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THE OFFICIAL PRIDE RECAP ISSUE 9 DAYS OF E V E NTS, 16 U N IQU E LOCATIONS, 65,000+ P EOP LE O N LY O N E R O C H E S T E R P R I D E 2 0 1 8


620 South Ave. Rochester, NY 14620 (585)461-2556


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PHOTOS: Fiona Jones

FEATURES 12

ROWAN COLLINS Editor rowanc@outalliance.org T_ 585-244-9030

OPENING CEREMONIES:

DAVE KYLE Advertising davek@outalliance.org T_585-244-9030

The 60ft Pride flag was raised and the Grand and Honorary Marshals were honored in front of City Hall, with performances and speeches.

ALAN ALTMAN Graphic Design www.A3-Design.com

Issue printed by:

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CONVERSION THERAPY: The Out Alliance works to be champions for LGBTQ+ life and culture. We strive to ensure that all members of the LGBTQ+ communities, at all stages of their lives, are free to be fully participating citizens, living lives in which they are safe, stable and fully respected.

THE OUT ALLIANCE 100 College Avenue Rochester New York 14607 Monday & Friday 9am–5pm Tuesday–Thursday 9am­–8pm T_

585. 244. 8640 585. 244. 8246 E_ info@outalliance.org www.outalliance.org F_

City Council and Mayor Lovely Warren move to ban the harmful practice in Rochester

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#ROCPRIDE2018 PARADE + FESTIVAL: Want to experience

the weekend all over again? Check out our photo recap of this year’s record-breaking Pride Parade and Fest.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

Another Rochester Pride has come and gone in what felt like the blink of an eye. All of the planning, logistics, meetings, committees, decisions, conversations, building, lifting, sorting, and creation came to fruition as our community was urged to Stand Out: [Live] in Color.

And you did. Our 2018 Pride included a record breaking number of groups and individuals marching in the parade. This year’s parade consisted of over 150 contingents with over 38,000 spectators. An estimated 20,000 individuals attended in the Pride Fest at Cobb’s Hill Park. Thank you to all of the incredible volunteers that put time, love, and sweat (it was a hot one!) into this year’s events. These dedicated, passionate folks helped every aspect of event management throughout our 9 days of Pride. If you enjoyed an event, thank a volunteer! Another huge thank you to the non-profits, businesses, faith communities, LGBTQ organizations, and other organizations who marched down Park Avenue in our 30th Pride Parade and filled the park for the Roc Pride Fest. I would be remiss if I did not save a special thank you for our staff and Board. Every day, our staff does hard, important work for our community. We are incredibly fortunate that some of the people who started this organization almost 50 years ago are still involved with the Alliance and fighting for our community today. We provide critical, life-changing services and continue

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to expand the spheres of safety for LGBTQ+ folks not only here in Rochester but in schools and workplaces across the country. I’m proud to work with these folks and proud of the work we have done and the work we have ahead. Last, and certainly not least, a heartfelt thank you to our Pride Executive Team and committees. Without these incredible folks, Pride 2018 would not have been possible. I hope, if you attended Pride in any capacity, that you had the opportunity to speak with any of them and learn about their passion and commitment to our community. Putting together an incredible slate of events that highlight local organizations, grassroots efforts, history in motion, social and political stakes, and the vast diversity of our movement is no small task and they took it on with aplomb. Pride has transformed from its roots as community picnic in the 70s and 80s to the highly-anticipated week of events capping off with the parade and festival it is today. It’s a hot, sticky, sweaty week with little sleep and lots of logistics. And it’s worth it because it means our community has a space to proclaim themselves authentically. 5-year-olds and 100-yearolds, and everyone in between, existing and resisting together. Here’s to next year: the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion.

ROWAN COLLINS Editor


CONTRIBUTORS

FIONA JONES is a rising senior at the University of Rochester majoring in computer science and studio art with a concentration in linguistics. She is the Communications Intern with the Out Alliance this summer and currently runs the social media accounts.

MANUEL PEÑA works for Trillium Health and is known all over for his incredible art and photography. He can be found most frequently at Hot Shots Volleyball playing with his friends. His work has been featured in many Empty Closet editions.

DAWN FOX is an organizer and coordinator with the Out Alliance Youth Program. She came on as a social work intern in 2013 and has stayed involved with the youth ever since. As an LMSW, she also supervises new social work interns as they provide resources and support to young LGBTQ+ and allied youth.

BESS WATTS is both President of the Rochester Finger Lakes Chapter of Pride at Work and CSEA Local 828 Monroe County and has been an activist for several years in Rochester. Bess has been with her wife, Anne Tischer, for over 24 years.

REILLY HIRST foodie from age 7 (when she sautéed zucchini in butter and dill), has lived in many good places to eat: Cape Cod, San Diego, the Bay Area, Portland. Now in Rochester, she believes that what you taste now is the beginning of a renewed integrated Rochester revolution.

