in St. Croix Falls. Olson ended her season at the Amery Regional last Wednedsay, Sept. 28. – File photo by Marty Seeger

Amery Regional AMERY – Avery Steen finished in the top two among 40 golfers in the WIAA regional tournament held in Amery on Wednesday, Sept. 28, which helped qualify her to the sectional tournament which was held in Baldwin-Woodville on Tuesday, Oct. 4. Steen shot a 74, which was just four strokes behind first-place Casey Danielson of Osceola. The Chieftains took first place as a team, followed by BaldwinWoodville, Somerset, Ellsworth, St. Croix Central, Prescott and Amery. “Avery was very steady throughout the match with only one double bogey and four birdies for the match. I am very proud of the girls and all the improvement, hard work, team unity and fun that we had,” said coach Ron Steen. With just three golfers on the Luck/Unity golf team, and just two representing the St. Croix Falls golf team, there weren’t enough golfers to record a total team score. Others golfing were Tina Lennartson of Luck/Unity, who shot a 133 and took 33rd overall. Megan Bartylla of Luck/Unity shot a 146 and took 38th. “Not exactly how they wanted to finish, but both plan to continue to practice and play a lot next summer. They continued to improve throughout the season and can’t wait until next year,” said Steen. St. Croix Falls senior Caitlyn Olson shot a 137, and freshman McKenzie Katzmark finished with a score of 173.

••• EAU CLAIRE – Landen Strilzuk, a 2011 Luck graduate, has been busy playing on the UW-Eau Claire football special teams unit as a freshman this season. The Blugolds have been taking advantage of Strilzuk’s speed on kickoffs and kickoff returns. Strilzuk has a knack for getting to the ball in a hurry on kickoffs and recorded one solo tackle during a 24-10 win against UWLanden Strilzuk Stout last Saturday, Oct. 1. He also returned a kickoff for 20 yards. The Blugolds lost their first nonconference game of the season at Bethel, Tenn., but have won their previous three games. They host UW-Oshkosh this weekend, Saturday, Oct. 8, during their homecoming game beginning at 2 p.m. Strilzuk’s teammate and roomate, Roger Steen, also a 2011 Luck graduate, is also on the Blugolds roster this season as a defensive lineman. – Marty Seeger with information from www.blugolds.com ••• STATEWIDE – The Wisconsin Basketball League, a statewide men’s league for adults with referees and a postseason tournament, is accepting registrations from teams around the state for its inaugural season. Players must be age 18 and above for this competitive league with regional conferences. The season begins in January and runs through May, with 14 regular season games (one per week) and up to seven more in the postseason. The season concludes with a state tournament at a location TBD. The WBL is working with recreation departments and school districts around the state to build this unique league into a firstclass experience for the players and the communities they will represent. Towns of all sizes are eligible, as long as it has a gym to host games. The deadline to register is Nov. 1. For more information on the league, visit www.wisconsinbasketballleague.com. To register a team or for additional questions, e-mail info@wisconsinbasketballleague.com. – submitted ••• LEADER LAND – The Frederic at Luck football game can be heard on 104.9 FM on Friday, Oct. 7, beginning at 7 p.m. The Baldwin-Woodville at Amery football game can be heard on 1260 AM on Friday, Oct. 7, beginning at 7 p.m. The Packers at Falcons game can be heard on 105.7 FM on Sunday, Oct. 9, beginning at 7:30 p.m., and the Cardinals at Vikings game is being broadcast on 104.9 FM beginning at noon on Sunday, Oct. 9.

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by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer BALDWIN – Luck junior Avery Steen is headed to her third consecutive trip to the state golf tournament after her performance at the Pheasant Hills Golf Course on Tuesday, Oct. 4. She shot a 78 at the sectional meet, placing fifth in the overall standings and second place as an individual state qualifier. “She started out with a triple bogey on the first hole after going in the water off the drive. She had some tough breaks on putting the first round and posted a 41 the first nine. She settled into her game on the back nine and stayed pretty solid shooting a 37 on the back,” said coach Ron Steen. It was a tough day on the greens as they were fast and had difficult pin placements, according to the coach, but another solid performance by the Luck junior, who no doubt has the experience at University Ridge Golf Course in Madison. Steen will be competing at state on Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 10-11. In the team standings, Hayward took first place with an overall score of 330 and Osceola will be heading to state with their score of 332. Osceola’s Casey Danielson

Extra Points


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Saints playoff bound with win at Unity

St. Croix Falls 38, Unity 13

by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE – The St. Croix Falls Saints used an explosive ground game to win the Friday, Sept. 30, football game against conference rival Unity on the road, 38-13, giving them a postseason ticket. The Eagles were first on the board, when Xavier Foeller capped a Unity drive at 2:50 in the first quarter from two yards out. That would be all the scoring for the Eagles until the final quarter. Foeller

Saints senior Jake Rademacher turns the corner for a few more yards. – Photos by Greg Marsten

The Eagles' Xavier Foeller racked up big yards before leaving later with an injury.

would later leave the game with a shoulder injury. The Saints got into a groove in the second quarter, using several running weapons to their full effect, racking up 22 unanswered points, from a variety of sources, including a picture-perfect 42-

yard scoring pass from Ben Clausen to Jace Marek for a 42-yard scoring pass. That would prove to be the Saints only pass completion all night. St. Croix Falls also had a momentumbuilding break with an 85-yard breakaway run by Alex Bertram at 7:29 in the

second frame. Bertram finished the contest with 111 yards on just seven carries. The game was still wide open as the second half began, with St. Croix Falls leading 14-7, but a strong Saints drive ended on the Unity 2-yard line, giving the Eagles a chance to get back in the driver’s seat. But that possibility quickly faded with a safety a few minutes later, giving the Saints another shot at stretching their lead. St. Croix Falls senior Jake Rademacher had a noteworthy second half and used his linemen to good effort, as well, amassing an impressive 231 yards on 25 carries on the night, with a pair of TDs to boot. Unity did turn a 54-yard Reed Sorensen pass completion to Clay Peckman into a score as the final quarter started, but the Saints took control shortly thereafter as Rademacher racked up two TDs in the final four minutes, twisting the knife in the Eagles backs for a 38-13 final. Unity falls to 3-1 in conference play, and 4-3 overall, with just one more win needed for a ticket to the postseason. “We lost a hard-fought conference game, but we are not done yet. We are still in the running for the conference title and are going to play tough in our next two conference matchups,” said Eagles coach Dave Anderson The Saints are now playoff-bound with the win, which gave them a 4-1 conference record and a 6-1 overall mark.

Pirate boys slip past Warriors Grantsburg 18, Clear Lake 15 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer CLEAR LAKE – The Grantsburg Pirates slipped past the Clear Lake Warriors on the road Friday, Sept. 30, winning 18-15 and bringing them one win away from a postseason appearance. The Pirates racked up over 300 rushing yards against the Warriors, but managed

just 4 passing yards. The Pirates held the Clear Lake offense to only 129 yards rushing and another 97 yards in the air. Grantsburg took the lead early on a 34yard Cody Benedict scamper in the first quarter, but the extra-point attempt was no good. Benedict blasted over the goal line in the second frame from 1 yard out, and again the two-point conversion was no good, giving the visiting Grantsburg squad a 12-0 lead.

Clear Lake scored a rushing TD a short time later and with the extra point, it was 12-7. The Warriors also scored again a few minutes later on a 12-yard Erik Ulrich run, but the extra point was no good, giving them a lead over the Pirates, 13-12. The Warriors made up for their failed conversion in the third quarter, when they blocked a Pirate punt into the end zone for a safety, moving ahead 15-12. Clear Lake was unable to keep that lead,

as the Pirates turned a fourth-quarter drive into a win with a 4-yard Daniel Larsen pass completion to Nolan Hanson, giving them the win, 18-15. The Pirate win means just one more conference win means extra season play for the Grantsburg boys, who now have a 3-1 conference record and a 3-4 overall mark. Clear Lake continues to struggle, and falls to 1-3 in conference play and 2-5 overall.

Tigers fall short in homecoming game Suffer sixth consecutive loss Elk Mound 18, Webster 9 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer WEBSTER – It’s been a tough year for the Webster Tigers football team this season, and with two games left against Unity and Flambeau, they’ll no doubt be hungry for a win to try to close out the season. Their loss during their homecoming game against Elk Mound on Friday, Sept. 30, was the team’s sixth straight, but they nearly came away with a win against a solid Mounders team, who has defeated Boyceville who is currently 5-2, and Spring Valley who is currently 6-1.

Webster got on the board in the opening kickoff when Austin Bork returned it 91 yards for the score to give the Tigers an early 6-0 lead. But just over 10 seconds later, the Mounders answered back with a 29-yard touchdown run to gain a onepoint edge. At the start of the second quarter, the Tigers regained the lead when Ben Leef put the ball through the uprights from 35 yards out, and the defense did the rest in the second quarter as the Tigers took a 9-7 lead at the half. But despite efforts from the Tigers defense in the second half in holding Elk Mound to just one touchdown and a field goal in the fourth quarter, the offense wasn’t able to put any points on the board in the second half. The Tigers had a total of 200 yards rushing and Garrett Eichman led with 59 yards on 12 carries. Bork had 53 yards on eight

In spite of some intense interest from surrounding Mounders, Austin Bork (34) battled his way forward for yardage. – Photos by Carl Heidel

Nathaniel Mack (4) didn't get far on a pass reception as Benjamin Cliff (57), assisted by other Tiger defenders, forced him out of bounds. attempts. Aaron Clay completed two of jamin, 5.5 tackles and three assists and nine passes for 14 yards and an intercep- Bork had five tackles and two sacks. The Tigers will travel to Unity on Frition, and Bork was on the receiving end of day, Oct. 7, before closing out the season at both completions. Eichman had 14 tackles, four assists and home against Flambeau on Friday, Oct. 14. 2.5 sacks, while Josh Baer recorded 11 tackles with two sacks. Aaron Dietmeier had nine tackles, two assists, Cliff Ben-


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Siren boys snuff out the Raiders Siren 30, Bruce 6 by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer BRUCE – The Siren Dragons are acting like a playoff team after a solid victory over the Bruce Raiders on Friday, Sept. 30, on the road, winning easily, 30-6, getting them ever closer to a postseason appearance. While stats were unavailable at press time, head coach Bill Hoefler noted a whole host of Dragons who were involved in the victory, with senior Andrew Brown catching a Murdock Smith pass for one score and fellow senior Evan Oachs running another in for a touchdown. Sophomore Caleb Mulroy added another rushing touchdown, while junior Shay Johnson ran in a fumble from the 3yard line for another touchdown. “We did well on defense, too,” Hoefler said. “We had good play from our linebackers and our defensive backs for pass coverage. It was a good game for the guys.” According to Hoefler, the Dragons started fast on defense, noting the Johnson fumble recovery for a touchdown, and a generally solid defensive secondary, limiting the Raider pass options. “Our pass defense was much better than the Birchwood game, as we have improved a lot on this part of our defense,” Hoefler said. “Offensively, we got Andrew Brown some catches and did fairly well on the ground, as well.” Siren has had a monumental season, and continues to be one of the strongest

Siren’s Andrew Brown and Caleb Mulroy, No. 58, block the Bruce Red Raiders during their 30-6 victory on Friday, Sept. 30. – Photos by Mackenzie Erickson Small Lakeland Conference contenders after a tough 2010 season, but they also have two real tests coming the next two weeks, starting this Friday, when they go up against Northwood/Solon Springs, who is 6-1 in conference play. “The game against Northwoods is extremely important,” Hoefler said. “They are an excellent team that runs the triple option very well with three very good threats in their wingbacks, fullback and

quarterback. Hoefler is not mincing his words, calling the contest with the Evergreens “the biggest test to date for our kids, so we will see how we stack up against one of the two best teams in the conference.” That other best team he referenced is none other than Frederic, the squad with which the Dragons close out their regular season schedule on Oct. 14. Siren moves to 4-2 in conference play

Siren’s John D’Jock goes up for a loose ball against Bruce. and 5-2 overall. Bruce falls to 1-5 in Small Lakeland play and overall.

Area distance runners eyeing conference in Cameron Pirate boys place first again in Amery by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer AMERY – If you take glance at the results sheets from the Amery cross-country meet on Tuesday, Oct. 4, it’s not difficult to tell why the Grantburg Pirate boys have been so successful this season. With the exception of Webster’s Joey Erickson, who finished first overall and four seconds ahead of the second-place winner from Bruce, Grantsburg’s Zack Arnold, Kyle Roberts, Jacob Ohnstad and Brendan Kutz were next across the finish line. It’s that group effort, along with Daniel Biorn, who took eighth overall, followed by Richard Schneider, 13th and Taylor Olson, 19th, that has given the Pirates a signifi-

Kayla Faschingbauer, Amery, races Jade Stanley, Flambeau, at the Amery Cross-Country Invite. – Photos by Tammi Milberg

cant edge. “The day was unusually warm and that reflected on the times at the meet. Everyone’s times were slower than we were hoping for. However, most of the varsity posted times faster than last year, which is good,” said Pirates coach Paul Huskamp, adding that Webster’s Erickson, who helped lead the Tigers to fourth place overall, has been the team’s nemesis all season long. “Every time we close the gap on him, he seems to pick up the pace and outdistance us. He is such a great runner and an honorable athlete,” Huskamp said. The Pirate boys also showed depth on Tuesday, winning the JV boys race against both the small schools and large schools. In all, there were well over 100 athletes running for both girls and boys races, which will be a good test before the conference race in Cameron on Tuesday, Oct. 11. The St. Croix Falls Saints boys team took third place overall among the larger schools, with Alex Frey coming across the finish line first with a time of 18:05. “We missed bringing home a secondplace trophy by one point. Just goes to show how every place counts in the end for team placings overall,” said Saints coach Jennifer Clemins The Unity/Luck boys team also competed in Amery on Tuesday and finished eighth overall. Colton Sorensen was the team leader with a time of 19:50. The Pirate girls finished eighth among the small schools, and Haley Burkhardt led the team across the finish line. “Haley Burkhardt is struggling with shin splints which definitely affects her performance. We have a ways to go to get back to where we want to be before conference meet next Tuesday,” Huskamp said. The Webster girls finished strong with a third-place finish among the nine smaller schools. Kally Schiller was third in the overall standings, Emma Kelby finished in the top 10, and then next three Tiger girls coming across the finish line were Roselinn Takvam, Diana Pope and Emilie Pope. Among the larger schools, the St. Croix Falls girls placed fifth overall, with Becky Thayer leading the team with a time of 17:44. Erica Bergmann, Allie

Alex Frey, Saint Croix Falls, runs past a Grantsburg runner in the boys varsity race.

Joey Erickson, Webster, placed first in the boys cross-country varsity race in Amery with a time of 17:18. Holmdahl, Jordan Johnson and Autumn Erickson rounded out the team’s top five runners. “After a week off from meets, I was hoping our team would come to the course refreshed and ready to tear things up. Unfortunately, times were not as good as I hoped. I’m not sure if it was heat (80plus degrees) that psyched them out or the fact that its homecoming week here at SCF that interfered with their focus. I’m just praying for better results next week at conference,” said Clemins. The Unity/Luck girls finished in last place with Tatum Kline leading the team with a time of 20:20.

Webster’s Kally Schiller took third place in the girls varsity cross country race at Amery on Tuesday, Oct. 4.


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Meet the Heritage Cup Where Frederic and Luck’s athletic rivalries are celebrated by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer LUCK – An idea born on a remote Ontario fishing trip a few years back between a couple of local coaches and dedicated sports fans may mean the decades-long rivalry between Luck and Frederic finally has a “trophy” of sorts. “We call it the Heritage Cup,” stated Luck girls basketball coach Marty Messar. “It was just made in the last year.” For almost two decades, the Luck and Frederic football squads could only watch on the sidelines of each other’s games. Though separated by just a few miles of rural real estate, the two districts hallowed, though friendly, rivalries on the gridiron had no true benchmark. That may all change this Friday, Oct. 7, when the two schools football teams will meet at Luck for only the second time in recent memory, and they’ll be playing for more than just bragging rights, as they will also be playing for the annual right to display the first-ever award, which is a handmade trophy made from black walnut and maple, noting each school’s historic heritage, with one side for Frederic with a Swedish flag - and the other showing Luck - and a Danish flag. Messar, who hails of Slovenian, Irish and Dutch heritage, explained that the idea for the Heritage Cup surfaced during a fly-fishing trip with himself and former Frederic basketball coach Dave Dobkins, “who is of Polish extraction,” and former wrestling coach Bob Peterson, who Mes-

The so-called Heritage Cup makes its debut this Friday, Oct. 7, as Luck and Frederic battle on the gridiron for only the second time in two decades. However, the possible change to eightman football may mean future awarding will need to find another determining factor between the two schools. – Photo by Greg Marsten sar said was probably of Swedish background. They were excited about the renewed football contests between the Vikes and the Cards, but also wanted to note the rich European background of the region. “We were really excited about it, and wondered how cool it would be to have a traveling trophy ... to have in place when this rivalry resumes,” Messar said. The cup was originally planned to be called The Pedersen/Peterson Cup, to celebrate the Frederic versus. Luck heritage of Swedish and Danish history, and the alternate spelling of the two common

names, but the crew settled on the Heritage Cup in the end. It all started to come to fruition over the next year, as they commissioned Ron Erickson to make the black walnut/maple trophy on his lathe, with Larry Wallin also helping with the badging and emblems. No cobbled together beer can trophy here, the final cup is a significant item, and in fact may weigh too much for the typical glass display shelves. “We wanted something quite substantial, with an enduring quality,” he said. Messar noted that while local heritage

has been largely ignored in recent years, the region really was a hotbed of friendly genealogical rivalries, which the cup represents with Swedish flag colors on one side for Frederic and the Danish flag colors for Luck on the other side. He noted that the school colors curiously also seem to correspond to the respective flags. “You’ve got to wonder,” he joked. “It definitely fits the school colors and the ethnic backgrounds of the communities.” However, there is a real issue ahead with the Heritage Cup, as Luck is tentatively planning on going to eight-man football next year, meaning the gridiron rivalry may be short-lived, and with the two schools also cooperating for baseball and softball next year, earning the cup may need some adjustment. “It was originally strictly a football trophy, like Paul Bunyan’s ax,” he said. “Next year, with the loss of the football contest, we’ll have to take a look at it then, maybe making it an overall athletic championship, involving the competing sports, which will be volleyball and girls and boys basketball.” With the cooperative sport sharing between the two districts, the formula for winning the Heritage Cup may need further review, and might mean win-loss records or head-to-head results. Messar joked that it might mean the two schools elect subcommittees to figure it out, but he insisted that the sport probably doesn’t really matter as much as the concept of friendly rivalries. “At least we can do it this year for homecoming,” Messar said, noting how he will take the trophy to both coaches and their teams for them to see in the locker rooms prior to this week’s game. “It’s all about rivalries.”

Luck hangs tough against Living Word Lutheran Two games remain in regular season Living Word Lutheran 31, Luck 24 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer BANGOR – The Luck Cardinals football team made the long trek to Bangor on Saturday, Oct. 1, meeting the Living Word Lutheran Timberwolves halfway for a

Luck is 3-4 overall and 100-percent healthy heading into their game against the Vikings this week. Luck’s Trent Strapon, is just one of those players healthy again. – File photo by Marty Seeger

nonconference game, and nearly coming away with a chance at a big win in the process. The Timberwolves are currently sitting on a 6-1 overall record, compared to the Cardinals 3-7 overall mark, but records went out the window as the Cardinals held strong the entire way. Facing a fourth down and six with 1:05 left in the game and down 31-24, Cards quarterback Trent Strapon threw a pass to John Denny that fell incomplete, ending a chance for Luck to tie the game and a possible win. Yet their matched play against a solid team like Living Word Lutheran should draw considerable interest with the Cardinals upcoming rivalry game against the Frederic Vikings this Friday, Oct. 7. This weekend is also Luck’s homecoming game, which should only add to the excitement of the game, and to top it off, it looks as though the Cardinals are 100-percent healthy entering this Friday’s game. Over a dozen players on the Cardinal sidelines were injured during a handful of games this season, but the team has battled adversity this season, while hanging onto their playoff hopes. As for the Cardinals game against Living Word Lutheran, it was a back-andforth battle last Saturday and Luck drew first blood in the first quarter when Ben Kufalk ran it in for the score on a 6-yard run. Along with a two-point conversion pass from Karsten Petersen to Kufalk, the Cards took an early 8-0 lead with 10:32 still left in the first quarter. The Timberwolves would answer back on a 52-yard pass play with 4:42 remaining in the first quarter, but Luck maintained an 8-7 lead until just five seconds into the start of the second quarter when Kufalk ran it in for another score on a 9yard run. Kufalk had 125 yards on 21 carries during the game and two touchdowns. Despite a close game, the Cardinals trailed 21-16 at the end of the first half as Living Word Lutheran connected on two key pass plays that would end up being

the difference in the game. The Timberwolves connected on a 4-yard pass play under a minute after Kufalk’s touchdown, and then scored on a 30-yard pass play with 5:10 remaining in the first half. The Cardinals managed to hold the Timberwolves to a 24-yard field goal in the third quarter, which was the only scoring in the third quarter. However, with 8:46 on the clock in the fourth, Jake LaDuke scored on a 4-yard run. Strapon

connected with Petersen on a two-point conversion pass to knot the game at 24 apiece, but less than a minute later, Living Word Lutheran would have the final say as they scored on a 16-yard touchdown run to help put the game away. In the end, the Cards rushed for 285 yards on 62 carries and completed eight of 12 passes for 68 yards. Petersen and Kufalk were on the receiving end of all eight passes.

Frederic JV goes 8 eightman in Birchwood forfeit

The Frederic Vikings JV football team opted to play Birchwood in eight-man football on Friday, Sept. 30, after Birchwood was unable to field enough players for a varsity game. None of the Frederic varsity players suited up for the Birchwood game. The forfeit is counted as a win for the Vikings varsity who improved to an overall record of 6-1 before heading into a key conference battle at Luck this Friday, Oct. 7, during the Cardinals homecoming. The Vikings final regular season game will be at home against Siren on Friday, Oct. 14. – Photo by Becky Amundson


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Unity/Luck tennis moves four to sectionals strokes.” Tess Anderson and Leslie Peterson were also defeated, but faced a No. 1 seed from Baldwin-Woodville. Both will be back next season. “The girls really stepped up their enthusiasm and energy on the court. BaldwinWoodville was a tough team and Unity gave their all, but were unable to pull the win out,” Fogarty said. Kayla Bramson and Emily Ferguson were also defeated by a No. 1 seed, but for their first year of playing tennis, Fogarty was impressed with their confidence and relentlessness on the court. “It has been wonderful watching them grow as players and I can’t wait to have them back next year,” Fogarty said.

Finish fourth in the conference standings by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer OSCEOLA – By the time this edition of the Inter-County Leader heads to print, members of the Unity/Luck tennis team will be in the middle of competition in La Crosse for the Division 2 sectional tournament on Wednesday, Oct. 5. All four of the Unity/Luck singles players earned a spot at La Crosse after their play at the Osceola subsectional on Monday, Oct. 3, which was held in Osceola. Pending the results of the sectional in La Crosse, all four athletes will be competing for a spot at the state tournament in Madison, starting with No. 1 singles player Julie Franzel. Franzel had the No. 2 seed and won both sets against Amy Jackson of Phillips. She has a 15-8 record heading into sectional play. “Julie was a strong threat today and got the No. 2 seed, playing the No. 7 seed today. She had very aggressive volleys and amazing placement shots to the corners,” said coach Beth Fogarty. Anna Ebensperger is entering sectionals with a 22-2 record and defeated an Ellsworth opponent and player from Phillips to advance. “Ebensperger has had an amazing year and she only gets stronger as a player,” Fogarty said. At the No. 3 singles spot, Elizabeth Thuerkoff was perfect in two sets against Bailey Hanson of Barron and defeated an opponent from Baldwin-Woodville 7-5 and 6-2. Fogarty said she played mentally strong for both wins and is entering sectionals with a 20-2 record. The fourth singles player headed to sectionals was Sierra Thomfohrda, who was

Julie Franzel is one of four Unity/Luck tennis players moving onto the sectional meet and a chance at making the state tournament. – File photo by Greg Marsten perfect during her 6-0, 6-0 defeat of Megan Stress of Ellsworth, and defeated Angel O’Brien of Phillips, which took three sets. “Sierra had a great day! She started out strong against Ellsworth with fabulous corner shots to make her opponent move. Then she stepped up her game in the third set against Phillips, coming back from 1-4 to win 7-5,” said Fogarty. Thomfohrda is

10-11 on the season. Unity/Luck’s three doubles teams fell short of a chance to play at sectionals, with each recording losses, but facing tough No. 1 seeded teams. Emily Petzel and Kelsy Johnson lost to the No. 2 seeded Barron team, but Fogarty was pleased with the effort. “They played very aggressively, found the open court and had excellent ground-

Unity/Luck takes fourth OSCEOLA – Rain on Tuesday, Sept. 27, forced the Unity/Luck tennis team to finish up the conference tournament the next day at Osceola, and all four of the team’s singles players were able to get past the first round. At the end of the day on Wednesday, Unity/Luck finished fourth among the teams in the Middle Border Conference. Both Durand and New Richmond had yet to decide their conference standings when the day ended, but the results showed Durand in first with 28 points, followed by New Richmond, 24, Baldwin-Woodville, 16, Unity/Luck, 14, Mondovi, 10, Amery, 6, Osceola, 5 and Ellsworth, 0. Among the four singles players that moved past the first round of the conference tournament were Anna Ebensperger, who placed first overall, and Julie Franzel who took fourth. Elizabeth Thuerkoff came in second overall and Sierra Thomfohrda placed fourth. Unity/Luck’s doubles teams were knocked out of the first round.

Luck earns easy sweep over Frederic Grantsburg gets by St. Croix Falls Luck 3, Frederic 0 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The Luck volleyball team cruised to an easy match win over Frederic on Tuesday, Oct. 4, by scores of 25-8, 25-17 and 25-9. Luck captured their 20th win of the season and moved to 7-2 in the conference standings. Luck commanded in the first set but the Vikings hung around throughout much of game two, leading early, but the Cardinal hitters, and solid serving proved too much. The Vikings were led by Corissa Schmidt with five kills, and seven digs. Maria Miller had six digs and two kills, along with one serving ace. Miller also had two solo blocks. Grantsburg 3, St. Croix Falls 0 GRANTSBURG – Despite what Saints coach Stacie Hoff called a questionable call in game three against the Pirates during their Tuesday, Oct. 4, game in Grantsburg, coach Hoff called it their best match of the season. “We really scrambled and moved so well. We covered great on defense and I am very proud of the girls. Our block was a little off on game one but we certainly found it in the second and third games,” Hoff said. The Saints held a 24-23 lead in the third set before losing 26-24, and lost the first two sets 25-17 and 25-15. “We certainly gave a great battle and we now know what it is that we want to accomplish here as playoffs approach,” Hoff said. Although the Pirates won all three games, coach Deb Allaman-Johnson said her team was definitely off Tuesday.

Luck’s Jaimee Buck did a nice job throughout the night on defense.

Taylor Joy goes up for the kill against the Vikings on Tuesday, Oct. 4. “It would be easy to throw out half a dozen plausible explanations for our pathetic play tonight, but excuses are for losers,” Allaman-Johnson posted on her blog after the game. The Pirates committed a season high, 14 hitting errors and 10 missed serves. “Even the first two sets, which we won without any difficulty, were flat, uninspired, and awkward,” Allaman-Johnson said, but added that there were positives. Sam Schwieger led with 10 kills, Nikki Ticknor nine and Carly Larson seven, with no errors and a .412 hitting percentage. RuthAnn Pederson hit the ball hard with four. Gab Witzany had three and Macy Hanson “had a couple of sweet swings,” Allaman Johnson said.

“Although our passing wasn’t consistently crisp tonight, Carly, Sam and Gab had error-free serve receiving. Larson led the team defensively with 24 digs, Witzany, 16, Ticknor 15 and Schwieger 11. For the Saints, Sarah Petznick had six kills, three assisted blocks, nine digs, six assists and one ace. Sydney Geisness had five kills, one solo block, five assisted blocks and eight digs. Mariah Rohm had a kill, six solo blocks, four assisted blocks and one assist. Kierstyn Campbell left with one kill, one solo block and nine digs. Jesse Rademacher, two kills, one assisted block, seven digs, two assists. Amy Segelstrom and Ally Mahler had six digs. Alexis Erickson, four kills, two solo blocks, six assisted blocks, one dig, two assists. Natalie Sempf had four digs and one assist. “This team is strong, talented, hardworking and positive,” said AllamanJohnson. “We’ll get back to work tomorrow. Tomorrow is a new day.”

Grantsburg 3, St. Croix Falls 0 SIREN – The Tigers defeated the Siren volleyball team in three games by scores of 25-12, 25-23 and 25-19 on Tuesday, Oct. 4. The Tigers were led by Raelyn Tretsven

Mariah Miller of Frederic tips the ball over the net against Luck. – Photos by Marty Seeger with 10 kills, while Amber Davis added six, and Ashley Davis, Gabby Schiller and Alex Holmstrom each had four kills. Chelsea Larson had a whopping eight serving aces, and Amber Davis added four. Christina Weis had 24 assists.


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Saints come together in win over Vikes

Luck girls sweep Dragons

St. Croix Falls 3, Frederic 1 by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer FREDERIC – Despite a scrappy, nevergive-up attitude by the Frederic Vikings volleyball team on Thursday, Sept. 29, it was the Saints who prevailed in four sets by scores of 25-17, 27-25, 21-25 and 25-21. With the win, St. Croix Falls improved to 6-3 in the conference and 8-13 overall, but are showing a lot of improvement since late August. “It was a good match and the girls have really improved a lot and have showed it in the last couple of weeks. It’s nice to finally be playing to the potential that I have seen all season,” said Saints coach Stacie Hoff. St. Croix Falls commanded early in the first set and took that win relatively easily until the second set, which had the Vikings falling behind by as many as eight points. The Saints had an 18-10 lead before the Vikings surged, eventually tying the game on a kill by Maria Miller. Consistent serving by Frederic freshman Mya Rivera helped as well, and even though the Vikings nearly pulled out the win, leading 25-24, the Saints managed to hold onto the win. “We really hit the ball well again last night with 43 kills last night, 75 digs and 30 solo blocks. That is really good. It sure helped us pull out a win,” Hoff said.

Luck's Bella Nelson gets a dig against the Siren Dragons. – Photo by Greg Marsten

Siren senior Abigail Mitchell gets a kill against Luck. – Photo by Greg Marsten

Sarah Petznick and Sydney Geisness go up for a block against the Vikings last Thursday, Sept. 29, in Frederic. – Photo by Marty Seeger Frederic did manage to pull out one set victory in game three, avoiding the early match loss and winning despite being down much of the way. It wasn’t until late in the set that the Saints finally pulled away, even though Frederic actually led 21-20 at one point. The Vikings didn’t give up in game four, even when they saw the Saints starting out with a commanding lead. At one point the Saints led by as much as eight points, and the Vikings got to within three points before surrendering the final set and the match. Hoff was specifically pleased with the effort of her freshman Mariah Rohm who had 11 kills on the night. “That was the best game she has played and hopefully it will build some confidence in her,” Hoff said. Rohm also had three solo blocks, six assisted blocks, three digs, two assists and three aces. Sarah Petznick led the Saints with 13 kills, seven solo blocks, two assisted blocks, 11 assists and 13 digs. Sydney Geisness had 11 kills, 16 solo blocks, four assisted blocks, 17 digs, one assist and three aces. Kierstyn Campbell ended with one kill, two assisted blocks, 10 digs, one assist and two aces. Ally Mahler had five digs and one assist, while Jessica Rademacher ended with two kills, one solo block, one assisted block, 11 digs and five assists. Amy Segelstrom had six digs, Natalie Sempf, six digs and Alexis Erickson had four kills, three solo blocks, six assisted blocks, two digs and eight assists.

Webster 3, Unity 2 WEBSTER – The Webster volleyball team took a match win over Unity on Thursday, Sept. 29, and split wins with the Eagles, who defeated them in early September in similar fashion. The teams took Thursday’s match to five sets and Webster managed to come from behind after losing the first two sets 25-22 and 25-14. The final three sets, however, belonged to the Tigers as they won 25-17, 25-23 and 15-7. Raelyn Tretsven led the Tigers with nine kills, followed by Alex Holmstrom and Amber Davis with seven apiece, Ashley Davis, six, Gabby Schiller, four, Christina Weis, three, Chelsea Larson, two, and Jill Holmstrom, one. Amber Davis had four serving aces and Weis had three aces and led the team with 23 assists. Marissa Elliott had six digs and Sarah Nyberg and Tretsven each had five.

Freshman Mariah Rohm goes up for the kill against Frederic. – Photo by Marty Seeger Gore also had five aces in the win. Siren had a hard time stopping several of the Luck rallies, and the Card’s 17 aces means the Dragons had a hard time coordinating their service returns. But the Dragons did have their moments, and had several players make some impressive athletic saves of deflections, but not enough of them were converted into points. Luck stays in the second seat of the West Lakeland Conference, right behind Grantsburg, and just a titch ahead of St. Croix Falls, whom they play on Thursday, Oct. 6, on the road. The Dragons remain winless with the loss, and close out their regular season on Tuesday, Oct. 11, against those same Saints. – Greg Marsten

Luck 3, Siren 0 LUCK – The Luck Cardinals volleyball team came away with a 3-0 win over the Siren Dragons on Thursday, Sept. 29, at Luck, winning 25-14, 25-10 and 25-12. Luck never trailed, and dominated the match solidly, led by 10 kills each for Bella Nelson and Ashley Dexter, with six more from Camille Marsten, four kills for Taylor Joy and a pair of kills by freshman Angela Gore. Nelson also tallied eight digs and four aces. Sophomore setter Tessa Clemenson registered 26 assists, alongside five aces.

Vikings teammates celebrate a set win over the Saints during a match on Thursday, Sept. 29. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Luck senior Maia Lehmann sets up a shot for the Cardinals. – Photo by Greg Marsten


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Pirates take down multiple divisions Defeat four Division 2 teams and D1 Chippewa Falls by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer NEW RICHMOND – The Grantsburg Pirates had a successful tournament at New Richmond last Saturday, Oct. 1, defeating three Division 2 teams, Division 4 Clayton and Division 1 New Richmond. Other teams included Northwestern, Altoona, Chippewa Falls and BaldwinWoodville. Coach Deb Allaman-Johnson credited the girls success with steady passing and solid defense throughout the day. The team had a .352 hitting percentage, and served 92 percent with 43 aces altogether. During the Pirates first match of the day, they defeated Northwestern 25-7 and 2518. “Over half of Kylie’s (Pewe) sets connected for kills. Sam (Schwieger) led with nine,” said Allaman-Johnson. “We missed just one serve for a nice 98 percent. Five players were in on three team block kills.” Grantsburg went against D2 Altoona in their next match, and with only three hitting errors the Pirates managed to take 2519 and 25-14 wins. Altoona also finished

The Grantsburg Pirates defeated several teams while playing at the New Richmond tournament. – Photo submitted second-place in the tournament. Nikki Ticknor had 10 kills in the game and Pewe led with 11 digs. Gab Witzany and Schwieger also had eight and nine digs apiece. “We needed that great defense! Carly (Larson) also had a solo block and three block assists plus a number of deflections,” Allaman-Johnson said. The Pirates third match was played against Clayton who, despite being young with only one senior, played a solid game and showed the Bears have a bright future ahead. “We came out fired up and dominated the first set 25-11. We seemed to poke a sleeping bear, because they stormed back

in the second set with scrappy play and a powerful middle attack,” Allaman-Johnson said. But the Pirates prevailed in the final set, 25-21. Ticknor had four aces which helped the Pirates get ahead late in the game, while Witzany had perfect serving through five of the team’s six games. Pewe had a great game defensively with 18 digs and Ticknor added 16. After a pair of set wins against New Richmond, and an intense battle against D1 Chippewa Falls, in which the Pirates won 25-14 and 25-20, they moved onto their sixth and final championsip match of the day against Baldwin-Woodville. The Pirates won both sets, 25-16 and 25-12. “We billed this as the championship

match since we were the only undefeated team left standing. I hadn’t watched D2 Baldwin-Woodville play much, but I determined that we could defeat them,” Allaman-Johson said, which Grantsburg did by scores of 25-16 and 25-12. Statistic totals from all six matches included Ticknor with a team-leading 60 digs. Pewe had 99 assists on the day, and Ticknor led with 11 aces. Larson had four solo blocks on the day and Witzany and Schwieger each had a 96 serving percentage. Ticknor also led the team in kills with 39. Larson had 36 and Schwieger added 35. Macy Hanson led the Pirates with a .500 hitting percentage, and Larson hit .453.

NFL Pepsi Punt, Pass and Kick results

Nathan Skow of Luck took second and Cory Popham of Frederic placed first in age 6-7. Along with the Knights of Columbus Punt, Pass and Kick contest held at the Siren Ballpark on Saturday, Sept. 24, the National Football League Pepsi Punt, Pass and Kick Contest was also held. First-place finishers move on to compete in Siren on Saturday, Oct. 15. The check-in begins at 10:15 a.m., and competition begins at 11 a.m. Pictured (L to R) are the age 10-11 winners; Brandon Peterson of Grantsburg, Beau Brenizer of Luck and Brady Lunsmann of Luck. – Photos submitted

Chase Horstman of Wesbter took third in the age 6-7 punt, pass and kick competition.

In age 12-13, Tyler Ingram (left) of Osceola took second place and Dolan Highstrom of Siren was first.

From (L to R) in the age 10-11 category: Jade Horstman of Webster was third, Abby Painovich of Hinckley, Minn., was second and Elle Emery of Siren came in first place.

LEFT: In the age 6-7 group, Makenna Engen (left) of Frederic took second and Lindsay Liljenberg of Siren took first.

Chad Songetay Jr. won first place in the age 8-9 category. LEFT: Jenna Curtis of Webster took second place in age 12-13, while Jennifer Hill of Frederic was first place.


