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WED., AUG. 17, 2011 VOL. 78 • NO. 52 • 2 SECTIONS •

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No sign of Rose

Missing for two years, the trail stays cold as the search heats up by Greg Marsten and Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writers GRANTSBURG – Candus Harer sits staring out her kitchen window at a colorful garden beyond the glass. In the corner hangs a poster for her missing daughter, Rose Marie Bly. “There hasn’t been a word. I’m just taking it day by day,” said Harer. “But it’s tough.” Sunday, Aug. 21, will mark two years since Bly has been

Asian carp DNA found in St. Croix

seen, and in the more than 700 days since she went missing, Harer has done all she could to help find her daughter. She and friends have placed a battery of posters, and they have hoped, prayed and waited. “The Polk County Sheriff’s Department has been very good since Rose disappeared,” said Harer. “They have not forgotten about the case. They’re still on it and they call me

See No sign, page 19

Rose Bly, in three different photos. - Photos submitted

This is just a drill

22 of 50 DNA samples in the St. Croix test positive for silver carp

Gerald R. Tobeck Edna M. Smith Arvilla A. Voltattorni Marlin John Larson Clarence W. Peterson Doris V. Hanson Obituaries on page 14-15B

Three men and a beating

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Judge Anderson retakes oath Frederic firefighters, police and EMS personnel took part in a drill Monday evening, Aug. 15, at Comforts of Home, an assisted living and senior apartment living complex, an exercise designed to increase readiness in handling fires and emergency at senior facilities. Shown above, firefighter Mike Laqua took position in a stairwell landing to anchor a fire hose for fellow firefighters during the exercise. More photos on page 27. - Photo by Gary King

Health-care switch cuts Webster’s Frederic cross country without a Estimated $300,000 savings PAGE 5

New technology

Frederic Schools make use of new technology; possible drop in lower-grade enrollment PAGE 7

Will President Obama win a second term? 1. Definitely. 2. I doubt it. 3. I’m tired of politics. Go to our online poll at www.the-leader.net (Weekly results on page 8)

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Briefly 3A Letters to the editor 8-9A Sports 16-18A Outdoors 15A Town Talk 6-7B Coming Events Back of B Currents feature 1B Behind the Signpost 5B Letters from Home 3B Cold Turkey 3B Just for Laughs 3B River Road Ramblings 4B Focus on the Family 16B Church directory 17B Copyright © 2011 Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association Frederic, Wisconsin

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Sirens of the ‘60s on stage at Festival Theatre ST. CROIX FALLS - Colleen Raye, Debbie O’Keefe and Katie Gearty bring their talents to the stage of Festival Theatre on Wednesday, Aug. 24, at 7:30 p.m. to perform classic ‘60s tunes from the female artists of the era. Sirens of the ‘60s celebrates the vocal prowess of singers like Dionne Warwick (“Walk on By”); Mama Cass Elliot with the Mamas and the Papas; Marilyn McCoo and the 5th Dimension; Lesley Gore (“It’s My Party”); Barbara Streisand (“People”); Petula Clark (“Downtown”); Shirley Bassey (“Goldfinger”); and many others, including Mary Travers of Peter, Paul and Mary and Tammy Wynette. Sirens of the ‘60s features dynamic vocals, excellent musicianship, laughs, fun facts, reminiscing and singalongs—a perfect recipe for a highly entertaining evening. “Even though the songs are nearly 50 years old, they are ‘our music’— music that has found its way into the corners of our collective culture and happily emerges when we hear even a few bars of an old song,” says Danette Olsen, executive director of Festival Theatre. “I love this music and Colleen, Debbie and Katie do it so well. In addition to being great singers and excellent musicians, they are consummate show people. I can’t wait!” Reservations are advised and the show is on track to sell out. For more information, to order tickets or join the Festival Theatre mailing list, call 715-483-3387 or 888-887-6002. You may also check the Web site at www.festivaltheatre.org or send an e-mail to info@festivaltheatre.org. - submitted

Former NYC firefighter to speak RICE LAKE - Salvatore Rignola, U.S. Marine Corps and former NYC firefighter, will speak at the Rice Lake city park band shell on Sunday, Sept. 11, at 1 p.m. Sponsored by Northcross, a new church being launched in Rice Lake, the ceremony is in honor of the 10-year anniversary of 9/11. Several churches and community organizations are participating. Rignola survived the attack at the World Trade Center and is currently appointed as deputy to the U.S. Marshals Service. All veterans and citizens are invited to come hear and his riveting account of Sept. 11, 2001, what he experienced and how he survived. For more details as they develop, visit www.northcross.cc and click “9/11 ceremony.” - submitted

Lewis Taylor

Elmer “Jay” Emery

Nancy Matrious

Stuart Bearheart

Phyllis Lowe

Three new faces on tribal council One more incumbent defeated by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer HERTEL – One more incumbent, David “Maabin” Merrill, has apparently lost his seat on the St. Croix Tribal Council after the election Saturday, Aug. 13. His Big Round Lake seat was won by Phyllis Lowe. Four other winners from the June 11 election repeated their victories. They are Elmer “Jay” Emery Jr. and Lewis Taylor, Big Sand Lake; Nancy Matrious, Danbury; and Stuart Bearheart, Maple Plain. The June 11 election was voided by a

tribal court. Emery and Taylor are incumbents. Taylor will be starting his 10th term on the council and Emery his fifth. Lowe has served three term in the past, most recently from 1993 to 1995. Matrious and Bearheart will be starting their first terms. Matrious replaces Beverly (Songetay) Benjamin, a six-term incumbent. Bearheart replaces Jeanne Awonohopay. The new council may be sworn in on Friday, Aug. 19, if there are no challenges, the Leader has been told. The results are unofficial at this time, and the vote totals were not available at press time. The full returns will be printed in the Leader when available.

Aldo Leopold film “Green Fire” to be shown ST. CROIX FALLS - The St. Croix Conservation Study Center will screen the first full-length documentary film ever made about legendary conservationist Aldo Leopold and his environmental legacy on Saturday, Aug. 27, 7 p.m., in the community room of the St. Croix Falls Public Library. “Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time” shares highlights from Leopold’s life and extraordinary career, explaining how he shaped conservation in the 20th century. Although probably best known as the author of the conservation classic “A Sand County Almanac,” Leopold is also renowned for his work as an educator, philosopher, forester, ecologist

and wilderness advocate. The film illustrates how Leopold’s vision of a community that cares about both people and land continues to inform and inspire people across the country and around the world to support modern projects that put Leopold’s land ethic in action in a multitude of ways. “Green Fire” is a production of the Aldo Leopold Foundation, Baraboo, the U.S. Forest Service, and the Center for Humans and Nature. This screening is sponsored by the Conservation Study Center, a joint project of the library, St. Croix Scenic Byway and the St. Croix Scenic Coalition.- submitted

For the trip home

Shriners hold summer picnic

PRESCOTT – Members of the St. Croix Valley Shrine Club enjoyed a leisurely picnic on the beautiful grounds of Freedom Park overlooking the confluence of the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers in Prescott. In attendence were Shrine dignitaries, left to right, Darl Hoffman, past potentate of River Falls; Larry Riemenschneider, chief rabban of the Zor Divan, of Amery; Rod Rommel, Shrine Hospital representative of River Falls; and Vern Engebretson, past potentate of Clear Lake. - Photo by Milt Helmer

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Editor • gbking@centurytel.net

Noah, Blake, Connor and Michael, all from the Twin Cities area, found books at the book fair next to the library during Gandy Dancer Days, Webster’s annual summer celebration, which was held this past weekend. More photos of Gandy Dancer Days in Currents. - Photo by Sherill Summer

Board of directors Vivian Byl, chair Charles Johnson Merlin Johnson Janet Oachs Carolyn Wedin

A cooperative-owned newspaper, the Inter-County Leader is published every Wednesday by the Inter-County Cooperative Publishing Association, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837. Second Class postage paid at Frederic, WI 54837.

The Inter-County Leader is a qualified newspaper for the publication of legal notices, meeting the requirements as set forth in Chapter 985.03 of the Wisconsin Statutes. Every government official or board that handles public money should publish at regular intervals an accounting of it, showing where and how each dollar is spent. We hold this to be a fundamental principle of democratic government. Publisher reserves right to reject any advertisement or news release or letter of opinion at any time.

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The Inter-County Leader [ISS No. 8750-9091] is published weekly. Subscription prices are $34/yr. in Polk and Burnett counties; $38/yr. in Barron, Chisago, Washburn, St. Croix counties; $41/yr. anywhere in the United States $23/yr. for servicemen or women; $23/yr. for students or schools (9 months). Payment is needed before we can start the subscription. No refunds on subscriptions. Persons may subscribe online at www.theleader.net, write us at Inter-County Leader, Box 490, Frederic, WI 54837, or stop by one of our three offices.

Marty Seeger mseeger@centurytel.net Brenda Martin brendals@centurytel.net Greg Marsten marscafe@lakeland.ws Sherill Summer sherill33@gmail.com Gregg Westigard greggw@lakeland.ws Carl Heidel cheidel389@centurytel.net Priscilla Bauer cilla@grantsburgtelcom.net Mary Stirrat marystirrat@hotmail.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Raelynn Hunter rael@centurytel.net

BRIEFLY FREDERIC - The Frederic School District welcomes students, parents and community members to visit both the elementary and junior/senior high school on Wednesday, Aug. 31, from 5-6:30 p.m. Staff will be available to meet with students and parents. Come see your classroom, meet your teachers and find your locker. Welcome to the 2011-2012 school year. - submitted ••• BURNETT/POLK COUNTIES – Who’s the most die-hard Packer fan? Do they live in Burnett or Polk county? The American Cancer Society serving Polk and Burnett counties has one last 2010 Packer team football and needs to raise money to boost year-end totals. It’s doing a sealed bid sale until Friday, Aug. 26, to see who loves the Packers the most. If you would like to own the Super Bowl-winning Packers team football, please send a recipe card with your name, address, phone number and amount you’re willing to bid to: American Cancer Society, 1645 87th Avenue, Dresser, WI 54009, envelope must be postmarked Aug. 26. Extra credit for the prettiest recipe card! - submitted

Ingalls CLinic temporarily closed for remodeling WEBSTER - Ingalls Clinic in Webster will be closed for remodeling Wednesday through Saturday, Aug. 24-27, reopening Monday, Aug. 29, for regular hours. “We apologize for the inconvenience, but this remodel is necessary to improve the reception desk and waiting-room areas,” states a news release from the clinic. “We are hoping to update the electrical service at the same time in preparation for a new Xray unit installation.” To assist patients during this time, some staff are being rescheduled to the Frederic Clinic and offering appointments there. Patients needing to be seen may call the Frederic Clinic for an appointment with a provider or physical therapy. Please call 715-327-5700 or 800828-3627 for appointments or with questions - from SCRMC-Ingalls Clinic

Congressman Duffy to host small-business conference SUPERIOR — U.S. Congressman Sean Duffy will hold a smallbusiness conference in Superior for residents and small-business owners of Wisconsin’s 7th Congressional District. All are invited to attend and participate in the event on Thursday, Aug. 18, at the University of Wisconsin-Superior. Large group and breakout sessions will include topics such as federal government procurement, Native American business partnerships, export assistance, financing programs and regional economic development assistance. The event takes place from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Yellowjacket Union at 1605 Catlin Ave. on the UW-Superior campus. Please call Duffy’s district office at 715-298-9344 for further information and to register. - from the office of Congressman Duffy

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 3

Judge Jeff Anderson retakes oath by Gregg Westigard Leader staff wrJudgeiter BALSAM LAKE – “I always want to do justice,” Judge Jeff Anderson said. “I want to do the best job for the people of Polk County.” Jeff Anderson retook his oath of office as Polk County Circuit Judge Monday, Aug. 15, celebrating the start of his new career with a room full of friends and visiting judicial officials. Anderson was elected in April to replace Judge Robert Rasmussen, who retired last November after nearly 20 years on the bench. Rasmussen administered the oath to his successor. Anderson actually became a judge on June 24 after the governor appointed him to fill the vacant position. He again took the oath on Aug. 1 at the official start of his six-year term. The Monday oath was Anderson’s chance to thank the public for his election. “Your life will change in more ways than you can imagine,” Rasmussen told Anderson. “Being a judge is a great opportunity to change people’s lives and to make the community a better place.” Anderson thanked all the people who he said gave him advice and guidance over the years, giving special thanks to Assistant District Attorney Stephen Dorrance. He mentioned his respect for his predecessors on the Polk County bench, judges Rasmussen and James Erickson, and for his fellow Circuit Court Judge Molly GaleWyrick. The oath-taking was followed by a reception with food and conversations.

Retired Judge Robert Rasmussen (right) delivers the oath of office to new Polk County Judge Jeff Anderson at the start of his six-year term. - Photos by Erik Barstow

Judge Jeff Anderson (center) is shown with (L to R) retired Polk Judge James Erickson, Burnett County Judge Ken Kutz, Scott Needham, chief judge for District 10 and retired Polk County Judge Robert Rasmussen.

Three men and a beating A night of drinking leads to a surprise assault and attempted homicide charges by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer RANGE – Three local men face decades in prison after a night of alcohol-fueled camaraderie turned ugly, when a couple invited four young men to their home after a night of partying, which later led to a vicious attack on the man who invited them in. The incident has led to a battery of felony charges for three men, Merrill Leoso, Daryl Merrill and Aaron Merrill, who allegedly assaulted the man so violently, they thought they had killed him. The three men kicked him so hard he became unconscious, and he woke the next morning in his own driveway. The incident is alleged to have started late in the evening on Saturday, July 30, when a local couple rode their ATV to the Straight 8 Tavern in Range for pizza and drinks. Once at the bar, they began to chat and talk with four young men. Later, as the tavern was closing, the men asked to return to the couple’s home nearby for more drinks, as the men said they had several bottles of liquor with them. Reportedly, the couple and the four men finished all the liquor, and as they were leaving, one of the men talked of fighting the husband, while another talked of taking the wife back to his house. That scenario is apparently what prompted one of the men to prop open the hood on their car, go back to the house, and then claim that their car had a dead battery and needed a jump. As the host brought his ATV back around for a jump start, one of the men is alleged to have knocked the husband hard in the head,

Merrill Leoso

Aaron Merrill

sending him to the ground. That was when one or more of the men are alleged to have kicked the man repeatedly until he was nearly unconscious, all the while he was begging for them to stop and asking what he did. The victim even recalls hearing the men mention out loud that they may have killed him, which is when one of the men is alleged to have kicked him one more time before they fled the scene. The beating was so severe, the man did not wake up until the next morning, after the sun had risen. He then woke his wife, who had passed out inside the home, and alerted police, who conducted interviews and began to suspect that both Daryl and Aaron Merrill were involved. They had several photos of the duo inserted in a lineup of other men, and the victims reportedly positively identified both men. An investigation by the Polk County Sheriff’s Department later connected Merrill Leoso to the incident as another of the accomplices, as well. According to the criminal complaint, several of the men have admitted to being at the Straight 8 Tavern and later at the couple’s home, but have not admitted to the beating,

Daryl Merrill

although Leoso reportedly told an investigator that he was “in the wrong place at the wrong time.” All three men, Leoso, 22, Aaron Merrill, 25, and Daryl Merrill, 22, are each facing felony charges of substantial battery - intending bodily harm as well as first-degree reckless endangerment and second-degree attempted homicide. The fourth man is believed to not have been involved in the beating. Aaron and Daryl Merrill each have extensive criminal histories, with 33 adult arrests between them, including several convictions for resisting arrest, battery, criminal trespassing, OWI, domestic abuse and more. Leoso has no recent criminal record. All three suspects made an initial appearance on Aug. 12 before Judge Molly GaleWyrick. Leoso was freed on a $500 cash bond, which is 10 percent of his $5,000 signature bond. GaleWyrick placed a $10,000 bond on both Aaron and Daryl Merrill, because of their histories. All three men have a preliminary hearing set for Thursday, Aug. 18, before GaleWyrick, where she will decide if there is enough evidence to bind them over for trial.

Democrats hold two seats in final Senate recall Republicans keep Senate by one-seat majority by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer STATEWIDE – The recall elections are now over, and the two Democratic state senators have held their seats in the final elections Tuesday, Aug. 16. Sen. Jim Holperin took 55 percent of the votes in District 12, the northeastern corner of the state, defeating Kim Simac. And in the southeast corner, Sen. Robert Wirch defeated Jonathan Steitz with 58 percent of the votes. Republicans will hold a one-seat majority in the Senate with 17

seats to the Democrats 16. The recalls started in late February and early March with petition drives to force recall elections against all 16 senators, eight from each party, who were elected in 2008. Enough signatures were collected to recall challenges against six Republican senators, including Sen. Sheila Harsdorf from the 10th District, and three Democrats. Two of the six Republicans were defeated last week. All three Democrats kept their seats. The four Republicans who kept their Senate seats are Robert Cowles, Alberta Darling, Harsdorf and Luther Olsen. The defeated Republicans are Randy Hopper who lost to Jessica King, and Dan Kapanke who was

defeated by Jennifer Shilling. The successful Democratic senators are Dave Hansen, who won a July 19 recall election, plus Holperin and Wirch. There were four Legislative recall elections in Wisconsin prior to this round. Incumbents kept their seats in two of those elections and were defeated in two. Sen. Otto Mueller, Republican, survived a recall in 1932. In 1990, Jim Holperin, then in the Assembly, won his first recall. Sen. George Petak, Republican, was defeated in 1996 and Sen. Gary George, Democrat, lost to another Democrat in a primary in 2003.

PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

Village splits sidewalk repairs with Van Meter’s

New assessor hired by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer LUCK — With two trustees absent from the Wednseday, Aug. 10 meeting of the Luck Village Board, village trustees voted not to follow the recommendation of administrator Kristina Handt in cost sharing for sidewalk repairs with the business that neighbors the village hall. Ross Anderson and Tim Van Meter of Van Meter’s Meats attended the July meeting of the board to ask that it consider sharing the cost of repairing the sidewalk that extends between the two driveways that serve a joint parking area. Just last month, the board approved an ordinance requiring property owners to repair or replace sidewalks with cracks or heaves of three-fourths of an inch or more, and the sidewalk along the joint parking lot meets that criteria. Handt, following a 1985 agreement between the village and Van Meter’s Meats, noted that the agreement called for equal cost sharing when it comes to repairs to or replacement of the joint parking area but does not refer to the sidewalk. “The recommendation from staff,” she said, “is that the village would pay for that approach, but there wouldn’t be any cost sharing beyond that.” Handt’s comment came after Trustee Kristine King made a motion at the start of the discussion to pay 50 percent of the sidewalk repair costs. “I think we need a little discussion,” said Trustee Hassan Mian directly after King’s motion. “I think staff recommends something different.” Both Trustee Phil Warhol and village President Peter Demydowich agreed with King, saying that the village had originally agreed to cost sharing with Van Meter’s and should stand by the agreement. However, said Handt again, the agreement discusses only the parking lot, not the sidewalk. If there were an agreement for maintaining sidewalks, she said, the group would not even need to be discussing Van Meter’s request. Since the agreement is a mutual agreement easement, said Handt, perhaps the village and Van Meter’s should discuss the cost of recent work on the sidewalk/approach for the village hall.

The sidewalk between Van Meter’s Meats and the Luck village hall needs repair, and last week the village board voted to split the cost with Van Meter’s. — Photos by Mary Stirrat

With trustees John Wilcoxon and Bob Determan absent from the meeting, the board voted to pay half the cost of the repairs. In attendance were Demydowich and Trustees King, Warhol, Mian and Marsha Jensen. “It’s a shared area,” said Jensen before the vote. “Our village hall looks wonderful. Let’s share. Because we share the parking lot, let’s share the cost of the sidewalk.” No bid has yet been obtained, said Van Meter at the meeting.

Appraisal service approved Luck’s longtime assessor, Bob Clifton, announced early this year that he will be retiring this fall, and the village board has officially selected Associated Appraisals of Appleton to be the new village assessor. The village received three bids, and Associated Appraisals was given the threeyear maintenance contract. Cost for the first year is $3,500, the second is $3,550 and the third is $3,600. In addition, there will be a one-time fee of $7,600 to convert to electronic files, which the Department of Revenue requires to be completed by 2013. The other

bids were $6,000 per year and $9,100 per year. Along with two three-year contracts with Associated Appraisals, the board approved a total revaluation of the village for 2012. Cost of the revaluation is $28,500, which includes the first year’s maintenance contract of $3,500 plus the $7,600 electronic conversion. There is currently $22,673 in a village savings account for revaluation, said Handt, and another $2,500 will be added in November for the 2011 appropriation, bringing the total year-end balance to $25,175. The village has anticipated budgeting $6,800 for revaluation in 2012, but only $4,325 will be needed to meet the $28,500 commitment. The last full revaluation took place in 1997, although the Department of Revenue recommends one every 10 years. Clifton has been the assessor for the villages of Luck and Frederic as well as the Town of Laketown, and the three municipalities have discussed options for hiring a joint assessor. On Monday, Aug. 8, the village of Frederic voted to contract with Associated Appraisals. The Town of Laketown will meet Tuesday, Aug. 23, to dis-

Bernard Laird, CEO of Associated Appraisals, discussed his firm’s services with the Luck Village Board. Associated Appraisals was selected as the new village assessor following the retirement of Bob Clifton. cuss and possibly hire a replacement for Clifton, said town board Chair Dan King.

Other business • The board gave approval to the school to put in a wider driveway on the north side of the school building. The school will be eliminating the two separate driveways, one into the wood shop and one into the small engine shop, to make one larger driveway to accommodate the recycling truck. • The village plan commission will hold a public hearing at 6 p.m. Monday, Aug. 22, on proposed changes in the floodplain ordinance and map. At 6:45 p.m., the commission will meet at the school to discuss options for building a bypass road to alleviate traffic problems on 7th Street by the school. • The community club is seeking volunteers to begin planning the 2012 Lucky Days celebration, which will be July 20-22. Anyone interested in helping can contact Mian at 715-472-2000.

School board approves changes to district’s health insurance plan by Priscilla Bauer Leader staff writer GRANTSBURG – The Grantsburg School Board met Monday, Aug. 8. In a 50 vote, the board approved changes to the district’s health insurance plan which will bring the employee contribution to 12 percent of their health insurance premium cost. The new changes will take effect on Sept. 1. The four board members on the transition committee read the minutes of two meetings held this summer by the committee and explained the members consensus recommendation. The transition team, whose role it was to provide staff input to the school board on changes to the employee handbook, is made up of volunteers including one teacher and one support staff per school, plus principals and one nonrepresented employee. After hearing the transition team’s rec-

ommendation the board had a lengthy discussion over the details, pros, cons, costs, savings, employee contribution percentages and comparison to other local school districts also changing to a similar model, etc. The board also heard explanations of the two insurance options by Bremer insurance benefit specialist Doug Willert. The first option, a health reimbursement arrangement, would double the current deductible from $225 for a single employee and $675 for a family. The second, a health savings account combined with the HRA, would mean higher deductibles for employees than the HRA option but costs would be offset with the district helping fund the HSA from a portion of the savings on the health insurance premiums, meaning a savings to staff members. After the meeting, Superintendent Joni Burgin commented on the two options

saying employees will need to understand the options and see how they will apply to their individual medical needs. “Now that they have two options, they need to understand the differences so they can make the best decision for their situation,” said Burgin. “They, of course, are concerned they will have smaller paychecks with fixed budget responsibilities,” commented Burgin, noting the 12-percent health insurance contribution will be in addition to the 50-percent WRS retirement contribution, which is also new. Burgin went on to say the contribution is the same level as state employees and some nearby districts, including Luck and Webster, which are also changing plans and considering an HSA.

In other board business Cindi Throngard, director for the district’s community education, volunteers

and STEP programs gave the board a report on each for the coming school year. The board heard goal and building reports for the 2010-11 school year. The board voted to approve the 20112012 transportation contract with a costof-living increase of 3.8 percent on the daily equipment rate for a total increase of $7,218.69, increasing the daily equipment rate to $99.09. Cocurricular rates are frozen for 2011-2012. When applied to total fleet costs, the total cost-of-living increase is 1.31 percent. The board approved the second reading of the grade advancement policy for grades four through eight which requires students to be proficient in core classes in order to move to the next grade. The board approved the resignation of Kim Bassett with the $600 late-resignation penalty fee. The board approved Maurice Henderson as assistant football coach.

Stranded canoeists rescued Recent rainfall has made St. Croix River dangerous in spots DANBURY - A group of young campers from a Hudson YMCA camp were rescued Thursday evening, Aug. 4, after encountering high waters and rapids on the St. Croix River north of Danbury. The Burnett County Sheriff’s Department issued the following press release: On Thursday, Aug. 4, at 8:49 p.m., the Burnett County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a number of canoeists overturned and stranded on the St. Croix River

about one mile south of CCC Bridge Landing in the Town of Blaine. This area is located approximately 12 miles northeast of Danbury. According to Chief Deputy Scott M. Burns, the group of 14 female campers ages 15-20, and two adult counselors from YMCA Camp St. Croix in Hudson began an overnight canoe trip from the Schoen Park Landing in Douglas County earlier in the day and encountered high water and fast-current conditions on the St. Croix River, causing several canoes to swamp, and the canoeists to become stranded along the riverbanks. Rescue efforts were coordinated immediately, and all of the stranded campers were removed

from the riverway utilizing a hovercraft and boats by about 1:40 a.m. This incident occurred in a remote, wilderness area where the riverbanks, landings and campsites are only accessible via the river. “All campers and counselors have been accounted for and were taken back to Camp St. Croix in Hudson. North Memorial Ambulance personnel treated and released one camper at the scene who was reportedly suffering from exposure. No other injuries were reported. The Burnett County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by St. Croix Tribal Police, the Wisconsin State Patrol, National Park Service, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Danbury Fire Department, Dairy-

land Fire Department and North Memorial Ambulance. The Burnett County Sheriff’s Office reminds canoeists and boaters that recent heavy rainfall in northern Wisconsin has caused the St. Croix and other area rivers to become treacherous with many downed trees in the riverways, high water levels, and extremely fast and dangerous currents. Extreme caution must be used when on or near these waterways. Individuals and groups can check with National Park Service headquarters for river conditions before heading out on the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers. - with information from Burnett County Sheriff’s Dept.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 5

County plans to limit claims for damages caused by dogs by Mary Stirrat Leader staff writer BALSAM LAKE — Back in January, the Polk County Board of Supervisors was asked to consider a $27,000 claim for damages after dogs killed three trophy deer. In the end, the owner of the deer received nothing. At its Tuesday, Aug. 16, meeting, however, the county board of supervisors considered a new ordinance that limits claims to $1,000 per incident, regardless of how many animals are killed. There will be a public hearing on the ordinance before it is voted upon at the Tuesday, Sept. 20, meeting of the board. Claims for domestic animals killed by dogs, if approved, are paid with funds collected for dog license fees. However, before any claims can be paid, the dog license fund must first cover licensing expenses as well as expenses at Arnell Humane Society, plus retain $1,000 in the fund. State statutes, said the county’s legal counsel, Jeff Fuge, allow counties to set a limit on dog claims. Using other counties as a model, he said, the Polk County Agricultural and Extension Education Committee set the limit at $1,000. “This sets a cap of $1,000 per claim,” explained Fuge, “no matter how many animals per occurrence.” Other issues discussed that may be added to the resolution are a time limit for reporting damages and whether multiple incidents within a 24-hour time period should be considered as just one claim. Property values County Administrator Dana Frey reported that the state Department of Revenue has come out with the new equalized valuation for Polk County. Polk County’s property value declined 7 percent from 2010, the greatest decline in the entire state. Total equalized value in the county in 2010 was just under $4.545 billion. That figure for 2011 is $4.228 million. The only municipality to show an in-

Todd Demers, director of the information technology department at Polk County. – Photo by Mary Stirrat crease is the village of Frederic, with an increase of less than 1 percent. The greatest drops were in the towns of Alden (13.7 percent), Balsam Lake (10 percent), Johnstown (13.9 percent), Laketown (15.6 percent), Osceola (12.1 percent) and St. Croix Falls (11.9 percent).

Information technology Todd Demers, director of the county’s information technology department, gave the board an overview of the philosophy and direction of his department. That general philosophy, he said, revolves around providing the service that Polk County citizens need. Demers told the board that technology is the process of providing services rather than the tools we generally think of as technology. Using a definition from Wikipedia, Demers said in his report, “Technology is the making, usage and knowledge of tools, techniques, crafts, systems or methods of organization in order to solve a problem or serve some purpose.” The IT department, he said, is in the

business of making the county run better, not implementing technology for technology’s sake. Among what Demers calls “the major elements” involved in determining the county’s technology needs are the fact that technology must be available around the clock, every day of the year, and that it must follow established standards. Demers also outlined several areas that have been identified where technology can reduce business costs. Right now, he said, the county is in the process of replacing desktop computers with thin client devices that operate off of a server. These are one-fourth the cost of a desktop computer and operate for about $5 per year. The current PCs cost $28 per year to operate, according to Demers, and there are about 420 units. The goal is to convert 150 of these to thin client devices this year and another 150 in the near future. Another area of savings is in videoconferencing, and Demers said that his department is looking to increase usage particularly for trainings and for court proceedings. As of the end of July 2011, Demers said, law enforcement has spent more than $31,000 in transporting inmates to court appearances. He estimated that roughly 50 percent of that could be saved through videoconferencing.

Master fee schedule Under the direction of Frey, the county now has a complete list of all fees for services that are charged by each department. It is good practice, Frey told the board, to have all the fees together in one place and have them reviewed annually. The premise, he said, is to charge what it costs to provide the services. Charging an amount more or less actual costs should be a deliberate decision made for budgetary reasons, he said. With a handful of changes from last year’s fees, the board approved the schedule with only Supervisor Dean Johansen opposed. Two larger changes in the fee schedule

were included in the fee schedule. One was a previously approved increase in the rent charged to Endeavors Adult Development Center, from $38,271 in 2011 to $68,000 in 2012. The board had temporarily decreased the rent to accommodate Endeavor’s other expenses. A second increase comes in the amount charged by the county clerk to municipalities for the statewide voter registration system. In the past, support fees were charged based on the number of voters, but now a flat rate will be charged based on the population of the municipality. Board supervisors Neil Johnson and Dean Johansen each spoke against fees charged to churches and fraternal organization that hold potlucks or concession stands. The board will have the opportunity to change the fee schedule during consideration of the 2012 budget.

Other business • Supervisors were reminded that the Polk County Energy Fair is this Friday and Saturday, Aug. 19-20, at the county fairgrounds. Hours are Friday from noon to 8 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. See www.polkcountyenergyfair.com for more information. • A public hearing will be held Tuesday, Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m., on the final supervisory district plan. The regular monthly board meeting will follow the public hearing. • The board voted to authorize a threeyear contract between the Polk County medical examiner and the Anoka County medical examiner for autopsy services, at a maximum of $26,000 per year. • The board approved purchase of clinical documentation software for the public health department. The software, said department head Gretchen Sampson, will allow more efficient electronic documentation, particularly for the reproductive health, jail health,and public health nursing programs. Grant funds are available to purchase the $55,847 software.

SCF city administrator on board by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The new city administrator for St. Croix Falls has been on the job and says he is enjoying St. Croix Falls. Joel Peck hails from White Bear Lake, Minn. He received a journalism degree and reported for the White Bear Press for two years, covering city and local government. In his attendance of those meetings, he began to get more interested in city government. “I felt like an outsider looking in,” he said. “He tried to get into the government circle more by working with the Minnesota House of Representatives. He earned his master’s degree in public administration. Peck said an internship with the League of Minnesota Cities opened doors for him professionally. “I worked with city managers and it was through the internship that I got my first job as a city

administrator in Crosby, Minnesota,” he said. Peck worked for three years as the Crosby city administrator. One of the projects he worked on there was developing 25 miles of biking trails. He stated that when he saw the job description in St. Croix Falls, he felt it matched a lot of what he wanted to do. “I have enjoyed my time here so far. I am learning a lot and meeting new people,” Peck said. Peck and wife Kate and daughter Rosemary have moved to the city. Peck stated he has family buried in Centuria and his grandmother lived on Deer Lake. He says he spent some time as a youth in the area and is glad to be back. When asked about challenges the city faces he says the wastewater-treatment facility is one of them. “The city has been working with the Army Corps of Engineers on the wastewater-treatment facility

Joel Peck is the new city administrator for St. Croix Falls. – Photo by Tammi Milberg

for a number of years. I hope to facilitate and make it easier for everybody. Certainly if we have a sewer rate increase, I would hope we could keep it as low as possible for the taxpayers.” As far as city finances, Peck says the city has less budget reserves than most city administrators would like to see, but he says the city is adequate for what is happening in the city. “The city seems in solid shape and the city has done an adequate job managing finances for what’s been happening.” In the future, Peck says a challenge he sees is the civic auditorium building and how that building will be preserved and developed. He also said there are a number of people in the city interested in mountain-biking trail development in the city and that he would like to lend his experience for that vision. “I’m looking forward to working with the city.”

Health-care switch cuts Webster school costs by Carl Heidel Leader staff writer WEBSTER - After months of studying a variety of health-care plans, it only took a few minutes at the Monday, Aug. 15, meeting for the Webster School Board to switch health-care providers for the school’s staff. By unanimous vote the board dropped the Wisconsin Education Association plan, that has been in place for a number of years, and agreed to implement the program offered by HealthPartners.

When board member Terry Larsen asked Superintendent Jim Erickson how much the switch would save the school district, Erickson replied that a precise figure was uncertain, but that an estimate would be around $300,000. Currently it is costing the district $20,000 for a health insurance policy with WEA for a school staff member and family, but with HealthPartners that figure drops to around $12,000. In addition to the initial cost savings to the district, the new plan permits the creation of health savings accounts for staff.

Funds will be placed in a dedicated health savings account for each staff member, and those funds can be used to cover the deductible costs of the insurance policy. If the staff members and families are healthy and don’t use the funds, the savings can be accumulated from year to year as a hedge against major medical expenses. The new health plan will take effect Sept. 1. In other business the board approved new fee schedules. Prices for student hot lunches were increased by 10 cents, but

other meal prices remained the same. Erickson explained that the change was mandated by the Department of Public Instruction. The DPI said that since the district receives a significant reimbursement for free and reduced lunches for students, the schools should charge more for standard meals to help cover dollars lost by offering the free and reduced lunches. All other fees remained unchanged: 512 registration fee is $5; parking permit is $5; and driver’s ed fee remains at $100.

Veterans to benefit from Webb Lake event Saturday Sale items left over from Fourth of July sale/benefit WEBB LAKE - The July 1 storm cut short the 10th-annual One Nation Under God sale and auction to benefit veterans,

but this Saturday, Aug. 20, will see a continuation of the event during the Cabaret Veterans Appreciation Day in Webb Lake. Organizer of the One Nation event,Dan Kaye said a total of $9,500 was raised for the county food shelf and area veterans, but they had planned on raising more than twice that.

“If it weren’t for the storm, the results could have hit over $22,000 combined,” he noted. The fireworks show and sale went on despite a lack of electricity, and large crowds attended, but not big enough to generate the goal amount. “The building is still full of sale items,” he said. “I am tying in with the Cabaret

Veterans Appreciation Day, and all items sold that day will go to the veterans of Burnett County.” The items for sale include many brandnew items, including power tools, boats, camping gear, shelving units, office furniture, gloves, liquid soap, microwave ovens and much more. - submitted

PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

New library almost complete Library-related items top agenda by Sherill Summer Leader staff writer WEBSTER - The library project is coming to a close, but the Webster Village Board still had some library-project items on its meeting agenda Wednesday, Aug. 10. A public hearing was held prior to the regular meeting to hear public comments on the project. The public hearing near the end of the project to gather feedback was a requirement of grants used to help fund the project. There were no comments from the public during the hearing. Engineer Dave Rasmussen from MSA Professional Services passed out an article from an MSA trade journal that highlighted the Webster library project, and later during the meeting, a check for $113,886.51 was issued to the general contractor of the project, Jeff Howe. The check was the sixth such check issued during the course of construction to pay for the project. This check, how-

ever, is the first that will not largely come from grants obtained to fund the project, but instead will come from a Bremer loan that the library must pay back. Other library-related business was the opening of a sidewalk, curb and gutter bid at the new library. Two bids were received for the job, and the board decided to choose the higher bid from village resident Steve Zmuda so that the job would remain local. The current library is scheduled to close later this week, and the new library is to open next week. A grand opening for the library is scheduled for Friday, Sept. 9. Author Michael Perry will headline the festivities.

Two requests for ordinance variances Not all the village business was library related. There were two other public hearings on variances to village ordinances. Zia Louisa owner Jason Hanson was granted a variance to place a concrete slab approximately 7 feet from the east property line. The slab will house an outdoor cooler / refrigeration system.

A second variance to the village ordinances was not granted. Owner of Big Al’s, Brian Mintz, wanted to move his business sign closer to the highway because brush and trees are obstructing the view of the sign from the north. The board felt that the sign closer to the highway would be a safety hazard, and so the request was denied. The board also noted that the DOT generally has final say on sign locations along highways. The board sympathized with the request, however, and village President Jeff Roberts offered to try and mediate an agreement to remove the obstructions to the sign.

Other business The village approved a bid from Taylor Paving to work on portions of Cedar and Elm streets in the village. The village decided to have the village crew remove the curb and sidewalk near the new library instead of hiring out the project. A survey map of the the new library was approved.

Woman faces charge of OWI with kids in car She was eventually stopped and given tests for suspected operation while intoxicated and was taken into custody. The woman is also alleged to have had her two preteen children in the vehicle at the time, which may lead to even more serious charges. According to the incident report filed with the sheriff’s department, Marion Graber, 46, Turtle Lake may be facing charges of OWI with the enhanced charge of having

High-speed chase ends with foot race by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – A high-speed chase that began in the early morning hours on Saturday, Aug. 13, in Chisago County, Minn., ended in Polk County on CTH H, just east of 130th Street, with the driver leaving the scene on foot and not being found for some time. According to the incident report from the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, the driver was identified as Donald P. Hayes of Amery. He was reportedly attempting to elude authorities at speeds approaching 100 mph in Pontiac Montana minivan. Several squad cars became involved, and the pursuit included the running of several stop signs in western Polk County, finally coming to an end with application of tire deflation devices placed near 105th Avenue and CTH H.

As the vehicle tires began to deflate, the driver apparently attempted to flee on foot, which led to an extensive search of the area by both officers and a canine search team, all to no avail. Hayes was identified as the driver, using documents in the van, and according to Polk County Sheriff Peter Johnson, was indeed taken into custody a short time later, although he did not elaborate. Hayes, 49, is facing a felony charge of fleeing an officer, with a misdemeanor charge of resisting arrest. He made an initial appearance before Judge Jeffery Anderson on Monday, Aug. 15, where he set a signature bond of $5,000 and set a preliminary hearing for Thursday, Aug. 18. Hayes has an extensive history of driving infractions and has been convicted at least five times of operating while intoxicated.

RUBY’S PANTRY FOOD DISTRIBUTION

HOSPICE VOLUNTEER TRAINING

Thursday, Aug. 25

Registration starts at 1:30 p.m. Distribution starts at 2 p.m. Anyone who gets hungry qualifies. $15 Cash Donation Bring your own baskets, boxes or carts.

543580 52L

24534 State Rd. 35/70 North of Siren

Do you have the time? The needs are easy for a volunteer, but priceless to a family in crisis. It might just be to run an errand, spend time with their loved one by playing cards, reading to them, listening to their life story or just holding their hand. Volunteers are workers, homemakers or retired folks. They are men and women of various ages with one thing in common - they care. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer for Regional Hospice, there will be a training session starting on Monday, September 12, at SwedbergTaylor Funeral Chapel on Highway 35 in Siren. The training will be one day a week for six weeks and will cover such topics as philosophy of hospice, admission criteria, hospice medical issues, pschological and social concerns, listening and communication skills and bereavement and spiritual care. More information is available by calling the hospice office at 715-635-9077. 543574 52-1L

her two juvenile daughters in the vehicle at the time. Charges had not been filed at press time.

TAM, 50 Is Nifty, But Mud Packs Don’t Help!

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by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer TURTLE LAKE – A report of a possibly intoxicated woman at a bar led to a strange incident on Sunday, Aug. 14, as a responding deputy from the Polk County Sheriff’s Department attempted to block the woman’s car as she left the tavern near Range. The woman is alleged to have driven around the squad car in the ditch, heading for her home.

Ingalls Clinic at Webster Temporarily Closed August 24-27 for Remodeling

Ingalls Clinic in Webster will be closed for remodeling August 24-27, reopening August 29 for regular hours. We apologize for the inconvenience, but this remodel is necessary to improve the reception desk and waiting room areas. We are hoping to update the electrical service at the same time in preparation for a new X-ray unit installation. To assist patients during this time, some staff are being rescheduled to the Frederic Clinic and offering appointments there. Patients needing to be seen may call the Frederic Clinic for an appointment with a provider or physical therapy. Please call 715-327-5700 or 800-8283627 for appointments or with questions. 543556 52L 42a

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AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 7

New technology at Frederic schools Possible drop in lower-grade enrollment by Gregg Westigard Leader staff writer FREDERIC – Moodle, Google Docs, SMART Boards, iPads. More new technology is coming to the Frederic schools, new tools that aid students and allow more interaction between students, teachers and parents. Frederic Principals Kelly Steen and Josh Robinson, together with Administrator Jerry Tischer, gave on update on technology advances at the monthly meeting of the Frederic School Board Monday, Aug. 15. The board also had a look at enrollment projections for September. Moodle is a new 24/7 system that gives each student a voice, Robinson said. It is a high-tech learning tool that is a way for students to be connected to each other and their teachers, a place to ask questions and start dialogues. It allows teachers to create online courses, which students

“U.S. needs to address lingering legacy of Agent Orange” says president of VVA 50th anniversary of Vietnam War WASHINGTON, D.C. — “On Aug. 10, 1961, the U.S. Air Force began spraying chemical defoliants, dessicants and herbicides over wide swaths of land in South Vietnam. This was done, first and foremost, to protect our troops — to clear vegetation from the perimeter of fire bases and other outposts, to deny those we were fighting cover and concealment, and to deny food to our enemy,” said John Rowan, national president of Vietnam Veterans of America. “By the time we left Vietnam, some 19 million gallons of dioxin-containing Agent Orange had been sprayed. “Agent Orange did more than its job, however. It is now known to be associated with a variety of health conditions in those who served there as well as those who lived there,” Rowan said. “This year we commence the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of America’s involvement in Vietnam. We, at Vietnam Veterans of America, hope this will be more than a rehash of key events and battles in the war. We hope it will recognize that, as we remember the service and sacrifices of those who gave of themselves during the years of the war, we also need to focus attention and address the lingering legacy of the spraying of Agent Orange and other defoliants,” Rowan said. “We believe that the saturation of Agent Orange is now affecting the health of the children, and even the grandchildren, of those who were there between 1961 and 1975. We will insist, loudly and clearly, that the Department of Veterans Affairs support research into the potential intergenerational effects of exposure to dioxin. And we will work to enact legislation that will establish centers where the progeny of Vietnam veterans who are afflicted with birth defects and learning disabilities that we believe are associated with the veterans exposure to dioxin can go for health assessments and treatment at no cost to the veteran and the family. “We, as a nation, need to accept our responsibility and address both the ecological destruction and the human agonies that resulted from our spraying of defoliants in southern Vietnam,” Rowan said. “Maybe then we can finally have some closure to our war.” Vietnam Veterans of America is the nation’s only congressionally chartered veterans service organization dedicated to the needs of Vietnam-era veterans and our families. VVA’s founding principle is, “Never again will one generation of veterans abandon another.” — from WCVSO

can access as a virtual classroom. Moodle may be a way to make more of a connection with the home-schoolers. And Moodle, which stands for Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment, (thank goodness for abbreviations) costs only $1,000 per year, a cost paid by the special education budget. Most elementary rooms now have SMART Boards, Steen said. The amazing boards must be seen to be believed. They are a learning tool for even the youngest students. Three teachers took a workshop on Google Docs, paid for by a technology grant. Robinson said the possibilities are endless with the new tools. “We have a good program,” Tischer said. “We are expanding what we are doing, we are transitioning in technology. There are some pretty great things at Frederic.”

Enrollment At this point, Frederic’s enrollment may be down about 21 students when school opens, from 492 last September

to 471 this fall. Most of the drop at this point is in the lower grades, 5K and grades one and two, which have lost 14 students who were in the school this spring. Steen said a major reason for this drop is custodial, children going to live with a different parent. Aside from those grades, there are minor changes in enrollment, a loss of seven students in five grade groups offset by a gain of four in two groups and no change in three others. However, the incoming senior class, with 49 students, is the last “big” class. The other classes range from 41 students (grade 11) to 19 students (grade 4) for an average of 32.46 students per grade from 4K thru 11th grade. The district is adjusting to the declining enrollment. The sixth grade is moving from the elementary building to the other building. That will allow the district to shut down a few classrooms in the four-five wing, and that will allow a reduction of four hours a day of custodial work in the elementary building.

Clayton mans dies in ATV crash BAYFIELD COUNTY - A 31-year-old Clayton man died Saturday evening, Aug. 6, after sustaining head injuries in an ATV crash while riding on a trail approximately 14 miles southwest of Washburn. The Bayfield County Sheriff’s Department identified the man as Ricky L. Juleff. He was with other members of his group from the Clayton and Amery area when the accident occurred shortly after 5:30 p.m. on Valhalla Trail east of Forest Road 236. A passenger riding with Juleff was transported to Memorial Medical Center in Ashland with what is believed to be non-life-threatening injuries. The Bayfield County Sheriff’s Department, Washburn Area Ambulance Service, city of Ashland Fire Department paramedic intercept and Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources responded to the call.