MERLE EXIT a long-time comedian, singer, and actress, writes for several publications as well as hosting an internet radio show, Whirl With Merle, on blogtalkradio.com. Merle has traveled to more than ¾ of the United States focusing on entertainment and food.

JEANNIE GAINSBURG is the Out Alliance’s

CHRISTOPHER COLES is an American thinker, Sign Language interpreter, civil rights activist and spoken word poet. As “Rochester’s Son“, he believes in the empowerment of the community thru its collective social, political and artistic cultural engagement.

Education Director. She has been with the organization since 2003, previously serving as Outreach Coordinator. She is best known for her love of volleyball and biking, helping coordinate the yearly Ride For Pride fundraiser for the Alliance.

TO READ THE DIGITAL VERSION AND SO MUCH MORE, VISIT WWW.OUTALLIANCE.ORG/EMPTYCLOSET

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES

COLLEEN RAIMOND President CHLOE CORCORAN Vice President JEFF LAMBERT Secretary MARTIN MURPHY Treasurer JASON BARNECUT-KEARNS SADY FISCHER MILO PRIMEAUX LUIS ROSARIO-MCCABE DAVID ZONA

JEFFREY MYERS Interim Executive Director JOSHUA STAPF Development Director JEANNIE GAINSBURG Education Director ROWAN COLLINS Communications Director KAYDEN MILLER Education Coordinator OLIVIA PAGE LGBTQ Academy Educator LORI CRAMER Administrative Assistant ERIDAN MAEDER SAGE Program Coordinator ANNE TISCHER Outreach Coordinator EVELYN BAILEY Historian KAT WIGGALL Database Administrator

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ALLIANCE NEWS A special thank you to the RIDE FOR PRIDE coordinators! With our excitement about the incredible fundraising efforts of our riders last month – $54,000 and still counting! – we forgot to personally credit the three coordinators of the “Ride”. Thank you to Jeannie Gainsburg, Al Carver-Kubik, and Jamie Allen for their relentless dedication, passion, and love for biking, the Out Alliance, and wearing silly costumes. Pulling together Ride for Pride is no small feat and they accomplished it with aplomb. Almost like a well-oiled bicycle…

Pictured: It’s hard to find these three not in motion.

JAMIE ALLEN, AL CARVER-KUBIK, JEANNIE GAINSBURG Photo by: ED FREEDMAN

VOLUNTEER OF THE MONTH: Maria Monacelli

Our August Volunteer of the Month is Maria Monacelli! Maria went above and beyond for Rochester Pride this year, stepping in to help with absolutely anything she could. Whether she was working hard during the week to make sure the huge 24-foot moving truck got filled with Festival decorations, moving barricades to create the alcohol tent, setting up the couch in the VIP section, or reloading everything back into the truck on Sunday night, Maria was up for any task and kept her cool in 95° heat. Maria is a member of LORA and a regular at yoga at the LGBTQ+ Resource Center on Tuesdays and Thursdays. She’s quick with a smile and encouragement for anyone who needs her. Her matter-of-fact manner makes it seem like everything she does is no big deal, but those who work with her know her dedication to Rochester Pride and the Out Alliance is second-to-none. We would like to thank Maria for her amazing commitment, passion, and ability to stay calm under even the most chaotic of situations! Rochester Pride 2018 would not have been the same without her.


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JULY 15 PRIDE 5K RUN & WALK LOCATION: Cobb’s Hill DATE: Sunday, July 15 PHOTOS: Rowan Collins WINNERS: Charles (“Chuck”) Collins – 1st overall Jaime Peca – 1st, women’s category Alyssa Lombardi – 1st, nonbinary category

C L O S E T


Join us the 2nd Thursday of every month. Locations vary. EMAIL HRCSecondThursday@gmail.com or follow us on FB @HRCSecondThursday for details on upcoming events.

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JULY 15 PRIDE KICK-OFF BEACH PARTY & VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT WITH ROCHESTER VICTORY ALLIANCE LOCATION: Ontario Beach Park DATE: Sunday, July 15 PHOTOS: Fiona Jones, Manuel Peña, Jeannie Gainsburg, Christopher Coles

C L O S E T


PRIDE OUTFIT WI NN ERS:

ia Polashenski Kevin Pond & Anastas

TO UR NAM ENT W

IN NE RS: Kay P

fleghardt & Bre

ndan Merna


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JULY 16 PRIDE OPENING CEREMONY LOCATION: Rochester City Hall PHOTOS: Fiona Jones MCS: Sam Brett, Chloe Corcoran SPEAKERS: James Smith (Mayor’s Office), Jeff Myers (Out Alliance Interim Executive Director), Harry Bronson (NYS Assembly) PERFORMANCES: Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus, Dangerous Signs GRAND MARSHAL: Peter Mohr HONORARY MARSHALS: Arlisha Massey, Carlos Merriweather