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Kasey Johnson finishes eighth

ABOVE: Kasey Johnson of Cushing, son of Jason Johnson and Penny Pogreba, finished eighth in his division, at the 2011 National Pedal Tractor Pull in Mitchell, S.D. LEFT: Kasey Johnson had a big smile, standing beneath the billboard that someone put together in his honor. – Photo submitted

A R E A Hacker’s Lanes

Sunday Afternoon Youth Games Standings: The Bowlers 10.5, The Dogs 10, Gears of War 8, Hi There 6.5, Team Hambone 5.5, The Girls 3, The North 3, The Strikers 1.5. Boys games: Kyle Hunter (TB) 225, Zach Schmidt (TB) 213, Charlie Lindberg (GOW) 190. Boys series: Kyle Hunter (TB) 561, Zach Schmidt (TB) 528, Charlie Lindberg (GOW) 515. Girls games: Corissa Schmidt (TG) 224, Julia Owens (HT) 159, Avery Steen (TG) 147. Girls series: Corissa Schmidt (TG) 539, Julia Owens (HT) 437, Avery Steen (TG) 401. Team games: The Bowlers 584, The Girls 512, Gears of War 500. Team series: The Bowlers 1574, Gears of War 1352, The Girls 1297. Monday Afternoon Senior Mixed Standings: Swans 10, Eagles 9, Bears 5, Hummingbirds 5, Vultures 4, Night Hawks 3, Badgers 2. Men’s games (Handicap): Dave Bannie (Eagles) 292, Alvin Tyler (Vultures) 224, Dale Johnson (Vultures) 223. Men’s series (Handicap): Dave Bannie (Eagles) 720, Tony Deiss (Swans) 618, Alvin Tyler (Vultures) 604. Women’s games (Handicap): Sandy Bannie (Eagles) 235, Betty Anderson (Badgers) 233, Sharon Holt (Hummingbirds) 212. Women’s series (Handicap): Betty Anderson (Badgers) 625, Sandy Bannie (Eagles) 597, Pearl Noble (Bears) 588. Team games (Handicap): Eagles 856, Badgers 823, Swans 812. Team series (Handicap): Eagles 2455, Badgers 2330, Swans 2324. Tuesday Classic Standings: Great Northern Outdoors 37, House of Wood 30, Bottle Shop 29, Yellow Lake Lodge 25, Frandson Bank & Trust 18.5, Pioneer Bar 16.5. Individual games: Chris Olson 276, Ed Bitler 250, Butch Hacker Jr. 233. Individual series: Ed Bitler 659, Chris Olson 658, Josh Bazey 654. Team games: Great Northern Outdoors 703, Bottle Shop 624, Yellow Lake Lodge 613. Team series: Great Northern Outdoors 1872, Bottle Shop 1780, Pioneer Bar 1708. Consecutive strikes (5 or more): Chris Olson 6x = 276; Ed Bitler 6x = 250. Games 50 or more above average: Chris Olson 276 (+94); Mike Skow 205 (+67); Butch Hacker Jr. 233 (+62). Series 100 or more above average: Mike Skow 553 (+139); Chris Olson 658 (+112); Butch Hacker Jr. 615 (+102). Wednesday Night Early Men’s Standings: Daeffler’s Quality Meats 14, Pioneer Bar 10, A-1 Machine 9, Skol Bar 8, Larsen Auto Center 8, Lewis Silo 7, Cummings Lumber 7, Bye Team 1. Individual games: Duane Doolittle (LS) 234, Brett Daeffler (DQM) 223, Milt Daeffler (LAC) 222. Individual series: Brett Daeffler (DQM) 605, Jim Sladky (LS) 595, Wayne Olson (LS) 582. Team games: Lewis Silo 950, A-1 Machine 923, Daeffler’s Quality Meats 907. Team series: Lewis Silo 2699, Skol Bar

B O W L I N G

2643, Daeffler’s Quality Meats 2588. Thursday Late Standings: Hansen Farms Inc. 10, Fisk Trucking 10, Hog Wild BBQ & Grill 8, Stotz & Company 4. Men’s games: Tom Bainbridge 243, Oliver Baillargeon 232, Dale Frandsen 215. Men’s series: Oliver Baillargeon 681, Dale Frandsen 584, Tom Bainbridge 563. Women’s games: Heather Wynn 157. Women’s series: Heather Wynn 402. Team games: Hansen Farms Inc. 1005, Fisk Trucking 772, Hog Wild BBQ & Grill 770. Team series: Hansen Farms Inc. 2705, Fisk Trucking 2287, Hog Wild BBQ & Grill 2283. Friday Night Ladies Standings: Pin Heads 23.5, SKM 19, Pioneer Bar 15, The Leader 14.5, Junque Art 14.5, Frederic Design 11.5, Meyer’s Plus 10. Women’s games: Gail Linke 215, Margie Traun 211, Sandra Bennie 183. Women’s series: Marge Traun 533, Gail Linke 524, Sandra Bennie 475. Team games: Pin Head 696, The Leader 578, SKM 523. Team series: Pin Heads 1835, The Leader 1563, SKM 1503. Games 50 or more above average: Marge Traun. Saturday Night Mixed (9/10/11) Standings: Hot Shots, Skowl, Lakers, Luck-E, Handicaps, Yard Tools. Men’s games: Terry Ingram 236, Rodger Wroge 214, Bruce Java 201. Men’s series: Mark Bohn 543, Terry Ingram 541, Rodger Wroge 536. Women’s games: Deb Ingram 248, Rita Bohn 234 & 194. Women’s series: Rita Bohn 607, Deb Ingram 596, Linda Giller 463. Team games: Skowl 929, Handicaps 882, Luck-E 874. Team series: Luck-E 2527, Lakers & Hot Shots 2525. Saturday Night Mixed (9/24/11) Standings: Lakers, Handicaps, Hot Shots, Yard Tools, Skowl, Luck. Men’s games: Mark Bohn 222, Eugene Ruhn 216, Ron Skow 209. Men’s series: Mark Bohn 605, Ron Skow 548, Mike Renfro 536. Women’s games: Deb Ingram 199, Heidi Skow 179 & 176. Women’s series: Deb Ingram 518, Heidi Skow 489, Kathy Java 455. Team games: Handicaps 982, Yard Tools 925, Lakers 920. Team series: Handicaps 2732, Yard Tools 2637, Lakers 2562.

McKenzie Lanes

Monday Night Madness Standings: McKenzie Lanes 16, Mishaps 11, Eagle Lounge 10, Alleycats 5, Bogus Pumpkins 2, Bye 4. Individual games: Barbara Benson 201, Sue Wonka 194, Lois Murphy 190. Individual series: Barbara Benson 564, Julia Delougherty 492, Brenda Garske 426. Team games (Handicap): Mishaps 705, McKenzie Lanes 645. Team series (Handicap): Mishaps 1930, McKenzie Lanes. Monday Night Ladies

Standings: Edina Divas 39, Wolf Creek Log Furn. 33, Milltown Appliance 28, Frederic Truck & Tractor 25.5, Alyeska Contracting 25.5, Metal Products 23, McKenzie Lanes 20, Bye 8. Individual games: Patti Katzmark 209, Toni Sloper 207, Luann White 193. Individual series: Patti Katzmark 539, Kelley Hill 518, Kathy McKenzie 506. Team games (Handicap): Edina Divas 861. Team series (Handicap): Edina Divas 2446. Tuesday Women’s Standings: Tomlinson Insurance 45, Gutter Dusters 41, Custom Outfitter 39.5, Country Gals 33, Trap Rock 30, Kassel Tap 28.5, LC’s Gals 27, Hauge Dental 28. Individual games: Jane Smith 214, Kelley Hill 204, Audrey Ruck 192. Individual series: Jane Smith 590, Kelley Hill 555, Lonnie Stowell 521. Team games (Handicap): Hauge Dental 880, Country Gals 861, Kassel Tap 843. Team series (Handicap): Hauge Dental 2550, Kassel Tap 2510, Country Gals 2371. Tuesday Night Men’s Standings: The Cobbler Shop 48.5, Dream Lawn 45.5, McKenzie Lanes 43, Nel-Lo-Hill Farm 40.5, Centurview Park 37.5, Hack’s Pub 36.5, The Dugout 36.5, Steve’s Appliance 32. Individual games: Rick Fox 300, Darren McKenzie 245, Jim McKenzie 237. Individual series: Rick Fox 693, Darren McKenzie 679, Ryan Wiemer 635. Team games (Handicap): McKenzie Lanes 1220. Team series (Handicap): McKenzie Lanes 3520. Wednesday Early League Standings: Suzie Q’s 18, Gerhman Auto Body 14, Holiday StationStore 14, Amrhien Painting 14, Hack’s Pub 12, Cutting Edge 10, Top Spot 8, Bye 6. Men’s games: Merlin Fox 269, Mike Welling 236, Dennis Kindem 207. Men’s series: Merlin Fox 625, Mike Welling 595, Dennis Kindem 551. Women’s games: Jeanne Kizer 161, Janice Fox 154, Patty Walker 152. Women’s series: Janice Fox & Patty Walker 450, Jeanne Kizer 416. Team games (Handicap): Top Spot 726. Team series (Handicap): Gerhman Auto Body 1920. Wednesday Night Men’s Standings: Edina Realty 22, McKenzie Lanes 20, Dalles Electricians18, Tiger

R E S U LT S Express 16, Davy’s Constuction 14, Hanjo Farms 14, Harvest Moon 12, Reed’s Marina 12. Individual games: Darren McKenzie 266, Erv Lehmann 235, Gordie Moore 234. Individual series: Darren McKenzie 682, Jason Loney 616, Gene Braund 610. Team games (Handicap): Tiger Express 1068, Dalles Electricians 1038. Team series (Handicap): Dalles Electricians 2970, Tiger Express 2896. Thursday Night Ladies Standings: Hauge Dental 52, Bont Chiropractic 51.5, Hack’s Pub 41,Truhlson Chiropractic 39.5, Cutting Edge Pro 39, RiverBank 35, Eagle Valley Bank 33.5, KJ’s 28.5. Individual games: Shannon Cox 220, Jane Smith 198, Penny Kammerud 196. Individual series: Penny Kammerud 537, Jane Smith 532, Shannon Cox 529. Team games: Hauge Dental 782, Truhlsen Chiropractic 775, Eagle Valley Bank 773. Team series: Hauge Dental 2296, Bont Chiropractic 2206, Truhlsen Chiropractic 2135. Saturday Night Mixed Standings: The Bald & The Beautiful 22, Pin Busters 21.5, The In-Laws 19, TDawgs 16.5, The Cutting Edge 16.5, B&K Cousins 16, Roller Coasters 14, Eureka Bombers 10.5. Women’s games: Kathy Braund 180, Jean Judd 176, Brenda Lehmann 169. Women’s series: Kathy Braund 491, Brenda Lehmann 480, Jean Judd 476. Men’s games: Roger Fisk 225, Jeff Lehmann 225, Gene Braund 223. Men’s series: Jeff Lehmann 606, Jason Schultz 566, Tim Katzmark 563. Team games (Handicap): T-Dawgs 907, The In-Laws 886, Pin Buster 853. Team series (Handicap): T-Dawgs 2601, The In-Laws 2546, Pin Buster 2515.

Black & Orange

Early Birds Standings: The Tap 11-1, Yellow River Saloon 5-7, Black & Orange 4.5-7.5, Gandy Dancer Saloon 3.5-8.5. Individual games: Linda Strong (YRS) 165, Kay Casey (YRS) 161, Lynn Toivola (T) 148. Individual series: Kay Casey (YRS) 456, Linda Strong (YRS) 454, Delores Lien (T) 428. Team games: Yellow River Saloon 871, The Tap 861, Gandy Dancer Saloon 828. Team series: Yellow River Saloon 2532, The Tap 2465, Gandy Dancer Saloon 2440. Monday Night Standings: Black & Orange 6-2, Larry’s LP 5-3, Glass & Mirror Works 3-5, Vacant 2-6. Individual games: Mike Zajac (G&MW) 226, Curt Phelps (G&MW) 201, Vern Nottom (B&O) 192. Individual series: Dean Eytcheseon (G&MW) 542, Josh Johnson (L) 526, Mike Zajac (G&MW) 520. Team games: Glass & Mirror Works 980, Black & Orange 857, Larry’s LP 855. Team series: Glass & Mirror Works 2666, Larry’s LP 2498, Black & Orange.

TNT Standings: Flower Power 11-5, Larry’s LP 9-7, Cashco 8-8, Vacant 4-12. Individual games: Becky Reynolds (L) 182, Mary Ellen Smith (C) & Jennifer Kern (L) 177. Individual series: Jennifer Kern (L) 475, Becky Reynolds (L) 417, Sue Eytcheson (FP) 408. Team games: Flower Power 813, Larry’s LP 812, Cascho 757. Team series: Flower Power 2359, Larry’s LP 2337, Cashco 2229. Wednesday Night Standings: 10th Hole 6-2, Cashco 5-3, Pheasant Inn 5-3, Zia Louisa’s 3-5, Black & Orange 3-5, Lions 2-6. Individual games: Tim Vasatka (PI) 215, Gene Ackland (ZL) 202, Bruce Norstrem (C) 200. Individual series: Gene Ackland (ZL) 563, Tim Vasatka (PI) 543, Jason Hansen (ZL) 524. Team games: Cashco 982, Zia Louisa’s 925, Pheasant Inn 913. Team series: Pheasant Inn 2734, Cashco 2685, 10th Hole 2635. Splits converted: 6-7-10: Mike Zajac. Early Risers Standings: A+ Sanitation 11-5, Gayle’s Northwoods Hair Design 10-6, Gandy Dancer 9-7, 10th Hole 2-14. Individual games: Jan Carlson (GNHD) 191, Claudia Peterson (GD) 177., Pam Dildine (10th) 172. Individual series: Jan Carlson (GNHD) 483, Claudia Peterson (GD) 464, Connie Lundeen (A+) 454. Team games: A+ Sanitation 692, Gayle’s Northwoods Hair Design 682, Gandy Dancer 634. Team series: Gayle’s Northwoods Hair Design 1996, A+ Sanitation 1952, Gandy Dancer 1881. Games 50 or more above average: Jan Carlson 191 (+53); Pam Dildine 172. Thursday Night Ladies Standings: Dolls w/ Balls 7-5, Webster Motel 7-5, Rollettes 5-7, Pour House 57. Individual games: Sandy Churchill (R) 166, Jill Wieser (WM) 163, Val Fremont (PH) & Jackie Churchill (DW/B) 160. Individual series: Daphne Churchill (DW/B) 458, Jackie Churchill (DW/B) 445, Val Fremont (PH) 429. Team games: Webster Motel 710, Rollettes 683, Dolls w/ Balls 659. Team series: Webster Motel 2066, Dolls w/ Balls 1921, Rollettes.

Denny’s Downtown Lanes

Sunday Afternoon Mixed Standings: Redneck Coon Hunters 21, Team Siren 19, Spare Us 18, George’s Angels 14, Blind 9, The Pacifiers 3. Women’s games: Ernie Meyer 151, Lori Dake 136, “Trouble” Barfknecht 132. Women’s series: Ernie Meyer 425, Lori Drake 394, Sue DeMarre 310. Men’s games: Isaac Jewell 167, George Nutt 160, Jamie Meir 158. Men’s series: Jim Loomis 462, Issac Jewell 435, Scott Lamphere 428. Team games: Spare Us 423, George’s Angels 414, Team Siren 382. Team series: George’s Angels 1195, Spare Us 1176, Team Siren 1127.


PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

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Badger fans are funny A group of local Badger fans reported a euphoric trip to Madtown over the weekend as Wisconsin rolled over Nebraska in the Big Ten football opener. This particular Badger brigade gleefully ATHLETIC paid the $350 per night for lodging on State Street. Hotels in Madison during “event weekends” impose a two-night minimum stay; thus, fans of Bucky needed at least $700 to cover weekend lodging expenses. When the local caravan of Badger fans was asked if their road trip included a pit stop at the establishment known as Shooters outside of Menomonie, the group scoffed at the inquiry. The Badger brigade did not object to the questionable atmosphere of Shooters but rather had a problem forking over the $10 cover charge – apparently an outrageous amount – unlike $350 room rates in the glamorous Madison area.

Garth Olson

ESTHETIC

Sportscasters continue to dye As 40-somethings everywhere contemplate hair coloring to remove pesky gray

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E A D E R

hair, baby boomers may point to film star George Clooney as one person who can pull off the salt-and-pepper look. Actually, kudos go to the former “Price Is Right” host, Bob Barker, as the original television pioneer who started the grayis-OK look. Interestingly, Anderson Cooper, Jay Leno and David Letterman all have the natural-hair look, whereas many sportscasters, locally and nationally, oddly, are still clinging to their bottles of hair dye. Of course for gray-haired, aging baby boomers, there is the option of shaving one’s head a la Michael Jordan or Mr. Clean, etc. Ups and downs of football cycles Two schools that haven’t seen a lot of postseason action during the football playoffs will be playoff bound this year. Congrats to Siren and Unity. Rumor has it that St. Croix Falls hasn’t won a playoff football game since 1991. Perhaps 2011 will change the Saints postseason fortunes as the playoffs begin on Oct. 21. Down in Osceola, longtime residents are wondering when was the last time the Chieftains went winless during a football season? Funny how things go up and down – just like the S&P 500 and those toy drinking birds or dippy birds that dip their heads into water. Welcome hunters This is the time of year where camo is stylish and restaurateurs need to place Welcome Hunters signs in front of their establishments. I can’t remember the last

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Park Ridge, Ill. I saw the new Brad Pitt baseball movie “Moneyball.” I thought it was excellent – thumbs up. The original thumbs-up guys - Siskel and Ebert – in their television show, the theater marquee shown during the opening credits was from the Pickwick Theatre in Park Ridge, Ill. Believe it or not, many Leader Land sports fans may be unaware that they have seen the streets of Park Ridge – a suburb of Chicago. During “The Blues Brothers” movie, Jake and Elwood Blues, when pulled over by the police during the start of the film, and many scenes during the start of the ensuing classic chase scene, were filmed near the Pickwick Theatre on the streets of Park Ridge. Park Ridge is also the home office to Big Ten athletics. Facebook Fans of the film “The Social Network” surely remember Harvard rowers Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss. The twins, who sued Facebook, are currently training for the 2012 Olympics and are

nice guys according to fellow Olympic rower and St. Croix Falls grad Megan Kalmoe. Fantasy the new reality Forget reality television – fantasy football continues to push the NFL into new terrain. This season, the NFL decided to report fantasy stats inside NFL stadiums. It’s the new fantasy world where football fans are equally concerned with their fantasy team as their home team. And fantasy football fans want scoring! Will offenses that feature “three yards and a cloud of dust” give way to passing-only schemes? Football, like everything else, is evolving, for better or worse… Texting and Coleco Have you noticed at every sporting event, for every fan in the stands watching the game, there are twice as many fans looking at their phones - sending text messages. The first precursor to texting, I believe, actually started in 1979. That’s when Coleco introduced the Electronic Quarterback – a hand-held game that required quick thumbing to press buttons to move your red LED light quarterback up, down and forward through an onslaught of blinking, tiny red dashes of light – representing the defense. The game required a steely gaze and quick thumbs – it was texting-like and quite addictive to ‘70s circa kids.

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Webster Knights of Columbus Punt, Pass and Kick results

VOLLEYBALL

Small Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall Frederic Vikings 6-0 6-1 6-1 Northwood/Solon Springs 6-1 Shell Lake Lakers 5-2 5-2 Siren Dragons 4-2 5-2 3-3 4-3 Turtle Lake Lakers Luck Cardinals 3-3 3-4 Bruce Red Raiders 1-5 1-5 Winter Warriors 0-6 0-7 Birchwood Bobcats 0-6 0-6 Scores Friday, September 30 Frederic 2, Birchwood 0 Siren 30, Bruce 6 Saturday, October 1 Living Word Lutheran 31, Luck 24 Upcoming Friday, October 7 7 p.m. Frederic at Luck Northwood/Solon Springs at Siren

West Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall Grantsburg Pirates 10-0 21-0 6-2 19-6 Luck Cardinals St. Croix Falls Saints 5-4 7-14 Unity Eagles 5-5 9-9 3-5 5-6 Webster Tigers Frederic Vikings 3-6 3-7 Siren Dragons 0-10 0-11 Scores Thursday, September 29 St. Croix Falls 3, Frederic 1 Luck 3, Siren 0 Webster 3, Unity 2 Saturday, October 1 Grantsburg 2, Altoona 0 Grantsburg 2, Baldwin-Woodville 0 Grantsburg 2, Clayton 0 Grantsburg 2, Northwestern 0 Grantsburg 2, Chippewa Falls 0 Grantsburg 2, New Richmond 0 Webster 1, Spring Valley 1 St. Croix Falls 1, Spring Valley 1 Tuesday, October 4 Webster 3, Siren 0 Luck 3, Frederic 0 Grantsburg 3, St. Croix Falls 0 Upcoming Thursday, October 6 7:30 p.m Frederic at Webster Luck at St. Croix Falls Grantsburg at Unity Saturday, October 8 TBD Unity at Mora, Minn. 10 a.m. Webster at Luck Tournament Monday, October 10 7:30 p.m. Birchwood at Frederic Tuesday, October 11 7:30 p.m Unity at Luck St. Croix Falls at Siren Frederic at Solon Springs Grantsburg at Webster Thursday, October 13 6 p.m. Luck at Lac Courte Oreilles

FOOTBALL

Large Lakeland Standings Team Conf. Overall St. Croix Falls Saints 4-1 6-1 Unity Eagles 3-1 4-3 Grantsburg Pirates 3-1 3-4 Cameron Comets 3-2 4-3 Flambeau Falcons 1-3 4-3 Clear Lake Warriors 1-3 2-5 Webster Tigers 0-4 1-6 Scores Friday, September 30 St. Croix Falls 38, Unity 13 Grantsburg 18, Clear Lake 15 Elk Mound 18, Webster 9 Upcoming Friday, October 7 7 p.m. Grantsburg at Flambeau St. Croix Central at St. Croix Falls Webster at Unity Thursday, October 13 7 p.m. Unity at Grantsburg Flambeau at Webster

CROSS COUNTRY

P O R T S

time I had to pump the brakes for a roadcrossing whitetail. Are local deer herd numbers down or have I just been lucky to avoid ambushing bucks along the highways of Leader Land? While deer populations may be in question, it appears many bear hunters are enjoying success. Bear hunting informants in Douglas County report excellent bear hunting and quite thrilling hound-led hunting adventures.

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LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD FOOTBALL

S

TENNIS

Upcoming Tuesday, October 11 4:15 p.m. At Cameron (Grantsburg, St. Croix Falls, Unity/Luck, Webster)

Upcoming Thursday - Saturday, October 13-15 TBA State at Madison

GIRLS GOLF

Upcoming Monday - Tuesday, October 10-11 TBA State at Madison

Visit www.wissports.net for local high school scores & stats

The regional Knights of Columbus Punt, Pass and Kick competition was held last Saturday, Oct. 1, in Turtle Lake. Participants in this competition were the first-place winners from the Webster area’s Saturday, Sept. 24, competition. Pictured (L to R): Jenna Ruiz, 10, second place; Andrew Ruiz, 12, third place; Kale Hopke, 8, first place; Jack Washburn 10, second place; Xander Pi ero, 11, third place; and Taylor Nyren, 11, first place. Not pictured, Summer Winkler, 8, third place. First- and second-place winners, Ruiz, Hopke, Washburn and Nyren, will move on to the state Punt, Pass and Kick competition in Marshfield on Saturday, Oct. 22. – Photo submitted “For some reason, my loyal readers are quiet when I have an undefeated week. I wonder why,” the Swami said with a smirk early Wednesday afternoon as he noted last week’s unblemished 7-0 performance. The above comment was made in reference to the barrage of e-mail har a s s ment he endured last THE SWAMI weekend after a substandard 3-4 mark. Undaunted, his most recent perfecto raised his overall record to 37-12 for a 76percent success rate which is tops in Northwest Wisconsin. “I’m on a roll now!” he added, while plucking the first of four nice, fat drake wood ducks he’d shot earlier in the morning.

The Swami

PREDICTS

This week’s predictions: New Richmond 22, Osceola 10 – The Chieftains nightmarish 2011 continues. Iowa-Grant 20, Fennimore 12 – The best team wins in this battle between two longtime rivals. Unity 20, Webster 14 – The Eagles temporarily maintain their title hopes. St. Croix Central 27, St. Croix Falls 8 – Ouch! The Dunn-St. Croix comfortably asserts its superiority over the Large Lakeland. Northwood-SS 22, Siren 14 – The Dragons are for real but won’t be able to close the deal against the Evereagles. Grantsburg 20, Flambeau 12 – Once again, it’s not very pretty, yet once again it’s a Pirate “W.” Luck 28, Frederic 26 – The Cards might be the best team in the Small Lakeland at this point in time. The Swami answers all e-mails and can be reached at predictionking@yahoo.com.


O UTDOOR S

OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

I N T E R! C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Hunting and heart disease

It didn’t seem right in May when my doctor said my high blood pressure needed to be kept in check, but it was even more of a shock to learn months later that my cholesterol levels were out of Marty whack too. For an Seeger early-30s male who barely weighs 150 pounds soaking wet, The even my doctor raised an eyebrow on my Bottom most recent visit, when she saw that my bad Line cholesterol levels were quite high. “Does this run in your family or something?” she asked. “Yeah, actually it does,” I said, not knowing what to expect next. As it turned out, the meds prescribed in May seemed to be working nicely on the blood pressure, but the question of what to do about the high cholesterol came next, and I had a sneaking suspicion on what the next question might be. “Do you exercise?” she asked. The question was a compliment actually, as I’ve often looked in the mirror and figured just about anyone could see that I was probably out of shape. Even though much of my free time is spent hiking through the woods, the 10 to 15 minute walk generally concludes with a three or

more hour sit. Sometimes, I even fall asleep. So, to be completely honest, I told my doctor that there was little exercise involved in my life, other than the occasional walk to the stand. If I’m really lucky in the exercise department, my heart pumps uncontrollably at various times during the fall or spring when a huge buck is spotted, or a bird or biggame target is spotted and it looks like a shooting opportunity exists. This year, I’ve been on that walk once – and it actually took less than 10 minutes this time. The conversation inevitably turned to my diet, which mostly includes my favorite foods like brats, hot dogs, processed sandwich meat and anything and everything in the salt food group. There is a salt food group, right? So, my diet isn’t the greatest, but I’m not always indulging in my favorite foods either, and my wife is a great cook who uses as many garden veggies and wholesome foods as possible when she cooks. We do eat a ton of venison, skinless chicken or grass-fed beef, which still has potential to raise cholesterol levels. Although the amount of meat I consume needs to be reduced to smaller portions, my doctor did hint that some of her patients who consume considerable amounts of deer and elk have very good cholesterol levels. She also recommended that I try to eat fish twice a week. Try? Granted, the fish are best when baked or boiled, as opposed to my methods, which involve frying in oil or deep-fried, but my doctor’s suggestion essentially meant that I needed to do more fishing. And as for the exercising? Thinking of how eating more venison could potentially lower my cholesterol

It’s no secret that venison is a healthy option for meat eaters, but this author was ecstatic to learn that the right amounts could have little effect on cholesterol levels. More venison, please. – Photo by Marty Seeger levels, it led me to believe that I should said, adding that the skinless chicken that do more hunting too. I explained to my is also recommended for high cholesterol doctor that I bow hunted for elk two could also be substituted with pheasant years ago and throughout the summer, I or grouse, and nothing says exercise betslowly worked myself into what felt like ter than upland game bird hunting. the best shape of my life. The two-mile Laura smirked mildly and rolled her hikes down the mountain and back up eyes, which suggested to me that elk again each morning for about a week in hunting was a go for next year. I even got Colorado were exhausting, but I’d never to go bow hunting for the first time of the felt so good. For the past two years, how- season last weekend, too. Since our ever, new shingles for the house, and of freezer is completely void of venison, course, a new beautiful baby girl has put nearly every deer was a target, and to my a bit of a hold on the elk hunting. delight, a big lone doe did come through. “You’ll need to talk to your wife about But even at 10 yards, I wasn’t able to pull that one,” the doctor said. off a shot. For a good 10 minutes, howAnd that night, I did just that, explain- ever, I could have sworn the deer could ing to my wife, Laura, how hunting and hear my heart beating uncontrollably, fishing could help prevent heart disease. and must have been why she spooked. It “Fishing more often, hunting for elk in looks like I’m already off to a great start the fall for much-needed venison and ex- with lowering my cholesterol. ercise, could save my life someday,” I

Dr. James Kroll appointed to study state deer management MADISON – The Wisconsin Department of Administration has retained Dr. James C. Kroll, the world’s foremost expert in modern deer herd management, to provide the state with an independent, objective, and scientifically based review of Wisconsin’s deer management practices. Kroll will immediately commence a scientific study of Wisconsin’s white-tailed deer management practices, including management practices related to chronic wasting disease, and complete a report by June 2012. Kroll is a nationally renowned

expert in deer management techniques. He currently holds the Harry M. Rockwell chair in forest wildlife at Stephan F. Austin State University where he also serves as director at the Institute for White-tailed Deer Management and Research. “Wisconsin is well-known for its proud deer hunting tradition,” Kroll said. “I have over 30 years of experience in deer herd management. That, combined with the expertise of staff at the Wisconsin DNR, will provide a solid foundation for a scientifically based review of Wiscon-

sin’s deer management practices. In the end, this work will help Wisconsin’s deer hunting tradition to thrive for generations to come.” Last week, Gov. Scott Walker issued Executive Order No. 44 to create a whitetailed deer trustee who will review and evaluate Wisconsin’s deer herd management practices. Under this executive order, the Department of Administration is directed to retain, no later than Oct 1, an independent expert with recognized scientific credentials and demonstrated ex-

perience in the field of white-tailed deer management to review Wisconsin’s deer management practices as white-tailed deer trustee. The DOA says that the contract for the white-tailed deer trustee is $125,000 and will be paid through Department of Natural Resources funds. – from press release

Youth gun deer hunt is Oct. 8-9 MADISON - The annual Wisconsin Youth Gun Deer Hunt will take place statewide on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 89, for youth ages 10 -15. Under Wisconsin’s Mentored Hunting Law, now in its third season, hunters as young as 10 years of age may participate – with or without hunter education certification – in the youth gun deer hunt with a mentor. The mentored hunting law also allows deer hunting during later seasons. The early date of the hunt offers milder weather and allows more time in the field under more comfortable conditions for young hunters and their mentors. In addition to giving youths their own opportunity to experience the traditions of deer hunting in Wisconsin, the focus is on the youth and allows more time for the mentor to share skills and teach their charges how to hunt safely and ethically. There are several changes from last year’s youth gun deer hunt. The junior antlerless gun deer carcass tag will now be valid statewide for youth hunters, allowing them to use it in buck only units. A separate, unit specific, antlerless tag will not be required in these units. The hunt will be held in all deer management units statewide, except state park units, Ft. McCoy, Chambers Island,

Menominee County and the Apostle Islands other than Madeline Island. Wisconsin has two programs designed to introduce youths to deer hunting under controlled conditions and under close supervision of an adult hunter: Youth hunters 12 through 15 years of age (resident and nonresident) who possess a hunter education certificate of accomplishment and a gun deer hunting license may hunt deer Oct. 8-9 accompanied by an adult 18 years of age or older. “Accompany” means the adult is within both visual and voice contact of the youth. The adult does not have to be a licensed hunter or a hunter education graduate to accompany one or two youth who are at least 12 years of age and have completed a hunter education course.

Adults accompanying youth hunters: • May not gun hunt for deer during the youth hunt, but may possess a bow or gun and hunt for another game species that is open for them to hunt at that time; and • May not accompany more than two youth hunters during the youth gun deer hunt at any given time. • Youth hunters 10-11 years of age, or youth hunters 12-15 years of age who do not possess a hunter education certificate,

but possess a mentored gun deer hunting license may hunt while “mentored” by an adult who is within arm’s reach at all times during the hunt.

Qualified adult mentors: • Must be at least 18 years of age and have the youth’s parent or guardian’s permission to mentor the youth hunter; • Must possess a valid hunting license for the current year (any type of game), unless they are mentoring a youth on land that the mentor owns; • Must be a graduate of a hunter education course or have completed basic training with the U.S. Armed Forces if the mentor was born on or after Jan. 1, 1973; they • May only mentor one youth hunter who is age 10 or 11, or who has not completed hunter education at any given time; and • May not accompany more than two youth hunters. If one youth is hunting under mentored hunter rules, the adult may accompany no more than one other youth at the same time and only if the second youth is at least 12 to 15 years of age and has completed hunter education. Additionally, only one firearm or bow may be possessed jointly between the

mentor and youth who is age 10 or 11, or who has not completed hunter education. Qualified youth hunters may harvest one buck deer using their gun buck deer carcass tag and additional antlerless deer with the appropriate carcass tag valid in the unit in which they are hunting. Earn-a-buck restrictions do not apply to the hunter’s one green “gun buck deer carcass tag” in CWD EAB units. Following EAB rules, a youth may harvest and tag bucks or antlerless deer using the free 2011-12 or 2012-13 CWD Deer Carcass Tags in CWD units. Further details on EAB rules and CWD tags is available on page 15 of 2011 Wisconsin Deer Hunting Regulations. All hunters and their mentors must observe blaze orange clothing requirements. All deer, bear, turkey and small game hunters, with the exception of waterfowl hunters, are also required to meet blaze orange requirements on these two days. More information on the youth deer hunt and Mentored Hunting Law is available on the DNR Web site at www.dnr.wi.gov. – from the dnr


PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING VARIANCE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER

TAKE NOTICE THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD AT THE VILLAGE OFFICE, 7505 MAIN STREET, WEBSTER, WISCONSIN, ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2011, AT 6:10 P.M.

For the purpose of the consideration of a zoning variance for Brian & Dawn Sargent, for their residence located at 26420 Pike Avenue South, Webster, Wisconsin Parcel #07-191-2-39-16-08-5 15-042-183000. The property is zoned R1, Single-Family Residential District. The request is to build a deck 4’ x 32’. The Board will hear all interested persons, or their agents or attorneys, and thereafter will make a decision on the request. For additional information, please contact: Patrice Bjorklund, Village Clerk 7505 Main Street West Webster, WI 54893 Phone: 715-866-4211 546926 48a 7L WNAXLP

NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK TOWN OF MILLTOWN

Pursuant to s70.45, Wis. Stats., the assessment roll for the 2011 assessment year will be open for examination at the following time: Friday, October 14, from 5 to 7 p.m., at the Milltown Fire Hall At the open book session, instructional information and objection forms will be available. These documents will assist with scheduling a hearing before the Board of Review. The assessor will be present and available to answer questions at the open book. Keep in mind that objection forms must be filed with the clerk of the Board of Review at least 48 hours before the Board of Review is conducted, unless the Board of Review chooses to waive this requirement. Virgil Hansen, Town Clerk Town of Milltown 546115 5-6L 47-49a,d WNAXLP

SCREEN PRINTING

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Mark-It Graphics, a dynamic screen printing, digital printing, die cutting and plastic fabricating company is accepting applications from self-motivated and quality conscious people for the following full-time 1st-shift positions: Color Formulator - Experience in 4 color process and precision color matching is preferred. In-Line Press Operator - Experienced press person to operate one of the finest, precision press lines in the industry. Screen Print Leadperson - Must have experience in the entire screen printing process including ink, screen making and printing. Mark-It has a reputation for quality products and services, competitive wages and benefits and a clean, safe, friendly working environment. No phone calls, please. Please fax or send resume with salary requirements to: Mark-it Graphics, Inc., 500 Simmon Drive, Osceola, WI 54020 Fax: 715-294-4992 www.mark-itgraphics.com

Virgil Hansen, Clerk 546528 6-7L 48-49a,d

(Sept. 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ROYAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ESTATE OF JAMES B. CANTERBURY c/o Attorney Lawrence J. Kaiser Special Administrator, Defendant Case No. 11CV438 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered in the above-entitled action on September 16, 2011, in the amount of $29,306.59, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, in said County, on the 16th day of November, 2011, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: A parcel of land in the northwest quarter of southwest quarter (NW 1/4 of SW 1/4), section twenty-eight (28), township thirty-four (34) north of range sixteen (16) west, described as follows: beginning at the northeast corner of said NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, thence south on the east line of said NW 1/4 of SW 1/4, a distance of 305 feet to the point of beginning of the parcel being conveyed; thence south a distance of 80 feet; thence west parallel to the north line of said NW 1/4 of SW 1/4 to the east bank of Apple River; thence northerly along said river to a point due west of the point of beginning, thence east to the point of beginning, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1345 100th Street, Amery, Wis. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check upon confirmation of sale. Dated this 26th day of September, 2011. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Attorney Christine A. Gimbor Weld, Riley, Prenn & Ricci, S.C. 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway P.O. Box 1030 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715/839-7786 Attorneys for Plaintiff This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

NORTHWEST PASSAGE/ NORTHWEST COUNSELING & GUIDANCE CLINIC www.nwpltd.org

Has an Immediate Opening for

Full-Time Building Maintenance Worker

Competitive pay & benefits! Excellent opportunity! Must have experience in carpentry & building maintenance. Must have valid driver’s license & the ability to travel to multiple locations. Interested applicants, send cover letter with work experience, strengths & interests to: NickK@nwpltd.org or Nick Kalambokidis - 203 United Way Drive, Frederic, WI 54837. Northwest is an equal opportunity employer.