Frederic’s 22nd-Annual

Lots of unique items from crafters throughout the area! DELICIOUS HOMEMADE PIES

F Fine ine Fair Fair

Sat., August 20, 2011 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Downtown Frederic by The Train Depot & Museum For more information, contact: Jackie Bergeron, 715-653-2338

A sheriff’s department deputy, the first emergency responder on scene, reported CPR had been started on the victim, according to the Superior Telegram. When the ambulance arrived, it was determined the injuries received were fatal. A group of four was traveling on two ATVs. They were staying in the Iron River area and had traveled the ATV trails from Iron River to Washburn. At the time of the crash, they were heading back to Iron River. It is believed speed, alcohol and the lack of a helmet are all contributing factors in the death, the sheriff’s department reported. The Wisconsin DNR will be the lead agency completing the investigation in this crash. - with information from the Superior Telegram

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Train Depot & Museum Sponsored by the Frederic Area Historical Society

MUSIC ON THE DEPOT DECK 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Sponsored By The Frederic Arts & The Frederic Library

Rain Or Shine Sponsored By The Frederic Area Chamber Of Commerce

17th-Annual

FREDERIC AMBULANCE CHICKEN & CORN DINNER SAT., AUG. 20, 2011 543314 41a 52L

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RAIN OER SHIN

Frederic Pavilion, next to The Depot Featuring.... Grilled Chicken, Corn & More

Serving starts at 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Purchase a ticket to win one of 10 cash prizes. Tickets available from crew members and on day of event.

PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

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• Where to write • President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 transition@wisconsin.gov Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 202-225-3365 U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov

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Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 6 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628 rep.Severson@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Roger RIvard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 608-266-2519 • 888-534-0075 rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 202-224-5323

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th District) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707 Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us

Two unique and historic summer elections are - well, history now - and many weary voters are glad. But there’s still a buzz out there. Barring any challenge, three members of the St. Croix Tribe will become new council members this Friday in a low-key swearing-in ceremony. Potentially historic is how many tribal members see the event, as it holds promise for the change a dedicated and relentless group has long fought for. With the political winds now in their favor, and the eyes of all tribal members upon them, the new council has two years to prove good on their agenda until a new election looms. Constitutional change, transparency and fairness in all facets of its government. These are familiar themes, and we wish the new council well. The second historic contest wrapped up this week with the last of six Senate recall elections (See story in this issue). Rebuffing the challenges posed by the elections, the GOP retained control of the state Senate - by one seat. As the dust settles from the wild political rodeo we just witnessed, there’s also speculation on the Dems promise to stay on the recall trail - rounding up votes to recall Gov. Scott Walker this coming year. Walker was not eligible for recall until he had served a year - and that milestone is fast approaching. According to Wisconsin Democratic Party Chairman Mike Tate, Walker is still a recall target. Tate made that assessment a day after last week’s first round of recall elections in which Republicans won four of the contests. But the Dems winning of two of the contests show how vulnerable Walker is to a recall effort, he noted. Republicans are angry at how unnecessary the recall elections were. Democrats say it was their only recourse, and that Republicans added to the cost by running phony Democrats to force primary elections. USA Today, American’s first national newspaper, has worked hard to shed the critics who claimed it was the “fast food” of journalism. They’ve overcome that tag for many by diversifying their editorial page with some point-counterpoint pieces. Recently they took on the recall elections. USA Today took the side against the need for them: “Backers of recall elections to unseat state and local officeholders say the process is merely democracy at work. But if there's such a thing as too much democracy, this might be it. Elections should mean something. Recalls should be used only in extreme cases, such as criminal conduct or egregious malfeasance. Giving voters a do-over when they disagree with a new policy undercuts the significance of regular elections (why bother when there'll be another one soon?). Recalls reward voters who failed to pay attention or vote the first time. And, most destructively, recalls make politicians wary of taking tough but unpopular steps to address problems.” And the paper also provided space for an opposing view - in the same issue: “That recalls have been so rare in American history should not discount the important role they have played. Recalls provide the people a direct, democratic way to restore accountability in times of public crisis ... Wisconsin was thrust into constitutional crisis when Walker's GOP-controlled Legislature violated the state's open meetings law to pass the bill ... But instead of grabbing pitchforks and torches, the proud people of Wisconsin responded peacefully to Walker's reckless abuse of power by organizing and executing two successful recalls of GOP state senators ... The right to recall provided a frustrated and betrayed electorate with the ability to channel its outrage.” And there are those who just want to give politics a rest. Is there such a thing in today’s politics?

Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th District) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707 608-266-7745 • 715-232-1390 Toll-free - 800-862-1092 sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Rep. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

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AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 9

• Letters to the editor • How is that change working? Now that the Democratic Party was defeated in four of the six recall votes they demanded, will they respect the majority of voters? Most likely, they will not! Rest assured that the teachers unions and others will probably demand recounts of all votes, investigate having the GAB throw out the election for some obscure reason, have the vote declared unconstitutional by the State Supreme Court, hire their professional protestors to disrupt the state proceedings in Madison and see if Obama and the federal level supporters can nullify the recall election. The Wisconsin voters are tired of the Democratic Party shenanigans. They are tired of having the Democratic Party demanding that more money be spent. I for one know of at least one violation of recall election signature process that was illegal, but the teachers union and others had those numbers counted to get the recall election. Is there any way we can have the minority respect the majority. Probably not. The education system in Wisconsin is broken. We have (in Siren) some of the highest student spending, the highest teacher to student ratio and a dismal 67-percent graduation rate. The Democratic Party solution to problems of any sort is to extort money from the taxpayers and throw the money at the problem. It is time that we throw out the current system and get back to education of our youth. Of course, that will require accountability and responsibility of both parent and students. I doubt that will ever happen. Now, Obama and the rest of the Democratic Party have thrown out the No Child Left Behind requirements by executive decree. All the school districts need to do is send in a form to the federal education chairwoman and she will send back permission to make the legislation void. The education system has had since 2008 to meet the standards. A total of six years to bring education of our youth up to minimum standards. According to CBS news, the majority of school districts across the country will be applying for permission to avoid the minimum standards. Not only have the Democrats destroyed the housing market, increased unemployment, reduced senior Social Security benefits, increased Medicare while reducing benefits, increased energy costs, increased food costs and increased the deficit by 175 percent since 2008, but now they have completely destroyed the education of our youth. How is that change working for the U.S. taxpayers now? Dave Wilhelmy Siren

Farmer states his side in bear killing An article entitled “Bear kills calves, farmer takes action” in the Aug. 3 edition of the Inter-County Leader newspaper had several omissions and errors regarding my attempts to reach state and federal authorities for assistance. The article correctly indicates my phone calls to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department between approximately 3:26 and 4:30 a.m. The sheriff’s department gave me a USDA APHIS phone number, which I called (it was a number in Rhinelander) at about 4:30 a.m. Sunday. No one answered the phone, so I left a message and received a return phone call over 24 hours later on Monday morning. At about the same time, approximately 4:30 a.m., I also called the Polk County conservation warden and left a message but did not receive a return phone call until about 5:30 p.m. At 4:13 a.m., the Polk County Sheriff’s Department left a voice message on my cell phone advising I should not shoot the bear. I did not retrieve this message until after I had already killed the bear, but I would have shot it anyway after we found it at the site of the second calf kill. The article incorrectly indicated Sundvall and Rouzer tracked the bear with

dogs. This was not the case. Rouzer followed the path the bear had made through the cornfield. As he moved along the track, Rouzer heard what turned out to the be the bear moving through the corn, and he came upon the bear moving east from the site of the second calf kill, approximately 100 feet from the calf carcass. Rouzer chased the bear through the cornfield to the open field where I shot and killed the bear. The article incorrectly states Warden Phil Dorn called Sundvall at 7 a.m. In fact, I called Dorn at 7 a.m., leaving a message. I called because I had not received any call back from any other DNR warden. Dorn did not return my phone call until approximately 11 a.m. Regional Warden Supervisor Dave Zebro indicated in the article that word had gotten around the community the bear had been shot and that Sundvall “figured the wardens would be arriving on his property so he thought he should call Dorn.” In fact, my first call to the DNR (Polk County) was before 5 a.m., and before I killed the bear. Zebro also stated that had a game warden been immediately reached, they would have referred the problem to APHIS or found a way to meet him (Sundvall) in the morning and resolve the problem. In fact, my attempts to reach the wardens and APHIS hours before I shot the bear did not result in any timely action. In the article, Zebro states “if a bear is in the act of killing or harming an animal, pet or for personal safety, people can defend themselves or their property. In this situation the bear left the area, and Sundvall and his companion went on a bear hunt and shot the first bear they saw.” This flies in face of the fact that the bear was tracked from the hutches, through the cornfield to the second calf. This clearly was the bear which had killed the calf and not the result of a “bear hunt” with wanton killing of the “first bear they saw.” In fact, Chad Alberg, USDA Wildlife Services, who accompanied Dorn on the visit to my farm, stated in The Country Today, July 27, “Sundvall’s case is unique because the offending animal was caught in the act.” Alberg and Dorn retraced the tracks of the bear through the cornfield to the site of the second calf kill and to the site in which I shot the bear during their visit to my farm. If Zebro is correct in the justification of people defending themselves or their property, the killing of this bear was completely justified. As Alberg indicated, the bear was caught in the act. It is not clear why DNR personnel are taking a position at odds not only with me but with the opinion of USDA APHIS Wildlife Services. Donald Sundvall Turtle Lake Editors note: Sundvall says that he called and left a message for APHIS in Rhinelander, at about 4:30 a.m., before he shot the bear, and they didn’t call back until the following Monday morning. District supervisor Bob Willging of the APHIS headquarters in Rhinelander, told the Leader on Tuesday, Aug. 16, that there was no record that Sundvall ever called the Rhinelander office, nor did the Rhinelander office contact Sundvall the following Monday. Willging noted that the Rhinelander office is responsible for relaying information of problem wildlife to Chad Alberg, the APHIS trapper in Cumberland. Alberg did respond to Sundvall’s bear problem, but only after he was contacted by Warden Dorn between 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sundvall is right, in the fact that he did leave a message for Dorn at 7 a.m., and Dorn returned that call when he received the message at around 11 a.m. Alberg and Dorn arrived at the farm at around 1 p.m. As for tracking the bear with dogs, The Country Today, Polk County Ledger and the Inter-County Leader indicated that the bear was tracked with dogs. Sundvall’s wife, Fran Moore, indicated that the dogs weren’t hounds or hunting dogs, but an ancient Labrador, a Border collie and a short, mixed-breed dog, that weren’t really involved at all.

We the people Last Sunday, Aug. 7, thousands of people across our District 10, the whole state of Wisconsin, and the nation bowed their heads in prayer that our Sen. Harsdorf would hold her seat. Those prayers were answered! We the people are triumphant for the second time. Harsdorf and Gov. Walker are making changes in Wisconsin that are making a big positive difference. The schools that were thousands of dollars short in budget, now have an excess and did not have to lay off one teacher to do it. The union dictated the insurance company the school administrations had to use. Teachers have been taken advantage of by the union for years. Teachers are forced to pay union dues even if they object to the union’s agenda. We have the greatest respect for teachers and the job they chose to do, however, when this country is in the shape it is in, we need to re-examine what put us there, and make changes to bring everything back in to perspective. Walker is trying to give us a country we can afford to live, work and raise a family in. The union, the media and the Democrats would have you believe otherwise. The Democrat-run economy is the reason your 401K and your retirement money in the stock market took a crash this past week. The Democratic Party is not what it was when our grandparents were small. The Republican Party now stands for people who work for a living, small business, the farmers and people who believe what God says about abortion. Abortion is killing babies, and the Democratic Party supports abortion. It is impossible to be a true, Bible-believing Christian and at the same time support the Democratic Party for that one reason alone. As the recall election results tell you, we the people are sending the message that we want back what our country was founded on, the Christian beliefs, values and virtues that our forefathers lived and breathed. We do not want to “breathe union,” as Shelly Moore said! The Republicans are trying to rein in spending, and they are making a difference in our state government, and as Harsdorf said in her victory speech ... ”The nation is watching Wisconsin.” Now, how about cutting benefits to people who are not our citizens and save some more? I have always voted for the person, not the party, but I do not find anyone in the Democratic Party that shares our beliefs or values anymore. Ask yourself, are you supporting what you really believe in? Or are you supporting what you are being told you should by unions? Perhaps what your parents always supported before the real definition of the political parties changed somewhere along the line? Go deep in your conscience for the answer. Stop and ask yourself why Republicans are called conservative and the Democrats are called liberal. I rest my case. Elizabeth Petersen Rural Frederic

ATV use and common sense For anyone unaware, Polk County’s Town of Clam Falls Board approved the use of ATVs to run on town roads at last week’s, Aug. 10, scheduled board meeting. Absent at the open hearing was input from law enforcement, emergency medical responders, county public safety representatives and the media – all the governmental and societal watchdogs that one would expect to monitor or offer views on the wisdom of the action under consideration. (Not that their presence on the agenda would have made any difference as Town of Clam Falls officials have consistently ignored any voices questioning the preconceived conclusions of the clannish entrenched good-old-boy threemember board). I’ve watched this sort of thing take place

C O O P E R A T I V E - O W N E D

on any number of issues since becoming a resident of Somers Lake 12 years ago, and I find it appalling the citizens of the town continue to tolerate actions of the board that defy reason and jeopardize public welfare. (Here we have the oxymoron – ATV use and common sense). I attended the Wednesday evening meeting. I sat quietly as the cautionary words of Perry Karl, planning committee chairman, were essentially dismissed. Most others in the audience sat stonefaced or asked softball questions as the ATV- use proponents dominated the discussion. This is a common dynamic in town board meetings, a citizen with a dissenting view might just as well step outside and talk to a tree. I waited for any strong voice of protest to be heard as the apparently preordained approval rationale was presented. Finally, I spoke out, and now in good conscience I write to memorialize my statement on these pages in full, explicit detail for whatever it may be worth. This proposal, if approved, makes about as much sense as the 2006 posting of a 55mph speed limit sign on the unimproved, narrow country lane that provides access to my home. I prevail upon you to think of the implications of your actions for all of us and not pander to those who share your sociocultural views. As a member of this community, I’ve observed countless, blatant violations of basic, commonsense safety considerations in the use of ATVs in my area. These have been duly reported to the sheriff, and when law enforcement was able to apprehend the violators, citations were issued. The particulars of these reports and associated public risk details are a matter of record. None of these reports involve the legal use of ATVs in essential, active farmto-farm travel, agricultural or industrial maintenance usage. What I have observed, for example, are people towing their boats on public roads with unprotected kids and dogs piled into the towed craft and on the ATV; a supersized ATV, carrying children and adults with no protective gear, flying down a loose gravel road at high speed, going to the lake. Similar activity continues near my home, today, a Sunday, as this is written. ATV advocates argue that designated town road usage will afford residents, especially the elderly and handicapped, convenient, inexpensive access to local businesses, places of worship, etc. But to get to an authorized, sign-identified ATV route, one can run on a nondesignated road to get there. This is patently ridiculous and opens up the entire town road net to ATV use. Further, when decoding the ATVers, and other motorized-sports enthusiasts reference to “businesses,” what they’re really talking about is clandestine, easy, police avoidance access to local taverns, especially in Lewis, Clam Falls and Siren. This is a contrived, bogus, self-serving argument that’s resulted in the regular maiming and death of its devotees and innocent victims – never mind the intrusion on the environment, ecological damage, noise nuisance aspects of their behavior. I ask anyone, how many times have you seen snowmobiles or ATVs in areas where currently allowed, in a church parking lot on any given Sunday? Contrast that with what’s parked at the bars! I estimate that more than 75 percent of the ATV, snowmobile, riding-mower crowd are obese or well overweight. Many are chewers and smokers. We all pay for their unhealthy lifestyles. What they commonly need is a regimen of good, long walks and to get away from the barto-bar, tobacco-beer-brat addiction, that’s if they expect to survive beyond their present, self-indulgent preoccupation with recreational machines. Bradley E. Ayers Clam Falls-Somers Lake Frederic

N E W S P A P E R

PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

• Letters to the editor • Drive sober … or get pulled over Drunken driving in Wisconsin is prevalent, deadly and absolutely preventable. To get drunken drivers off our roads before they kill or injure themselves or innocent victims, hundreds of law enforcement agencies from every part of the state will be out in force from Friday, Aug. 19, through Labor Day, Sept. 5, for the national Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign. Drunken driving continues to be one of our state’s most destructive and lethal crimes. Last year, 220 people were killed and more than 3,500 injured in nearly 5,800 alcohol-related traffic crashes. There were more than 40,000 convictions for drunken driving in Wisconsin in 2010. It’s obvious that far too many people make

the undeniably dangerous and recklessly irresponsible decision to get behind the wheel while impaired. During the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign, and throughout the year, law enforcement officers will do their duty to deter drunken driving. But they also need our help. Here are some commonsense ways to combat drunken driving: • Choose a sober designated driver before you start drinking. • Don’t let friends drive drunk. • Report impaired drivers to law enforcement officers by calling 911. With everyone’s commitment, we can stop the senseless devastation caused by drunken driving and make progress toward the goal of reducing the number of preventable traffic deaths to Zero in Wisconsin.

Mark Gottlieb, secretary of the Wisconsin Department of Transportation Madison

Superior suggested cuts

When I read the Free Press and read the cuts being suggested by the county board to make, I was appalled at Supervisor Kristine Hartung’s suggestion. That is really stupid. The Home Care Program is fantastic, it allows the sick and elderly to stay in their homes. It also costs a lot less than nursing home care. I have a suggestion as to where to cut. I went and sat in the Polk County courtroom last week. What an eye-opener. I was there for 1-1/2 hours, because the case I wanted to hear ran late. If you really want to make cuts, cut the public defender. I don’t have anything against her.

She’s only doing her job. What I am against is the taxpayers having to pay for the defense of people over and over again. If they have money to go out and drink and get drunk or high on drugs, then mame, kill or beat on someone, then they should have the guts to man up and admit they did wrong. This not-guilty crap don’t cut it with me. In the 1-1/2 hours I was there at least 10 people used the public defender, and the majority were repeat offenders. The court system continues to coddle these people and the taxpayers pay. I can see one time, but after that either change your ways, do the time or pay for your own attorney. That’s the only way these freeloaders are going to learn. We’ve made it too easy. Fed up, Martha Heiden Amery

Rep. Milroy appointed to military council MADISON - State Rep. Nick Milroy, DSouth Range, has been appointed to the Council on Military and State Relations. Created in 2005, the council works in conjunction with the governor, military installations, communities, state agencies and economic development professionals to enhance the installations. In addition, the council is directed to determine how state agencies can better serve military

communities as well as military families. It also assists military families and support groups regarding quality of life issues for servicemen and women and their families. “As a veteran, I am honored to have been asked to serve on the Council on Military and State Relations,” said Milroy. “I believe it is especially beneficial given the fact that I am also a member of the Assem-

bly Committee on Veterans and Military Affairs.” The seven-member council consists of a representative of the Department of Military Affairs, a representative of Fort McCoy, a representative for the governor and four legislators. Milroy will serve as the appointee of Assembly Democratic Leader Peter Barca, D-Kenosha. “Rep. Milroy has been a strong advo-

cate for veterans and our military,” said Barca. “I’m proud to appoint Nick to serve on the Council for Military Affairs and State Relations. There is no doubt in my mind that he will be a tremendous asset in providing assistance to the military and its families.” - from the office of Rep. Milroy

Minnesota gives final approval to Minnesota-Wisconsin tuition reciprocity agreement MADISON– The Wisconsin Higher Educational Aids Board has announced that the Minnesota-Wisconsin Interstate Tuition Reciprocity Program provision included in the state budget, co-authored by state Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, R-River Falls, has been agreed to by the state of Minnesota. This provision will preserve the tuition reciprocity agreement between the two states and ensure continued access to

Alcohol and other drugs of abuse with youth This is the sixth in our series of educational articles about what restorative justice is and what our agency does within the communities of Northwest Wisconsin. The folks of Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin are concerned about the challenges that youth face day to day. Some of these choices may lead youth down a very slippery slope and set the pattern for their adult lives. This article includes information provided from the most recent Youth Risk Behavior Survey (March 2010) and includes local data from middle and high school students in schools throughout this area. Please note that this information is not necessarily more, or less, concerning of an issue in Polk County or any other neighboring communities of Northwest Wisconsin. We believe that it is representative and is given as example of the magnitude of these issues in our communities based on the information from this valuable survey that the Burnett County Adolescent AODA Prevention Coalition was kind to provide us with. For purposes of example, the information provided in this article is a breakdown of even more specific data pertaining to the three Burnett-area school districts. Here are some current morsels to dwell on as we explore the problem of alcohol and other drugs of addiction in our local communities. As for high school, 9th- through 12thgrade students: • 72.7 percent reported having at least one drink of alcohol in their lives while

resident tuition rates for those students accepted into the program. “This agreement protects Wisconsin students who are attending college in Minnesota, from having to pay out-of-state tuition rates that are up to nearly 2-1/2 times higher than resident tuition rates,” says Harsdorf. Current students and those first enrolling in the 2011-12 academic year par-

Restorative Justice in 9th-12th grade. • 27.7 percent of students reported within the past 30 days riding in car or other vehicle with someone drinking alcohol one or more times. • 11.1 percent reported driving a vehicle after drinking alcohol within the past 30 days prior to taking the survey. • 24.8 percent reported having one drink of alcohol before the age of 13. • 37.8 percent of surveyed high school students stated that they had consumed at least one drink of alcohol within past 30 days. • 22.6 percent of these students reported binge drinking five or more drinks in a row within the past 30 days prior to the survey. • 36.6 percent said that people their age would say it was OK to binge drink at least once or twice each weekend. • 42.3 percent reported trying cigarette smoking. • 19.9 percent saying they had smoked a cigarette within the past 30 days prior to taking the survey. • 3.6 percent have smoked at least one cigarette every day during the past 30 days. • 11.7 percent have used chewing tobacco, snuff or dip in past 30 days. • 25.3 percent of surveyed high school students reported using marijuana at least one time. • 12.5 percent reported using marijuana within past 30 days. • 22.2 percent have taken prescription drugs such as OxyContin, Percocet, Vi-

ticipating in the reciprocity program will continue to follow the provisions of the previous agreement. Starting in the 201213 academic year, Wisconsin students enrolling at a Minnesota school will pay the resident tuition rate of the Minnesota school that they attend. “Over 10,000 Wisconsin students take advantage of this program every year,” says Harsdorf. “It is important that we codin, Adderall, Ritalin or Xanax without a doctor’s prescription at least once. • 12.5 percent reported taking an overthe-counter drug at least once to get high. • 9.4 percent of students reported being offered, sold or given illegal drugs on school property in the last 12 months of the survey. The Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin’s AODA Youth Educational Program works with the youth involved in these issues by using a journaling educational program that allows youth to explore their abusive and addictive behaviors. Youth also receive important facts on the effects of alcohol and other drugs, and explores areas such as the drug abuse roller coaster ride, their relationship with alcohol and drugs today, use versus abuse versus addiction, and offers information on the central nervous system and the body’s delivery network. It also looks at the battle between youth and drugs – alcohol, binge drinking, marijuana, the social consequences, stimulants, inhalants, opioids, prescription drugs, designer drugs, hallucinogens, drug interactions, along with tobacco and other tobacco products. It guides the youth through looking at the risks taken and the personal consequences that result from use of alcohol and other drugs. Local law enforcement agencies, county human services workers and municipal courts can also refer youth with AODA-related offenses to this program. What this means for youth and their future, is that youth receive the education and help that they need to look at and identify whether their choices are abusive or addictive behavior. Please contact us if this seems like a program that might benefit you or a youth you know of who,

keep our state’s commitment to those students currently participating in the reciprocity agreement while ensuring that the tuition reciprocity agreement continues to provide additional options for Wisconsin students.” For more information on the WisconsinMinnesota tuition reciprocity agreement, contact Sen. Harsdorf’s office at 800-8621092. - from office of Sen. Sheila Harsdorf by taking this journey with us.

Upcoming Activities Victim impact panel Monday, Oct. 17. Registration: 5:30 p.m. at the Restorative Justice Office, Southwinds Plaza in Siren Annual spaghetti feed All-you-can-eat spaghetti and salad feed on Saturday, Oct. 8, 4:30 – 7 p.m., at the Burnett County Moose Lodge No. 1194, 7330 Hwy. 70, Siren. Restorative Justice of Northwest Wisconsin, Inc. is a nonprofit (501c3) agency that consists primarily of volunteer community members who work in many ways to help those affected by crime to find peace and healing. They give their services to the community by participating in other programming such as Victim Offender Conferencing, Youth Educational Shoplifting Program, Youth Alcohol and Other Drugs of Addiction Educational Program and the Community Service Program. Please contact us at our office at 715-349-2117 for any information about this program or to make a tax-deductible donation. Monetary donations always needed. Bingo The Restorative Justice of Northwest WI Board of Directors, volunteers, and staff would like to invite the public to our newly established Bingo extravaganza. This monthly event will be held at in Grantsburg at the Crex Convention Center on the third Sunday each month, starting at 5 p.m. Fun for the whole family – kids are welcome to play with parents. Upcoming dates are Aug. 21, Sept. 18 and Oct. 16.

Man faces fifth DWI charge by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer TURTLE LAKE – It was about 3 a.m. on Sunday, Aug. 14, when a Polk County Sheriff’s deputy noticed a vehicle traveling in front of him on U.S. Hwy. 8 was drastically weaving back and forth. When the stop was made, the man said he was traveling to his home in Barron from Turtle Lake, but was already three

miles west of Turtle Lake at the time. The officer also heard the sounds of clinking glass and smelled the odor of intoxicants as he approached the vehicle. The man was put through a battery of tests and was believed to have been under the influence at the time. He was later identified as Richard L. Manning, 42, Barron, and he has an extensive history of intoxicated driving charges, with the latest

charge being his fifth, which is an automatic felony. According to the report, after Manning was taken into custody, he is alleged to have become violent and aggressive with the arresting officer, and was later taken to a medical center for a blood draw. The officer also reportedly discovered the remnants of two mixed drinks on the floor of Manning’s car.

He is now facing a felony charge of operating while intoxicated, (fifth or sixth), as well as operating without a valid driver’s license. Manning made an initial appearance in court on Monday, Aug. 15, before Judge Jeffery Anderson, where he was released on a $1,000 cash bond, and has a preliminary hearing set for Oct. 15.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 11

Recreational combat use gets planning thumbs-up Online car sales also endorsed by Tammi Milberg Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – The plan commission for St. Croix Falls met Monday, Aug. 15, and held a public hearing for a conditional-use permit for a combined recreational combat and online car sales use of a building in the industrial park. The building is owned by Paul Christensen and he would be leasing the space to two separate business entities: The Facility-airsoft headquarters and Ben Motors. During the public hearing, a description of the businesses was given by the lessees of Christensen’s building on Pine Street, aka the former Pack-It Bindery building. Trevor Christiansen of The Facility-airsoft headquarters, explained that his business is recreational use where simulated weapons are used for combat scenarios indoors. The firearm replica shoots a plastic pellet at a lower velocity than a paintball gun and there is no paint involved. He stated the activity is growing in popularity, but there are no locations for this that are indoors in the Midwest. Christiansen stated having the recreational activity in St. Croix Falls would be a draw and economic boost. The indoor facility has designed cover areas and the size of the area is 18,000 square feet. He stated that the maximum people allowed to participate in game play at a time is 40. “It’s not just an open area where people shoot at each other,” he said. “There are cover areas and it is really well-designed.” The minimum participant age without a participating parent is 14 years. The other business Ben Motors, operated by Ben Christensen, son of building owner Paul, would be an online automotive sales business. The business involves purchasing vehicles that are misdiagnosed, having them repaired and selling them online. The business would not be a car lot, and the number of vehicles acquired would be a few at a time and would be housed inside the building. The transactions would take place on-site for the sale of a vehicle, but the advertising would be online only. It was described as a few vehicles on hand with a quick turnaround, but not a car lot. The plan commission questioned insurance on the building and the businesses and were satisfied with the information they were given by all parties. They moved to approve the conditional-use permit and forward the recommendation to the city council. The matter will be on the Monday, Aug. 29, council meeting. That meeting will be held at the fire station. The council had to table a public hearing for rezoning the wastewater-treatment facility and neighboring city property and a conditional-use permit for the waste-

Final recall election results - Polk County

water-treatment facility due to the uncertainty of proper publication. The notice for e public hearing to rezone needed to be published twice and the conditional-use public hearing notice needed to be published once. The city clerk, Bonita Leggitt, stated the newspaper informed her they published the opposite. Leggitt stated that she was unsure if the notices were published legally because she did not have past papers to make sure and, based on the newspaper information she was given, she recommended the commission table the matter until it has been properly published. A motion was made to table all items related to the wastewater-treatment facility until the next plan commission meeting. Finally, the commission was updated on the auditorium building, now being referred to as the civic auditorium. The project, Living Landmark, is the committee dedicated to preserving the building and fundraising to do so. Deb Kravig, council member and committee member, updated the commission on what has happened to date. She stated that with a grant for planning that the city matched, the committee was formed and a consultant was hired. The renovation goal for the building is 2017, the centennial of the building. The Living Landmark committee was divided into three subcommittees: strategy, operations and building. These committees have been developing goals for the civic auditorium. The vision statement includes vitality for the building. The operations committee has a strong view of the building being used more by the public. The building committee is looking at the vibrancy and the lease of the building. Kravig stated that the rewording of the lease will help clear up confusion among the public and reflect reality. Currently the lease indicated Festival Theatre is a tenant of the city building. Kravig stated that to keep the building vibrant and not a dark building, Festival Theatre has kept the building in use, done maintenance and answers the phones. She stated they are a managing partner of the city and would like the lease to reflect that partnership rather than listing them as a tenant. “It will help people see the difference between the fact that the city owns the building and that Festival Theatre is really a managing partner,” she said. “We have a corner that is a blight, a building that needs repair and a theater that is struggling. We can come together and be stronger than to go alone as parties and be weaker.” As part of the grant dollars, the consultant Tom Borrup will be determining fundraising feasibility and strategies. There was no action on the informational update, but Kravig did ask that the lease be rewritten to reflect reality with Festival Theatre as a managing partner before grants are applied for by the Living Landmark committee.

Frederic schools grand piano fundraiser reaches halfway mark FREDERIC - The Grand Idea piano project has reached the halfway mark at just over $4,200 raised to date. Contributions have been coming in, and with the raffle reaching its deadline off Aug. 31, it is hoped that the goal of $9,000 to purchase a new piano for the Frederic School District will be reached, according to project coordinators. “The project is going strong,” said Grand Idea project manager Corey Arnold. “We are continuing to get donations, and the raffle is drawing some extra attention and funds. Everyone likes a chance at winning great prizes while donating to a worthy cause.” Watch for the Grand Idea table set up at the depot at the Frederic Arts and Crafts Fair this Saturday, Aug. 19. Raffle tickets and items are on display at the State Farm

office in Frederic. Tickets offer a chance to win a Savage AXIS XP 270 caliber rifle with scope ($500); 21-inch push lawn mower ($300), a handmade quilt ($200); massage/salon care basket from Avalon in Frederic ($100); savings bond ($100 value); miscellaneous items, including a leather-sleeved Holloway varsity jacket in Frederic’s blue and gold ($200 value) from Frederic Design & Promotions; a picnic package including cooler, lawn chair, propane cylinder refills, weather radio/flashlight and other smaller items. Donations are always welcome. Any questions, please call the Grand Idea committee at 715-327-8076. - submitted

PAM’S DANCE COMPANY Pam Aubert: Owner, Director and Instructor P.D.T.A. U.S.T.A. • 715-268-9827

Municipality Harsdorf Moore Town of Alden 657 367 Town of Apple River 228 158 Town of Balsam Lake 318 194 Town of Black Brook 322 160 Town of Bone Lake 168 120 Town of Clam Falls 114 93 Town of Clayton 170 164 Town of Clear Lake 176 95 Town of Eureka 365 229 Town of Farmington 416 222 Town of Garfield 378 238 Town of Georgetown 193 188 Town of Laketown 225 158 Town of Lincoln 549 352 Town of Lorain 58 42 Town of Luck 198 150 Town of Milltown 259 185 Town of Osceola 601 404 Town of St. Croix Falls 282 137 Town of Sterling 136 84 Town of West Sweden 152 100 Village of Balsam Lake 162 127 Village of Centuria 105 68 Village of Clayton 56 46 Village of Clear Lake 160 121 Village of Dresser 153 102 Village of Frederic 180 146 Village of Luck 196 146 Village of Milltown 116 124 Village of Osceola 396 329 City of Amery 475 447 City of St. Croix Falls 412 337 Total 8,376 5,833 (Nine scattering votes- four in Amery and one each in Frederic, Clayton, Town of Apple River, Town of Garfield and Town of Lincoln)

NORTH MEMORIAL AMBULANCE

announces an upcoming

EMT CLASS

North Memorial Ambulance is currently recruiting people who may be interested in becoming an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and working for the local ambulance service. With ambulances located in Grantsburg, Webster, Danbury, A & H and Spooner, we hope to recruit additional EMTs to fill open positions. North Ambulance currently has both paid and “oncall” positions available. North Memorial Ambulance will reimburse 100% of the expenses of the course upon successful completion of the class and subsequent employment with our service.

For those who may be interested in becoming an EMT, the following EMT basic course will be held in the area:

Grantsburg High School:

Starting Tuesday, August 23, 2011, finishing December 29, 2011. Held on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, 6 - 10 p.m. To register contact WITC at 1-800-243-9482, extension 4202 or visit www.witc.edu for further information. If you have questions regarding North Memorial Ambulance, please call 715-866-7990, ask for Mark or Joe.

Come and join our team!

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Annuals!

NOW 2 LOCATIONS!

AMERY:

SIREN:

124 Keller Ave. Amery

Northwoods Crossing Event Center Hwy. 35, Siren

ENROLLMENT DAYS

Tues., Aug. 23, 543085 51-52Lp 41-42a,dp

4 - 7 p.m.

Thurs., Aug. 25, 4 - 7 p.m.

Classes begin: Monday, Sept. 12 Classes begin: Thursday, Sept. 15 Tuesday, Sept. 13 (Classes Are Limited)

OR ENROLL BY PHONE

BALLET • TAP • JAZZ • HIP-HOP • BABY COMBO BATON • ACROBATICS • MODELING

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PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

C O N TAC T YO U R

L E G I S L ATO R S

President Barack Obama 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D.C. 20500 E-mail: www.whitehouse.gov/contact/ Web site: www.whitehouse.gov Gov. Scott Walker Wisconsin State Capitol Madison, WI 53707 Phone: 608-266-1212 E-mail: govgeneral@wisconsin.gov Web site: www.wisgov.state.wi.us/

Rep. Roger Rivard (75th District) State Capitol Room 307 North P.O. Box 8952, Madison, WI 53707 Phone: 608-266-2519 or 888-534-0075

E-mail: rep.rivard@legis.wi.gov Staff: Doug Lundgren Doug.Lundgren@legis.wisconsin.gov Web site: legis.wisconsin.gov/asmhome.htm (then click on Representatives home pages)

Congressman Sean Duffy (7th District) 1208 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-225-3365

Sen. Robert Jauch (25th State Senate Dist.) Room 415 South, State Capitol P.O. Box 7882, Madison, WI 53707

Web site: duffy.house.gov/

Phone: 608-2663510 or toll-free 800-469-6562 FAX: 608-2663580

E-mail: Go to Web site: duffy.house.gov/contact-me/email-me

E-mail: Sen.Jauch@legis.state.wi.us Web site: legis.wisconsin.gov/senate/sen25/news/

U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl 330 Hart Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 715-832-8492 E-mail: senator_kohl@kohl.senate.gov Web site: kohl.senate.gov/

Sen. Sheila Harsdorf (10th State Senate Dist.) State Capitol, P.O. Box 7882 Madison, WI 53707

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson 2 Russell Courtyard Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-5323 E-mail: ron_johnson@ronjohnson.senate.gov No Web site at this time State Rep. Erik Severson (28th District) Room 312 North State Capitol Madison, WI 53708 PH: 608-267-2365 • 888-529-0028 FAX: 608-282-3628

E-mail: rep.Severson@legis.wisconsin.gov

Phone: 608-266-7745 715-232-1390 800-862-1092

E-mail: sen.harsdorf@legis.state.wi.us Web site: legis.wisconsin.gov/senate/sen10

Burnett Co. Nick Milroy (73rd District) Room 8 North, State Capitol P.O. Box 8953, Madison 53708 PH: 608-266-0640 or 888-534-0073 FAX: 608-282-3673

Polk Co.

St. Croix Co.

Web site: legis.wisconsin.gov/asmhome.htm (then click on Representatives home pages)

E-mail: rep.milroy@legis.state.wi.us

Web site: legis.wisconsin.gov/asmhome.htm (then click on Representatives home pages)

Legislative Hotline: 1-800-362-9472 • For general information on state legislature go to: legis.wisconsin.gov/contact.htm

Burnett and Polk County marriage licenses Burnett County

Roger L. Sandberg, Grantsburg, and Dawn M. DeRocker, Grantsburg, issued Aug. 1, 2011. Bradley R. Reinhardt, Meenon, and Katherine M. Waltzing, Meenon, issued Aug. 8, 2011. Merlin L. Lines, Town of Sterling, and E. Louise Lade, Town of Trade Lake, issued Aug. 9, 2011. James M. Kerce, Nashville, Tenn., and Katie L. Thill, Webster, issued Aug. 11, 2011. Robert E. Gongoll, Zimmer-

man, Minn., and Jessica R. Niles, Zimmerman, Minn., issued Aug. 10, 2011. Gary A. Thill, Meenon, and Dianne L. Maddeau, Meenon, issued Aug. 12, 2011. Edward K. McRoberts, Durand, and Carmen M. Brickner, issued Aug. 12, 2011. Jack V. Anderson Jr., Shakopee, Minn., and Jennifer M. Wermerskirchen, Shakopee, Minn., issued Aug. 12, 2011.

Polk County

Tonia J. Erickson, Lindstrom, Minn., and Barry J. Edelstein, Lindstrom, Minn., issued Aug. 8, 2011. Katherine M. M. Goode, Cologne, Minn., and Trent D. Lindquit, Cologne, Minn., issued Aug. 9, 2011. Kathleen R. Barney, Clear Lake, and Jared J.M. Roethle, Clear Lake, issued Aug. 9, 2011. Emily M. Camrud, Rochester, Minn., and Cap D. Richards, Rochester, Minn., issued Aug. 11, 2011.

Jessica J. Wickenhauser, Star Praire, and Joseph G. Stock, Alden, issued Aug. 11, 2011. Kathleen M. Voeller, Eureka, and Thomas M. St. Amand, Eureka, issued Aug. 11, 2011. Jacquelyn R. Kortas, Flagstaff, Ariz., and Kevin R. Daly, Flagstaff, Ariz., issued Aug. 11, 2011. Julie K. Jones, Georgetown, and Joshua J. Johnson, Apple River, issued Aug. 11, 2011.

Sign up for e-mails of breaking local news @ www.the-leader.net

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 13

Rockie Lynne Tribute to Soldiers Tour concert Country Music Association artist, Rockie Lynne belted out country and rock tunes during his concert at T-Dawgs on Saturday, Aug. 13. Fans at the outdoor event were thrilled Lynne’s Tribute To Soldiers Tour honoring vets and soldiers made a stop in Grantsburg.

ABOVE AND BELOW: Rockie Lynne and his band members rocked out at T-Dawgs in Grantsburg Saturday evening.

Members of the Brask-Fossum-Janke American Legion Post 185 Honor Guard stood as Rockie Lynne sang the song “We Want to Thank You” in honor of America’s servicemen and women.

Honor guard members Mike Martin, Roger Hess and John Bruzek Jr. (not pictured) gave a symbolic 21-gun salute during Rockie Lynne’s performance at T-Dawgs in Grantsburg Saturday evening.

Photos by Priscilla Bauer

From DULUTH to EAU CLAIRE And Thousands Of Destinations!

Members of the audience stood and applauded the veterans present and all of America’s servicemen and women during the Rockie Lynne Tribute To Soldiers Tour concert at T-Dawgs in Grantsburg Saturday night.

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PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

Powering up for a second year, the other fair is ripe with displays and tech by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS — Plans are being finalized for Polk County’s “other” fair, the Polk County Energy Fair, which is set to take place on Friday and Saturday, Aug. 19 and 20, at the Polk County Fair Park in St. Croix Falls. According to the volunteers organizing the energy fair, they are once again living up to their mission statement To make information about renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency, and sustainable products and practices available to the greater St. Croix Valley area. Last year’s event, called the Energy 2010 Renewable Energy and Resource Fair, was the organization’s first attempt at recreating on a regional level the same sort of educational opportunities that the Midwest Renewable Energy Fair in Portage County has provided to a national audience for over 20 years – minus the crowds and parking hassles. Kris Schmid, owner of Legacy Solar in Frederic, is a sponsor of this year’s energy fair, and has been an active member of the event’s planning committee. His contacts in the renewable energy industry helped attract a number of exhibitors to the fair. About 500 people attended the fair’s rookie effort in 2010, and Schmid said most exhibitors were pleased with the event. “I heard very positive comments from almost everyone,” Schmid said. “The fair actually resulted in a number of sales for our vendors, including at least one geothermal system and one good-sized wind turbine.” He noted that most of the 40plus exhibitors who participated last year are coming back. Ron Edlund, of rural St. Croix Falls, is the exhibit coordinator for the energy fair. He is impressed with the variety of businesses that have chosen to participate in the Polk County event and the distances they’re willing to travel. “We’ve got people with wind turbines, wood boilers, solar collectors, geothermal systems … you name it, we’ve got it!” Edlund said. He’s especially excited about a new exhibitor called Columbia ParCar that manufactures electric utility vehicles in Reedsburg.

Energy fair spools up

More and more people are interested in electric vehicles. This street legal model made by Columbia ParCar Inc. of Reedsburg will be back at this year’s Polk County Energy Fair. – Photos submitted Steve Healy is director of the Polk County Economic Development Corporation and an enthusiastic member of the energy fair planning group. “This type of event really helps put Polk County on the map,” says Healy. “Plus it provides great value for the regional economy by helping put potential customers in touch with reputable businesses that have what they need.” Numerous businesses are helping to sponsor the Polk County Energy Fair, including Xcel Energy, GreatMats of Milltown, Nelson Construction Services of Balsam Lake, Focus on Energy, Freier’s Electric & Heating of Ellsworth, Bearpaw Design & Construction of Strum, PolkBurnett Electric Cooperative and the Conserve School of Land O’Lakes. Additional support and guidance comes courtesy of the Polk County Energy Independence Team and the Polk County Fair Society. One change Linda Leef would like to see this year is for more people to take advantage of the many workshops that are being offered throughout the course of the two-day fair. Leef is coordinator for the fair’s workshop schedule. “We have an amazing lineup of speakers this year, and we’re making sure that they leave lots of time for questions and answers,” she says. Workshops begin on the hour and last

about 45 minutes. A complete schedule can be found on the fair’s Web site at www.polkcountyenergyfair.com. Leef is also excited about a new feature of this year’s fair: a contractors workshop, which is designed to help contractors make informed decisions when sitting and building a structure that can significantly reduce the environmental impact and energy requirements of a building. That session will run for four hours on Friday morning and will earn CEU credits for participating builders. The energy fair will once again be a family-friendly event, with displays, projects and games for kids, and includes a children’s tent and food vendors, as well as numerous local vendors. The Polk County Energy Fair runs from noon to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19, and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. There is a charge for adult admissions, but kids under 18 are admitted free. For more information, visit the fair’s Web site or call 715-472-2728. - with information from Jeff Peterson and the Polk County Energy Fair.

The Polk County Energy Fair offers plenty of opportunity for asking questions. Here Mike Helfman of Bubbling Springs Solar of Menomonie explains how a solar domestic hot water system works.

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O UTDOOR S

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 15

I N T E R! C O U N T Y L E A D E R

ATVs • BIRDING • BOATING • CAMPING • FISHING • HIKING • HUNTING • RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

Asian carp DNA found in St. Croix River ate a commercial market for it,” He said. Unfortunately, the fish can be very difficult to catch, and so far, seem to evade traditional techniques such as netting or the use of electroshocking. However, as the silver carp becomes more of a problem, departments such as the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife services are directing more funds toward finding ways to control it.

22 of 50 DNA samples in the St. Croix test positive for silver carp by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer ST. CROIX FALLS – On Thursday, Aug. 11, the Wisconsin and Minnesota DNR issued statements regarding DNA samples that tested positive for the invasive silver carp. Of the 50 water samples taken on a 4.3-mile stretch of the St. Croix River, starting at the hydroelectric dam in St. Croix Falls, 22 of 50 were positive. Interestingly, a 3.6-mile stretch tested on the Mississippi between the Ford Dam and confluence with the Minnesota River, tested negative. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that the fish aren’t there. That’s because commercial fisherman have been finding Asian carp in their nets for a number of years now, dating back to 1996. “It’s really not new, it’s really not surprising, but it does just remind us that these fish are present,” said Bob Wakeman, who coordinates Wisconsin DNR efforts to prevent and control the spread of aquatic invasive species. Wakeman said the DNR is asking that anglers or boaters who come across the silver carp, to take a picture of the fish and bring it to them to confirm its identification and where it was caught. But according to Wakeman, anglers won’t likely catch one at all. The silver carp, which is just one of many types of invasive Asian carp, swims with its mouth open, letting the water filter through its gills. Whatever gets caught in its gill rakers becomes dinner. “We really don’t anticipate anglers catching them, but if they do, we want them to bring it in for identification,” Wakeman said. How they got here The silver carp began migrating up the Mississippi as a result of aquaculture according to Wakeman. The fish were used in lagoons that were filled with algae, and the fish used to turn the algae into biomass. When flooding occurred in the early ‘90s, fish escaped into the Mississippi River basin, where there’s a highly established spawning population. The Illinois River also has a spawning population, as well as some of their tributaries.