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CITY OF ROCHESTER PROPOSES BAN ON LGBTQ+ CONVERSION THERAPY FOR MINORS By: ROWAN COLLINS

Photo by: FIONA JONES

Mayor Lovely Warren, City Councilmember Mitch Gruber, HRC’s Carol Ebersole-Weiss, Out Alliance Interim Executive Director Jeff Myers, and Assemblymember Harry Bronson addressed members of the media Friday, July 13 outside of the Bachelor Forum, 670 University Ave, to announce the City of Rochester’s plan to ban the harmful practice of “conversion therapy” on minors, or those under 18. Councilmember Gruber and Mayor Warren have proposed legislation to Rochester City Council to ban the harmful practice as a matter of protection for children in our city. The legislation presented to the City Council adds language under the consumer protection section of the municipal code to prohibit “any services, offered or provided to consumers for a fee, that are intended to change a person’s sexual orientation or to change a person’s gender identity to conform to the sex of such individual that was recorded at birth.” The practice known as conversion or reparative therapy has been rejected by most health practitioners as ineffective and harmful, leading to negative outcomes such as depression, anxiety, drug abuse and even suicide. “This controversial practice has been debunked and is seen by health professionals as detrimental and unhealthy for LGBTQ youth,” Mayor Warren said. “Our LGBTQ community deserves the same protections from discrimination as everyone else. In order to create more jobs, safer and more vibrant neighborhoods and better educational opportunities, we must be a welcoming city that prides itself on its diversity.” “Conversion therapy is based on a false and ugly premise: that there is something wrong with being LGBTQ,” said Councilmember Gruber. “By banning conversion therapy, the City of Rochester will reject this lie and reaffirm that all people should be treated equally regardless of who they are and who they love.” “For therapists to charge individuals -- or their parents -- for such a ‘therapy’ is predatory, and really unconscionable,” Mayor Warren said. “It is basically a scam, and it instills pain and shame at a time when young people need love and support.” Mayor Warren spoke exclusively with the Empty Closet moments after the press conference.

When asked what this piece of legislation meant for our city, the Mayor had this to say: “It hopefully will help the State move to where they ban [conversion therapy] state-wide and for us...we have always been leaders when it comes to LGBTQ communities and the issues and challenges they face. For us to continue to be at the forefront is important. We know that this is something that causes more harm than good and it’s not something that we want practiced in our community.” Former Councilmember Matt Haag, who served until 2017, brought the issue up initially with Mayor Warren and they discussed producing the legislation before the end of Haag’s term. Discussions with the Human Rights Campaign and extensive research on the part of the City’s law department and City Council legislative aides followed to understand logistics, legal rights to enact the ban, and language to put to paper followed. “It was a question of getting it started, researching it, looking at what other cities are doing across the state, what we were allowed to do from a state perspective, and putting it into City Council for them to vote,” said Mayor Warren. She said she is confident that the proposed legislation will pass in the City Council unanimously. “For Rochester, we want to make sure our children are protected and lifted up and we will continue to do everything possible to ensure that. When we’re looking at safer, more vibrant neighborhoods, job opportunities and better educational opportunities for our children: this is in line with what we are doing and how we’re moving Rochester forward.” New York State has not passed state-wide legislation banning conversion therapy at the legislative level. Since June 2018, Erie County (with the P.E.N.C.E. Act), Albany, New York City and Ulster County already legally ban conversion therapy on minors. Proposed conversion therapy bans are pending in Nassau County,  Albany County, and Westchester County.


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JULY 16 & 17 GAYME NIGHT(S)

LOCATION: Playhouse/Swillburger & Bachelor Forum DATE: Monday, July 16 & Tuesday, July 17 PHOTOS: Fiona Jones


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C L O S E T | August 2018 | 15