(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DIAN L. BERGMAN Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 66 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for information administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth December 9, 1951, and date of death July 2, 2011, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1526 - 155th Street, Centuria, WI 54824. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is December 23, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 500. /s/ Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar 715-485-9238 September 13, 2011 Christine A. Rasmussen 103 North Knowles Avenue New Richmond, WI 54017 715-246-2211 Bar No. 1048961

546026 WNAXLP

SUBSTITUTE EDUCATIONAL AIDES

Applicant must enjoy working with children; have strong communication skills, be able to lift 50 pounds, willing to work outside, must hold or be eligible for licensure as handicapped aide by Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction. CPR certification desired. How to Apply: Qualified, interested persons should apply by sending a letter of application, District application (available at www.unity.k12.wi.us), resume, copy of license or evidence of license eligibility, transcripts and three (3) letters of recommendation to: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator Unity School District 1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North 546029 46d 5Ltfc 47a,dtfc Balsam Lake, WI 54810

Case Number: 10 CV 354 AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 30, 2010, in the amount of $191,817.76, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 26, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lots 1 and 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 4468 filed on May 19, 2004, in Volume 20, Page 20, as Document No. 680274, being a part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 26, Township 36 North, Range 17 West, in the Town of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin. ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 26, Township 36 North, Range 17 West, Town of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as Lots 1 and 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 4468 filed in Volume 20, Page 20, as Document No. 680274. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1382 and 1382-A State Rd. 48, Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 036-00614-0100 & 036-00614-0200 Dated this 15th day of September, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 277279

Monthly Board Meeting Monday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall

(Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR FFMLT 04-FF10 Plaintiff vs. JILL LARAYNE WHITE, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 08 CV 542 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 17, 2008, in the amount of $189,652.00, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 26, 2011, at 10:00 AM TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 5 of Certified Survey Map No. 632, filed in Volume 3 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 124 as Document No. 393653, Located in the SW 1/4 of the SW 1/4 of Section 12, Township 35 North, Range 17 West, Town of Milltown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2202 Antler Lake Drive, Milltown, WI 54858. TAX KEY NO.: 040-00344-0000. Dated this 23rd day of August, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 276359

544890 WNAXLP

AGENDA: Minutes & treasurer report, payment of town bills and any other business properly brought before board. Agenda will be posted at Daniels Town Hall 24 hours before meeting. Visit Daniels Township Web site (www.townofdaniels.org). 546912 7L Ellen M. Ellis, Clerk

(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. LEON E. MEWHORTER, et al. Defendant(s)

Melanie D. Beresford, 51, Luck, died Sept. 19, 2011.

WNAXLP

The Monthly Town Board Meeting Will Be Held Tues., Oct. 11, 2011, At 7 p.m. At Daniels Town Hall

Agenda will be posted at the Town Hall. Town of McKinley Deborah Grover, Clerk

Burnett County

TOWN OF MILLTOWN

546662

TOWN OF DANIELS MONTHLY BOARD MEETING

The Regular Monthly Board Meeting For The Town Of McKinley Will Be On Tues., Oct. 11, 2011, At 7:30 p.m.

Burnett and Polk Co. deaths

NOTICE

546674 6-7L 48-49a,d

NOTICE

NOTICE

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Virgil Hansen, Clerk

Restorative Justice of Northwest WI Inc. Annual Board Meeting Thursday, October 20, 3:30 p.m. Restorative Justice Office Southwinds Plaza in Siren

546088 WNAXLP

Mon., Oct. 10, 2011, 6:30 p.m. Milltown Fire Hall

547003 7L

Plan Committee Meeting

NOTICE

547004 7-8L

TOWN OF MILLTOWN

Polk County

Margaret L. Holmberg, 94, Town of Daniels, died Sept. 13, 2011. Marion C. Clover, 76, St. Croix Falls, died Sept. 17, 2011. James B. White, 28, Town of Bone Lake, died Sept. 19, 2011.

The Leader Connect to your community NOTICE

The October meeting of the Village Board of Siren will be held Thurs., October 6, 2011, at 2 p.m. at the Village Hall. Agenda posted. Ann Peterson 547009 Clerk-Treasurer 7L (Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. WESTON J. HERMAN, and VIRGINIA Y. BONIN, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. Case No. 11 CV 32 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on February 24, 2011, in the amount of $265,370.74, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Thursday, November 3, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Part of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 of SE 1/4) of Section Twenty-nine (29), Township Thirty-four (34) North, Range Eighteen (18) West, described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said SW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 29, Township 34 North, Range 18 West; thence East 871.2 feet to an iron pipe stake; thence South 500 feet more or less to the North line of U.S. Highway No. 8; thence West along the North line of U.S. Highway No. 8 to the West line of said SW1/4 of the NE1/4; thence North along the West line of said SW1/4 of the SE1/4 to beginning, EXCEPT parcel described in Volume 477 Records, page 313 as Document No. 433129 and EXCEPT parcel described in Volume 627 Records on page 75 as Document No. 517424, as corrected by affidavit recorded in Volume 818 Records on page 91 as Document No. 598896, Polk County, Wis. PIN: 281-01388-5000. STREET ADDRESS: 2249 West Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 5th day of September, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson / #1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787 546254 WNAXLP


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 29

Notices/Employment BID NOTICE - TOWN OF APPLE RIVER POLK COUNTY The Town of Apple River is requesting bids to: Shoulder: Belisle Court - 2,140’ plus 20’ hammerhead (approx. 4,800 s.y.) each side to 2’; 162nd Ave. - 1,950’ plus RADII (approx. 4,363 s.y.) each side to 2’; and 90th St. - 700’ (approx. 1,556 s.y.) each side to 2’. For specific details, contact either Dave Waterman at 715-268-6471 or Rick Scoglio at 715-268-8108. Sealed bids are to be submitted by October 7, 2011, 5 p.m., to the Town Clerk at 612 U.S. Highway 8, Amery, WI 54001. Bids will be opened at the October 10, 2011, regular monthly meet547079 7L WNAXLP ing. Note: Prevailing wage requirements may apply.

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY GRANTSBURG SCHOOL DISTRICT September 15, 2011

Job Title: Qualifications:

Custodian at Grantsburg Elementary School High school diploma or equivalent (preference given to those with school maintenance and supervisory skills.) Hours: Full time, 12-month position, 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Requirements: The ideal candidate for this position will be highly professional, confident, and possess a great deal of energy and pride in workmanship. The person will have a sincere interest in children and be able to perform a wide array of duties while contributing to a nurturing learning environment. Must be able to work both collaboratively and independently, follow written and/or oral directions, and maintain good work habits. Excellent communication skills are a must. Having a proof of a stable work history will be essential. Responsibilities include daily cleaning and maintenance of the interior and exterior of the building. Position requires ability to utilize custodial equipment to perform duties, such as: stripping and resurfacing floors, dry mopping, vacuuming, dusting, cleaning rest rooms, snow removal and ability to stand for extended periods of time and safely lift 65 lbs. How to Apply: Send letter of application, resume, credentials (three current letters of recommendation and transcripts), and a copy of any pertinent licenses by September 30, 2011. Contact: Katie Coppenbarger, Principal Grantsburg Elementary School 475 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap. 546084 5-7L

NOTICE OF MEETING OF BOARD OF REVIEW TOWN OF MILLTOWN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Board of Review for the Town of Milltown, will meet at the MILLTOWN FIRE HALL, on SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2011, from 10 a.m. to Noon, for the purpose of reviewing and examining the assessment roll of the real estate and personal property therein, and correcting errors in said roll whether in description of property or otherwise and to perform such other duties as imposed by law. Please be advised on the following requirements to appear before the Board of Review and procedural requirements if appearing before the Board: No person shall be allowed to appear before the Board of Review to testify to the Board or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has refused a reasonable written request by certified mail of the assessor to view such property. After the first meeting of the Board of Review and before the board’s final adjournment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the Board of Review may contact, or provide information to a member of the Board about the person’s objection except at a session of the Board. No person may appear before the Board of Review, testify to the Board or contest the amount of assessment unless, at least 48 hours before the first meeting of the Board or at least 48 hours before the objection is heard if the objection is allowed because the person has been granted a waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent to file a written objection by appearing before the Board during the first two hours of the meeting and showing good cause for failure to meet the 48-hour notice requirement and files a written objection, that the person provides to the clerk of the Board of Review notice as to whether the person will be removed and the person’s reasonable estimate of the length of time the hearing will take. When appearing before the Board, the person shall specify, in writing, the person’s estimate of the value of the land and of the improvements that are the subject of the person objection and specify the information that the person used to arrive at the estimate. Virgil Hansen Town Clerk 566113 5-7L 47-49a,d WNAXLP Town of Milltown

NOTICE - SIREN SANITARY DISTRICT TOWN OF SIREN BOARD MEETINGS

The Siren Sanitary District will hold their monthly Board Meeting on Thursday, October 13, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Siren Town Hall. Immediately following the Sanitary District Meeting the Town of Siren will hold their monthly Board Meeting at approximately 6:45 p.m. The agenda will be posted. If you wish to be on the agenda, please call Mary Hunter, Clerk. Mary Hunter, Clerk, 715-349-5119 546771 6-7L WNAXLP

MILLTOWN PUBLIC LIBRARY

PART-TIME LIBRARY ASSISTANT AND YOUTH SERVICES POSITIONS INCLUDING NIGHTS AND WEEKENDS Candidates should have a strong background in youth services and enjoy working with the public. View the complete job description on the library’s Web site at www.milltownpubliclibrary.org. Submit cover letter, resume and references via e-mail to milltownpl@milltownpubliclibrary.org. Applications sent via traditional mail or delivered by hand will not be considered. Applications will be accepted until 5 p.m. Wednes547229 7L day, October 12, 2011.

ATV ORDINANCE TOWN OF LUCK, POLK COUNTY ORDINANCE #10 An Ordinance regulating the use of all-terrain vehicles within the Town of Luck, Polk County, State of Wisconsin, has been adopted pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes 23.33 (8)(b). The Town Board of the Town of Luck does ordain as follows: 1. That the following named roads in the town of Luck shall be designated as all-terrain vehicle routes, between those areas POSTED with all-terrain vehicle route signs; and that the roads must be properly signed as required in accordance of Wisconsin Administrative Code: NR64.12 (7) (C) for ATV travel and are not of the designed route until such signs are in place: AMENDMENT TO ORDINANCE #10 - ATV TRAVEL PER BOARD DECISION AT THE SEPTEMBER 22, 2011, TOWN BOARD MEETING: 120th St. from St. Rd. 48 to 300th Ave. 130th St. from 270th Ave. to 300th Ave. 135th St. from 270th Ave. to 280th Ave. 140th St. from St. Rd. 48 to 300th Ave. 143rd St. from 260th Ave. to Dead End. 145th St. from 240th Ave. to Chippewa Trail. 145th St. from 260th Ave. to Dead End. 150th St. from 240th Ave. to St. Rd. 35. 160th St. from St. Rd. 35 to 300th Ave. 163rd St. from 260th Ave. to 270th Ave. 166th St. Little Butternut Lake Ln. to Dead End. 170th St. from 240th Ave. to 300th Ave. 180th St. from 240th Ave. to 300th Ave. 240th Ave. from 120th St. to 180th St. Chippewa Trail from 120th St. to Village Limits. Little Butternut Lake Ln. from St. Rd. 35 to Dead End. 243rd Ave. from 150th St. to Dead End. 260th Ave. from St. Rd. 48 to 180th St. 270th Ave. from 120th St. to St. Rd. 35. 275th Ave. from 170th St. to 180th St. 280th Ave. from 130th St. to Dead End. 290th Ave. from 150th St. to 180th St. 293rd Ave. from 160th St. to 170th St. 300th Ave. from 160th St. to 180th St. 2. The speed limit shall be 25 miles per hour while operating on all Town of Luck gravel roads, and 25 miles per hour while operating on all Town of Luck paved roads. NOTE: State law restricts all-terrain vehicle speed to be 10 miles per hour within 150 feet of a dwelling at all times / 24 hrs. a day. 3. All-terrain vehicles shall operate on the extreme right side of the roadway and travel with the flow of traffic. 4. All-terrain vehicles shall be operated in single file. 5. All-terrain vehicle operators shall yield the right of way to all other vehicular traffic and pedestrians. 6. Headlights shall be turned on and in working order at all times while operating on designated town roadways. 7. No person shall operate an ATV on any designated route in the Town of Luck, unless that person operating the ATV is at least 16 years of age and is in the possession of a valid driver’s license. (A valid identification card is not a substitution for a driver’s license.) 8. Operators of all-terrain vehicles travel at their own risk, and the Town of Luck will not be liable for any damages or injuries to operators of all-terrain vehicles occurring in the Town of Luck. 9. The Polk County Sheriff’s Department is hereby designed as the law enforcement agency responsible for enforcing the provisions of this ordinance. 10. The penalty for violating any of the provisions of this Ordinance is the same as listed in S.23.33, Wisconsin Statutes, as adopted by reference. 11. This Ordinance shall be in effect upon passage and publication as provided by law and shall repeal and replace all previous all-terrain ordinances heretofore enacted by the Town of Luck. Should any section, clause or provision of this Ordinance be declared by the courts to be invalid, the same shall not affect the validity of the Ordinance as a whole or any part thereof, other than the part so declared to be invalid. APPROVED BY: TOWN BOARD OF THE TOWN OF LUCK AT SAID TIME Dean Johansen, Chairman Larry Wright, Supervisor Greg Marsten, Supervisor Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 547272 7-8L 49a WNAXLP

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING VARIANCE VILLAGE OF WEBSTER TAKE NOTICE THAT A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD AT THE VILLAGE OFFICE, 7505 MAIN STREET, WEBSTER, WISCONSIN, ON WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12, 2011, AT 6 P.M. For the purpose of the consideration of a zoning variance for Angie Heyer, for her residence located at 7475 Birch Street West, Webster, Wisconsin, Parcel #07-191-2-39-16-08-5 15042-182000. The property is zoned R1, Single-Family Residential District. The request is to build a deck 8’ x 16’. The Board will hear all interested persons, or their agents or attorneys, and thereafter will make a decision on the request. For additional information please contact: Patrice Bjorklund, Village Clerk 7505 Main Street West Webster, WI 54893 546730 6-7L WNAXLP Phone: 715-866-4211

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (REQUIRED BY 39 U.S.C. 3685) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9.

10. 11. 13. 14.

15.

Publication Title - Inter-County Leader Publication Number - 265-740 Filing Date - October 1, 2011 Issue Frequency - Weekly Number of Issues Published Annually - 52 Annual Subscription Price - $34.00 Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication - 303 North Wisconsin Avenue, Frederic, Polk County, WI 54837-0490. Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher - P.O. Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837-0490. Publisher - Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, 303 North Wisconsin Avenue, Frederic, WI 548370490. Editor - Gary B. King, 303 North Wisconsin Avenue, Frederic, WI 54837-0490, Managing Editor - Douglas Panek, 303 North Wisconsin Avenue, Frederic, WI 54837-0490. The Owner is Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, 303 North Wisconsin Avenue, Frederic, WI 54837-0490. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities - none. Publication Title - Inter-County Leader Issue Date for Circulation Data Below - 9-28-11 Actual Average No. No. Copies Copies Each of Single Issue Issue During Published Extent and Nature of Preceding 12 Nearest to Circulation Months Filing Date

a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run)........................................ 7,815 7,591 b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside The Mail) (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies).............. 2,483 2,553 (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS FORM 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies. . 2,326 2,313 (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, & Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®.......................................... 2,274 2,233 (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail®)...................................... 0 0 c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b(1), (2), (3) and (4)................... 7,083 7,099 d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail) (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541. . . 306 51 (2) Free or Nominal Rate InCounty Copies Included on PS Form 3541.......................... (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS (e.g. First-Class Mail)............ 0 0 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means)...................................... 56 56 e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)................................ 362 107 f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e).......................................... 7,445 7,206 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instruction to Publishers #4 (page #3)).................................. 385 385 h. Total (Sum of 15f and g)............... 7,830 7,591 j. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100)................................ 95.13% 98.52% 16. Publication of Statement of Ownership Will be printed in the October 5, 2011, issue of this publication. I certify that all information on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties). Douglas Panek Manager 547063 7L WNAXLP


PAGE 30 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: Isaiah Joseph Stauber To: Isaiah Joseph Morales Birth Certificate: Isaiah Joseph Stauber IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Polk County, State of Wisconsin, Molly E. GaleWyrick, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, October 12, 2011, 11:45 a.m. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 715-4859299 at least ten (10) working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. BY THE COURT: Molly E. GaleWyrick Circuit Court Judge September 12, 2011

NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING (Section 65.90 (4))

Notice is hereby given to the qualified electors of the School District of Siren, that the budget hearing will be held at the Siren School Auditorium, on the 10th day of October, 2011, at 6 o’clock p.m. The summary of the budget is printed below. Detailed copies of the budget are available for inspection in the Siren School District Office. Dated this 26th day of September, 2011. Molly Bentley, District Clerk

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF SIREN BUDGET PUBLICATION, 2011-2012 GENERAL FUND Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES Transfers-In (Source 100) Local Sources (Source 200) Interdistrict Payments (Source 300 + 400) Intermediate Sources (Source 500) State Sources (Source 600) Federal Sources (Source 700) All Other Sources (Source 800 + 900) TOTAL REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES Instruction (Function 100 000) Support Services (Function 200 000) Nonprogram Transactions (Function 400 000) TOTAL EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES SPECIAL PROJECTS FUNDS Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES DEBT SERVICE FUND Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES EXPENDITURES OTHER FINANCING USES FOOD SERVICE FUND Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES COMMUNITY SERVICE FUND Beginning Fund Balance Ending Fund Balance REVENUES & OTHER FINANCING SOURCES EXPENDITURES & OTHER FINANCING USES

AUDITED 2009 - 2010

UNAUDITED 2010 - 2011

BUDGET 2011 - 2012

1,616,255.07 1,557,000.76

1,557,000.76 1,423,603.32

1,423,603.32 1,373,603.32

0.00 3,865,220.87 193,857.00 5,406.94 1,598,932.02 535,066.19 35,656.92

0.00 4,195,934.53 214,058.000 8,212.00 1,557,130.61 537,631.59 101,673.34

0.00 3,830,844.00 208,441.00 4,368.00 1,386,495.00 472,202.00 77,650.00

6,234,139.94

6,614,640.07

5,980,000.00

2,936,535.49 2,524,002.05 832,856.71

3,179,391.69 2,631,866.91 936,778.91

2,673,778.00 2,322,036.00 1,034,186.00

6,293,394.25

6,748,037.51

6,030,000.00

0.00 0.00 1,060,740.08

0.00 15.80 1,089,436.73

15.80 0.00 1,094,767.00

1,060,740.08

1,089,420.93

1,094,782.80

136,697.47 131,745.14 664,990.17

131,745.14 124,039.95 1,323,496.79

124,039.95 113,539.95 774,531.00

671,942.50

1,331,201.98

785,031.00

86,933.90 81,065.81 303,647.19

81,065.81 79,104.48 277,493.16

79,104.48 39,104.48 293,275.00

309,515.28

279,454.49

333,275.00

6,829.52 2,411.73 40,089.55

2,411.73 1,625.83 44,211.00

1,625.83 1,625.83 57,788.00

44,507.34

44,996.90

57,788.00

Total Expenditures and Other Financing Uses ALL FUNDS GROSS TOTAL EXPENDITURES - ALL FUNDS 8,380,099.45 Interfund Transfers (Source 100) - ALL FUNDS 543,216.99 Refinancing Expenditures (FUND 30) 0.00 NET TOTAL EXPENDITURES - ALL FUNDS 7,836,882.46 PERCENTAGE INCREASE - NET TOTAL FUND EXPENDITURES FROM PRIOR YEAR PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX LEVY FUND General Fund 3,824,730.00 Referendum Debt Service Fund 664,938.00 Nonreferendum Debt Service Fund 0.00 Capital Expansion Fund 0.00 Community Service Fund 36,000.00 TOTAL SCHOOL LEVY 4,525,668.00 PERCENTAGE INCREASE TOTAL LEVY FROM PRIOR YEAR

9,493,111.81 603,482.01 606,760.03 8,282,869.77

8,300,876.80 652,203.00 0.00 7,648,673.80

5.69%

-7.66%

4,137,529.00 690,259.00 0.00 0.00 41,500.00 4,869,288.00

3,767,581.00 722,040.00 52,441.00 0.00 53,788.00 4,595,850.00 547213 7L WNAXLP 7.59% -5.62%

547001 7L

(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY EVERBANK, 8100 Nations Way Jacksonville, Florida 32256; Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN S. COWAN and ANA J. COWAN, husband and wife, 813 Superior Avenue Centuria, Wisconsin 54824; and WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, c/o Its President, 101 North Phillips Avenue Sioux Falls, South Dakota 57104; and ST. CROIX REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER, INC., c/o Steve J. Swanson, 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin 54024; Defendants. Case No. 11-CV-515 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 Honorable Molly E. GaleWyrick FORTY DAY SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO: BRIAN S. COWAN and ANA J. COWAN, husband and wife 813 Superior Avenue Centuria, WI 54824 AND 229 State Road 35 Dresser, WI 54009 You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after September 21, 2011, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Polk County Justice Center 1005 West Main Street Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to O’Dess and Associates, S.C., Plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is: O’Dess and Associates, S.C. 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, Wisconsin 53213 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer within 40 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff By: M. ABIGAIL O’DESS Bar Code No. 1017869 POST OFFICE ADDRESS: 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

NOTICE TOWN OF LUCK

BOARD MEETING Tues., Oct. 11, 7 p.m. Town Hall

Agenda: 1. Reading of the minutes 2. Treasurer’s Report 3. Review and pay bills 4. Patrolman’s report Any additional agenda will be posted in the Luck Town Hall and Clerk’s Office. Lloyd Nelson, Clerk 547227 7L

(Aug. 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb, Plaintiff, v. David T. Heuring, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 09 CV 953 Case Code: 30404 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered September 2, 2010, in the amount of $262,758.12, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described property at public auction as follows: DATE/TIME: October 13, 2011, at 10 a.m. PLACE: Foyer Area, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. DESCRIPTION: Parcel I: The North 660 feet of the Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 19, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, AND the North 660 feet of the Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 19, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, except that part lying East of West Church Rd., AND the South 660 feet of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 19, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, AND the South 660 feet of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 19, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, except that part lying East of West Church Road. Said land being in the Town of Alden, Polk County, Wis. Parcel II: The North 660 feet of the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 19, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, AND The North 660 feet of the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 19, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, except that part lying East of West Church Road. Said land being in the Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: N/A. Vacant land along West Church Road, Star Prairie, WI 54026. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you are currently in bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this letter is not an attempt to collect the debt from you personally. This letter serves only as notice of the commencement of a legal proceeding as required by the loan documents, state law and/or federal law. ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) 430 Second Street Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-3733 Attorneys for Plaintiff

WNAXLP

Case No. 11 CV 592

The regular Monthly Village Board Meeting will be held on Monday, October 10, 2011, at 7 p.m., at the Village Hall, 107 Hope Road W. Agenda will be posted at the Village Hall. Kristi Swanson Clerk

544572

Apply online at http://danburystcroixcasino.com/employment/apply/ or fill out an application at the Human Resources office Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. For more information, call 1-800-238-8946. 547247 7L 49a,b

Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing

NOTICE OF MEETING Village of Frederic

545835 WNAXLP

EVS Manager, Valet Staff and Valet Supervisor

By: (Petitioner) Maria Alyssa Ruth Morales

(Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION as Grantor Trustee of the Protium Master Grantor Trust c/o HomEq Servicing, as its attorney-in-fact, Plaintiff, vs. GARY L. SIGSWORTH and JUDY A. SIGSWORTH husband and wife, Defendants. Case No.: 10-CV-655 Code No.: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 25, 2011, in the amount of $130,866.53, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 1, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in part of government Lot 2, Section 30, Township 33 North, Range 16 West, Town of Lincoln, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the East 1/4 corner of said Section 30; thence, along the East line of said Section on an assumed bearing, South 01 degree 25 minutes 15 seconds East a distance of 1,375.94 feet to the Northwest corner of Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 749 as recorded in Volume 3, Page 241 of said Maps in said County; thence North 87 degrees 00 minutes 33 seconds West a distance of 491.07 feet to an iron pipe; thence, along said right of way, South 87 degrees 42 minutes 15 seconds West a distance of 170.00 feet to the point of beginning, this being an iron pipe on the Southerly right of way of Baker Street; thence South 04 degrees 08 minutes 04 seconds East a distance of 407.42 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 87 degrees 42 minutes 15 seconds West a distance of 150.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 01 degree 19 minutes 34 seconds West a distance of 405.66 feet to the said right of way of Baker Street; thence, continuing, North 01 degree 19 minutes 34 seconds West a distance of 61.25 feet to the North line of said Government Lot 2; thence, along last said North line, South 88 degrees 29 minutes 17 seconds East a distance of 126.80 feet; thence South 04 degrees 08 minutes 04 seconds East a distance of 63.26 feet to the point of beginning. The above described parcel is subject to said Baker Street (a Town Road). PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1114 Baker Ave., Town of Lincoln. TAX KEY NO.: 032-00903-0000. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 414-727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

545420 WNAXLP

THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE:

IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF ISAIAH JOSPEH STAUBER

WNAXLP

The Town of St. Croix Falls Plan Commission will hold a public hearing at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, October 12, 2011, at the Town Hall at 1305 200th Street and U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin. Written evidence, testimony or comments, if any, must be delivered in person or by mail to the town hall. Riegel Family Limited Partnership Request a SPECIAL EXCEPTION to rent their property for transient lodging in the Residential District. The property address is 1384 Hungerford Point Rd., St. Croix Falls, WI. The property is located in Section 25, the parcel number is 044-01057-0000. Jim Alt, Zoning Administrator 546783 6-7L WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY

546169

TOWN OF ST. CROIX FALLS Polk County, Wisconsin www.townofstcroixfalls.org PLAN COMMISSION NOTICE OF HEARING October 12, 2011

(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5)


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 31

MINUTES OF THE

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, by the Polk County Board of Supervisors that: 1. Polk County does declare its intent to join a multicounty consortium consistent with the requirements set forth in Act 32. 2. Polk County does declare its intent to participate in a multicounty consortium consisting of 10 counties, Barron, Douglas, Polk, Burnett, Washburn, St. Croix, Dunn, Pierce, Eau Claire and Chippewa. 3. Polk County hereby authorizes its County Administrator and Human Services Director to enter into and execute on behalf of Polk County any and all contracts or other documents necessary to create, form, authorize and/or operate the multicounty consortium of which Polk County will be a member. 4. Polk County hereby authorizes its County Administrator and Human Services Director to take any other actions necessary to effectuate the intent of this resolution. 5. The County Clerk shall send a certified copy of this resolution to the County Clerks of other member counties and to DHS for the approval of consortium membership. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: September 20, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by: Dana Frey, Bill Alleva, Russell E. Arcand, David Markert, Marvin Caspersen, Geri Christensen and Kris Hartung. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on September 20, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 44-11; Resolution To Proceed With And To Authorize Contracts To Form And To Join Income Maintenance Administration Multicounty Consortium, by a simple voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Res. 44-11 - Resolution To Proceed With And To Authorize Contracts To Form And To Join Income Maintenance Administration Multicounty Consortium. Motion (Christensen, Caspersen) to approve. Admin. Frey addressed the Resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 44-11, carried by voice vote. Resolution adopted.

POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS September 20, 2011 - 5:30 p.m.

Chairman Johnson called the meeting of the Polk County Board of Supervisors to order at 5:30 p.m. County Clerk informed the chair that notice of the agenda was properly posted in three public buildings, published in the county's legal paper and posted on the county Web site the week of Sept. 12, 2011. Corporation Counsel informed the Board that the same satisfied the notice requisites of the Open Meetings Law and County Board Rules of Order. Roll call was taken by the Clerk with 21 members present. Supvr. Stroebel was excused. Supvr. O'Connell was absent at roll call, but joined the meeting at 6:20 p.m. Chairman Johnson requested consideration of those items contained under the Consent Agenda: The Noticed Agenda and Confirmation of County Board Minutes from August 16, 2011. Motion (Jepsen/Kienholz) to approve those items included in the consent agenda, motion carried by unanimous voice vote. Community member Resser Adams led the prayer. Chairman led the Pledge of Allegiance. Time was given to Public comments, none offered. Administrator Frey presented his recommendation of the 2012 Budget, followed by questions and discussion. Chairman called for a 15-minute recess. Presentation by Marc Bowker from the Dept. of Transportation on the Highway 8 Corridor Project. 7:00 p.m. Chairman Johnson opened the Public Hearings on the Ordinance to Limit the Amount for Claims for Damages by Dogs to Certain Domestic Animals and the Final Supervisory District Plan. Chairman Johnson asked for any public comment, none was offered. 7:10 p.m. Chair announced the public hearings closed. Second Presentation by Sarah Pischer, from the Dept. of Tourism, on the Power of Tourism in Polk County. Chairman's Report was given by Wm. Johnson. Committee/Board Reports were cancelled.

RESOLUTION 44-11

RESOLUTION TO PROCEED WITH AND TO AUTHORIZE CONTRACTS TO FORM AND TO JOIN INCOME MAINTENANCE ADMINISTRATION MULTICOUNTY CONSORTIUM TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: WHEREAS, under current law, pursuant to Wis. Stat. § 49.78, the State Department of Health Services (DHS) has delegated certain duties and responsibilities related to the administration of the Income Maintenance program to counties; and WHEREAS, under current law, Wis. Stats. § 46.031 and 49.78 require Polk County to enter into a contract with DHS for the provision of Income Maintenance program administration services; and WHEREAS, as part of the Governor's budget proposal for the 2011-13 biennium, 2011 Assembly Bill 40, the Governor proposed that starting in calendar year 2012, responsibility for administration of the Income Maintenance program be transferred from counties to DHS; and WHEREAS, counties across Wisconsin registered objections to the Governor's proposal and offered an alternative whereby counties would work cooperatively in creating regional consortia, which would be responsible for Income Maintenance Program administration services; and WHEREAS, the counties offered the Legislature an alternative to the Governor's complete DHS takeover of Income Maintenance program administration, which proposal allowed, among other things, for the creation of consortia over the course of the 2011-13 biennium and a gradual phase in of consortia-based contracts to replace the individual county contracts for Income Maintenance program administration; and WHEREAS, the Legislature's Joint Committee on Finance accepted the counties' alternative proposal, in part, and rejected the complete DHS takeover of Income Maintenance program administration services; and WHEREAS, the adopted 2011-13 State of Wisconsin Biennial Budget, 2011 Wisconsin Act 32, modifies current law relating to the authorization for DHS to enter into contracts with individual counties in relation to Income Maintenance program administration services and instead authorizes the formation of county-based regional consortia and further authorizes the consortia to enter into a contract with DHS related to the provision of the services; and WHEREAS, Act 32 specifically provides that each county with a population of less than 750,000 shall participate in a multicounty consortium that is approved by the Department and that by October 31, 2011, the DHS shall approve multicounty consortia; and WHEREAS, ACT 32 further provides that DHS may not approve more than 10 multicounty consortia; and WHEREAS, Act 32 further provides that if a county with a population of less than 750,000 does not participate in a multicounty consortium or DHS determines that a multicounty consortium does not satisfy the DHS's performance requirements, DHS shall assume responsibility for administering income maintenance programs in that county or in the geographical area of the multicounty consortium; and WHEREAS, Act 32 further provides that, without regard to whether a county chooses to allow DHS to take over Income Maintenance program administration services or join a consortium that will provide the services, Polk County is required to maintain a tax levy contribution to the system at an amount not less than the amount contributed in 2009; and WHEREAS, as a result of Act 32, Polk County is faced with a choice of either fully relinquishing all responsibility for Income Maintenance program administration services to DHS or joining a multicounty consortium consistent with the requirements established in Act 32; and WHEREAS, Polk County believes it to be in the best interests of the citizens of Polk County to join a multicounty consortium related to the provision of Income Maintenance program administration services consistent with the requirements established in Act 32 and which consists of 10 counties which surrounds Polk County (Barron, Douglas, Polk, Burnett, Washburn, St. Croix, Dunn, Pierce, Eau Claire and Chippewa); and WHEREAS, joining a multicounty consortium for purposes of the provision of Income Maintenance program administration services will require that Polk County enter into a contract or series of contracts with the such other counties that make up the consortium; and WHEREAS, the contracts with other counties will establish, among other things, the following: (1) financial responsibility for the consortium; (2) financial accountability among consortium members; (3) individual county responsibilities related to the provision of services; (4) methods for service level accountability among consortium members; and (5) overall responsibility for the contract that will be entered into by and among the multicounty consortium and DHS; and WHEREAS, the intent of this resolution is to declare the intent of Polk County to join a multicounty consortium consistent with the requirements set forth in Act 32, comprised of the 10 counties of Barron, Douglas, Polk, Burnett, Washburn, St. Croix, Dunn, Pierce, Eau Claire and Chippewa; and WHEREAS, it is further the intent of this resolution to authorize the Polk County Administrator and Human Services Director to enter into on behalf of Polk County any and all contracts or other documents necessary to create, form, authorize, and/or operate such a multicounty consortium of which Polk County will be a member; and WHEREAS, this resolution shall be interpreted liberally in favor of authorizing the County Administrator and Human Services Director to take all actions necessary to effectuate the intent of this resolution.

ORDINANCE NO. 40-11

ORDINANCE TO LIMIT AMOUNT ALLOWED FOR CLAIMS FOR DAMAGES BY DOGS TO CERTAIN DOMESTIC ANIMALS (WISCONSIN STATUTE § 174.11(5)) TO THE HONORABLE SUPERVISORS OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF THE COUNTY OF POLK: WHEREAS, § 174.11, Wis. Stats., permits persons who have claims for damages by dogs to certain domestic animals to bring such claims against the County Dog License Fund; and WHEREAS, § 174.11(4), Wis. Stats., requires the County Board to allow the fair market value of the domestic animal as the amount of the claim for domestic animals killed by a dog; and WHEREAS, § 174.11(4), Wis. Stats., requires that the County Board allow the costs of the injury to a domestic animal, including any loss of fair market value, but not to exceed the fair market value of the domestic animal, as the amount of the claim for a domestic animal injured or killed by a dog; and WHEREAS, § 174.11(5), Wis. Stats., authorizes the County Board to establish the maximum amount that may be allowed for a claim under § 174.11, Wis. Stats., regardless of fair market value; and WHEREAS, the County of Polk has designated the Arnell Humane Society to provide a pound for collecting, caring for and disposing of dogs; and WHEREAS, § 174.09(2), Wis. Stats., provides that in counties that have designated county humane society that moneys in the Dog License Fund may pay for the county's expenses incurred in administering the dog license law and the expenses incurred by a humane society designated by the county in collecting, caring for and disposing of dogs; and WHEREAS, § 174.09(2), Wis. Stats., further provides that after paying such expenses incurred by the county and the county-designated humane society, the amount remaining in the Dog License Fund shall be available for and may be used as far as necessary for paying claims allowed by the county to the owners of domestic animals because of damages done by dogs during the license year for which the taxes were paid; and WHEREAS, § 174.09(2), Wis. Stats., further provides that any surplus in excess of $1,000 which may remain from the dog license taxes of any license year shall on March 1 of the succeeding year be paid by the county treasurer to the county humane society designated by the county board to provide a pound. WHEREAS, unlimited claims under § 174.11, Wis. Stats., could exhaust the Dog License Fund. NOW, THEREFORE, that pursuant to § 174.11(5), Wis. Stats., the Polk County Board of Supervisors does ordain as follows: Section 1: Purpose: This ordinance limits the amount that the Polk County Board of Supervisors may allow for claims that are processed for damages by dogs to certain domestic animals pursuant to § 174.11(5), Wis. Stats, and as amended hereafter by the Wisconsin Legislature. Section 2: Limitation: The maximum amount that may be allowed for a claim for damages by dogs to domestic animals, including loss of fair market value, injury or death, under § 174.11, Wis. Stats. shall be limited to $1,000.00 per claim, regardless of the number of domestic animals that may be injured or killed in the incident or occurrence that gave rise to the claim.

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Section 3: Treatment of Multiple Claims Arising from Single Incident: In the event that more than one claim for damages is presented for the injury or death of domesticated animals in which such claims all arose out of the same incident or occurrence, the Polk County Board of Supervisors shall treat such multiple claims as one claim. Said claim shall be limited by Section 2, regardless of the multiplicity of claims filed. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Date of Public Hearing: September 20, 2011. Effective date: Upon Passage and Publication. Date Submitted to County Board: September 20, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by the Polk County Agriculture and Extension Education Committee: Herschel Brown. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on September 20, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled ordinance, Ordinance No. 4011; Ordinance to Limit Amount Allowed For Claims For Damages By Dogs to Certain Domestic Animals (Wisconsin Statute § 174.11(5)), by a simple unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Ordinance No. 40-11 - Ordinance To Limit Amount Allowed For Claims For Damages By Dogs To Certain Domestic Animals (Wisconsin Statute 174.11(5) Motion (Jepsen/D. Johansen) to approve. Supvr. D. Johansen addressed the Ordinance. Motion to approve Ordinance No. 40-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Ordinance adopted.