Silver lining on the St. Croix As for the St. Croix River, the DNR says there is likely no significant population of silver carp or spawning going on. A New York Times article printed last week said that an air-bubbling barrier is going to be placed at the mouth of the river near Prescott to try and temporarily stop the fish from continuing any further migration north. This is a temporary method until a more permanent solution is found. The Minnesota DNR is also hoping to do some electroshocking and netting to find a fish and confirm further that the DNA testing, which is taken through water samples, was accurate. Wakeman noted that DNA is left by the silver carp through a lost scale, excrement or slime, and can last up to 48 hours. He said the technique isn’t really all that new, but it is for the use of testing to find invasive species.

This chart from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources highlights the distribution of two types of Asian carp in Wisconsin’s waters between 1996-2011. The blue areas indicate waters at risk, and the green areas show barriers to upstream carp movement. The photo at the top right corner shows the silver carp and their ability to jump from out of the water, creating a water hazard for boaters and water-skiers. – Courtesy of the DNR A fish of destruction The silver carp has several significant impacts on a waterway, and its hard to mistake their presence with those who use rivers for boating or waterskiing. As boats travel at either high or low speeds, the fish can jump as high as 10 feet out of the water. As a result, injuries have occurred as people get hit with the fish, or the fish jump right into the boat. About the only group that seems to be having fun with silver carp are the archery enthusiasts and bowfishermen, who shoot the fish in midair while traveling a slow speeds. “Quite honestly, it’s not something we want,” said Wakeman, who reiterated not only the recreational impact it has on boaters, but also the river itself. “What they’ve done to the southern

part of the Mississippi at just devastating,” Wakeman said, adding that the silver carp competes with native fish species for plankton (the very base of the food chain), algae and have detrimental effects to the water quality. Wakeman said the fish in the lower Mississippi and Illinois River are so abundant they have chased away the native fish species and changed the characteristics of the waterways “And we sure don’t want that up here,” Wakeman said. Some businesses are even trying to combat the carp problem and promote it as a valuable food source. Wakeman said he had a taste of it while he was on a visit to Little Rock, Ark. “It’s not bad. I wouldn’t necessarily go out of my way for it, but they want to cre-

Update: A Wednesday, Aug. 17 edition of the Pioneer Press, printed a front page article that featured the Minnesota DNR’s first attempts at netting and electrofishing to try to find solid evidence that the silver carp has indeed made up the St. Croix River. No silver carp were caught, which is positive news, and the report indicates that it is possible, that fish aren’t in the river at all. Although more research is being done to help stop the Asian carp, people need to continue their focus on the preventitive measures already in place to stop the spread. All anglers should inspect boats and trailers and remove any plants or materials and drain the water from your boat and live wells before leaving the lake. Also never move live fish, and if you’re planning to take them home to eat, put them on ice. “These are things we all can do, whether it’s Asian carp, Eurasian water milfoil or zebra mussels, we’re not going to allow it to get around the state,” Wakeman said.

DNR firmly supports removing gray wolf from endangered list by DNR Secretary Cathy Stepp The Department of Natural Resources firmly supports the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in delisting the wolf in the upper Great Lakes states. Wisconsin has exceeded its delisting goal eight times over and must have flexibility to manage problem wolves if any support for wolves by the public is to continue. While the department is committed to long-term conservation of wolves in Wisconsin, it is critical that we be allowed to

manage wildlife populations within our borders. Wisconsin has approximately 800 wolves; this is the most wolves ever counted in the state. Wolf numbers far exceed the federal delisting recovery goal of 100 wolves for both Wisconsin and Michigan, and are causing real problems. It is time for management of wolves in Wisconsin to be turned over to us. The same is true for Minnesota and Michigan. For this to happen, the wolf must first be removed (delisted) from endangered or

Great Northern Outdoors Bass Fishing League Standings Week 15 Co-sponsored by BLC Well Drilling in Milltown Standings

1. Long, 113 lbs., 9 oz. 2. Luck Sport and Marine, 112 lbs., 7 oz. 3. Bistram Boys, 101 lbs.,13 oz. 4. 46 Store, 94 lbs. 11 oz. 5. Bon Ton, 93 lbs., 4 oz. 6. Main Dish, 75 lbs., 10 oz. 7. Jim Duncan, 72 lbs., 2 oz. 8. Grumpy Grandpas, 68 lbs., 15 oz.

9. Laqua/Allee, 67 lbs. 15 oz. 10. Cory/Jamie, 67 lbs., 11 oz. 11. Harry/Dave 66 lbs., 8 oz. 12. BLC Well Drilling, 62 lbs., 15 oz. 13. Mossey’s, 55 lbs., 15 oz. 14. Struck/Lonetti, 52 lbs., 2 oz. 15. Milltown Dock, 47 lbs., 14 oz. 16. GNO, 47 lbs. 3 oz. 17. Dockmasters, 39 lbs., 11 oz.

18. Ones/Roberts, 39 lbs., 0 oz. 19. Bill Hallenger 14 lbs., 4 oz Big bass/Big bag weekly winner: Big Bass: Bon Ton, 3 lbs., 8 oz. Big Bag: BLC Well Drilling, 8 lbs., 0 oz.

threatened status under the Endangered Species Act. We support the USFWS in its current attempt to delist, but we also strongly disagree with its conclusion that a newly discovered and separate species of wolf exists in the Western Great Lakes. Wisconsin’s wolves are the same species that was listed in 1978 and are most closely associated with the gray wolf. Recent genetic analyses refute the existence of Eastern wolves as a separate species. Wisconsin’s wolves are of mixed genetics, but they are physically indistinguishable, readily interbreed and occupy the same range. Wolves in Wisconsin act and behave as a single population and must be managed as a single population. Accordingly, our message to the USFWS is clear and strong: Don’t muddy the waters with this indefensible two-population concept. We need a solid, defensible, delisting proposal, and we need it now. Minnesota, Michigan, the U.S. Sportsmen’s Alliance, the Wisconsin Wildlife

Federation, Defenders of Wildlife, Timber Wolf Alliance, the Natural Resources Defense Council, prominent scientists actively working with wolf genetics, and other organizations and government agencies support Wisconsin’s position: Wisconsin has a gray wolf population that has successfully recovered. The public grows weary of the delays and government inaction. They need to know that their state DNR is pushing hard to get this done. The ball is in the USFWS’s court, again. It needs to make the right decisions and to publish an effective delisting rule that will withstand challenges from those opposed to the delisting of wolves. I will not stop pushing on this issue until we have delisting of wolves and relief for Wisconsin residents who are seriously struggling with our unchecked and unmanaged growing wolf population. That’s a promise.

PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

SUMMER SPORTS INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER • INTER! COUNTY LEADER

F R E D E R I C • G R A N T S B U R G • L U C K • S T. C R O I X F A L L S • S I R E N • U N I T Y • W E B S T E R L E G I O N B A S E B A L L • A M AT E U R B A S E B A L L

(Lack of) Numbers game; Frederic cross country suffers

Extra Points

The cross-country scene won't be quite the same without the presence of a Frederic squad. Here they're shown after their sectional runnerup victory last season in Boyceville, which earned them a second consecutive trip to state. – Leader file photo

“Dream team” graduation leaves school without a team by Greg Marsten Leader staff writer FREDERIC – The Frederic Vikings cross-country team had arguably one of the most talented pools of distance runners in the region for the last couple of years, and last year at this time they were spooling up for an almost sure spot atop any polls. But now, they don’t even have a team. The reality of Frederic’s cross-country disappearance is one other schools and programs may have faced or will at some time in the coming years, as the class-size pendulum swings back and forth. The Frederic girls were among the toughest distance runners in the state, finishing 12th overall as a team at last fall’s cross-country state championship in Wisconsin Rapids. That team of senior girls had a combined 38 trips to the state level in cross country and track and field. “You probably won’t find a talent pool as deep as last year’s again,” stated former co-coach Eric Olson. “It’s really too bad, but what do ya do?” The reality of going from one of the most formidable distance-running teams in the state to not even fielding a squad is hard for some to fathom, but one that may be a reality of several factors. “Well, it became a numbers game – or in our case – a lack of numbers,” said Frederic athletic director Troy Wink. “We had nine girls last year and six graduated, we had three boys and two graduated. The one boy returning is out for football. And

we didn’t have a coach coming back this year, either, so that factored in a little bit.” So you can tell that the issue was pretty clear, they were going from a program that was so top heavy that graduation killed it. “We felt without being able to field a full team, we couldn’t justify the cost of a head coach and the fees to all of the meets,” Wink said. “For that matter, if any of the individuals coming back were a top-tier runner we would’ve had to consider that too, but that was not the case.” Maybe it was just a class fluke in Frederic’s case, and some people think the future of their distance-running program is far from dead and may indeed come back in the coming years, as a new crop of students moves up through the ranks. “It is my thought it is on a year-to-year basis, depending on numbers,” Wink said. Wink’s assessment is not unusual, and is one that many school districts may face in coming years. The school is not alone in having trouble fielding athletes in some sports, and they’ve realized the class sizes may threaten other sports, as well. Frederic will be co-opting with Luck in varsity baseball and softball next season, and is already combining their junior varsity versions. Frederic already shares several other sports with several schools, from boys and girls hockey to wrestling. Co-opting between smaller, rural schools has become a more common way to keep a sport alive as numbers fall, and as class sizes vary. Other schools have also looked to unique cooperatives to keep low participation sports alive, from gymnastics to tennis to golf and even downhill ski racing. It is not just for civic pride, but also because students can literally shop for school districts that support their passion, through open enrollment or private schooling. Yes, school districts are indeed

in competition with each other, and eliminating a sport is a risk that may hurt for years to come. While Wisconsin’s overall population has grown significantly in the past 15 years, there are fully 10,000 fewer students in public schools this year than in 1998, and while some of that is because of private schooling, the reality is that families are universally smaller with fewer children. That trend may be changing, slightly, as several local schools have reported somewhat larger kindergarten-age classes, which is good for funding, teacher demand and ultimately, sports participation. Many local schools are also coming off larger senior class sizes over the past two or three years, and most local districts show reduced high school class sizes. While there may be several very lean years at some schools, at least at the high school levels, the trend of class sizes may be reversing slightly. Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction data showed several hundred more students in the state educational roles this year than last year. While that might not seem like much, the trend has been pretty steadily going the other way as family sizes are much smaller than they have been in recent generations, a problem that has shown its face in all flavors of public financing and entitlement projections for support. From paying for Social Security to smaller football teams, the effect of smaller families is broad and diverse. While Frederic may be without a crosscountry squad this season, the accomplishments of their past teams are proof positive that a smaller school can have a true moment in the sun, even with athletes from just one class, gender or specialty.

••• HOLMEN – Former Luck athlete Albie McKinney has been busy training for an upcoming mixed martial arts bout that is scheduled to take place at the Hyatt Regency on Friday, Sept. 23, in Minneapolis, Minn. McKinney is training at a brand-new 5,000-square-foot facility in Holmen, just north of La Crosse, called the Ironworks Training Center. On Monday, Aug. 16, McKinney was busy helping Albie McKinney the owners construct an official octagon cage. “It’s really exciting,” McKinney said of the new facility, and his upcoming fight against Chad Vaudrin of Clear Lake, who owns and operates Anytime Fight Club in Clear Lake. McKinney has one more year of schooling left at UW-La Crosse, but is a student assistant volunteer coach for UW-La Crosse, and helps coach youth wrestling at the Holmen Middle School. Last year, McKinney won his first-ever NCAA Division 3, All-American honor. The Ironworks Training Center is hosting its grand opening on Saturday, Sept. 17, and several professional UFC athletes will be there, doing seminars and other talks. Nick Thompson, who has over 50 professional fights, is also a trainer at the facility. He was ranked in the top 10 MMA fighters by MMA Weekly. – Marty Seeger ••• ST. CROIX FALLS – An ill-timed downpour late Saturday, Aug. 13, forced the postponement of events at St. Croix Valley Raceway. The brief, but intense, rain rendered the grounds unsuitable for the planned racing and American Wrestling Federation charity wrestling program. The AWF event, along with the appearance of stuntman Clay “The Wildman” Gallagher, has been rescheduled to be part of the Raceway’s season-ending $5,000-to-win Survivor Series Enduro race on Saturday, Oct. 1. The wrestling will begin the program at 3 p.m. with Gallagher and racing to follow. This Friday, Aug. 19, is the Upper Midwest Winged Sprint Cars. Kids are free as it's Kids Night. "It's always fun when they come to town!" Raceway Rob stated. – submitted ••• The Friday, Aug. 19, the high school football game between Unity and Amery is being broadcast from UWStout on 1260 AM, beginning at 2:30 p.m. The Osceola at St. Croix Falls high school football game is being broadcast on WLMX 104.9 FM, beginning at 7 p.m.

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– Brian Tracey, Eat that Frog

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 17

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Foundation receives check for 2011 golf classic LEFT: The RiverBank Insurance Center’s agency manager, John Gauper, recently presented the 11th-annual golf classic proceeds, a check for $14,183, to Elvira Schmidt, president of the St. Croix Valley Healthcare Foundation. Pictured (L to R): Cheryl Bjornstad, SCVHC Foundation; Jessica Minor, SCRMC education/marketing assistant; Sandy Williams, SCRMC marketing/education Director; Denise Sinclear-Todd, VP SCVHC Foundation; Sarah Heintz and Pam Stratmoen of The RiverBank Insurance Center; Connie Erickson, SCVHC Foundation, Schmidt and Fay Caneday, secretary/treasurer of SCVHC Foundation. – Photo submitted

Community hockey veterans share photos

ST. CROIX FALLS – The RiverBank Insurance Center’s John Gauper recently presented proceeds from the 11th-annual golf classic, a check for $14,183, to Elvira Schmidt and officers of the St. Croix Valley Healthcare Foundation. “Registrations and sponsorships confirm that this tournament has become a significant area event. We’re pleased to be the sponsor of the golf classic for the last 11 years benefiting patients of SCRMC’s service area,” he continued. On behalf of the medical center and the Healthcare Foundation, Sandy Williams, SCRMC director of marketing, expressed her gratitude to Gauper and to his staff for their outstanding support and efforts. “We certainly want to thank the Frederic Golf Course staff, Joan Spencer, manager, and their board members for providing wonderful service and a course in excellent condition,” said Williams. “Without the generous support of Voyageur Radiology, Dr. Stephen Johnson and our corporate and hole sponsors and team players who contributed to this fundraiser,” noted Williams, “the tremendous success we enjoy wouldn’t have been possible. Everyone appeared to appreciate the great weather for the day and especially the prime rib dinner catered by Beth Lemieux. Williams pointed out that the event’s real winners are “all the people in our community who use St. Croix Regional Medical Center.” The funds theyraised helped purchase valuable patient care equipment. Both the 9-hole and 18-hole tournament events included course games, giveaways and hole-in-one contests to win cars, courtesy of Larsen Auto and Johnson Motors.

SCF and Luck/Unity golfers get started Last week’s photo of the Frederic hockey team from the 1940s (not 1950s) evoked some memories among other community hockey club veterans, including Wally Anderson of Frederic and Eldon Arneson of Webster. Anderson played on the same team as his brothers Duaine, Jerry and Lawrence in the 1950s, as well as team members Chuck Ryan, Ted Hagberg Jr., Dean Dversdall, Darwyn Dversdall and Ernie and Bruce Tromberg. Anderson is shown in the top right photo dressed in his full hockey uniform as a teenager and in the top left photo with teammates and brothers (L to R), back row: Lawrence Anderson, Duaine Anderson (Wally at far right, back row); and front row: Jerry Anderson and Ernie Tromberg. Wally went on to play hockey for four years at Superior State University and then served as assistant coach at Memorial Senior High School in Superior. Just 4 years old when he stepped out onto a hockey rink built by his father, Wally played for more than 70 years, staying active through inner-city scrimmages in the Twin Cities and local scrimmages with area veterans at the Siren hockey arena. “He gave it up a few years ago but still plays with the grandkids,” says wife, Vonnie. LOWER PHOTO: Eldon Arneson (shown third from right) is the only surviving member of the Webster 1948 hockey team shown. Arneson says Webster played Frederic, Grantsburg and Minnesota teams of Pine City, Shafer and Scandia. Mac McPherson was the head coach (shown far right). “He was a one-armed Canadian and could handle the puck better than the two-armed players,” McPherson noted. The lineup of Webster’s 1948 team is (L to R): Donald Fahland, Buddy Hughes, Harris Hills, Russ Connor, Jim Frizzel, Kenny Nordin, Lowell Broberg, Gordy Premo, Bill Stabin, Pader Briggs, Eldon Arneson, Jim McCarthy and coach Mac McPherson. - Special photos

by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer MAPLE – The Luck/Unity golf team and St. Croix Falls golf teams have already logged in two golf meets to start the season, with their last being hosted at Northwestern. Teams included Luck/Unity, Northwestern, St. Croix Falls and Ladysmith. Avery Steen was the overall medalist with her course leading score of 38. It’ll be a totally new system for both the St. Croix Falls and Luck/Unity golfers as they are no longer part of the Middle Border and have been forced to join the Heart of the North Conference, which includes schools such as Hayward, Spooner, Ladysmith and Cumberland to name a few. This Friday, Aug. 19, both teams travel to Hayward, but Luck/Unity’s first home meet of the season will be at the Luck Golf Course on Monday, Aug. 22.

PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

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Honkers push for state falls short Osceola Braves making their first trip to state by Marty Seeger Leader staff writer OSCEOLA – The Grantsburg Honkers season came to an end during the Wisconsin Baseball Association playoffs in Osceola Friday through Sunday, Aug. 12-14, with a big 7-5 win over Whitehall, on Saturday, followed by a 11-1 loss to the River Falls Fighting Fish the following Sunday. The Honkers started Bryan Johnson on the mound against Whitehall, who gave up two early runs in the first inning. But the Honkers bounced back in the third inning, with Chris Ryan colliding at the plate with the Whitehall catcher to allow two runs to score. “From there, the Honkers 2011 MVP Bryan Johnson settled down and held a scrappy Whitehall team down until late in the game, which allowed us to build the lead to 7-3,” said Mike Ryan. Two late runs by Whitehall weren’t enough to overcome the Honkers, who Ryan said played excellent defense. He noted that Bryan Vilstrup made two crucial over-the-shoulder catches at the right times, preventing runs from scoring. “All in all, we were thrilled to pick up a win in our first playoff game of 2011, which was the first playoff game for a lot of the younger guys on our roster,” Ryan said. However, Grantsburg’s second game didn’t go as smoothly. Chris Ryan started the game on the mound and pitched well, but the Honkers struggled defensively. “On top of that, River Falls was by far the best hitting team we had faced all year, so they were able to build a big lead fairly early and hold on. It’s always disappointing to see a season end, and it’s never fun to lose big. However, we all had a great weekend of baseball in the wonderful atmosphere of Oakey Park. If this core of guys stays together, we’re going to be one of the teams to beat in the years to come,” Ryan said. Osceola off to state Despite their 7-9 regular season record, the Osceola Braves earned their first-ever trip to state last weekend during the WBA playoffs. Their first win of the weekend came in a 15-inning affair against Haugen, where the Braves won 5-3. They defeated Elmwood the following Sunday by a conHigh school sports fans throughout Northwest Wisconsin tend to welcome the Prediction King’s annual late-summer reappearance as much as they do the fresh August mornings, which signal the coming of autumn. The King finished with a mediocre 69percent success rate in the 2010 gridiron THE SWAMI campaign but hopes to rebound this season. “Unlike basketball, where a forecaster has plenty of games to recover his winning percentage, a successful football prognosticator depends on a quick start out of the gate,” the Swami said early Wednesday morning. “But a fast start is no guarantee this week. There are some dandy matchups,” he added, while taking a few warm-up swings with his ricing flail in preparation for a coming wild rice foray. This week the Swami has opted to substitute the Shell Lake versus Bruce game for St. Croix Falls versus Osceola in order to celebrate The Leader’s sister-

The Swami

PREDICTS

The Honkers Mike Ryan, pictured above, was one of three Ryans on the Grantsburg roster. Mike is the son of Inter-County Leader sports columnist John Ryan.

LEADER SPORTS SCOREBOARD

Scores Thursday, August 11 Falun Churches 6, Siren Covenant/Bethany 12 Frederic Free 15, Trade River Free 11 Friday, August 12 Siren Assembly 13, Falun Churches 7 Faith Lutheran 20, New Hope Lutheran 3 Calvary Covenant 13, Frederic Free 0 Trade Lake Baptist 14, W.Sweden/Zion Lutheran 9 Saturday, August 13 Falun Churches win, New Hope Lutheran forfeit W.Sweden/Zion Lutheran 13, Frederic Free 6 Siren Assembly 21, Faith Lutheran 18 Calvary Covenant 20, Trade Lake Baptist 7 Faith Lutheran 8, W.Sweden/Zion Lutheran 5 Trade Lake Baptist 8, Falun Churches 7 Siren Assembly 14, Trade Lake Baptist 7 Calvary Covenant 17, Siren Assembly 5 Trade Lake Baptist 15, Faith Lutheran 3 (3rd & 4th place) Calvary Covenant 22, Siren Assembly 12 (champion & 1st place)

CROSS COUNTRY

Upcoming Thursday, August 25 4:30 p.m. Grantsburg Invitational (St. Croix Falls, Unity/Luck, Webster)

FOOTBALL

The Honkers Bryan Johnson helped Grantsburg defeat the Whitehall Wolves during the first round of the Wisconsin Baseball Association playoffs on Aug.13 at Oakey Park in Osceola. – Photos by Garth Olson vincing 9-0 score. The Braves are one of eight teams scheduled to play at the state tournament held in Coon Valley this Friday, Aug. 19. As a No. 4 seed, the Braves will be playing the No. 3 seeded Rib Lake Lakers beginning at 9 p.m.

Upcoming Friday, August 19 2:30 p.m. Unity vs. Amery at UW-Stout 7 p.m. Luck at Birchwood Northwood/Solon Springs at Frederic Osceola at St. Croix Falls Turtle Lake at Siren Grantsburg at Spooner Washburn at Webster

GIRLS GOLF

Upcoming Friday, August 19 9 a.m. St. Croix Falls at Hayward Monday, August 22 12 p.m. St. Croix Falls at Luck Tuesday, August 23 9 a.m. St. Croix Falls at Superior

TENNIS

hood with the Washburn County Register. But he consoled SCF fans by adding: “Rest assured that starting next week I’ll include the Saints in my weekly forecast.”

This week’s predictions: Luck 28, Birchwood 6 – The Cardinals will snare the Bobcats Webster 32, Washburn-Bayfield 6 – The Tigers are aiming for a return to glory in 2011. Spooner 28, Grantsburg 14 – Spooner blows past Grantsburg with two late scores. Shell Lake 26, Bruce 7 – The Lakers roll on. And for the ninth consecutive season the Swami asks this rhetorical question: “Will this be the year Frederic finally knocks off Shell Lake for the conference title?” Unity 20, Amery 19 – The Eagles prevail on the big stage in Menomonie. Turtle Lake 30, Siren 14 – The Dragons could sneak into the playoffs this year, but don’t have the horses to knock off the Lakers. Frederic 26, Northwood-Solon Springs 20 – Since our up-north neighbors went with a co-op program, they’ve been far from a pushover. But the Vikes will prevail. The Swami answers all e-mails and can be reached at predictionking@yahoo.com.

Upcoming

Saturday, August 20 9:30 a.m. Unity/Luck at Marshfield Monday, August 22 9 a.m. Unity/Luck at Rice Lake Tuesday, August 23 4:15 p.m. Baldwin-Woodville at Unity Thursday, August 25 4:15 p.m. Unity at Amery

VOLLEYBALL

Upcoming Saturday, August 20 9 a.m. Unity & Luck at Clayton scrimmage Monday, August 22 9 a.m. Luck at Chetek scrimmage Tuesday, August 23 TBD Unity at Colfax Quad 5 p.m. Siren at Northwood Quad Frederic & Webster at Shell Lake scrimmage Thursday, August 25 7:30 p.m. Webster at Cumberland Grantsburg at Frederic Unity at Siren

SOFTBALL LEAGUES

Falun Church League Team Record Siren Assembly 10-0 Calvary Covenant 9-1 Trade Lake Baptist 6-4 Faith Lutheran 6-4 Webster Baptist 6-4 New Hope Lutheran 5-5 W.Sweden/Zion Lutheran 4-6 Trade River Free 4-6 Siren Covenant/Bethany 2-8 Falun Churches 2-8 Frederic Free 0-10

Women’s Slow-Pitch Monday League Team Record Beehive 11-1 Coyland Creek 9-3 Smith Family Eye Care 9-3 Kris’ Pheasant Inn 7-5 Maurer Construction 3-9 The Rumors 3-9 Big Butz BBQ 0-12 Scores Monday, August 15 Smith Family Eye Care 30, The Rumors 0 Kris’ Pheasant Inn 12, Big Butz BBQ 8 Beehive 7, Coyland Creek 6 Beehive 14, Maurer Construction 3 Upcoming Monday, August 22 Playoffs 6:30 p.m. Big Butz BBQ vs. Kris’ Pheasant Inn (East) The Rumors vs. Maurer Construction (West) 7:30 p.m. Winner of East 6:30 game vs. Coyland Creek Winner of West 6:30 game vs. Smith Family Eye Care 8:30 p.m. Winner of East vs. Winner of West 7:30 games 9:30 p.m. Winner of 8:30 game vs. Beehive Men’s Slow-Pitch Wednesday League Team Record Bon Ton 10-1 Pour House 9-2 Century 21 8-3 Chell Well 7-4 Sundowners 7-4 Wayne’s 6-5 Kris’ Pheasant Inn 5-6 True Quality Auto Body 2-9 Lake Lena 1-10 JCS 0-11 Scores Wednesday, August 10 Century 21 32, JCS 2 Pour House 8, True Quality Auto Body 0 Bon Ton 23, Sundowners 10 Wayne’s 25, Lake Lena 10 Kris’ Pheasant Inn 11, Chell Well 8

Visit www.wissports.net for local high school scores & stats

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 19

No sign/from page 1 with updates.” Officially, the case can be summed up pretty simply: On Friday, Aug. 21, 2009, Bly, then 21, left her home in the Town of Sterling in northern Polk County at somewhere around 7 7:30 p.m. She told her husband, Christopher Larson, that she was meeting with her cousin at a Cushing tavern, which was about five miles away. Bly never met with her cousin and was never seen or heard from again. She was reported missing on Saturday, Aug. 22. Her vehicle - a white, 2001 Pontiac Grand Am four-door - was found in Grantsburg in a municipal parking lot on Aug. 26. Bly would be or is now 23 years old. She and Larson have two daughters in common, both of whom were toddlers at the time of her disappearance. That she never arrived in Cushing and has not been seen, heard from or even sighted since that nearly pitch dark, moonless Friday evening in August is both bizarre and tragic. And as it turns out, the case is far from forgotten. In fact, it’s quite the opposite.

“She went completely off the grid” - Polk County Sheriff Peter Johnson

Fresh eyes and numerous interviews

While Bly’s disappearance rolls over the two-year mark next week, the attention to the case stays strong and focused, and seems to exhibit a sort of renewed vigor. “We’re always working on it ... reinterviewing people, following up on earlier leads, but it hasn’t produced anything so far,” stated Polk County Sheriff Peter Johnson. PCSD investigator Lisa Ditlefsen is the lead on the case, and echoed that commitment strongly. She said her agency is conducting several interviews per week, and has literally started from scratch on the case, putting the details, clues and circumstances before a fresh set of eyes - another investigator in the department - to try and get a better idea of what happened. In spite of what some people may have heard, nobody has been cleared. “There hasn’t been anyone excluded (as a possible suspect,)” Ditlefsen said. With that comment, Ditlefsen is also pointing out a critical detail of Bly’s disappearance, that in spite of hundreds of interviews, routine follow-ups on past interviews, tracking new and revised leads and using the assets of numerous agencies, one thing is clear: Nobody really seems to know what happened to her.

But is it a crime?

While the Bly case has been under several spotlights and has taken countless hundreds of investigatory hours, the sad reality is that it may not have been a crime. With so little actual evidence, no true suspects, no body, no obvious evidence of her being taken against her will, it technically has a unique nonlabel. “That’s the truth. You can’t really label it a crime,” Johnson said. “What do you label it? It’s certainly suspicious ... but until that one certain piece of evidence comes along...” Johnson trailed off with a shake of his head. He knows the case is grinding away at her family and friends and, while the trail has been cold since the beginning, there have been glimmers of hints along the way. “We’re currently working on some new information,” Johnson said cryptically. “We’ll follow it to see where it goes ... like we’ve done along the way.” That is not unusual, as Ditlefsen noted several false leads in the past. “There were times when we thought she was in California with a cousin,” she said. “but it turned out there was nothing there.” She said they had a similar false lead later that seemed to connect her to someone in Missouri, but again, it was a dead end that proved to be a wrong end. “We have everything in place,” she said with a sigh. “We just need a break.”

Possibilities

Several scenarios have played out along the way, some were quickly eliminated while others have continued to fuel the rumor mill. They range from Bly making a secret connection with someone on the Internet, to faking her own death, to being abducted against her will, to committing

Rose Bly’s mother, Candus Harer, held up a display of photos of her daughter that she compiled after the young woman went missing 2 years ago. Harer hopes people will keep the posters of her daughter displayed and report any leads to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department. - Photo by Priscilla Bauer suicide, to even being confused and just slipping away into a remote area - or into the wrong vehicle with the wrong person. Bly’s mother has suggested the latter issue in the months after she disappeared, stating how Bly had fallen off her horse several days prior, and how she had reportedly been confused. But Bly apparently never visited a doctor or seemed ill enough to alter her life, and the horse fall possibility is only loosely addressed by investigators. “I guess that’s one possibility,” Ditlefsen said, noting how there are many possible scenarios. Johnson narrowed it even further and said he thinks there are three distinct possibilities of what happened to her: “She either left on her own, committed suicide or something happened to her against her will,” he said, implying that she could have been abducted. “Most people who knew her said that wasn’t likely (leaving on her own),” he added. “She wouldn’t leave her kids.” As for the suicide, no body has ever been recovered, and with two years of combing the woods, several changes in leaves, seasons and local water levels, as well as two hunting seasons - which some people in law enforcement refer to as the annual search party - logic would likely reduce the likelihood of suicide without a body. In other words, if she took her own life, she would be more or less within walking distance of where her Pontiac was discovered. Other possibilities - such as abduction would seem to get more likely without a body after all this time. “We really can’t say for sure,” Johnson admitted, not committing to any theories at this point. “We honestly just don’t know and really aren’t ruling anything out.”

The troubles

It was no secret that Bly and her husband had a troubled marriage. They had several noted instances of alleged abuse, reportedly on both sides. In fact, Judge Robert Rasmussen had granted a temporary restraining order for Bly against her husband that June, just a few months prior to her disappearance, but they apparently recon-

ciled within a few days and no charges were pursued. He had also filed for divorce in the months prior to her disappearance, but pulled the filing with another reconciliation. However, things changed after Bly was missing for over two months, and he refiled for divorce and full custody of the couple’s two children, now 2 and 3. Judge Molly GaleWyrick granted him the divorce and full custody in March 2010. But again, showing how the case stands, legally, the court records of the divorce mention that she is considered a missing person, and also makes sure the petition was published three times in local papers, and mentions her non appearance in court, and that there are not leads of her whereabouts. Public court records also leave a caveat if she returns or is discovered, noting that “Ms. Bly may motion the court in the future with matter concerning the children.” In other words, just like with the PCSD, in the eyes of the circuit court, there is no crime, only a disappearance. In fact, the court also granted her property to the husband, including that same white 2001 Pontiac Grand Am sedan she left in the Grantsburg municipal parking lot. The troubled marriage and divorce situation has also led to numerous speculations on some of the public Internet posts about the case. Several of them anonymously grouse about everything from shoddy police work to from-the-hip theories of the husband’s involvement. Many of the comments are outright accusatory, and blatantly speculative on painting his guilt, which is quickly shot down by investigators, while in the same breath reiterating that nothing has ever been proven. When asked, authorities were reluctant to discuss the merits of the speculation, but also hesitant to exclude any person or scenario. They do admit that he passed a polygraph test, while in the same breath, at separate times, both Ditlefsen and Johnson also reiterate that nobody has ever been cleared. [Attempts to get comments from the husband were unsuccessful by press time.]

The sharing

The details behind Bly’s disappearance have been shared with numerous agencies, at both the state and federal level. “They’ve even run it through Quantico (Virginia, the FBI headquarters) and it hasn’t come up with any hits,” stated PCSD investigator Sgt. Ray Joy. “It’s pretty strange.” But again, with the lack of evidence proving it as a crime, the amount of work involved has been a noted surprise to outside agencies. “They’ve all seemed to be fairly impressed with the amount of work we’ve put into it,” Johnson said. “It’s far from a closed case.” Johnson said that with modern technology, there has not been one shred of a flag to appear that has positively been traced to her, either through cell phones, security cameras, Internet postings, account activity. Nothing. “She went off the grid, completely,” Johnson said with a shrug. “In this day and age, that’s probably one of the biggest issues ... for someone to disappear completely just doesn’t seem possible.” He is not alone in that assessment, and the PCSD has praised the assistance of other agencies that have helped with the investigation, from the Grantsburg Police Department - which processed evidence on the parking lot scene - to the Burnett County Sheriff’s Office to the state and federal agencies, numerous volunteers and family members who have kept the case active in more ways than can be discussed. It has been a shared effort in many ways, but also has become a passion of sorts for people like Ditlefsen, who said she couldn’t begin to tally the hours she’s spent on the investigation. But again, as the two-year mark passes, the case of Bly is facing growing obstacles of time and memories. “That’s always a big challenge,” Johnson said. “The longer it’s open, the less fresh those old memories become ... there’s now two years of new memories (for witnesses). We’ll continue to work on it, until we run out of places to go. We just need that break.”

Gardens for Bly

Ditlefsen has made it a point to give Bly’s mother and other family members updates, even when there is little to update - good or bad. “Her mom seems to be holding up,” Ditlefsen said, outlining how she just recently gave her a synopsis last week as the anniversary approaches. “We’ve been staying in constant contact with the family.” Harer is both melancholy and hopeful, and said that people continue to ask her about Bly. “Rose grew up in Grantsburg and she knew a lot of people here. People come up to me on the street and ask if there’s been any news.” Every day there is something Harer says she would like to tell her daughter about, but can’t. “I couldn’t even tell her that her grandmother passed away last February.” Harer’s other two daughters miss their younger sibling very much, as well. “They call and are holding up but want their sister back,” she said. And as for Bly’s two daughters, Harer says they remain with their father and grandfather and she sees them infrequently. “I can’t answer if the girls miss or even remember their mother, but Rose is greatly missed by a lot of people,” she said. The special days without Bly are especially hard, Harer said. “September 16 is Rose’s birthday, her 24th birthday, and next week we are having a family reunion. There’s a lot she’s missing out on.” She said it’s the not knowing that really hurts. “I have my theories but can’t point any fingers at this point.”

Bly’s garden

Harer and her friend, Valetta Walton, are standing in the garden they started planting after Bly disappeared. The garden has grown large, bountiful and ever more colorful as they continued to add more perennials as the weeks and months went by. “It’s a garden for Rose, so we planted perennials because they come back,” said

See No sign, back page

PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

Polk County circuit court

UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT GARAGE SALE 1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North Balsam Lake, WI 54006 Friday, August 26, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Items include: 36V scrubber; gymnastic equipment; weight room equipment; generator; electric swimming pool pump, filter & chlorinator and other miscellaneous items too numerous to mention. 543374 Something for Everyone! 41-42a,d 52-1L

Rush D. Hickethier, Centuria, speeding, $200.50. Willie J. Hochstetler, Glenwood City, speeding, $175.30. Jesse A. Hoefflin, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Gary R. Hoffman, Madison, speeding, $200.50. Amanda B. Hol, Balsam Lake, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, not guilty plea. John W. Jacobson, Eden Prairie, Minn., speeding, $250.90. Cary M. Jensen, Frederic, speeding, $175.30. Simon A. Johansen, Edina, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Kelly O. Johns, Eagan, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Craig A. Jones, Cushong, knowingly operate while revoked, $200.50. Brian E. Kearney, Blaine, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Bruce D. Kearns, Burnsville, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Todd R. Keller, Cambridge, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Sone T. Khaochonethan, Elk River, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Seth D. Kirk, Amery, speeding, not guilty plea. Kevin R. Klakeg, Frazee, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Gene H. Klemp, Albany, Ore., speeding, $175.30. Todd C. Kluga, Barron, cliff jumping, $150.10. Catherine A. Kohanek, Zimmerman, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Daniel J. Krunkkala, Duluth, Minn., failure to notify police of accident, $263.50; inattentive driving, $187.90. Joni L. Kryspin, Maumee, Ohio, speeding, $225.70. Burton D. Kvenevig, Lakeland, Minn., speeding, $175.30. William J. Laden, Minnetonka, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Thomas M. Lancaster, St. Paul, Minn., load boat above safe carrying capacity, $175.30. Peter C. Lande, Duluth, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Eric W. Larson, Amery, failure to notify police of accident, $263.50; driving too fast for conditions, $213.10. Lorrain Larson, Amery, established salvage yard w/o special exception permit, not guilty plea. Russel D. Larson, Anoka, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10.

APARTMENT FOR RENT 1 Bedroom

400/mo.

$

Frederic

Includes garage, water & sewer.

715-566-0464

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Fri. & Sat., Aug. 19 & 20, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

WEBB LAKE COMMUNITY CLUB RUMMAGE SALE Corner of Namekagon Trail & Hwy. 77 There will be detour signs for you to follow.

Fri. & Sat., August 26 & 27

(nonprofit) * 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. - 25¢ Tent and Garage * 8 a.m. - Donuts, Cookies, Coffee And Cold Drinks (Sold Outside) * 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. - Main Hall Open With Homemade Pies & Barbecues * Saturday - Half Price Sale All Day * Saturday - $3.00 Bags of Clothing All Day Accepting Rummage 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Any Tuesday And All Day On Mon., Tues. & Wed., Aug. 22, 23 & 24 543448 52L 42a,b

James R. Moss, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Brad A. Munz, Vail, Colo., speeding, $250.90. Christopher T. Nelson, East Bethel, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Keenan M. Nemeth, Frederic, operating while suspended, hit and run property, $263.50. Jeffrey P. Nieland, Grey Eagle, Minn., speeding, $183.30. Anthony M. Ninke, Deer Park, operating while suspended, $200.50; speeding, $200.50. Timothy E. O’Leary, Shakopee, Minn., interstate record of duty status, $263.50. Alicia A. Olson, Balsam Lake, keep open intoxicants in vehicle, not guilty plea. Carlos A. Orellana, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $200.50.

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-6699777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1800-927-9275. 445101 8a-etfcp 19Ltfc

Dennis A. Peterson, Moundsview, Minn., fail/carry boat floatation devices, $162.70. Michael J. Pierre, Dalbo, Minn., fish without license, $190.70. Kelly K. Plenty, Clayton, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Jenna L. Price, Coon Rapids, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Samantha J. Price, Cottage Grove, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. Jason M. Quick, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Jason F. Rabuck, Springbrook, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Cassandra A. Rasmussen, St. Croix Falls, speeding, $175.30. Phillip J. Reimenschneider, St. Croix Falls, operate w/o valid license, $200.50. Robert W. Reynolds, Balsam Lake, operating motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Karl R. Riebe, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Alex E. Ripley, Hager City, fish without license, $190.70. Devyn M. Roe, Osceola, speeding, $175.30. Nathaniel G. Sackett, Rosemount, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Bradley K. Schaefer, Amery, nonregistration of vehicle <=10,000 lbs., $175.30. Michele A. Schaffer, Clayton, speeding, $175.30. Jerome L. Schlei, Cumberland, speeding, $175.30. Rhonda L. Schmaltz, Brooklyn Park, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Kevin A. Schmidt, Frederic, speeding, $175.30. Briana M. Schock, Amery, inattentive driving, $187.90; failure to notify police of accident, $263.50. Jonathan R. Schwartzbauer, Coon Rapids, Minn., enter closed area, $175.30. Philip R. Searles, Minnetonka, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Jamie A. Selvig, Clear Lake, operate w/o valid license, $200.50; operate after rev./susp. of registration, $175.30. Satomi K. Shinde, St. Paul, Minn., security violation – discharge certificates, not guilty plea. Dmitriy Shindyakou, Coon Rapids, Minn., security violation – discharge certificates, $175.30. Joshua L. Shirk, Burnsville, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Roger A. Siemenrs, Grand Junction, Colo., speeding, $200.50. Augustine T. Sierra II, Andover, Minn., camping after permit had expired, $200.50. Monica L. Skinaway, Luck, speeding, $175.30. Taran R. Skwira, Little Falls, Minn., speeding, $250.90. Andrew M. Smith, Clear Lake, speeding, $175.30.

FOR RENT IN LUCK, WIS.

Deluxe Twin Homes in 8th St. Court – Spacious 2-bedroom, 1-bath home includes refrigerator, dishwasher, stove and washer and dryer. Also included is an attached 2-car garage with an auto. door opener. Monthly rent of $775 includes lawn care, garbage service and snow removal.

MOVING SALE Baby & children items: Car seats, high chair, bikes and much more! Adult clothes: Gap, JCrew, Old Navy. Winter coats; maternity clothes - like new; women’s shoes and boots (size 7); futon; bookcases; desk; tools; hunting/fishing gear; books and lots of misc. Rain or shine! 543679 52Lp

Tad R. Lawson, Coon Rapids, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Carl W. Lee, Amery, speeding, $200.50. Kristopher P. Leopold, Centuria, speeding, $225.70. Rachel A. Lepper, New Richmond, speeding, not guilty plea. Justin M. Lindberg, Amery, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. April L. Lowe, Lindstrom, Minn., operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Jessica A. Lybeck, Chicago, Ill., speeding, $175.30. Tyler W. Marko, Clear Lake, speeding, not guilty plea. Kyle R. Marquard, Blaine, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Steven F. Marty Jr., Dresser, speeding, $175.30. Peter W. Matson, Centuria, speeding, $175.30. Michele M. Mazanec, Mendota Heights, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Amanda N. Mead, Grantsburg, speeding, $200.50. Sara M. Measner, Osceola, speeding, $175.30. Nathaniel D. Melin, Grantsburg, keep open intoxicants in vehicle, not guilty plea. Vincen M. Metzger, Mendota Heights, Minn., keep open intoxicants in vehicle, $263.50. Roger S. Miller, Hudson, operate a salvage yard without a permit, not guilty plea. Andrew R. Millis, Savage, Minn., built garage too close to lot line, not guilty plea. Marissa J. Montgomery, Burnsville, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Aubrey A. Moore, Cambridge, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10.

FOR RENT In Balsam Lake 1-BR Furnished Apt.

Ground level, with cable. Includes water, sewer, garbage pickup, coin laundry.

400/month

$

No pets. No smoking. Mtg. on-site.

Parkway Apts. 715-485-3402 Cell 715-554-0780

Kyle Johansen, 715-472-4993

543575 52-1Lp 42-43a,dp

540486 35a,d,tfc 46Ltfc

DUPLEX FOR RENT Siren

2 BRs, 2 baths, 2-car attached garage with opener, deck, range, refrig. w/ice, micro/vent, dishwasher, washer & dryer, gas furnace with central air, lawn care, snow removal, weekly trash pickup and cable TV included in rent. References and security deposit required.

Available Immediately

Call Kevin - 715-349-5350 Days Or 715-349-2450 Evenings No Pets

885

$

/mo. + utilities

539208 44Ltfc 34atfc

Maureen K. Stormont, Stillwater, Minn., speeding, $250.90. Laura L. Strausburg, Seattle, Wash., speeding, $200.50. Lisa C. Strub, River Falls, speeding, $200.50. George W. Sunseri, Roseville, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Shelly R. Swanson, St. Croix Falls, failure to yield right of way, $187.90. Jacob A. Swenson, Siren, License restriction violation; speeding, not guilty pleas. Michael L. Tomczak, Bruce, speeding, $183.30; seat belt violation, $10.00. Anthony J. Truhler, Maplewood, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Sara A. Underwood, Frederic, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Michael J. Utgard, Amery, speeding, $183.30. Ricky D. Vangundy, Centuria, speeding, $175.30. Ravi Verma, Esko, MInn., speeding, not guilty plea. Gena C. Walters, Buffalo, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Mark E. Warner, Maplewood, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Alisha D. Webster, Maple Grove, Minn., speeding, not guilty plea. David C. Wiencke, Columbia Heights, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Timothy H. Wilkerson, Osceola, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Steven P. Wojcik, Andover, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Brian K. Wolf, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $175.30. George M. Zappa, Milltown, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Cody L. Zelinski, Balsam Lake, speeding, $175.30. John P. Zeman, St. Croix Falls, operate moped w/o valid license, $200.50.