SHOULDERS TO STAND ON The LGBTQ RESISTANCE Movement Pre-Stonewall Stonewall did not just happen. The dramatic political awakening by the gay community in New York City in 1969 was preceded by more than a decade of intensive political work by a small cadre of devoted activists in the Mattachine Society and the Daughters of Bilitis. The Mattachine Society, founded in 1950, was one of the earliest LGBT (gay rights) organizations in the United States, probably second only to Chicago’s Society for Human Rights. The Mattachine Society, Inc. of New York (MSNY) was founded in New York City in 1955 (incorporated in 1961) as a non-profit organization for educating the public in open forums in all aspects of homosexuality, for assisting the individual gay in coping with problems related to his homosexuality through creation of protective, supportive social networks, for effecting changes in social attitudes towards gays, for securing the repeal of laws discriminating against gays in housing, employment and assembly, and providing a clearinghouse for legal, medical, and personal advice for homosexuals in jeopardy. During the same period, the Daughters of Bilitis, founded by Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon in San Francisco in 1955, provided similar support, community, and political conversation for lesbians. The DOB educated lesbians about their rights, and about gay history. The historian Lillian Faderman declared, “Its very establishment in the midst of witch-hunts and police harassment was an act of courage, since members always had to fear that they were under attack, not because of what they did, but merely because of who they were.” The New York chapter was started in 1958 by Barbara Gittings, who went on to edit and radicalize the organization’s national journal, The Ladder, with her partner, the photographer Kay Tobin Lahusen. By the early 1960s, a new generation of East Coast activists had become dissatisfied with these strategies, which they saw as politically ineffective and overly respectful of medical and legal authorities. In 1965 the Mattachine Society of Washington, D.C., under the leadership of Frank Kameny, boldly inaugurated a series of pickets of the White House, the Pentagon, and the State Department to protest the exclusion of homosexuals from military service and federal employment. These pickets led to annual Fourth of July pickets of Independence Hall in Philadelphia each year until 1970, when they were superseded by the annual Gay Pride marches we know today. The New York chapters of the Daughters of Bilitis and the Mattachine Society were radicalized by close contact with Washington’s Mattachine through collaboration at such conferences as the annual East Coast Homophile Organization (ECHO) meeting, which in 1965 was held in New York City. Under the innovative leadership of Dick Leitsch, the Mattachine Society of New York challenged the State Liquor Authority’s ban on serving homosexual patrons and worked to stop police entrapment of homosexuals. New York Mattachine also worked closely behind the scenes with sympathetic political officials, such as Mayor John V. Lindsay, to reduce the oppression of homosexuals. Although they were only a handful of people, these activists made a real impact on the lives of gays and lesbians and laid the ground for future political work. On October 3, 1970 guest speakers from Cornell University, Ithaca’s chapter of the national Gay Liberation Front, and the Buffalo chapter of the national Mattachine Society came to the University of Rochester to speak to a group of approximately 100 students who formed

By: EVELYN BAILEY

the University of Rochester Gay Liberation Front. In 1973, this group would become the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley, today the Out Alliance. Shoulders To Stand On recognizes with pride the courage, tenacity and perseverance with which the Rochester LGBTQ community has demonstrated its RESISTANCE to the current ongoing discrimination and oppression our LGBTQ community is confronted with. As J. Peters wrote and Pete Seeger sang: “DEEP IN MY HEART, I DO BELIEVE, WE SHALL OVERCOME SOME DAY”


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JULY 18 STAND OUT ON THE TOWN

LOCATION: Bachelor Forum, Avenue Pub, Lux, 140 Alex Bar & Grill DATE: Wednesday, July 18 PHOTOS: Fiona Jones

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By EVELYN BAILEY Photos by FIONA JONES

LGBTQ LANDMARK INITIATIVE

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An LGBTQ Historic Walking Tour of three distinct landmarks The Landmark Society launched this groundbreaking new initiative in 2016 to educate the Rochester community about the history of the local LGBTQ movement and to enhance the sense of pride about the place that our city occupies in the fight for civil rights & human dignity throughout our nation’s history. Just as Rochester is celebrated for the instrumental role that it has played in the abolitionist and women’s rights movements, so should it be recognized for its contributions to LGBTQ equality. The Landmark Society, with its preservation-based mission, is uniquely positioned to honor this history. We’d like to thank our partners that worked together to plan this walking tour, the City of Rochester, the Human Rights Campaign, and the Out Alliance, as well as our additional partners on the initiative: ImageOut, LGBT Giving Circle, Q Center at RIT, Rochester Area Community Foundation, Susan B Anthony Center at U of R, Trillium Health, U.S. Assemblyman Harry Bronson, U.S. Senator Kirstin Gillibrand, WXXI and The Little. This walking tour unearths the story of the LGBTQ Resistance movement that took place in the 100 - Acre Tract, Rochester’s oldest “neighborhood”, in the 1970’s. The tour, held Thursday, July 19 during Pride week, began at Rochester’s City Hall, 30 Church St. The second stop was was Genesee Crossroads Park (Federal Building), 100 State St., and the third and final tour stop was St. Lukes/St. Simon Cyrene Episcopal Church, 17 S Fitzhugh St. In 1803, Ebenezer Allan turned over the title of 100 acres alongside the west bank of the Genesee River to William Fitzhugh, Charles Carroll, and Colonel Nathaniel Rochester. In 1811, Colonel Rochester subdivided the parcel into building lots. In 1817 when Rochesterville was incorporated as a village, the former 100-Acre Tract became the center of government and commerce as well as a residential neighborhood.