PAGE 32 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

RESOLUTION 45-11

Res. 46-11 - Resolution To Adopt Final Supervisory District Plan. Motion (Brown/Kienholz) to approve. Clerk Carole Wondra addressed the Resolution. Motion (Jepsen/Kienholz) to amend Resolution 46-11, by renumbering a portion of the newly assigned supervisory district numbers. The changes would be: District 15 to 16; District 16 to 17; District 17 to 18; District 18 to 19; District 19 to 20; District 20 to 21; and District 21 to 15. Motion to approve amendment to Resolution 46-11, carried by voice vote. Motion to approve amended Resolution 46-11 carried by voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION TO CHANGE DESIGNATION FOR PERSONS AUTHORIZED TO REQUEST COVERAGE UNDER LEGAL EXPENSE ENDORSEMENT OF THE WISCONSIN COUNTY MUTUAL INSURANCE CORPORATION LIABILITY POLICY TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: WHEREAS, the County of Polk maintains a liability policy through Wisconsin County Mutual Insurance Corporation (WCMIC); and WHEREAS, said liability policy contains an endorsement, Legal Expense Endorsement (WCMIC-23 (10/04)) that allows the County of Polk to utilize WCMIC financial resources for certain legal expenses that are unrelated to claims against the County thereby reducing the cost to the County on the outlay toward legal expenses; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Resolution 34-06, the Polk County Board of Supervisors designated certain authorized persons to request coverage on behalf the County of Polk as provided under the Legal Expense Endorsement; and WHEREAS, it is appropriate to update the previous designation required under the Legal Expense endorsement. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors designates the following county officers as authorized designees for the purposes of requesting utilization of the legal expense endorsement on behalf of the County of Polk. Signatures Of Authorized Designees As Required By The Endorsement: Dana Frey, County Administrator Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Resolution 34-06 is hereby repealed. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: September 20, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by the Personnel Committee: Russell E. Arcand, Patricia Schmidt, Ken Sample, Warren Nelson and James Edgell. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on September 20, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 45-11; Resolution To Change Designation For Persons Authorized To Request Coverage Under Legal Expense Endorsement Of The Wisconsin County Mutual Insurance Corporation Liability Policy, by a simple unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Res. 45-11 - Resolution To Change Designation For Persons Authorized To Request Coverage Under Legal Expense Endorsement Of The Wisconsin County Mutual Insurance Corporation Liability Policy. Motion (Masters/Edgell) to approve. Supvr. Masters addressed the Resolution. Motion to approve Resolution 45-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

AMENDED RESOLUTION 47-11 RESOLUTION TO ADOPT THE GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE CONCERNING EMPLOYEE TERMINATIONS, EMPLOYEE DISCIPLINE AND WORKPLACE SAFETY AS REQUIRED BY WIS. STAT. § 66.0509(1M) WORKPLACE DISCIPLINE AND SAFETY APPEAL POLICY TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: WHEREAS, 2011 Wisconsin Act 10 created Wis. Stat. § 66.0509(1m), which requires local units of government to establish a civil service system or grievance procedure that addresses employee terminations, employee discipline and workplace safety no later than October 1, 2011; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors believes that it is in the best interests of all stakeholders in Polk County government to create a fair and equitable system for resolving employee grievances surrounding terminations, discipline and workplace safety issues; and WHEREAS, following lengthy study and deliberations, the Transition Committee and the Personnel Committee have presented to the Polk County Board of Supervisors with a final draft of a grievance procedure that addresses employee terminations, employee discipline and workplace safety as required by Wis. Stat. § 66.0509(1m); and WHEREAS, it is the intent of this resolution to establish the attached Workplace Safety and Discipline and Safety Appeal Policy as the official Grievance Procedure of Polk County pursuant to Wis. Stat. § 66.0509(1m); and WHEREAS, existing policies contain language that is inconsistent with the grievance appeal procedure; and WHEREAS, it is the intent of the Polk County Board of Supervisors to eventually have a uniform personnel policy. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopts and establishes the Grievance Procedure Workplace Discipline and Safely Appeal Policy attached hereto as Exhibit A as its grievance procedure required by Wis. Stat. § 66.0509(1m), notwithstanding any inconsistent language contained in current policies. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors repeals the following policies: Policy 205 - Probation, Policy 395 - Severance Package for "At-Will" Polk County Employees, Policy 716 Employee Discipline, and Policy 781 - Appeals Procedure, and strikes the inconsistent language in current personnel policies as attached hereto as Exhibit B. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Date Submitted to County Board: September 20, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by Transition Committee: Brian Masters. Submitted and sponsored by the Personnel Committee: Russell E. Arcand, Patricia Schmidt, Ken Sample, Warren Nelson and James Edgell. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed, recommended and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on September 20, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 47-11; Resolution To Adopt The Grievance Procedure Concerning Employee Terminations, Employee Discipline And Workplace Safety As Required By Wis. Stat. §66.0509(1m) Workplace Discipline And Safety Appeal Policy, by a simple unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011

RESOLUTION 46-11

RESOLUTION TO ADOPT FINAL COUNTY SUPERVISORY DISTRICT PLAN TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: WHEREAS, every ten years the United States Census Bureau conducts a census of the population and provides population counts to local municipalities; and WHEREAS, the State of Wisconsin delivered detailed population data and block level maps to Polk County on March 25, 2011; and WHEREAS, pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 59.10(3)(b) 1., the Polk County Board of Supervisors conducted a public hearing on the temporary supervisory district plan, adopted a tentative supervisory district plan and transmitted the tentative supervisory district plan to each municipal governing body in Polk County; WHEREAS, each municipality of Polk County has reviewed said temporary supervisory district plan and adjusted its wards as required by Wisconsin Statute Section 5.15; and WHEREAS, Wisconsin Statutes Section 59.10(3)(b) 2. requires counties, within 60 days of receiving the municipal ward plans, to hold a public hearing and then adopt a final county supervisory district plan; and WHEREAS, after giving due and proper notice, the Polk County Board of Supervisors conducted a public hearing on the proposed final county supervisory district plan; and WHEREAS, the proposed final county supervisory district plan contains supervisory districts which are substantially equal in population. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopts the final county supervisory district plan, attached to and incorporated herein this resolution. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes Section 59.10(3)(b) 4., the Chair of the Board of Supervisors file a certified copy of the final county supervisory district plan with the Secretary of State. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the County Clerk provide copies of the final county supervisory district plan and final municipal ward plan to each municipality in County. Funding amount: N/A. Funding source: N/A. Date Finance Committee Advised: N/A. Finance Committee Recommendation: N/A. Effective date: Upon Passage. Date Submitted to County Board: September 20, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by Herschel Brown and William Johnson. Reviewed and recommended by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on September 20, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 46-11; Resolution To Adopt Final County Supervisory District Plan, by a simple voice vote. Dated: Sept. 22, 2011 William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: Sept. 23, 2011 Resolution was amended by changing the map numbers for the districts. See attached for new numbering.

WORKPLACE SAFETY AND DISCIPLINE AND SAFETY APPEAL POLICY I. PURPOSE A. This policy serves as the grievance policy pursuant to Wis. Stat. § 66.0509(1m) to address employee terminations, employee discipline and workplace safety as required by law. An Employee shall use this grievance policy for resolving disputes regarding employee terminations, employee discipline or workplace safety issues covered by this policy. The procedures contained herein shall hereinafter be referred to as “grievances appeals." B. If an employee is subject to a contractual or statutory grievance procedure, that procedure must be followed as applicable. For example, the Employees that are deputy sheriffs will continue to be governed by Wisconsin Statute § 59.25 and whatever additional protections, if any, exist in an applicable collective bargaining agreement. C. It is the policy of the Employer to treat all employees with fairly and this grievance policy is intended to be one of the tools given to the employees in that effort. II. DEFINITIONS A. "Employee" for purposes of an grievance appeal involving discipline or termination means a regular full-time or part-time employee. "Employee" does not include any of the following: elected officials or officers that serve at the pleasure of an appointing authority as provided by statute; limited-term employees; independent contractors; temporary employees; employees who have not completed at least six (6) months of continuous employment with the County. B. "Discipline" is defined as any of the following adverse employment actions: disciplinary suspension of employment without pay; disciplinary reduction in rank or demotion. "Discipline" does not include any of the following actions: terminations, layoffs, workforce reduction; nondisciplinary wage, benefit or salary adjustments; nondisciplinary reductions in rank or demotions; plans of corrective action; performance evaluations; verbal or written warnings; verbal or written reprimands; administrative leave; change in assignment or job duties and a change in schedule or location of job duties. C. "Termination" means a separation from employment initiated by the employer for disciplinary or performance reasons. "Termination" does not include layoffs, furloughs or reduction in workforce, reduction in hours, job transfer or reassignment, or retirement. D. "Workplace Safety" includes any condition of employment related to the physical health and safety, including the safety of the physical work environment, the safe operation of the workplace equipment and tools, etc. "Workplace Safety" does not include conditions of employment unrelated to physical health and safety matters, including, but not limited to, hours, overtime and work schedules.

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III. GRIEVANCE APPEAL PROCEDURE FOR DISCIPLINE AND TERMINATION A. Filing Procedure 1. Who May File - An grievance appeal may only be filed by an "employee" who is the subject of the Discipline or Termination. 2. Initiating An Grievance Appeal - An Employee may initiate a Grievance Appeal by presenting a written grievance appeal on the form attached to this policy as Appendix A to the Employee Relations Director within fifteen (15) calendar days of the event giving rise to the Grievance Appeal. The form must be filled out completely to be considered filed.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 33 3. If the Grievance Appeal is incomplete the Employee Relations Director or his or her designee shall inform the Grievant Appellant of the defect and shall allow the Grievant Appellant seven (7) calendar days to remedy the defect. Failure to correct the defect or failure to comply with the time frames listed shall constitute a waiver of the right to access this Grievance procedure. The Employee Relations Director shall not have the discretion to waive the time limits herein contained. 4. If the Grievance Appeal was untimely or incomplete and not remedied, the Grievant Appellant may seek a review by the Personnel Committee of the rejection of the Grievance Appeal by the Emplo-yee Relations Director. The Personnel Committee will only determine whether there are extreme circumstances that rendered compliance with the time frames unduly burdensome. Such exceptions to the filing requirements shall be construed narrowly. The decision of the Personnel Committee on this issue shall be final. A failure by the Employee to follow the time lines herein required constitutes a waiver by the Employee of their right to access this Grievance Procedure and an abandonment of the Grievance Appeal. 5. By filing and signing the Grievance Appeal the Employee is declaring under penalty of false swearing that the information contained within the Grievance Appeal is true and correct to the Employee's belief. Any Employee who files an grievance appeal that is false or misleading or is filed for the purpose of intimidation, annoyance or harassment or who otherwise files an grievance appeal in bad faith is subject to disciplinary action. B. Impartial Hearing Officer 1. Selection of the Officer - The Impartial Hearing Officer shall be selected from a panel of three (3) designated by the Employee Relations Director, based upon the nature of the matter in dispute. This shall occur as soon as reasonably possible. Once the Employee Relations Director has provided the three (3) names, the Employee shall make a selection within ten (10) calendar days. If that Officer is unable for any reason to fulfill his or her role this step shall be repeated until an Officer is selected. 2. Role of the Officer - The Impartial Hearing Officer conducts the Hearing and may limit the scope of the Hearing by defining the issues, identifying areas of agreement and to hear the parties respective arguments. The Impartial Hearing Officer may at his or her discretion attempt to mediate the dispute prior to the date set for the Hearing. 3. Cost - The Employer shall be responsible for the cost of the Impartial Hearing Officer. C. Hearing 1. Time frame - The Impartial Hearing Officer will be to set a hearing date within forty-five (45) calendar days from the date of his or her selection. This time frame can be expanded for good cause at the discretion of the Hearing Officer or by mutual agreement of the parties, but in no case may the time frame go beyond ninety (90) calendar days from the date of his or her selection. 2. Discovery - Depending upon the complexity of the issues, discovery may be authorized by the Hearing Officer. It is expected that the parties will voluntarily and in good faith share information without needing to seek authorization to engage in formal discovery. Formal discovery, if required, shall consist of interrogatories and Requests for Production of Documents. All formal discovery, if required, must be provided no later than seven (7) calendar days prior to the sche-duled hearing date. The parties shall provide a list of anticipated witnesses within the same time frame contained in this subsection. 3. The Grievant Appellant may call witnesses and present testimony and exhibits that are relevant to the events at issue in the Grievance Appeal. The Employer may choose to cross-examine the Grievant’ Appellant’s witnesses. The Employer may choose to call witnesses and present testimony and exhibits that are relevant to the events at issue in the Grievance Appeal. The Hearing Officer may also question any witness he or she deems necessary. 4. Rules of Evidence - The Impartial Hearing Officer is not bound by rules of evidence any may admit all evidence that the Officer determines is reliable and relevant. The Officer may limit evidence that is unduly repetitious. The Hearing Officer shall recognize the rules of privilege, unless waived by the appropriate party. 5. Representation - The Employer and/or the Employee may choose to be represented. The Representative does not need to be an attorney. 6. Briefs - There shall be no briefs submitted by either party; however, each party may choose to submit a two-page summary of their position in lieu of closing oral arguments of the parties. 7. Recording the Hearing - The Hearing shall be recorded. Any party wishing to have the recording transcribed shall bear the cost of the transcription. 8. Decorum - The Impartial Hearing Officer shall maintain order and decorum at all times during the hearing. 9. Closed Hearing - The Hearing shall be closed unless the Employee requests an open hearing. 10. Burden of Proof - Except for an Grievance Appeal involving termination of an employee that is subject to Wis. Admin. Code Chap. DHS 5, the Grievant Appellant bears the burden of proof to persuade the Impartial Hearing Officer by clear, convincing and satisfactory evidence that the Employer abused its discretion in disciplining or terminating the Grievant Appellant. In determining whether this burden has been met, the Hearing Officer shall consider whether there was a rational basis for the discipline or termination. 11. Decision - The Impartial Hearing Officer shall issue a written decision within seven (7) calendar days of the close of the evidence. The decision shall, at a minimum, contain a statement of issues, standard of review, findings and, if the grievance appeal is sustained, a remedy for the Employee. 12. Remedies for Appeals Involving Terminations Grievances - If the grievance appeal is sustained, the Hearing Officer may award the Grievant Appellant one of the following remedies: a) Reinstatement, with or without a suspension b) Reinstatement with a lesser employment action such as a reduction in rank and/or base pay; demotion; oral or written reprimand c) Reinstatement with actual back pay 13. Remedies for Appeals Involving Discipline Grievances - The Hearing Officer may award one of the following remedies: a) Reduction in suspension b) Reduction in base pay and/or rank, demotion c) Oral or written reprimand in lieu of a suspension d) No adverse employment action IV. GRIEVANCE APPEAL PROCEDURE FOR WORKPLACE SAFETY A. Conditions Precedent to Filing a Workplace Safety Grievance Appeal 1. An Employee may not file an grievance appeal relating to a condition that the employee believes constitutes a Workplace Safety violation unless the Employee has first reported the condition to their immediate supervisor and/or the Employee Relations Director in writing.

2. Upon receipt of the notice under paragraph 1, the Employer shall have ten (10) calendar days in which to investigate the condition and advise the Employee in writing that the Employer: has determined that the condition does not constitute a Workplace Safety violation and will not be taking corrective action; or will be taking corrective action in accordance with the law to address the condition. If the Employer advises the Employee in writing within ten (10) calendar days that it is taking corrective action in accordance with law, no Grievance Appeal under this subsection may be initiated. B. Action by Safety Committee 1. If the Employer determines that the condition does not constitute a Workplace Safety violation, the Employee Relations Director shall immediately notify the Chair of the Safety Committee. 2. The Chair shall call a meeting of the Committee as soon as practicable. The Employee shall be given notice of the meeting in addition to the notice required under the Open Meetings Law. The Committee shall have the authority to review the matter and provide a resolution to the matter as it deems appropriate, as appropriate under County Policy. C. Initiating an Grievance Appeal relating to Workplace Safety 1. An Employee may initiate an Grievance Appeal under this subsection by presenting a written complaint on the form attached to this Policy as Appendix B to the Employee Relations Director within seven (7) calendar days from the Employee's receipt of notice contemplated under subsection IVA from the Employer that it will not be taking corrective action. 2. The Grievance Appeal must be signed and dated by the Employee and must be complete. If it is determined by the Employee Relations Director that the Grievance Appeal is not complete the procedure under III A 3 & 4 shall apply. D. Impartial Hearing Officer 1. Selection of the Officer - The Impartial Hearing Officer shall be selected from a panel of three (3) designated by the Employee Relations Director, based upon the nature of the matter in dispute. This shall occur as soon as reasonably possible. Once the Employee Relations Director has provided the three (3) names, the Employee shall make a selection within ten (10) calendar days. If that Officer is unable for any reason to fulfill his or her role this step shall be repeated until an officer is selected. 2. Role of the Officer - The Impartial Hearing Officer conducts the Hearing and may limit the scope of the Hearing by defining the issues, identifying areas of agreement and to hear the parties respective arguments. The Impartial Hearing Officer may at his or her discretion attempt to mediate the dispute prior to the date set for the Hearing. 3. Cost - The Employer shall be responsible for the cost of the Impartial Hearing Officer. E. Hearing Procedure 1. Time frame - The Impartial Hearing Officer will be to set a hearing date within twenty (20) calendar days from the date of his or her selection. This time frame can be expanded for good cause at the discretion of the Hearing Officer or by mutual agreement of the parties, but in no case may the time frame go beyond thirty-five (35) calendar days from the date of his or her selection. 2. Discovery - Depending upon the complexity of the issues, discovery may be authorized by the Hearing Officer. It is expected that the parties will voluntarily and in good faith share information without needing to seek authorization to engage in formal discovery. Formal discovery, if required, shall consist of Interrogatories and Requests for Production of Documents. All formal discovery, if required, must be provided no later than seven (7) calendar days prior to the scheduled hearing date. The parties shall provide a list of anticipated witnesses within the same time frame contained in this subsection. 3. The Employer shall present evidence and call witnesses, subject to cross-examination by the Employee. The Employee may present evidence and call witnesses, subject to cross-examination by the Employer. 4. Rules of Evidence - The Impartial Hearing Officer is not bound by rules of evidence any may admit all evidence that the Officer determines is reliable and relevant. The Officer may limit evidence that is unduly repetitious. The Hearing Officer shall recognize the rules of privilege, unless waived by the appropriate party. 5. Representation - The Employer and/or the Employee may choose to be represented. The Representative does not need to be an attorney. 6. Briefs - There shall be no briefs submitted by either party; however, each party may choose to submit a two-page summary of their position in lieu of closing oral arguments of the parties. 7. Recording the Hearing - The Hearing shall be recorded. Any party wishing to have the recording transcribed shall bear the cost of the transcription. 8. Decorum - The Impartial Hearing Officer shall maintain order and decorum at all times during the hearing. 9. Burden of Proof - The Employer bears the burden of proving by a preponderance of the evidence that the condition identified by the Employee does not constitute a Workplace Safety violation and that no corrective action is required. 10. Decision - The Impartial Hearing Officer shall issue a written decision within seven (7) calendar days of the close of the evidence. The decision shall, at a minimum, contain a statement of issues, standard of review, findings and, if the grievance appeal is sustained, a remedy for the Employee. 11. Remedies - If the Grievance Appeal under this subsection is sustained, the Impartial Hearing Officer may issue an order requiring the County to take corrective action. The Hearing Officer may not order a particular kind of corrective action.

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V. FINAL APPEAL TO COUNTY BOARD OF DISCIPLINE, TERMINATION AND WORKPLACE SAFETY GRIEVANCES APPEAL DECISIONS A. Requesting an Final Appeal - An final appeal may be initiated by filing a request to the Employee Relations Director on the form attached as Appendix C within seven (7) calendar days of the date of the decision of the Impartial Hearing Officer. Failure to file the request within the deadline constitutes a waiver of the right to an final appeal. B. County Board Final Appeal - When the Employee Relations Director receives a timely request, he or she shall forward the final appeal to the County Board Chair along with a copy of the Hearing Record, including the audio recording. The Chair shall schedule a meeting to review the Record and the Hearing Officer's decision. The County Board may not take new evidence and is only to conduct a review of the Record. C. Standard of Review - The County Board shall only overturn the decision of the Independent Hearing Officer if the Officer abused his or her discretion and rendered a decision that is arbitrary, oppressive or unreasonable. D. Remedies on Final Appeal in Termination and Discipline Cases - If the County Board overturns the Hearing Officer's decision, the matter goes back to the Hearing Officer for reconsideration of his or her decision consistent with the findings made by the County Board.


PAGE 34 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Notices/Employment Opportunities (Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. ROBERT H. DAHL, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 10 CV 634 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 21, 2011, in the amount of $151,398.45, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 26, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lots 15, 16, 17 and 18, Block 2, Plat of Wanderoos, said Plat being a part of the North 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4 of Section 32, Township 33, Range 17 West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1623 68th Ave., Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 024-01206-0000. Dated this 8th day of August, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 275652

544889 WNAXLP

Case No. 11CV96 Code: 304040 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered in the above-entitled action on May 12, 2011, in the amount of $199,196.72, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, in said County, on the 16th day of November, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lot 1 of CSM #3601 recorded in Volume 16 of CSM, Pg. 114, Doc. #627837, located in part of the NE 1/4 of NE 1/4, Section 23, Township 32 North, Range 17 West, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1318 30th Avenue, Amery, Wis. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check upon confirmation of sale. Dated this 19th day of September, 2011. /s/Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Attorney Christine A. Gimber WELD, RILEY, PRENN & RICCI, S.C. 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway P.O. Box 1030 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715-839-7786 Attorneys for Plaintiff This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose

(Sept. 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY RURAL AMERICAN BANKLUCK, Plaintiff, vs. MERALD J. SAGNES and BONNIE R. SAGNES, and U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, ND, Defendants. Case No. 11 CV 159 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on April 25, 2011, in the amount of $207,432.53, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front Entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin, on Thursday, October 27, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot 22, Plat of Rollingwood Shores, said plat located in the North Half of the Southeast Quarter (N1/2 of SE1/4), and the South Half of Northeast Quarter (S1/2 of NE1/4), Section 31, Township 36 North, Range 18 West, Polk County, Wisconsin. PIN: 030-01005-2200. STREET ADDRESS: 2463 232nd Street, Cushing, WI 54006. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 29th day of August, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

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(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WESTCONSIN CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. APRIL A. SPURRELL, NATHAN A. SPURREL, Defendants.

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STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. KENNETH ROBERT LARSON, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 09 CV 220 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 6, 2009, in the amount of $195,237.31, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: November 23, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin . DESCRIPTION: The South 228 feet of the West 365 feet of the Southwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 33 North, Range 15 West. Said land being in the Town of Clayton, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 499 115th Ave., Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 016-00096-0000. Dated this 15th day of September, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 277249

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(Oct. 5, 12, 19, 26, Nov. 2, 9)

NOTICE FOR ANNUAL DISTRICT MEETING (Section 120.08(1))

Notice Is Hereby Given To Qualified Electors Of The School District Of Siren, That The Annual Meeting Of Said District For The Transaction Of Business, Will Be Held At The Siren School Auditorium, On The 10th Day Of Oct., 2011, At 6:30 o’clock. Molly Bentley, District Clerk 546737 6-7L

(Sept. 21, 28, Oct. 5) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH J. BERGMAN Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 66 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for information administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth January 27, 1949, and date of death July 2, 2011, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 1526 - 155th Street, Centuria, WI 54824. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is December 23, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wis., Room 500. /s/ Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar 715-485-9238 September 13, 2011 Christine A. Rasmussen 103 North Knowles Avenue New Richmond, WI 54017 715-246-2211 Bar No. 1048961

Continued from previous page E. Remedies on Final Appeal in Workplace Safety Cases - The County Board may immediately require the Employer to take corrective action according to law. F. The decision of the County Board is final.

nonunion employees affected by the imposition of Wisconsin Act 10 for the remainder of the calendar year 2011 only. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this temporary pay equity adjustment also be effective retroactively to the imposition date of Wisconsin Act 10. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the cost of this temporary pay equity adjustment may be proportionately increased or decreased so as to equal the savings to the County from the imposition of Wisconsin Act 10 for calendar year 2011. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the amount of this temporary pay equity adjustment may not exceed the increase in pension contribution by any individual employee. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that said adjustment shall be budget neutral and without an increase to the budgeted personnel costs of the County for 2011. Funding amount and source: 2011 Departmental Budgets/Actual Cost of Temporary Pay Equity Adjustment, (estimated general revenues $67,014). Date Finance Committee Advised: September 7, 2011. Finance Committee Recommendation: Passage. Effective date: Retroactive to effective date of 2011 Wisconsin Act 10. Date Submitted to County Board: September 20, 2011. Submitted and sponsored by the Personnel Committee: Russell E. Arcand, Patricia Schmidt, Ken Sample, Warren Nelson and James Edgell. Reviewed only by: Dana Frey, County Administrator. Reviewed and approved as to form by: Jeffrey B. Fuge, Corporation Counsel. At its regular business meeting on September 20, 2011, the Polk County Board of Supervisors adopted the above-entitled resolution, Resolution 48-11; Resolution To Authorize A One-Time Temporary Equity Pay Adjustment To Nonrepresented Employees, by a simple unanimous voice vote. William Johnson IV, County Board Chairperson. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Attest: Carole Wondra, Polk County Clerk. Dated: Sept. 28, 2011 Res. 48-11 - Resolution To Authorize A One-Time Equity Pay Adjustment To Nonrepresented Employees. Motion to approve Resolution 48-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted. Supervisors Reports were given. Motion (Sample/Voelker) to adjourn. Motion carried. Meeting adjourned 8:43 p.m.

Note: Nothing in this Grievance Policy should be interpreted to create a contractual relationship between the County and any employee. Unless specifically required otherwise by statute or code, the County's employment relationship with employees covered under this policy is at-will and employment may be terminated at any time, for any reason that does not violate state or federal law, with or without cause, at the option of the employer or the employee. Res. 47-11 - Resolution To Adopt The Grievance Procedure Concerning Employee Terminations, Employee Discipline And Workplace Safety As Required By Wis. Stat. 66.0509(1m). Motion (Masters/Schmidt) to approve. Motion (Hartung/Masters) to amend Resolution 47-11 with a change to the original resolution in the wording. Replacing the words "Grievance Procedure and Workplace Safety" throughout the resolution with "Workplace Discipline and Safety Appeal Policy. The word grievance/grievances replaced by appeal/ appeals; Grievant replaced by Appellant. The title of the Resolution to become: Resolution to Adopt the Workplace Discipline and Safety Appeal Policy. Asst. Corporation Counsel Malia Malone addressed the proposed amendment. Motion to approve amendment to Resolution 47-11 carried by voice vote. Motion to approve amended Resolution 47-11 carried by unanimous voice vote. Resolution adopted.

RESOLUTION 48-11

RESOLUTION TO AUTHORIZE A ONE-TIME TEMPORARY EQUITY PAY ADJUSTMENT TO NONREPRESENTED EMPLOYEES TO THE HONORABLE MEMBERS OF THE POLK COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS WHEREAS, the timing of union contracts results in a disparity among county employees in the effective date of the provisions of Wisconsin Act 10 that require increased employee pension contributions; and WHEREAS, nonunion employees will begin paying an increased pension contribution in August 2011, and union employees not beginning paying this increase until January 2012; and WHEREAS, Polk County has adopted a budget for 2011 that fully funded pension contributions for all employees for the remainder of the year; and WHEREAS, the Polk County Board of Supervisors has the authority to partially compensate nonunion employees for increased pension contributions until the law is effective for all employees and to do so without increasing the 2011 budget. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Polk County Board of Supervisors does hereby authorize a one-time, temporary pay equity adjustment for

STATE OF WISCONSIN COUNTY OF POLK

) )

I, Carole T. Wondra, County Clerk for Polk County, do hereby certify that the foregoing minutes are a true and correct copy of the County Board Proceedings of the Polk County Board of Supervisors Session held on September 20, 2011. Carole T. Wondra Polk County Clerk 547164 7L

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(Sept. 28, Oct. 5) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT WASHBURN COUNTY SHELL LAKE STATE BANK P.O. BOX 130 SHELL LAKE, WI 54871 Plaintiff(s), vs. KATE M. SOHOLT 28281 N. BASHAW LAKE RD. SHELL LAKE, WI 54871 Defendant(s). Small Claims Publication Summons And Notice Case No. 11SC291 PUBLICATION SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING TO THE PERSON(S) NAMED ABOVE AS DEFENDANT(S) You are being sued by the person(s) named above as Plaintiff(s). A copy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. The lawsuit will be heard in the following Small Claims Court: Washburn County Courthouse, Clerk of Court - 715-468-4677, Washburn County Courthouse, 2nd Floor, 10 4th Ave., Shell Lake, WI 54871, on the following date and time: October 18, 2011, 1:30 p.m. If you do not attend the hearing, the court may enter a judgment against you in favor of the person(s) suing you. A copy of the claim has been sent to you at your address as stated in the caption above. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. You may have the opportunity to answer without appearing in court on the court date by filing a written answer with the clerk of court before the court date. You must send a copy of your answer to the Plaintiff(s) named above at their address. You may contact the clerk of court at the telephone number above to determine if there are other methods to answer a Small Claims complaint in that county. If you need help in this matter because of a disability, please call: 715-468-4677. Gloria Butterfield, V.P. 715-468-7858 September 20, 2011


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 35

“It’s just neighbor helping neighbor” by Carl Heidel Leader staff writer TOWN OF SCOTT - According to Mick Peterson, chairman of the Town of Scott, it’s an old-fashioned idea being put to good use. “It’s just neighbor helping neighbor,” he said. Peterson uses those terms to describe a cooperative effort by the Towns of Scott, Jackson and Webb Lake to clear debris left along the roads of the three towns by the July 1 windstorm that battered Burnett County. Those three towns were among the hardest hit by the storm. Town Chairmen Roger Larson, Jackson, John Kielkucky, Webb Lake and Peterson found themselves faced with the daunting task of clearing their roads, and they realized that if they tried to clear roads only in their own towns, with only the equipment each town owned, it would be long months before they restored even a semblance of order. So they agreed to cross the town boundaries and help each other out. For about three weeks now, crews and equipment from the cooperating towns have gathered regularly at a designated site in one town or the other to focus on cleaning that site. The crews gather on Wednesdays at 7:30 a.m. and work all day. By working together they are making

With jaws like a prehistoric monster, a roadclearing machine can look like an animal with a mouthful of debris.

Equipment operators from the three towns finally agreed to have their picture taken. Left to right they are Ben Keup, Webb Lake; Chip Lohman, Jackson; Rick Larson, Scott; Tom Christopherson, Scott; Scott Hostrawser, Webb Lake; and Brad Huser, Jackson. – Photos by Carl Heidel large advances in the total cleanup operation. One of the economies of the joint oper-

The Webb Lake Community Club furnished these T-shirts as a fundraiser for the cleanup effort with an equal share of what was raised going to each town.

Break time! Breaking for lunch, work crews from the three cooperating towns bring their equipment to a central point. Yellow equipment is from Webb Lake, red from Scott and orange from Jackson.

ation comes in the simple process of hauling the debris to the dump sites. With only one loader and one truck, each town faced lengthy downtimes as the trucks traveled to and from the sites. With three loaders and trucks, there can be a fairly steady flow in the hauling and little downtime in the loading operation, time lost simply waiting for the truck to return. The joint operation began in Jackson, and the photos in this story were taken as it came to Scott. The operation in Jackson alone removed around 60 loads of brush and logs. Peterson sees several benefits in working cooperatively. The cleanup will get finished sooner, and that will mean money saved with reduced labor and equipment costs. But the real benefit, according to Peterson, is the return to the old way of doing things, of neighbors coming together to help one another out. “Now,” he said, “we’re beginning to ask ourselves if there are other ways we can do things together.”

With Brad Huser of the Town of Jackson standing in the open grapple with his arm extended, one can begin to get an idea of the size of the equipment used to clear the debris.

By combining equipment from three town, cleanup crews could keep a steady flow of debris moving to the dump sites.

Webster homecoming royalty

Rebecca Mouw specializes in forest fire related issues for the DNR. She was at the site, with equipment from Minong, observing the cleanup and preparing to launch an educational effort, Firewise, designed to reduce risk to homeowners in the event of a wildfire.

The new Webster homecoming royalty is shown back row (L to R): Chelsea Larson, Olivia Kopecky, Mackenzie Koelz, Cody Isaacson, Austin Bork and Joey Erickson. Front row: 2011 Homecoming King Henri LeGrelle and 2011 Homecoming Queen Melissa Gustavson. – Photo submitted


PAGE 36 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Local artists in competition for national RAWards Public can vote online through Oct. 15

Local artists Erik Barstow and Laura Seed. - Photo of Bartstow submitted. Photo of Seed by Erik Barstow suming but rewarding at the same time.” Her work can be viewed at www.lashseedstudios.com or at rawartists.org, where people may also vote for their favorite artist. Barstow, of Dresser, is the son of David Barstow and Mary Lou Barstow of St. Croix Falls and brother to Todd and Greg Barstow. He is a photographer, videographer and digital artist who has been capturing and creating scenes of the St. Croix Valley, including night photography and high dynamic range photography. “I joined the Army Reserve when I was 17 and re-enlisted in the United States Marine Corps when I was 19. I was honorably discharged when I was 23. I served as a correctional officer in the Minnesota Department of Corrections until I was 26,” he noted. Barstow later went to video school at the Globe College of Minnesota School of Business and worked on various video

“The Mechanic,” a painting by Laura Seed.

A photo of Laura Seed using high dynamic range photography. - Photo by Erik Barstow projects while at the same time learning about digital photography. “I have been photographing since 2005 and I have never stopped,” he said. Barstow’s business, Barstow Photography, offers photos for art and portraits for seniors, weddings and kids. “After I was injured in an auto accident

last year, I have been focusing more on art pieces than using it as an actual profession,” he noted. “I will shoot anything that I find great to look at, I love the night photos of my work, especially the photos of the St. Croix River Valley,” Barstow noted. “It’s been the main source and inspiration of my photography.” A link to the RAWards voting page can also be found on Barstow’s Web site, www.BarstowPhotography.com. Voting will end Oct. 15. - Gary King, with submitted information

You Are Invited To The Hottest Event In Town! Come with your unwanted GOLD and leave with CASH today!

547036 7L

Necklaces, bracelets, rings, earrings, gold watches, gold coins, silver coins or bars, white gold, dental gold, platinum & silver jewelry – We will buy it all for top dollar ... CASH!

2 DAYS ONLY!

Tuesday, Oct. 18, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. St. Croix Regional Medical Center (old entrance) 204 South Adams Street, St. Croix Falls Sponsored by SCRMC Volunteer Partners

Don’t mail it in! We test & weigh in front of you! If you can’t make the event, drop off the gold with the sponsoring party and we will fill the bag with cash!

TW IN CIT IES

EAU CLA IRE G N O MIN RICE LAK E

SP OO NE R CHIPPEWA FALLS

From DULUTH to EAU CLAIRE And Thousands Of Destinations!

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ST. CROIX FALLS - Two area artists are showing their works at the Fine Line Music Cafe in Minneapolis this Thursday, Oct. 6, as part of the national 2011 RAWards competition. Erik Barstow and Laura Seed are members of RAW (rawartists.org), a group operating in 21 cities across the United States, dedicated to providing independent artists of all creative genres with the tools, resources and exposure needed to “inspire and cultivate creativity.” Barstow, a photographer, will be showing his photography taken around the St. Croix Valley, and Seed, a designer, painter, sculpture artist and maker, will be showing her work, including paintings done in acrylic, metallic and oil. They are the only couple among those entered in this year’s competition. Seed, a Unity graduate and daughter of Penny and Paul Seed of Centuria and sister to Shannon Bibeau and October Seed, is no stranger to art. “I was raised by two talented artists, my parents, who taught me everything they knew from a very young age,” she noted. “They use all different mediums so therefore I learned many different types of art, from weaving and sewing to painting and sculpting. I did my first weaving when I was just 2 years old and have never stopped creating.” Seed said she loves painting the images she comes up with in her head and pays close attention to detail, using very small brushes and making each piece “time-con-

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WED., OCT. 5, 2011 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

Currents

THE-LEADER.NET

Follow the Leader

An award-winning newspaper serving NW Wisconsin

The tale of an immigrant violin

Editor’s note: The author is a former Grantsburg resident.

by Vranna Selander Manor GRANTSBURG - The year was 1911. Roald Amundsen was the first explorer to reach the South Pole; a first-class stamp cost 2 cents; and Rutherford discovered the structure of an atom. The first Indianapolis 500 auto race was held that year—and a young man named Charles Lindberg immigrated to America. Oh, not the Lindbergh who later flew solo across the Atlantic Ocean. No, this Lindberg was to become Grantsburg’s very own Dr. C. O. Lindberg. That was quite a journey we had coming to America from Hamrange in Gavleborg, Sweden, where Charles Olov Lindberg was born on July 3, 1891. You notice that I said “we.” Perhaps I should tell you that among the few items he was able to take on the ship, Dr. Lindberg chose me, his lowly but oh-so-beautiful violin, if I might brag a little. I went everywhere with him. He was only 20 years old, after all, when he immigrated so he needed my companionship. Yes, I was with him when he studied at North Park College in Chicago and later at the University of Chicago. How very proud I was when he received his medical degree on June 4, 1924, from the University of Oklahoma where he was on the medical faculty. Then came nearly three years of experience in Army and hospital work. Now I don’t want you to think that I was the only important thing in his life. Doc Lindberg also had a wife, Effie, who accompanied us when we moved from Clyde, Kan., to Grantsburg on Nov 4, 1926. A son, Charles Jr., was born into our little family a few years later in 1932. Eventually four grandsons became part of our lives. At first we lived briefly in the Silas Thoreson residence and had a practice above Thoreson’s store in downtown Grantsburg. I know that Dr. Lindberg also made a lot of house calls to people in the village as well as to farms in the country. Those were very busy years for our Lindberg household. It is a wonder that the good doctor even had any time for me. One of Dr. Lindberg’s biggest accomplishments was in 1929 when he called the community together to talk about building

Vranna (Selander) Manor presented Dr. C.O. Lindberg’s violin to Charlie Lindberg and his father, Joe Lindberg. – Photos submitted a hospital in Grantsburg. Four hundred people turned out! By then we were living in our own nice house on Broadway Avenue. A busy committee of H.A. Anderson, Byron Selves, V.E Hawley, C.C. L. Peterson and F.B. Huth met in our home many evenings to discuss how to raise the needed $30,000-$40,000 for the hospital. Stocks were sold at $100 a share but the Depression made it hard for people to pay the balance on their pledges. One day I overheard the doctor saying that those who didn’t have cash offered services instead – D.O. Olson offered to deliver milk and other men offered to paint the hospital rooms. Churches and clubs furnished hospital rooms at $125 apiece. In September 1930, three board members – Philip Carlson, Dr. Lindberg and pharmacist N.C. Unseth – went on a train called the Blueberry Special to Minneapolis, Minn., to pick out operating room equipment. I was absolutely flabbergasted when they told me the outrageous cost of just a few simple items – $1,100!! Next they needed to hire some nurses whom I really loved. Neva Parker of Mud Hen Lake community – daughter of the F.E. Parkers of Falun – was offered $60 a

The old hospital (now Village Square Apartments) looks much the same today as it did in 1930, except for the statue of Sheriff Big Gust that now stands in front of the building. The statue was carved by Alf Olson, a good Swedish friend of Dr. Lindberg.

month as night nurse. Dorothy Sandberg – daughter of the Fred Sandbergs – was to earn $75 a month as general nurse. And Lillian Lunde from Frederic would get $75 a month plus meals and laundry as superintendent of nurses. I also got to know the rest of the staff who were all wonderful local people: cook – Mrs. Chas. Anderson of Alpha ($45 a month); janitor – Arthur Skog; business manager – Philip Carlson. Now I realize that people would be quick to point out that Dr. Lindberg was not the first to wish for a hospital, but I am so pleased that it was on his watch that it was actually accomplished. Dedication came in November 1930, just four short years after we moved to the village. In all, Dr. Lindberg practiced in Grantsburg for nearly 30 years, except for a short stint in Lawton, Mich., in 1932. I was a part of almost everything. There was one exception, though, when on Dec. 2, 1930, Carol Halvorson (Mrs. Jake Lysdahl) became the first baby born in the brand-new hospital. The beautiful and pleasing strains of an instrument like me should have been soothing music to mother Hazel, I would have thought, but Doc put his foot down and I was not allowed to do any serenading in the birthing room. Well, soon the hospital was bursting with activity. But remember that I said this was during the Great Depression and many people could not pay for the services rendered. Sometimes they had to find other ways to pay off their bills. One such person was Philip Selander. He was a young man in his mid-20s who had lost his mother to tuberculosis when he was a mere child – 9 years old. For several years after that, he stayed with the Nels O. Nelson family near North Fork, on Grantsburg’s northeast side, and also worked for the nearby Roy Anderson and Otto Peterson families. When Philip needed an emergency appendectomy, Dr. Lindberg came up with an arrangement where Philip could work off the cost of the operation. Oh, how I remember Philip working so hard to earn the room and board that he also got at the hospital. Yes, that’s right – he actually lived at

the hospital for five or six years! I would see Philip mowing the lawn, tending to the furnace, repairing furniture and equipment, washing windows, shoveling snow, laundering sheets, making beds, getting surgical instruments ready for use, going on house calls with the doctor, and even assisting in surgeries along with nurses Helen Northam and Laurene Dahle, among others. The hospital was not the only place Doc and Philip worked together, however. Many evenings after work, I would look out the window of the house on Broadway Avenue in Grantsburg that served as the Lindberg residence as well as the medical clinic, and I would observe the two of them hard at work on a rock garden in the backyard. Now this was no ordinary rock garden, mind you. It contained, among other things, an exact replica of the church Dr. Lindberg attended in Sweden, as well as models of his birthplace and his grandfather’s stone blacksmith shop where the doctor played as a boy. A waterwheel furnished power for the shop. Three times – in 1931, 1933 and 1938 – he made trips to his native land to take precise measurements of buildings so he could build them to scale in his miniature village. Small bridges, rivers, lakes, walks, stone fences and flowers – like the landscape in Sweden – made the yard a sight to behold. Oh, how exciting it was for me to see Philip and the doctor using their skills and creativity to build something so beautiful! Often I would beg to be taken into the garden where I could add music to the peaceful setting. Then the doctor decided to take on another project, this time on property he bought at Mud Hen Lake on the way to Siren. I spent much time at that relaxing

See Immigrant violin, page 2

Dr. Lindberg beside the church he and Philip Selander built to model his boyhood church in Sweden. (Do any readers know whatever happened to the little church?)