(Aug. 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff vs. ALLEANA CABLE, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 10 CV 983 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 30, 2011, in the amount of $98,371.37, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 5, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot Ten (10), except the South 25 feet and all of Lot Eleven (11), Block Nine (9), Original Plat of the Village of Centuria, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 504 Superior Ave., Centuria, WI 54824. TAX KEY NO.: 111-00301-0000. Dated this 28th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 275179

543669 WNAXLP

Bruce A. Colburn, Turtle Lake, speeding, $225.70. Brent A. Dahlberg, Balsam Lake, seat belt violation, $10.00. Kyle T. David, Farmington, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Kraig M. Decker, Duluth, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Kelly H. Denney, Cedar, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Evalou Dillin, Elk River, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Trevor C. Doran, St. Louis Park, Minn., enter closed area, $175.30. David J. Dubay, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Danielle R. Dziedzic, Coon Rapids, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Kristen M. Egan, Lakeville, Minn., speeding, $175.30. James R. Elstad, Hugo, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Donald R. Engen, Osceola, fish without license, $190.20. Carolyn A. Fassett, Shoreview, Minn., speeding, $250.90. Dustin G. Featherstone, Taylors Falls, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Robert A. Fischer, Eagle Bend, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Kristana J. Flandrena, Dresser, speeding, $175.30. Eric J. Frisle, Glenwood City, speeding, $225.50; seat belt violation, $10.00. Cheryl D. Fritz, Hudson, speeding, $175.30. Dianne M. Gale, Clear Lake, speeding, $175.30. Gary R. Gall, Turtle Lake, fail/stop at stop sign, $175.30. Heather L. Geistfeld, Oakdale, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Thomas E. Geistfeld, Prescott, passing in no-passing zone, not guilty plea. Cullen J. Geppert, Madison, speeding, $225.70. Jeremy M. Gerres, Belle Plaine, Minn., fraud in obtaining a license, not guilty plea. Wade W. Glenna, Shafer, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Chase A. Gorres, Clear Lake, speeding, not guilty plea. Nathan L. Gundrum, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Benjamin R. Haesemeyer, Apple Valley, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Thomas J. Hansen, Hudson, speeding, operating while suspended, not guilty pleas. John M. Hays, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $200.50.

541944 49-52Lp 39-42ap

Nassan A. Ahmed, Minneapolis, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Terrance L. Aldrich, Fridley, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Joseph L. Allen, St. Paul, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Matthew M. Allen, Shorewood, Minn., speeding, $225.70. Margaret A. Anaya, Spring, Texas, speeding, $175.30. Melissa A. Anderson, Clear Lake, operate tax, business w/o license, $137.50, costs. Heath D. Andrews, Spooner, speeding, $175.30. Ashley M. Arden, Red Wing, Minn., fish without license, $192.70. Alicia M. Ash, Amery, speeding, $175.30. Nathan R. Babcock, Plymouth, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Matthew R. Bader, Centuria, operating motor vehicle w/o proof of insurance, $10.00. Joseph S. Barstow, Dresser, seat belt violation, $10.00. Lisa M. Beeman, Coon Rapids, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Jasmine O. Belille, Ramsey, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Patricia A. Benson, Rochester, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Gary L. Berhow, Osceola, automobile following too closely, $200.50; inattentive drive, $187.90 Jill M. Betz, Woodbury, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Joshua D. Brist, Dayton, Minn., enter closed area, $175.30. Rochelle I. Bulow, fish without license, $192.70. Harold P. Busch, Lino Lakes, Minn., speeding, $175.30. James R. Camarata, Chanhassen, Minn., speeding, $175.30. Guadalupe H. Campuzano, Barron, operating motor vehicle w/o insurance, $200.50. Zachary D. Chase, Duluth, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Austin S. Christenson-Braddock, Tucson, Ariz., cliff jumping, $150.10. Tye J. Christie, Minneapolis, Minn., cliff jumping, $150.10. Desmond R. Clancy, Cottage Grove, Minn., speeding, $200.50. Vanessa S. Cochran, Lino Lakes, Minn., speeding, $200.50.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 21

Burnett County sheriff's report

Charles E. Barstow, 85, Town of West Marshland, died July 13, 2011. Mildred P. Schmuhl, 72, Grantsburg, died July 24, 2011.

Polk County

Albertina J. Holteen, 97, St. Croix Falls, died July 25, 2011. Marion I. Johnson, 90, Town of Garfield, died July 28, 2011. Joyce L. Liesch, 80, Osceola, died July 30, 2011. Kenneth R. Johnson, 83, Clear Lake, died Aug. 1, 2011. James L. McLevish, 67, Centuria, died Aug. 8, 2011.

The Leader

Connect to your community

542236 WNAXLP

(Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. DEBORAH JOHNSON, et al Defendant(s) Case Number: 11 CV 137 CORRECTED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 16, 2011, in the amount of $142,136.23, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 21, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 11, Plat of Hasta La Vista, Village of Milltown, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 106 Ranger Court, Milltown, WI 54858. TAX KEY NO.: 151-00367-1100. Dated this 21st day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Benjamin J. Pliskie State Bar #1037985 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274646

543002 WNAXLP

Burnett County

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Grantsburg School District August 15, 2011

Job Title: Reading Specialist/Math Teacher Job Description: Full-time, Long-term Substitute Qualifications: Appropriate Wisconsin Certification: Elementary Education with Reading Specialist 316 license. Requirements: Elementary experience preferred. This individual will work in an RtI capacity with students that need intervention strategies in reading and math. The individual must be aware of the RtI process as well as reading and math intervention strategies. The individual will work collaboratively with classroom teachers on developing strategies and systems to help with the success of those students needing interventions in reading and/or math. How to apply: Send letter of application, resume, credentials (Three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by August 29, 2011. Contact: Brad Jones, Principal Grantsburg Middle School 500 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2455 The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, 543621 52-1L color, national origin, six, religion or handicap.

Krawczyk, Duginski & Rohr, S.C., is a debt collector. This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a discharge in bankruptcy of the underlying debt, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt.

(Aug. 10, 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BRANCH 1 BREMER BANK N.A. 855 Eagle Point Blvd. P.O. Box 1000 Lake Elmo, MN 55042, Plaintiff, vs. Patrick T. Rose 313 10th Avenue Clear Lake, WI 54005, and Rebecca C. Tyler-Rose 313 10th Avenue Clear Lake, WI 54005, Defendants. Case No. 09 CV 999 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Code: 30404 By virtue of an pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on March 4, 2010, I will sell at public auction at the Polk County Justice Center in the Village of Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, in said Polk County, on September 29, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m., all of the following described mortgaged premises, to-wit: That part of the South Half (S1/2) of the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4) of the Southeast Quarter (SE1/4) of Section Twenty-eight (28), Township Thirty-two (32), North, Range Fifteen (15) West, described as follows: Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 3522 recorded in Volume 16, of CSM, page 35, Town of Clear Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. The above property is located at 313 10th Avenue, Clear Lake, WI 54005. TERMS: 1. 10% cash or certified check down payment at time of sale, balance upon confirmation by Court. 2. Sale is subject to all unpaid real estate taxes and special assessments. 3. Purchaser shall pay any Wisconsin real estate transfer fee. 4. Property is being sold on an “as is” basis without warranties or representations of any kind. 5. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of property. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wis., this 24th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin SCHOFIELD, HIGLEY & MAYER, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff Bay View Offices, Suite #100 700 Wolske Bay Road Menomonie, WI 54751 715-235-3939

(July 20, 27, August 3, 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC10, MORTGAGE PASS-THOUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006OC10 Plaintiff Vs CHRISTOPHER HEINN, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 09 CV 442 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 25, 2009, in the amount of $438,473.58, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 7, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lot Four (4) of certified survey map No. 2677 recorded in Volume Twelve (12), of certified survey maps, Page One Hundred Sixty-Four (164), Document No. 581439, located in the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW 1/4 SW 1/4), Section Twenty-Seven (27), Township Thirty-Two (32) North, Range Seventeen (17) West together with easements located in the South Half of the Northwest Quarter (S 1/2 NW 1/4), Section TwentySeven (27), Township ThirtyTwo (32) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, as described in Volume 518 of records, Page 211, Document No. 459339, Polk County, Wisconsin, the above property is situated in Polk County, State of Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 152 147th Street, Deer Park, WI 54007. TAX KEY NO.: 002-007050400. Dated this 14th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274388

541493 WNAXLP

(Aug. 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GWENDOLYN ALDEN Notice Setting Time to Hear Application and Deadline for Filing Claims (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 56 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth July 24, 1923, and date of death October 29, 2010, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 509 Benson Road, Frederic, WI 54837. 3. The application will be heard at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, Room 500, before Jenell L. Anderson, Register in Probate, on September 7, 2011, at 9 a.m. You do not need to appear unless you object. The application may be granted if there is no objection. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is November 10, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wis., Room 500. 6. This publication is notice to any persons whose names or addresses are unknown. If you require reasonable accommodations due to a disability to participate in the court process, please call 715-4859238 at least 10 working days prior to the scheduled court date. Please note that the court does not provide transportation. Please check with person named below for exact time and date. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar August 2, 2011 Adam C. Benson Attorney at Law BENSON LAW OFFICE LLC P.O. Box 370 Siren, WI 54872 715-349-5215 Bar No.: 1032855

(July 13, 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HARRIS N.A., f/k/a COMMUNITY BANK GROUP, f/k/a FORTRESS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS J. NEWBERG, TERRY J. NEWBERGHACKETT, JANE DOE SPOUSE, Unknown spouse of DOUGLAS J. NEWBERG and BONE LAKE OWNERS ASSOCIATION Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Case No. 11-CV-104 Case Code 30404 By virtue of and pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure made in the above-entitled action, and the order of the court dated on the 24th day of May, 2011, I will sell at public auction in the foyer of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, on the 30th day of August, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., all of the following described premises, to-wit: Lot Three (3) of the Polk County Plat of Bone Lake Acres recorded at the Office of the Polk County Register of Deeds on March 16, 2005, in Envelope 306A of Plats as Document No. 695822. Said Plat being located in Government Lot Three (3) and the Northeast One-quarter (1/4) of the Northeast One-quarter (1/4) of Section Thirty-one (31) and the Southeast One-quarter (1/4) of the Southeast Onequarter (1/4) and the Southwest One-quarter (1/4) of the Southeast One-quarter (1/4) of Section Thirty (30), Township Thirty-six (36) North, Range Sixteen (16) West, Town of Bone Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. ADDRESS: Vacant Land. PARCEL ID#: 012 00767 0300. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: 10% of amount bid by cash or certified check. Balance of purchase price must be paid within ten (10) days after confirmation of the sale. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 7th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County This property is sold “as is” subject to all legal encumbrances and any outstanding and accruing real estate taxes, special assessments, and penalties and interest, if any. Purchaser will be required to pay all transfer and recording fees and, if desired, the cost of title evidence. Prepared by: Matthew J. Krawczyk SBN 1064349 Krawczyk, Duginski & Rohr, S.C. 16650 West Bluemound Road, Suite 300 Brookfield, WI 53005 (262) 827-5800

felony bail jumping Aug. 11: Brian Tinkle, 30, Siren, probation violation Robert Pate, 25, Luck, failure to appear, failure to pay, probation violation, domestic battery, possession of THC and drug paraphernalia Aug. 12: Joshua Denetz, 33, Frederic, warrant for failure to appear Aug. 14: Bryon Nickence, 53, Webster, disorderly conduct Joan Monn, 56, Webster, operating while revoked

543064 WNAXLP

Burnett and Polk County deaths

(July 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. NANCY JOHNSON, et al Defendant(s) Case Number: 10 CV 936 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 10, 2011, in the amount of $105,175.37, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 13, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The South 54 feet of Lot 6, Block 15, Third Addition to Lawson City in the Village of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 311 S. Main St., Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 146-00181-0000. Dated this 19th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274735

Jail bookings - Aug. 8-14 Aug. 8: Jessica Spencer, 43, Spooner, arrested for theft between $500 and $1,000 Aug. 9: Anthony Reynolds, 29, Hertel, arrest warrant for probation violation Aug. 10: Cory Powell, 23, Shoreview, Minn., serving sentence for failure to pay, failing to report to county jail and operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration. Jeremy Benton, 40, Grants-

burg, felony bail jumping Shaurette Reynolds, 30, Webster, substantial battery court order Charles Bentley, 20, Webster, court order for domestic disorderly conduct, criminal property damage, battery and disorderly conduct. Kurt Matrious, 41, Danbury, disorderly conduct James Pijanowski, 46, Danbury, disorderly conduct Brandon Studeman, 19, Balsam lake, disorderly conduct and

WNAXLP

Marsh Road, Grantsburg, was reported.

540952

was reported. A structure fire on Williams Road in Hertel was reported at 3:34 p.m. Aug. 11: A property-damage accident at 29401 CTH H, Danbury, was reported at 8:45 a.m. Aug. 12: Destructive property damage in Danbury was reported at 5:42 p.m. Kids were reportedly spray painting letters and possible words in white, red and black paint on pine in front of the driveway of a residence. No suspects were identified. A property-damage accident on Hwy. 70 west of Cranberry

541884 WNAXLP

Aug. 7: Damage to the wooden boards of a gate on property owned by Larry E. Lamphere on Kruger Road, Webster, between 3 and 5:15 p.m. was reported. Aug. 8: An accident with unknown injuries on Russel Avenue and Hwy. 70, Grantsburg, was reported at 2:20 p.m. A wildland fire at 23515 West River Road, Grantsburg, at 4:34 p.m. was reported. Aug. 9: An injury accident at 1:35 a.m. on Park Street West and North Lake Road in Webster

UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North Balsam Lake, WI 54810-7267 Phone: 715-825-3515 Fax: 715-825-3517 www.unity.k12.wi.us

BUS DRIVERS WANTED Unity School District is taking applications for bus driver. Commercial driver’s license (CDL) with school bus endorsement required. Materials to obtain permit and assistance to obtain license are available. The process of obtaining a CDL is obtaining permit, bus training & scheduling road test. Qualified applicants will be given first consideration. Multiple positions available. Applications may be obtained from the District Office, 715825-3515 or on the District Web site, www.unity.k12.wi.us. Interested, qualified person may apply by submitting letter of application, District application and letters of recommendation to: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator Unity School District 1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North Balsam Lake, WI 54810-7267 Taking applications until positions are filled. E.O.E. 543373 41-42a,d 52-1L

PAGE 22 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

TOWN OF SWISS - NOTICE OF OPEN BOOK

Pursuant to s.70.45, Wis. Stats., the Town of Swiss assessment roll for the year 2011 assessment will be open for examination on the 10th day of September, 2011, at the Swiss Town Hall, 7551 Main Street, Danbury, from 10 a.m. to noon Instructional material about the assessment, how to file an objection and board of review procedures under Wisconsin law will be available at that time. Notice is hereby given this 17th day of August, 2011, by Judith Dykstra, Clerk. 543645 52L WNAXLP

JOB VACANCY School District of Siren

POSITION:

Native American Home School Coordinator (Part-time .65 FTE) Interim Position 2011 - 2012 School Year Only START DATE: August 31, 2011 SALARY: $15.00/hour HOURS: To be determined by District Administrator RESPONSIBILITIES: Serve as a liaison for Native American students between the school and home for the purpose of increasing the educational opportunities and accountability for all Native American students. QUALIFICATIONS: Minimum of high school diploma with preference given to candidates with postsecondary education and/or relevant professional experience. Serve as an advocate for Native American students to promote good attendance and academic success in accordance with the Title VII grant. TO APPLY: Send a letter and resume with three letters of recommendation to: Scott Johnson, District Administrator, School District of Siren, 24022 4th Avenue, Siren, WI 54872. This position will be filled as quickly as 543181 51-52L possible. (Aug. 10, 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS A. NEIDERMIRE and LORI A. NEIDERMIRE, husband and wife and THE RIVERBANK Defendants. Case No. 10-CV-445 Code No. 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage Dollar Amount Greater Than $5,000.00 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 20, 2010, in the amount of $297,109.97, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 28, 2011, at 10:00 o’clock a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center located at 1005 West Main St., Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A Parcel of Land in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4), Section Thirteen (13), Township ThirtyThree (33) North, Range Nineteen (19) West, in Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of said Southeast Quarter; thence South along the West Line of said Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 OF SW1/4), 345.0 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence due East 264.0 feet; thence

due South 165.0 feet; thence due West 264.0 feet to the said West Line of the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 OF SW1/4); thence North along said West Line 165.0 feet to the Point of Beginning, Excepting the right of way of the Town Road Extending along the said West Line of said Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4); AND A Parcel of Land in the SouthEast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4), Section Thirteen (13), TownShip Thirty-Three (33) North, Range Nineteen (19) West described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest Corner of said Southeast Quarter thence South along West Line of said Southeast Quarter 510 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence due East 264.0 feet; thence due South approximately 30 feet to the Border of Private Road as it is presently travelled; thence West along North Border of said Road 264.0 feet to the West Line of Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4); thence North along said West Line to the Point of Beginning; Excepting the right of way of the Town Road Extending along said West Line of said SouthEast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE1/4 of SW1/4); being approximately 0.18 acres. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 916 248th St., Town of Osceola. TAX KEY NO.: 042-01029-0000 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County, WI O’DESS AND ASSOCIATES, S.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1414 Underwood Avenue Suite 403 Wauwatosa, WI 53213 (414) 727-1591 O’Dess and Associates, S.C., is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have previously received a Chapter 7 Discharge in Bankruptcy, this correspondence should not be construed as an attempt to collect a debt.

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Dated this 22nd day of July, 2011 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274728

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543164

Case Number: 10 CV 789 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on March 31, 2011, in the amount of $154,678.75, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 5, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 10, Township 34 North, Range 18 West, Town of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as follows: Commencing at the East OneQuarter corner of said Section 10; thence West, along the North line of said Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, 1,632.00 feet to the point of beginning; thence continue West, 208.00 feet; thence South parallel with the East line of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 10, 195.00 feet; thence East, parallel with the North line of said Northwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, 208.00 feet; thence North, parallel with the East line of the Southeast 1/4 of said Section 10, 195.00 feet to the point of beginning, all in Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2044 165th Avenue, Centuria, WI 54824. TAX KEY NO.: 044-00262-0000.

543445 41d 52L 42a

Steven J. Swanson No. 1003029 Attorney at Law P.O. Box 609 105 South Washington Street St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-483-3787

542120 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY THE RIVERBANK, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT BRIGGS, and ANCHORBANK, fsb., Defendants Case No. 10 CV 974 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled action on March 14, 2011, in the amount of $125,899.16, I will sell the described premises at public auction at the Main Front entrance of the Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, in the Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin on: Thursday, September 15, 2011, at 10 o’clock a.m. TERMS OF SALE: 1. 10% down in cash or certified funds at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeiture of deposit plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. 3. Buyer to pay applicable Wisconsin Real Estate Transfer Tax. DESCRIPTION: Lot Two (2) of Certified Survey Map No. 5264 recorded in Volume 23 of Certified Survey Maps, page 171 as Document No. 721566, located in part of Government Lot Seven (7) and part of Government Lot Eight (8), Section Thirty-five (35), Township Thirty-five (35) North, Range Seventeen (17) West, Town of Milltown, Polk County, Wisconsin. A perpetual nonexclusive easement for the purposes of ingress and egress over the existing roadway that lies between the Northerly boundary of the property being conveyed as Parcel 1b and 1c, and the pond, and runs in a Westerly and Northerly direction, between two ponds, and on across the roadway as described in Certified Survey Map No. 486 recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps, page 215. PIN: 040-01289-0000. Property Address: 1385 Kemah Drive, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. Dated at Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, this 18th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson, Sheriff Polk County, Wisconsin

(Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BRANCH I POLK COUNTY Acuity, a Mutual Insurance Company 2800 South Taylor Drive Sheboygan, WI 53081, Plaintiff, vs. Kyle M. Hawkins 2252 160th Avenue St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Defendant. Case No. 11 CV 435 AMENDED SUMMONS Money Judgment: 30301 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each person named above as a defendant: You are hereby notified that the plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within 45 days after August 3, 2011, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Court, whose address is Clerk of Court, Polk County Judicial Center, 1005 West Main Street, #300, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 and to Thrasher, Pelish & Franti, Ltd., plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 31, 13 East Eau Claire Street, Rice Lake, WI 54868. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the complaint within 45 days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: July 21, 2011. THRASHER, PELISH & FRANTI, LTD. James A. Pelish State Bar #1014596 Attorney for Plaintiff Thirteen East Eau Claire Street P.O. Box 31 Rice Lake, WI 54868 715-234-8105

WNAXLP

(Aug. 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. ROGER D. BIBEAU, et al. Defendant(s)

(Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY CITIZENS COMMUNITY FEDERAL, Plaintiff, vs. TRACY L. BRABEC, JASON A. BRABEC, ANCHORBANK, f/k/a S&C Bank Defendants. Case No. 11CV336 Case Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered in the above-entitled action on July 22, 2011, in the amount of $165,099.65, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, in said County, on the 29th day of September, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lot 2 of CSM 14-15, Map No. 2993, a part of the SE 1/4 SW 1/4 of Section 36, Township 33 North, Range 16 West (in the Township of Lincoln). PROPERTY ADDRESS: 613 65th Street, Clear Lake, Wisconsin. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale, balance to be paid by cash or certified check upon confirmation of sale. Dated this 1st day of August, 2011. /s/Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Attorney Christine A. Gimber WELD, RILEY, PRENN & RICCI, S.C. 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715-839-7786 Attorneys for Plaintiff This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

WNAXLP

(July 27, August 3, 10, 17, 24, 31)

Notices/Employment Opportunities

542488

(Aug. 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME CHANGE OF ELIZABETH BRETT COLLINS By: (Petitioner) Elizabeth Brett Collins Notice and Order for Name Change Hearing NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: Elizabeth Brett Collins To: Elizabeth Brett CollinsHansen Birth Certificate: Elizabeth Brett Collins IT IS ORDERED THAT: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Polk County, State of Wisconsin, Judge Molly E. GaleWyrick, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, September 7, 2011, 4 p.m. BY THE COURT: Molly E. GaleWyrick Circuit Court Judge August 2, 2011

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(Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Zachary S. Lowe Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 52 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth 7/11/1988 and date of death 6/13/2011, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 577 216th Ave., Luck, WI 54853. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is October 25, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse, Balsam Lake, Wis., Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar July 15, 2011 Scott Lowe 2147 Circle Drive Luck, WI 54853 542423 715-857-5099 WNAXLP

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 23

The agenda will be posted.

Patsy Gustafson Town Clerk

541008

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(July 13, 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WESTCONSIN CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff vs. DAVID L. DRINKWINE, BRENDA L. DRINKWINE, Defendants. Case No. 11CV38 Code: 30404 Foreclosure of Mortgage NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of a Judgment of foreclosure and sale rendered in the above-entitled action on June 30, 2011, in the amount of $277,437.08, the undersigned Sheriff of Polk County, Wisconsin, will sell at public auction at the front entrance of the Polk County Courthouse in the City of Balsam Lake, in said County, on the 7th day of September, 2011, at 10 a.m., the real estate and mortgaged premises directed by the judgment to be sold, therein described as follows: Lot 1 of CSM #3324, recorded in Volume 15 of CSM, on page 91, as Document #610025 located in part of the SE 1/4 of the SE 1/4 of Section 26, Township 33 North, Range 17 West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin, except land deeded to Polk County, Wisconsin, in Volume 217 of records on page 344 as Document #293053. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 707 130th Street, Amery, Wis. TERMS OF SALE: Cash. DOWN PAYMENT: A deposit of 10% of sale price to be deposited in cash or by certified check with the Sheriff at the time of sale; balance to be paid by cash or certified check upon confirmation of sale. Dated this 7th day of July, 2011. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Attorney Christine A. Gimber WELD, RILEY, PRENN & RICCI, S.C. 3624 Oakwood Hills Parkway P.O. Box 1030 Eau Claire, WI 54702-1030 715-839-7786 Attorneys for Plaintiff This is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

UNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT

1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North Balsam Lake, WI 54810-7267 Phone: 715-825-3515 Fax: 715-825-3517 www.unity.k12.wi.us

C-SQUAD VOLLEYBALL, C-SQUAD BOYS BASKETBALL, AND JV GIRLS BASKETBALL Qualifications Necessary: Qualified applicants of high character should possess a high level of sports knowledge, high school or college playing and/or coaching experience, and a strong desire to develop and motivate student-athletes while working effectively within a high school environment. Strong organizational and communication skills are necessary. Applications may be obtained from the District Office, 715825-3515 or on the District Web site, www.unity.k12.wi.us. Qualified, interested persons should apply by sending/faxing a letter of application, District application, resume, transcripts and reference letters to: Brandon W. Robinson, District Administrator Unity School District 1908 150th Street/Hwy. 46 North Balsam Lake, WI 54810-7267 EOE 543372 41-42a,d 52-1L

543272 41d 52L

543572 52L

Submit them to:

Lynette Larson, Food Service Supervisor St. Croix Falls School District P.O. Box 130 740 Maple Dr. St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 Fax: 715-483-3695 By August 19, 2011.

(July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff Vs JUDITH AAMOLD, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 09 CV 256 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on July 1, 2009, in the amount of $135,172.36, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: Sept. 8, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: The following described real property situate in the County of Polk, and State of Wisconsin, to wit: Part of the Southwest One-Quarter of the Northwest One-Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4), Section Thirty (30), Township Thirty Five (35) North, Range Eighteen (18) West, described as follows: Commencing at the West One-Quarter corner of said Section 30, thence East along the South line of said SW 1/4 of NW 1/4 115.40 feet; thence leaving said South line North 01 Degrees 41’ 22” West along the Southerly extension of the Easterly right of way of State Highway No. 87 and along said Easterly right of way a distance of 898.89 feet to the point of beginning, thence leaving said right of way South 89 degrees 32’ 41” east 425.41 feet, thence North 00 degree 38’ 07” East, 401.9 feet, more or less, to the North line of said SW 1/4 of NW 1/4, thence Westerly along said North line 441.73 feet, more or less to said Easterly right of way of STATE Highway No. 87, thence South 01 degree 41’ 22” East along said Easterly right of way 402.2 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning, containing four acres, more or less, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1976 State Road 87, Saint Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 020-007570001. Dated this 14th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274397

(July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the action of Jackson County Bank v. Tracy L. Songetay et al, Polk County Case No. 10CV511, I will sell at public auction in the foyer area Polk Co. Justice Center, 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin, on Wednesday, September 7, 2011, at 10 a.m. the following described premises, located in Polk County, Wisconsin: Lot 6, Block 2, Bretl Addition, City of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. Property Address: 406 North Day Road, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024. Notice is further given that the successful purchaser will be responsible for the lien of real estate taxes, for the municipal charges, if any, the Wisconsin real estate transfer fee and is responsible for obtaining possession of the property, which is sold “as is.” TERMS OF SALE: Cash with 10% to be paid at time of sale. /s/ Sheriff Peter M. Johnson Polk County, Wisconsin James Flory Wiley Law, S.C. P.O. Box 629 Eau Claire, WI 54702-0629 Phone: (715) 835-6171

541481 WNAXLP

The Monthly Board Meeting Will Be Held Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2011, At 7:30 p.m., At The Cushing Community Center.

WNAXLP

TOWN OF LAKETOWN

BIDS

We need Bread Bids for Whole Grain Wheat and White Hamburger Buns, Hot Dog Buns, White and Wheat Bread.

541494 WNAXLP

NOTICE

(July 20, 27, August 3, 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY AnchorBank, fsb, Plaintiff, vs. Kipp A. Peckman, Victoria J. Peckman, Wesley Duane Hendrickson, Capital One Bank USA, Duane Gurtner, Marilyn Gurtner and Unknown Tenants, Defendants, The RiverBank, Added Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Case No: 10 CV 729 Case Code: 30404 Judge: R.H. Rasmussen PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure entered March 1, 2011, in the amount of $403,230.62, the Polk County Sheriff will sell the described property at public auction as follows: TIME: Sept. 8, 2011, at 10 a.m. PLACE: Foyer Area, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 West Main St., Suite 900, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. TERMS: 10% of successful bid must be paid to the Sheriff at sale in cash or by certified check. Balance due within 10 days of court approval. Purchaser is responsible for payment of all transfer taxes and recording fees. Sale is AS IS in all respects and subject to all liens and encumbrances. DESCRIPTIONS: Lot 7, Plat of Oak Hills Estates, Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis. Lot 8, Plat of Oak Hills Estates, Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis. Lot 15, Plat of Oak Hills Estates, Village of Balsam Lake, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESSES: 107 Vadnais Lane, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. 111 Vadnais Lane, Balsam Lake, WI 54810 120 Vadnais Lane, Balsam Lake, WI 54810. /s/ Peter M. Johnson Polk County Sheriff Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are required to state that we are attempting to collect a debt on our client’s behalf and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose. If you are currently in bankruptcy or have been discharged in bankruptcy, this letter is not an attempt to collect the debt from you personally. This letter serves only as notice of the commencement of a legal proceeding as required by the loan documents, state law and/ or federal law. ECKBERG, LAMMERS, BRIGGS, WOLFF & VIERLING, P.L.L.P. Nicholas J. Vivian (#1047165) 430 Second Street Hudson, WI 54016 (715) 386-3733 Attorneys for Plaintiff

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Notices

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF LUCK REGULAR BOARD MEETING Monday, August 22, 2011, 6 p.m. Boardroom

AGENDA 1. Call to order and seek approval of the agenda, Robert Clifton 2. Consideration of previous minutes, LeRoy Buck 3. Presentation of Vouchers, Amy Dueholm 4. Treasurer’s Report, Amy Dueholm 5. Recognition of Guests or Delegates A. Student Representation 6. Administrative Reports A. Mr. Palmer B. Mr. Gobler C. Mrs. Goldbach 7. New Business A. Recommendation to raise lunch and breakfast prices by .10 for 2011 - 12. B. Action by Board to designate portions of fund 72 as nonspendable and committed. C. First reading of employee “Grievance Procedure” that will become a portion of the new Employee Handbook. D. Shared service agreement with Frederic. E. Second reading of Grading and RTI Policy for 7 - 12 grades. F. Approve WIAA addition to Extracurricular Policy. G. Recommendation for elementary special education teacher. H. Any other business that may properly come before the Board. 8. Motion to convene into a joint session with the Village Board for discussion about a future road to bypass the heavy traffic past the school. No action to be taken. Approximately 6:45 p.m. 9. Motion to adjourn. 543643 52L

SCHOOL DISTRICT OF ST. CROIX FALLS NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH & BREAKFAST PROGRAMS & SPECIAL MILK PROGRAM

The School District of St. Croix Falls today announced its policy for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. Each school office and the central office has a copy of the policy, which may be reviewed by any interested party. The following household size and income criteria will be used for determining eligibility. Children from families whose annual income is at or below the levels shown are eligible for free and reduced price meals. FAMILY SIZE INCOME SCALE For Determining Eligibility for Free and Reduced Price Meals or Milk

Family

(Household) Size

ANNUAL INCOME LEVEL Free Reduced Price

Must be at or below figure listed

Must be at or between figures listed

MONTHLY INCOME LEVEL Free Reduced Price

Must be at or below figure listed

Must be at or between figures listed

1 $14,157 $14,157.01 & $20,147 $1,180 $1,180.01 & $1,679 2 19,123 19,123.01 & 27,214 1,594 1,594.01 & 2,268 3 24,089 24,089.01 & 34,281 2,008 2,008.01 & 2,857 4 29,055 29,055.01 & 41,348 2,422 2,422.01 & 3,446 5 34,021 34,021.01 & 48,415 2,836 2,836.01 & 4,035 6 38,987 38,987.01 & 55,482 3,249 3,249.01 & 4,624 7 43,953 43,953.01 & 62,549 3,663 3,663.01 & 5,213 8 48,919 48,919.01 & 69,616 4,077 4,077.01 & 5,802 For each additional household member, add +4,966 +4,966 & +7,067 +414 +414 & +589 Application forms are being sent to all homes with a notice to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced price meals or free milk, households must fill out the application and return it to the school (unless notified at the start of the school year that children are eligible through direct certification). Additional copies are available at the office in each school. The information provided on the application will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by agency or other program officials. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year. To obtain free or reduced price meals or free milk for children in a household where one or more household members receive FoodShare, FDPIR or Wisconsin Works (W-2) cash benefits, list the household member and the FoodShare, FDPIR or W-2 case number, list the names of all schoolchildren, sign the application and return it to the school office. For the school officials to determine eligibility for free or reduced price meals or free milk of households not receiving FoodShare, FDPIR or W-2 cash benefits, the household must provide the following information requested on the application: names of all household members and the Social Security number of the adult household member who signs the application. In lieu of a Social Security number, the household may indicate that the signer does not possess a Social Security number. Also, the income received by each household member must be provided by amount and source (wages, welfare, child support, etc.). Under the provisions of the free and reduced meal and free milk policy, the Food Service Coordinator will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of the official, he/she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis. If the parent/guardian wishes to make a formal appeal, he/she may make a request either orally or in writing to: Glenn Martin, District Administrator, P.O. Box 130, St. Croix Falls, WI 54024, 715-463-2507, ext. 1401. If a hearing is needed to appeal the decision, the policy contains an outline of the hearing procedure. If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the family should contact the school. Such changes may make the household eligible for reduced price meals or free meals or free milk if the household income falls at or below the levels shown above, and they may reapply at that time. Children formally placed in foster care are also eligible for free meal benefits. Foster children may be certified without a household application. Households with foster children and nonfoster children may choose to include the foster child as a household member, as well as any personal income available to the foster child, on the same application that includes their nonfoster children. The information provided by the household on the application is confidential. Public Law 103-448 limits the release of student free and reduced price school meal eligibility status to persons directly connected with the administration and enforcement of federal or state educational programs. Consent of the parent/guardian is needed for other purposes such as waiver of textbook fees. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call toll-free 866-632-9992 (Voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at 800-877-8339; or 800-845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Any questions regarding the application should be directed to the determining official. 543579 52L WNAXLP

PAGE 24 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

Notices/Employment Opportunities (Aug. 3, 10, 17)

Our File: 1294603 THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, To each person named above as Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The complaint, which is also served upon you, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within 40 days after August 4, 2011, you must respond with a written answer, as that term is used in chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the complaint. The court may reject or disregard an answer that does not follow the requirements of the statutes. The answer must be sent or delivered to the court whose address is 1005 W. Main Street, Suite 300, Balsam Lake WI 54810-4410 and to Rausch, Sturm, Israel, Enerson & Hornik, LLC, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is shown below. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not provide a proper answer to the complaint or provide a written demand for said complaint within the 40-day period, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated: July 8, 2011. /s/ Brandon E. Bowlin Rausch, Sturm, Israel, Enerson & Hornik LLC Attorneys in the Practice of Debt Collection 250 N. Sunnyslope Rd. Suite 300 Brookfield, WI 53005 Toll-Free: (877) 667-8010 Attorney for the Plaintiff

HELP WANTED Cushing

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Now Hiring Part-Time Sales Associate

This position includes afternoons, evenings and weekends. Must 543082 51Ltfc 41atfc be 18, apply in person at the store. EOE

The McKinley Town Board will hold a public hearing to receive comments from interested citizens and community agencies regarding the proposed amendment of the current Town of McKinley Comprehensive Plan from 40 acres Rural Preservation to 20 acres. The public hearing will be held on Tuesday, September 20, 2011, at 7 p.m. at the McKinley Town Hall. Additional information related to the proposed amendment as well as viewing a copy of the current Comprehensive Plan can be obtained by contacting: Mark Renstrom, Chairman 175 State Highway 48 Cumberland, WI 54829 Telephone: 715-822-3762 543588 52L WNAXLP

543327 52L 42a

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING - VILLAGE FLOODPLAIN ORDINANCE VILLAGE OF FREDERIC

PUBIC NOTICE is given to all persons in the Village of Frederic that a public hearing will be held on Tuesday, August 30, 2011, at 6:30 p.m. to solicit comments on proposed floodplain (zoning ordinance and/or map) revisions that are required by state and federal law. These revisions govern development in mapped floodplain areas. The proposed (ordinance/map) revisions are on file in the office of the Village Clerk. The proposed regulations are intended to protect life, health and property in floodplain areas and will govern uses permitted in mapped floodplains. Activities such as dredging, filling, excavating and construction of buildings are generally allowed, but may be restricted according to which flood zone the property is in. A copy of the proposed ordinance will be on file and open for public inspection in the office of the Village Clerk for a period of two weeks prior to this public hearing. All persons interested are invited to attend this hearing and be heard. Written comments may be submitted to: Village of Frederic Planning & Zoning Commission, 542802 51-52L WNAXLP William Johnson, IV, Chair

(July 13, 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY WILSHIRE CREDIT CORPORATION, AS SERVICER FOR U.S. BANK, NA, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, NA, AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK, NA, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2006-RM4 Plaintiff vs. CHRISTINE A. SIMONSON, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 09 CV 946 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on February 18, 2010, in the amount of $185,761.73, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 1, 2011. at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 25, Croixwood, in the City of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin. ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Lot 25, Croixwood, “A Planned Unit Development,” City of St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wis. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1326 East Aspen Drive, Saint Croix Falls, WI 54024. TAX KEY NO.: 281-01380-2500 Dated this 7th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Scott D. Nabke State Bar #1037979 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 273954

541004 WNAXLP

Money Judgment: 30301

(July 13, 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS, CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2007-18CB MORTGAGE-PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-18CB Plaintiff vs. RONALD JAMES SANOSKI JR., et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 08 CV 687 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 5, 2009, in the amount of $253,098.32, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 31, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: The South Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (S1/2 of NW1/4 of NW1/4), Section 24, Township 33 North, Range 18 West, Town of Garfield, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 882 190th St., Dresser, WI 54009. TAX KEY NO.: 024-00853-0100 Dated this 7th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 273899

541005 WNAXLP

Case No. 11CV337 AMENDED SUMMONS

(July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWMBS, 2004-12 Plaintiff vs. INPONG LUANGRATH, et al. Defendant(s) AMENDED NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 237 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on May 7, 2010, in the amount of $256,916.08, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 31, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot One (1) of Certified Survey Map No. 1753 recorded in Volume 8 of Certified Survey Maps on Page 101 as Document No. 523410, being a part of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest (SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4) of Section Twenty-Two (22), Township Thirty-Two (32) North of Range Nineteen (19) West, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 272 270th St., Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 022-00533-0100 Dated this 14th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274422

541640 WNAXLP

CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N.A. 701 E. 60TH ST. NORTH SIOUX FALLS, SD 57117 Plaintiff, vs. LINDA WELCH 175 230TH AVE. COMSTOCK, WI 54826-6421 Defendant(s).

(July 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. DANIEL R. JOHNSON, et al Defendant(s) Case Number: 10 CV 403 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on July 21, 2010, in the amount of $99,977.47, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 13, 2011, at 10 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Part of the Southeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, Section 28, Township 35 North, Range 18 West, described as follows: Commencing at the Southeast corner of the Southeast 1/4 of Southwest 1/4, Section 28-3518, thence North along the forty line 300 feet; thence West parallel to the South line of said forty 500 feet; thence South parallel to the East line of said forty to the South line of said forty; thence East to the point of beginning, in the Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2155 190th Avenue, Centuria, WI 54824. TAX KEY NO.: 020-00721-0000. Dated this 10th day of May, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Marie M. Flannery State Bar #1045309 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 270718

541861 WNAXLP

STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY

542238 WNAXLP

543004 WNAXLP

(Aug. 10, 17, 24) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT CIVIL DIVISION POLK COUNTY State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company One State Farm Plaza Bloomington, IL 61701 Plaintiff, vs. Charles D. Bloom 1882 220th St. Centuria, WI 54824 Donald A. Carlson 800 8th St. Centuria, WI 54824, Defendants. Case No.: 11-CV-376 Case Code: 30201 Publication Summons THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO: Each person named above as a defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the above named plaintiff has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. Within forty-five (45) days after August 11, 2011, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is Polk County Courthouse, 1005 W. Main St., Ste. 300, PO Box 549, Balsam Lake, WI 54810, and to Deutch & Weiss, LLC., attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is: 7670 North Port Washington Road, Suite 200, Glendale, Wisconsin 53217. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within forty five (45) days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you now own or may own in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Dated this 3rd day of August, 2011. Deutch & Weiss, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff, State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company Monte E. Weiss State Bar No. 1003816 Charles W. Kramer State Bar No.: 1021504 P.O. Address: Deutch & Weiss, LLC 7670 N. Port Washington Road Suite 200 Milwaukee, WI 53217 (414) 247-9958 - Telephone (414) 247-9959 - Facsimile

HELP WANTED Full-time Experienced Equipment Operator CDL required. Applications or resumes to:

U.B.P.

1514 190th Ave., Balsam Lake, WI 54810 Applications Available

543390 41d 52L

NOTICE OF HEARING

The Polk County Board of Adjustment will hold a public hearing at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, August 30, 2011, at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. The board will call the public hearing to order at 8:30 a.m., recess at 8:45 a.m. to view each site and will reconvene at 10 a.m. at the Government Center in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. At that time each applicant will inform the Board of their request. (THE APPLICANT MUST APPEAR AT 10:00 A.M. WHEN THE BOARD RECONVENES AT THE GOVERNMENT CENTER.) DAVID NORDGAARD requests a Special Exception from Article 8D7 of the Polk County Shoreland Protection Zoning Ordinance and Sec. VIA3 of the Polk County Comprehensive Land Use Ordinance to expand existing travel trailer park which will add 23 travel trailer units and 6 yurt rental sites. This is a continuation from July 5, 2011, hearing date. Property affected is: 1977A Polk-Barron St., Pt. of Gov’t. Lot 1+ 2, Sec. 25/T35N/R15W, Town of Johnstown, Staples Lake 543148 51-52L 41a,d WNAXLP (class 3).

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 25

543262 WNAXLP

NOTICE OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Grantsburg School District August 12, 2011

Job Title:

Head High School Custodian with District Duties. 100% FTE Qualifications: High School Diploma or equivalent (Preference given to those with school maintenance and supervisory skills). Requirements: Knowledge of building maintenance and operations, HVAC and boiler experience and general maintenance ability is preferred. The candidate should have the ability to negotiate best prices for district purchasing of supplies and equipment. Willing to work as a team and having social skills with students/staff is a required attribute. Having proof of a stable work history will be essential. Responsibilities include daily cleaning and maintenance of the interior and exterior of the building and grounds. Position requires experience with utilizing custodial equipment to perform duties, such as: Stripping and resurfacing floors, dry mopping, vacuuming, dusting, cleaning rest rooms, snow removal and ability to stand for extended periods of time and safely lift 65 lbs. Ability to follow written and verbal instructions and work independently is critical. We desire a candidate who will develop job skills as needed to adapt to change. How to apply: Send letter of application, resume, credentials (three current letters of recommendation and transcripts) and a copy of license by August 31, 2011. Contact: Stan Marczak, Principal Grantsburg High School 480 East James Ave. Grantsburg, WI 54840 715-463-2531 The School District of Grantsburg is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, 543622 52-1L color, national origin, sex, religion or handicap.