ROCHESTER CITY HALL

30 CHURCH STREET

In 1977, the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley (GAGV) resisted the hate filled discrimination led by Councilperson Charles A. Schiano against the GAGV after receiving a CETA (Comprehensive Employment Training Act) Grant for $35,406 (3.5% of the total allocation). The Grant’s mission was “to ease the burden of discrimination faced by gay women and men in the community”. Schiano called a press conference to express his “outrage” at the recommendation to fund GAGV. His “biggest concern”? - That the grant would “promote homosexuality.” The Rochester Community Chest, forerunner of the United Way of Rochester, refused to administer the grant fearing people would not contribute to the Community Chest. The “RESISTANCE” began. Bill Johnson, CEO of the Urban League, recognized this discrimination. The Urban League became the evaluator and administrator of CETA funds. At the November 22nd Rochester City Council meeting, the eight to one affirmative vote came after a heated public debate by 19 opponents and 17 supporters. RESISTANCE succeeded, justice prevailed. Architecturally, City Hall (old Federal Building), an example of Richardsonian Romanesque architecture, is one of the three 19th century buildings left in Rochester.


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AUGUST EVENTS

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Wednesday August 1

Wednesday August 15

OUT IN THE STICKS BATAVIA MEETUP at GoArt! 6:00pm to 8:00pm, 201 E Main Street, Batavia 14020. Pizza Party with short films, table topic discussions, and great people. All ages welcome. Kennan at dnartskceb.nannek@gmail.com or annet@ outalliance.org INQUEERY MOVIE NIGHT OUT: Call Me By Your Name 7–9:30pm. $2 suggested donation. Light refreshments will be available.

INQUEERY PRESENTS “50 Ways to Play: Kink & Health” 7–8pm. Join this interactive session about consent, boundaries, and sexual health in play. Free and open, 18+.

Thursday August 2

Friday August 17 YOUTH LOCK IN 7pm–7am. Join us overnight for snacks, games, music and more! Open to youth 13–20. Registration required.

Saturday August 18

LORA, WOMEN’S LUNCH & HERSTORY 11:30am–1:30pm. “Feminism: The Roaring 20’s and Those Mad Flappers.” Discussions focused on women’s issues and interests. All ages welcome. Lunch provided. $3. annet@outalliance.org

T- MINUS 35 4–5pm, social & peer support group for transgender and gender-expansive people 21–35. Monthly meetings focus on the importance of mental health, self-care, and building a community. More info: Eridan at erim@outalliance.org

Saturday, August 4

Tuesday, August 21

INQUEERY HOME BUYERS & SELLERS WORKSHOP 10am–1pm. Firsttime home buyers worship at 10:00am and a home-sellers workshop at 11:30am, facilitated by Gary Norselli. Pizza lunch between workshops. Individuals may attend either workshop or both. Free admission. Light refreshments provided throughout.

TANGENT 5:30–6:30pm, trans & gender-expansive youth ages 13–20. Come join us as we create our own hand-fans!

LGBTQ+ CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP 5–7pm. Taking care of a friend, partner, or family member living with a chronic illness and/or memory loss? Join us for our monthly group, cosponsored by Lifespan’s Finger Lakes Caregiver Institute and Alzheimer’s Association. Contact Mara at (585) 244-8400 x239 or mkouides@lifespan-roch.org ALL-AGES TRANSGENDER SOCIAL GATHERING AND DINNER, 6-7:30pm, free catered social dinner, all are welcome! Vegan and vegetarian options available!

Wednesday August 8

Saturday, August 25

Tuesday August 7

INQUEERY MOVIE NIGHT OUT: Boys Don’t Cry, 7–9pm. $2 suggested donation. Light refreshments will be available.

Thursday August 9 LGBTQ ACADEMY, SAFEZONE TRAINING 9am–1pm. Training is open to the community. Registration required – outalliance.org or 585-244-8640. $75 p/p.

Friday August 10 YOUTH GAME NIGHT 7–9pm. Hang out with your friends, have a snack and enjoy some games! Bring your favorite board/card game with you. Free and open to youth 13–20.

Tuesday August 14 INQUEERY MOVIE NIGHT OUT: The Death & Life of Marsha P. Johnson, 7–9pm. $2 suggested donation. Light refreshments will be available. For weekly, monthly, and ongoing events, see our ongoing calendar!

INQUEERY, MOVIE NIGHT OUT: The Wizard of Oz 7–9pm. Special Anniversary Screening! $2 suggested donation. Light refreshments will be available.

Monday, August 27: INQUEERY PRESENTS “BINGO AT THE BREWERY’ DRAG QUEEN BINGO. Hosted by Vivian Darling, Ms. Figgy Pudding and more to be announced! Doors 6:30pm, games begin 7pm, Three Heads Brewing, 21+ event, $5 donation at the door

Wednesday, August 29 INQUEERY MOVIE NIGHT OUT: Moulin Rouge 7–9pm. $2 suggested donation. Light refreshments will be available.