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PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Homecoming 2011

St. Croix Falls

St. Croix Falls homecoming royalty are pictured (L to R) front row: Ally Mahler, Alexis Erickson, Sarah Petznick, Caitlyn Olson and Jasmine Hoggatt. Back row: Jake Rademacher, Alex Frey, Alex Mikl, Ben Clausen and Matt Rude. Not pictured: Haley Anderson and Alex Bertram. Homecoming is this Friday, Oct. 7, against the Panthers. – Photo by Tammi Milberg

Immigrant violin/from page 1 place in the country and thoroughly enjoyed being in the cabin that Philip Selander built there for the Lindbergs. It was modeled after the houses in Sweden – red paint and all – so, of course, I felt right at home there. In the yard, I enjoyed looking at another waterwheel, much stonework and more lawn ornaments, all designed and constructed by Doc and Philip. One place I stayed away from, though, was the beach that Dr. Lindberg graciously donated for the community to use – didn’t want to get my beautiful wood wet, you know. Probably the most difficult time for me was when Dr. Lindberg picked up stakes and moved to Minnesota for six years. You cannot imagine how happy I was that day in May 1959 when he told me that all of us – me, Doc and Effie – were coming back to Grantsburg and would be retiring for good at the Mud Hen Lake cottage – my little piece of Sweden! Now I am getting ahead of myself. I wanted to tell you more about how important music was in the doctor’s life. Being a violin myself, I am very aware of such things, you know. Yes, Doc surely loved his music and I was thrilled to be a part of it. Not only could he play an instrument such as myself, he could also sing! In fact, in 1946, when Helene Stratman-Thomas toured the state looking for folk singers throughout Wisconsin, Dr. Lindberg was one of those chosen for her project. Ms. Stratman-Thomas recorded him singing several Swedish folk tunes by himself, and also a duet with Ruth Olson Sandberg (later married to Ole Rockland). I have heard that the recordings are archived in the Wisconsin Folksong Collection, 19371946 at the Wisconsin Historical Society in Madison. Dr. Lindberg and I surely brought a little bit of our beloved homeland Sweden to the far reaches of rural Wisconsin. Come to think of it, perhaps I am more of a fiddle than a violin! But alas! Even doctors eventually face the end of life, which in Dr. Lindberg’s case came on Nov. 11, 1963, at the Veterans Hospital in Tomah. Oh, how I would have liked to have joined Betty Dewing when she accompanied Gene Gronlund and Francis Nero as they sang “Children of the Heavenly Father” in Swedish at Doc’s funeral service in a small rural Lutheran church about seven miles east of Grantsburg. You are probably wondering what happened to me, his faithful violin, after Dr. Lindberg passed away. Who would want

This customs stamp was put on the violin case when it came to the United States from Sweden in 1911.

Charlie Lindberg looks comfortable holding his great-grandfather’s violin. – Photos submitted such an old instrument? Who would value me like Doc did? Fortunately, he had already taken care of that. Remember his good and special friend, Philip Selander? Well, some years before the doctor died, he lovingly gifted me – his treasured possession – to Philip with whom I enjoyed several years of leisurely retirement. It was altogether fitting that I should go and live with Philip. Through the years, I had had many opportunities to observe that Dr. Lindberg considered Philip to be his right-hand man, both personally and professionally. The doctor expressed his gratitude in a letter he wrote to Philip on April 24, 1956: “It is indeed very gratifying to experience such results in workmanship as you have displayed at our lake home. Philip it is indeed astonishing. I am very proud of your ability and more so of your integrity. I shall always feel as though I am part of you because you know as well as I do, you and I kept Community Hospital in Grantsburg intact and self-supporting during the Depression days.” Things at the hospital moved along very quickly while I was staying at the home of Philip Selander and his wife Doris. I was out in the country now so I was no longer able to be part of conversations about the hospital. But I do remember hearing about Dr. Richard Hartzell, Dr. Roger Cutshall, Dr. Larson, Dr. Jensen and Frank Snapp coming on staff, along with wonderful nurses and workers like Audrey Branstad, Marcella Hanson, Agnes Peterson, Ally Ramsdell, Pearl Lindquist, Manda Swanson and many others too numerous to mention. Eventually the old hospital was outgrown and I recall that the community once again came together to fund a brandnew hospital that was dedicated in 1961. And, oh, the pie social that was held in June of 1959 – it netted $400 for the new hospital. I couldn’t believe it when they told me that 300 pies, 75 gallons of ice cream, 60 cases of pop – and gallons and gallons coffee – were consumed. Actually I heard that some of the blueberry pies were used for a pie-eating contest with the winners being Lloyd Kallman, first, Donny Erickson, second, and Larry Dahlberg, third. When Philip Selander passed away in 1974, I went to live with his daughter, Vranna and her family, in Middleton. Oh, boy, was that an experience! I would be the first to tell you that Vranna has no musical talent whatsoever in spite of the best efforts of her music teachers, Iris Erickson and Morris Skinner. So for years I sat in a corner

of her rec room, where I found myself becoming almost as sad as the day Doc and I had to wave goodbye to our beautiful Sweden. Life has been very good in America, but now I found myself wishing that someone would again pick me up and play some old folk tunes as Dr. Lindberg had done so many years earlier. Vranna would dust my case occasionally and took pretty good care of me – she even had my frayed strings replaced—but she just didn’t seem to realize how I yearned to be back with family. Until – One day she got to thinking about the good ol’ days of growing up in Grantsburg. Suddenly, my attention was awakened. Silently I held my breath as she remembered how Dr. Lindberg provided work for her father when there was not much to be had during the Depression. She recalled how Dr. Lindberg could be stern and down-to-business when someone’s life was at stake, but he also had a humorous side and a hearty laugh. And there was a very gentle side to the good doctor, as well. I know for a fact that Vranna still remembers the box of chocolates he surprised her with one Christmas – all in the shape of sewing objects. (Personally, I think they should have been in the shape of a violin, but I was not consulted!) The candy is long gone, but the memories linger of the gift given by a generous family doctor. Another year, I was along when he picked out a book of Bible stories which Vranna still has, complete with the original paper jacket. I never asked him, but I think he liked giving things to a little girl because he had no daughters of his own – only a son and some grandsons. My hopes were roused even further as Vranna recalled that in 1946 her cousin, Armand Luedtke, was seriously injured in a farm accident. It was Dr. Lindberg who saved his life as he took care of Armand for 101 days in the hospital. There was no elaborate equipment or drugs back then, only the tender care of a loving and skilled rural doctor who cleverly devised a tent over Armand’s body to keep out the germs. I recall that his trusted nurse, Miss Okerlund (Oakey) deserves some of the credit, as well. And I often wonder if Armand heard the doctor and me playing Swedish folk tunes in the parlor of his house only a couple of blocks from the hospital. I would like to think that maybe I had a small part in helping him to get well, too. Memories of Dr. Lindberg came to light once again when Vranna read that the Grantsburg Area Historical Society was putting on a program about historical personalities in the community. Berdella Johnson narrated the performance with Merlin Johnson playing the part of Dr. Lindberg. Yes! It only seemed right that I should be given back to the Lindberg family. That was the thing to do. But how to find them after all those years? The answer came easily. With the help of Trade Lake historian Stan Selin, Vranna was put in touch with Dr. Lindberg’s daughter-in-law, Beulah Lindberg, who still lives in Siren. On a hot August day, I was delivered to Beulah’s home where her son Joe and her grandson Charlie came from Frederic to meet me and take me home with them. How excited I was to discover that Joe

Philip Selander and his bride, Doris Bowman, in 1942. and his three brothers—Bob, Andy and John (grandsons of Dr. Lindberg)—are all musicians involved in local bands with names like the Butanes, Bill Bittner Memorial Dixieland Band, Dan Zimmers Polka Band, the Lindberg Brothers Blues Band and Intensive Care! If violins had hearts, you could have felt mine racing! This was way too good to be true! But there is more. All of Dr. Lindberg’s great-grandchildren are musical as well. Angela had her own band in her teen years, played guitar and sang, and wrote her own music. Jess plays saxophone and bass guitar. Sara plays keyboard. Charlie played trumpet in school and has learned guitar. David played baritone in school. As far as I know, none of them plays the violin – but be assured that I will do my best to tempt them! After all, their great-grandfather on Beulah’s side was an excellent musician, as well, and even played the violin. Furthermore, I was overjoyed to learn that the name Charles Lindberg is carried on by a great-grandson. Another greatgrandson, David, has had some thoughts about becoming a doctor (but he still has some years to decide). I am thinking that things may have come full circle for me! As I look at the original customs stamp on my violin case and reflect on the 100 years since Doc and I emigrated from Sweden, I am grateful to be back where I should be – in the Lindberg home with relatives who are very talented musicians and who carry on the family name. ••• Acknowledgments: Berdella Johnson for documents from the Grantsburg Area Historical Society; Billy Haraldson for photo of the old hospital; Wisconsin Historical Society for 1946 photo of Dr. Lindberg and Alf Olson (WHS Image #25300).


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

A man went to

Just for

see a wizard and said, “Can you lift a curse that was put on me years Joe Roberts ago?” “Maybe,” said the wizard, “if you can remember the exact words of the curse.” The man replied without hesitation “I pronounce you man and wife.” ••• If dogs are man’s best friends, why won’t they pick you up at the airport? ••• Two cannibals were having dinner. The first one said to the second, “Your wife makes a lovely stew.” The second answered, “Yes, but I will miss her.” •••

Laughs

Open stage opportunity FREDERIC - The Frederic Art Center, 310 South Lake Ave., will hold an open stage on Saturday, Oct. 15, with sign-up time at 7:30 p.m. Come get your 10 minutes of fame and fortune, take a chance and perform your poetry, prose, music, debate, juggling, theater, comedy, whatever you can come up with. The center is an old, one-room schoolhouse without the need for microphones and amplifiers, but it does contain a small stage you can jump up on. Frederic Arts seeks to promote artistic endeavors in Polk County and beyond. They invite you to take part as performer or audience member and find out more about their organization and its future events. For more information, check out their Web site at fredericarts.com or call 715-327-8181. There is plenty of parking available, and this event is free. - submitted

Fall writers contest and meeting set by Mary B. Olsen Special to the Leader SPOONER — The Indianhead Writers Fall Writers meeting and contest will be held on Saturday, Oct. 15, from 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., at the Agriculture Center, Experimental Farm, on Hwy. 70, east of Spooner. Three cash prizes are offered: First prize $100; second prize $75; and third prize; $50. The contest rules are simple. The entrant must write a fiction or nonfiction prose piece on any subject of 100 minimum to about a 1,500-word limit. Only one entry per person. The entry must be brought to the fall meeting/contest where the writer or a designated person will read it. All attending the meeting will vote to determine the winning entries. The entries will be read in the order of their registration. Prizes will be awarded at the meeting. This will be an opportunity for writers to get together to discuss writing problems and to bring their books, photographs and other work to show, sell and tell about. Lunch will be served without charge. There will be music, door prizes and other surprises. A writer who wishes to enter a story, article or essay can preregister before the meeting, but they may enter at the meeting. Late entries may not be read due to time constraints. To preregister or to register for lunch write to Indianhead Writers, Mary B. Olsen, 314 6th Ave., Shell Lake, WI 54871, or call 715-468-2604.

Parenthood for life

Cold Turkey

I am a father, and speaking as a father, I believe there are few things in life more satisfying than being a parent. The level of conJohn W. Ingalls tentment cannot be overstated when as parents we can sit down to a meal with our adult children and have an adult conversation. You can finally recline in your recliner believing your parenting job is nearly over and everything appears to be turning out just fine. Yet somehow and somewhere along the path you begin to realize that even though children may stop being children, parents never stop being parents. I once had a wonderful woman come into my office complaining about her son. “My son is lazy,” she began. “He stays up too late watching sports on TV and he sleeps too late in the mornings.” She paused for a short time and then resumed her commentary. “He leaves his clothes lying around the house, he doesn’t have a job, and I don’t like his girlfriend either. I am not sure what I should do.” I remained silent for a minute wondering if this was a rhetorical question or if she really wanted my advice. “Well I am not sure there is much you can do.” I explained, “After all your son is retired now!” She was 93 years old herself and laughed when she grasped what she was saying. “You know what?” she said, “You never really stop being a parent, do you?” We have survived four daughters and each of our girls is deeply precious to us. We could never imagine life without them. However, at one point in our pro-

For the past couple of months, Daniel and I have been preparing to take a college entrance exam as part of our scheme to return to grad school. Our areas of study are different, Carrie Classon but the test is the same and so we have had the luxury of studying together. It has been a bit of a sacrifice. September is a beautiful month and we have been wistfully watching the leaves change through the window and ruefully refusing dinner invitations from people who are all apparently enjoying their autumn without algebra. The sacrifice has seemed worthwhile. My boyfriend Daniel is an excellent study buddy: disciplined and upbeat. We have taken time for proper meals and exercise. We have conquered frightening long words and nasty lines of exponents. We have picked up a shared vocabulary as we compared “sapid” to “vapid” and learned that “sanguinary” does not mean cheerful but involves bloodshed. I even caught myself getting excited by triangles (who knew they could be so fun?) and amusing myself with equations. (Yesterday I calculated the age of Bride X to be a dewy 120 years old and laughed till I cried.) We have assisted one another in our weak areas and tooted our horns when we have overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles. We did not toot our horns today. Today we took one in a series of sample tests and we both bombed. I would like to say that we fell short of our expectations, but that is not how it felt. It felt like we bombed. Daniel’s usually sharp algebra skills fell by the wayside and I became unsure of words I have known since the age of 12. I think we both were despairing of cramming the necessary information into our mature skulls. I tried

Letters from

Home

to make light of the test’s importance as we ate our eggs and Daniel accused me of “cognitive dissonance,” which he really did not mean as an insult, but it irritated me anyway. I had been in junior high band long enough to know that dissonance is not what we were aiming for. I got hurt, he got defensive and the eggs got cold. I think I can speak for both of us when I say that it appeared we had squandered a perfectly good September for no reason whatsoever. I went upstairs and looked out at the maple tree that had turned orange while I was too absorbed in geometry to notice, and I wondered why the heck we were doing any of this. And then I remembered. We’re doing it because it is fun. It is fun to do things that are new and a little uncomfortable because it is the only way we can shake loose from old habits and old ways of thinking. It is fun to share the experience with someone. It is fun because it is not comfortable or entirely safe to our ego. It is fun to blow the dust out of our brains and see what they can do. I may not do as well as I hope on the big test, but the big test is not the point and has never been. It is the journey to the test that counts: learning how to learn, remembering how to remember, forcing parts of my brain to work that have lain comfortably dormant for years, pushing through fears and becoming less afraid. Daniel spoke of dissonance, now I know what he was referring to. It’s the sound of a couple of dusty horns being taken out and blown. Till next time, —Carrie

Good Samaritan Society pledges to be crime free ST. CROIX FALLS – The tenants of Forest Heights and River Town Heights apartments in St. Croix Falls along with the management company, The Good Samaritan Society, have joined The Crime Free Senior Living Program. Sandy Bowman, housing manager of both properties said, ”We take this program very seriously. A lot of people entrust us to provide a safe living environment and to do that we need everyone to do their part.” To become a member of this program, Bowman set up times for the St. Croix Falls Police Department to come out and inspect the property both inside and out. They made sure all of the security measures were working properly, the property was well lit, the landscaping was maintained and all personal information was properly secured. St. Croix Falls Police Chief Jack Rydeen then came out to both buildings and presented to the tenants on identity theft. Even the tenants did their part to be crime free. Each tenant had to sign a crime free pledge to be on the lookout for any unsafe situation. - submitted

Pictured are St. Croix Falls Police Chief Jack Rydeen and Sandy Bowman, housing manager of Forest Heights and River Town Heights apartments, holding a crime free property sign that will hang at both locations. – Photo submitted

creating years we had hoped to have a son. I am not sure why now, but at the time it seemed to be important. Now I am very thankful that it worked out this way because it is always the MD girls that look after you in your later years, not the boys. We had two children, and then in medical school when I finally figured out how it happened, we decided to have two more. We didn’t have a son, and my wife pinned the blame on me, something to do with X and Y chromosomes. My response to her seemed logical. I gave her all of the X’s and Y’s and she had to make the choice. She made the right choice. Having little girls is absolutely wonderful. As a father you feel like a king. They hug you, kiss you on the cheek and make you feel like a real-life hero. When you come home from work little girls bounce into your arms with crayon sketches and flowers they picked from alongside the road, erasing all of the frustrations of your day. Then one day when you come home from work there is no little girl to meet you at the door and your heart skips a few beats and nearly quits. That bouncy child is now a sulking 14-year-old waiting for the new man in her life – a skinny runt with size 52 pants held in place at the bottom hem of his boxers with a worn-out Army belt. You can’t understand his name because of the pierced lips and shiny chrome tongue stud. “Hi, I’m Lahwee”

“Nice to meet you Lahwee,” as you cautiously extend your hand to greet him while frantically wondering what attracted you daughter to this person. “Dad, his name is Larry and stop embarrassing me!” “I didn’t do anything to embarrass you.” “You’re breathing.” She rolls her eyes two or three times while skipping out the door with Lahwee on the way to a movie. “Let’s go Dad!” she yells in your direction. “You have to drive us, and if we meet any of my friends, duck down behind the wheel so they don’t see you.” I loved every stage of our girls lives, but the teen years were the most challenging. A teenage girl in the house at age 14 is the emotional equivalent of having a kidney stone. It only hurts when they are moving. Unfortunately they are usually moving unless you want to go somewhere as a family, then they won’t move. If you grit your teeth long enough it will pass. Some day after the kidney stone passes you will get out of bed on a Saturday morning and life will be changed. Sitting in your kitchen will be a beautiful, intelligent woman sipping a cup of coffee and reading the morning paper. In a daze you go up to her and ask, “Who are you?” She smiles at you and for a time you have flashbacks of crayon drawings and wilted flowers clutched in tiny hands. The sun is shining and the birds are singing in the trees. You sip your hot, perfectly brewed cup of coffee and realize how lucky you are. “Dad?” She has a dreamy, far-off look in her eyes. “Larry is coming over. He has something important to ask you …”


PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

House warming One hundred and sixty years ago, Henry David Thoreau wrote, “Every man looks at his wood-pile with a kind of affection. I loved to have mine before my window, and the more chips the better to remind me of my pleasing work. I had an old axe which nobody claimed, with which by spells in winter days, on the sunny side of the house, I played about the stumps which I had got out of mybean-field … they warmed me twice – once while I was splitting them, and again when they were on the fire, so that no fuel could give out more heat.” Thoreau was single and lived in a rustic cottage in the woods on Walden Pond for two years, trying to live simply and spend most of his time thinking, reading, exploring nature and writing rather than in the pursuit of money. He dressed warmly and used his wood sparingly, pleased that it warmed him twice. Most of us know that putting up firewood warms us more than two times. Sawing the tree, splitting, hauling, piling, carrying, burning and removing the ashes are all warming jobs. At the cabin, where wood is our only heat, wood warms us several more times. As the weather turns cold, and the wasps and flies who have come inside over the summer struggle to get to the warm outside, Margo’s thoughts turn to cutting fire wood, which means getting me in the cutting-up mood as I am the chain-sawyer and the splitter while Margo is the hauler, piler and consumer. I don’t mind cutting wood, but admitting that time has come means summer has passed leaving most of my summer plans still undone, so the longer I can put it off the better. Margo grew up only a few miles inland from Lake Michigan, east of West Bend. Down there, in growing zone 5, zephyrs from the lake moderate the temperatures year-round. She lived in a large farmhouse that several generations of her thrifty German family had improved from a snug log house to a comfortable warm home. Her favorite memories are in the huge farm kitchen, at the hub, Grandma’s large wood cookstove, always warm, fragrant with fresh bread, pie and coffee, and a refuge for cold little girls. Cold weather is OK for her as long as she doesn’t have to be in it. The Hansons, who grew up in a drafty farmhouse, so cold inside in midwinter that we took Herman, our beloved pet carp, bowl and all, under the covers with us each night to keep him from freezing solid (we filled the bowl with very warm water so it doubled as a hot water bottle). Margo has never really got used to being cold, a real handicap when emulating Thoreau’s frugality with firewood. I like cool weather, and left on my own, would let the cabin drop to the 30s at night and warm some in the day. My idea of heating the cabin is wrapping the water pipes with heat tape and letting inside temperatures fluctuate to better appreciate what is happening outside. As a Scout leader, I much preferred winter camping and generally slept under the stars in a sleeping bag wrapped in a tarp even at our Zero-Hero camp-outs. The first time wood heats me is when Margo, whose fingers all turn white at 60 degrees, starts pushing to get me started cutting the winter’s wood. It can get pretty warm for me when the cold gets to her. Usually I wait until she refuses to get out from under the electric blanket in the morning until I start a fire—about 50 degrees inside. The chain saw has been resting in the garage since maple syrup season, so I get it out and file the chain, mix up some gasoil and fill the saw. Then I start pulling the rope to start it. Here I get my second

River Road

Ramblings Collected by Russ Hanson

The Hansons buzzing firewood in the 1950s. Dad, V.R., and Russ pose for the picture taken by oldest son Marvin. In the old days, people cut trees into poles and piled them to be cut into chunks with the buzz saw. A year or two after this picture, Dad changed to doing it all with the chain saw and youngst son Byron painted a picture on the saw blade. – Photo submitted warming. Normally, after about an hour of yanking, switching arms many times, cleaning the spark plug, air cleaner and squirting some gas into the carb accompanied by the appropriate language, the saw makes a few feeble attempts to run, killing each time you try to speed it up. With persistence, it finally catches and you tear into a tree, notice the chain is on backwards, fix it and then drop the tree exactly where you planned. While I am getting the saw ready, Margo comes to check on my progress. “Go away, or you’ll get an earful of stuff you don’t want to hear,” I warn her, but she overhears me grumbling that my next wife is going to be an Eskimo, and goes away steaming. After the 20-year-old Stihl saw has warmed up and run for the first time, it starts after 7-10 pulls the rest of the fall and is reliable. My brothers have recently traded up and have new wireless electronic ignition systems running Android version 2.6 or higher with built-in webcams posting to Facebook. I tell Margo, “You have to be pretty fed up with the old model before you go to all the expense of trading up and learning a whole new saw’s personality.” We start by cutting a few smaller dead elms that will make nice quick “warmup” fires, good for frosty mornings. Elms here grow about 15-20 years before dying from Dutch elm disease, and dry nicely still standing. Sawing the trees down and into chunks warms us once; loading, hauling and stacking a few more times. We don’t even try to split elms, having only a maul and wedges. Elms, at least American elms, resist splitting as much as any tree I know. Many a time I have buried all my 13 steel wedges in a single small chunk of elm that has not given the slightest hint it was thinking about breaking apart, and end having to burn the chunk to get them out. We have many down oak trees on our sandy land along the River Road. Sand oak is pretty much worthless for lumber, full of seams and flaws, but is good for firewood. It has to be split before it will dry out, so it is wood for next spring when we cut it this fall. It splits easy enough so we saw and split before hauling it. Margo uses the plastic-handled maul while I use the wood one—her aim is weak and wood handles don’t last very long that way. A few 150-year-old oaks have blown over. The wood disks we slice off are 2 feet in diameter, and when each ring is

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split up it makes almost a day’s worth of wood. Oak rots gradually in from the outside, so 10 years after a tree has fallen, it may be still mostly sound inside an inch or two from rotten edges. Brother Marv, who heats Grandpa’s huge farmhouse with an outside furnace, spends most of his spring and fall time cutting trees to keep his house warm. He stays a year ahead with his woodpiles. Unlike Grandpa, who closed off much of the house for winter, Marv thinks he should be able to use all the rooms, and pays dearly for it in woodcutting time. Brother Everett is lucky to live along Hwy. 70 and tap directly into the natural gas line going through his property. Natural gas is by far the cheapest heating fuel around here, about one-third the price of propane and one-quarter the cost of fuel oil per heating therm, but you need to be on the pipeline—mostly in or around towns. “We should buy a propane heater,” says Margo each fall, “then we won’t have to work so hard.” Our propane cost this year at Pine Island is $1.96 a gallon, with about 800 gallons needed each winter at the superinsulated, high-efficiency house we built there where our son Scott lives and we retreat to for part of the winter. Up here, with the barely insulated cabin, I’m sure it would take more propane. "At the cabin, with our own wood, you can sit in the recliner right next to the stove and be as warm as you like. If we had propane, we would be trying to conserve by keeping it cooler. No, we sure want to stay with wood as long as we can still swing a chain saw.” Some of my neighbors turned to corn stoves a few years back when corn was $2 a bushel and made a low cost fuel. Most of them have changed to wood pellets now as corn is in the $6 range. I did some research and found that per pound, corn and wood are similar in their heat values. I haven’t tried throwing an ear of corn in the stove, but it just seems somehow immoral to burn it (although the deer, bear and turkeys are chomping it down as fast as they can right now as it dries enough to be harvested). I suppose burning an ear versus turning it into ethanol is not much different. Brother Everett doesn’t like using ethanol-based gasoline in his chain saw (or old tractors or other small engines). He blames it for rusting gas tanks and damaging old parts designed for lead additives. I am the opposite, I like giving

the old Ford and Farmall a little ethanol. At their age, they need a shot of whiskey with their morning coffee to get their knees working. My neighbor across the lake brings his camper out for the summer. He doesn’t have electricity—quite expensive to get it so far into his place, so runs a generator at times and has propane for heating. I think about this too, buy a nice-sized, completely contained, well-insulated camper and move it to the lake for the summer and somewhere in the south for the winter. My cabin is a taxed home, whereas a camper is not. A friend of mine from the Rochester area bought an old school bus and parked it on his hunting land in southeastern Minnesota. “No taxes, just take out most of the seats and throw in some cots, window shades and a stove,” he told me when, as a Boy Scout father, he invited our troop to camp out on the land. He had electricity to a post, just like at a state park hookup and a port-a-potty nearby. Last time I saw him he had upgraded. “The bus had a metal roof. All night long as the weather cooled down, it rattled and banged as the metal contracted and then expanded when the heater came on. Too many windows and too hard to keep warm. I sold the bus and bought a worn out semi truck enclosed trailer. I insulated it, put in windows, a stove, and pulled it up to my stairway— much better as it had a wood frame. Might pull in two next to each other. Still no taxes!” I think we will keep the cabin, cold as it is, for now—more prestige in having a permanent home than a trailer with all the stereotypes about people who live in trailer parks. When we bought our five acres west of Pine Island, Minn., back in 1990, it had an older, but nice 70-foot Rollohome on it. We were looking for a place to build a house, and having the trailer adjacent to the new house was convenient. The trailer did have a few problems—the crawl space under it was truly a neighborhood crawl space. Opposums, cats, mice, squirrels, skunks and even a neighbor’s dog managed to pry their way through the surrounding metal panels to investigate and often winter below. Most stayed the winter, hibernating quietly and leaving graciously with the spring thaw. One elderly opossum played dead so convincingly that he drove us from the house as he thawed and returned to nature with one final odiferous curtain call. The cabin too has a crawl space, but it is open to the world. Sitting on posts on a steep hillside, one end is at ground level, the other 8 feet above, deer, bear and moose are free to stroll through without obstruction. Cold winter winds will soon blow under, over, around and through the cabin, driving Margo to huddle next to the stove, feeding it stick after stick of firewood, giving a last warming as she seeks the 98.6 degrees of the womb, the last place she felt warm enough. This is grape jelly week. The garden Concords and wild grapes were thick this year. We picked a lot of them and hope to have grape jelly for the farmers market next summer. Chuck, who rents our farmland, started combining the soybeans Sunday. They froze this year before turning their usual golden brown. The maple trees here are at their peak and it is surely the nicest time of the year.

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OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

Writing your life stories We all have stories

We all have stories to tell, no matter what our age – stories about childhood, work, places we’ve visited, people we’ve known, crises we’ve met and joys we’ve experienced. When we gather with friends or family, stories often become the natural core of conversation. Some of our stories are hilariously funny; many are sad and heart wrenching. Yet our stories are the words that describe who we are and what we believe, how we feel and what we value. Our stories are the windows into our lives. Our writers club is designed to help you recall the stories of your life and write them, so you can refer to them, so your friends and relatives can enjoy them, and so that you can reflect on them as you face crossroads in your life. They provide an assessment of where you’ve been and where you are now.

Who writes life stories? Life story writers are of all ages, and their stories cover a variety of topics and periods in history. Everyone has a story to tell, each in its own way unique. Older people, because they have so much life experience, have a bountiful supply of stories to tell. But one does not have to be 60 years old or older to write life stories. There are many classic examples of works completed by people in their early years. Henry David Thoreau wrote “Walden” when he was 37. Annie Dillard, author of “An American Childhood,” wrote her book about growing up in Pittsburgh when she was 40 years old. Mark Twain penned his classic memoir, “Life on the Mississippi,” when he was 48. Some life story writers focus on particular times in their lives, as illustrated by the writers previously mentioned. Other life story writers have focused on life themes or particular influences in their lives. What is life story writing? First, let’s say what a life story is not. It is not a biography; a biography is the story of your life, but written by someone else. In most instances, a life story is not an autobiography either; an autobiography suggests the whole story of your life, not some segment of it. A life story is not a genealogy, but most people will do some tracing of family to flesh out their own life story. Likewise, a life story is not a family history, but again some elements of what might go into a family history will find their way into a person’s life story. And life story writing is more than reminiscence writing where the author recounts glimpses of times and places and experiences, but usually does not write the whole story. Memoir is the word that comes closest to describing life story writing. A memoir includes stories

Behind the

Signpost Bernice Abrahamzon about a time in or a perspective about your life – usually in some focused detail. The power of memoir is in the stories themselves.

The value of life story writing Many older people write life stories to share information and insights about their lives with their children and grandchildren. For them, life story writing is a way of moving history across the generations. As people face crossroads in their lives, such as deciding to move to another part of the country, joining the military, getting married and having children, or selecting a new career, life story writing can help sort things out. Systematically reflecting on and writing about the stories in one’s life can provide a context for such decision making. The rewards of life story writing are many; the values come from who you are and where you are in your life, from what you know about your life and what is a mystery. The process of reflecting on one’s life, of digging out related information and trying to make sense out of what has happened, is what matters most. The process of actually doing it is one of the most valuable life experiences you will ever have. (Based on information from Wisconsin author Jerry Apps who taught a course on it.) You’ve been talking about writing your life story. What are you waiting for? Once the glory of fall fades, a long period of black and white and perhaps a green evergreen or two. Winter is a perfect time to do handwork, read, bake, do scrapbooks and, yes, write your stories. If you don’t do it, who will? Meanwhile, get out and enjoy the colors of fall. What a going-away party! One of my favorite poems ends with these words: “Margaret, are you grieving over golden grove unleaving, know this, it is Margaret you grieve for.” Until next week, Bernice

Regional Hospice Services Inc., Spooner/Grantsburg assisted Catch a Dream program SHELL LAKE – John and Jessica Defilippo came from Gurnee, Ill., which at one time was a small town north of Chicago. After Six Flags Great America settled there, the town changed and no longer felt safe and friendly. They moved to northwestern Wisconsin and began building their dream home that reflects their Italian ancestry. They have put a lot of time and hard work in this home, which they love, and there are still some things to be finished. The latest is a solar system to provide electricity. After moving to Wisconsin, the 2001 tornado came through. John was very gen- Volunteers for the Catch a Dream Program that assisted the John and Jessica Defilippo in erous with his time to the cutting and processing their wood for the upcoming heating season. – Photo submitted community. He donated his time to make memorial plaques for the towns of Dewey that Regional Hospice would provide food and beverand LaFollette. He also put in brick pathways for both ages for the event. Anita, being very good at what she sites and constructed a bell tower for the Dewey Town does, was able to get Papa Murphy’s to donate three pizzas, and Catch a Dream money provided funds for the Hall. Ten years later, John Defilippo is a patient of Regional rest of the pizzas and the beverages needed. Family and Hospice Services, Inc. John and his wife, Jessica, live in friends alike, a total of 20 people, came to cut and process the Italian villa they have built themselves, all but the 18 full cords of wood. "The Regional Hospice Catch a Dream program sets well and septic. With winter approaching and a semitrailer load of logs in the yard, John knew that his wife, aside money which has been donated to fulfill patients Jessica, was very worried about how they could get the and family members one last dream. It is our hope that wood cut and processed for the coming heating season. this will leave the family with comforting, lasting memHis nurse, Anita, presented this problem at a Hospice ories that aren’t medical in nature. It is wonderful to be meeting and suggested Catch a Dream, a program able to write this article and to know that many people funded entirely by donations. When John told Anita who have donated money for this program can see how they were planning a wood-cutting party, she suggested much good it does." - submitted

Do you remember? Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago Specials at the Co-op Store in Frederic included 3 lbs. lard at 45¢, hams at 3 lbs. for $2.29, sliced bacon at 49¢ lb., carrots at 9¢ bag and peas at six cans for 79¢.-Specials at Route’s, Frederic, included coffee at 2 lbs. for $1.10, chocolate chips at 33¢ bag, carrots at three bags for 29¢ and pork chops at 33¢ lb.-The Osceola free fair was Sept. 8, 9 and 10.-W.H. Fleming, Frederic, sold russet potatoes.-Seven lettermen reported for Siren’s football team.-The Siren Community Hospital would have major additions and improvements.-The September special at Carlson Hardware in Frederic was a slide-top refrigerator tray for 57¢.An ad said, “Smooth driving ahead … if you drive in now, just say, ‘Fill-er-up’” at Don’s Shell Station, Frederic.-Marvel Gas Co., Frederic, had a full page ad for an open house Sept. 8 – 9, on appliances, etc., with two grand prizes offered.-A curb and gutter project in Frederic was expanded.-Over 700 registered for Marvel Gas open house party.-A nursing scholarship was given to Carol Huber of St. Croix Falls.-September rains broke the drought.-Record bean pack at Frederic ended Sept. 9.

40 Years Ago Specials at Anderson’s Store, Siren, included catsup at 21¢ bottle, fresh carrots at 19¢ lb., evaporated milk at 19¢ can, mandarin oranges at six cans for $1, Spaghettios at 15¢ can, bologna at 69¢ lb.-A turkey shoot was set at the Indian Creek Hall on Oct. 3.-The October special at Carlson Hardware was a cookie keeper at $1.17.-Specials at the Frederic Co-op Store included turkeys at 48¢ lb., round steak at 98¢ lb., butter at 73¢ lb., catsup at three bottles for $1, and apples at $1.89 lb.-Central Supply, Frederic, had an ad saying, “Use now, pay later,” which included tractors and implements, lawn and garden tractors, plows, corn pickers, wagons and boxes, repair parts and an invitation to schedule your repair work.–Trophies were awarded at County Club Ed Baldwin Day at the Frederic Country Club.-Trollhaugen Inn of Dresser was open Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays.-A Kenmore washer and dryer would cost $159.88 at the Sears Catalogue Store, Frederic, operated by Ken Kongshaug.-The Frederic Senior Citizens Center set a bake sale for October.-The Frederic Immanuel Lutheran Church had a smorgasboard coming on Oct. 14, from 5 to 8 p.m.-A coyote attack was reported at Wolf Creek area.-Chris Jensen became an Eagle Scout in Frederic Troop.-Pictures completed this ad for Farmers State Bank, Frederic, “If the apple of your eye has become a lemon, you can make a peach of a deal on a buy on a new car right now.”