542389 WNAXLP

(July 13, 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. AS SERVICER FOR DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2006HE6, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE6 Plaintiff vs. MELISSA C. KRUGER, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 46 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 28, 2010, in the amount of $125,407.82, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: August 31, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 12 of Block 2 of Horsmann’s First Addition to Village of Dresser, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 379 Horsmann Avenue South, Dresser, WI 54009. TAX KEY NO.: 116-00241-0000. Dated this 7th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Christina E. Demakopoulos State Bar #1066197 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 273940

540995 WNAXLP

541003 WNAXLP

(Aug. 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. RICK BOGAN, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 11 CV 35 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 30, 2011, in the amount of $300,002.89, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 6, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 505, recorded in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps, on Page 234, as Document No. 385464, being located in the West 1/2 of the Southeast 1/4 of Section 1, Township 32 North, Range 18 West; also, a nonexclusive easement for ingress and egress in common with grantors, their heirs, personal representatives and assigns over and across that part of the East 33 feet of the East 1/2 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 1, Township 32 North, Range 18, bounded on the North by the South line of the Plat of Round Lake Beach; bounded on the South by a line parallel with and 511.53 feet South of said North line. (It is intended that the East end of said North line shall be the Northwest corner of Lot 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 505, as recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Polk County, Wisconsin, in Volume 2 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 234, as Document No. 385464. It is further intended that the East end of said South line shall be the Southwest corner of Lot 4 of said Certified Survey Map, Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel 2: Lot 5 of Certified Survey Map No. 3660 recorded in Volume 16 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 173, as Document No. 630537, located in the Northeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 1, Township 32 North, Range 18 West, in the Town of Alden, Polk County, Wisconsin. Together with an access easement as shown in Certified Survey Map No. 3660 recorded in Volume 16 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 173, as Document No. 630537. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 534 Round Lake Court, Osceola, WI 54020. TAX KEY NO.: 002-01017-0000 & 002-00999-0000. Dated this 28th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Annie M. Schumacher State Bar # 1074726 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 275164

(July 13, 20, 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. MARC R. COCHERELL, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE Case Number: 10 CV 63 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on April 26, 2010, in the amount of $121,427.76, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 1, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 1186, recorded in Volume 6 of Certified Survey Maps, on Page 2, as Document No. 449416, located in the Northwest 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 22, Township 35 North, Range 17 West, Town of Milltown, Polk County, Wisconsin. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2036 150th Street, Milltown, WI 54858. TAX KEY NO.: 040-00596-0000. Dated this 7th day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Chaz M. Rodriguez State Bar #1063071 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 273936

(Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF SHIRLEY M. MONSON Notice to Creditors (Informal Administration) Case No. 11 PR 55 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: 1. An application for informal administration was filed. 2. The decedent, with date of birth November 21, 1926, and date of death March 26, 2011, was domiciled in Polk County, State of Wisconsin, with a mailing address of 472 95th St., Clear Lake, WI 54005. 3. All interested persons waived notice. 4. The deadline for filing a claim against the decedent’s estate is November 4, 2011. 5. A claim may be filed at the Polk County Courthouse Balsam Lake, Wis., Room 500. Jenell L. Anderson Probate Registrar July 25, 2011 Robert J. Richardson Bakke Norman, S.C. 990 Main St., Suite 200 Box 54 Baldwin, WI 54002 715-684-4545 Bar No. 1010382

(Aug. 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY ANCHORBANK, FSB Plaintiff vs. DAVID M. SWENSON, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 10 CV 388 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 13, 2010, in the amount of $66,923.11, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 4, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Parcel 1: The Southeast 1/4 of the Southwest 1/4, Section 20, Township 36 North, Range 16 West, Town of Bone Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin. Parcel II: The Southwest 1/4 of the Southeast 1/4, Section 20, Township 36 North, Range 16 West, Town of Bone Lake, Polk County, Wisconsin; EXCEPT Lot 1 of Certified Survey Map No. 2163, recorded in Volume 10 of Certified Survey Maps, Page 87, as Document No. 553225 and EXCEPT Lots 1, 2, 3, and the Access Road of Certified Survey Map No. 526, recorded in Volume 3, of Certified Survey Maps, Page 18, as Document No. 386179. Also EXCEPTING parcel described in Volume 408, Page 645, as Document No. 386378. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1043 St. Rd. 48, Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 012-00417-0000 and 012-00420-0000. Dated this 22nd day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274731

543670 WNAXLP

Notices/Employment Opportunities

POLK COUNTY POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT GOLDEN AGE MANOR

LPN - Part Time (.6) Benefit qualifying position 10:30 p.m. to 6:45 a.m. Deadline to apply: Aug. 22, 2011

$19.89/hr. plus $1 shift differential

Laundry Aide - Limited Part time With casual in housekeeping Deadline to apply: Aug. 19, 2011

$11.02/hr.

CNAs - Part Time 6:30 a.m. - 2:30 a.m. 2:30 - 9/10:30 p.m. Deadline to apply: Aug. 25, 2011

$12.92/hr. $13.32/hr.

YOU MUST COMPLETE OUR POLK COUNTY EMPLOYMENT APPLICATION TO BE ELIGIBLE. For applications, complete job description & qualifications, please visit our Web site at www.co.polk.wi.us, Employee Opportunities, or in person at 100 Polk County Plaza, #229, Balsam Lake, WI, 715-485-9176 or GAM, 220 Scholl Ct., Amery, WI, 715-268-7107. 543549 52L AA/EEOC

FREDERIC BOARD OF EDUCATION Regular Meeting, Monday, July 18, 2011

The President, Mr. Nelson, called the regular meeting of the Frederic School Board of Education to order at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, July 18, 2011, in the 6 - 12 School Library. Board members present: Mrs. Amundson, Mr. Engen, Mr. Holicky, Mrs. Matz and Mr. Nelson. Administration present: Mr. Draxler, Mr. Robinson and Mr. Tischer. Mrs. Steen arrived at 6:35 p.m. Motion Matz/Holicky to approve that the meeting was properly noticed. Handbooks were added to the agenda at item #6E. Motion carried 5 - 0. Public in attendance were Elizabeth Johnson, Kindergarten Teacher, and the press. Motion Matz/Holicky to approve the 6-20-11 regular meeting minutes. Motion arrived 5 - 0. Mr. Nelson provided a summary of the closed session of the 6-20-11. Motion Matz/Engen to approve the minutes to the closed sessions held on 5-16-2011, and 5-24-2011. Motion carried 5 - 0. The invoices for June 2011 were presented as follows: Regular invoices (#9582-9622 & 3596-28597).......$379,659.02 Payroll account.......................................................$247,188.67 Motion Amundson/Holicky to authorize and confirm the money payments of the invoices presented. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Engen presented the receipts for June 2011 totaling $755,200.99. Mr. Tischer reviewed the 2010 - 2011 budget. Mr. Holicky will be attending the CESA in August. Mr. Tischer presented the district report. Mr. Draxler presented the 7 - 12 school report. Mrs. Steen presented the Elementary School report. The building and grounds and food services submitted reports. Mr. Twister presented the 2011 - 2012 budget. Motion Amundson/Engen to approve the contracts for Bonnie-Lou Musial, First Grade Teacher; Elizabeth Johnson, Kindergarten Teacher; and Josh Robinston, 6 - 12 Principal. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Engen to accept the resignation of Mr. Draxler, 7 - 12 Principal, with thanks for many years of service to the district. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Engen to approve administrative contracts as printed with an opener for future discussion on wages and benefits. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Matz to approve the audit contract. Motion carried 5 - 0. Mr. Tischer presented the options on the chiller for the elementary school building. Motion Engen/Matz to accept option 2, Johnson Controls. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Engen to approve the resolution to exceed the revenue limit. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Amundson/Holicky to accept a donation to the FFA. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Amundson/Matz to approve the 2011 - 2012 handbooks for the faculty and 6 - 12, 4K - 5 students. Motion carried. Mr. Nelson announced to members of the Board that they should consider adjourning to closed session for the purpose of administrators and district office, new staff and negotiations. Mr. Nelson informed the Board the closed session would be proper and is authorized by s. 19.85 (1) (c) (f) (i) of the WI Statutes. Motion Matz/Engen to adjourn into closed session. Vote by roll call was unanimous to convene in closed session and the motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 7:40 p.m. The regular meeting reconvened at 9:05 p.m. Motion Holicky/Amundson to approve Billy Struck as a volunteer football assistant. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Amundson to approve Ryan Lind for the Jr. High football coach. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Holicky/Matz to approve Megan Carlson as .75 math teacher and assistant volleyball coach. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Engen/Amundson to approve Deb Long, pending background check, as dance line coach. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Amundson/Engen to accept contract 66.30 with Luck for Spanish teacher Chelsey Drohman. Motion carried 5 - 0. Motion Matz/Amundson to adjourn. Motion carried 5 - 0. Time: 9:25 p.m. 543662 52L Rebecca Amundson, Clerk

PAGE 26 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

The School District of Siren today announced its policy for children unable to pay the full price of meals served under the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program. Each school office and the central office has a copy of the policy, which may be reviewed by any interested party. The following household size and income criteria will be used for determining eligibility. Children from families whose annual income is at or below the levels shown are eligible for free and reduced price meals. FAMILY SIZE INCOME SCALE For Determining Eligibility for Free and Reduced Price Meals

Family

(Household) Size

ANNUAL INCOME LEVEL Free Reduced Price

Must be at or below figure listed

1 $14,157 2 19,123 3 24,089 4 29,055 5 34,021 6 38,987 7 43,953 8 48,919 For each additional household member, add +4,966

Must be at or between figures listed

$14,157.01 & 19,123.01 & 24,089.01 & 29,055.01 & 34,021.01 & 38,987.01 & 43,953.01 & 48,919.01 &

MONTHLY INCOME LEVEL Free Reduced Price

Must be at or below figure listed

Must be at or between figures listed

$20,147 27,214 34,281 41,348 48,415 55,482 62,549 69,616

$1,180 1,594 2,008 2,422 2,836 3,249 3,663 4,077

$1,180.01 & 1,594.01 & 2,008.01 & 2,422.01 & 2,836.01 & 3,249.01 & 3,663.01 & 4,077.01 &

$1,679 2,268 2,857 3,446 4,035 4,624 5,213 5,802

+4,966 & +7,067

+414

+414 &

+589

Application forms are being sent to all homes with a notice to parents or guardians. To apply for free or reduced price meals, households must fill out the application and return it to the school (unless notified at the start of the school year that children are eligible through direct certification). Additional copies are available at the principal’s office and the food service office. The information provided on the application will be used for the purpose of determining eligibility and may be verified at any time during the school year by school or other program officials. Applications may be submitted at any time during the year. To obtain free or reduced price meals for children in a household where one or more household members receive FoodShare, FDPIR or Wisconsin Works (W-2) cash benefits, list the household member and the FoodShare, FDPIR or W-2 case number, list the names of all schoolchildren, sign the application and return it to the school office. For the school officials to determine eligibility for free or reduced price meals of households not receiving FoodShare, FDPIR or W-2 cash benefits, the household must provide the following information requested on the application: names of all household members and the Social Security number of the adult household member who signs the application. In lieu of a Social Security number, the household may indicate that the signer does not possess a Social Security number. Also, the income received by each household member must be provided by amount and source (wages, welfare, child support, etc.). Under the provisions of the free and reduced price meal policy, Deborah Jaskolka, Food Service Manager, will review applications and determine eligibility. If a parent or guardian is dissatisfied with the ruling of the official, he/she may wish to discuss the decision with the determining official on an informal basis. If the parent/guardian wishes to make a formal appeal, he/she may make a request either orally or in writing to: Mr. Scott Johnson, District Administrator, Siren School, 24022 4th Ave., Siren, WI 54872. If a hearing is needed to appeal the decision, the policy contains an outline of the hearing procedure. If a household member becomes unemployed or if the household size changes, the family should contact the school. Such changes may make the household eligible for reduced price meals or free meals if the household income falls at or below the levels shown above, and they may reapply at that time. Children formally placed in foster care are also eligible for free meal benefits. Foster children may be certified as eligible without a household application. Households with foster children and nonfoster children may choose to include the foster child as a household member, as well as any personal income available to the foster child, on the same application that includes their nonfoster children. The information provided by the household on the application is confidential. Public Law 103-448 limits the release of student free and reduced price school meal eligibility status to persons directly connected with the administration and enforcement of federal or state educational programs. Consent of the parent/guardian is need for other purposes such as waiver of textbook fees. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination write USDA, Director, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410 or call toll-free 866-632-9992 (voice). Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Frederal Relay Service at 800-877-8339; or 800-845-6136 (Spanish). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Any questions regarding the application should be directed to the determining official. The School Distract of Siren is an equal opportunity employer/educator and does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, sex, age, nation origin or handicap. 543644 52L WNAXLP

Notice is hereby given; that a Special Town Meeting of the Town of Eureka, Polk County, Wis., will be held at the Eureka Town Hall on Aug. 23, 2011, at 6 p.m., for the purpose of information on possible uses of Town funds, possible decision of equipment purchase, or purchase of New Town Hall. 542782 51-52L 41-42a,d

(Aug. 3, 10, 17) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY Bremer Bank, N.A., a national banking association, 8555 Eagle Point Boulevard P.O. Box 1000 Lake Elmo, Minnesota 55042, Plaintiff, vs. Debbie K. Nahkala 307 Woodlawn Avenue Frederic, Wisconsin 54837, Defendant. Case Type: 30301 Case No.: 11CV427 PUBLICATION SUMMONS THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO DEFENDANT, DEBBIE K. NAHKALA: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff above-named has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. WITHIN forty (40) days after August 3, 2011, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Complaint. The demand must be sent or delivered to the Polk County Clerk of Court, Polk County Justice Center, whose address is 1005 West Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin 54810, and to Plaintiff’s attorneys, Anastasi & Associates, P.A., whose address is 14985 60th Street North, Stillwater, Minnesota 55082. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Complaint within forty (40) days, the Court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or may in the future and may also be enforced or garnishment or seizure of property. We, the undersigned, Anastasi & Associates, P.A., on behalf of Plaintiff, Bremer Bank, N.A., a national banking association, are attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained from you will be used for purposes of collecting that debt. If you notify Anastasi & Associates, P.A. within thirty (30) days that you dispute the validity of this debt or any portion of it, we will obtain verification of the debt and send it to you. If you do not contact us, we will assume the debt to be valid in its entirety. In addition, if requested by you within the thirty (30) day period, we will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor. Federal law does not require us to wait until the end of the thirty (30) day period before suing you to collect this debt. However, if you request proof of the debt or the name and address of the original creditor within the thirty (30) day period that begins with your receipt of this Summons, Federal law requires us to suspend our efforts under this legal action to collect the debt until we mail the requested information to you. Dated: July 21, 2011. ANASTASI & ASSOCIATES, P.A. Garth G. Gavenda, #1079588 David C. Anastasi, #1027144 14985 60th Street North Stillwater, MN 55082 Telephone: 651-439-2951 Attorneys for Plaintiff #15726

(Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff vs. LEON E. MEWHORTER, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 10 CV 354 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on September 30, 2010, in the amount of $191,817.76, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: September 21, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wisconsin. DESCRIPTION: Lots 1 and 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 4468 filed on May 19, 2004, in Volume 20, Page 20, as Document No. 680274, being a part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 26, Township 36 North, Range 17 West, in the Town of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin. ALSO DESCRIBED AS: Part of the Northwest 1/4 of the Northwest 1/4, Section 26, Township 36 North, Range 17 West, Town of Luck, Polk County, Wisconsin, described as Lots 1 and 2 of Certified Survey Map No. 4468 filed in Volume 20, Page 20, as Document No. 680274. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1382 and 1382-A State Rd. 48, Luck, WI 54853. TAX KEY NO.: 036-00614-0100 & 036-00614-0200 Dated this 21st day of July, 2011. Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Russell J. Karnes State Bar #1054982 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274840

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SCHOOL DISTRICT OF SIREN NATIONAL SCHOOL LUNCH & BREAKFAST PROGRAMS

Tues., Aug. 23, 2011, 6 p.m. at the Town Hall

(Aug. 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 21) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT POLK COUNTY BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P,. AS SERVICER FOR THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS CWALT, INC. ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC7, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006OC7 Plaintiff vs. SAREE L. REINDAHL, et al. Defendant(s) Case Number: 11 CV 74 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on June 30, 2011, in the amount of $101,189.04, the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows: TIME: October 6, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money order at the time of sale; balance due within 10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to plaintiff. 2. Sold “as is” and subject to all legal liens and encumbrances. PLACE: Polk County Justice Center at 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis. DESCRIPTION: Part of GovernMent Lot 3, Section 31, Township 34 North, Range 15 West described as follows: Commencing at a Point on the West Line of said Section 31, Township 34 North, Range 15 West, 641.25 feet South of Northwest Corner of said Section 31, Township 34 North, Range 15 West, thence South 69 feet, thence East 175 feet, thence North 69 feet, thence West 175 feet to the place of beginning. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1286 60th Street, Amery, WI 54001. TAX KEY NO.: 008-00818-0000 Dated this 22nd day of July, 2011 Peter M. Johnson Sheriff of Polk County Annie M Schumacher State Bar # 1074726 Blommer Peterman, S.C. 165 Bishops Way Brookfield, WI 53005 262-790-5719 Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer Peterman, S.C., is the creditor’s attorney and is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf. Any information obtained will be used for the purpose. 274724

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• Line Cook • Prep Cook • Beverage Bar Wait Staff • Beverage Manager • Valet Staff • Hotel Desk Clerk

TOWN OF EUREKA SPECIAL TOWN MEETING

542301 WNAXLP

THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS ARE AVAILABLE:

NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION TO ALL CREDITORS AND CLAIMANTS OF VIEBROCK DEVELOPMENT, INC. We, the undersigned being all of the shareholders of Viebrock Development, Inc. for the purpose of dissolving the corporation pursuant to Wisconsin Statutes, Section 180.1407, do hereby give notice that: I. Dissolution of Viebrock Development, Inc. was duly authorized and approved in accordance with Wisconsin Statutes, Section 180.1402 on August 2, 2011. All claims must include the Claimants name, address, telephone number, description of and reason for claim and amount claimed. II. All claims must be in writing and mailed to Viebrock Development, Inc., c/o Bakke Norman, SC, Attn.: Adam M. Jarchow, P.O. Box 54, Baldwin, Wisconsin 54002. III. A claim against Viebrock Development, Inc. or its directors, officers or shareholders is barred unless a proceeding to enforce the claim is brought within two (2) years after the publication date of this notice. Dated: August 2, 2011 Viebrock Development, Inc. By: Gerald Viebrock Its: President 543548 52Lp

Employment/Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that there will be a public informational meeting on Monday, Aug. 29, 2011, at 6:30 p.m., in the Community Room, Polk County Justice Center, 1005 W. Main Street, Balsam Lake, Wis., to discuss natural hazard mitigation efforts. Polk County is in the process of updating the County’s Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan which is a prerequisite for certain FEMA grant funding. As part of the plan development process, the County is seeking input regarding the use of various activities to reduce or eliminate natural hazard risks to residents and property. A copy of the draft plan is available for review at the County Emergency Management Office at 1005 W. Main Street in Balsam Lake. County residents are encourage to attend. If you have any questions or need any additional information, please contact Kathy Poirier, Polk County Emergency Management Coordinator at 715-485-9280. Notice is hereby given that members of the County Board may be present at the foregoing meeting to gather information about a subject over which they have decision-making responsibility. This may constitute a meeting of the County Board, pursuant to State ex. rel. Badke v. Greendale Village Bd., 173 Wis. 2d.553, 494 N.W. 2d408 (1993), and must be noticed as such, although these governmental bodies will not take any formal action at this meeting. Kathy Poirier 543014 51-52L Polk County Emergency Management Coordinator

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - PAGE 27

Firefighters train for apartment rescues

Realizing the growing number of nursing and extended-care facilities in the village of Frederic, along with apartments for older citizens, Frederic Fire Chief Brian Daeffler arranged for a special fire drill Monday evening, Aug. 15, to simulate the evacuation and rescue of residents from one of those facilities, Comforts of Home, on Main Street. Frederic has two apartment complexes for senior citizens as well the Frederic Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and Comforts of Home, which is expanding soon. The drill simulated the rescue of five patients, along with the evacuation, plus locating and extinguishing a fire. Frederic and Luck ambulance personnel, units 974 and 975, also took part in the drill. Daeffler (shown above speaking into a portable radio microphone) held a meeting following the drill to discuss the challenges. “It was a learning experience,” Daeffler said. “There’s a lot of decisions that need to be made along the way – between saving people and putting out a fire - but we thought the drill went well.”

Comforts of Home, an assisted living and senior apartment living complex on Frederic’s Main Street, will soon be expanding. LEFT: Firefighter Mike Laqua guides a fire hose to fellow firefighters in the basement of Comforts of Home during Monday’s simulation. RIGHT: Firefighters Ken Hackett and Jeff Cummings were among 25 volunteer firefighters taking part in Monday’s drill. Photos by Gary King

LEFT: Comforts of Home House Manager Karen Olson and Supervisor Erik Kramer shared thoughts during a break from helping firefighters execute their rescue drill. RIGHT: Young bicyclists paused to take in the excitement from across the street. BELOW: Supervisor and cook Chris Haugen helped organize the relocation of residents to the village park behind Comforts of Home, as part of the drill.

PAGE 28 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NEWS SECTION - A - AUGUST 17, 2011

No sign/from page 19 an emotional Harer. “We just keep hoping. We still leave the door unlocked for Rose.” Harer says all she can do is to keep Bly in her thoughts and prayers and hopes others will, as well. She also wants people who have, or think they have, a lead to please call the sheriff’s department. “Some places have taken Bly’s poster down,” said Harer. “I want to keep the word out ... but I’m only one person.“

The other mysteries

While there has been quite a bit of attention placed on Bly’s disappearance, and rightfully so, there are other unsolved and missing-persons cases in Polk County, and they are equally frustrating to law enforcement. But one of those cases may have a new chapter in the coming months, as was revealed just last week.

Gary Bergstrand

Gary P. Bergstrand left his residence in Milltown on foot at approximately 9 a.m. on June 23, 2004. He was known to have walked on the Gandy Dancer Trail, but it is not known which direction he may have walked that morning. He was wearing a green sweatshirt and blue sweatpants when he was last seen. Bergstrand has not been seen nor heard from since that morning. In the days after his reported disappearance, there were several coordinated searches conducted, both by foot and by horseback. However, no clues were Bergstrand recovered, and there have been no reports or sightings since. Bergstrand literally disappeared completely. Originally, the case was handled by Milltown police, but was later transferred to the Polk County Sheriff’s Department, who has been handling all information since. “To be honest, we’ve never heard anything,” Sheriff Johnson said with a shrug. Previous investigators and law officials have been admittedly surprised that he has never been found or sighted since, especially with all the activity on the Gandy Dancer Trail in the years since, and with the amount of hunting that occurs in that area. According to investigators, Bergstrand was considered a vulnerable adult, and family members told police he was possibly suicidal. Bergstrand is a white male, 41 years old at the time, and would be 48 years old today. He is about 5 foot, 7 inches tall, 180 pounds with brown hair and eyes. He has several tattoos on his arms, including a heart with wings, one that said “Mom,” another of a cross and another that said “GNU.” He has several other tattoos but police do not know what they spelled. There has been no activity, sightings, calls, reports or contacts since that June morning, over seven years ago. It is unclear if he was abducted, was suicidal, lost or disappeared on purpose. But the questions on what happened to Bergstrand hang over his friends, family and law enforcement to this day.

her bones. “We have no idea how she died,” Polk County Sheriff Peter Johnson said. “And we don’t know who she is.” The Dresser Jane Doe is believed to have been a woman of combined Caucasian and African-American heritage, about 21 to 25 years old, and approximately 5 foot, 6 inches tall. She was discovered wearing blue/green Sears jeans (boys, size 14 slim), size 36A bra, a T-shirt, and red tennis shoes, size 7 to 7-1/2. Dental impressions were taken but have never matched any existing or reported missing person. Authorities performed a facial reconstruction (see photo) which was sent to every applicable agency and relevant clearinghouses, including all modern missing or search networks online, as well as with federal and state agencies. In almost 18 years, no match or name has ever been made. Johnson was highly involved in the early investigation of her remains at the time of her discovery, and several years back tried to get the case considered for further examination by a specialized federal task force that was trying to connect several reports of missing, unidentified females found near major thoroughfares. “We tried to submit the case to a task force looking into highway killings,” Johnson said. “But they said it was too far off (a major interstate).” Johnson poured over the case long after her discovery, and was quite sure there was more to it. “I really think it would appear to have been a transient type of case,” he said. “It’s one of those cases I would really like to see done and solved before I’m done.” He may get his wish. The Dresser Jane Doe case is getting some new traction, as Johnson said they have submitted the case for an extensive DNA extraction identification program being conducted through the University of North Texas at Denton and at Fort Worth, where their groundbreaking Center for Human Identification program has become a recognized national center, providing scientific and technical support to law enforcement agencies, medical examiners and crime labs throughout the country. The DNA extraction will be paid for through the president’s DNA initiative, which is meant to eliminate the current testing backlog of DNA samples and improve DNA laboratories’ testing capacities, research and also to enhance the development of DNA technology. The president’s initiative is part of a fiveyear program that is also meant to provide training and assistance for criminal justice professionals, access to post-conviction DNA testing and, in the case of the local unidentified Dresser Jane Doe remains, will expand the use of DNA for missingpersons cases and identifying human remains. Last year alone, over $64 million in fund-

The Dresser Jane Doe

It is admittedly one of the most puzzling, frustrating and bizarre cases in the region. It is also one of the few cases that may have a break in the near future, if we are lucky. The mystery of the Dresser Jane Doe goes back almost 18 years, when the skeletized remains of a woman were discovered by a hunter in a ditch on CTH F, near Trollhaugen, just east of Dresser on Nov. 20, 1993. Forensic investigation and medical examination of the Dresser Jane Doe remains put her date of death somewhere a few months earlier, likely in late July or early August 1993. However, that examination did not reveal the cause or manner of death, which could have been anything from strangulation to drowning, or any other means that did not directly damage

This is a composite rendering of what the Polk County Sheriff’s Department believes the “Jane Doe” found near Dresser in 1993 may have looked like. Her skeletal remains were discovered in a ditch near Trollhaugen. Recent federal grants may allow investigators a chance to have North Texas University do a cutting-edge DNA extraction for a match.

Rose Bly’s mother, Candus Harer, and her friend, Valetta Walton, stood in the flower garden they started after Bly disappeared. The garden has grown large and beautiful as more and more perennials were added as the weeks and months went by. “It’s a garden for Rose, so we planted perennials because they come back,” said an emotional Harer. “We just keep hoping. We still leave the door unlocked for Rose.” - Photo by Priscilla Bauer ing was provided through the National Institute of Justice for the initiative, to a total of 114 different agencies, programs or local research organizations, including the UNTCHI program, which has been a major benefactor. The initiative requires an annual report to the attorney general’s office on statistics, cases solved and other factors for the DNA backlog reduction program, which then presents that report to Congress for annual funding review. The program has had few, if any, critics, in spite of its costs, and is poised on expansion into even more missing-persons cases and unsolved mysteries, some of them going back even further than the woman found in Dresser. “I’m hoping we can get some closure on this,” Johnson said, noting that because he was an investigator when her bones first surfaced, and how he spent so much time on her case, it has always been a troubling unsolved question. The UNT-CHI program already has numerous success stories, including the prominent case of Douglas Prouty, and how his name was positively connected to bones discovered by hikers in Kentucky. The case of the found bones was called The Madison Man, and was originally labeled as unsolvable by state and federal authorities. The Madison Man case is remarkably similar to the Dresser Jane Doe case, as Prouty’s bones were discovered on Thanksgiving Day, 1993, - literally just a few days after the Dresser Jane Doe discovery. PCSD investigator Lisa Ditlefsen is confident that between the major advancements in technology, connectivity of databases, attention to research and the relative ease of modern DNA extraction, it is very likely there will be closure on the Dresser Jane Doe. “Yes, I really believe that,” she said, noting how newer, so-called “touch DNA” advancements mean the amount of material needed for a specimen evaluation is now much less than was needed when Dresser Jane Doe was found. But the advancement on so-called “fresh” DNA evaluation from body fluids, skin samples, or even from sweat or skin oil is much easier than the process for DNA extraction from old bones, weathered fragments or hair samples, which remains an expensive, daunting and not wholly successful field. According to the UNT - CHI, fragment DNA extraction remains a very difficult task to obtain a DNA profile out of an old bone sample. They claim that even with their advanced system, it takes highly trained and experienced forensic DNA analysts to work many of the older, weathered or dried-out and semi fossilized samples. “Even with the most modern instruments and the most sophisticated

methods, some bones remain stubborn and will not reveal their DNA secrets.” So far, the UNT-CHI program has assisted law enforcement with DNA sampling on over 600 missing-person cases, and several local people are hoping that the Dresser Jane Doe case becomes another one of the remarkable success stories, putting her lost identity to rest, once and for all. “Somebody somewhere, wonders where she went,” Johnson said. “I’d really like to put a name on her.”

What is DNA?

According to the University of North Texas - Center for Human Identification, - deoxyribonucleic acid is the molecule responsible for all inherited genetic traits. There are two types of DNA found in each cell (with the exception of red blood cells): nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA. Nuclear DNA is found in the nucleus portion of the cell and mitochondrial DNA is found in the cellular organelle called the mitochondria and is inherited only from the mother. Each individual inherits one half of their DNA from their father and the other half from their mother. Each person’s DNA is unique, except for identical twins - who have the same DNA. When a sufficient nuclear DNA profile from the victim’s remains matches the nuclear DNA profile from a family member’s reference sample, you can be very sure of the identity of the victim. The majority of forensic DNA tests are performed on nuclear DNA. However, simultaneous analysis of mtDNA from a maternal relative may be necessary in order to improve the identification process. Cases with limited fragments of materials, such as with hair samples or deteriorated samples, the more specialized mitochondrial DNA testing may be the only option, such as in the case of the Dresser Jane Doe.

WED., AUGUST 17, 2011 • INTER-COUNTY LEADER NORTHERN CURRENTS • SECTION B

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Recalling a year in Denmark by Nancy Jappe Leader staff reporter SPIRIT LAKE - At this time a year ago, Caitlyn Klawitter was beginning a year's stay in Denmark with the responsibility of being an au pair (nanny) for four Danish children, three of whom didn't speak English other than common words like thank you. Caitlyn didn't speak any Danish. "It was kind of like (playing) charades for the first couple months," she recalled. Caitlyn was the fifth nanny hired by Claus and Helle Langdahl to watch over their children, each for a one-year period. The other nannies were Danish girls. A good part of her responsibility was to teach English to the children. This meant that the concentration was on the English language, not Danish; and even though now back home, Caitlyn doesn't speak much Danish. She knows words, but conversation is another story. The one-year period started Aug. 1, 2010, and ran through July 31 of this year. Caitlyn learned about the job from her Spirit Lake neighbor Cindy Merrifield. Merrifield and her husband had been dorm parents for missionary kids in Africa. They were in contact with Helle Langdahl, who had been schooled when young at that African missionary facility. When the idea of hiring another nanny came up, Merrifield passed the word on to Caitlyn. "I was excited about the opportunity. I knew this was what God wanted me to do," Caitlyn said. She had been homeschooled, graduating from high school in 2006. Since that time, in addition to working for three years at the Expresso Cabin in Grantsburg, she had been trying to figure out what to do with her life. "My parents (Randy and Renee Klawitter) were behind me, which surprised me," Caitlyn continued. "To think they would let me fly off to be with people I have never met other than by e-mail a couple times. I was shocked they were so for it." She was not able to get a work visa for Denmark. This meant she couldn't get a salary for her time, only pocket money. It took a couple of months to get everything lined up, and some tense times along the way, but everything fell into place. Caitlyn was amazed how quickly the

Caitlyn Klawitter and Caroline Langdahl were having fun on an amusement ride at FDF (called simply by those initials), a large Christian Scout organization for children and youth in Denmark. - Special photo children took to speaking English. "After a month and a half or two months, it got to be fun," she said. "They were getting good enough so I could get to know them rather than (just) correct them." The oldest Langdahl girl, 10-year-old Anna, had the best grasp of English, having learned it in school. The next oldest, 8year-old Sam, would rather go outside and play with his tractor than practice his English. The two youngest girls, 5-yearold Josie and 3-year-old Caroline, caught on quickly. Both parents spoke fluent English as did most of the people in the country. Only the youngest and the oldest Danes, not having had as much English in school, were nonspeakers. The first day in the country was spent unpacking and getting settled. The children silently watched her unpack. The town she went to was called Hvorslev. It consisted of a church, a bed-and-breakfast, houses and one other industrial building. "There were supposed to be 200 people there, but I am not convinced. I never saw half of that," Caitlyn said, adding, "I don't know what people do because I never saw anybody. I know peo-

Boutiques and other shops lined the narrow streets in Aarhus, a Danish village bigger than the one in which Caitlyn Klawitter stayed.

ple work away from town in one of the bigger cities." The bigger town of Aarhus was 10 kilometers away or a three- to four-hour drive from Copenhagen. Everything was very quaint, looking like pictures you would see of a small Danish village. "I got used to it because it was home," Caitlyn said. She did get the opportunity to go to Aarhus where there were narrow streets lined with boutiques and parks to visit. One of her great joys was to hop on a bike and go for long rides in the country. The family wouldn't expect her back for a couple of hours as she enjoyed the countryside to the fullest. Claus Langdahl worked full time as a sire analyst (breeding geneticist) for a cattle-breeding company. His wife was a

part-time nurse working two to four days a week. Caitlyn was treated as a part of the family, even after working hours. The family lived in a large red-brick house (most of the houses were brick). Caitlyn had her own room and her own bathroom. During a typical day, which would start at 7:30 a.m., Caitlyn would take care of the youngest children after the older two had gone off to school. She helped them get dressed, eat breakfast and find things to do. Playing school was one of the activities, working with counting, letters and crafts. Playing outdoors was a big part of the day, too. Caitlyn loves to bake, and the younger girls loved to help her. Anna and Sam came home from school anytime from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. depending on the day's schedule. At 3 p.m., they had afternoon treats, fruit or cookies. This was a sacred time, something that was done every day. By 4 p.m., she was off work, but took meals with the family. Both parents cooked, and cooking a meal was never anything Caitlyn did. The family ate very healthful foods with lots of fruits, veggies and especially bread on the menu. One of their favorites was liver pate served on thick rye bread, chockfull of seeds and grains. "It was like a block of birdseed," Caitlyn said, adding that pickled beets were usually served on top of the pate. When asked if she missed anything in the line of food or food ingredients, Caitlyn answered that, for one thing, she couldn't buy sweetened condensed milk, something she needed for a recipe. She did eventually find milk powder at a Muslim market in Aarhus. Missing people, friends, family and

See Denmark, page 2

Caitlyn Klawitter is shown here with the four children she supervised during this past year in Denmark. Shown in costume are (L to R) Josie, Caitlyn holding Caroline, Anna and Sam. One of Caitlyn's jobs during the year was to teach the children English, especially the younger children who were not yet in school. – Photos submitted

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PAGE 2 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

Brownies visit Girl Scout Camp Northwoods MASON – Frederic Girl Scout Brownies made a trip to Mason recently to visit Girl Scout Camp Northwoods. The 10 girls, accompanied by adults, were able to partic-

ipate in a variety of activities. The girls experiences included water games, horses, low ropes (adventure course), crafts and hiking. This trip was partially funded by their Girl Scout Cookie sales. - submitted

Besides riding horses, at the Girl Scout Camp Northwoods the girls learned the basics of grooming horses. Here Elaine Lahti practices her new skills. – Photos submitted

At the Girl Scout Camp Northwoods, Brownies enjoy skits and s’mores around the campfire. Pictured front row (L to R): Mikayla Roper, Haley Ennis, Kaitlin Bartlett and Mckenzie Christian. Back row: Katie Peterson, Teresa Neely, Megan Williamson, Lexy Doyle, Elaine Lahti and Hannah Schmidt.

What’s camp without fun in the water? Haley Ennis and Kaitlin Bartlett enjoy the trampoline raft on Camp One Lake at the Girl Scout Camp Northwoods.

With the help of her teammates, Mikayla Roper is able to climb this 12-foot wall. At the Girl Scout Camp Northwoods, low ropes is a team building adventure course. For this eleKaitlin Bartlett prepares for her horse ride ment, the girls partnered with an older group of Girl Scouts to find a way to get all members at the Jane Olive Equestrian Center at the Girl Scout Camp Northwoods. of the team from one side to the other.

Denmark/from page 1

close relationships were a drawback to the Danish experience. "It's hard to build close relationships in one year," Caitlyn commented. She was grateful to have the use of e-mail and Skype video to keep in close touch with home. A good friend came over to visit during the year, and her parents were able to make the trip in June. Randy Klawitter admitted that he and his wife weren't able to finance such a trip. However, a man was visiting them at Wilderness Fellowship on Spirit Lake one day, and saw Caitlyn coming in from Denmark via Skype video. The man reached into his pocket and gave Randy and Renee vouchers to cover their trip to Denmark plus $500 in traveling money. All the time this was going on, Caitlyn was watching it via Skype and thinking, "This is incredible!"

Mason

The Klawitters spent eight days in Denmark. They celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary there, and Randy gave Renee a special ring in commemoration while the two were sitting on a hillside overlooking the countryside. They were able to stay with the Langdahls and spent three days with Caitlyn in Copenhagen. "Our purpose in going was to see her and what she had been involved in," Randy Klawitter said. "We had a personal tour guide. It was awesome." "It was an amazing experience to live with another family, learning how to take care of the whole family and a house, training for that (myself) someday. I am grounded in the Lord. Everything was totally different, with different standards for everything. It made me realize that being firmly rooted in Christ helped with every-

Baking was a favorite activity for Caitlyn Klawitter during her year in Denmark. She is shown here with her mother, Renee Klawitter and Caroline Langdahl on the left, Caitlyn and Josie Langdahl on the right. – Photos submitted

Randy and Renee Klawitter from Wilderness Fellowship on Spirit Lake, Frederic, spent their 30th wedding anniversary in Denmark, visiting their oldest daughter, Caitlyn. Caitlyn spent a year there, acting as an au pair (nanny) for four Danish children. Randy presented Renee with a special ring while the two were sitting on a hill overlooking the countryside, and Caitlyn recorded the occasion with her camera.

thing," Caitlyn commented. The church in Hvorslev was a small one with services in Danish. Caitlyn went to an English-speaking church in a larger town. Denmark is a Christian country, and a huge percentage of the population goes to church. The church was 23-25 miles from the house, but Caitlyn had the use of one of the family's two cars during the weekends. "It was pleasing to be in that family," Caitlyn said. "I had heard a lot of stories about friends who had been au pairs, and it was very difficult (for them). The kids were spoiled and difficult to handle. This (experience) was such a God thing, such a wonderful thing." One amazing coincidence came out during the interview for this story. Remember the dorm school in Central Africa that Helle Langdahl went to? Helle's father knew Randy Klawitter's cousin, Tim, who was murdered in the Central African Re-

public. The Klawitters donated a large bell that they had at Wilderness Fellowship to that school in honor of Tim many years ago. Helle Langdahl's father was the one who installed the bell there. What's up now for Caitlyn? In September she is going to Roseville, Minn., to work with an independent costume designer who makes costumes for the Children's Theatre and the Guthrie Theatre. Caitlyn does flat-pattern drafting (making patterns based on a person's measurements), and that skill fit what the costume designer was looking for. In the meantime, Caitlyn is enjoying time spent with her family, and just being at home. One Danish thing she especially misses during these hot summer days is Danish ice cream. "It was so wonderful," she said, a big smile lighting up her face.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 3

Did you hear

Just for

about my brother? He lost his left arm and leg in a car crash? He’s all right now. Joe Roberts ••• I almost had a psychic girlfriend, but she left me before we met. ••• Two small boys were talking at the zoo one day. “My name is Billy. What’s yours?” asked the first boy. “Tommy,” replied the second. “My daddy’s an accountant. What does your daddy do for a living?” asked Billy. Tommy replied, “My daddy’s a lawyer.” “Honest?” asked Billy. “No, just the regular kind,” replied Tommy ••• I dated a belly dancer once. She left me because she said I turned her stomach. •••

Laughs

Fourth-annual Knitting Extravaganza set FREDERIC – The fourth-annual Knitting Extravaganza will be held Saturday, Sept. 17, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Frederic Elementary School. Join knitting enthusiasts for a fun-filled day of knitting. There will be displays, demonstrations, vendors and plenty of knitting time. Special speakers are Shelley Staeven, owner of Shelley’s Yarns & Fiber Shoppe in Taylors Falls, Minn.; Janelle Hermann, teacher and speaker from Grantsburg; and Kathy French, a physical therapist from Lewis. Vendors include Fibre Functions, Luck; Whispering Wind Ranch, Webster; Yellow Dog Knitting, Eau Claire; Shelley’s Yarns & Fiber Shoppe, Taylors Falls; Gypsy Moon Body Care, Frederic; Mrs. I’s Yarn Parlor, Osceola; Northwind Book & Fiber, Spooner; Brush with Wildlife Gallery, Dallas; Alpaca Royale, Hayward; Pine Needles Yarn Shop, Cable; Avalon, Frederic; and local spinners will have wool yarn available. Preregistration is required. A $20 registration fee includes a catered lunch and door prizes. E-mail: knittingextravaganza@live.com or contact Konnie at 715-653-2619 or Lisa at 715-653-2510 by Thursday, Sept. 1, to register. Late registrations are $25 and will be considered based on available space. This event is sponsored by Frederic Community Education and Frederic-area knitters. - submitted

Class of 1941holds 70th reunion ST. CROIX FALLS – The St. Croix Falls High School Class of 1941 met at the Dalles House on July 27, with eight class members in attendance plus three spouses and three friends. Of the 61 members, only 16 survive, living in six states. Of 10 women, nine are widows, and of six men, four are widowers. There are three married couples and all were in attendance. Three girls and 22 boys served the country in World War II, representing all branches of the Armed Forces. Edwin Englund made the supreme sacrifice when his bomber, based in Italy, was shot down over Europe. They plan to continue their annual reunions, which have been continuous for at least 20 years. - submitted

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The writing on the wall I could see the handwriting on

Cold Turkey

the wall. After 20 years the red crayon remained as bright as the day it was written. It was difficult John W. Ingalls for me to realize that 30 years of child rearing was winding down. It was quiet in the house – no music from the bedrooms, no chatty laughter on the phone and no sob stories about boyfriends and broken hearts. The handwriting was a preschooler’s valiant attempt at spelling their name. The letters, although distorted and bent like a flag in a windstorm, were proudly displayed. That preschooler was now grown up. The scribbling was on the walls of a very small storage room under the stairway. It had the feeling of a cocoon or a nest, an empty nest. I tend to believe that fathers look toward the empty nest with more anticipation than mothers, but I really don’t know. I think it depends on the parent and the child. There were a couple of times around the age of 14 that I seriously considered adoption, not getting a child but rather giving. I was sure the nest would never survive to the empty stage. We had feathered the nest, but I couldn’t wait until the little fledglings would fly. I was ready to push them out.

I found an old diary last week.

Letters from

I keep a pretty regular journal these days, but I didn’t used to. I had forgotten this diary existed until I went digging in the bottom of my old sewing machine Carrie Classon cabinet. I found clothespins, rusty bobbins, old Butterick sewing patterns, bits of elastic, spare buttons and lots of mouse droppings. I was going through it and pitching it all out— including the sewing machine cabinet— in my ongoing efforts to lighten the load, when I found the old diary. I wasn’t sure there was anything in it. I opened it up and saw my writing, which has not changed much in the last 30 years. I read how I had bought the diary, 24 years earlier, and started writing in it that day. Pretty sure I didn’t want to walk down memory lane while disposing of mouse droppings, I tucked it away and continued my exorcism of sewing projects past. I forgot about the diary till last night and I read it this morning. It was not an easy read. It’s tempting to imagine that life follows a slow but gradual learning curve. Sure, there may be a dip or two and maybe a moment of intense insight along the way but, by and large, I imagine myself as someone who knows more now than I used to. Protected by experience and wisdom, I pretend that I am less likely to be hurt, less likely to experience pain or disappointment. So it is a bit off-putting to read my own words, spread over the course of 11 years, and realize that I already knew quite a bit about myself and my life. I didn’t write often, but made entries in times of change or upheaval. I wrote of frustrations and loneliness and reflected on why I was both frustrated and lonely. I was putting the pieces together, as I wrote,

Home

trying to make sense of it. Reading the puzzled diary writer’s efforts, I felt as if I was watching her playing on the railroad tracks and hearing a distant train whistle. Thirteen years ago, I wrote the last entry. In the midst of yet another transition, I wrote, “What happens next?” There is no more. I put the ribbon in the page and presumably left it in the sewing machine cabinet where it remained till last week. Two careers, a divorce, a three-year sojourn to Africa and a new love later, I found the diary. “What happens next?” Flooded with emotion, I closed the diary and went out for a run with Milo. I ran around the lake and we stopped at the boat landing for Milo to get a drink. I saw the late-summer sun glinting off the water and, although it was warm, I could smell the first hint of autumn in the air. I felt tears form. What happens next? It gets worse, I wanted to tell her, but then it gets a lot better. There’s pain you didn’t expect, but I want you to know that you were right about most of it. I don’t blame you for the stuff you didn’t get quite right. What happens next? I looked across the water and felt wind in my wet eyes. What happens next is I take a black and white dog on a brisk run. We run pass willow trees and two boys fishing with cane poles. I say “hello” to a woman watering her flowers in the sunshine. I smile, for no good reason, at everyone we see. Till next time, —Carrie

Historic Danish/Jewish boat lift featured at Luck museum

LUCK — In 1943, during the height of World War II, the Danish and Jewish communities worked together to ferry more than 450 Jews in small fishing boats, from Nazi occupied Denmark across the straits to neutral Sweden. At the Thursday, Aug. 25, meeting of the Luck Historical Society, an exhibit that tells of that legendary event will be opened. The exhibit is on loan from the Danish Immigrant Museum. Along with the exhibit, the film “Tak for Alt: Survival of the Human Spirit” will be shown. This film, the title of which in English means “Thanks for everything,” documents the life of Judy Meisel and her flight across Europe to the relative safety of Denmark. It compares her experiences during the war years with other, more recent, civil rights issues right here in the United States. The historical society extends gratutyde to the Luck Danish Brotherhood Lodge 186 and Frandsen Bank and Trust for donations to make this display possible. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Aug.