Friday, August 31: YOUTH U-DJ DANCE 7–10pm, free and open to youth 13–20, you bring the music!

Keep up to date with new events follow us on Facebook @OutAllianceRoc

See our online community calendar at: bit.ly/RocLGBTQCal

(all events at LGBTQ Resource Center unless otherwise noted)


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COMMUNITY CALENDAR

C L O S E T | August 2018 | 21

Got an event next month? Submit it to rowanc@outalliance.org before Aug10th for inclusion in September’s calendar.

EVERY SATURDAY

ROCHESTER BLACK PRIDE

THE REPAIR SHOP 5:30–6:30pm, Out Alliance LGBTQ Resource Center. An open AA meeting in a safe space for all, meeting has an evolving weekly format. Open to all - LGBTQ and allies.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8 Opening Reception & Movie Premiere: 6-9pm. The Avenue Blackbox Theatre, 780 Joseph Ave. $7 fee.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1 LIVING AUTHENTICALLY: Him – 4-5:30pm, MOCHA Center 189 N Water St (lower level). Community support group for all transmasculine people. Meeting every other Wednesday of August – second date is 8/15. 8/1 discussion: sex & relationships. 8/15 discussion: presentation, hormones, and surgery

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 PRIDE RALLY CLEAN SWEEP – 11am-2pm, location announced to volunteers. Help keep our community clean and give back to the city before Rochester Black Pride kicks off! To volunteer email blackcrownedent@gmail.com, including your name and phone. Free BBQ catered by Sister’s Soul Food provided to all who participate. Presented by BlackCrowned Entertainment BOYZ NIGHT OUT: Drag King Revue – 10pm-2am, Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton Avenue, Rochester NY 14620. Hosted by: Miss Deelicious and featuring amazing local talent. First show at 10, second at 11:30. 21+, $5 Cover. All proceeds are donated back to the LGBTQ community. @BoyzNightOut on Facebook for details

SUNDAY, AUGUST 5 DRAG BRUNCH – seatings at 11:30am and 2pm, Edibles Restaurant, 704 University Ave, featuring Aggy Dune, Mrs. Kasha Davis, Darienne Lake, and Pandora Boxx. $27 includes brunch & show, call 585-271-4910 or ediblesrochester.com to reserve your seat. LGBTQ+ WATER WARS – 2-6pm, Danforth Community Center 200 West Ave. Come out & play at our very gay water-filled field day. Team and individual game competitions. Come with a group or solo! Best dressed and best team outfits will be awarded. Hosted by Tamara Leigh and Sharda Boykins CHAMBER MUSIC “OPEN MIC” at The Spirit Room – 6:30-7:30pm, The Spirit Room, 139 State Street. Play, sign, listen…in a casual, cosy hour of chamber music at the Spirit Room. Have something you’re working on? Need a chance to play something in front of an audience before the big recital? Want to be motivated to put something together with friends? Looking for other musicians to put together something to play? Come on down.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7 LIVING AUTHENTICALLY – 4:30-6pm, MOCHA Center 189 N Water St (lower level). Community support group for all transgender people. Meeting every Tuesday of August – 8/14, 8/21, 8/28. 8/7 discussion: name and gender marker change, 8/14: techniques for self care, 8/21: substance and needle use, 8/28: suicide and suicidal ideation.

THURSDAYS, AUGUST 9 Club MOCHA Youth Day Party: 4-7pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Square Park, free admission. COCKTAILS & CONVERSATIONS: Studs & Stilettos: 7-11pm. Bar Bantam, Chase Tower (S. Clinton & Main Street) $5 fee. FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 MOCHA WORKSHOPS & COMMUNITY DISCUSSIONS: 12:00pm4:30pm. MOCHA Center, 189 N. Water Street, free admission. 2ND ANNUAL TRANS BRUNCH: 4-7pm, East Ave Inn & Suites (384 East Ave), free admission. THE GET DOWN: Old School Party: 8pm-12:00am, location to be announced. Free admission VOGUE ROCHESTER: 10pm-2am, Anthology (322 East Ave) $15 fee (before midnight) ROC DA HOUSE: The After Party: 12:00-4:00am, location to be announced. $7 fee (all night) SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 BLACK PRIDE FESTIVAL: 2-7pm, Edgerton Park (41 Backus Street), free admission. SUMMER NIGHTS (Featuring Trina): 9pm-2am, Funk N Waffles Music Hall (204 N Water St.) $30 tickets (pre-sale) & $60 VIP tickets (pre-sale). Tickets can be found at https://tinyurl.com/y9e67k4n SUNDAY, AUGUST 12 The Cookout – 2-7pm, Durand Eastman Park, Sunset Shelter. Free to attend!