20 Years Ago An arts and crafts fair was held Aug. 17 at the Polk County Fairgrounds, St. Croix Falls.-An ice-cream social was held at St. Croix Falls at the United Methodist Church on Aug. 16.-Homes were needed for exchange students.-A pie and ice-cream social and cakewalk were held at the Brenholt Stone Park, Cushing on Aug. 16.-Residents of Clam Falls were pictured with a sunflower that reached 13 feet.-A big fire sale was held Aug. 17 at the Sleepy Hollow Store with someone seeking clothes for a boy and a girl.-The contact place was the Frederic Motel on Aug. 15.-A fish fry was held on Aug. 15 at the United VFW Post 6856 for $4.50 including seconds.-Jessica Nelson was Little Miss Lewis for Charles E. Lewis Days and Little Mr. Lewis was Bradley Chenal.-Obituaries included Jim Caragan, Clyde Shore, Susan Montieth and Linda Piepko.-An accused marijuana grower faced federal charges.-A Gandy Dancer bicycle ride was set for Aug. 24.-Webster bought a site for a new Webster well.-Seniors could get a free fishing license at the fair for $15 (not exactly free as headline states).-The Grantsburg Fair opened on a Thursday.-Commodities would be distributed.-Siren street project was almost completed.-Traprock sand would be tested as trail surface.-DNR grant money was awarded to Meenon and Memory Lake parks.

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PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Greetings fellow citizens, how are you enjoying our beautiful fall days? I love to lie out and soak up the sun and smell the fresh air. Occasionally I get up to chase a squirrel but other than that, I’ve gone from the lazy days of summer right into the lazy days of fall! You should see that Maya and how much she has grown. She is all legs and has no problem jumping up onto the furniture now. She even jumps in the car all by herself, unlike Eli who waits to be helped! Money is still coming in for the Walk for the Animals, which is very much appreciated. It’s not too late to contribute to the walk, just send in a check, attention to Pam! She is very busy planning for next year with lots of good ideas. The shelter meeting was last Wednesday and there was some brainstorming for fundraiser ideas. In the meantime, we’re taking orders for kringles again so contact the shelter to make sure you don’t miss out on these yummy Christmas treats. Carly, the 9-month-old Gordon setter mix and is now available for adoption. I’m guessing she is medium in size, and is sweet and playful. Carly was a stray and she was lucky to be picked up by a very nice lady who brought her to us for safekeeping. It’s nice to have people out there that care about us four-footed creatures! If you think you might be interested in adopting Carly or one of our other great residents then please come and visit – we love company. The shelter has kittens looking for a home. Pia came in on her own and Marmalade, Zara, Sookie, Theo and Huey came in together. I’m told we’re expecting more kittens from the same group as the five I just told you about. I can’t express enough the importance to spay and neuter your animals so

Happy Tails

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County Eli is a 1-year-old Pomeranian. His long and silky coat is black. Eli has the Pomeranian prance and a happy-go-lucky personality. He will be happy to provide a solid friendship and go with you everywhere, knowing he is lucky to have found a new home. Eli is a larger-sized Pomeranian, weighing in at 15 pounds. He is housebroken and knows some commands. He enjoys long walks and sunny afternoons. He is good with other dogs and cats. He just wants to be a friend to everyone he meets. The Arnell shelter is full to overflowing with available dogs and puppies. Waiting for adoption day are 6- and 8-week old puppies, one male and five females. Cute as they can be, some are cream yel-

Shelter

YAPpenings Sadie that they don’t have unwanted litters. It’s not the poor babies fault they were born into this world but they’re the ones that suffer for it. We also have a young neutered male cat called Scruffy, not because he’s scruffy but because he has a damaged ear. Poor guy is terrified at the moment, but who can blame him with the two hounds barking – it’s stressful for him but Mom says he’s a nice boy. Hey, we have something new at the shelter, a cage with three little birds in it. Unfortunately their owner was going to live in a home and couldn’t take these little finches with her. So Lucas named them – Tweedle Dee, Tweedle Dum and Huckleberry Finch. Isn’t that hilarious? The names are bigger than they are. Anyway, they’re looking for a home. I don’t know who wrote the following but thought it would be good to share:

I rescued a human today

Her eyes met mine as she walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to help her. I wagged my tail, not too exuberantly, so she wouldn’t be afraid. As she stopped at my kennel I blocked her view from a little accident I had in the back of my cage. I didn’t want her to know that I hadn’t been walked today. Sometimes the shelter keepers get too busy low, some are black and silver and some are black and white. They are English sheepdog-husky-Lab mixes. Lucky is a handsome 1-year-old black Lab. He is ready to enjoy the trails with you during this awesome autumn and help you with snow shoveling this winter. As a youngster, Lucky is just waiting for your instruction. He loves life and has an exuberance for adventure. He will make a great companion and pal. Shooter is a purebred 2-year-old Brittany spaniel. He is also very handsome. Shooter is a tall Brittany with a hunting nose and spirit. He is a beautiful dog that loves the outdoors. His nose is probably what caused him to become a stray and brought him to the shelter. Shooter is now neutered and ready to become your new hunting companion. Gordon is a 6-month-old, medium–sized black Lab mix, young and anxious to please. Oliver is a 1-year-old neutered male puggle with long legs. Snowball is an 11-year-old Maltese. He is miniature and sweet. Just the right size to tuck under

Lewis It was Communion Sunday at the Lewis Memorial United Methodist Church. Assisting Pastor Tom were LaVonne Boyer and Kara Alden. “Happy Anniversary was sung to Carol and Jeff Tabat and to Renae and Rick Peterson. Flowers on the altar were courtesy of Roger Wolfgram, who was injured in the explosion at the former Lundeen house, then the Ed Greinke house and several others. Mr. Wolfgram suffered burns and a broken hip. He has been temporarily transferred to a care center and will have his hip tended to at a later date. He was not allowed to have flowers in his room in the burn center so a lovely fall arrangement was donated to the church in Lewis. Members and friends of the church have been praying for the man who was hurt. His wife has been keeping in touch with Joe and Cheryl DeGeer, next-door neighbors. The house was located across from the old Lundeen Mill. Birthday cake, fruit and beverages were served after the Sunday church service in honor of the recent birthday of Kara Alden. Her parents, John and

LaVonne Boyer, were doing the honors behind the counter. A Lewis church board meeting was held Wednesday night at the church preceded by a supper of glorious leftovers. Three white pines on the church lawn will be professionally cut down, as they are reportedly old and a danger to fall on people or the church building itself. Little by little the pine grove is disappearing but plans are afoot to plant other trees at a later time. The United Methodist Men are planning a pancake supper Saturday night, Oct. 15. Freewill offering. Watch for menu, etc., in coming news. October 15 is also the 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. writers conference at the Ag Center in Spooner. Free admission, free lunch and a chance to read a story aloud and compete for prizes. The Indianhead Writer’s Club is sponsoring the conference, this being the third in a row held there. Good fun, good writers and an anticipated treat. Please plan to carpool and come and enjoy the day at Spooner. Sheila Staples and Bernice Abrahamzon enjoyed

Borderline news Last Friday, Sharon Proffit and nine other 1960 classmates from Sandstone High School enjoyed a dinner hosted by former classmate Ardis Swanson at her home on Pine Lake west of Finlayson, Minn. Ardis and her husband, Ken, are the 20-year owners of a B&B in Stillwater, Minn. At this time, they are in the process of selling the B&B in order to spend more time with their family at their lake home. We thought the sighting of a cougar a few weeks ago was a rare treat. Dave Drake has a trail camera that shows a moose. Also, John Stelsel of Cozy Corner tells of seeing a huge bull moose while he and his wife, Kay, were bear hunting over near Donald Arendt’s. The Dairyland community was saddened by the

news of Harold “Tony” Aspen passing away on Monday, Sept. 26. A memorial service was held in Superior with a lunch following at the Dairyland Town Hall. An 80th birthday party was held for Russell Fischer on Oct. 1, at the Dairyland Town Hall. His wife, Mary Lou, and his son and daughters put on the party. Russell was telling every one that he was going to live until he was 95. A large crowd of family and friends were on hand to help him celebrate. Markville residents are saddened by the loss of Carol Erickson, who lived here with her husband, Gary, and family for several years. Her son, Tracy, wrote this in her memory: “Carol was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister, aunt, and for many oth-

and I didn’t want her to think poorly of them. As she read my kennel card I hoped that she wouldn’t feel sad about my past. I only have the future to look forward to and want to make a differ-

ence in someone’s life. She got down on her knees and made little kissy sounds at me. I shoved my shoulder and side of my head up against the bars to comfort her. Gentle fingertips caressed my neck; she was desperate for companionship. A tear fell down her cheek and I raised my paw to assure her that all would be well. Soon my kennel door opened and her smile was so bright that I instantly jumped into her arms. I would promise to keep her safe. I would promise to always be by her side. I would promise to do everything I could to see that radiant smile and sparkle in her eyes. I was so fortunate that she came down my corridor. So many more are out there who haven’t walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. I rescued a human today. Have a great week everyone. Licks and tailwags. The Humane Society of Burnett County is saving lives, one at a time. www.hsburnettcty.org. 715866-4096. License No. 267335-DS We’re on Facebook too!

your arm and hold in your lap. All of these dogs are ready to meet you at our shelter. Not to be outdone, adoptable cats and kittens are biding their time, waiting to be chosen. Brooklyn the Eli Maine coon-mix female with panache; Annie, the softspoken gray-andwhite spayed female; Cassidy, a quiet, loving, medium-hair brown tabby female; Oscar, the superfriendly all-black neutered male; and of course, the kittens. Meet them all in our adoption room easy chair. So much personality in one room, they will make your day. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, 185 Griffin St. E., Amery, 715-268-7387 (PETS) or online: Arnellhumane.org.

Bernice Abrahamzon the Mark Twain program last Thursday night at St. Luke UM Church in the sanctuary. It was sponsored by the Frederic Public Library, and was done professionally. It was part of the library’s 75th anniversary. The actor came out of Branson, Mo., and is now touring in small-town America. Very professional and very convincing. Sheila Staples and Rick Abrahamzon went to Hinckley, Minn., for a gun show, then over to Wrenshall, Minn., and home via Superior. On Sunday, Sheila and Rick, along with Bernice Abrahamzon, enjoyed a ride to Siren, Webster and Grantsburg. They drove through Crex Meadows as it was Crex’s fall tour day on a beautiful, almost sunny summer day. They topped off the day with a double-dip ice-cream cone. Good reports of elderberry jelly making and grape jelly or juice. A vegetable vendor in Webster was doing a good business on Sunday at Webster selling different varieties of squash, yellow watermelon, green peppers, carrots, etc.

Bob Brewster ers as well, she was by far the most selfless person I have ever met. I am proud to have had such a wonderful woman in my life. She was born on Jan. 3, 1944, and passed on Tuesday, Sept. 27. Carol will be missed by all that knew her and will be honored by all that loved her. While our hearts may be broken, remember what a wonderful woman she was without pain, as she left scars to feel pain from." Cheryl Wickham spent a few days up in Duluth at the Edge Water Park with four other ladies. They went on the train ride, dinner boat cruise, drove up the North Shore, played a lot of cards and had a great time. The colors on the trees were spectacular. Enjoy this nice weather.

Birth announcements Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A girl, Lyla Mae Edaburn, born Sept. 15, 2011, to Rodney Edaburn and Rebecca Smith-Edaburn, St. Croix Falls. Lyla weighed 9 lbs., 7 oz. ••• A girl, Natalie Ann Carlson, born Sept. 16, 2011, to Clayton and Kelli Carlson, Osceola. Natalie weighed 6 lbs., 14 oz. ••• A boy, Blake Ian Hutton, born Sept. 20, 2011, to Jennifer Walker and Leon Hutton, Frederic. Blake weighed 7 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A boy, Owen Kenneth Swenson, born Sept. 21, 2011, to Wendy and Michael Swenson, Grantsburg. Owen weighed 7 lbs., 9 oz. ••• A girl, Annabella Kathryn Weller, born Sept. 22, 2011, to Latasha Campbell and David Weller, Frederic. Annabella weighed 8 lbs. ••• A boy, Odin Broderick Songetay, born Sept. 23, 2011, to Amber Berglind and Jon Songetay, Siren. Odin weighed 9 lbs., 1 oz. ••• A girl, Rebekah Charlotte Westby, born Sept. 25, 2011, to Benjamin and Rachel Westby, Taylors Falls. Rebekah weighed 7 lbs., 12 oz. •••

Born at Osceola Medical Center:

A girl, Maudie Cole Bjelland, born Sept. 26, 2011, to Jeremy and Nicole Bjelland, Grantsburg. Maudie weighed 6 lbs., 6 oz. •••

St. Croix Senior Center Marian Edler Tuesday morning Ucare was at the center and gave information on Medicare and related subjects. In the afternoon, games were played. Don Anderson, Donna Schlosser and George Meixner were the winners in Dominos. The winning team in Hand and Foot was Bill McGrorty and Russ Adams. The winners in 500 cards were Ray Nelson, Marlys Borchardt, Ron Flostad and Larry Anderson. Thursday morning, we held our exercise session followed by Skip-Bo. Thursday evening 500 cards were played. Friday morning, Bridge was the game of the day. Saturday, Autumnfest was held with a beautiful, sunny day, but a little cool. Gratitude is extended to everyone who stopped and enjoyed some food or bought from our bake sale and garage sale. It was a very successful fundraiser. Tuesday, Oct. 4, the Department of Transportation will come and give us some tips on the roundabout that will open soon by Menards. It will be great to have construction done on Hwy. 8.

Frederic Senior Center Hazel Hoffman What a great place to live, our weather has been perfect. I hope everyone gets a chance to just drive around and see the beautiful trees in their fall colors. Everyone had better enjoy this now but remember right around the corner winter is hiding ready to attack us with snow, ice, sleet and cold winds. All our current senior center members remember our special dinner coming up this weekend. Our cardplayer winners were, in Spades: first, Jim Anderson; second, Holly Stonesifer; third, Lorna Erickson; and fourth, Inez Pearson; 500 winners: first, Rich Hustad; second, Sue Hughes; third, Arnie Borchert; and fourth, Mildred Ihrig. Our regular weekly schedule is Spades on Monday at 1 p.m., 500 is every Thursday evening at 6:30 p.m. Then Poker is played every Wednesday and Friday at 1 p.m. Then last but not least are our pool players who play almost every day around 9 a.m. Everyone is welcome. Hope to see you all next week.

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OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Wedding

Siren

715-349-2964 Last Wednesday afternoon and most of Thursday were blue days in bear country. Not sad days but blue bird days. There were bluebirds everywhere, in the trees, on the ground and even fighting over the birdbath. Seems this is their annual migration south and just stopped in for a quick bath, something to eat and maybe a little rest. By Thursday evening they took off; I haven’t seen them since. Have you ever tried to do any outside painting at this time of year? Not a good thing. Wednesday morning I got everything ready for a painting project, the five steel doors. They needed to be painted but first they needed to be primed. I had a good start on the job when it started warming up. There they came, wasps flying everywhere. I spent more time swatting them away than I did painting. Things went from bad to worse in a hurry – I got stung. It then became an all-out war. I armed myself with a flyswat-

Swenson/Wegner Rick and Patty Swenson of Frederic and Dave and Janis Wegner of Siren are honored to announce the July 8, 2011, marriage of their children, Jesse Martin and Natalie Jane in Forrestville, Calif. They surprised their parents, family and friends with a call on July 8 to announce they had eloped to the Sonoma Valley wine country. Their wedding was coordinated by the Farmhouse Inn (farmhouseinn.com) where they spent their four-day “weddingmoon.” The ceremony was held at the Russian Hill Winery overlooking Russian River Valley vineyards. Natalie and Jesse currently reside in Rochester, Minn., where Natalie is employed at Mayo Clinic and Jesse at IBM. - submitted

Orange

Fran Krause

LaVonne O'Brien

Harmony HCE Club met at Cedarwood Manor on Tuesday, Oct. 4, with Amy Kopecky and Fran Krause as hostesses. LaVonne O’Brien had lunch with Marie Sheppard at Emily’s restaurant on Friday. Last weekend John and Reeny Neinstadt drove to UW-River Falls to pick up grandson Blake Johnson and then to UM-Duluth for grandson Jared Johnson. Later they drove home to Cadott. Reeny volunteered at Ruby’s Pantry on Saturday in Danbury. Patty and Mike Kringen spent the weekend with Jack and Jeri Witzany. Mark and Deanna Krause met Karen and Jerry Hintz at Madison Saturday and enjoyed the Badger versus Nebraska football game there Saturday night. Allyson and Bryan Krause spent homecoming weekend at home. The Orange 4-H Club met Saturday a.m. at the library to re-enroll for the new year. This week is National 4-H Week.

from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Come enjoy the all-you-caneat spaghetti dinner at just $7 for adults and kids 11 and under just $4. After the dinner, check out the silent auction articles and don’t forget the raffles. Congratulations to elementary student Derek Highstrom, middle schooler Payton Decorah and high schooler Michelle Potempa for being chosen Siren Schools students of the week. What a great job – keep it up. For those of you who enjoy singing in choirs or have in the past sung in the Siren Community Christmas Choir, rehearsals started on Monday, Oct. 3. However, you can still join by coming to the Siren Bethany Lutheran Church on Monday, Oct. 17, at 7 p.m. The choir will perform two engagements, Saturday, Dec. 3, at 7 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 4, at 3 p.m. The instructor is James Muus.

Webster Senior Center Another month has flown by and here we are in October already. This is such a pretty month, though, I hope everyone can get out and enjoy it. The Wii bowling gals took their bowling very seriously this week. Pat had high individual game with a 245 and high individual series with a 447 (we bowl two games). Gladys picked up the 4–6 split. The Sleepers had high team game with a 799 and high team series with a 1509. Super job by everyone. We are in need of one or two subs. If anyone is interested, call me at 715-656-3583 or just stop by the center Wednesday morning.

There were 24 to play Dime Bingo on Wednesday, who enjoyed the treats furnished by Jane Wardean. We always have room for more. The games start at 12:30 p.m. every Wednesday. Just bring your dimes and come on in. Don’t forget we have pool and cards on Thursday evening starting at 7 p.m. We finish about 9 p.m. Stop in and join the fun. Happy birthday to Bill Lalor and all others who celebrated birthdays in September. Remember, Nikki is serving brunch every Friday in October. Stop in and pick up a menu. You can also

Bernie Boelter

look over the lunches and sign up for your favorite. If you have questions regarding meals, call Nikki at 715-866-5300. Mark your calendar for the next monthly meeting, which is Tuesday, Oct. 18, at 1 p.m. Please plan to attend. All those wishing to vote for officers next June need to pay their dues between Oct. 1 and Dec. 31. It is a proven fact, people who have more birthdays live longer. See you at the center.

Interstate Park news Naturalist programs at Wisconsin Interstate Park Saturday, Oct. 8

Molten Lava and Melted Ice, 10:30 a.m., at the Pothole Trail sign. Join naturalist Barb Walker for a fall hike around the trail and learn about the Gee

Whiz Geology of Interstate Park. See a spectacular view of the river gorge as the leaves reach their peak of color. The Secrets of Eagle Peak, 1:30 p.m., at the Eagle Peak Trail sign in the Pines Group Camp. Meet the naturalist for a short hike up to the highest point in the park and learn some of the secrets of the peak. See a view of the St. Croix River Valley from the top.

Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls, on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy. 8. Call Walker or Julie Fox at 715-483-3747. Or visit the Web site at www.friendsofinterstatepark.org and “Like” us on Facebook for more information and upcoming events.

Siren Senior Center Are you enjoying the colorful leaves? I am certainly enjoying the change of season and hope we have a long fall, as I am not ready for the white stuff. The Burnett County Department of Health and Human Services began taking applications for energy assistance Oct. 1. Call Connie Crosby, Burnett County elderly benefit specialist, at 715-349-7600, Ext. 1239, to schedule an appointment. Applications for people 60 and over will be done at Siren Senior Center on Thursday, Oct. 6, from 9 a.m. until noon. The monthly evening meal will be served at Siren

Academic news CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa – Jacob Stiemann of Siren is attending Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Stiemann, the son of Phil and Sheryl Stiemann, is a graduate of Siren High School. With a record enrollment year, Stiemann joins a class of 399 new students, including 361 first-year and 38 transfer students at Coe. In total, the college has 1,378 full and part-time students registered for fall 2011 term. While this year’s incoming class is historically large, the profile of the new students builds upon the Coe tradition of academic quality. The Class of 2015 has an average ACT score of 26 and grade-point average of 3.7. All totaled, 58 first-year students scored 30 or greater on the ACT test. As well, more than 31 percent of first-year class members ranked in the top-10 percent of their high school graduating class. Stiemann received the Dean’s Scholarship to attend Coe for his outstanding academic profile. - submitted ••• SUPERIOR – Congratulations to Lynn Stubbe, Webster, who was awarded the Roger & Gloria Redding Educational Fund for the upcoming 2011/2012 academic school year. Stubbe is majoring in elementary education and was among several distance learning students awarded a scholarship. UW-Superior’s Distance Learning Center has been serving students for more than 30 years, offering adult nontraditional students the opportunity to pursue an accredited University of Wisconsin degree through online studies. The distance learning center is dedicated to expanding students academic horizons while learning from any geographical location and continuing with current life obligations such as family or career. Further information can be found at www.uwsuper.edu/distancelearning. - submitted •••

ter and a can of Raid. Let me tell you, there are a lot less than there were, at least in bear country. You can bet your bottom dollar this old gal got her doors primed. I’m betting I get a repeat performance when I put the paint on those doors. The Siren Covenant Church ladies are again selling their great apple pies. To place your orders for pies call 715-349-2486 or 715-349-5601. These frozen pies are just $9 a piece. Sympathy to the family of Michael Anderson who passed away Sept. 16. Sympathy to the family of Dorothy Melin who passed away Sept. 17. This county will miss this lady. Every 4-H’er knew and loved her. She will be missed. The Restorative Justice of Northwestern Wisconsin will once again hold their spaghetti feed at the Burnett County Moose Lodge on Saturday, Oct. 8,

Bev Beckmark

Senior Center on Thursday, Oct. 6. We will be having turkey, mashed potatoes, vegetable and salad bar. Please call Siren Nutrition at 715-349-2845 or Siren Senior Center at 715-349-7810 for reservations. Laurie, our sub cook, has been filling in due to CeCe’s medical absence. Winners at 500 were Gerry Vogel, Herb Wasserman, Don Antiel, Dave Peterson and Arvid Pearson. Spade winners were Gerry Vogel, Ernie Hintze, Dorothy Cronquist, Shirley Doriott and Mary Sicord.

Congratulations to all the winners. Some of our snowbirds are already talking about leaving us for a few months. We hope they stay and enjoy our fall weather. On a personal note, I have broken one bone in my foot and have a badly sprained ankle. I have to wear an ankle brace for a month. Thanks for all the best wishes, calls and cards - they are all appreciated. Until next time, enjoy the nice weather and stay healthy.

Dewey - LaFollette Sympathy is extended to Pam and Bob Bentz and family due to the death of Pam’s son, David. He was ht by a car in Pennsylvania. David was 36. Gerry and Donna Hines went to Vadnais Heights, Minn., Monday and stayed overnight with Brenda and Tim Sweet. On Tuesday, they went to Radcliffe, Iowa, and visited Pastor Earl and Joan Korhonen and family. They returned to the Twin Cities Thursday and came home Friday. Inez and Arvid Pearson visited Lawrence and

Nina Hines Wednesday morning. Don and Pat Israel, Roger and Sue Mroszak and Hank and Karen Mangelsen went out to eat Friday evening to celebrate their anniversaries – 60 years for Don and Pat, 49 years for Roger and Sue, and 45 years for Hank and Karen. Diane Hulleman, Nina and Donna Hines, Lida Nordquist and Karen Mangelsen went to a baby shower for Sonya Murray Saturday at Faith Lutheran Church in Spooner. Sonya is a granddaughter of

Karen Mangelsen Marlene Swearingen, and she’s married to Mike Murray, Diane’s grandson. A large number of people attended the open house for Kay and Jack Krentz at Lakeview Church Sunday afternoon. It was in honor of their 50th wedding anniversary. Sunday afternoon visitors and supper guests of Hank and Karen Mangelsen were Wayne and Marie Romsos. They enjoyed watching the Packers game together.

Grantsburg Public Library Halloween face-painting night on Monday, Oct. 31, from 3:30-5:30 p.m. Kids can come in costume to have their faces painted to match. But, we are not professionals ... keep it simple please. Can’t wait to see the great costumes and faces. Get To Know Your Library Night will be Monday, Nov. 14, from 6-8 p.m. The library will be open after hours to answer questions, give tours, help patrons learn the catalog system, help with e-readers and much more. Save the date. Youth chess club has begun as of Wednesday, Oct. 5, after school. Can’t wait to see all of last year's members and our new members. It will be a great year. Preschool story hour is in full swing. Story time is every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m. Stories, crafts, music and fun will keep your preschool wanting to come back each week.

RIGHT: Heidi Rusch, natural resources educator from Crex Meadows, will be reading every fourth Wednesday at 10:30 a.m., as part of Grantsburg Public Library’s preschool story time. – Photo submitted

Nona Severson


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547060 7L


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

First-person history – living the details Recreating or “interpreting” a persona from a past era can be tricky, but worth the effort, according to Bob Braun of Fort Atkinson, who will portray fur trader John Sayer on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Forts Folle Avoine Historical Park’s Beaver Club dinner. As he explains, “Many folks think of history as a dry, fact-laden subject. What if you could converse with a person of the past? What would that be like?” Questions like these drive Braun’s portrayals of fur trade life. He also talks of reaching right out of the history books directly into the lives of modern people, adding that “being able to bridge the historical gap for visitors is one of my passions.” Joining Braun as a Beaver Club host

Bob Braun of Fort Atkinson, dressed as John Sayer who lived at the original Forts Folle Avoine in 1803-04, will be featured at this year’s Beaver Club dinner. Reservations can be made by calling the Forts at 715-866-8890. More info is available on the Web at www.theforts.org. – Photos submitted

Folle Avoine Chronicles Woodswhimsy the gnome

will be Duke Addicks of St. Paul, Minn. Along with Braun, Addicks’ way of bridging the time gap with his audiences relies heavily on his gift for storytelling, a knack of his developed listening to his Cherokee grandmother’s tales. “She wasn’t just satisfied to tell me a story—to make sure I’d absorb it, she had me repeat it back to her,” he explains. Later, he was able to expand on that heritage via tales about people such as fur trader James Aird, whom he will portray at the Beaver Club, and his bag of stories eventually grew to include many other types, ranging from ghost stories to Native American lore to performing flute music of various tribes, a talent which will also be evident throughout the Beaver Club festivities. Asked what he hopes people will take away from their Beaver Club experience, Addicks’ response is, “Well...a story. What sort of story will they take away? To whom will they pass the story? In passing the stories along, that’s how the history is remembered, like it was with my grandmother.” Braun concurs, viewing the Beaver Club event, he says, as “an opportunity to recreate the world of the fur trade as some of its original members experienced it.” By showing a slice of that life, he hopes that the evening‘s diners will kind of experience a story within a story, one that makes distant history more memorable, less stale. At the least, it provides a unique way to explore another facet of fur trade society than can usually be shown at the reconstructed wintering posts at Folle Avoine. Sounds easy, but both Addicks and Braun are aware of inherent problems that arise from doing “first-person” portrayals. As Braun acknowledges, “Not everyone is into role-playing.” Addicks

Duke Addicks, dressed as fur trader James Aird, will host and play Native American flute music at the Forts Folle Avoine Beaver Club dinner this Saturday, Oct. 8. The cabin in this picture was built by the original Aird in the 1770s near Prairie du Chien and is the oldest structure in Wisconsin still on its original location. emphasizes that “you have to really know what you’re talking about or it falls flat,” and he emphasizes “details ... details ... details. If you’re taking a role of a specific person, really know the individual’s life or don’t venture there.” Braun, for instance, in researching John Sayer, has closely read the latter’s journal, written during the winter of 1804-05 while he was in the Folle Avoine country. Then, as he explains, “I read his entries and try to verbalize in his style, which uses an economy of words. I then do more general reading—about voyageurs, about the North West Company, its characters and nuances. I also read up on the Ojibwe people and their culture, to form an understanding of their essential role in the fur trade.” In other words, both re-enactors are thorough in their approach to fleshing out “dem bones” called history. All those details, as Addicks reminds, “can’t be stressed enough.” While many students of history end up glorifying the past they portray, Braun’s approach is more careful in tracing the leads he finds. As he says, “I am most struck by the fallibilities of humans of the fur trade. Curot (the XY Co opponent of Sayer’s at Yellow River) struggled with irascible employees, Sayer dealt, or more properly didn’t deal, with his own internal demons, what appears to be alcoholism, a malady that may have destroyed his career. We modern investigators are left with the question regarding sufferers of addiction we may know in our own lives and can only surmise, ‘what if...’” History, with warts included, can be a teacher even across time, is his conclu-

sion. What’s also interesting about all this, Addicks explains, “is how one thing can lead to another. In portraying fur trader James Aird, and knowing his family, I can talk about his Dakota/Sioux wife Grey Cloud, her brother Wabasha, and bring in the Native American element all the time. It was, after all, an essential part of Aird’s, and any fur trader’s, life. Just to say I’m James Aird, fur trader, doesn’t cover all the bases of that life, it’s not the whole picture.” Braun was active for years in Revolutionary War and Civil War era re-enactments. But he fell in love with the fur trade one year during a visit to Grand Portage on Lake Superior. “One trip and I was hooked!” he proclaims. Later he came upon Forts Folle Avoine. Reflecting on his experiences there, he explains, “Something many don’t realize is that the Forts site is truly a unique site, showing as it does how two companies of the time traded for furs with the Ojibwe on virtually the same location. This is, dare I say, the only example of this aspect in the United States.” Then again, the Forts Folle Avoine experience, at least at the reconstructed wintering site, is unable to recreate the Montreal aspect of the trade. How to remedy this? Hold a Beaver Club dinner, set in Montreal, in 1810; try to recreate what it must have felt like; add food and entertainment, celebrate with passion and live the history. Signed, Woodswhimsy

COATS FOR KIDS Distribution Day...

Coats, Snowpants, Boots, Hats, Mittens, Scarves • Size Infant - Adult

Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 to 11 a.m.

Siren Assembly of God Church 23811 State Rd. 35 • Siren, WI Everyone welcome!

547114 7Lp 49ap

Still taking donations of these items. Need more info? Contact Luann Ackerley, 715-327-4737 or Sylvia Hansen, 715-327-8235.

Formerly held at Pilgrim Lutheran Church in Frederic.

RETIRING! Duane & Liz Stager

Ma & Pa’s Construction

We would like to thank all our friends and customers that made our business a success for the past 33 years. 547117 7Lp

546592 6-8L

We Have Sold Our Business To Taylor Excavating, 715-349-7484


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LIBRARY NEWS Polk County Library Federation

POLK COUNTY – The Polk County Money Smart Week schedule is: Monday, Oct. 10, 4 – 5 p.m. Budgeting and Your Kids from Royal Credit Union at Osceola Public Library, 102 Chieftain North, Osceola, 715-2942310. Tuesday, Oct. 11, 3 – 4 p.m. Loans, Credit and Fraud from Bank Mutual St. Croix Falls at the St. Croix Falls Public Library, 230 South Washington St., St. Croix Falls, 715-483-1777. Wednesday, Oct. 12, 1 – 2 p.m. Identity Theft from Frandsen Bank in Luck at Balsam Lake Public Library, 404 Main St., Balsam Lake, 715-485-3215. Wednesday, Oct. 12, 6 – 7 p.m. Investments for Your Future from Bremer Bank at Centuria Public Library, 409 4th St., Centuria, 715-646-2630. Thursday, Oct. 13, 6 – 7 p.m. Understanding Your Property Taxes from Bob Clifton, former assessor at the Dresser Public Library, 117 S. Central Ave., Dresser, 715-755-2944. Friday, Oct. 14, 2 – 3 p.m. Medicare 101, Wisconsin specific from JA Counter at the Frederic Public Library, 127 Oak St., Frederic, 715-327-4979. Saturday, Oct. 15, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. All Friends of the Polk County Libraries gathering for a Smart Money Week conclusion. The keynote speaker will be Sue Hall, library strategies coordinator from St. Paul, Minn.

Friends – Now More Than Ever. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. for the Friends of the Library group members and supports at the Polk County Library Federation, 400 Polk County Plaza, Suite A, Balsam Lake. Call 715-485-8680 to register for any of the above. Brought to you by www.moneystartwi.org and the Polk County Library Federation. No selling of products is allowed. Questions? Call Colleen Gifford Foxwell at the Polk County Library Federation, 715-485-8680.

New computer classes Free classes at the library are starting on Tuesdays, beginning Oct. 11, from 2 - 3 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11 – Internet basic and safe shopping; Tuesday, Oct. 18 – E-book readers, how to set up and download library books on a Nook and iPad , hands on time and questions. Tuesday, Oct. 15 – Set up Facebook. Call to reserve your spot at 715-485-3215. Wisconsin author Terry Fisk “Wisconsin Ghosts and the Afterlife.” The presentation highlights evidence for the afterlife. Examples include the recent scientific studies of mediums, near-death experiences, past-life regressions, and out-of-body experiences. He also describes his ghost investigations with world-renowned medium Allison DuBois, the real-life inspiration for the hit CBS series, “Medium,” and psychic Chip Coffey, from TV’s “Paranormal State” and “Psychic Kids.” This session examines some of the haunted locations in Wisconsin personally investigated by Fisk. He will share photos, case histories, eyewitness accounts and ghost lore. Please join this group at the Balsam Lake Library for the free event on

Halloween party – Treats, spooky stuff and duct tape. Wednesday, Oct. 26, 4 p.m., all ages. Come in costume and receive a door prize. Free movie passes to best costumes made of duct tape. Supplies available.

Little Yoga – Wednesdays in November at 11 a.m. Free yoga for children and caregivers with instructor Julie Karsky. Preregistration required, call 715-483-1777 or register online at www.stcroixfallslibrary.org. Write Where UR – A writers workshop Saturday, Nov. 5. Educator and author Carolyn Wedin will facilitate the polishing and reworking process, encouraging writers to share their final piece with fellow participants.

Wednesday, Oct. 26, 6:30 p.m.

New books in October “Litigators” by John Grishman, “Great Leader” by Jim Harrison, ”Dovekeepers” by Alice Hoffman, “Shockwave” by John Sandford, “Best of Me” by Nicholas Sparks, and “Bonnie ” by Iris Johansen. Book club Selection for October is “Blood, Bones & Butter“ by Gabrielle Hamilton. In “Blood, Bones & Butter,” you’ll meet a French mother who cooked “tails, claws and marrow-filled bones” in high heels, a father who built sets for the circus, and then follow Hamilton’s own various incarnations as waitress, freelance caterer, camp cook, graduate student and restaurant entrepreneur. All with tightly crafted prose, the heat of the kitchen, and more than a pinch of emotional honesty. Book club meets Wednesday, Oct. 19, 3 p.m. Everyone welcome. Hours Balsam Lake Library, (under the water tower) at 404 Main St., Balsam Lake. Hours are Monday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Tuesday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Wednesday 10 a.m. – 8 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. E-mail: balsamlakepl@ifls.lib.wi.us. Web site: www.balsamlakepubliclibrary.org., 715485-3215.

Artsy Smartsy authors and illustrators. We are pleased to welcome back teaching artist Tiffany Paige Meyer for this amazing visual arts program created exclusively for children ages 3-6 and their caregivers. The third Tuesday of each month, September though May, participants will take a closer look at some favorite authors and illustrators through books and creative expression at 10 a.m. at the St. Croix Falls Public Library. Preregistration is required. Register at the library circulation desk, online or call 715-483-1777. This is a free program. Remember to wear art-smart clothing (dress for mess!) ... see you at the library.

School’s Out! SCFPL’s after-school program for kids age 8-plus. Meet friends, get homework help and hang out at the library on Wednesdays during the school year 3:30 – 5 p.m. Take bus No. 9 down to the library on Wednesday afternoons (with a note from your parent or guardian). Contact Cole czrostlik@stcroixfallslibrary.org for more info and to sign up for updates. On display at the library First Impressions: The St. Croix, a collaborative project of the UW-River Falls Studio photography and printmaking classes. Images on exhibition reflect each student’s research and interpretation about an aspect of the community, ecosystem, geology, history or industry of the St. Croix. Community meeting room is available for your organization Reserve the meeting room with our online form at www.stcroixfallslibrary.org. Story hour with Cole Listen to stories, create art and have fun with other kids and parents every Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. Check out our Web site It has up-to-date information on what’s happening at the library and other useful library tools you can use at home, www.stcroixfallslibrary.org. Look for us on Facebook. Technology Free wireless and eight public computers are available at the library. Plus, seven laptops are available for use in the library, but you must have a valid MORE library card in good standing. Hours The library is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. 715-483-1777. Email: scflibrary@stcroixfallslibrary.org Online: www.stcroixfallslibrary.org.

Frederic Public Library Food for Fines Month at the library For each grocery item you bring to the library during October we will deduct $1 from your library fines and take the donations to the Family Pathways food shelf. Now is the time to erase your fines and dig under the bed, look behind the couch, and check your car for long-lost library items. Bring in your overdue materials along with your food shelf items, and we’ll bargain. Best of all – you will feel good about helping to fill the shelves of our community food pantry. Confused about health-care issues? Plan to attend Medicare 101, with J. A. Counter, at the Frederic Library on Friday, Oct. 14, from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. This is a great opportunity to learn about Medicare and have your questions answered by an expert in the field. This session is one of a series in the Money Smart Week program sponsored by the Polk County Library Federation.

What’s your ghost story? If you are curious – and brave – join us at the library on Thursday, Oct. 27, at 7 p.m., for an evening with Chad Lewis, author and presenter of “Most Haunted Locations of Wisconsin.” Lewis is a paranormal researcher and has stories to tell – and we think you do, too. Prepare to be entertained, amazed and enlightAthlete’s Choice - Unity athletes picked ened. their favorite chili, and the winner was Hack’s Pub. Wednesday morning story time People’s Choice – The winner of a popLibrary staff and volunteer moms have ular vote from the community was Indian- planned a great story time program for head Supper Club. school year, and all preschoolers and their Top Honors - A local celebrity panel of caregivers are welcome Wednesday judges, Carl Holmgren, Rod Peterson, Pete mornings at 10:30 a.m. for an hour of Peterson and Marilyn Peterson, offered books, activities and fun. Come and be their taste buds to test the recipes. The part of the excitement! winner was Indianhead Supper Club. Thank you to the chili cook-off partici- Book groups to meet in October pants and congratulations to this year’s The Thursday morning book group will winners. - submitted meet Oct. 20, at 10 a.m., to discuss “Can-

Chili cook-off results from Unity Community Picnic

BALSAM LAKE – Unity Community Education planned and coordinated the 11th-annual Unity Community Picnic, which took place Saturday, Sept. 24. This year saw the return of the chili cook-off as businesses and organizations competed for recognition. The competing businesses donated all of their ingredients and served hundreds of people. This year’s entrants were Hack’s Pub, CWS Security Watch, Royal Credit Union, Indianhead Supper Club and Balsam Lake Fire Department. They competed for three honors:

Friends of the Library (FOL) Book Club Wednesday, Oct. 12, 3 p.m., in the Community Meeting Room. The current book is “The Story of Charlotte’s Web : E. B. White’s Eccentric Life in Nature and the Birth of an American Classic,” by Michael Sims.