25, in the Luck Museum. Museum events are free and everyone is welcome. Call the museum at 715-472-2030 from noon to 4:30 p.m. if you have questions. - submitted

Mayberry to perform at St. Peter's Lutheran Church

Rally Sunday at Peace Lutheran Church DRESSER – Sunday school for 4-year-olds through 12th grade begins Rally Sunday, Sept. 11. Classes are held between services from 9:35 to 10:45 a.m. at Peace Lutheran Church in Dresser. Rally Day will be a Family Sunday School Event with parent participation. The community Howard Mayberry, gospel and country singer, will be making is invited. Please contact the church office to register at his fourth appearance at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church on CTH 715-755-2515. - submitted B, Luck, on Thursday, Aug. 18, 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served afterwards. Freewill offering. - submitted When the nest is full you long for some quiet, precious moments of peace and time to yourself. Suddenly you find the silence and the time to yourself and it isn’t quite what you exMD pected. Without a house full of children you now have the chance to rekindle your romantic side if you could only stay awake through the evening news. A weekend stay at a B&B takes on new meaning when you realize most of the guests are retired. B&B no longer means bed-and-breakfast but stands for bifocals and bunions. When our first two children moved out we made changes. Walls were knocked out and bedrooms were repainted. One bedroom was sacrificed to become a laundry room and the old laundry became part of the kitchen. The kitchen cabinets were transferred to the garage as new ones took their place. The first stage of the transition to the empty nest was exciting and fun. We enjoyed watching our children become adults and take their places in the real world but we had younger children who still needed us at home. We had our feet firmly planted in the parenting realm but we were taking baby steps toward the empty nest. We are now facing new realities as our youngest is

perched on the edge of the adult world. Striving to be financially prudent we want our children to take on as little debt for college as possible. Striking the balance between saving for own future and our children’s futures becomes a challenge when we realize that the tuition payments for the next year exceed the entire cost of our first home and 40 acres of land. There were times I longed for the empty nest. No more sports programs or parent-teacher conferences. No more notes from the principal about petty quarrels and detention. No more arguments about eating more vegetables and less junk food. No more writing on the walls. Actually I am glad some of that is gone. It may seem that I am sad about the changes we are facing but I’m not. I am excited about the future. I am excited about the opportunities and challenges ahead, not only for us but for our children as they carve out their own niche in the world. The other reason to be excited is the recent birth of our third granddaughter, Evangeline (Eva) Judy Jacobs. God willing, I am going to get every grandchild a box of crayons, and we are going to write our names on the walls. We are going to laugh and eat snacks and draw stick people behind the doors in the closet and later, when it is quiet, we can relax and realize the contentment of a good life because we can read the writing on the wall.

PAGE 4 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

The last roundup

River Road

As we arrived in lush Seattle, Wash.,

where the streets are lined with peach and pear trees, the wild blackberries grow in every ditch with 2-inch diameter fruit, and everything is shockingly green after the long drive across the dry western prairies - the yards and town squares beautifully flower-spersed with plants that would have long ago been eaten by deer or bugs in Wisconsin - we are in the land where window screens and air conditioners are unknown. We settled into the guest room in Cousin Sally’s big restored Victorian house in the Yuppified Queen Anne’s neighborhood to take in the culture of the city where Starbucks and Windows originated; where you can buy anything from the whole world fresh at Pike’s Market and where a cup of coffee costs more than a gallon of gas and comes in 327 unique blends including ethanol added. Cousin Sally, a retired University of Washington professor, comes back soon from two weeks in New York City where she escaped to find some culture, after having spent June in Paris, each time apartment sitting for a friend, as we are for a few days here. Seattle certainly outdoes Cushing for a number of attractions; however, I will miss this Saturday’s adult soapbox derby there down Main Street. Seattle has better hills for it, but not the attitude! We brought along a case of syrup, 10 pounds of Burnett Dairy cheese and some homemade raspberry jelly as gifts from Wisconsin to our cousins who only remember Wisconsin through stories from their parents and grandparents (i.e. the year the rutabagas failed in Cumberland; the Cushing marsh mosquito plague of 1939; the dry years in the Great Depression drought when the Holsteins were so thin that it took two to make a shadow, etc. It’s funny how adversity stories persist longer than any others). We managed to get out to Seattle without any car trouble at all with the 1991 Olds. It is just about ready to turn over 100,000 miles and came from Margo’s Aunt Lou as a final gift as she made her own final trip. The Olds sailed flawlessly through the hot Dakota prairies, climbed energetically into the Big Horns where Custer made his last stand, cruised through Montana roads where “prudent speeds” are the limit and intersections along the roads are littered with flowered crosses representing deaths of folks who thought they could make it across before the next car cruising at 95 got there, and then zoomed up the Cascades without even shifting the V-6 down from overdrive and finally veered through the switchbacks coasting down to the end of the United States of America. Gas prices ranged from $3.57 to $3.99 with the average about $3.75. Here in Seattle, it is $3.85. Overall, the Olds made about 28 mpg with spurts of 30 on the plains with a tailwind. I changed the oil (synthetic for better mileage), aired the tires to 32, and put in a new air cleaner before hitting the road. The engine control module (computer) that I replaced seems to work perfectly. The GPS only led us astray half a dozen times as we wandered the back roads seeking adventure, only to end at closed-gate private road signs, the GPS egging us on, Margo worrying about crazy Westerners and their gun racks in the back window of their pickups, and the Rambler ready for adventure, duct tape at the ready to patch the oil pan. We kept costs low by tenting and sandwiching our way through the West. Our 40-year-old tent is still sound; the cots we bought last year are comfortable and high enough so the rattlers sleep under them, and with the screened windows, we managed to see many falling stars from the

Ramblings Collected by Russ Hanson

Alfalfa freckles the dry western plains where otherwise only sagebrush survives. Alfalfa’s root system can go 50 feet deep seeking moisture and food. Bacteria, growing in its roots, take nitrogen from the air and make a surplus to fertilize the plant. A plant can live for 20 years and stand repeated harvests and terrible droughts, while providing an almost perfect food source for cattle. – Photo on the Montana dry lands by The Rambler ongoing meteor shower last week though the cloudless western skies. The trip across country was consistent in one thing – everyplace from South Dakota north has had a wet late spring and relatively wet summer so far with a two-week delay in everything growing from apples to wheat. Most of the northern midlands have been hot and humid too. The Missouri River Valley flooded extensively due to the huge snowfall in the mountains melting and coming down the river, and water is still high in the rivers out here. The woman stopping traffic on Hwy. 12 for construction waits of 10 minutes, told us about the nearby windmill farm, one of dozens we saw beginning just west of Rochester, Minn. “Most of them aren’t running now, too much water going through the power dams out here from the big melt in the mountains. Water-generated electricity is cheaper than wind. Did you know that inside each of the huge towers is a 374-step circular staircase to the top? Some people complain about the swishing sounds, but I think they are good for the future.” I mentioned we were retired, and not in a rush, so the highway construction delay didn’t bother us. “I should be retired too,” she replied. “Our ranch went bankrupt a few years ago after the drought. Started in 2002 and lasted seven years out here. We raised riding bulls for the rodeo. The water ponds went down and the bulls died from the water. We didn’t know then, but the drought concentrated the salt and it killed our stock and we had to sell out. It is easy to get a job out here with all the oil work and such, but there is a lot of unemployment too. Too many of the younger folks don’t pass the drug tests and can’t get hired. Gets on their record and they can’t find a job.” Generally speaking, the crops we saw looked good. Corn and beans dominated through Minnesota and eastern South Dakota. Winter wheat farther west is being harvested and looked good. Sunflowers were beautiful and healthy. Many fields had bare areas, drowned out due to the extra water. Although there is a drought to the south, the northern onethird of the country seems to have good crops. We stopped in a small café midway through Montana. The parking lot was littered with battered pickup trucks so we knew it was a hangout for local ranchers. As we drank strong coffee and waited for ranch-style eggs, (everything thrown in with the eggs from restaurant leftovers for the past week), we listened to the conversation at the nearby extended old-

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guys table. “I miss the big roundups of the old days,” said a weather-beaten lanky old fellow with well-worn cowboy boots, cigarette-yellowed teeth and a sweat-stained Stetson. “Nowadays we just bring alfalfa bales to the cattle, don’t drive the cattle down from the high summer range anymore. The roundup era is over.” As a farm kid, and someone who still dabbles in farming in Wisconsin, one of the biggest changes we see now over a few decades back, are the weed-free fields along the road. In a vast 1,000-acre field in the plains you can wear your eyes out looking for a single weed. In farming, the Roundup era is upon us. This comes from the “Roundup-ready” plants, beginning in the late '90s, that have dominated the past decade of farming all over the world. Monsanto, a big chemical and seed company, spliced a gene into all sorts of farm plants that makes them impervious to their herbicide, Roundup, that normally kills everything it touches. Farmers have enthusiastically adopted this technology and no longer cultivate crops to get rid of weeds. To learn more about Roundup and farming I turned to the Internet. Wikipedia is a “grassroots” encyclopedia of the world, thus a wonderful place to turn for information on crops. It is being built by people who have expertise and are willing to share it on the Internet. Each article is submitted and then undergoes ongoing and continuous review by readers and is updated as needed. If I wanted to submit a topic, for instance, the history of Cushing, I could do it, and others could review and modify it after a discussion of the changes. What makes Wikipedia work is that experts from all fields of endeavor have taken it seriously and worked to make it useful. I looked at Roundup. There is some discussion of problems with the chemical in our environment, not at all clear what harm it might do, but the main problem is the number of weeds which are no longer killed by it, the “super weeds.” Evolution, as seen by scientists, is an ongoing process where living things adapt better to their surroundings. Every time sex occurs, potential for a new and unique combination of genes arises from male and female species (plants and animals). The offspring are very, very close to the parents, but yet different in some ways. In the billions of new and slightly different pigweed seeds formed each year, a few are enough different to no longer be killed by Roundup. Sometimes the differences are not just from normal variation, but from a muta-

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tion (an accidental change in normal genes, like a cat with an extra toe). The change, if it is inherited by the next generation and favorable for survival (i.e. an ice age starting where cats with bigger feet can hunt better), will gradually spread as it gives the plant or animal an advantage. Already, in the U.S., super weeds are found in 13 states, in 63 types of weeds and are rapidly spreading, forecasting the end of Roundup as a useful weed killer, the end of the Roundup era. (Note: the exact same process is happening with antibiotics and bacteria growing into super bugs predicting the end of the antibiotic era that began in the 1940s). Monsanto, the inventor of Roundup and Roundup-ready crops (the first being soybeans released in 1996 from the Middleton facility), is working on plants resistant to 2,4D, an old herbicide used since the ‘40s. It is the broad-leafed weed and brush killer you can buy in the store. 2,4D and 2,4,5T were the two chemicals mixed 50-50 to make Agent Orange, the defoliant used in Vietnam to clear Vietcong jungle hideouts; the chemical that also ruined the health of many of my friends who were sprayed with it while in Vietnam. Replacing Roundup by 2,4D will be controversial. Although the farmer in me admires a vast weed-free field, and the homeowner in me admires a pure grass lawn, the scientist in me worries about what is going to happen when super weeds spread. Some kind of new plant needs to be found that solves some of the problems of current farming for the future, a plant not so dependent on artificial sprays and fertilizers and genetics to survive. It got me to thinking what kind of plant it should be. The ideal plant for farmers would be something that is a perennial (you plant it once and it continues to grow each year—like the alfalfa plant). It would, like the alfalfa plant, fix its own nitrogen from the nitrogen in the air. It would, like the alfalfa plant which can have roots as deep as 50 feet, grow a tremendously deep root system to get moisture and food from far below the soil while breaking up the hardpan that occurs when farmers plow the top 8 inches of soil. It would be, like the alfalfa plant, adapted to drought, heat, resistant to harsh winters, spring back rapidly from repeated harvestings, resistant to disease and bugs, high in protein and work as a single food source for animals providing most of its needs, competitive with weeds, harvestable in different ways (i.e. greenchop, silage, dry hay and sprouts), produce more nitrogen than it needs, thus creating fertilizer for a future crop on the same field. An ideal plant, if it is ever found, would be a great thing for farmers! The above paean to alfalfa came about as we drove into the far western dry prairies and continued to see alfalfa fields growing in land that otherwise, without irrigation, supported only sagebrush. Alfalfa plants, with their purple to gray blooms, lined the road ditches and freckled vast dry prairie fields; a crop that thrives where little else survives. May your own taproots be deep, your resistance strong and your tolerance great. May you thrive in adverse conditions. I like to think of these columns as helpful bacteria doing a little bit to remove fertilizer from the air and spread it about your feet, some weeks deeper than others, as we all ramble into our own last roundup, ready or not.

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AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 5

In the beginning In 1966, I

joined the Wisconsin Regional Writers Association. Originally it was called Wisconsin Rural Writers Association, but regional was more all-inclusive including villages and cities. I heard about the organization through two writing sisters, Jean Bunker Schmidt of Siren and Ruth Bunker Christiansen of Frederic. Through the WRWA, I learned about the School of Arts held for a week in Rhinelander. That particular year the program was loaded with well-known and gifted authors. August Derleth, one of Wisconsin’s most prolific authors, was a perennial speaker. He was a poet, essayist, historical fiction writer, creator of horror stories, one of Wisconsin’s own. He was also a beloved character and a bit of a lady’s man. Bob Gard of the UW-Madison was on staff and an encourager of beginning writers. He was not born in Wisconsin but he adopted the state as his own, writing about Horicon Marsh and other landmarks and customs here. My husband, Ken, had him as professor at the UW-Madison. Teresa Rios Versace, author of the TV series based on her story of “The Flying Nun,” was a popular speaker that year. I had just learned to drive a car, with Allan Staples as instructor, as my husband had me drive around a few times and promptly gave up on me. Allen turned around and sold me a good, used vehicle, and I got my driver’s license. I was confident enough to ask two good friends, Ruth B. Christiansen of Frederic and Jean Wester of Webster, if they’d go with me to Rhinelander that year. They were as thrilled as I was. The author in residence was Jesse Stuart of Greenup, Ky. His stories were already in English anthologies in high school, and Ken and I had long admired his writing. Early one Sunday in July we got into my good, used car and headed across state. Ruth was in the front seat with me but she kept whirling around to talk to Jean in the back. Every time she whirled, I reacted with a little jerk so at the first comfort stop, I suggested to Ruth, “Would you mind changing seats with Jean as I’m getting nervous.” It worked much better, although Ruth said afterward, “Bernice made me sit in back all the time.” At one stop we ate our bag lunches. A car parked next to us, and the man and woman started looking for something. Being friendly and chatty, I asked, “Did you lose something?” and the woman said, “We had a revolver with us, somewhere.” Jean looked at me and I looked at Ruth, and Ruth whispered, “Let’s get out of here.” As we drove away, she said, “You’ve got to stop talking to strangers all the time.” Was it a narrow escape or just a strange experience? We reached Rhinelander and found the old hotel downtown and went inside to verify our reservations. The bellhop was such an old man that we carried our own luggage to our second-floor rooms. It was no easy task as we struggled with suitcases, portable typewriters, purses, etc. We each had a separate room. We went out to find a place to eat supper and then found the modern school where our classes began the next morning and also had our meals in the school cafeteria. We returned to the ancient hotel and settled

Behind the

Do you remember?

Signpost

Compiled by Bernice Abrahamzon

Bernice Abrahamzon

50 Years Ago

in. All night long the nighthawks flew near the outside roof, eating flies and bugs. The birds had a very distinctive cry. We didn’t learn until later that they were August Derleth’s favorite birds and he often wrote about them. We were up early the next day, ready to start our week of classes. August Derleth walked into our first class, wearing what was his usual outfit, casual clothes and open-toed sandals. In the course of his first lecture, he said, “If you want to be a writer, you have to get out there and talk to people,” and I turned to look at Ruth as if reminding her. After class all the women gathered around Augie, having already been enamored by him. We couldn’t help ourselves as we mingled with the famous and the great. Jesse Stuart had brought his wife, Naomi, and little daughter. They were absolutely charming people and we fell in love with their Kentucky accent. Jesse said, “Wesconsin is a beautiful state,” pronouncing it as if Wisconsin has an “e” in it. He was very interested in our surnames. Fortunately, my married name has a very intriguing story. Someday I will tell it to you. During the week we talked to strangers. Lots of them. We took pages of notes, trying to capture the most important quotes. We fell asleep at night to the cry of the nighthawks after sitting in our rooms typing our assignment. Our heads were floating with ideas. We would become famous. We got home without incident. It was a week of new experiences. Tere Rios (later Versace), was a charming lady. I started writing letters to Jesse Stuart. In later years I reread the packet of letters written to me by August Derleth and won first prize of $50 plus a framed picture of a gazebo in a park in his hometown. Nothing is ever wasted by a writer. No memory is lost. I never became famous, but I’ve been writing since 1967 and I thank the local newspaper for that. I’ve entered a lot of contests and shared my life experiences. When my husband died, I gathered his stories into a book, “Hawthorne Boy,” about his boyhood in that small town. The log house where he lived is now sided over. We walk the few streets there relating to the church (another denomination now), the school is now a Laundromat is the cemetery, now replaced by a new cemetery up the road, the store was closed a long time ago. So everything changes in time. Until next week, Bernice

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40 Years Ago The Frederic School Board approved the budget, the lease of the Lewis School and the sale of old band uniforms. The Lewis VFW would lease the Lewis school.–The Luck School District would propose a drop in the school mill rate.–The Webster school approved the budget at the annual meeting.–The new board salary was proposed and 21-mill rate tax levy proposed by Siren board.–Specials at Anderson’s Store, Siren, included home-style dill pickles at 69¢, 10-1/2-oz. marshmallows at 15¢, beef liver at 49¢ lb., and thuringer at 89¢ lb.–Anderson’s Store had a sidewalk sale of jackets, slacks, skirts, dresses, blouses and shirts.–Route’s Store in Frederic included specials on round steak at 79¢ lb., steakettes at 89¢ lb., popsicles at six for 29¢ and Miracle Whip at 89¢ for 1-1/2 quarts.–Specials at the Frederic Co-op Store included sauerkraut at two for 89¢, Ivory liquid at 47¢, lettuce at 18¢ head, Duncan Hines cake mixes at three for $1 and 2 lbs. coffee at $1.29.–A common announcement in this paper was “No colored pictures, please.”–Wannigan Days were held July 23 – 24 in St. Croix Falls.–Webster teachers went to Superior for a workshop.–Real estate transfers were published regularly in this newspaper.–Surplus commodity dates were set for Polk County.–Perma-Home was said to be “the people’s way to enjoy living.”– Trollhaugen Inn, Dresser, was now open weekends to serve food Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

20 Years Ago

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On Aug. 22, Dr. Grindell delivered a baby girl, Tammy Lynn Beckmark, daughter of Art and Bev Beckmark of Siren.–Special at Route’s, Frederic, were pork sausage at three 1-lb. rolls at $1, thuringer at 69¢ lb., tomato soup at 10¢ can and 25 lbs. Pillsbury flour at $1.89.–The grand opening of Schauls Shoe Store, Frederic, was held Aug. 11 – 12.–Glov-etts Shoes were available at Hagberg’s, Frederic.–Wisconsin ranked high in help to communities.–The August special at Carlson Hardware, Frederic, included pens and pencils at 44¢ (the regular rate was 98¢).–The Polk County Fair at SCF was held Aug. 4, 5 and 6, 1961.–Yellow River Supply Corp. had ready-mixed concrete available.–Obituaries included Mary McClees and Jacob Nahkala.–Ray’s Firestone Store, Frederic, had a threeday tire sale.–Stock car races were held every Sunday at 2 p.m. beginning Aug. 6, at the Grantsburg fairgrounds.–Burt Lancaster was starring in the movie “Young Savages” at the Frederic Theater.–Lowrey organs were available at Jotblad Music Center of Falun.–Cameron & Son, Inc., Ford dealer in Danbury, said it had the largest car lot in the area with 16 new Fords and Falcons and 32 used cars and trucks.

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The Golden Anniversary of LaVern and Doris Jean Larson was held July 7 at First Lutheran Church, Cushing. The open house announcement also had their picture.–The tribe still planned to build the Danbury salmon farm.–Soldiers faced erupting enemy in the Philippines.–Dave Obey planned to shift money from foreign aid to deficit reduction.–Public hearings were scheduled for gas pipeline proposal.–Marie’s Ceramics and Gifts was located in Webster.–Burnett County was accepting bids on one squad car radio.–One headline read “Putting the Social Security earnings test to rest.”–Improved boating safety was wanted.–Polk-Burnett Winter Texans had a noon picnic at the Siren park.–The Siren Lions Club offered a $1,000 reward for information on who removed the 20’x30’ flag and damaged the flag pole at the intersection of Hwys. 35 and 70 north of Siren between June 15 – 16.–Open house was held for Matie (McKenzie) Paulson on June 30 at the home of her daughter, Carole Paulson, Siren.–Roy Peck celebrated his 80th birthday at the Trade River Free Church on July 7.–Elmer and Curis Baston were at the Pine City Town Hall on July 7.–Lots going on at the Forts Folle Avoine.–Nursing assistants were wanted at the United Pioneer Home, Luck.–Cattle rustlers hit Polk County.–D.A.R.E. was coming to Burnett County.

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PAGE 6 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Greetings to all my readers out there, hope each of you is having a great August. Just think, it’s almost time for the kidlets to go back to school for another year of learning. I went to school a couple of times, didn’t learn to read or write, but I did learn how to heel, sit down, come and a few other things. I think I did really well, but don’t practice it much now - especially when Mom asks me to come. It’s like I’m having a good sniff around and she wants me to stop what I’m doing. I have to tell you, it doesn’t always happen. My friend, Pam, writes the article for the shelter in the Sentinel and does a great job. Last week, she focused on the cats and in particular the black cats. Pam says they get a bad rap, and I think that it’s true. A black cat is just a cat. You can consider yourself lucky if you keep the company of any cat whatever coat color, or pattern, the cat has. Probably the myths and superstitions are because they are beautiful, dark and mysterious appearance. At the shelter, there are black cats, Gato, the twins Dudley and Jose, and the new baby Coal. All handsome with their beautiful shining coats. There are also three black and white cats, Tux and the siblings Missy and Zach. Don’t forget, cats are half price at the moment, we just want to find them loving homes and make room for other cats waiting to come in for safe keeping. I want to remind everyone of the importance of spaying and neutering, if you do then it helps with the unwanted litters and the suffering they endure. Many of these litters are dumped and are primarily the result of pet owners abandonment or failure to

Happy Tails

Await

Arnell Humane Society of Polk County Margo was the 2009 homecoming queen at Beagle Tri-County High where she was a cheerleader and lettered in cross county. Margo has a lovely classic tricolor coat and a slender silhouette. She uses her significant physical gifts to win you over and then showers you with hugs and kisses to make it clear that she has a loving nature. Margo is an inyour-lap, squirming cuddler. Her days as a cross county star are over, but she still enjoys the strong scent of a squirrel now and then. She can get lost with her nose to the ground but only needs a mild reminder that home is where her heart is. Margo plays well with other dogs and is good with children. She is looking forward to keeping your yard safe from furry intruders. Speaking of scent hounds, two of Hound Annie

YAPpenings Sadie

Marian Edler

spay and neuter. These poor animals suffer sickness, exposure, starvation and death on the streets of our nation’s cities and towns, and in the fields and forests of the countryside as they attempt to survive on their own. Some even drown unwanted litters, I mean how cruel can you be. Can you imagine what it must feel like to drown? We had a very happy reunion at the shelter this last week. Rowan who came in as a stray was claimed by his owner, he had been missing for a year and his humans thought they would never see him again. They brought in pictures and records for identification; it was a wonderful thing to see. Rowan had been microchipped, but unfortunately, the information wasn’t updated when they moved, so it’s a good thing his mom and dad saw his picture on one of the posters. Three stray dogs in this week. Bertha, the Border collie, she is a real sweetie but sure needs a good bath and grooming. Luca came in on Friday, a very nice lady picked him up in the middle of Hwy. 35, and then I notice that a golden retriever arrived on Saturday. Don’t forget to visit the Yellow River Saloon in puppies have returned to the shelter in need of new homes. One year ago, a litter of 11 Walker Coonhound puppies were born at our shelter. They were all adopted out, spayed and neutered. Now two of them have returned because their caregivers are moving. These two are large, loveable and ready to watch the ballgame with you. Adoptions were fantastic last week. Three of our long-term residents went home. Lulu the Boston terrier mix, Mandy the declawed Ballerina, and Jade, a young tabby and white sweetheart with a motor, all went home. Mandy had been waiting for a home since May 3, and Lulu and Jade since June 24. Sometimes it just takes awhile for the right people to meet our pets. People often ask us how long we hold our animals. These long-term residents are not the norm, but we are willing to wait for as long as it takes. Usually we are able to find loving homes for our adoptable pets within 30 days. The first seven days are required by law for a stray, and then another one to three weeks to find them a home through e-mail, Petfinder.com, lists of available pets at veterinarian clinics, posters at various businesses, phone inter-

Lewis A member of the Northwest Regional Writers, Stanley Miller, invited club members to his place, rural Luck, on Friday, Aug. 12. The group met at noon to enjoy a potluck picnic outside overlooking a stream which leads into a river. Present were hosts, the Millers, Betty and Bob Mackean, Alice and Charles Ford, Jennifer Tahtinen, Arleth Erickson, Denis Simonsen, Walter Pfuegal, Bernice Abrahamzon and visitor. Because it was a picnic and informal, minutes, etc. were eliminated and those present read their stories or poems. Stan had made homemade vanilla ice cream for the occasion and Bernice gave a brief memorized reading on “The Little Boy and the Old Man” (not written by her). It was Charles E. Lewis Days this past weekend in the small community halfway between Frederic and Siren. Last week’s full page ad in the Indianhead Advertiser gave the schedule of events for all three days. The usual striped yellow and white tent was rented and set up on the church grounds, and programs were given there. Friday night brought “The Gospel in Song and Words” presented by Pastor Mike and Lisa Weaver

St. Croix Senior Center

Shelter

of St. Croix Falls. The choir also sang plus a solo by Phil Sweitzel. The mistress of ceremonies was Sylvia Sweitzel. Saturday’s events were interrupted by brief rain showers interspersed with sunshine. The schedule included five gospel bands, Crossed Paths, Luck Crosswalk Singers, Glory Train, Northern Crossroads and the Ottersons. Plus speaker Jim Renno, director of Teach All Nations telling about his experiences teaching the Bible in many far-off countries. Sundays events were the Sunday church service under the tent, the silent auction with about 37 items, children’s games, scrambling for coins, etc. The Little Miss and Little Mr. Lewis contest, by drawing, was held. Beautiful weather on Sunday made up for Saturday’s rain. The parade was held with floats from several nearby towns. Juanita Berg was this year’s grand marshal. Barbara Schallenberger Olinger set up for the flea market as did Debby Lenz Eaton of Hayward, where she has a religious gift store. They had some very lovely things for sale. The silent auction offered many framed pictures,

Gato

Coal

Webster for their Friday meat draws, the proceeds are being donated to the shelter which we all appreciate. Also Saturday, Aug. 20, at 10 p.m. at the Siren Theatre is the showing of the classic “The Quest Man.” Entrance is by donation with proceeds being given to the shelter. Aren’t people wonderful to care about us four-footed animals the way they do. I was asked to let you know, that starting September our shelter meetings will be on the fourth Wednesday of the month instead of Tuesday. You are welcome to attend and participate. “Dogs feel very strongly that they should always go with you in the car, in case the need should arise for them to bark violently at nothing right in your ear.” – Dave Barry Have a great week everyone. Licks and tail wags. The Humane Society of Burnett County (HSBC) is saving lives, one at a time. www.hsburnettcty.org. 715-866-4096. License No. 267335-DS We’re on Facebook too. views, visual display during daily walks and of course, this column. All of our efforts are paid off when Fido or Furball find a new forever home. Adoptions of our long-term Margo residents are just that much more rewarding. Our cross county star Margo has been at the Arnell shelter for 32 days. We can feed and shelter them, advertise and rehabilitate them, but it is the adopter that comes to our shelter that makes it all happen in the end. Without the adopter, willing to give a pet a second chance, all of our animals would be long-term residents. Arnell Memorial Humane Society, Amery 715 268-7387 (PETS) or online: arnellhumane.org.

Bernice Abrahamzon grocery baskets of groceries, even a load of gravel. There was some brisk bidding on items. Things were going on all over town, including a car show, games, live music for dancing, fish pond and food. Lewis really came alive for three special days. If it hadn’t been for Charles E. Lewis, who lent his name to the town, it might have been called Nowhere, Wis. If he hadn’t donated a church to the town, there would have been no church to attend and insure, and when the building was damaged by fire, smoke and water, there would have been little chance of building a new church. So many “ifs” but much is owed to our town’s benefactor. Lewis has become more of a home community with most businesses gone and just a memory. It has, however, a very unusual history. Town residents really pitched in to set up and make the town’s celebration a success. Sympathy is extended to the family of Doris Hanson, Grantsburg. Services were held Tuesday, Aug. 16, at Zion Lutheran Church in Trade Lake. Doris was a member of the Northwest Regional Writers Club.

Tuesday started out with 10 a.m. exercises followed by Skip-Bo. In the afternoon, games were played. Winners in 500 cards were Ray Nelson, Marian Edler, Don Benson, Laurice Lambert and Peter Schlosser. Winners in Dominos were Gladis Weikert, Martha Lundstrom and George Meixner. Dottie Adams and Donna Schlosser was the winning team in Hand and Foot. Wednesday we celebrated the August birthdays with cake and ice cream. Then David Thelin and Audrey McNurlin showed their pictures from the Washington, D.C., trip during cherry blossom time and their trip to Holland, Mich., for the tulip festival. Thursday morning, we exercised and then played Skip-Bo. In the evening, 500 cards were played. The winners were Artis Brown, Charlie Mevissen and Jim Case. Are you interested in any of the activities? Stop in and have some coffee and get the schedule. We need new faces to join in. You do not have to live in St. Croix Falls to attend. We are St. Croix Valley seniors.

News from the Service SAN ANTONIO, Texas – Air Force Airman Maxwell M. Morley graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. He is the son of Woodie Morley of Dresser. Morley graduated in 2007 from St.Croix Falls High School and received an associate degree in 2009 from Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College, Ashland. - submitted

Webster Senior Center Bernie Boelter We send our appreciation to all of the Bingo players who have attended lately. There were 29 this last Wednesday who enjoyed the treats furnished by Nancy and Vern Pieper. We always have room for more, just drop in at 12:30 p.m. every Wednesday. There have also been many enjoying cards and pool on Thursday evenings. The fun starts at 7 p.m. Just stop in. Women’s Wii bowling begins Wednesday, Sept. 7, at 9 a.m. There is a sign-up sheet at the center. Mixed bowling will start after the first of the year. There will be a celebration of the lives of Paul and Mary Poretti on Saturday, Sept. 10, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Webster Senior Center, hosted by their children. The center is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Stop in, pick up a menu and sign up for your favorite lunches. The monthly meetings are held the third Tuesday of every month. All seniors are welcome and encouraged to attend. See you at the center.

Birth announcements Born in Eau Claire:

A girl, Ayla Rain Peterson, born July 12, 2011, to Jackie and Anthony “AJ” Peterson of Frederic. Ayla weighed 7 lbs., 3 oz. Grandparents are Rita and Mark Bohn of Frederic, Mike and Sarah Funk of Luck, and Marilyn Peterson of South Carolina. Greatgrandparents are Sandy Hickey of Frederic, Virgean and Harlan Funk of Clam Falls, Margaret Peterson of Amery, Chris Byerly of Frederic and Dennis and Carol Bohn of Frederic. Great-great-grandparents are Cecelia Johnson of Frederic, Hazel Bohn of Frederic and Helen Hedrickson of Duluth, Minn. ••• A boy, Xzavier Phillip Hedlund, was born July 15, 2011, to Amanda Pope and Aaron Hedlund in Eau Claire at Sacred Heart Hospital. He weighed 6 lbs., 7.7 oz and was 19 inches long. Grandparents are Sherri and Keith Becker of Rice Lake and Mary and

Kurt Hedlund of Frederic. Great-grandparents are Robert and Doris Workman of Rice Lake; Dennis and Carol Bohn of Frederic and Robert and Shirley Hedlund of Evelith, Minn. Great-great-grandmother is Hazel Bohn of Frederic. - submitted

••• Born at St. Croix Regional Medical Center:

A girl, Mackenna Marie Prochaska, born July 24, 2011, to Angela Krenz and Brian Prochaska, Osceola. Mackenna weighed 7 lbs., 7 oz. ••• A girl, Farah Kay Vadner, born July 26, 2011, to Cassidy and Richard Vadner, Osceola. Farah weighed 9 lbs., 7 oz. ••• A girl, Lydia Elizabeth Peterson, born July 28, 2011, to Karla and Daniel Peterson, Siren. Lydia weighed 8 lbs., 15 oz.

••• A girl, Kendra Mae Stertz, born Aug. 1, 2011, to Casey and David Stertz, North Branch, Minn. Kendra weighed 7 lbs., 3 oz. ••• A girl, Karlie Jean Aberle, born Aug. 1, 2011, to Karl and Missie Aberle, St. Croix Falls. Karlie weighed 8 lbs., 8 oz. ••• A boy, Cabrelon Bradley Martin, born Aug. 1, 2011, to Julie Marlowe and Adam Martin, Dresser. Cabrelon weighed 8 lbs. ••• A girl, Jazmen Marie Minor, born Aug. 1, 2011, to Crystal Morris and Aaron Minor, Milltown. Jazmen weighed 6 lbs., 15 oz. •••

A boy, Johnathon Russel Donath, born Aug. 4, 2011, to William Donath and Alice Harvey, Osceola. Johnathon weighed 8 lbs. •••

Born at Osceola Medical Center:

A boy, Damon Jax Paulson, born Aug. 8, 2011, to Heather Madden and Chris Paulson, Milltown. Damon weighed 7 lbs., 9.8 oz. ••• A girl, Bailey Lynn Hoffman, born Aug. 9, 2011, to Kim Bainbridge and Tyler Hoffman, Centuria. Bailey weighed 6 lbs., 15 oz. ••• A boy, David D. Croix Hackmann, born Aug. 13, 2011, to Kristina and Jonathan Hackmann, St. Croix Falls. David weighed 8 lbs., 7.8 oz.

•••

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 7

TOWN TALK/COUNTRY CHATTER Karen Mangelsen Karen, Hank, Jake and Grace Mangelsen and Patty Close visited Wayne and Marie Romsos and Krista, Brent, Alison, Aiden and Kiera Losey at the Romsos farm Tuesday evening. Krista and Brent and family were visiting in Wisconsin from Germany for several days. Nina and Lawrence Hines went to Milaca, Minn., Thursday and were overnight guests of Dean and Lorraine Kendall. Nancy and Steve Hagen visited Lawrence and Nina Hines Friday and Saturday. Hank and Karen Mangelsen called on Sue and Roger Mroszak Saturday afternoon. Don and Lida Nordquist went to the home of Joleen and Richard Funk Saturday afternoon. Several other relatives were there also and they celebrated Caleb Schott’s birthday. Gerry and Donna Hines went to Spooner Saturday and attended the open house for Joan and Bob Ademino in honor of their 50th wedding anniversary. Karen and Hank Mangelsen visited Penny and David Doskey Sunday afternoon. Along with a number of other relatives and friends, they helped Penny celebrate her 60th birthday. Marlene and Bruce Swearingen visited Lida and Don Nordquist Sunday evening. There will be a Doran reunion at the Siren Park on Saturday, Aug. 20, at noon. Beverages, plates, napkins and eating utensils will be provided. Bring a dish to pass and come and enjoy the afternoon.

Orange

Fran Krause

LaVonne O'Brien

Several Orange 4-Her’s enjoyed Burnett County 4H camp at Lake 26 Tuesday through Friday. Others helped with a booth to advertise the dog park during Gandy Dancer Days in Webster. There were activities for the kids and adults and food during Gandy Dancer Days. The Webster Lions club had a freewill pancake breakfast and the Lionesses had a bake sale and the Methodist church had sloppy joes, pie and ice cream and the Girl Scouts had cookies. LaVonne O’Brien attended her high school reunion for St. Margaret’s in the Cities on Saturday. Travis Helland, formerly from Webster, was married in New Richmond on Saturday afternoon. Some guests from here who attended were Annette and Randy Hedrick, Pam and Brad Peterson, Jarrod and Kerrie Washburn, Cheri and Steve Ammend, Mark and Deanna Krause and Allyson and Katheryn Krause. Six ELCA churches, including Bethany Lutheran in Siren, had Sunday worship at Luther Point Bible Camp on Sunday followed by a potluck meal.

Academic News MILWAUKEE – The following individuals have been named to the dean’s list at the UW-Milwaukee for the spring 2011 semester. UWM is the second largest university in the state of Wisconsin with more than 30,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Amery Natalie M. Otte, letters and science undergrad; Osceola Jacob J. Elmquist, engineering and computer science, undergrad; Unity Kendra L. Kramas, school of the arts, undergrad. - submitted ••• EAU CLAIRE - The College of Nursing and Health Sciences at the UW-Eau Claire recently announced nursing and environmental public health scholarship recipients for the 2011-12 academic year. Forty-four nursing students and three environmental public health students were awarded UW-Eau Claire Foundation scholarship funds. The following is the scholarship recipient from the area: Luck Megan Panek, Loretta Donnellan Nursing scholarship, Tri-County Medical Alliance scholarship. – submitted ••• OSHKOSH – University of Wisconsin Oshkosh officials have announced the names of students who received undergraduate and graduate degrees following the spring semester of the 2010-2011 school year. Graduates received their degrees at the University’s spring commencement ceremony in May. St. Croix Falls Amy M. Busby, Bachelor of Science in Education, physical education, coaching. - submitted •••

715-349-2964

Siren

Something is up in bear country. Not a single sighting of a bear or a deer this past week. Even the tree rats seem to be slow to arrive each morning, and then they seem skittish. Can fall be in the air? Baltimore orioles seem to have hit the road for their winter homes, as have the rose-breasted grosbeaks. The bluebirds usually fledge two batches of young, not so this year, after the first batch of young left the nest, they were gone. Hummingbirds are hitting the feeders in an almost frantic pace most likely to fatten up, as they too will soon be on there way south. As I watch the signs old Mother Nature is putting out, it doesn’t look too good for us. Seems fall is nearer than we think, and winter not far behind. If the signs ring true we are in for a long, cold winter again with lots of snow. Where did the year go? Last Monday evening, a good-sized group of Lions and Lioness and spouses met at the Siren Crooked Lake Park. After a short Lions meeting, they enjoyed a potluck super with a lot of fun. Those of you who donate blood, mark your calendars for Tuesday, Aug. 23. The community blood drive for Siren/Webster will be held at the Siren Covenant Church from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. For more info or to set your appointment, call Susan at 715-244-3708.

Last Tuesday, Art and Bev Beckmark headed north to Keewatin, Minn., and picked up Bev’s nephew, Craig Anderson’s son Derek of Monroe, N.C. He spent Tuesday through Saturday in bear country. While here, he went to see the old farmhouse he stayed in as a kid. For his 39th birthday he wanted to try elk. He celebrated his birthday at Adventures and enjoyed an elk steak dinner. He left Siren on Saturday to the airport and was home in Monroe at 1 p.m. Sunday after church at Siren Methodist, the parishioners helped Glenna Hauger celebrate her 91st birthday over birthday cake and coffee. Monday, Aug. 15, is her actual date. Many more Glenna. The Siren Methodist Church youth group will be doing a 30-hour famine starting on Friday, Aug. 19, at 3 p.m. through Saturday, Aug. 20. A luncheon will follow the famine on Sunday after services. The Biggs family held their annual family reunion last Sunday at the Crooked Lake Park. A potluck lunch was enjoyed by all at noon, and the afternoon was spent catching up on family news. The oldest there was Art Beckmark, 75, and the youngest was James Woods at 1 year. The farthest away was Kathy Fish of Glen Burnice, Md. It was decided to change it from every three years to every year, the third Sunday in August.

Borderline news Markville will be having their annual potluck picnic, reunion and get-together on Saturday, Aug. 20, at noon (doors open at 11 a.m.). Please bring a dish to share. Coffee and lemonade will be provided (no alcohol allowed). Larmar Productions will provide Karaoke. Come and have fun with us. Also, due to the devastation from the storm at the Markville Cemetery, there will be a cemetery cleanup day on Saturday, Aug. 27, starting at 8 a.m. Lunch will be provided and served around noon at the town hall. Any help, even briefly, is very much appreciated. Please bring along your wheelbarrows, shovels and any other appropriate tools that you can. Two recent pleasant events involved some of us out here in Cloverton and Markville. The Duxbury Volunteer Fire Department held a training session at the Cloverton station last week, which was followed by the annual hamburger nite special at the Cozy Corner Inn. Fire Chief Mike McCullen, Don Mishler, Dave Drake, Paul Raymond and Dave Baker all ate heartily. On another day, seven members of the East Pine County Wanderers attended the annual potluck indoor picnic at the Hinckley Community Center. We were given an excellent tour of the fire and train museum. Papa John Kolstad and his band from the Twin Cities provided the music for the day. Darlene Merimonti won a door prize of a carryall bag from the One More Time Thrift Store, while Marlene Mishler won one of the beautiful quilts that were part of the raffle. On the afternoon of Sunday, Aug. 7, Ron and Sharon Proffit’s daughter, Renelle, and family of Cameron, came to visit and help with the gathering of winter wood. On Monday, daughter Jennifer Kinblom and children, came and also worked on the

Engagement

Bev Beckmark

Bob Brewster

w o o d . They left on Thursday. Again, we are thankful for all the hard work our families do to help us. On Wednesday, the Proffits took the grandchildren over to McGraw Lake, and then over to the Wood Tick Bridge. On the way over the bridge they were treated to a very rare sighting of a cougar, which was padding slowly across the road. They couldn’t believe their good luck to be in the right spot at the right time. Similar sightings were in the news last year down in the Webster area. In the column last week, it was reported that Webster’s football team went to football camp and Matt Freymiller’s name was omitted. Sorry about that. This morning at the Woodland church service, Cassandra Baer presented pictures and told us about her mission project in Montana. This week 20 kids attended the community Bible school that was held at the Northland Community Center. The weather was perfect after the first night. Sunday evening, Aug. 14, they had their program, so their parents could see what they had learned during the week at vacation Bible school. Tuesday night the ladies of the Woodland church are having their ladies day out. It will be held at the Log Cabin Store in Danbury at 6 p.m. Any lady that would like to come is welcome to do so. The Arna Township planning commission is changing their regular meeting schedule to four quarterly meetings held on the first Wednesday of January, April, July, and October at 7 p.m., at the Arna Town Hall. However, if a permit application or other relevant issue arises more frequently, then an additional meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on the first Wednesday of the month that immediately follows

Stratmoen/Gilker Leah M. Stratmoen and Marc S. Gilker wish to announce their engagement. Leah is a 2008 graduate of Unity High School in Balsam Lake. She recently graduated from Aveda in massage theray and is also a graduate of YWAM Mazatlan. Marc is a graduate of W.P. Wagner School of Science and Technology, and he graduated from YWAM, South Africa, and is currently a student at University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, with a major in political science. Leah is the daughter of Phil and Pam Stratmoen of Balsam Lake and the granddaughter of Dick Coen and Carol Park-Coen of Luck. Marc is the son of Richard (Kelly) Gilker of Cobble Hill, British Columbia, Canada, and Gladys (Bruce) Stasiuk of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Leah and Mark will exchange their vows at sunrise, Saturday, Aug. 27, at Lake O’ The Dalles, Interstate Park and follow with a reception at Townsend barn, Centuria, in the evening. The couple will make their home in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, where Marc will continue his studies at the university, graduating in Dec. 2011. – Photo submitted

Tot time at Peace Lutheran Church DRESSER – Tot time, an hour of Bible stories, music, crafts and a snack, is held the first and third Tuesdays, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. during the school year, September through May, at Peace Lutheran Church in Dresser. The community is welcome. Please contact the church office to register at 715-755-2515. – submitted

The Leader

Nature story time at the Park ST. CROIX FALLS – Thursday, Aug. 25, is the final week of summer nature story time. Join naturalists Julie Fox and Barb Walker at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Aug. 25, at Wisconsin Interstate Park for a story and activity chosen especially for children pre-K through kindergarten and their parents. Check at the park office upon arrival for the program location within the p a r k .

After a fall break, the popular program will resume again in winter from January through March 2012. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls, on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy. 8. Nature story time is free of charge, but a state park sticker is required to enter the park. For more information call Fox or Walker at 715-483-3747. - submitted

THANK YOU

Thank you for making our 20th-Annual Corn Feed another huge success. A special thank-you to Lakeside Foods of New Richmond for donating the flavorful sweet corn. Also, a big thankyou to all the people that donated their time toward our annual event. Luck Fire Dept.

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Dewey LaFollette

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PAGE 8 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

Highlight on Passage III In 2003, Northwest Passage opened

the Passage III program in Frederic to address the statewide shortage of programming aimed at meeting the needs of adolescent females with behavioral and emotional problems. Recognizing the unique needs of adolescent females, ages 12-17, who are challenged by emotional instability and mental health issues, our program is designed with components to address the need to increase self-esteem, develop healthy coping skills, promote positive relationship-building and social skills, and promote connection with community. Northwest Passage is committed to relationship-based services. The Passage III girls volunteer weekly at the Frederic Public Library by shelving books, twice weekly at the Burnett County Humane Society by walking dogs, and three times weekly at the Frederic Rehabilitation Center by playing games, doing projects, and visiting with residents. Passage III also has an Adopt-A-Highway and Adopt-A-Trail,

Getting to know

on the Gandy Dancer, where they frequently volunteer their time, and they enjoy working on Ice Age Trail beautification projects in Birchwood and Luck whenever they get the opportunity. Earlier this year, the girls also helped with spring cleanup at the Community Referral Agency in Milltown, and they helped paint the Frederic hockey rink in June. In addition to using innovations in mental health treatment, we maintain a core treatment value of assisting our clients with developing and maintaining healthy relationships in all facets of their lives. We believe that one critical facet of long-term, stable mental health, particularly for our female clients, is a lasting connection to a strong community. Therefore, Northwest Passage III incorporates service-learning programming to assist clients with productive

The Adopt-A-Highway program and Burnett County Humane Society are two volunteer opportunities Northwest Passage takes part in. - Special photos and rewarding community involvement, with the aim of broadening the relationship skill building to include communities. By partnering with organizations in surrounding communities to engage our clients in rewarding

service-learning projects, we are able to meet our goals of broadening such relationships. For further information contact Lisa Hobbie, communications coordinator – LisaH@nwpltd.org, or, 715-327-4402.