SERVICES DIGNITY/INTEGRITY Sundays, 5pm, 17 South Fitzhugh Street AUGUST 5: Episcopal Eucharist with healing service AUGUST 12 & 19: Catholic Liturgy AUGUST 26: Prayers to start and the week and potluck supper OPEN ARMS METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH Sundays, 10:30am, 707 E Main St AUGUST 26: Stewardship Pillar meeting, prior to service THIRD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH Sundays, 9:15am Invitation to Prayer in the Chapel & 10am Worship in the Sanctuary, 4 Meigs Street No worship service in the Chapel during summer

All events listed are provided by groups and organizations outside of the Out Alliance and are accurate to the best of our ability.


E 22 M P| TAugust Y C L 2018 O S |E E T M | August P T Y 2018 C L O| S22 E T

GENESEE CROSSROADS PARK (FEDERAL BUILDING)

100 STATE STREET

RESISTANCE in Rochester, NY on Saturday, September 23, 1978 was 800 strong at the Rally For Rights, Rochester’s answer to Anita Bryant’s “Save Our Children Rally”. Bryant’s crusade to stop the 1977 Dade County Florida ordinance forbidding discrimination due to sexual orientation was based on her belief that homosexuals, not being able to reproduce on their own, were trying to push their “lifestyle” to recruit children for their ranks. Kate Millet, feminist and rally speaker, said the Rally marked the “beginning of a community through enlarging our understanding of oppression”. This RESISTANCE Movement’s goals: reach out to the non-gay community, establish a firm base of understanding and mutual agreement, and establish more communication between the diverse members of the gay community. Karen DeCrow, former NOW president, said by challenging the definitions of what it means to be male or female, lesbians and gay men had “become the witches of the ‘70’s, and are punished more than any other group”. The RESISTANCE battle cry became: “Save our children …for the Revolution!” Genesee Crossroads Park, known as Charles Carroll Park, is located approximately where the notorious old Front Street was located.


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For event details, reservations, maps & more, visit: JonesPond.com 585.567.8100

JonesPond.com 585.567.8100

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We offer a full spectrum of senior services from independent living to skilled nursing. Most importantly, we have designed communities to help you embrace living your way. Call 585-760-1300 to schedule a tour or go to stjohnsliving.org/tec.

Our life. Our way. SJ TEC 2018 - All.indd 4

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25 | August 2018 | E M P T Y

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GNAW ROCS:

OUT AND ABOUT:

GET THE 411 ON THE 311

NAPA VALLEY? FUGGETABOUTIT! THERE’S WINE GOLD IN THEM THER’ HILLS!

LOCALS ONLY

By REILLY

HIRST

311 ALEXANDER STREET I’ve been wondering why I haven’t been as excited as I expected about a couple of places that have opened recently (* cough cough* Swan Dive *cough* Bar Bantam). Locals Only is open 7 AM until at least 10 most nights; has coffee, food, and a bar. But where the others were built around one prominent component, Locals Only started with 3 specialists, each dedicated to one department. You can tell; there was excellence in so many ways. The concept from inception is to focus on coffee, drinks, and food but from a local perspective. The only time I am for discrimination is really this kind of discrimination: local, great food attempting to achieve excellence and celebrating this area and NYS in general. The flavor of where you live. Examples include the seasonal spruce in my drink pictured below [Knocking Me SIDEWAYS]. This drink is Rochester, not a chain experience or any other mini-mall in America. For the soft opening they had a lovely plate full of oysters with a raspberry mignonette or cocktail sauce. For my money the mignonette had it all over the cocktail sauce. The main course I ordered? The scallops of course, served over a bed of pureed hominy. They had the perfect char on the outside and were buttery soft on the inside, meaning they had been pulled in those 30 seconds of perfection. The second drink I had included Mango Caviar. That’s right, mango caviar. Think deliciousness. No small elves were enslaved to do tiny melon balling of this caviar. It comes from juice mixed with ingredients that are vegan friendly and create these delectable globes. It’s sort of like having tiny bobas or jellies in your alcoholic beverage. See the picture (courtesy of the IG @threeamchef) below. Desert was espresso con panna, vegan style, made with coconut milk whipped cream. The only complaint I’ve heard so far about Locals Only comes from their tendency to appear to borrow from other establishments. To wit, cereal drinks have been produced by the Spirit Room and are a theme of PopRoc around the corner. The interior decor is the same as has done many local establishments such as Swan Dive. This is to some degree a legitimate complaint. But somehow, I don’t really mind. The local focus can incorporate exactly this habit. I would say that Locals Only feels of a single cloth, despite the eclectic menu: mushroom terrine, scallion pancakes, chicken and waffles, steak and eggs. It seems the chef has chosen dishes that are about what the he wants to make and eat, and for the most part, I agree with his choices.