Haunted hike Haunted hike in Park Rosemarie by the fairgrounds. Check out the Web site or Facebook for more information.

Balsam Lake Public Library Story time Bring the little ones to the library for story time every Wednesday at 11 a.m. Stories, crafts and snacks, all ages welcome to join our lively group.

St. Croix Falls Public Library

nery Row,” by John Steinbeck, his iconic novel about the adventures of cannery workers living in the run-down waterfront section of Monterey, Calif. The evening book group will also meet Oct. 20, at 6:30 p.m., to talk about “The Wolf at Twilight,” by Kent Nerburn. The author has written a fictionalized account of accompanying an old friend and Indian elder on a journey through “a land of ghosts and shadows.” Copies can be borrowed from the library, and new members are always welcome at the book discussions.

Computer questions? Basic computer training is offered Tuesdays, 9 – 10 a.m., in comfortable, drop-in sessions. If you have questions about terminology, the Internet, e-mail, Facebook or anything else computer-related, register at the library for a space. If the time is not convenient for you, talk to library staff about scheduling other computer training sessions. Totes and tees at the library The Friends of the Frederic Library are offering sturdy canvas library totes and comfy cotton T-shirts with the new library design celebrating the 75th anniversary. Totes and shirts are available at the library, so stop in soon for the best choice of colors. Your purchases support the programs of the library. Keep up with what’s happening at the library Find us on Facebook at Frederic Public Library. The Web site is www.fredericlibrary.org. E-mail us at library@fredericlibrary.org. Frederic Public Library, 127 Oak Street West. 715-327-4979. Library hours are Monday through Friday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Story time for preschoolers is held every Wednesday morning at 10:30 a.m.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

100 ,0 00 th pizza comes out of the oven at Zia Louisa in Webster by Nancy Jappe Leader staff reporter WEBSTER - It happened recently in Webster. The 100,000th pizza put together at Zia Louisa, a Webster pizza place, came out of the oven and out to the table Tuesday, Sept. 20. A record for the restaurant, for its creator, Paul Hanson, and for Jason Hanson, the son who recently bought the place from his father. Paul Hanson is a local man with a reputation for making good pizzas. He got his start at the C & S Cafe in town - 10 years there. Then, 16 years ago, in February 1995, he moved the business to Hwy. 35 and changed the name to Zia Louisa. Pictures on the wall mark the times when the 25,000th and 50,000th pizzas came out of the oven. Paul will be 69 in December and felt it was time to retire. He put the business up for sale, waiting for a buyer(s) to come forward. Jason and his sisters talked about buying the restaurant and keeping it in the family. That didn’t work out. Paul was disappointed. Jason had been working in construction. For the past five years, he had worked for Lunda Construction in Black River Falls. He and his dad talked about Jason taking over, and Jason agreed to do so. “I wanted him to go and enjoy himself,” Jason commented. Paul trained him for about a month, making sure Jason knew all about the kitchen, baking amounts, handling the books, getting into the rhythm of being the owner of a restaurant. Then June 1 the takeover took place. Paul stayed around for about a month, answering questions, being ready to help, then started on that long-wished-for retirement. The time since June 1 has been busy for Jason. He has been making some changes; people have been coming in to talk with him. One big change is now in place. Zia Louisa is offering deliveries within a five-mile area of the restaurant. Anything on the menu, with the exception of breakfast items, can be ordered for home delivery. The motels in Siren are included in the delivery area, and deliveries are made between 11 a.m. and closing. Hours for Zia Louisa are from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sundays. Items on the menu have an Italian touch and include pizza, lasagna, spaghetti, burgers and a wide variety of appetizers. The biggest seller in the pizza line is the house special which includes pepperoni, sausage, mushrooms, green and black olives, green peppers and onions. Other pizza choices include Hawaiian, garlic shrimp, chicken Alfredo and creole. Specials are included in the offerings, like $1 burgers on Monday nights, 50-cent wings on Tuesday, spaghetti on Wednesdays, even at times money off on the order of a large pizza. Jason has joined the Burnett County Tavern League and cleared a space to the north of the restaurant for a volleyball court and a team that he sponsors. He’ll be looking into various offerings to keep people coming in. “I appreciate everybody giving me the chance,” Jason said. “If things need to be changed, let me know. I appreciate the employees, who have done a great job.” Eleven employees are on the payroll now, but that may increase as deliveries increase. Bonnie Hammond, who is in charge of the kitchen and makes the pizzas, has been

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE OF NORTHWEST WI ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT SPAGHETTI FEED With salad, fresh bread sticks, dessert & beverages.

Saturday, October 8, 2011 Served: 4:30 - 7:30 p.m. Cost: $7 (Age 12-Adult) $4 Children (Age 11 & Under) Burnett County Moose Lodge #1194 7330 State Highway 70, Siren Raffle and Silent Auction Items: * MN Vikings Percy Harvin #12 Framed Autograph Print * Mall of America Nickelodeon Universe Package * $50 Bremer Savings Bond * Pottery * Electric Table Fountain * 2-Person Tent * Birdhouses * Gourmet Knife Set * Girl Scout Cookies * The Lodge * Fur, Fins & Feathers * Making Memories and More * Nouveau * Chattering Squirrel * Adventures * Best Western * St. Croix Casino Danbury Package * Integrative Healing Therapist and much more.

Please come and help Restorative Justice raise money to continue their efforts to hold offenders accountable and provide healing for victims. We are a nonprofit organization.

This ad is sponsored by Burnett County Department of Health and Human Services through the Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant. 546582 48a 7L

Jason Hanson, the new owner of Zia Louisa in Webster, is shown here with Kelly Oster, Tanya Thompson and the 100,000th pizza made by the business started by his father, Paul, 26 years ago. - Photo submitted

Paul Hanson, Webster, the man who started and built up a reputation for good pizzas, is shown with the 25,000th and 50,000th pizzas he created. His son, Jason, who now owns the business, got the recent thrill of being on hand when the 100,000th pizza came out of the oven. on the job for six years. Carol Hawkinson is another longtime employee. Jason’s own son Justin cooks breakfasts. Jason was born in Webster and graduated from Webster High School in 1990. He spent four years in the Marine Corps, then two years in the Army before returning home. He started in construction by building bridges, then went into sewer and water work before going back to bridge building. He thought he was working a lot of hours in the construction field, but has now found out how much time it

takes to own a restaurant - seven days a week currently. He’s been pretty much tied up there so far, but plans to venture out to visit other restaurants and do some errands away from the business eventually. He’s got plans for kitchen upgrades and getting outside work done before the snow flies. If he’s away from the business, he will try to be back by 4 p.m. each day. “I am grateful for people coming in and seeing me,” Jason said. “If you haven’t been in, stop and see me and have a good experience here.”

Zia Louisa offers dine-in, takeout and now delivery service (within five miles) to residents of the Webster area. The restaurant is located at 26708 Lakeland Ave. North, Webster. – Photos by Nancy Jappe unless otherwise noted

2011Wisconsin Honey Queen visits Polk County The 2011 Wisconsin honey queen is Danielle Dale. She is the daughter of Rich and Lorie Dale of Sparta. Danielle is a hobbyist beekeeper in Monroe County. She is a freshman at Western Technical College where she is pursuing an associate degree. Prior to being selected as the Wisconsin honey queen, she served as the 2010 La Crosse-area honey queen. She is available to speak and appear at fairs, festivals, farmers markets and to give educational presentations at schools and to community organizations. She wants kids to know that her sponsoring organization, Wisconsin Honey Producers, is having a honey bee poster contest and the deadline for entries is Tuesday, Oct. 25. For more information, go to www.wihoney.org/index.php/contests/. Pictured with Dale are Ronald Wilson and Carolyn Christensen at the Polk County Fair. 0


PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Village Players Community Theatre holds annual meeting by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer DANBURY – The Village Players Community Theatre group held its annual meeting on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Voyager Village Community Center. Members enjoyed entertainment by local singer and guitarist Ron Larson during a social time held before the business meeting. Board members reported on this season’s summer production and announced that Ginna Erickson, who stepped in to take over as this year’s director, has agreed to direct the 2012 production. During the meeting, members reelected Cilla Bauer, Nancy Rogers and Wendy Rechsteiner to the board for another term. VPCT board members presented representatives from Grantsburg, Siren, Webster and Spooner schools and the Siren/Webster community education with donations for their arts, music and theater programs. Deb Finnigan, coordinator of the

VPCT’s fall dinner theater, gave an overview of the upcoming murder mystery “Till Death Do Us Part” set for Nov. 3 and Nov. 5 at the Voyager Village restaurant. Finnigan invited people to join in the marriage celebration of Becky Giovanni and Stanley Simpson at an Italian wedding reception not soon to be forgotten. “As friends and family gather for a night of fun and food, it will quickly turn into a night of mystery and mayhem as one of the guests will be murdered! As the night progresses, secrets will be revealed and motives will be exposed. The guests sleuthing skills will be put to the test,” said Finnigan, giving VPCT members a teaser of the upcoming fun evening. Finnigan also told the group that in addition to being entertained and enjoying great Italian food, 20 volunteers are needed to be the main characters in the wedding. For more info on the November murder mystery dinner theater go to www.villageplayerscommunitytheatre.co

Village Players Community Theatre members signed up for 2012 memberships at the group’s annual meeting held on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Voyager Village Community Center.

VPCT Board President Kitty Holmquist (L) and board members Ginna Erickson and Bunny Day (far right) resented Grantsburg student Joe Dumas with a donation check. – Photos by m or e-mail Deb at murdermystery11@gmail.com For reservations and to sign up as one of the wedding party con-

VPCT member Wendy Rechsteiner (L) and VPCT Board President Kitty Holmquist (R) presented Siren/Webster community education coordinator Jennifer Swenson with a donation check.

Deb Finnigan, coordinator of the VPCT’s fall dinVPCT board members Linda Schmidt and Barb St. Peter presented Webster spener theater, gave an overview of the upcoming mur- cial education instructor Rita Bishop (center) with a donation check. – Photos by der mystery “Till Death Do Us Part” set for Nov. 3 Priscilla Bauer and Nov. 5 at the Voyager Village restaurant.

Puppet show at Siren Covenant Liam Hammond, Lars Erickson, Johannah Erickson and Kalea Hammond enjoy the antics of puppet Scurvy Bill during opening exercises of Siren Covenant Sunday school. Classes are available for students of all ages including adults who are discussing the current best-selling book “Is Heaven for Real.” - Special photo

tact Linda at the Voyager Village office, 715-259-3910.

VPCT members enjoyed entertainment by local singer and guitarist Ron Larson during the social time held before the business meeting.

V P C T members N a n c y Rogers (L) and Bunny Day (R) presented a donation check to Spooner High School d r a m a teacher Bob Thornley.

VPCT members Wendy Rechsteiner (L) and Ginna Erickson presented Siren Principal Peggy Ryan (center) with a donation check.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Homecoming 2011

Webster

Sophomore boys versus senior boys tug-ofwar homecoming event held Wednesday, Sept. 28, at Webster.

Josh Baer dressed up like Chelsea Larson placed a cracker on the forehead math teacher Mr. Sorenson during the faculty fashion of Joey Erickson and he had to try to get it to his mouth without touching it with his hands. show on Wednesday. Kally Schiller, junior, during the dodgeball competition.

Photos submitted by the Webster School

Die-cast collectible toy show

Dillion Reeder from the junior boys volleyball team hits the volleyball hoping to score a point. It was also Class Color Day at the Webster School. The junior class color for the day was pink.

Grantsburg

Seven-year-old Logan Hanson couldn’t resist playing with the farm set displayed at the secondannual collectible toy show held at the Grantsburg Community Center on Oct. 1.

Brianna Viebrock pulled out all the stops during her turn in the pedal pull tractor competition. The 7-year-old’s extreme effort earned her first place in her age category.

Corey Sandberg was one of several teens taking a try at pedal pulling. The popular event was held during the collectible toy show at the Community Center in Grantsburg last Saturday.

Visitors to the second-annual collectible toy show had lots of toys to pick from as dealers displayed their cool collectibles last Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Grantsburg Community Center. Tammy Wondra, owner of Leaning Pine Farm Toys, handed an excited Zaidyn Wedin his newly purchased toy plow as his sister, Justyce, eyed the camera.


PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Autumnfest

St. Croix Falls

These young ladies enjoyed a perfect afternoon for music and events on the Overlook Deck downtown.

Washington Street was transformed into a market square for a day, Saturday, Oct. 1, for Autumnfest. – Photos by Greg Marsten

Lucy, 3, of Cushing shows off her cake and ice cream at the St. Croix Falls Library Saturday.

Jackson Dowd, 2, of Dresser is fascinated by the magical bubbles of a local artist at Autumnfest.

Mellisa, 10, of Milltown shows off the buttons she made outside the St. Croix Falls Library.

Kids of all ages gathered outside the library for a little sing-along and treats.

T h e band, The Undergrooves, rocked the Overlook Deck Saturday afternoon, Oct. 1. 546741 6-7L 48a


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

Polk County Health Department Notes October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month Since the program began in 1985, mammography rates have more than doubled for women age 50 and older and breast cancer deaths have declined. Since early detection of breast cancer can prevent deaths, the Polk County Health Department encourages women to consider the following strategies, know your risk Talk to your family to learn about your family health history. Talk to your health-care provider about your personal risk of breast cancer. Get screened. Ask your health-care provider which screening tests are right for you if you are at a higher risk for breast cancer. Have a mammogram every year starting at age 40 if you are at average risk.

Have a clinical breast exam at least every three years starting at 20 and every year starting at 40. • Know what is normal for you and see your healthcare provider right away if you notice any of these breast changes: Lump, hard knot or thickening Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening Change in the size or shape of the breast Dimpling or puckering of the skin Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast Nipple discharge that starts suddenly New pain in one spot that doesn’t go away Make healthy lifestyle choices Maintain a healthy weight Add exercise into your daily routine Limit alcohol intake The Wisconsin Well Woman Program provides preventive health screening services to women, between the age of 45 and 64, with little or no health insurance coverage. The well woman program pays for mammograms, pelvic exams and Pap tests. To see if you are eligible please contact Julie Baryluk at the Polk County Health Department 715-485-8500.

WITC in-service Monday

grams, technical diplomas, short-term certificates, customized training and a wide array of courses for personal or career enrichment. WITC is a member of Wisconsin Technical College System. For more information call 800243-WITC or visit witc.edu.- from WITC

www.the-leader.net

546591 6-7L

Stay connected to your community.

547290 7-9L 49d

RICE LAKE - Daytime classes will be canceled at all Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College campuses on Monday, Oct. 10, for an in-service day to be held at the WITC-Rice Lake campus. All campuses will still have staff available. For WITC staff, the day features speakers Mark Tyler, Wisconsin Technical College System Board chair; Dan Conroy, the vice president of Nexen Group, Inc; and WITC graduate J.P. Damico. The day will also provide training sessions, demonstrations and exhibits designed for employee enrichment. Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College serves the educational and career needs of more than 25,000 residents of northwestern Wisconsin each year. With multiple campuses, WITC offers career-focused associate degree pro-


PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

COMMUNITY EDUCATION Frederic Community Education Call Ann Fawver at 715-327-4868 or e-mail fawvera@frederic.k12.wi.us to enroll. Yoga. Ongoing classes Tuesdays 10-11 a.m. or 6-7 p.m. Thursdays 6-7 p.m. Bring a mat and a blanket. Instructor: Sandy King. Register first class of attendance – call 715-327-4868. Fee: $28/age 62-plus $16. Cardio Kickboxing. Through Nov. 22 in the upper gym. Fee: 12 sessions for $40, six sessions for $25. Instructor: Tima Atkinson, certificated fitness trainer. Call 715-553-1123 for registration or information. Weight Watchers. Monday evenings at the elementary school library – Weigh-in starts at 5 p.m. Meeting starts at 5:30 p.m. and goes until 6 p.m. For more information go to weightwatchers.com or Amy Tinman at 715-566-2478 or jatinman@hotmail.com. Zumba! Instructor: Amy Tinman, certified Zumba fitness instructor. For more information contact Tinman at 715-566-2478 or e-mail jatinman@hotmail.com. Dance by Andrea Lundquist. Tap, jazz and ballet for girls and boys, aged 3 to 18. Contact

Lundquist at 715-327-8650 or dancewithandrea@gmail.com for registration or information. Chair-seat weaving. Introduction to hand-caning and other styles of weaving seats, Tuesdays, Oct. 18 – Nov. 8, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $44/$24 62plus. Instructor: Andrea Hildebrandt “From the Naked Heart”: Introductory Poetry Workshop. Thursdays, Oct. 27 – Nov.17, 6 – 8 p.m. Fee: $26.37/ages 62-plus $4. Instructor: Denise Sweet. Italian Cooking –Risotto. Tuesday Oct. 25, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $12/age 62-plus $8. Instructor: Betty Linden. No Knead Bread and Pizza - Tuesday, Nov. 1, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $12/ages $62-plus $8 plus $7 materials fee. Instructor: Betty Linden. Salads, Vegetables and Side Dishes. Tuesday Nov. 8, 6 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $12/ages $62-plus $8 plus $7 materials fee. Instructor: Betty Linden. Drivers Education. Monday, Oct. 17, 6 p.m. – Orientation. Tuesday, Oct. 18 – Nov. 10. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday - 6-8 p.m. and Wednesday 57 p.m.

Luck Community Education Check out the school Web site for a complete listing at www.lucksd.k12.wi.us. Preregistration is required for the classes listed below. There’s a minimum number of participants needed to run each class and also a maximum number allowed. Don’t delay to put your name on the roster. Call Amy Aguado at 715-472-2152, Ext. 103, or e-mail amya@lucksd.k12.wi.us to register. Basic welding. Thursdays, Sept. 29 – Oct. 27, 6 – 9 p.m. Fee: $84.80/$52.80 senior fee. Instructor: Tony Jenson. Add light and drama to your watercolor. Monday and Thursday, Oct. 3 and 6, 6 – 9 p.m. Fee: $28/$16 senior fee. Instructor: Lydia Rennicke. Improvisational comedy class. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 4 – 27, 6 – 8 p.m. Fee: $35. Instructor: Dan Mielke. Write, right now! Thursdays, Oct. 6 – Nov. 17, 4 – 6 p.m. Fee: $20.50. Instructor: Carolyn Wedin. African violets from A to Z. Monday, Oct. 10, 6 – 7:30 p.m. Fee: $10/person, $17/couple, $20 family. Instructor: Pat Mattson. Aqua Zumba. Thursdays, Oct. 13 – Nov. 17, 6:15 p.m. Fee: $30. Instructor: Tina Atkinson.

Picasa your photos. Mondays and Thursdays, Oct. 17 – 27, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $36/$20 senior fee. Instructor: Mike Chalgren. Great American nature writers. Tuesdays, Oct. 25 and Nov. 1, 6 – 8 p.m. Fee: $15. Instructor: Charles Huver, Ph.D. Intermediate welding. Thursdays, Oct. 27 – Nov. 17, 6 – 9 p.m. Fee: $63.60/$39.60 senior fee. Instructor: Tony Jenson. Water aerobics. Mondays and Wednesdays, Nov. 7 – Dec. 21, 4 – 5 p.m.; Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nov. 8 – Dec. 22, 9 - 10 a.m. and 10 – 11 a.m. Instructor: Stephanie Robinson. Course fee: $52/$28 senior fees. Organize your kitchen … without losing your cookies. Thursday, Nov. 10, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: $15. Instructor: Susi McCune. Beginning woodworking. Thursdays, Dec. 1 – 22, 6 – 9 p.m. Fee: $52/$28 senior fee. Instructor: Tony Jenson. Join square dancing for fun and health. Wednesdays thru Jan. 25, 2012, 7 – 8:30 p.m. Fee: Free.

Webster Community Education Creative writing. Instructor: Kathleen King. Class number: 66653, Catalog number: 42-801402. The class will be held at Siren High School Tuesdays, Oct. 14 - 25, 7 – 9 p.m. The fee is $26.37/$4 sr. Class size is limited to 10. Preregistration required. Call WITC at 800-243-9482, Ext. 4221. Intermediate machine quilting (table runner). Instructor: Vicki Tollander. Class number: 66511, Catalog number: 60-304-615 This class will be held at Siren High School for three Thursdays, Oct. 6 – 20, 6 – 9 p.m. The fee: $44/$24 sr. Class size is limited to 10. Preregistration required. Call WITC at 800-243-9482, Ext. 4221. Natural family funerals. Facilitator: Lucy Basler. ComEd Class. This class will be held at Webster

High School on Monday, Oct. 17, 6 – 8:30 p.m. The fee: $10, $15 for two. Preregistration required. Call ComEd at 715-349-7070. Buying your first home. Instructor: Tracy Nooner. ComEd Class. This class will be held at Siren High School on Monday, Oct. 24, 6 – 8 p.m. The fee: $5. Preregistration required. Call ComEd at 715-349-7070. MS Word. Instructor: Renae Petersen. Class number: 66515, Catalog number: 47-103-438. This class will be held at Siren High School on Tuesdays, Oct. 25 – Nov. 15, 6 – 8 p.m. The fee: $26.37/$4 sr. Class size is limited to 10. Preregistration required. Call WITC at 800-243-9482, Ext. 4221.

Unity Community Education To register for the following classes/events, please call or e-mail the community ed office, 715825-2101, Ext. 1560. 26th-annual Unity Community Halloween Party Mark your calendar for Monday, Oct. 31, 6-8 p.m., and plan to join us for some Halloween fun. Toddlers, preschoolers and students from Early Childhood to eighth grade are invited to Unity School for an evening of free games, activities and prizes. And don‘t forget to sign up for the Witches’ Call, and be sure to be home by 8:30 p.m., in case the Witch calls to announce your prize. Volunteers and donations for this community event are welcome - please call or e-mail Tanna in Community Ed if you would like to help 715-825-2101, ext 1560 or tworrell@unity.k12.wi.us. Water aerobics Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5 to 5:45 p.m. Sixweek sessions starting on Nov. 1 and Jan. 10, 2012. Please write check out to WITC. For 12 classes: $52 or $28 for seniors age 62 and better. For six classes: $28 or $16 for seniors age 62 and better. Basic Education for Adults. Classes held at Polk County Job Center in Balsam Lake: Tuesdays, 1 – 4:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 1 – 4 p.m., Thursdays, 12:30 – 3 p.m. Cost: Free, please register by calling Polk County Job Center at 715-485-3115. Instructor: Becky Peterson. Zumba (Latin dance party exercise). Mondays and Wednsdays. Come and try out the Latin dance

sensation. Cost: Six classes for $30 or 12 classes for $54, payable to instructor, you can just show up and purchased your punch card at class. Location: Auditorium. Instructor: Michelle Flaherty, licensed Zumba instructor. Neil Diamond Tribute Concert. Sunday, Oct. 23, 2 p.m. Cost is $15 preconcert and $20 at the door. The Unity Music Program has been given the opportunity to present this show that has been featured in Branson, Mo. All proceeds go to the Unity Friends of Music. Gift-Wrapping Gone Green. Tuesday, Nov. 15, 6 – 8 p.m., in the high school Room 128. Cost is $10 per individual, $17 per couple, payable to community education. Instructor: Tanna Worrell. Big Trips, Little Trips October “Hairspray” at Chanhassen. Saturday, Oct. 22, leave Grantsburg at 9 a.m. Cost: $80, includes luncheon, show and coach. Call 715-463-5165, Ext. 160 to register. Trips must have 30 participants. November Mall of America – Christmas Extravaganza. Saturday, Nov. 19, leave 8 a.m. – return 6 p.m. Cost is $25, $20 for two or more. Call 715-463-5165, Ext. 160, to register. Trips must have 30 participants. To register for the following classes/events, please call or email the Community Ed office.

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH???

Menu LOCATION

OCTOBER 10 - OCTOBER 14

MONDAY

TUESDAY

BREAKFAST

LUNCH California burger, fries OR buffalo chicken salad.

BREAKFAST Apple slices and yogurt. LUNCH Pizza, raw veggies, dip OR chickentaco salad.

LUNCH Chili, crackers, bread stick, lettuce salad, mixed vegetables, sliced peaches, apples, oranges, bread basket.

HS: Salad bar or sub sandwich. MS ELEM - NEL: Sub sandwich, fixings, whole-grain chips, fresh veggies/dip, applesauce, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUCK

BREAKFAST Cereal/breakfast pizza. LUNCH Mozzarella pizza dippers, dipping sauce, rice, peas, fruit sauce. Alt.: Chicken patty, 7-12.

SIREN

FREDERIC GRANTSBURG Each building will have their own breakfast menu.

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITY WEBSTER

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

BREAKFAST Uncrustable. LUNCH Mini corn dogs, baked beans, pretzels OR turkey salad.

BREAKFAST Waffles snacks. LUNCH Football nuggets, tritaters, ice-cream treat OR tuna salad.

LUNCH Chicken nuggets, curly fries, corn, fresh pear, apples, oranges, bread basket.

LUNCH Pizza, lettuce salad, mini carrots, dip, ice-cream treat, apples, oranges, bread basket. EARLY RELEASE

NO SCHOOL

BREAKFAST Cereal/pancake stick. LUNCH Taco Tuesday, hard or soft shells, winter mix, fruit sauce. Alt.: Hot dog, 7-12.

BREAKFAST Cereal/donut. LUNCH Chicken patty on a bun, tater tots, corn, fresh fruit. Alt.: Hamburger, 712.

BREAKFAST Cereal/egg muffin. LUNCH Spaghetti hotdish, hot buns, green beans, fruit sauce. Alt.: Chicken nuggets, 7-12. EARLY RELEASE - 12:45 p.m.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, garden vegetables, rice, veggies, green beans, apricots. Alt.: Meatball sub.

BREAKFAST French toast sticks, juice and milk. LUNCH Cheeseburger hotdish, garlic bread, lettuce salad, corn, peaches. Alt.: Turkey/cheese/marble bread.

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Sloppy joes, Tostitos, shredded lettuce, peas, oranges. Alt.: Pita pocket.

BREAKFAST Cinnamon tastry, juice and milk. LUNCH Chicken and gravy over mashed potatoes, wheat roll, lettuce salad, green beans, strawberries. Alt.: Pizza dippers.

BREAKFAST Scrambled eggs, 1 slice of toast. LUNCH Cheeseburger, spicy fries, carrots, pears. Alt.: Beef stew and bread stick.

BREAKFAST French toast sticks. LUNCH Chicken nuggets, scalloped potatoes, green beans, peaches. Alt.: Fish wedge.

BREAKFAST Oatmeal muffin squares. LUNCH Tacos, hard and soft shell, fixings, peas, pineapple, cinnamon rolls.

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Sub sandwich, 3-bean salad, corn, mixed fruit. Alt.: Chicken patty.

Tastries.

Waffles.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Barbecues, hash browns and fruit.

LUNCH Hamburger hotdish, salad, bread stick, bananas.

LUNCH

BREAKFAST Breakfast pizza. LUNCH Hot dogs, baked beans and fruit.

LUNCH Pizza burger, bun, green beans OR beef barley soup with veggies, PBJ, crackers, fruit cocktail.

WEDNESDAY Frudel.

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Sub sandwich, raw veggies, dip, chips, apples OR ham salad.

Pancakes.

NO SCHOOL TEACHER IN-SERVICE

BREAKFAST Assorted cereal and toast, juice and milk. LUNCH Cheese Pizza dippers, quesadilla, rice, Tostito corn, carrots, chips, shredded celery, pineapple lettuce, beans, tidbits,pears. banana. Alt.: Cook’s Alt.: Cook’s choice. choice.

NO SCHOOL

BREAKFAST

LUNCH Sub sandwich, cottage chips and fruit.

cheese,

LUNCH Philly steak, bun, potato, carrots OR Spanish rice with hamburger and bacon, Monaco blend veggies, pears.

NO SCHOOL

NO SCHOOL

LUNCH Pizza dippers with marinara sauce, salad, pears.

LUNCH Chicken quesadillaq, salad, salsa, fresh fruit.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

CHURCH NEWS

Eternal

Perspectives

News from the Pews

Sally Bair

Freedom in worship

Remember when you were a kid, running through the grass, hands lifted high in sheer exuberance? Remember clapping and bouncing up and down when your mom said she’d take you to the beach? Dancing in anticipation in front of the ice cream counter? Ah, the joys of youth! Unfortunately, our expressions of joy fade with time. I heard someone say that second-graders express boldness in their artwork, but by fourth grade, their art becomes stilted and stuffy and “within the lines.” While maturing into adulthood, many of our visible signs of happiness and joy fade into mere smiles. We laugh, but only at the appropriate time and place. We clap, but only at a concert. We giggle and jump through rain-filled puddles only in our minds. Why don’t we act like children any more? I don’t mean in a childish manner, but in a childlike manner. I believe we Americans, compared to many foreign countrymen, have lost our outward zest for life. For years I sat in a mainline church, so filled with the sense of God’s wonder that I nearly choked with emotion. But because everyone else sat, unmoving, in their pews, I did too. Many years later, I witnessed exuberant praise and worship from fellow believers. Spiritually thirsty desert dweller that I was, I started clapping and moving my feet to the worship music’s rhythm and raising my hands along with others. No longer did I feel constrained, corked under the pressure of erupting. King David was childlike in his worship of God. “Because your lovingkindness is better than life, my lips shall praise you. Thus I will bless you while I live; I will lift up my hands in your name.” (Psalm 63:3-4) Other psalms speak of David telling us to sing to the Lord, make a joyful shout to him—like children. Like the crowds did when Jesus passed through Jerusalem and they hailed him as king with their palm branches. They shouted and sang and danced and lifted their hands in joyful praise. It’s unfortunate when we allow society’s “rules” and the sedate, inhibiting influences of our upbringing to keep our hands to our sides and our feet still. The most disturbing thing is that such rules don’t seem to apply when it comes to rooting for our favorite football team or our son’s Little League ballgame. Perhaps such a fact tells us that our society as a whole has decided to express freedom in worshiping our favorite team but not in worshiping God, our Creator, Savior, and Helper. Lord, help us to be a blessing to you through our childlike worship. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com.

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Usually, the first impression your business is able to make is through the printed materials you distribute. That’s why it’s important to do business with a quality printer. That’s why more businesses trust us to meet all their printing needs.

All 4 Locations

107 N. Washington St. Downtown St. Croix Falls, Wis.

11 West 5th Ave. Shell Lake, Wis.

715-327-4236 715-483-9008

715-349-2560 715-468-2314

546556 48a,b,c,d 7r,L

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION 24154 State Rd. 35N Siren, Wis.

Be sure to attend Pilgrim’s fifth-annual harvest dinner, which will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8. Serving begins at 4 p.m. and ends at 7 p.m. and the public is invited. The meal is a complete pork loin dinner. A freewill donation will be accepted with 10 percent of the proceeds going to missions, 45 percent will go to the church’s general fund and 45 percent will go toward debt reduction. Sunday, Oct. 16, will be a funpacked hour of worship. The Bill Bittner Memorial Dixieland Band will make a special guest appearance. The band will lead the congregation in hymns and play various numbers throughout worship and get everyone’s toes a tappin’! Traditionally the third Sunday in October has been designated as Pilgrim Lutheran Church Women Sunday. This year the program will center on ELCA World Hunger efforts and a video about the Lingson Family Story will be presented – “Watch husband and wife January and Telina Lingson, living in Kaseleka, Malawi, who overcome hunger through agricultural training and the gifts of livestock pigs and goats, to be exact.” In May of this year, the women of the church

voted to donated 10 percent ($250) of the proceeds from the churchwide garage sale to purchase five goats through the ELCA World Hunger Program. And the last event of the day will be a special congregational meeting after worship to continue to discuss the possibility of developing a two-point parish with Bethany Lutheran in Siren. The senior confirmation students are busy with their final studies of Luther’s Catechism as they will be confirmed during worship services on Sunday, Oct. 30, which is also Reformation Sunday. Pilgrim invites everyone to join them for Sunday morning worship at 10 a.m., and confirmation classes begin at 9 a.m. for seventh- and eighth-grade students in the Upper Fireside Room. For more information about the church or coming events, please call the church office at 714-327-8012 and leave a message and someone will call you back. You can also go to their Web site www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org or check out other activities on FaceBook. - submitted

Lutherans blow the Jewish shofar at New Hope by Wayne Anderson Special to the Leader GRANTSBURG – The sound of the shofar was heard loud and clear by Jews around the world last week, and by a few Lutherans at New Hope Lutheran Church last Sunday, Oct. 2. The shofar is a musical horn, gotten from an animal. The use of the shofar is found in the Old Testament and the Jewish Talmud, a compilation of Jewish laws, ethics and customs; and in Hebrew literature. Today the Jews, whom the Bible calls “God’s chosen people,” use the shofar in their synagogues to announce special religious events, like Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. This began last week. And in recognition of this happy occasion, Pastor Emory Johnson, of New Hope Lutheran, blew his personal shofar in the Sunday service to commemorate and demonstrate the use of the Biblical shofar. A ram’s horn is often used as a shofar. A cow’s horn is not used, because of the shameful “golden calf” idol the Hebrews made while Moses was on Mount Sinai receiving the Ten Commandments, Dr. Johnson said. The Rev. Johnson’s horn comes from North Africa. He got it when he lived in Israel for several years on a Jewish kibbutz, a farming community. There he studied the ancient sites of the Bible and deepened his relationship with God, he said.

Kids carnival set for Sunday, Oct. 9, at Bone Lake Lutheran

• • • • • •

303 N. Wisconsin Ave. Frederic, Wis.

FREDERIC – This past Sunday was the 16th Sunday after Pentecost and the Sacrament of Holy Communion was celebrated during worship services. It is a busy time of the year for Pilgrim members. On Wednesday, Oct. 5, the women of the church gathered to work on sewing quilts for Lutheran World Relief. Anyone in the community who wants to join them can call Jan at 715-327-8786 to find out when they will meet again. If you have bed sheets or material in good condition that you would like to donate for these quilts (no drapery material please), drop it off at Affordable Quality Appliances in downtown Frederic. On Wednesday evening, LWF3, Learning with Fun, Food and Fellowship, will be held beginning with supper at 5:15 p.m. After supper, students from birth through sixth grade and their parents, as well as the rest of the adults, will gather for some singing, Bible stories and crafts, gathering at 7 p.m. for a closing prayer. There will be a special playgroup for parents and children from birth to age 4. All children in the community from birth through sixth grade are invited to join in on the fun.

BONE LAKE – “One child under the age of 5 dies from malaria in subsaharan Africa every 45 seconds.” The Sunday school youth at Bone Lake Lutheran Church picked up on this horrendous statistic during one of their pastor’s recent sermons and wanted to do something about it. One of the things they want to do is host a kids carnival. The carnival will be on Sunday, Oct. 9, from 2- 5 p.m., at Bone Lake Lutheran Church, rain or shine. There will be face painting, relays, games, cupcake walk, bake sale and other fun activities … all for a freewill offering. For every $10 raised a mosquito bed net can be purchased for the children in Africa. All funds raised will go to this project, which purchases bed nets and medicines to help end the malaria epidemic in these countries. Pastor Mary Ann Bowman is thrilled that the children in her church have plans throughout the year to help with this global initiative. “This is their project, their ideas. It is so important that we empower even our youngest children to make a difference in their communities and the world. It is teaching them global awareness and good stewardship … that they are part of God’s mission for the world. The kids have set a goal to send 100 bed nets to Africa, and I know they will reach that goal. It’s amazing what happens when everyone pitches in and combines their resources. God’s work. Our hands.” Bone Lake Lutheran Church is located five miles east of Luck on Hwy. 48 and south one-half mile on CTH I. - submitted

Dr. Emory Johnson, pastor of New Hope, blows the Jewish shofar horn demonstrating how the Jews do it to herald important religious events. – Photo by Ron Wilhelm

Peder Eide performing Wednesday, Oct. 19 BONE LAKE – Peder Eide will be in concert at Bone Lake Lutheran Church on Wednesday night, Oct. 19, from 7 – 8:30 p.m. A freewill offering will be taken to cover expenses for this opportunity. Parents are encouraged to come to this concert with their middle school and high school youth (younger children are welcome as well). Eide will also be releasing his new album, “Rescue.” The church is located at 1101 255th Ave., Luck, five miles east of Luck on Hwy. 48 and south on CTH I one-half mile, phone 715-4728153. If anyone can profess to be in tune to the heartbeat of today’s youth, Eide has certainly earned the right to make that claim. For nearly one-third of his life he has led Christ-centered praise and worship for youth conferences, festivals, camps, churches and any other venues where teenagers and preteens have gathered. So, when Eide says he believes he knows what the youth of today need, he speaks from a platform of experience and authority on the subject. Groups such as Youth for Christ, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Youth Encounter, Youth Unlimited, Navigators, Celebrate Ministries, the ELCA Youth Ministry Network and other national gatherings representing a wide variety of Christian denominations have welcomed Eide as part of their events. Over the past several years, Eide has received consistent airplay and support from over 200 radio stations across the country. He’s had several songs recognized on the national inspirational charts including his Top 10 single “Roll the Stone Away.” His music has connected with radio programmers and listeners alike because of his passion and heart for the Lord that is so well communicated through each song. For more information visit his Web site www.PederEide.com. - submitted


PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

CHURCH NEWS/OBITUARIES Ruth Ann Radke Faith Lutheran youth had their own Shanty Town GRANTSBURG – On Saturday, Sept. 17, 22 youth and three adult chaperones spent the night outside on the grounds at Faith Lutheran. They slept in cardboard boxes or simply spent their night “under the stars” and experienced a little rain in the early-morning hours on Sunday. Faith Lutheran Grantsburg youth were able to collect $550 in offerings which will go to the local Habitat for Humanity. While participating in this event, many wondered what it would have been like if they really had to do this day after day. Their knowledge of, and compassion for, the homeless was expanded. All who took part quickly real-

ized that they had access to so many things that those that are truly homeless would not have easy access to. The youth completed several tasks for the church, they went to individuals homes with “Will Work for Food” signs and completed tasks for those individuals. They also baked muffins and made crispy cereal bars, which were shared with members of the congregation on Sunday morning. It was an experience for the youth of Faith Lutheran Church to have just a small picture of what it means to be homeless. - submitted

Twenty-two youth and three adult chaperones from Faith Lutheran Church in Grantsburg received a small experience of what it means to be homeless on Saturday, Sept. 17. – Photos submitted

Ruth Ann Radke, 58, passed away on Sept. 28, 2011, at home in Balsam Lake, surrounded by her loving family. Ruth was born in Rochester, Minn., on Aug. 6, 1953, the daughter of Tracy and Adeline (Luehmann) Lockman. Ruth is a graduate of John Marshall High School and Minnesota State University – Winona, with a Bachelor of Science in nursing. She was a registered nurse in Saint Paul and the Twin Cities metro area for over 30 years, working in maternity, hospice and home-care nursing before retiring from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota as a nurse-educator in the Healthy Start Prenatal Support program. Ruth met Terry Radke while a student in Winona and they married in 1976. They had three daughters, Sondra, Sabrina and Kristin, and made their home in Woodbury, Minn. Ruth put her family first and delighted in her role as a wife, mother and grandmother. Ruth made friends everywhere she went and shared her love and talent of scrapbooking, photography, food and fellowship with everyone. Ruth was diagnosed with ALS in 2008, and, through her journey, inspired everyone who came into contact with her by her faith, grace and positive attitude. She fought her disease bravely and lived every minute as fully as possible. Ruth is preceded in death by her parents, Tracy and Adeline Lockman. Ruth leaves to celebrate her memory, husband, Terry; daughters, Sondra (Shawn) Koster, Sabrina (Michelle Hipwell) Radke and Kristin (Eric) Larsen; grandsons, Liam and Duncan Koster, siblings; Geri (Fritz) Fashing, Kathy Liepold, Mary Kinsella, and Richard (Sylvia) Lockman, many nieces, nephews, cousins and other loving family and friends. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 11 a.m., at the East Balsam Baptist Church, 1816 CTH I, Balsam Lake. Ruth’s family will greet visitors at the church from 9 a.m. until the time of service. The family would like to invite their guests to join them for fellowship and luncheon following the service at the church. In lieu of flowers, memorials preferred to the ALS Association or Adoray Hospice. Ruth asks to be remembered as someone who loved life and her husband and family fiercely. She was a loving wife to Terry, the best mother to Sondra, Bree and KC and the greatest grandma for Liam and Duncan. Ruth loved an excuse for a party. The Kolstad Family Funeral Home of Centuria has been entrusted with arrangements.