Master Gardener volunteer training to be held

SIREN — Garden enthusiasts interested in learning more about horticulture and who have an interest in volunteering in their local communities can now sign up for the University of Wisconsin-Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Training program. Classes will be held on Tuesday evenings from 6-9 p.m. starting Sept. 6 and will continue through Nov. 22. Classes will be held at the Burnett County Government Center on CTH K north of Siren. The class format will include a combination of on-site live instruction and instruction via live interactive Web-based conferencing. Instructors include both University of Wisconsin specialists and guest instructors. Classes will meet once a week for 13 weeks and cover topics on general gardening practices, botany, soils, pest management, entomology, weeds,

plant pathology, herbaceous plants, woody plants, lawns and backyard wildlife. According to Kevin Schoessow, area agriculture development agent for Burnett, Washburn and Sawyer counties, the purpose of this program is to train volunteers to assist with community projects related to horticulture, gardening and nutrition. While participants will get a broad base of knowledge in horticulture, the ultimate purpose of the training is to recruit volunteers. To become certified as UW-Extension Master Gardener Volunteers, participants must commit to 24 hours of volunteer service per year. The registration fee covers the cost of the Handbook for Wisconsin Gardeners and the Wisconsin Master Gardener Program Manual, a one-year membership to the North County Master Gardeners As-

sociation and speaker costs. If two people share the manual and handbook, there is a reduction in cost for the second person to attend the training. The Spooner Area UW-Extension is sponsoring the Master Gardening Volunteer Training. Class size is limited. Copies of the registration form and a list of sched-

uled times and dates can be found on the Web at: www.cals.wisc.edu/ars/spooner/Progra ms.php. Materials can also be requested from Schoessow at the Spooner Area UWExtension Office at 715-635-3506 or 800528-1914. — from UW-Extension

Burnett Community Library Larsen Family Public Library

Next time you read the news about our library, we will be in the new Larsen Family Public Library building. We will be closed for moving on Thursday, Aug. 18, Friday, Aug. 19 and Saturday, Aug. 20. On Monday, Aug. 22, we will be ready for you to visit us in the new library. If you have any questions about this move, please call Patti at 715-866-7697.

Friends of the Library

Join us for a Taste of Italy spaghetti dinner and raffle on Saturday, Aug. 20, from 5 to 7 p.m., at the Moose Lodge, 7330 Hwy. 70. This event is sponsored by Moose Lodge 194 and Friends of the Library in support of the new Larsen Family Public Library.

Are you a senior citizen with low vision?

Our library will be hosting a series of classes this fall to teach a variety of basic computer skills to seniors with low vision. All materials will be presented in large-print format. I would like to get interested people registered as soon as possible, so I will know how many to expect. Please contact Patti if you are at all interested or if you have any questions or ideas about this at 715-866-7697.

Preschool story time

Mystery Mayhem book club

Read a mystery from the All Ghoul’s School Mysteries list and join us for a discussion on Monday, Sept. 12, at 10 a.m. Please call the library for list of titles and we will order a copy for you.

New adult fiction books

“The Throne of Fire” by Rick Riordan (young adult) “Sixkill” by Robert Parker “Cold Vengeance” by Preston Child “In the Guise of Mercy” by Wendy Hornsby “Sworn to Silence” by Linda Castillo “The Brink of Death” by Brandilyn Collins “Flowering Judas” by Jane Haddam

New adult nonfiction books

“Master the GED” by College Board “2012 CLEP Official Study Guide” by College Board “Bridal Shower Themes” by Pat Nekola

DVDs

“Out of Africa” “Adjustment Bureau” “Soul Surfer” “Getting Familiar with Microsoft Office 2007” “The Hidden City of Petra” (Ancient Civilizations)

We meet every Wednesday all year long at 10:30 a.m. for good stories, companionship and fun.

Audio books

Wednesday, Aug. 10, was our last summer session. Gratitude is extended to Annette and her daughter, Audrey, and to Toni for the programs they presented this summer.

Hours and information

Summer reading program

Adult book club

August’s book choice, Not Becoming My Mother by Ruth Reichl, will be discussed on Tuesday, Aug. 23, at 10 a.m. Everyone is welcome.

“Mind’s Eye” by Hakan Nesser “The Girl in the Blue Beret” by Bobbie Ann Mason “Split Second” by Catherine Coulter

Monday-Thursday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. For more information, contact the library at 715-866-7697, Web site: webster.wislib.org. Online catalog: merlin.nwls.lib.wi.us/search.

Interstate Park news Friday, Aug. 19

Hiking the Ice Age Trail, 3 p.m., at the Pothole Trail sign. The Pothole Trail is the western terminus of the 1,200-mile-long Ice Age National Scenic Trail that spans the state of Wisconsin. Join naturalist Walker and learn about the unique geology of Interstate Park, a unit of the Ice Age National Scenic Reserve.

Saturday, Aug. 20

What’s Fluttering: Butterfly or Moth? 1:30 p.m., at the Ice Age Center. A fun program for children and their parents, learn how to tell the difference between a moth and a butterfly and take home your very own crafted butterfly pin. Turtles Are Terrific. 4 p.m. behind the Beach House at Lake O’the Dalles. Drop by and visit with Walker and meet Gizmo the tortoise while learning some fascinating facts about these ancient creatures. Sun-sational Eagle Peak, 7 p.m., at the Eagle Peak Trail sign in the Pines Group Camp. Hike up the trail to the peak with Walker, learn the secrets of the peak and see fantastic views of the St. Croix River Valley as the sun begins to set.

Sunday, Aug. 21 543633 52L

Pondering the Potholes and Other Glacial Won-

ders, 10 a.m., at the Pothole Trail sign. Join the naturalist for a relaxing hike on the Pothole Trail while learning about the makings of Interstate Park’s natural wonders. The Owl and The Mouse, 1:30 p.m., at the grassy area in the center of the North Campground. Meet Aztec, a live owl, and play a game that illustrates the exceptional hearing of some nocturnal animals that have the best hearing of any creatures on earth. A fun activity for the entire family!

Thursday, Aug. 25

Nature story time, 10 a.m. Join naturalists Fox and Walker for the final summer nature story time this year. A story and activity will be chosen especially for children pre-K through kindergarten and their parents. Several special guests will be on hand as well. Check at the park office upon arrival for the program location within the park. Interstate Park is located in St. Croix Falls on Hwy. 35 just one-half mile south of Hwy. 8. For more information call Fox or Walker at 715-483-3747. Visit the Web site at www.friendsofinterstatepark.org and “Like” us on Facebook for information and upcoming events.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 9

Charles E. Lewis Days

20 11

LEFT: Someone yelled, “Net to the rescue,” bringing a net over to help young fish-pond hopeful bring in a fish to take home.

RIGHT: Brendon Roper was given the claim to this about 4-pound trout caught in the fish pond at Lewis Hideaway VFW Sunday, Aug. 14. According to spectators, Brendon’s grandpa, Bill Roper, hooked the trout and one of the pond helpers, Ryan, brought it in. “I’m going to eat it,” Grandpa Bill teased.

Members of Lewis United Methodist Church provided food for the 32nd-annual Charles E. Lewis Days celebrated Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 12-14 in Lewis. Shown here are workers (L to R) Carl Warndahl (collecting from customers, left back); front: Brad Alden and Chung Ae Jones; back: Scott, Nic and Marlene Nelson and Starr Warndahl. Photos by Nancy Jappe

This ATV was one of the parade units in Lewis Sunday, Aug. 14.

This old car was included in the Lewis Days parade lineup. The Northwestern Wisconsin Car Club sponsored its third-annual car show Saturday, Aug. 13, as part of Charles E. Lewis Days.

This group of people at Charles E. Lewis Days Sunday, Aug. 14, were enjoying a time of visiting on the lawn of Lewis United Methodist Church.

Juanita Berg rode in the limousine during the Lewis Elvira Schmidt, Citizen of the Year in Days parade Sunday, Aug. 14, bearing the honor of grand Frederic, rode in a convertible for the marshal for the 32nd running of the annual event. Berg is Two marchers carried a banner announcing the 32nd-annual Charles E. Lewis Days paLewis Days parade. rade Sunday afternoon, Aug. 14. shown here with Little Mr. Lewis, Brett Strenke. Skyla Baker brought her pet llama, Stella, to Lewis to walk in the parade. Stella won two blue ribbons at the Polk County Fair. “She was a fugitive, lost in Straight Lake State Park,” Skyla explained, adding that Stella was the subject of a Leader article on the month she spent in the woods.

Ken and Bonnie Chell were chosen mayor and vice mayor of Lewis for the 32nd-annual celebration of Charles E. Lewis Days Aug. 12-14.

Leader columnist Bernice Abrahamzon (left) and flea-market seller Barb Olinger shared conversation at Lewis United Methodist Church, site of the annual tent revival featuring “The Gospel in Word & Song” with Pastor Mike & Lisa Weaver Friday, five gospel bands (Crossed Paths, Luck Crosswalk Singers, Glory Train, Northern Crossroads and Ottersons) Saturday, along with sharing by Jim Renno, director of Teach All Nations.

This colorful “float” was sponsored in the Lewis Days parade by the Sundown Saloon.

PAGE 10 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

EAA flights

Siren

“Awesome,” said Dillon Buskirk following his ride in Ernie Swanson’s airplane at the BurCounty nett Airport Saturday, Aug. 13. When asked for details as to what he saw while up in the air, Dillon said he saw a “huge lake and a square pond.”

Local pilot Sheldon Olesen made sure his two passengers, Chase Dornink and Trevor Stanford, were properly belted in before they began their Young Eagles Flight Experience Saturday, Aug. 13. “I’m hoping this will be an annual event,” commented airport manager Jeremy Sickler. Sickler advised parents to watch for media announcements in mid-July or August next year.

We are excited to do this. It is really fun, fun for us and for the kids. It helps people be more comfortable with the airport and what is going on.

Photos by Nancy Jappe

- Ernie Swanson, Young Eagles Flight Experience coordinator

Ernie Swanson’s plane, loaded with three passengers and with Swanson as the pilot, came in for a landing at Burnett County Airport. Swanson is a member of the Experimental Aircraft Association chapter at Anoka County Airport in Minnesota. He enlisted EAA members from there to participate in a Young Eagles Flight Experience in Siren this past Saturday during which 55 young people (ages 8-17) got a ride in a small aircraft.

Ernie Swanson, Siren, is part of the EAA group at Anoka County Airport in Minnesota because there isn’t a local EAA chapter. In speaking about the Young Eagles program, Swanson pointed out that this is a worldwide program involving 1.6 million kids. “I’m excited to do this,” he said. "It is really fun, fun for us and fun for the kids. We are doing this to help people be more comfortable with the airport and what Before taking his young passengers up for a flight, Sheldon Olesen took is going on. It’s a public-relations effort that we are them around the plane, explaining what all the parts were. doing for the kids.”

Bill Lindberg (back to the camera), leader of Scout Pack 564, Webster and Siren, took a photo of pilot Ernie Swanson and his passengers, (L to R) Dillon Buskirk, Kaitlyn Lee and her brother, Tanner, following their ride in Swanson’s airplane.

Tony Dalsveen, Siren, watched as his daughter, Michelle, filled out her registration form for the Anoka, Minn., chapter of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Young Eagles Flight Experience at Burnett County Airport Saturday, Aug. 13. A total of 55 young people between the ages of 8 and 17 took flights up with four local pilots, Ken Kreutzmann, Dave Basten, Ernie Swanson and Sheldon Olesen.

Dr. Travis Stanford, Siren, made sure his four children were registered for an EAA Young Eagles flight this past Saturday morning at Burnett County Airport, with Bev Swanson doing the registration. Four local pilots donated their time, money, gas and more importantly, their planes, to take excited young people up for a short ride. Additional pilots from the Anoka County Airport in Minnesota were held back by bad weather.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 11

Vietnam museum

Siren Four young people from Grantsburg, Keegan and Jada Hecht, Chase and N o e l l e Dornink, looked over gear worn by military personnel in the Vietnam War.

Guides in the Vietnam War Museum semitrailer parked at Burnett County Airport Saturday, Aug. 13, included (L to R) Dutch Taylor, who does restoration work, Jerry Paulson and Craig Hass. All three of the guides are from Coon Rapids, Minn.

Photos by Nancy Jappe

This rudder came from a Grumman OV-1 Mohawk, a hightech reconnaissance plane that went down in bad weather during the first Desert Storm. The crew ejected safely, but the plane, which flew in 18 combat missions before it went down, could not be saved. The crew signed the rudder, adding their words of wisdom such as “We’re not in Kansas anymore,” written by Hawk 08 Chief Warrant Officer 3 member Bob Johnson. There are only three flying Mohawks in existence at this time. One of them is shown at the American Wings Air Museum at Anoka County Airport, Blaine, Minn. The other Mohawks are used only for parts.

Brother and sister Tanner and Kaitlyn Lee show the certificates they received following their EAA Young Eagles flight this past Saturday. According to pilot Ernie Swanson, who coordinated the event, it is important for the young people to save these certificates. “In order to take ground school, they have to have flight experience in a plane. That’s part of the FAA exam,” Swanson commented.

A semitrailer display of Vietnam War memorabilia was on display at Burnett County Airport Saturday, Aug. 13. The display is part of the American Wing Air Museum located at Anoka County Airport in Minnesota. This was the first time the items were display in the local area. The semi travels around the local states, opening up the display. The items were given to the museum by military personnel. Admission to the display is free, with all costs paid, barely, by donors. The names of donors are listed on the side of the vehicle.

Looking over the exterior cover of a military mail plane from the Vietnam era were (L to R) Brock and Kana Christianson, and Chase Crosby, three children who visited the Vietnam War Museum with greataunt/grandmother Laura Coyour Saturday, Aug. 13. The American Wings Air Museum will also be displaying the Vietnam Traveling Wall, an 80percent replica of the Wall in Washington, D.C., during Blaine Aviation Days at the Anoka Airport in June 2012.

This model plane was on display at Burnett County Airport Saturday, Aug. 13.

PAGE 12 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

Gandy Dancer Days

Webster

Brenda Christianson, Dianne Weber and Marian Barber Johnson were ready to help Gladys Beers and Fran Krause pick out that perfect piece of pie at the annual Grace United Methodist Church pie social last Friday, Aug. 12. – Photo by Priscilla Bauer

Abby and Lydia Turnquist happily shared a slice with friend Nina Thorson at the Grace United Methodist Church pie social in Webster Friday. The girls and their families were visiting the area from the Twin Cities and couldn’t resist stopping in for a sweet treat. – Photo by Priscilla Bauer

Burnett County American Cancer Society is shown selling brats and other goodies at Webster Gandy Dancer Days on Saturday, Aug. 13. Shown (L to R) Beth Ogren, Michele Gullickson Moore and Mike Moore.

Teagan Hollis, left, tried her hand at face painting at the Webster bike rodeo on Saturday, Aug. 13.

Photos by Sherill Summer unless noted

The Webster Lionesses held a bake sale as part of the Gandy Dancer festivities in Webster. Shown (L to R): Maxine, Billie, Sue, Paulette, Judi and Gladys.

Learning bike safety at the Webster bike rodeo on SaturThis boy takes the slide headfirst. The slide was day. – Photo by Steve Getts. a part of the annual Webster bike rodeo on Saturday, Aug. 13. - Photo by Steve Getts

Willy and Morgan Johnson of Webster try out an ice treat on Saturday during the Gandy Dancer Days in Webster.

Shown are some of the winners of a new bike given away at the annual Webster bike rodeo held on Saturday, Aug. 13. - Photo by Steve Getts.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 13

Festival’s Featured Artists ST. CROIX FALLS – As the summer repertory theater season has unfolded, two young artists, Cole Thomas and Olivia Main, have participated in their very first experiences at Festival Theatre. As accompanist for “Once Upon A Mattress,” Thomas’s artistry at the keyboard is apparent from the opening notes of the overture. A native of Chisago City, Minn., Thomas was enrolled in piano lessons at an early age and, after eleven years of extensive piano training, enrolled in music composition at McNally Smith. When he is not, as he says, “hunting down gigs,” he teaches piano, writes music and plays guitar, bass, harmonica, pipe organ, saxophone, hand percussion and sings. He is also an avid archer, geocacher and swimmer. Thomas’ next “gig” is as keyboardist on the Holland America cruise line. “We are very blessed to have Cole with

Music in the park is Thursday, Aug. 18, and this time I hope the weather cooperates. There is also a circus in Webster, but I don’t think the children would be interested in the goings on at the band shell in Siren. Last weekend we had the arborists back. They cut and split all morning and the only thing that stopped them was cinnamon rolls and caramel rolls and they didn’t stop long for that. Two or three rolls and a couple of gulps of lemonade and back to work. Lemonade and sweet rolls, that sounds like toothpaste and orange juice. We had hamburgers and fresh corn for lunch and I suppose I should apologize to all of the people I pushed in front of to get a whole bag of corn. I figured I was short and maybe they would not notice. Speaking of being short, I am shrinking! I used to think that happened to old people, oh heavens, what have I just said? Scary thought that I am to the age when I am no longer growing up but growing down. It is amazing how the arborists know exactly when we need them most. They had problems after the storm, just like everyone else, but still they found time for us. Interfaith could not do without

PD and Me, an update I shuffle, I shake, I fumble.

Until I take my meds, I mumble. Yes, I have Parkinson’s disease. Readers may recall the full-page spread this newspaper allotted me last April during Parkinson’s Awareness Month to tell my story about living with this disease. As a result, several people have contacted me and we have formed a new support group for people with Parkinson’s disease. The Burnett Medical Center in Grantsburg has offered us a regular meeting space and we plan to meet there on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 2 p.m. Along with sharing symptoms and discussing methods of treatment, we will also share small victories and expect to enjoy new friendships. Hopefully, we will even find some fun in all this.

us this summer,” says Danette Olsen, executive director of Festival Theatre. “From the first day he sat down at the keyboard with the cast of ‘Once Upon a Mattress’ it was Cole Thomas clear that he had a great sense of the rhythm and musicality of this show. His ability to bridge and improvise while working with director Mark Baer and choreographer Denise Baker was phenomenal. When the keyboardist was late for the opening night preshow party on the sidewalk in front of the theater, who sat down and filled in? Cole Thomas. Thomas’ philosophy is simple: ‘Expect everything to go wrong, then be pleasantly surprised when it doesn’t.’ He is a Renaissance man.”

Interfaith

Cares

Barb Blodgett those guys. Fathers and sons and sometimes wives and daughters all come. What a great bunch of people. Thanks guys and girls, we really appreciate you more than you know. A friend from New Richmond stopped by the other day and it is always great to see her. She got me to thinking about growing up in New Richmond. Life was so much simpler then. No locked doors, cars were left with keys in them and in the winter cars were left running while someone ran an errand. We didn’t have the electronic things kids have these days, so we actually had to make our own fun and actually had to talk to people. I remember my great uncle. Tom Doar Sr. was a tall white-haired man and I was so afraid of him. He came to school looking for me one day and he had to duck his head to get through the door. All I could think of was what I had done that he had to

A view

from the lake Pat Solomonson We may also have a show-and-tell time. And as we gather next Wednesday, Aug. 24, I will probably want to tell about the delightful experience I had last Sunday when my son Mark convinced me I could make it down to the lake, then out onto the dock and finally get my rigid body into his speedboat. It was not without fear and trepidation that I managed to walk the entire length of our 100-foot dock, hanging onto Mark for dear life. I was trying to ignore the visual distortion of water, one of many sensory tricks PD plays on us. Somehow, he and daughter Mary managed to get me into the boat and off we

(Next to Panda King) 22 Glacier Drive St. Croix Falls

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OPENING TUES., AUG. 23 Shear Spa and Tanning

Olivia Main comes to Festival Theatre as an intern from UWRiver Falls where she is a junior. Her talents were put to good use as the properties manager and assistant stage manOlivia Main ager for “Once Upon a Mattress” and as Amazing Maisey (the bird) in “Seussical the Musical.” In addition to her production and acting work in theater, Main also writes short stories and plays going back to well before she was 6 when, she reports, she would force her family to participate in plays she would write (especially her cousin Scotty). A native of Webster, Main has been involved with the Voyager Village Players where she directed “The Grandest Canyon.” At UWRF, she performed the

role of Nurse Preen in “The Man Who Came to Dinner,” was an actor and writer in “Art: What is the Meaning of That?” and worked as a stagehand for Marc Berg’s puppet adaptation of “Razia’s Shadow.” Her favorite role to date has been Catherine in “The Foreigner” and she recently won outstanding ensemble performer for her role in “Art: What is the Meaning of That?” at UWRF. Says Jaclyn Johnson, Festival Theatre’s associate artistic director, “Main has been very helpful this summer at Festival. She, along with a cast and crew of very talented and dedicated theater professionals, has helped make this summer’s repertory season a high point of Festival’s long history.” You will be able to hear Thomas’ musical talent and see Main’s production work in “Once Upon A Mattress” through Sunday, Aug. 21, at Festival Theatre. Reserve your tickets by calling the box office at 715-483-3387. - submitted

come and get me. I must have been all of 8 years old at that time. We had the desks that had the hole for inkwells, but never had the ink, too messy and pens were out, we only used No. 2 pencils. I always wondered what No. 1 or No. 3 pencils looked like. I used to try to read the flat ones that carpenters used, but they were old, short and the words were worn off. I think because they were flat they must have been like No. 6 or No. 7. Where did they find flat lead anyway? I often wondered things like that when I was young. I used to look at toothpicks and wonder who stood next to the tree and whittled all of those little sticks. Now I watch a show called “How it is made” and all of my illusions are just that, illusions. That is except the No. 2 pencils. I know they are still around but now I know how they get the lead in there. Oh, and what had I done? Nothing, he just wanted to take me for a ride in his new car that had no top. I did it again. Changed the subject right in the middle of a sentence. I am not sure that is all bad. I have met other people who do the same thing and I think it is becoming sort of an art. Practice and even you can do it. We have not had many men or ladies

from the Restorative Justice program lately. We were lucky to get one who knew which end to cut with on a chain saw. In fact Denny just stood there and stared. This guy was a pro. He came just at the right time. We needed a pro, we needed someone who could handle a chain saw. We really got lucky. I cannot mention his name, but I want him to know how much we appreciated what he did for us. Heavens, I can get wordy can’t I? Don’t you dare say yes, at least not to my face, it would hurt my feelings. Actually if you think something is not good about this column let me know and, between the two of us, we can make it better. I have to close, I am late getting this in and I don’t want to make my editor mad. He is a special guy. (When we were young we use to call that kissing up. Is that a bad thing?) And just so he knows I have not forgotten the cookies, it has just been a really busy time.

roared, like a shot, straight out into the middle of the lake. I think we scared the loons! “Slow it down!” I hollered. Mark obliged and finally even agreed to shut the thing off. I just wanted to sit quietly out there in the middle of the lake, enjoying the sunshine and this peaceful, perfect day. This is the life, I thought. This is kind of life I used to live, before Parkinson’s. Then, however, I didn’t need any help getting out on the dock. I would trot right out there, dive into the lake, swim out to the middle and then just sit out there, treading water, for maybe half an hour or so. I would generally wear something red on my head just to satisfy my family’s concerns, but I was always very comfortable in the water. My one claim to fame, according to my granddaughters, is that I was once an Aqua Belle in the Aqua Follies then a part of the Minneapolis Aquatennial celebra-

tion. (That was 60 years and that many pounds ago!) Back to reality. Parkinson’s is a bummer. I don’t like having to use a walker. I don’t like the sluggish feeling and slurred speech that suddenly seems to encompass me when I’m short on meds. And I especially don’t like the news we got today from our pharmacy that I have now slipped into the “donut hole,” meaning I have already used up all of my prescription insurance benefits for the year. Where’s the fun in this? All I have to do is look at the photo on my new driver's license. It’s one of those “deer in the headlights” kinds of startled, blank stares that really call for a caption, e.g., "That was a stop sign?” Maybe we’ll even take a few moments at our support group meeting to share driver's license photos and come up with appropriate captions.

SPECIAL THANK YOU

To all our friends and neighbors that helped make August 6 gathering a success. Clam Falls Neighbor to Neighbor: For all your help and setting up the tents, tables and chairs and supplies. Clam Falls Trailer Camp: For rest room facilities. Clam Falls Bar and Grill: For supplying ice. Carlson Excavating: For supplying a stage. Town of Clam Falls: For allowing us to block off Cherry Street. Glory Train: For a time of sharing the Good News and gospel music. Milton and Suzanne Johnson: For all your help. We are so thankful that the sky cleared and we had a beautiful afternoon and evening. 543691 Thanks again, Leo and Mary Carlson 52Lp

See you soon. Blessings, Barb

www.the-leader.net

Stay connected to your community.

KNITTING EXTRAVAGANZA Saturday, September 17, 2011, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Frederic Elementary School

Join knitting enthusiasts for a fun-filled day of knitting! There will be displays, demonstrations, workshops, special speakers and plenty of knitting time. A registration fee of $20.00 will include lunch and door prizes. 543577 52rp,Lp 42a-ep

E-mail: knittingextravaganza@live.com or Contact Konnie at 715-653-2619 or Lisa at 715-653-2510 by September 1 to register.

PAGE 14 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

CHURCH NEWS

Life changing mission trip

A total of 43 members of the Peace Lutheran Church in Dresser, seven adults and 36 youth, spent time during their busy summer repairing homes and hearts in Sturgis, S.D. After much time preparing through fundraising, training and gathering up needed tools, they headed to Sturgis in their newly purchased church bus. While in Sturgis, they stayed at the local high school with other youth from around the U.S. They worked hard repairing 65 homes in the town and surrounding communities. This area, known for the infamous Sturgis motorcycle rally, is actually a small quiet community with a high population of elderly residents and high cost of living, leaving many folks financially unable to make needed home repairs. The youth put in many hours painting, roofing, skirting, winterizing and building many wheelchair ramps, making homes more accessible and safe. While gaining skills, confidence and a changed heart, the youth brought so much hope and love to those in need. Thus raising up young people ready to serve and change the world one repair project at a time. The group expresses gratitude to Peace church and the community for all the support. This yearly mission trip continues to grow, and they are already preparing for next summer. The registration meeting for mission trip 2012 is Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 6:30 p.m. at Peace Lutheran Church. Shown are Kailey Ekstrom, Austin Blomberg, Kyle Kinzer, Sarah Haley, Kyle Bussewitz, Brooke Fennern, Nikki Schmidt, Danielle Bliese, Kelly Brinker, Jacqy Hall, Bailey Carlson, Cole Arvidson, Maddie Smith, Aly Isaacson, Karlee Howard, Sarah Gustafson, Alli Holmdahl, Rachel Mortel, Audre Breault, Dylan Blomberg, Danny Cronick, Conner Edling, Cody Bristow, Casey Mielke, Kyle Chapman, Emilee Nelson, Katie Brinker, Hanna Mierow, Trevor Carlson, Anna Smith, Savannah Stone, Peter Meyer, Matt Gjovig, Thor Riemer, Wynter Burrill, Mark Johnson–Trice, Aaron Degerstrom, Sonja Degerstrom, Mike Blomberg, Angie Gehrman, Tammy Breault, Brian Breault and Deb Hall. - Photo submitted

Perspectives Sally Bair

Control

There’s a famous picture of an angry-looking bluebird perched on a wire. It reminds me of a petulant kid who didn’t get his way. We adults, too, want our own way many times. We want to be in control. We set our schedule and plan our day, but sometimes we’re blind-sided by events beyond our control. Think about victims of flood, drought and fire. Add illness, accident, death, divorce and loss of job, and we can understand that we don’t really control the people and things around us after all. When we feel loss of control, it can upset our relationships and our physical, emotional and spiritual health—even when we try to deny or compensate for our loss of control. Perhaps we have even found ourselves feeling as angry as the bluebird looks. King Ahab of Israel believed he controlled his life. However, he couldn’t control the drought God sent. Nor could he control his war against Elijah the prophet. Nor could he control the outcome of his 450 prophets of Baal trying to call on their god to send fire to the altar. King David, in sharp contrast, spent most of his life calling on the Lord to lead him. Whenever he encountered an enemy, whether one man or an army of men, he prayed for God’s specific guidance. God never let him down; he honored David’s humble requests. Many times I’ve tried to control the circumstances in my own life, and I often messed up. Unlike David, I forgot to ask for God’s leading. I seemed to get things backwards, doing before asking, and I didn’t always learn from my experiences, either. Perhaps you also have experienced the desire to control every aspect of your life, too. The Bible has some good reminders about giving over our control to God, the one who knows what’s best for us. One of my favorite verses – one all of us would profit by using every day – is, “Seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you.” (Matthew 6:33) Lord, forgive us when we get things backwards, seeking first our own way and then asking for your blessing. Slow us down enough to remember that you always know best, and we’re better off seeking your way first. Thank you for offering us your perfect control for our lives. In Jesus’ name, amen. Mrs. Bair may be reached at sallybair@gmail.com.

OBITUARIES

Gerald R. Tobeck, 72, Dresser, passed away Aug. 7, 2011, at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, Minn. He was born the son of Henry D. Tobeck and Mary A. (Davidson) Tobeck on Sept. 22, 1939, in Grand Rapids Minn. He was united in marriage to Patricia Irene La Plant on Sept. 22, 1962, in Grand Rapids Minn. They had one child together, Lisa M., and three grandsons, Michael D., Andrew R. and Christopher J. Jerry served for six years in the U.S. Army as a reservist. He worked in the mines for several years and also as a logger, in his youth. Jerry worked for a sanitation company in Shakopee, Minn. After moving to Dresser, he worked in several factories, including a small airport in Osceola and for Polaris, until he retired. Jerry was preceded in death by his wife, Patricia I. Tobeck. Jerry is survived by his daughter Lisa Perez, and son-in-law, Ernest Perez; grandsons, Michael Tobeck, Andrew Tobeck and Christopher Perez. He is further survived by his brothers, Robert Tobeck, John Tobeck Roger Tobeck and sister Rosetta Stangland, their spouses and many nieces and nephews. Jerry was very involved with his church family and will be greatly missed by family and friends. Memorial service will be held on Saturday Aug. 27 at 2 p.m. at the St. Croix Valley Celebration of Life Center, 2012 U.S. Hwy. 8, St. Croix Falls, WI. Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson will be officiating. Visitation is one hour prior to the service at the funeral home, 1 to 2 p.m. St. Croix Valley Celebration of Life Center and the Cremation Society of Polk County, have been entrusted with assisting the family.

Cremation Society Of Northwest Wisconsin

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543624 52L 42d

Serving Polk, Burnett & St. Croix Counties

In Loving Memory Of

Dennis “The Gerb” Holdt

Open Arms

God saw you getting tired, And a cure was not to be. So he put his arms around you, And whispered “Come to Me.” With tearful eyes we watched you, We watched you fade away. Although we loved you dearly, We could not make you stay. A golden heart stopped beating, Hardworking hands now rest. God broke our hearts to prove to us, He only takes the best.

Stay connected to your community.

543326 52L

ST. CROIX FALLS – Open Arms, hosted by Alliance Church of the Valley in St. Croix Falls, invites everyone to a free meal and fellowship the fourth Tuesday of each month from 5 to 6:30 p.m. The next Open Arms is Tuesday, Aug. 23, when a free backpack and $5 Wal-Mart gift card will be given to the first 100 students attending. Alliance Church of the Valley is located at 1259 Hwy. 35, just south of Hwy. 8. Call 715-483-1100 for more information. – submitted

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543325 52L

Eternal

Gerald R. Tobeck

A wonderful husband, father, grandfather and friend who went home to be with the Lord on August 18, 2001 We Miss You And Love You Dearly, Your Loving Family 543487 52Lp

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 15

OBITUARIES

Edna M. Smith

Myrtle “Myrt” L. Snow

Edna M. Smith, 101, resident of Willow Ridge Nursing Myrtle “Myrt” L. Snow, 87, a resident of Siren, died Home in Amery, died Sunday, July 24, 2011. Aug. 7, 2011, at Burnett Medical CenEdna was born in Tony, on June 11, 1910, to Cora and ter Continuing Care Center. Phil Christman. She had three sisters and three brothers. Myrtle was born on June 22, 1924, Her dad ran a logging camp in the Flambeau Forest. in Webster to Ralph and Agnes ConEdna and her sisters were the cooks for the camp. nor. As a young girl, her family She married Vaughn Smith, and they had two sons, moved to Indian Creek where she atKirby and Doug. Edna was left in Tony to raise the boys tended school. Myrtle lived in Red as Vaughn enlisted in the service to serve his country dur- Wing, Minn., from 1927 until 1930 ing World War II. Upon his return to the states, both Edna before moving to Minneapolis. She and Vaughn taught in the Tony school system. Edna married Leslie on Dec. 26, 1943, in taught third grade. Webster. She worked as a laundry Edna was also a renowned cook and baker. Christmas- worker at Royal Laundry from 1948time was a very welcome time for her many friends and 1952 and then for Lawrence & North West Linen from family as she baked over 50 kinds of cookies and candies. 1952-1972. They made their home in Columbia Heights, The church, faculty lounges, neighbors, friends and fam- Minn., until 1972 before returning to Wisconsin permaily were the lucky recipients of her tasty treats. Once she nently. retired, she baked many apple pies and apple dumplings Myrt enjoyed her plants and flowers, feeding the birds for the freezer. She always had cookies, bars, muffins, or and the squirrels, collecting agates, eating good food … pies on hand when one visited. especially fish, going to church, being with friends and Edna and Vaughn also spent many months in their with her family. She also loved her cats that she had cabin on the Flambeau making maple syrup. Their syrup throughout her life. They were her babies. While at the was a very special gift to friends and family. She moved Burnett Medical Continuing Care Center, she enjoyed to Riverbend Assisted Living in Amery when she was 97 Bingo that she won at, card games and various other acyears young. She made many new friends and played a tivities with all the residents there. Myrt was called the mean hand of 500. She was the “poster person” as she “Sunshine Girl.” was the “oldest” and perhaps most active of all residents Myrtle was preceded in death by her husband, Leslie and required very little help. She celebrated her 100 birth- on April 10, 1995; their infant children, daughter, Avis; day with over 100 friends and family. Her greatest joy and son Leslie Jr.; her parents, Ralph and Agnes Connor; these past few years were the visits from her grandkids and her sister, Violet Johnson. and great-grandkids. Her eyes would light up, and her She is survived by her nephews, Ronald Johnson (Barsmile spread from ear to ear as the young kids wanted bara), Lonnie Johnson (Arliss) and Edwin Johnson (Ann); rides on her walker! She was a great lady who shared niece, Connie (Chuck) Keith with Connie’s children, her life with many. Ryan, Eric and Stephanie Keith, that Myrt assumed the She is preceded in death by husband, Vaughn; son, role of Grandma in place for her sister’s grandchildren Doug; daughter-in-law, Bonnie; two sisters and three and great-grandchildren, Aiden and Kaeden; along with brothers. other great-nephews and great-nieces; and her brotherShe is survived by her son, Kirby (Jane) Smith; three in-law, Wayne (Barbara) Snow. grandchildren, Sharri (Mark) Cyra, Marilyn (Matt) SmithFuneral services were held Saturday, Aug. 13, at Salbenblatt and David (Neely Orr) Smith; six great- Bethany Lutheran Church in Siren with Pastor Keith Regrandchildren; sister, Vyrle Lemke. diske officiating. Music was provided by Fran McBroom. Her celebration of life service will be held at the Faith Interment followed at the Danbury Cemetery. Casket United Methodist Church in Ladysmith, W8125 Shady bearers were Ryan Keith, Eric Keith, Chad Johnson, Lane, on Friday, Aug. 26, at 11 a.m. Visitation will take Kevin Johnson, Tony Payson and Keith Johnson. Honplace one hour before the service. Lunch will be served orary casket bearer was Stephanie Keith. Online condofollowing the service. Memorials preferred to the Faith lences can be made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. United Methodist Church in Ladysmith. The Swedberg-Taylor Family Funeral Home, Webster, Online condolences may be left on the following Web was entrusted with arrangements. sites. For updated information, please call Bruce Rowe at 715-472-2444. Rowe Funeral Home of Luck, www.rowefh.com, and the Northwest Wisconsin Cremation Center in Milltown, Marlin John Larson, 80, Frederic, passed away Sunday, www.wicremationcenter.com, have been entrusted with Aug. 14, 2011, at the Frederic Nursfuneral arrangements. ing and Rehab Center after a sixmonth battle with cancer. Marlin was born on Nov. 6, 1930, to Joe and Esther (Peterson) Larson in Grantsburg. He graduated from Arvilla A. Voltattorni, 84, Florence, passed away peace- Frederic High School in 1948. He served in the Army during the Kofully Friday, Aug. 12, 2011, at Dickrean War, stationed in Japan as an inson County Healthcare System, honor guard. He was a lifetime Iron Mountain, Mich., with her fammember of the VFW, where he held ily by her side. a number of positions. She was born in Chicago, Ill., on On Oct. 29, 1955, he married Virginia Maxine Johnson. July 6, 1927. Arvilla lived for many To this union five children were born, Laryn (Paula) of years on the South Side of Chicago Frederic, LaRaye of Rice Lake, Lydell (Wendy) of Fredbefore moving to Webster in the eric, LaDon (Carla) of Findlay, Ohio, and Lonna (Jordan) early 1980s. In March of 2011, she Coddington of Frederic. moved to Florence. Marlin held many jobs, from working the harvest fields Arvilla is survived by one son, David Smith; two daughters, Terri (Albert) Kremer, and in South Dakota to Peterson Lumber and Wood Products Laura (William) Walker; three sisters, Cheryl (Lawrence) on Spirit Lake for over 30 years. Marlin and his chain saw were hired to help clear the land for the Frederic Golf Matrious, Marlys Thayer and Beverly (James) Thoms; C o u r s e . three brothers, Frank “Bud” Elliott, Clyde Elliott and As a young man he was a pinsetter at the Frederic bowlDick (Jean) Huntoon; five grandchildren, Joseph ing alley before pin setting machines were installed. Mar(Theresa) Escoe Jr., Rachel (Chad) Rutnicki, Shannon lin rolled the first 700 series at the Frederic bowling alley Conroy, Emma Kremer and Allison Kremer; six great- and continued to bowl until this past year. grandchildren, Brandi, Zoe, Adison, JT, Evan and Pepper; Marlin loved the outdoors, going for drives looking for many nieces and nephews. wildlife and especially enjoyed deer hunting. He also enAlong with her parents, she was preceded in death by joyed spending time with his family and friends, travelone son, Kenneth; three brothers and two sisters. ing and watching sporting events. Countless hours were Memorial service will be Friday, Aug. 19, at 4 p.m., and spent sitting on the bleachers cheering. visitation will be 3-4 p.m. at the Swedberg-Taylor Family Marlin is survived by his children; 11 grandchildren; Funeral Home, Webster. Online condolences can be three great-grandchildren; sister, Gloria Pallas of Ontario, made at www.swedberg-taylor.com. Calif.; brother, Douglas (Phyllis) of Grantsburg; many The Swedberg-Taylor Funeral Home, Webster, was en- other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by trusted with arrangements. Virginia, his wife of 46 years; his parents; infant brother, Dale; and sister, Linda Piepho. Visitation will be held Thursday, Aug. 18, from 4 – 7 p.m., at the Rowe Funeral Home in Frederic. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 19, at Grace Lutheran Church of West Sweden, with visitation In Loving Memory of one hour prior to the service. Pastor Theresa Riewestahl will officiate. Music will be provided by organist, Carol Roy D. Radke Jennie C. Radke Mattson and vocalist, Andrea Lundquist. Sharon Greene Feb. 4, 1906 - July 14, 1976 Jan. 13, 1908 - Aug. 10, 1991 will be interpreter for the service. The years go by and we miss them still. Burial with military honors will take place at West SweMemories keep them in our hearts. den cemetery following the service. Pallbearers assisting On earth they did their best. will be Ron Hedberg, Mike Larson, Steve Larson, Jeff LarNow they are at rest. son, Roger Hinrichs and Alan Madsen. Online condolences may be left at www.rowefh.com. Please continue Dearly missed by to check the Web site for updated information or call George Radke & family • Margaret Asp & family Bruce Rowe at 715-327-4475. Rowe Funeral Home of Frederic has been entrusted

Marlin John Larson

543663 52Lp

Arvilla A. Voltattorni

Doris V. Hanson Doris V. Hanson, 81, Town of Trade Lake, passed away at her home in the Town of Trade Lake on Aug. 11, 2011. This is the same house where she was born 82 years ago on Nov. 26, 1928. She loved the country and especially the Trade Lake area. She was very proud of her Swedish heritage, and she spoke Swedish fluently. Doris attended Trade Lake No. 5 Elementary School and graduated from the Grantsburg High School in 1946. On Sept. 20, 1947, she married George E. Hanson of the Town of Wood River. To this union four sons were born. Doris worked as a mother, a farm wife and, later, a hospital cook at Burnett Regional Medical Center. She loved painting, playing piano, writing and visiting with family and friends. She and her musical group, The Get Togethers, spent many hours providing musical programs for area nursing homes and seniors groups. She always had time to help those less fortunate. She is preceded in death by her parents, Victor and Elsie Swanson; her husband, George; and brothers, Gunnard and Einar Swanson. She is survived by her sons and daughters-in-law, Bruce and Mary Ann of New Richmond, Allen and Cindy of Centuria, Glenn and Susan of Clear Lake and Thomas and Patti Jo of Grantsburg. “Grandma Doris” as she was affectionately known, was especially proud of her nine grandchildren, Kathy, Laura, Erik, Jillian, Ryan, Jenni, Shari, Danny and Pierce; and her 12 great-grandchildren. Services were held Aug. 16 at Zion Lutheran Church in Trade Lake, where Doris was a lifelong member. Interment was in the church cemetery. The Edling Funeral Home, Grantsburg, was entrusted with arrangements.

Clarence W. Peterson Clarence Warren Peterson, 82, Frederic, died May 25, 2011, at the VA Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minn., from an aorta aneurysm. Clarence was born July 6, 1928, to Raymond and Agnes (Brask) Peterson. He grew up in the Spirit Lake/Trade Lake area, attended the Spirit Lake School and graduated from the Frederic High School in 1946. In 1948, he joined the Marines and was honorably discharged in 1952. After his discharge, he worked and attended school for carpentry in St. Paul, Minn. On July 11, 1953, he married Delores Boe of Frederic, and they lived in St. Paul until 1955, when they moved to Frederic. They had three children Marilyn, Karen and Warren. Clarence worked in the building industry most of his life mainly residential but also some commercial, which included apartment buildings in Frederic and Siren as well as the Voyager Village Clubhouse, beach houses and various buildings. He worked as a licensed real estate broker, and briefly they owned the Coast-to-Coast in Frederic, but he didn’t like having to be inside. For several years he worked construction in Alaska bringing schoolhouses up to code in the native villages, the Exxon Oil spill, North Slope oilfields and built houses in Kotzebue. While in Alaska, he enjoyed fishing and sight-seeing. When the casinos came to the area, he was manager of the Turtle Lake Casino’s first card room and later trained blackjack dealers. In his retirement years, he built beautiful furniture and home and yard accessories for his family and friends. His favorite life-time hobby was gambling, especially cards. His family was very important to him, and he enjoyed traveling (especially car trips) and spending time with them. Clarence is survived by his children Marilyn (Jeff) Desjardins of Shoreview, Minn., Karen (Dave) Johnson of Forest Lake, Minn. and Warren (Karen) Peterson of Osceola; grandchildren, Jason (Nalani) Desjardins of Shoreview, Minn., Brian (fiancé Rebecca Nelson) of Las Vegas, Nev., Mark (Dr. Jessica) Desjardins of Chicago, Ill., Andy Peterson of Osceola, and Dusty Johnson of Forest Lake, Minn.; great-granddaughter, Hailee; special friend, Connie Gray of St. Croix Falls; sisters, Raynes (Orvil) Johnson of Redding, Calif., and Vernice Engelstad of South Dakota; sisters-in-law, Edna Peterson of Minnesota, Angie Peterson of Milltown and Evelyn Alden of Frederic. He was preceded in death by wife, Delores, in 1994; grandson, Joshua Johnson in 1994; parents and brothers, Kenneth and Lyle. A memorial service was held at the Pilgrim Lutheran Church, Frederic, on June 18, 2011.