Roger Eugene Beecroft

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Roger Eugene Beecroft, 59, Shell Lake, went to heaven on Oct. 3, 2011, at Sacred Heart Hospital in Eau Claire. Roger was born on May 17, 1952, in Cumberland. Roger grew up in Indian Creek. He attended the Indian Creek Grade School and graduated from Frederic High School. Roger was a country boy. He loved hunting, fishing, his mules and Belgium horses. Roger enjoyed listening to his wife play the harp and spent a lot of time with his grandson, Levi. He enjoyed the simple things in life; the beauty and quiet in nature. This was also his personality, he had a simple approach to life and put great emphasis and focus on God and his family. Roger was a “gentle” giant. He was the kind of person you wanted to get to know and be around. Never was a harsh word spoken or a kindness overlooked. You were drawn to Roger because of his tender and kind heart. Roger was a well driller by occupation, and his business thrived because of his honest and ethical standards. Roger married the love of his life, Sandi Plunkett, and God blessed them with two children. Roger was devoted to his wife, children and grandbabies. He was an indulgent Grandpa. He was never too busy to spend time with his grandchildren; whether it was horseback riding or reading them a story. Roger was a man of prayer and belief that God was in control. He put God first in everything. Roger was a member of the Shell Lake Full Gospel Church. Roger was a walking testimony of faith and what it meant to be a Christian. Roger is survived by his beloved wife, Sandi; his children, Jessica and Jeremy.; his grandbabies, Levi, Alicia, Ali, Austin and Jackson; parents, Clarence and Marie Beecroft; siblings, Linda (Harry) Buckwalter, Gary (Donna) Beecroft, Marlene (Mark) Beecroft and David (Shirley) Beecroft; Uncle William and Aunt Dorthea Beecroft and Uncle Eugene and Aunt Bonnie Beecroft; many nieces, nephews and cousins. The visitation will be Friday, Oct. 7, from 4 – 8 p.m. and the funeral on Saturday, Oct. 8, at 11 a.m. at the Shell Lake Full Gospel Church. Skinner Funeral home of Shell Lake has been entrusted with the arrangements.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

OBITUARIES

Wallace C. Erickson Wallace C. Erickson, 65, a resident of Grantsburg, died Sept. 24, 2011. Wallace was born on June 30, 1946, in St. Croix Falls to Carl L. and Doris M. Erickson. He served and was honorably discharged from the United States Army. He was employed at UFE Manufacturing and later North States where he worked over 20 years. Wallace enjoyed being outdoors hunting and fishing. He was an avid Packer fan, watching many games and took part in playing fantasy football. He was also a Little League coach for a number of years. His favorite pastime was spending time with family and friends. He was preceded in death by his father, Carl; and son, Rick. He is survived by his children, David (Kerrie) Erickson and Tim (Vickie) Erickson; grandchildren. Jon, Shannan, Jacob, Austin, Billie, Taylor and Holden; his mother, Doris Erickson; brothers, William (Chris) Erickson and John (Becky Newlin) Erickson; his sister, Dona McKenzie; along with other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Sept. 28, at the Pilgrim Lutheran Church, Frederic, with Pastor Maggie Isaacson officiating. Interment followed at the Maple Grove Cemetery in Frederic. Casket bearers were Duke Tucker, Jim McKenzie, Glenn Johnson, Bob Wright, Daryl Johnson and Rick Kloeppel. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Siren, was entrusted with arrangements.

Carol L. Erickson Carol L. Erickson, 67, Markville, Minn., died Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011, at her home. Carol was born Jan. 3, 1944, to John and Elsie Bahneman in St. Paul, Minn. She attended Mechanic Arts High School in St. Paul. On Oct. 7, 1961, Carol married Gary Erickson in St. Paul, Minn. They lived in Little Canada, Minn., from 1973 until 1990, when they moved to Markville, Minn. Carol worked for the St. Croix Casino in Danbury for 19 years. She enjoyed spending time with her husband, canning, cooking, collecting kitchen gadgets and spending time with her family and grandchildren. Carol is preceded in death by her parents; son, Gary Jr.; sister, Virginia; and half brother, Harry. She is survived by her husband, Gary; children, Kim (Greg), Wayne and Tracy Erickson; grandchildren, Jesse, Heather, Ashley, Tyler, Derrick, Noah and Hunter, sister, Jeannie (Mike) Mullvihill; along with many other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home in Webster, with Chaplin Marlin Harris officiating. Interment followed at Markville Cemetery in Markville, Minn. Casket bearers were Tracy Erickson, Wayne Erickson, Tyler Erickson, Noah Erickson, Curt Erickson and Jesse Rehbein. Online condolences may be offered at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home in Webster was entrusted with arrangements.

Douglas L. Buck

Barbara Peterson

Douglas L. Buck, 80, Portland, Ore., passed away peacefully at Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, on Aug. 25, 2011, surrounded by his family and loved ones during the last days. Doug was born in Frederic, on May 9, 1931, to Leslie and Ida Buck, both Wisconsin natives. He graduated from Milltown High School in 1948 and began his college career in 1950 as a prepharmacy student at the University of Minnesota. While studying at the school of pharmacy, Doug met and married Beva Kuiper, a nurse at Minneapolis General Hospital. He completed his studies in pharmacy by enrolling in the Army ROTC program. The young couple spent two years in Germany as Lt. Buck became commander of an ambulance train. Following his service, he enrolled in the University of Minnesota School of Dentistry completing his DDS degree in 1960 and his MSD orthodontic degree in 1962. Following graduation from dental school, Doug accepted a faculty position in the orthodontics department at the University of Oregon. In 1968 and 1969, Doug participated in the first of three Fulbright appointments as an honorary professor at Universidad Central del Ecuador. His next appointment took him to Columbia in 1982 and his third was to Amman, Jordan, in 1988. In 1972, Doug was made department chair of the orthodontics department at the Oregon Health Science University. He held this position until he retired in 1993. Doug enjoyed many outdoor activities including skiing, bike riding and hiking. He loved to travel especially when the travel involved his ski group, which he was involved with for many years. Doug is survived by his ex-wife, Beva Buck; children, Barbara (Robert) Darke and Brenda (Roy Hayashi) Buck; five grandsons, Erik Lea, Tyler Hayashi, Jim Darke, Jackson Darke and Spencer Hayashi; and a brother, Gary Buck. A memorial service was held Sept. 16, at West Linn Lutheran Church in Oregon. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be sent to the Douglas Buck Memorial Fund at West Linn Lutheran Church or to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation at www.jdrf.org.

Barbara Peterson, 69, Grantsburg, died suddenly at her home on Saturday, Oct. 1, 2011, with her husband, Gene, at her side. She was born in St. Croix Falls to Ernest and Betty Solomonson on Jan. 11, 1942, and was married to Gene Peterson on April 9, 1960. Barbara was preceded in death by her parents; her sister, Mary Bever; and her eldest daughter, Brenda. She is survived by her husband, Gene; sons, Michael (Charhe) of Grantsburg and Mark of LaCrosse; daughter, Beth Heilscher of Oronoco, Minn.; and grandchildren, Matthew, Eric, Andy and Chelsea. According to Barbara’s wishes there will be no funeral. The Edling Funeral Home in Grantsburg was entrusted with arrangements.

Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2011 ~ 10 a.m. Kolstad Family Funeral Home 301 Fourth Street, Centuria, Wisconsin 54824

birds. She loved to go hunting and fishing. She was a supporter of Ducks Unlimited for a number of years. Lisa traveled to Germany, Alaska and Hawaii. Lisa is survived and will be sadly missed by her husband, Jeff; their children, Scott J. and Nicole E. Hursh; her parents, Robert and Edna Spangler; her brother, Bruce (Nancy) Spangler; her prize possession and buddy, her dog, Ceasor; along with other relatives and friends. A time of gathering was held Saturday, Oct. 1, at the Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com.

Jack Swedberg, Monument & Marker Sales Patrick L. Taylor, Owner, Director Dennis W. Christianson, Director

Siren, WI • 715-349-4800

546568 48a 7L

Webster, WI • 715-866-7131

Funeral Preplanning

What it involves. Why it is important. Different options available. Protecting your assets.

Medical Assistance

How can I protect my money from the nursing home?

Veterans Benefits

Find out exactly what you’re entitled to for serving your country.

Guest Speakers Include:

Funeral & Cremation Preplanning

Tom Kolstad - Jack & Jason Mattura Our preplanning consultants will discuss the emotional and financial benefits of preplanning funerals. Also, learn how extremely helpful it is to your family and your estate.

First Call

Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes and Crematory

Be our guest at a fact-filled information workshop everyone needs to attend. Get your questions answered.

You will learn about the following topics:

Certain times in life require a personal touch We can help with • Prearrangements • Traditional Services • On-Site Crematory • Cemetery Monuments

Rhoda H. Parker, 84, Siren, passed away on Oct. 1, 2011, at Burnett Medical Center. Rhoda was born on Feb. 21, 1927, to Edmund and Emma Kroening in St. Paul, Minn. She attended Murray High School in St. Paul. On May 15, 1948, Rhoda married Donald Parker at Mount Olivet Lutheran Church in St. Paul, Minn. They lived in South St. Paul for many years. Rhoda was a stay-at-home mom while her children were at home. After her children left, Rhoda worked for the Minnesota state government as a secretary. After retirement in 1988, Rhoda and Donald moved to the family farm west of Siren and lived there to the present. She enjoyed reading, quilting and gardening. Rhoda was preceded in death by her parents. She is survived by her husband, Donald; children, Carol Gallagher and Michael Parker; three grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; along with many other relatives and friends. Funeral services will be Friday, Oct. 7, at 11 a.m., at First Baptist Church of Falun with Pastors Peter Parker and Steve Ward officiating. Visitation will be Thursday, Oct. 6, at Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Siren, from 5-7 p.m., and also an hour prior to services at the church. Online condolences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Homes, Siren, were entrusted with arrangements.

Free Community Workshop & Open House

Lisa C. Hursh Lisa C. Hursh, 44, a resident of Webster, died Sept. 24, 2011, surrounded by her family. Lisa was born on Oct. 13, 1966, in North St. Paul, Minn., to Robert and Edna Spangler. She attended Century College and graduated from nursing school as a registered nurse. She was employed at Amery Regional Medical Center, Capeside Cove Good Samaritan Center and St. Croix Regional Medical Center. She married Jeff on April 20, 1996, in Scandia, Minn. They were blessed with two children. In her free time, she enjoyed being outdoors to go jogging or just watch the

Rhoda H. Parker

Tom Kolstad, owner and funeral home director for 24-plus years’ will discuss what happens when they receive the first call from the family.

Veterans Benefits

A representative from one of our local county Veterans Service offices will explain what you and your spouse are entitled to for serving your country. Also, learn why it’s important to preregister with the Veterans Cemetery. This is great information every veteran should know.

Medical Assistance

Our counselors will discuss recent changes to Medical Assistance guidelines & the 5-year look-back period. Also, how you can shelter money for funeral expenses. 547110 7L

* Refreshments will be provided. Afterward, all speakers will be available to answer questions. Please bring family and friends. Everyone will receive take-home information at no charge.


PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

CHURCH NEWS

Try to remind yourself of life’s blessings every day Q: I really struggle to have a positive outlook, and always seem to dwell on the negative aspects of life. Is there something I can do to help me be more positive about things? Juli: Winston Churchill once said, “Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference.” Your outlook on life often becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. For example, if you see only the negative aspects of your spouse, your marriage will deteriorate. It‘s great that you recognize this as a problem and that you want to do something to change it. Part of changing your attitude is being intentional about what you focus on. If you make a point to look at the blessings in your life, you will begin to feel more thankful. A good friend of mine recommends keeping a “thankful journal” to write down the blessings of each day. You can be thankful for your health, for a roof over your head, for the friend that called you, or for the fact that your child took out the trash without being asked. Obviously, there are times throughout the day to tackle difficulties. Being positive doesn’t mean avoiding conflict or the

Jim Daly

Focus on the Family

realities of your life. Compartmentalizing problem-solving can keep you from dwelling on the negative throughout the day. Give yourself a set time daily to think, pray or journal about the things that bother you. When that time is over, be intentional about noticing the positive. Another helpful tool is called “thought stopping.” Every time you find yourself dwelling on something negative, have a catchphrase that you say to yourself, such as, “I’m not going there,” or perhaps just a word, such as “blessings.” If your negative thoughts are still overwhelming, you may want to talk them through with a good friend or counselor. ••• Q: A family of refugees from Africa recently moved into a house near ours, and I want to make them feel welcome. But they seem really shy, and I’m sure they don’t trust me. How can I build a relationship with them? Jim: First, let me commend you for

Baskets and dreams AMERY - The Christian Women’s Connection will meet Monday, Oct. 17, at 11:30 a.m. at Camp Wapo in Amery for a luncheon. The special feature will be presented by Phyllis Knutson, titled “The Awesome Tree of the Forest,” about making birch-bark baskets. Mae Robinson will provide music and will also be the main speaker. She will present “Dreams, Disappointments and Contentments.” - with submitted information

Juli Slattery

your desire to reach out. You say this family doesn’t “trust” you, but put yourself in their shoes for a moment. Can you imagine trying to make it in a country where you had no job, no car, no money and you didn’t even speak the language? I wonder if I’d survive a day in that environment. But that’s the reality for hundreds of thousands of refugees who have arrived in the United States in recent years. They have left behind friends, family members and the familiarity of home to find a new start. There’s no substitute for putting a smile on your face and simply walking across the street to say, “Welcome.” Don’t worry about the language barrier or the cultural divide – a smile speaks volumes in any language. Also, remember that refugee families don’t settle in America on their own – there is likely an agency in your area that is helping with housing, food and other basic needs during their first few months in the U.S. Contact this agency and ask how you can best reach out to this family on a practical level. There are likely many volunteer opportunities available. You might be just the person to help someone find his or her first job or learn English. Check with your local library or other organizations about English as a Second

Language classes, job skills training, and so on. Make it a family effort, too. My wife and I want to give our boys examples of the “love your neighbor” principle in action. You don’t have to be an expert in cross-cultural relations. You just need to be willing to be a friend to those who are often overlooked. ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, cohost of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2010 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

Brought to you by:

First Baptist Church Webster

Grantsburg Women Working Together meet Grantsburg Women Working Together recently met at Smoland Prairie for the fall introductory banquet and and installation of officers for the coming year. Speaker for the evening was Nancy Morton who addressed women’s heart issues. Marge Sauerberg (shown at left) was recognized for her years of service as secretary and co-chair of the calendar committee. Sauerberg and her husband, John, are relocating to the Milwaukee area. – Photo submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME

Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 Duane Lindh

HAULING

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Topsoil • Track Hoe 715-554-0526 Frederic, Wis.

Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

R&S TRUCKING

LUCK VAN METER’S MEATS

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

WEBSTER

ALPHA

CUSHING

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

BASS LAKE LUMBER

CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies

Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed

• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP 1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Dan Dowling, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 715-689-2467

Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

WILD RIVER FLAGS Jerry & Pat Willits 2815 285th Ave. Sterling Township St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-488-2729

Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

SIREN

Churches 6/11

FREDERIC

OLSEN & SON

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES 10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.


OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 21

Church Directory ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY

Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS)

Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD

Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Keith Radiske Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. School 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

Pastor Peter Rimmereid, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.; Education Hour 9:45 a.m. (Starts 9/18/11); Sunday Traditional Service 10:45 a.m.

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws

Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, 8:45 a.m. Prayer; 9 a.m. Sun. Schl. & Adult Bible Study; 10:30 a.m. Worship; 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS)

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Communion 1st Sun.; Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:20 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 June - Aug. Sun. Worship: Traditional 8:30 a.m.; Comtemporary 10:30 a.m. Sun., Aug. 21: One Worship Serv. 10 a.m. followed by annual meeting

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-416-3086, 715-327-8090 Pastor Theresa Riewestahl Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA

CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Interim Pastor Terry Stratton Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN

510 Foster Ave. E. Pastor Ralph Thompson Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Sun. Wor. 8 &10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl 9 a.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship ; 10 a.m. Sunday School

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Wed. Wor. 6:30 p.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Melissa Carmack Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Worship - 10 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m.

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sun. Wor. 8 & 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra and Myron Carlson Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Sunday Schl. 9 a.m.; Bible Class 9:30 a.m. Worship Serv. 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & Last Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sunday School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

Pastor Theresa Riewestahl 715-327-8384, 715-416-3086 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST 290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

SIREN COVENANT

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE

Pastor Gary Tonn Sunday School 9 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Frank Wampach 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Father Frank Wampach, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Pastor Merrill Olson, Interim Pastor 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

CHURCH OF CHRIST

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m. Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home ASSEMBLY

ASSEMBLY

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

EVANGELICAL

EVANGELICAL

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

HOPE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH

Pastor Dave Williams 933 248th St., Osceola Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School Sept.-May 8:45 a.m. Children’s Church & Nursery provided

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK. Pastor Gabe Brennan, 715-857-5411

Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun. School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sun. School - 10 a.m.; Wor. Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Reg. office hours: Tues.-Thurs. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Associate Pastor Sunday Service: 9 a.m.; All ages Sunday School 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER Church Phone 715-866-4111; Interim Pastor Ken Hyatt; Youth Pastor Jerry Scheumann Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church”

722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET

231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX

523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN, hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN

28313 CTH H, A&H Pastor Tryg Wistad, 715-635-9222 Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY

Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982 Sunday Worship 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School 9:45 a.m.

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WOR. GROUP

715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH “Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST


PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

www.the-leader.net

LAURITSEN CHIROPRACTIC OFFICE

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ALL NEW! Quality Mattresses, Twin sets $79, Full sets $145, Queen sets $165, King sets $225. Furniture too! Call Janet at (715)456-2907 www.cvfd.biz Eau Claire.

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PUBLIC AUCTION: Monday, Oct. 10, 2011, Siren Mini Storage, Siren, WI. 800236-3072. 1:15 p.m. Personal effects, household goods and misc. items belonging to the following: Mary Christiansen No. 06 and 21. 6-7Lc PUBLIC AUCTION: Monday, Oct. 10, 2011, Luck Mini Storage, Luck, WI. 800-2363072. 10:45 a.m. Personal effects, household goods and misc. items belonging to the following: Kim Braman No. 27, John Erickson No. 53. 6-7 Lc PUBLIC AUCTION: Monday, Oct. 10, 2011, Balsam Lake Mini Storage, Balsam Lake, WI. 800-236-3072. 8:30 a.m. Personal effects, household goods and misc. items belonging to the following: No. 53. 6-7 Lc

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This will be our 4th-annual expo and it just keeps getting bigger and better! Don’t miss the fun and excitement of all the new Fall/Winter products our companies have released! Start your Christmas shopping with us and enjoy refreshments, door prizes, giveaways and specials all day!

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The Roger Wolfgram family would like to thank all the First Responders who helped Roger after the explosion of our getaway dream house, in Frederic. Roger would not have survived had it not been for them. Also, Cheryl and Joe DeGeer, who insisted that someone was in the house, so they kept looking, not only for Roger but our beloved dog, Amber. They also went beyond duty by burying Amber and making a special cross for her. Also to all the people who prayed for him. Their prayers are working. 546972 48ap 7Lp Thank you so much.

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When: Saturday, October 8, 2011 Time: 6 to 9 p.m. Chili Judging, Chili Awards & Sportsman’s Raffle at 8 p.m. Where: Jackson Fire Hall (Intersections of Cty. Roads A & C) Cost: No fee to enter a chili in the contest ($5 donation to JFD for the public to taste each chili.)

Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

NEW YORK LIFE

546419 47-48a 6-7L

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Contact Dan at 715-475-8060 if you’re interested in entering your chili. More info at www.townofjacksonwi.com/firedepartment

Call 715-866-7261

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Freewill Donation

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Rated PG, 113 Minutes. Fri. & Sat.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:05, 7:10 & 9:15 p.m.; Sun.: 1:00, 3:00, 5:05 & 7:10 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:10 p.m.

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Rated PG-13, 127 Minutes. Fri. & Sat.: 1:00, 3:35, 6:00 & 8:30 p.m.; Sun: 1:00, 3:35 & 6:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.: 5:00 & 7:20 p.m.

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• Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • Siren, 715-349-2560 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

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OCTOBER 5, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 23

Students of the Week GRANTSBURG

FREDERIC

Kennady Alseth has been chosen Frederic Elementary School’s student of the week. She is the daughter of David Alseth and Karla Brunberg. Kennady is an excellent student and is respected by her classmates. Her favorite subjects in school are reading and math. Kennady enjoys playing soccer and basketball.

Brenton Nelson has been chosen Frederic Middle School’s student of the week. He is in sixth grade and the son of Jessica Olby and Richard Nelson. Brenton is involved in bells, hockey and baseball. He enjoys riding bike and playing video games. His greatest influences in his life are his mom and dad. He is cooperative and fun to be around. He plans on attending college to become a pro hockey player.

Jordyn Siebenthal has been chosen Frederic High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of Terry Siebenthal and Lisa Gusse. Jordyn works at Wayne’s and Bean’s. She is ambitious and works hard. She enjoys photography, drawing and being with her friends. She plans to attend college for art, animation or photography. Her greatest influence in her life is her sister, Jami.

Shannon Wedin has been chosen Grantsburg Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in third grade and the son of Aarin and Jillian Wedin. Shannon is new to Grantsburg this year. He is kind, always tries his best, is eager to participate, always has a smile on his face, works hard and contributes in a postive way. His favorite subjects are “all of them.” He wants to be an army guy when he grows up.

LUCK

Wyatt Jensen has been chosen Luck Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in second grade and the son of Sonja and Jake Jensen. He is a good student and hard worker. He is very helpful in the classroom. His favorite class is math. He likes playing football and likes playing outside with his brother when at home. Wyatt takes piano lessons and is involved in T-ball and Boy Scouts.

Devin McDaniel has been chosen Grantsburg High School’s student of the week. He is a senior and the son of Chad and Kori McDaniel. Devin is studious, respectful, well-read, always thinking, independent and resourceful. He will do what it takes to complete any task set before him. He has a part-time job cleaning. He enjoys reading novels, writing and the occasional TV. He plans to attend a four year college.

ST. CROIX FALLS

Anna Christensen has been chosen Luck Middle School’s student of the week. She is in eighth grade and the daughter of Jon and Julie Christensen. She is a friendly student who always has a smile on her face. She has a good personality, is helpful and a joy to have in class. She babysits and is involved in dance, basketball and track. She enjoys dance, coloring, shopping and watching movies.

Abbie Otlo has been chosen Luck High School’s student of the week. She is a sophomore and the daughter of Judy and Gary Otlo. She is, friendly, energetic, has a pleasant personality, leads by example and always does her best. She is involved in band, choir, solo and ensemble, volleyball, softball, yearbook staff, church youth group, FCCLA, Spanish Club and helps to train rescue and therapy dogs.

Gavin Lusk has been chosen St. Croix Falls Elementary School’s student of the week. He is in second grade. Gavin lives with his mom and dad and his older brother. At school Gavin likes reading and challenging himself. When he grows up he wants to be a policeman because he can have a computer in his car and he can help people.

Joshua Skallet has been chosen St. Croix Falls Middle School’s student of the week. He is in sixth grade and the son of Mike and Bridget Skallet. He has a brother named Jack. He is involved in hockey, football, Boy Scouts and baseball. He enjoys math because he likes challenges. Josh is a wonderful student who genuinely cares about his work and his classmates. He always puts forth great effort.

Kayla Newell has been chosen St. Croix Falls High School’s student of the week. She is a sophmore and the daughter of Beth Newell and has two older brothers. Kayla enjoys dancing, being outdoors, photography, hanging with friends and family and animals. She is in dance, student council, choir, band and softball.

WEBSTER

SIREN

Gracie Schultz has been chosen Siren Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in fourth grade and the daughter of Dawn and Todd Schultz and the sister of Annie. Gracie has been very helpful in the classroom to others and her teacher. She loves to learn and is very eager to learn new things. She enjoys drawing and reading. She admires her friend, Reed, because she is nice and friendly to many people.

Isabelle Maslow has been chosen Grantsburg Middle School’s student of the week. She is in sixth grade and the daughter of Jackie and Jonathan Maslow. Isabelle is an excellent student. She puts forth her best effort and is extremely helpful to her peers. She arrives in school with a positive attitude and stays engaged during class time. Her favorite class is reading. She is also active in cross country.

Autumn Tinman has been chosen Siren Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade. Autumn completes excellent work and contributes positively to the classroom. She allows others to shine, refrains from dominating the spotlight - but when her insight seems valuable, she shares it. She is thoughtful, considerate and exceptionally articulate. Autumn is the kind of student that offers a niche to a classroom and makes it a supportive place in which to learn.

Raven Emery has been chosen Siren High School’s student of the week. She is a junior. Raven is the secretary/treasurer of the junior class. She is active in volleyball, basketball, track and field. She leads by example, is a strong student and has clearly defined goals for her future. She is well respected by her classmates and the teachers.

Brenna Mahn has been chosen Webster Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in third grade and the daughter of Christine Mahn. Brenna is a thoughtful and hardworking student. She is very eager to learn new things and share what she has learned with others. Her favorite subject in school is art. She enjoys playing, swimming and going on rides.

Emily Sabatka has been chosen Webster Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of John Jr. and Jennifer Sabatka. Emily is a great student who is always prepared. She has a great awareness about others around her. She is involved in basketball and track. She enjoys writing short stories, poems and reading.

Miranda Burger has been chosen Webster High School’s student of the week. She is a senior and the daughter of Erika Burger. Miranda is a student with the utmost integrity and personal drive. She always has a positive attitude. She was voted president of F.O.R. Club, N.H.S., Senior choir and president of student council. She enjoys performing in school plays and watching movies.

UNITY

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Lilly Pecore has been chosen Unity Elementary School’s student of the week. She is in first grade and the daughter of Trisha and Matthew Pecore. Lilly is an outstanding model of exemplary behavior, positive attitude, citizenship and cooperation. Her sweetness and kindness are forthcoming to her classmates.

Riley Peltz Whipple has been chosen Unity Middle School’s student of the week. She is in seventh grade and the daughter of Rachel Foster and Chris Peltz. Riley has great focus and works hard in her classes. She has a great attitude and she is a leader. She has a great work ethic and sweet demeanor. Riley is a stand-up student.

James Butala has been chosen Unity High School’s student of the week. He is a freshman and the son of Joe and Becky Butala. James enjoys learning Spanish and fourwheeling. After high school James plans to work with his dad. He and his family are residents of Milltown.


PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - OCTOBER 5, 2011

Coming events

OCTOBER

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities Siren

• Head injury support group at Siren Covenant Church, 1-2:30 p.m., 715-349-8985.

THURS.-SUN./6-9

MONDAY/10

St. Croix Falls

Amery

• “The Mystery of Irma Vep” at Festival Theatre. Thurs.Sat. 7:30 p.m., Thurs. & Sun. matinees 2 p.m., 715-4833387 or 888-887-6002.

• Weight-loss surgery education and support at the medical center, 5-6 p.m., 715-2-68-0597.

THURSDAY/6

Balsam Lake

• Indianhead Chorus Guest Night at the old government center, lower level, 7:30 p.m., 651-226-9687.

Balsam Lake

• Kickoff meeting for Habitat/TeenServe house repair project at Unity School, 7 p.m., 715-483-2700.

TUESDAY/11 Amery

Dairyland

• Cancer support group at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-6722 or 715-68-7290.

• County flu vaccination at Northland Community Center, 11 a.m.-noon, www.burnettcounty.com, 715-349-7600.

Grantsburg

Frederic

• Preschooler and mother activity at Crosswalk Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m., 715-327-8767.

• County flu vaccinations at the middle school, 45:30 p.m., www.burnettcounty.com, 715-349-7600.

Milltown

THURS.-SUN./13-16

St. Croix Falls

• “The Mystery of Irma Vep” at Festival Theatre. Thurs.Sat. 7:30 p.m., Thurs. & Sun. matinees 2 p.m., 715-4833387 or 888-887-6002.

• Health department’s flu vaccinations at the senior center, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., www.polkcountyflu.com, 715485-8500. • Year One: Bringing Up Baby class at the medical center, 6-7 p.m., 715-483-0431.

Webster

• County flu vaccination at the high school, 4-5:30 p.m., www.burnettcounty.com, 715-349-7600.

FRI. & SAT./7 & 8 Milltown

• Jason Dueholm memorial fundraiser yard sale at 312 2nd Ave. NW, 7 a.m.-3 p.m.

Turtle Lake

• Fall gun show at the fire hall. Fri. 4-8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m.3 p.m., 715-986-4516.

FRIDAY/7

St. Croix Falls

SATURDAY/8 Amery

• Ruby’s Pantry at Congregational Church. Doors open 7:30 a.m. Dist. 8:30 a.m., $15 donation, 715-268-7390. • Senior center Octoberfest fundraiser at Cricket’s Bar, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., 715-268-6605.

Balsam Lake

• Indianhead Chorus Harvest of Harmony at Unity school, 2 and 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202.

Centuria

Balsam Lake

• Tanner Fest Cystic Fibrosis fundraiser at Bergmann’s Pumpkin Patch, 1-5 p.m., 715-554-1263.

Cumberland

• Beaver Club celebration at the Forts, 715-866-8890, www.theforts.org.

• Harvest supper at Holy Trinity Methodist Church, 4-7 p.m. • Fall festival at Cumberland ECU, noon-3 p.m.

Webster

• Brunch at the senior center, 10:30 a.m., 715-866-5300.

SAT. & SUN./8 & 9 Siren

• Mixed Sampler quilt show at the Siren School, 10 a.m.4 p.m.

THURSDAY/13

Fall colors are reaching their peak in Burnett and Polk counties. - Photo by Erik Barstow

Danbury Frederic

• Harvest dinner at Pilgrim Lutheran, 4-7 p.m., 715-3278012.

Milltown

• Taco feed and auction at the fire department, 4-7 p.m., www.milltownfire.com. • Artisan and brew show at Julia’s Java, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Every Day, AA &/or AlAnon, Polk & Burnett counties, 715-931-8262 for time/location. Amery, 715-268-8431.

Siren

Divorce care support group at Apple River Community Church, 715-268-8360, 715-268-2176.

• Restorative Justice spaghetti feed at the Moose Lodge, 4:30-7:30 p.m., 715-349-2117.

Every Monday

St. Croix Falls

Indianhead Barbershop Chorus meets at the Balsam Lake Government Center, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-9202. Baby and Me class - Amery Medical Center, 1-2 p.m. Grief Share support group at Centennial Hall, Amery, 715-268-2176 or 715-268-8360. Moms In Touch International, First Baptist, Amery, 2 - 3 p.m., 715-268-5408, www.momsintouch.com

• Hingepoint meeting for men battling sexual addictions, at River Valley Christian Church, 9 a.m.-noon, 715483-5378. • Good Samaritan Extravaganza in the St. Croix Valley dining room, 1-4 p.m. Bake sale, arts, crafts and a gently used purse sale.

Every Tuesday

Taylors Falls, Minn.

Bingo - Burnett County Moose Lodge, Siren, 6 p.m. Survivors of domestic violence & sexual assault support group, Polk Co., 800-261-7233, 6-7:30 p.m. Anger management group at Amery Regional Medical Center, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 715-268-4094.

• Mural dedication at the community center, 1 p.m.

SUNDAY/9

Jackson

• Kiddie carnival at Bone Lake Lutheran, 2-5 p.m., 715472-2535.

• Fire department’s chili cook-off & raffle, 6-9 p.m., 715475-8060, www.townofjacksonwi.com/firedepartment.

ONGOING

Pine City, Minn.

• High school rodeo at Heidelberger Arena, 6 p.m., 651464-6460.

Grantsburg

• Health fair at the medical center, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 715463-5353, www.burnettmedicalcenter.com.

Grantsburg

• Indianhead Chapter of the National Active and Retired Federal Employees dinner meeting at Dreamers, noon. RSVP by Mon., Oct. 6, 715-689-2252.

Luck

Rural Luck

• Fall colors walk and cookout event at Straight Lake Park section of IAT. 1 p.m. start, 715-472-2248.

Every Thursday

Breastfeeding support group at the St. Croix Regional Medical Center, 2-3:30 p.m., 715-483-0431. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the Serenity House (old jail), Balsam Lake, 7 p.m., 612-205-2321.

Leadership Day was a great success for local middle school students by Nancy Jappe Leader staff writer SIREN - Sixty-two middle school students from the three Burnett County schools and Frederic took part in a Youth Leadership Day at the Northwoods Crossing Event Center in Siren Wednesday, Sept. 28. The leader of the day was charismatic speaker, trainer and author Carl “Energizer” Olson from Sun Prairie. This wasn’t Olson’s first visit to the community. Last year he put on a leadership day for high school students that was very well-received. However, according to Lil Pinero, Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention coordinator, the day with the middle-schoolers was more successful than the high school session because more students were there. “The kids were really engaged and involved. It was a great day,” Pinero commented. “Most of the evaluations were positive. (The students) highlighted that it was a really great day for them, and they enjoyed (Olson’s) presentation. What they liked the least were the break times - they could have listened to Olson all day long.” Pinero added her praise for the staff of the Northwoods Center, the Burnett County Sheriff’s Department and the St. Croix Tribal Police Department, who handled the food part of the day. Funding for this middle-school session was provided through money raised by a Shamwalk/ Run in March, a grant from the Polk-Burnett Electric Company and a tribal liaison grant. “We hope to try it again next fall and continue the tradition with the middleschool. We have got to get to the middle schoolers with the prevention effort,”

A Siren Middle School Leadership Day was held at the Northwoods Crossing Event Center Wednesday, Sept. 28. Sixty-two students from the three Burnett County schools and Frederic took part in the daylong session which was led by Carl “Energizer” Olson, a nationally known speaker, trainer and author from Sun Prairie. “The kids were really engaged and involved,” said Lil Pinero, Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention coordinator. “Most of the evaluations were positive. The thing (the students) liked least were the break times. They said they could have listened to Olson all day long.” The day was financed by money raised by the Shamwalk/Run in March, a grant from Polk-Burnett Electric Company and a St. Croix Tribal liaison grant that covered the food cost. - Photos by Nancy Jappe Pinero said. She added that Olson gave the students a work sheet that they were to fill out. A letter from Olson will be sent to them next spring so they can check to see how they have been following through with leadership efforts in their communities. Olson told the students he wanted them to use the day to have fun, to learn and to get inspired. He encouraged them to use the word SNOW in remembering what they were learning. The S stands for set sights high; the N for never compromise your values; the O for overcoming setbacks and the W for work, work, work for success and happiness.

Another bit of encouragement from Olson was that, starting Jan. 1 of this year, the group known as the baby boomers started turning 65. This means they can retire and get out of the workforce. “When you come out of high school, there will be work for every single one of you,” Olson told the middle-schoolers. Olson also mentioned that employers will be demanding honesty of them as well as the ability to work with others as a team. He told the students that he sees the world today as a place where people think things have got to go their way. “This has to change,” he said. The day Carl Olson spent with the local

middle-schoolers was aimed at giving them plenty of inspiration to take back to their teachers and classmates. Olson has a master’s degree in education from Winona State University, Minnesota, and a master’s degree in guidance and counseling from Wisconsin State UniversityStout, experience and certification as a K-12 school administrator and over 30 years involvement in leadership education. In 2003, he was voted the first ever National Middle School Advisor of the Year by the National Association of School Council’s Leadership Training Center.


Oct 4 Leader