PAGE 16 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

CHURCH NEWS

Girl’s shyness may be caused by anxiety Q: My daughter is in elementary school and is extremely shy. So shy that it is affecting her schoolwork and friendships. What can we do to bring her out of this shell? Juli: Unfortunately, many kids struggle with shyness. According to Dr. Jerome Kagan, a professor of psychology at Harvard University, about 10 to 15 percent of kids in elementary school are very shy. For some, their shyness is a manifestation of a reserved personality trait. For others, shyness is a symptom of anxiety. The fact that your daughter’s grades and friendships are being impacted suggests that she is probably in the latter category. One of the best ways to combat anxiety is to make the world a more predictable place. You can help your daughter with this by role-playing everyday situations like what to do when you meet someone new or when someone teases you at school. You can also work with her teacher and other school staff to make social interactions at school more predictable. School can be an overwhelming experience for a young child. Your daughter may begin to develop more self-confi-

Jim Daly

Focus on the Family

Juli Slattery

dence in social situations by interacting with smaller groups of children outside the school setting. Start by inviting over a potential friend for a playdate. It is even better if the friend is a classmate, so that the relationship carries over into the classroom environment. You may even want to ask your daughter’s teacher for recommendations of what kids in the class would be a good fit for a friend. If you find that these interventions are not making a difference, it is time to seek help from a qualified professional. Most schools have on-staff counselors who are skilled at handling anxiety-related behavior. Your school or your daughter’s pediatrician may also be able to refer you to an expert in your area. ••• Q: The other day I heard my juniorhigh-aged son and his friend laughing about a classmate who passed out by sniffing an air freshener. I wanted to ask them about it, but I thought they were probably just making up stories. Surely

they were joking about this? Jim: Sadly, this has become an all-tooreal phenomenon. Even as illegal drugs continue to plague youth culture, some of the most harmful substances to your kids might be sitting right under your own roof. In 2010, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration released a study about an increasingly popular youth pastime known as “huffing.” This, as you may have surmised from your son’s conversation, is when kids attempt to get high by inhaling common household products such as shoe polish, glue and, yes, air fresheners. It sounds absurd, but research shows that more 12-year-olds have used household products to get high than marijuana, cocaine and hallucinogens combined. This is a very real problem. The use of inhalants can cause a child’s heart rate to increase dramatically. In some cases, the end result is cardiac arrest and sudden death. Even for kids who try huffing only once, the risk of serious injury or death is considerable. I’m not suggesting that you lock up all of your household products. But your son needs to know that this is no laughing matter. As you talk to him about the pitfalls of alcohol abuse and illegal drugs like marijuana, be sure to let him know

that “huffing” is a dangerous, and potentially deadly, pursuit as well. Help him make smart decisions and stand up to peer pressure. Your active presence in his life is the strongest defense he has against the dead-end road of drug and alcohol abuse. ••• Jim Daly is president of Focus on the Family, host of the Focus on the Family radio program, and a husband and father of two. Dr. Juli Slattery is a licensed psychologist, cohost of Focus on the Family, author of several books, and a wife and mother of three. Submit your questions to: FocusOnTheFamily.com. Copyright 2010 Focus on the Family, Colorado Springs, CO 80995. International copyright secured. All rights reserved. Distributed by Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut St. Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500. This feature may not be reproduced or distributed electronically, in print or otherwise, without written permission of Focus on the Family.

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Siren/Lewis United Methodist Churches Siren, Wis.

Lewis, Wis.

Swedish Fiddlers at Frederic Nursing and Rehabilitation Center

FREDERIC – A popular group of young Swedish fiddlers came to the Frederic Nursing and Rehabilitation Center on Monday, Aug. 8. Having entertained with a concert at Siren United Methodist Church the previous day, they continued with a program at this location. Gathering informally at the dining area, the fiddlers entertained with folk music and song for 30 minutes, then mingled with the residents until close to the noon luncheon serving time. Those residents who speak Swedish were able to converse in that lan-

guage with the musicians. Staff provided refreshments for the fiddlers prior to their departure. The Vikarbyns Lilla Spelmanslag has performed in parts of Scandinavia as well as Ireland, England and the United States. Margaretha Mattsson, well-known throughout Sweden for her innovative techniques with young musicians, is their director. - Info and photo submitted

Church listings sponsored by the following area businesses: BREMER BANK, N.A. Full-Service Banking Member FDIC Frederic - Danbury - Siren

DAEFFLER’S QUALITY MEATS, INC. Wholesale & Retail Meats Custom Butchering & Processing Phone 715-327-4456

NORTHWESTERN WISCONSIN ELECTRIC CO.

“Your Electric Servant” Serving Polk & Burnett Counties “Use Energy Wisely”

CARLSON-ROWE FUNERAL HOME

Frederic, Wis. 715-327-4475 Duane Lindh

HAULING

INTER-COUNTY CO-OP PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Top Soil • Trackhoe 715-472-2717 Mobile 715-491-1861 1065 290th Ave. Frederic, Wis.

Frederic, Wis. - 715-327-4236 Shell Lake, Wis. - 715-468-2314 Siren, Wis. - 715-349-2560 St. Croix Falls, Wis. - 715-483-9008

• Gravel • Sand • Rock • Topsoil • Track Hoe 715-554-0526 Frederic, Wis.

Printers & Publishers Office Supplies

STATE FARM INSURANCE COMPANIES

Corey T. Arnold, Agent Frederic, Wis. Phone 715-327-8076

BEAN’S COUNTRY GRIDDLE Hwys. 35 & 48 Downtown Frederic Phone 715-327-5513

R&S TRUCKING

LUCK VAN METER’S MEATS

Government Inspected Slaughtering and Processing, Sausage making • Ham & Bacon Cured & Smoked Sides and Quarters of Beef and Pork Available Old-fashioned Fresh Meat Counter Tim Van Meter and Ross Anderson, Owners Luck, WI 54853 Plant 715-472-2141

WEBSTER

ALPHA

CUSHING

CASHCO BUILDING SUPPLIES

BASS LAKE LUMBER

CUSHING COOPERATIVE SOCIETY

Complete Lumber & Building Supplies

Phone 715-866-4238 Hwy. 35 N. Webster, Wis. Tom & Becky O’Brien, Owners

HOPKINS SAND & GRAVEL, INC.

Sand, Gravel, Ready-Mix, Concrete, Black Dirt, Dozer Work, Landscaping & Septic Tanks Installed

• Complete Line of Building Supplies & Lumber • Cabot’s Stains Grantsburg, Wis. 715-488-2471 or 715-327-8766

BURNETT DAIRY CO-OP 1988 World Champion Cheesemaker Earl Wilson, Cheese Plant Mgr. Dan Dowling, Ag. Supply Mgr. for Feed, Propane & Fertilizer Alpha, Wis. 715-689-2468 715-689-2467

Feed Mill - Grain Dept. Cushing, Wis. 715-648-5215

WILD RIVER FLAGS Jerry & Pat Willits 2815 285th Ave. Sterling Township St. Croix Falls, WI 54024 715-488-2729

Hwy. 35 North Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-4157 M.P.R.S. #03059

SWEDBERG-TAYLOR FUNERAL HOME Webster, Wis. Phone 715-866-7131

SIREN

Churches 6/11

FREDERIC

OLSEN & SON

Your Full-Service Drugstore Siren, Wis. Phone 715-349-2221

D & L FINANCIAL SERVICES 10022 Elbow Lake Road Siren, Wis. 54872 715-689-2539

Any area business wishing to help sponsor the church listings should contact the Leader at 715-327-4236.

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 17

ChurchDIRECTORY Directory CHURCH ADVENTIST

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST - FREDERIC

609 Benson Road; Pastor Curtis Denney Sat. Worship 11 a.m.; Sabbath Schl. 9:30 a.m. ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE

ALLIANCE CHURCH OF THE VALLEY

Senior Pastor Bob Morton 1259 Hwy. 35 S., St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship: 9 & 11 a.m.

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

WORD OF LIFE CHURCH

Meeting in homes. Elders: Cliff Bjork, Jon Zens, 715-483-1357 and 715-755-3048 Sun. Fellowship - 10 a.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. LUTHERAN

LUTHERAN

BALSAM LUTHERAN CHURCH

1115 Mains Crossing, 1/2 Mile South Hwy. 8 On 110th St.; Sun. Worship 9 a.m.; Sun. School 10:15 a.m. Wed. Bible Study 8:30 a.m.; Wed. LOGOS 3:20 p.m.

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR LUTHERAN (WELS)

Gene E. Jahnke, Pastor, 715-635-7672, Hm. 715-354-7787, Hwy. 70 at 53, Spooner Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School & Bible Classes For All - 10:45 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - BRANSTAD Pastor Jay Ticknor, 715-463-5746 3 miles So. of Grantsburg on Hwy. 87 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

BETHANY LUTHERAN - SIREN

Hwy. 35, 1/2 blk. N. Main St. Interim Pastor Keith Radiske Pastoral Serv. 715-349-5280 Sun. School 8:15 a.m.; Sun. Worship - 9:30 a.m.

BETHESDA LUTHERAN - DRESSER (LCMC) www.bethesdalutheran.ws

Pastor Peter Rimmereid, 715-755-2562 1947 110th Ave., Dresser Sun. Contemporary Serv. 8:30 a.m.; Sunday Traditional Service 10 a.m.; July 31 & Aug. 28: One Service, 10 a.m. Only

BONE LAKE LUTHERAN bllc@lakeland.ws Pastor Mary Ann Bowman, 5 mi. E. of Luck on Hwy. 48, 1/2 mi. S. on I; Office - 715-472-2535 Pastor - 715-472-8153, Adult Bible Study 8:30; Worship 9:30 a.m.; Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays CHRIST LUTHERAN (LCMS)

Pipe Lake CTH G & T, 715-822-3096 Pastor Steve Miller Sun. Serv. 10:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m. during schl. yr.; Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sun. www.christlutheranpipelake.com

CLAM FALLS LUTHERAN (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Communion 1st Sun.; Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. School 9 a.m.

FAITH LUTHERAN - BALSAM LAKE

faithlutheran@lakeland.ws Pastor Diane Norstad 715-485-3800; CTH I & Mill Street Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:40 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st & last Sundays

FAITH LUTHERAN - GRANTSBURG

Pastor Victor St. George, 715-463-5388 Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

FIRST EVAN. LUTHERAN

561 Chestnut St., Taylors Falls, MN 651-465-5265 June - Aug. Sun. Worship: Traditional 8:30 a.m.; Comtemporary 10:30 a.m. Sun., Aug. 21: One Worship Serv. 10 a.m. followed by annual meeting

FIRST LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl, 715-648-5323 or 715-648-5324 Sun. Wor. 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9 a.m.

FRISTAD LUTHERAN - CENTURIA

ELCA - 501 Hwy. 35, 715-646-2357, Mel Rau, Pastor Sun. Wor. & Holy Communion - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:40 a.m.

GEORGETOWN LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rt. 1, Balsam Lake, WI (Fox Creek) Pastor Neal Weltzen; GT Office - 715-857-5580, Parsonage - 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wors. Serv. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:15 a.m.; Holy Communion - 1st Sun. of each month

GRACE LUTHERAN - WEST SWEDEN

Phone 715-327-4340, 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Pastor Theresa Riewestahl Worship 9:15 a.m.; Sun. School 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - FREDERIC

(Missouri Synod) Pastor Jody R. Walter, 715-327-8608 Sun. Schl. - 8:45 a.m.; Service - 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st, 3rd & 5th Sun.

LAKESIDE COMMUNITY LUTH. - ELCA CTH H, 1/2 mi. N. of CTH A & H on H Church Off. 715-635-7791 Roger Pittman, Pastor Sat. Serv. 7 p.m.; Sun. Serv. 9 a.m.

LAKETOWN LUTHERAN - CUSHING

Pastor Dorothy Sandahl Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 10:30 a.m.

LUCK LUTHERAN

510 Foster Ave. E. Pastor Ralph Thompson Office 715-472-2605; Home 715-472-8424 Sun. Wor. 10:30 a.m.; Mon. Wor. 6:30 p.m.

MILLTOWN LUTHERAN

113 W. Main St.. W., Phone 715-825-2453 Pastor Danny G. Wheeler 9:15 a.m. Worship ; 10 a.m. Sunday School

NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH

Pastor Emory Johnson, 715-463-5700 685 W. State Road 70, Grantsburg Sun. Wor. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

NORTH VALLEY LUTHERAN

Pastor Maggie Isaacson, 715-825-3559 3 mi. W. of Milltown on “G” Sun. Wor. - 9:15 a.m.; Wed. Wor. 6:30 p.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

OUR REDEEMER LUTHERAN, (LCMS) WEBSTER

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Church Phone 715-866-7191 Sun. Schl. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10:30 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

PEACE LUTHERAN - DRESSER (ELCA)

2355 Clark Road, Dresser, WI, 715-755-2515 Web site: plcdresser.org Pastor Wayne Deloach, Intern Courtney Young Sun. Wor. 8:30 & 11 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:35 a.m.

PILGRIM LUTHERAN - FREDERIC (ELCA)

Interim Pastor Andrew Hinwood 507 Wisconsin Ave. N., 715-327-8012 Sun. Worship - 9 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 2nd Sundays www.pilgrimlutheranfrederic.org

REDEEMER EV. LUTHERAN

(Wisconsin Synod) Pastor Gene DeVries 200 N. Adams St., St. Croix Falls Sun. Wor. - 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 8:30 a.m.

METHODIST

METHODIST

ATLAS UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Sunday School - 11 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

CENTRAL UNITED METHODIST GRANTSBURG

Pastor Carolyn Saunders, 715-463-2624 Worship - 9 a.m.; Sunday School - 10:30 a.m.

DANBURY UNITED METHODIST

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.

GRACE UNITED - WEBSTER

Cindy Glocke, Pastor, 715-866-8646 Sunday Worship - 10:30 a.m.

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST Holytrinity@wisconsinumc.org 1606 165th Ave., CTH I, Centuria Pastor Freddie Kirk, 715-485-3363 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship - 8:30 a.m.

LAKEVIEW UNITED - HERTEL

Pastor Jack Starr Wor. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - during worship hour

LEWIS MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST Tom Cook, Pastor Worship 8:45 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

McKINLEY UNITED METHODIST

Pastor Annie Tricker Sun. Worship 11 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m. Potluck dinner 1st Sunday

OSCEOLA UNITED METHODIST

350 Michigan Ave., Centuria Sun. Worship - 10:45 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m.

oumc@centurytel.net 306 River Street, Osceola, 715-755-2275 Pastor Mark Gilbert Adult Class - 8:30 a.m.; Sunday School 10 a.m. Sunday Worship - 10 a.m.; Holy Communion 1st Sunday

ST. PETER’S LUTHERAN - LCMC

ST. CROIX FALLS UNITED METHODIST

ST. JOHN’S EV. LUTHERAN (Wis. Synod)

ST. FRANCIS XAVIER

Pastor Father Frank Wampach, 651-465-7345 25293 Redwing Ave., Shafer, MN Sunday 9 a.m.

ST. JOHN THE BAPTIST

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa, 715-866-7321 Cedar & Muskey Ave. - Webster Mass Sun 10 a.m., Wed. 5:30 p.m. (Sept-May), Fri. 9 a.m. (Summer)

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

1050 North Keller Ave., Amery, 715-268-7717 Father John Drummy, Pastor Sat. Mass 4 p.m., Sun. Mass 8 a.m. Mass Wed. & Thurs. 9 a.m.

ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-294-2243 255 E. 10th Ave., Osceola Masses: Sun. 10:30 a.m., Tues. 5 p.m. Thurs. at 10 a.m. at Osc. Nursing Home ASSEMBLY

ASSEMBLY

CENTURIA ASSEMBLY OF GOD Pastor Don Wiltshire, 715-640-6400 Centuria - Phone 715-646-2172 Sunday Service: 10 a.m.

OSCEOLA COMMUNITY CHURCH

Pastor Larry Mederich, 715-294-4332 www.occconnect.org Mtg. @ St. Croix Art Barn; Sun. Serv. - 9 a.m. Nursery and children church

SIREN ASSEMBLY OF GOD

Pastor Andrew Bollant Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Morn. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Supervised Nursery; Wed. Evening - Worship Serv. 6:30 p.m.

EVANGELICAL

EVANGELICAL

APPLE RIVER COMMUNITY (EFCA)

1614 CTH B, North Luck, Pastor Rob Lubben Sunday Worship - 9 a.m. Contact Leslie Valentine, 715-646-2390; E-mail: leslie56@centurytel.net

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship Service - 10 a.m. Sunday School is at 9 a.m., Nursery available

Pastor Bruce Tanner, 715-268-2176 942 U.S. Hwy. 8, Amery Sun. Schl. 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m.

SHEPHERD OF THE VALLEY LUTHERAN

ST. LUKE UNITED - FREDERIC

Pastor Arveda “Freddie” Kirk, 715-327-4436 Pastor Tammy Clausen Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

CROSSWALK COMMUNITY CHURCH

(Missouri Synod) 140 Madison St. South, St. Croix Falls Pastor Mark K. Schoen Sun. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun.School - 10:30 a.m.

TRINITY LUTHERAN - ELCA

10 mi. W. of Cumberland on Hwy. 48 (McKinley) - Pastor Neal Weltzin GT Office 715-857-5580, Parsonage 715-822-3001, TR Office - 715-822-3001 Wor. Serv. - 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - 10:15 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st Sunday

TRINITY LUTHERAN LCMS, DANBURY

Pastor Gerald Heinecke Home 715-327-8608; Church 715-866-7191 Sunday Worship Service - 8 a.m. Holy Communion 1st & 3rd Sundays

TRINITY LUTHERAN - FALUN

SIREN UNITED METHODIST

Tom Cook, Pastor Sunday School 9 a.m. Worship - 10:15 a.m. (Nursery available)

TAYLORS FALLS UNITED METHODIST 290 W. Government Street, 715-294-4436 Reverend Dr. Rolland Robinson Sunday Service - 10 a.m. with nursery Sunday School - Sept. - May at 10 a.m.

WOLF CREEK UNITED METHODIST

Rev. Mike Weaver Sunday Worship - 8:15 a.m. COVENANT

COVENANT

CALVARY COVENANT - ALPHA

Hwy. 70 East, 715-689-2271, Pastor: Carl Heidel Worship 9 a.m.; Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Communion -Every Sunday

Pastor Scott Sagle, 715-689-2541 Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Worship 10:30 p.m.; Elevator provided, welcome

TRINITY EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN OSCEOLA

SIREN COVENANT

300 Seminole Ave. (CTH M) Mark Kock, Pastor, 715-294-2828 Sunday Worship 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.; Summer, 9 a.m.

WEST DENMARK LUTHERAN

Pastors Mike & Linda Rozumalski 1 mi. west of Luck on N, 2478 170th St., Luck Sunday Wor. 10 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 9 a.m. Fellowship 11 a.m.

WEST IMMANUEL LUTHERAN - ELCA

Rev. Rexford D. Brandt 447 180th St., Osceola, 715-294-2936 Sunday Worship 9 a.m. Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday of the month

YELLOW LAKE LUTHERAN

1/2 mi. W. of Hwy. 35 on U, 715-866-8281, Pastors Douglas Olson, Roger Kampstra and Myron Carlson Services begin at 9:30 a.m.; Communion 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - BONE LAKE (AALC)

Pastor Gary Rokenbrodt - 715-653-2630 5 mi. E. of Frederic on W, 2 mi. south on I; www.clamfalls-zion-aalcparish.net Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. Communion - 1st Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - EAST FARMINGTON (WELS ) Pastor Martin Weigand - 715-294-3489 Thursday Worship 7:30 p.m.; Sunday Worship 8 & 10 a.m.

ZION LUTHERAN - MARKVILLE

Pastor Tim Faust Worship - 11 a.m.; Sun. School - 10 a.m. Holy Communion - 1st & 3rd Sunday

ZION LUTHERAN - TRADE LAKE

Pastor Theresa Riewestahl 715-327-8384, 715-327-8090 Fellowship - 10:30 a.m., Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., Communion - 1st & 2nd Sundays

PRESBYTERIAN

PRESBYTERIAN

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

Rev. Bruce Brooks - 715-483-3550 719 Nevada St. , (between Simonson & Tower Roads) , St. Croix Falls Worship - 10 a.m. (Nursery provided) Sun. Schl. - Child.- 9 a.m.; Sun. Schl. - Adults 8:45 a.m.; Communion 1st Sunday

Pastor Dave Guertin 7686 Lofty Pines Drive, Siren, 715-349-5601 Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School 9 a.m.

UNITED COVENANT - CLEAR LAKE Pastor Gary Tonn Sunday School 9:00 a.m.; Worship 10:30 a.m. CATHOLIC

CATHOLIC

ASSUMPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 255 St. Hwy. 35, East Farmington Mass Friday 9 a.m.; Sacrament of Penance Sat. 3:30 p.m.

CHURCH OF ST. JOSEPH

Pastor - Father Frank Wampach 490 Bench St., Taylors Falls, 651-465-7345 Sat. Vigil 5:30 p.m.; Sun. 7:30 & 10:30 a.m. Tues. - Thurs. 7:30 a.m.

OUR LADY OF PERPETUAL HELP

Pastor Greg Lund, 715-327-8767 700 Churchwood Lane; 505 Old CTH W, Frederic Sun. Schl. - 9 a.m.; Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services Sat. Worship - 6 p.m., Luck Senior Center

HOPE EVANGELICAL FREE CHURCH Pastor Dave Williams 933 248th St., Osceola Morning Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School Sept.-May 8:45 a.m. Children’s Church & Nursery provided

TRADE RIVER EVAN. FREE

Pastor Dale VanDeusen, 715-488-2296 or 715-488-2653 20296 Hwy. 87, Grantsburg Morning Wor. 9:30 a.m.; Sunday Schl. 10:45 a.m.; Nursery provided for all services BAPTIST

BAPTIST

EAST BALSAM BAPTIST - BALSAM LK.

715-857-5411 Wor. Service - 9 a.m.; Sun. School-10:15 a.m.

EUREKA BAPTIST

2393 210th Ave., St. Croix Falls Pastor Willis Christenson, 715-483-9464 Sun. School - 10 a.m.; Wor. Service - 11 a.m.

FAITH FELLOWSHIP

Hwy. 35 and CTH N., Luck Bill McEachern Pastor, 715-485-3973 Sun. Bible study - 9 a.m.; Sun. Wor. - 10 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - AMERY

131 Broadway St., 715-268-2223; www.fbcamery.org; E-mail: churchoffice@fbcamery.org Reg. office hours: Tues.-Thurs. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pastor Charlie Butt, Lead Pastor; Nick Buda, Associate Pastor Sunday Service: 9 a.m.; All ages Sunday School 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Nursery available

FIRST BAPTIST - FALUN

Pastor Steve Ward Sunday School - (all ages) - 9:30 a.m. Church Serv. - 10:45 a.m.

LIVING HOPE CHURCH

Pastor Doug McConnell Youth Pastor Chris Radtke At Grantsburg High School, 715-463-5794 Sun. Serv. 9:30 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 11 a.m.

TRADE LAKE BAPTIST

Pastor Merrill Olson, Interim Pastor 715-327-8402 Sun. Schl. - 9:15 a.m.; Wor. Serv. - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.; www.tradelakebaptistchurch.org

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST

CHURCH OF CHRIST - WEBSTER

Minister Garret Derouin, 715-866-7157 Musky & Birch St., Avail. in office 9 a.m. - noon, Tues.-Fri.; Sun. Bible Study 9:30 a.m. Worship 10:30 a.m. WESLEYAN

WESLEYAN

WOODLAND WESLEYAN

Dairyland - Rev. Andrea Wittwer 715-244-3649 Sunday School - 10 a.m.; Worship - 11 a.m.

FULL GOSPEL

FULL GOSPEL

WOOD RIVER CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

Pastor Dan Slaikeu 4 mi. SE of Grantsburg on Williams Rd. Worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday School 10:30 a.m.

HOPE FELLOWSHIP OF SOMERSET 231 Bluff Drive, 715-247-2435 Services are Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

CHRISTIAN CENTER

CHRISTIAN CENTER

EL SALEM/TWIN FALLS CHRISTIAN CENTER

1751 100th Ave., Dresser Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Evening Services Sun. 6 p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m. Call Pastor Darryl Olson at 715-755-3133 for information and directions

ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN

CHRISTIAN ORTHODOX

HOLY TRINITY ORTHODOX 523 1st St., Clayton, 715-948-2493 Fr. Christopher Wojcik, Pastor Saturday Vespers - 5 p.m.; Sunday Liturgy - 9:30 a.m.

HOLY CROSS ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN Meeting at Zion Lutheran Church, 28005 Old Towne Rd., Chisago Lakes, MN, hcomm.org Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m. NAZARENE

NAZARENE

CALVARY CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

510 S. Vincent, St. Croix Falls Pastor Tom Reaume, 715-483-3696 Sunday School 9:30 a.m.; Worship 10:45 a.m. & Wed. 6:30 p.m.

FAITH COMMUNITY

7535 Peet St., Danbury, 715-656-4010 Adult Bible Service 9 a.m.; Services: Sun. 10 a.m.; Sunday School during church service.

NONDENOMINATIONAL

NONDENOMINATIONAL

CENTERPOINT CHURCH “Come as you are”

Pastor Dick Enerson, www.centerpointstcroix.com, 715-294-1833, Meeting at SCF High Schl. - Main entrance 740 Maple Drive, St. Croix Falls Sunday Worship 10 - 11:15 a.m.

CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN

28313 CTH H, A&H Pastor Tryg Wistad, 715-635-9222 Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.

NEW LIFE COMMUNITY - AMERY

Danbury - 7586 St. Rd. 77, 715-866-7321 Pastor - Father Michael J. Tupa Mass - Sat. 4 p.m., Fri. 9 a.m. (Sept.-May). Reconciliation as per bulletin & by appt.

FIRST BAPTIST - MILLTOWN

Pastor Marlon Mielke, 715-825-3186 Sunday Schl. 9:45 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m., 7 p.m.

Interim Pastor Craig Jorgenson Sunday Worship 10 a.m.; Children’s Church: K to 6th Grade

OUR LADY OF THE LAKES

FIRST BAPTIST - TAYLORS FALLS, MN

NEW LIFE CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY

Located across from elemen. school on West St., Pastor, Dr. Kevin Schumann; 651-465-7171 Sun. Morn. - Sun. School for all ages - 9 a.m. Morn. Worship - 10:15 a.m.; Nursery provided.

Balsam Lake - Rev. John A. Drummy, Pastor - 405-2253 Mass: Sat. eves. 6 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Tues. 5:30 p.m.; Fri. 9 a.m.Sacrament of Reconciliation 7:30 a.m. Sun. or by appt.

SACRED HEARTS OF JESUS & MARY

Pastor Father Michael J. Tupa CTHs A & H - 715-866-7321 Crescent Lake Voyager Village area. Mass Sun. 8 a.m., Thurs. 9:30 a.m. Reconciliation as per bulletin and by appt.

ST. DOMINIC - FREDERIC & IMMACULATE CONCEPTION - GRANTSBURG CATHOLIC MASS SCHEDULE

Pastor: Rev. Dennis M. Mullen, 715-327-8119 St. Dominic: Sat. 4:30 p.m.; Sun. 10:30 a.m. Immaculate Conception: Sat. 6:30 p.m.; Sun. 8:30 a.m. Call the office for daily & holy day Mass times

ST. ANNE PARISH

Rev. Thomas E. Thompson, 715-247-3310 139 Church Hill Rd., Somerset Mass Sun. 8:30 a.m.; Wed. 9 a.m. Sacrament of Penance Sun. 8 a.m.

FIRST BAPTIST - WEBSTER

Church Phone 715-866-4111; Interim Pastor Ken Hyatt; Youth Pastor Jerry Scheumann Sun. School 9:30 a.m.; Worship - 10:45 a.m (Nursery Provided)

GRACE CHURCH OF OSCEOLA “The Cure for the Common Church” 722 Seminole Ave., Osceola Pastor Dr. Kent Haralson; 715-294-4222 or 715-755-3454; info@gracechurchosceola.com Sun.: Praise & Worship Serv. 9 am., Adult Bible Study 10:45 a.m., Children’s Sun. School 10:45 a.m.

GRACE BAPTIST - GRANTSBURG

716 S. Robert St., Grantsburg, 715-463-5699 Sr. Pastor Brad Moore David Ahlquist, Assoc. Pastor Sun. Worship 9:30 a.m.; Sun. School 11 a.m.

Meets at Dresser Elem. School, Dresser Pastor Tony Minell, 715-417-1982 Sun. Wor. 9:45 a.m.; Sun. Schl. 9:45 a.m.

NEW WINE CHURCH - CENTURIA 309 5th Street, , 715-338-2751 Pastors Randy and Pam Stone Sunday 10 a.m.; Wednesday 7 p.m.

NORTHERN PINES FRIENDS WOR. GROUP 715-733-0481 or 715-733-0480 for time of meeting.

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

INTERDENOMINATIONAL

RIVER VALLEY CHRISTIAN

1289 160th St. (Hwy. 65), St. Croix Falls, 715-483-5378 Senior Pastors Paul and Sonja Hanson Sunday Adult Bible Class 9 a.m. Worship and Children’s Sunday Schl. 10 a.m.

ST. PETER’S COMMUNITY CHURCH “Faith on Purpose” (Love God, Love People...period) faithonpurpose.org CTH F, Dresser, 715-483-2911 Pastor’s res./office Sunday Worship 10 a.m.

church directory

ADVENTIST

PAGE 18 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

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“Distinctive Funeral Service”

C & J MINI STORAGE

County Rd. U, 1 mile West Of Hwy. 35 between Danbury & Webster

715-866-7107

543583 52L 42a

Milltown, WI

25.00 $ 10x10.............. 35.00 $ 10x16.............. 40.00 $ 10x20.............. 45.00 $ 10x24.............. 50.00 $ 10x40.............. 90.00

AT THE LODGE 24226 1st Ave. No. Siren, WI Local Movie Line 715-349-8888 Timbers1@starwire.net

SHOW TIMES FOR FRI., AUG. 19 THRU THURS., AUG. 25

RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES Rated PG-13, 110 Minutes. Daily: 1:00, 3:30, 6:00 & 8:15 p.m.

30 MINUTES OR LESS

Rated R, 83 Minutes. Daily: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.

SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD IN 4D

Call 1-800-919-1195 or 715-825-2335 & 715-646-2777 445914 eves. 9a,dtfc 20Ltfc

Danbury

Golf Course

*

Co. Rd. U

w Yello e Lak

Webster

Sat., August 20

TEXAS HOLD’EM TOURNAMENT Under the Big Top. Sign in at 1 p.m. Play at 2 p.m. $30 entry fee

$

5x10................

3-PERSON SCRAMBLE , WONDERLAND Y A D GOLF TOURNAMENT N MO G. 22 $25 Per Person Includes: Golf, Dinner & Prizes. AU C a l l O r S to p I n To S i g n U p . HAVE BREAKFAST OR LUNCH WITH US

A AND ND G GET ET A R ROUND OUND O OFF G GOLF OLF FFREE REE Join Us For Our Wonderland Meat Raffle Sundays at 4 p.m. Featur ing Sq uare 1 Specialty Brats & Stuf f ed Bur g er s

Ser ving Breakfast All Day, Ever y Day Star ting at 8 a.m.

Rated PG, 89 Minutes. Daily: 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.

COWBOYS & ALIENS

Rated PG-13, 118 Minutes. Daily: 1:00, 3:15, 6:00 & 8:15 p.m. All shows and show times before 6 p.m. $5.00. Shows and show times subject to change. Visit us on our Web site: www.timberstheatres.com Like us on Facebook

“Like us on Facebook for upcoming deals.”

• WEDDING BOUQUETS • FUNERAL DESIGNS • CUT FLOWERS • GIFTS • BALLOONS • BEDDING PLANTS • POTTED PLANTS • TUXEDO RENTAL BY SAVVI • ANTLER KING PRODUCTS

304 1st St. So., Luck, Wis.

OPTOMETRIST 119 Arlington Drive Amery, Wis.

YYellow ellow LLake ake GGolf olf CCourse ourse

The

AUSTIN LAKE GREENHOUSE & FLOWER SHOP

Family Eye Clinic

Dr. T.L. Christopherson

www.PolkCountyEnergyFair.com

MISCELLANEOUS

543552

TEAMS AND SOLOS! West Coast Reefer Runs, scheduled home time, late model equipment, insurance available. Never see the East Coast. Call Chuck at 800645-3748 (CNOW)

34AC 22 mile E of Park Falls on Hwy 182. Has permits for a motorhome/trailer pad, to be moved in the winter. $19K OBO 262-215-4352 (CNOW)

543595 52-1L

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

• Clean Energy Exhibits • Local Food • Speakers • Contractors Workshop • Children’s Tent Polk County Fair Park, St. Croix Falls, WI Fri., Aug. 19, Noon - 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20, 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

LAND FOR SALE

Hwy. 35

DONATE VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPONS NATIONAL ANIMAL WELFARE FOUNDATION SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS HELP HOMELESS PETS FREE TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NONRUNNERS ACCEPTED 1866-912-GIVE (CNOW)

Polk County Energy Fair

52L 42a

AUTOMOBILE DONATION

2nd-Annual

542837 51-52L

www.the-leader.net

543657 52-2r,Lp 42-43a-ep

Hwy. 35 & “FF,” Webster Flowers Phoned Anywhere

Robert L. Nelson New York Life Insurance Company Box 313 Luck, Wis. 54853 Phone

715-472-2502

NEW YORK LIFE

Call 715-866-7261

CUSHING CUSHING FUN FUN DAYS DAYS & LABOR L ABOR DAY DAY MEN’S MEN’S FFAST-PITCH AST-PITCH TTOURNAMENT OURNAMENT

CUSHING C U S H I N G FUN F U N DAYS: D AY S : Sat. S a t . & Sun., S u n . , Aug. A u g . 20 2 0 & 21, 2 1 , 2011 2 0 11

SATURDAY EVENTS FIREMEN’S PANCAKE BREAKFAST at the Cushing Community Center 8 to 11 a.m.........AUTO/TRUCK & TRACTOR SHOW at the Community Center site. 7 to 11 a.m.........

Let’s Thrive.®

Cris A. Moore, FICF, FIC Senior Financial Consultant

Joel L. Morgan, FIC

Assistant Financial Associate

Matt P. Bobick Financial Associate

201 Main St. S. • Luck, WI 54853

715-472-8107 office 800-500-2936 toll-free 22854A N1-07 200700115

• Commercial Printing • Office Supplies • Daily UPS Pickup • Fax & Copy Service See us for all your printing needs.

INTER-COUNTY COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION

• Frederic, 715-327-4236 • Shell Lake, 715-468-2314 • Siren, 715-349-2560 • St. Croix Falls 715-483-9008

Visit The Leader’s Web Site: www.the-leader.net

4/11

(Anything goes - derby cars, race cars, etc.) 8 a.m. to Noon..HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEMORY ROOM (2nd floor of Community Center) will be open for viewing. Info on the 2011 River Road - Hwy. 87 Ramble event will be available. FARMERS MARKET - ODDS & ENDS SALE in parking lot 10 a.m................MEDALLION HUNT BEGINS - Clues given out at community park concessions building - NOT ballpark. Limited to ages 16 and under. Noon..................KIDDIE PARADE - Lineup begins at fire hall at 11:30 a.m.

1 p.m. ................KIDS GAMES Including: Sawdust Money Pile, Frog Jumping, Turtle Races, Duck Pond, Lollie Tree, Water Balloon & Egg Toss, Sack Races, Moonwalk and Kids Colored Hair Extensions. 4 p.m..................ADULT SOAPBOX DERBY RACES - Registration from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Main Street. Cash only for entry fees. Races start at 4 p.m. 8 p.m................STREET DANCE ON MAIN STREET - Music by CJ the DJ, IDs required

SUNDAY EVENTS DAIRYLAND DONKEY BASEBALL at Al Peer Memorial Ballpark.

2 p.m...................

Sponsored by the Unity FFA Alumni.

MEN’S FAST-PITCH SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT SEPT. 2 - 4, 2011 – Al Peer Memorial Field!

COME JOIN US FOR ALL THE FUN & GAMES!!

543184 41a,d 52L

AUGUST 17, 2011 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - PAGE 19

Annual Lamar Festival RURAL ST. CROIX FALLS Local artists on stage with national acts, participatory activities from tai chi to Latin dance to bubbles, a sustainably run event that features local foods and low waste — Lamar Festival organizers pulled it off again for this very unique festival attended by over 600 people. The festival is the signature event of Lamar Community Center located in rural St. Croix Falls. The center operates from one of the few historic schoolhouses remaining in the public domain and offers programming in education and the arts to residents throughout the area. Its building, the 1905 Lamar School, is currently being ren- Joyce McKenzie, Centuria, and her grandson Erik Vold, ovated in keeping with its his- Brodhead, enjoyed the art activities at the festival. “We’re toric character in order to offer a family-friendly festival,” says co-chair Steve Bont. “We yearround programming that like for families to celebrate and participate in the arts towill draw people from outside gether.” the area as well and contribute “The festival is a great ‘friend-raiser’ for to the “experience economy” developing Lamar and brings people to the school. in the valley. The capital campaign for the Creativity is important to everything we renovation, which got a boost from do and we’re proud to bring this arts $100,000 of matching funds from the Jef- event to the community,” said David Butfris Family Foundation, requires a ler, festival co-chair with Steve Bont. - sub$200,000 match and must be completed by mitted June 30, 2012.

Lamar alumnus Maurine Melin serves up homemade pie at the Lamar Festival. The Lamar pie ladies bring their fabulous pies to the fest every year and they sell out early. Other pie ladies include Kathy Clark, Margie Beyl, Leann Sylvester, Joyce McKenzie, Brooke Dierkhising and Meg Farrington.

St. Croix Falls

Thirty people of all ages participated in the Latin rhythms drum lesson, one of the many participatory activities at the Lamar Festival.

Roger Mussell offered a soothing tai chi demonstration during Saturday afternoon of the festival.

Photos submitted

The Lamar Festival promotes arts and youth through its rock school band. Youth participants work in a seminar for five weeks before the festival and then perform their original songs on stage. This year’s band featured Madi Molina (sax) from Chisago, Minn.; Gus Molina (sax) Chisago, Minn.; Eli Holte (guitar and vocals) North Branch, Minn.; Freyja van der Paardt (bass) Milltown; Nicole Hoverman (vocals) Luck; and Matt Kahl (drums) Centuria. – Photos submitted Dan Worrell of Dan’s Plumbing in rural Centuria put together this innovative trailer with three stainless steel sinks and drying racks for the Lamar Festival. The festival has worked with Polk County sanitarian Brian Hobbs for the last three years in order to reduce waste at the Lamar Festival.

Dancers from Beyond the Rhythm – Barbie Luepke, Jessica Fishcher, Jen Bush and Christine Miller – posed for a photo following their set. The dancers performed to the drumming of Don Karsky, Dan Worrell and Frank Florin.

For the fourth year, the Lamar Festival has featured Afro-Cuban music with the band Salsabrosa. Keyboardist and composer Viviana Pintado is a Latin Grammy nominee. Frankie Rivery, on drums, has played with a number of international bands. Both are originally from Cuba.

PAGE 20 - INTER-COUNTY LEADER - NORTHERN CURRENTS, SECTION B - AUGUST 17, 2011

Coming events AUGUST

Happenings in the Upper St. Croix Valley communities

SUNDAY/21

THURS. & FRI./18 & 19

Cushing

Amery

• Donkey baseball at ball field, sponsored by Unity FFA Alumni, 12:30 p.m., 715-491-3803. • Skonewood Christian Retreat Center - Great Adventure Club, 6:30 p.m.

• Rummage sale in Centennial Hall. Thurs. 8 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri. 8 a.m.-1 p.m., 715-268-6605.

THURS.-SAT./18-20

Grantsburg

Danbury

• Restorative Justice Family Fun Night Bingo at Crex Convention Center, 5-7:30 p.m., 715-349-2117. • Pie and ice-cream social at Central United Methodist Church, 12:30-3 p.m., 715-488-2267.

• Wonderland Snowmobile Club garage sale at the club’s maintenance building, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.

THURS.-SUN./18-21

Voyager Village

Grantsburg

• Burnett County Safe Ride Golf Scramble. 1 p.m. shotgun shart, 715-349-5755 or 715-220-2416 to sign up.

• Burnett County Ag Fair. Horse show Thurs., Demo Fri. & Sun., tractor & truck pull Sat., animals & crafts, 715488-2472.

MONDAY/22 Balsam Lake

THURSDAY/18 Balsam Lake

• Adoption support group, Unity High School band room, 7:15 p.m.

Luck

• Bloodmobile at the community center, noon-6 p.m., 800RED-CROSS.

Grantsburg

• Beekeepers meeting in community room at Justice Center, 8 p.m., 715-327-5525. • Howard Mayberry will perform at St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m. • American Legion & Auxiliary 255 meeting at the village hall, 7 p.m. • Mystery writers, the Hartless Murderers, appear at the library, 7 p.m., 715-472-2770.

Siren

• Citizen Patrol meeting at the government center, 7 p.m. • Bill Bittner Memorial Dixieland Band at the band shell, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

• Diabetes support group at the medical center, 6-8 p.m., 715-483-0431. • “Once Upon a Mattress” at Festival Theatre, 7:30 p.m., 715-483-3387.

FRI. & SAT./19 & 20 St. Croix Falls

• Polk County Energy Fair at the fairgrounds. Fri. noon8 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

This frog found an interesting home in an umbrella base on the deck of a Polk County home recently. The water inside the metal tube must have created a nice place to relax in the late summer heat. – Photo by Marty Seeger

Milltown

• Fish fry at United VFW Hall, 4:30-7 p.m.

Siren

• Fish fry and buffet at Burnett County Moose Lodge, 5:30-7:30 p.m., 715-349-5923. • Mobile Travel Information Center at Crooked Lake Park, 2-3:30 p.m., www.wisconsinvisitor.com.

St. Croix Falls

• Music on the Overlook, Community Dinner Night, 6:30 p.m. • Community picnic BBQ supper and pie social at the United Methodist Church, 4-7 p.m. • Mobile Travel Information Center at the information center, 8-9:30 a.m., www.wisconsinvisitor.com.

SAT. & SUN./20 & 21 Roberts

FRIDAY/19

• St. Croix Valley Collectors Assoc. Barn Dance & Threshing Bee at Village Park. Dance/Sat. 8 p.m. Sun. activities begin at 10 a.m., 715-425-1367 or 715-262-5807.

• Bake sale by Faith Lutheran Church at the farmers market, 3 p.m.

St. Croix Falls

Balsam Lake Cumberland

• Truck pull at Dale’s Twin Pines, fundraiser for Boys and Girls Club, 7 p.m., 715-822-2554.

Danbury

• Mobile Travel Information Center at the Log Cabin Store & Eatery, 4-5:30 p.m., www.wisconsinvisitor.com.

Frederic

• Mobile Travel Information Center at the Soo Line Depot, 10:15-11 a.m., www.wisconsinvisitor.com.

Grantsburg

• Mobile Travel Information Center at Crex Convention Center, noon-1 p.m., www.wisconsinvisitor.com.

• “Once Upon a Mattress” at Festival Theatre, Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m., festivaltheatre.org.

SATURDAY/20 Amery

• Broadway/West Sweden comes to Balsam Lutheran Church, 7 p.m. • Beanbag tourney at Uncle Bob’s for Arnell Humane Society fundraiser, 11 a.m., 715-268-8922.

Cushing

• Fun Day. Medallion hunt, 10 a.m.; kiddie parade, noon; frog & turtle races after parade; balloon & egg toss & sawdust pile, 3 p.m.; derby, 4 p.m. on Main Street.

Danbury

• Oktoberfest, food, music, dance, 1-9 p.m., 715-2443403.

Frederic

• Fine arts & crafts show by the depot & museum, 9 a.m.3 p.m., historical society pie social 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 715653-2338. • Northland Ambulance chicken and corn dinner, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.

Grantsburg

• Wildflower expedition at Crex Meadows, 9-11 a.m., 715-463-2739. • JDRF bike run to benefit the fight against juvenile diabetes, 9:30 a.m., 715-463-6888.

Milltown

• Unity Area Lions Roger Reader spaghetti fundraiser at Milltown Community Center, 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Range

• Benefit for Daryl Fredrickson at the Straight 8 Bar, 1-6 p.m.

Siren

• Doran School reunion at Crooked Lake Park, noon-?, 715-349-2457. • Arts Alive on 35 at BAAG’s new location on Hwy. 35/70, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 715-349-2807. • Burnett County library spaghetti dinner and raffle at the Moose Lodge, 5-7 p.m. • Showing of “The Quiet Man” to benefit the humane society at Timbers Theatre, 10 p.m., 715-866-4096.

Webster

• Free workshop on forestry, timber salvage sales and more, at 5-12 school cafetorium. RSVP. 9:30-11:45 a.m., 715-349-2151, mkornmann@burnettcounty.org.

Wisconsin State Fair results

Anna Waterman won third overall bred and owned spotted barrow at the Wisconsin State Fair.

Peter Elwood won reserve grand champion spotted market barrow at the Wisconsin State Fair. The following 4-H and FFA members represented Polk County in the swine project at the Wisconsin State Fair, Aug. 8-11 (L to R): Spencer Elwood, Deronda Diplomats; Drew Waterman, Amery FFA; Anna Waterman, Amery FFA; Peter Elwood, Deronda Diplomats; and Gus Swenson, Beaver Brook Badgers. Not pictured: Drew Waterman won grand champion bred and owned spotted breed gilt. He also won grand champion bred and owned spotted market barrow. – Photos submitted

Luck

• Polk County Genealogy Society meeting at the museum, 1 p.m.

TUESDAY/23 Siren

• Bloodmobile at Siren Covenant Church, 11:30 a.m.5:30 p.m., 800-733-2767, 715-244-3708. • Burnett County Republican Party meet in Room 162 in the government center, 7 p.m. • Kids Night Out.

Milltown Spooner

• Twilight garden tour at ag research station, 4 p.m. till dusk, 715-635-3506.

St. Croix Falls

• Open Arms hosted by Alliance Church of the Valley. Meal and fellowship, 5-6:30 p.m., 715-483-1100.

TUES.-THURS./23-25 Balsam Lake

• Pioneer School for first- through sixth-graders at Lanesdale School, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Call 715-485-9269 to enroll.

WEDNESDAY/24 Grantsburg

• Parkinson’s support group at the Burnett Medical Center, 2 p.m., 715-689-2163.

St. Croix Falls

• Sirens of the ‘60s at Festival Theatre, 7:30 p.m., 715483-3387.

THURSDAY/25 Amery

• Lyme disease education and support at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, 7 p.m., 715-268-2856, 715-268-2035.


August 17