By MERLE EXIT Gold Country is located in the Northern area of California that is flecked with wineries. One of the best cities to visit is Murphys. At the heart of Calaveras County’s wine country is an old-school Main Street with a new-world vibe. Unique to any other wine region, Murphys is a wine-lover’s dream with more than twenty tasting rooms and many excellent restaurants in an historic downtown. Picturesque vineyards and destination wineries are nestled in the rolling hills throughout the county. Since 1851, they’ve been a pioneering wine industry with an innovative spirit. Under the Calaveras Winegrape Alliance there are just over 20 wine tasting rooms here. Murphys alone has about 16 all within walking distance. I visited three of them: Zucca Mountain Vineyard, Tanner Vineyards and Twisted Oak. www.calaveraswines.org I learned that for a wine to be labeled with a grape name it must consist of at least 75% of a specific grape. For example, Zucca’s 2006 Sangiovese and 2006 Barbera are two varieties measuring up to the 75%. Anything less than 75% cannot be labeled with the grape name, it becomes a blend and a name can be created. Zucca’s is a smaller winery producing about 1,500 cases. They specialize in Barbera, Sangiovese, Syrah, and Syrah Port. All of their grapes are from the Calaveras county grape growers, except for Barbera grapes as this variety comes from Amador county. www.Zuccawines.com Every year on the first Saturday in October crowds of people form in Downtown Murphys Park to celebrate the beginning of the wine harvest season at the Largest and Oldest Grape Stomp Competition in California. Now in its 25th year, the annual community Grape Stomp has grown by participation to include over 120 teams vying to be known as “Champion of the Juice” or winner of the “Best Costume” award. During the stomp, teams of two, many with creative names and costumes, compete to collect the most juice out of 25 pounds of grapes in three-minute heats. The stomp itself has become so popular that it sells out every year and people come from all over the US to compete. I registered to stomp and was trying to decide as to whether to stomp in my sandals or bare feet. After getting feedback from both sides I went for the barefoot rendition ala I Love Lucy. No, the buckets weren’t that large. Nancy was my partner who was responsible for pushing the liquid through a bucket hole and into a glass container trying to clear the screen from the crushed grapes. Rather than go fast, I concentrated on forcing the grape juice out of each heavy step. Yes, it felt mushy but the stems did not bother the bottom of my sensitive feet. Twisted Oak, in nearby Vallecito, was my favorite winery and where the Rubber Chicken National Forest is located. You can view the chickens looking out the windows of a house at the bottom of the hill. Amusing signs point the way to the main room, some having rubber chickens attached to them. A California 300+year-old twisted Blue Oak graced the hilltop location. This winery is known for their Iberians and Rhones, of which the grapes are in the foothills of the Sierra Mountains. Jeff Stai is the owner and president of the winery. www.twistedoak.com


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ST. LUKE & ST. SIMON CYRENE EPISCOAL CHURCH “TWO SAINTS”

C L O S E T

17 S FITZHUGH STREET

Known best for its historical significance of being the oldest surviving public building in Rochester, St. Lukes was home to the first visible RESISTANCE to LGBTQ oppression by the Rochester Episcopal and Catholic faith communities. Integrity, founded in 1974 by Louie Crew in rural Georgia, and Dignity, founded 1969 in San Diego, California as a “rap group” for gay and lesbian Catholics, became Dignity- Integrity/Rochester (D-I/R). Chartered in 1975, it was the first combined chapter of the two national organizations. D-I/R has been a local grass roots lay organization in pursuit of full inclusion of LGBTQ persons and for equal access to all rites and positions within the Episcopal and Catholic Churches. Beginning at St. Patrick’s Church on Plymouth Avenue, D-I/R moved to St. Luke’s and celebrated their First Anniversary on September 26, 1976. In October, 1986, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, head of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith issued the LETTER ON THE PASTORAL CARE OF HOMOSEXUAL PERSONS which precipitated other oppressive acts and led to the removal of local Catholic priests from presiding at liturgy. Peaceful prayerful RESISTANCE is the hallmark of D-I/R.


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y s s a S

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e g d e W h t u So in the

This year’s annual “Sassy in the South Wedge” night was a rousing success! Revelers spread out across the neighborhood for an evening of events that celebrated identity, community, and individuality. Events throughout the neighborhood all evening long, ensured that Thursday, July 19 was super-sassy in the Wedge! Starting at 5pm, the Lux Backyard Party included incredible performances from the cast of What the Frock Fridays, featuring DJ LCat. Games, music, and some great food kept the party going all night. The Good, The Bad, and The Funny returned once again to Equal Grounds Coffee House as the premier open mic night for the transgender and gender expansive community. Those feeling inspired shared their stories and reflections on -- you guessed it -- the good, the bad, and the funny aspects of life and identity. Tears of solidarity, peals of laughter, and thunderous applause ricocheted around the packed room well into the evening. Youth Pride Dance made a triumphant return as well, this year moving to the Odd Fellow’s Lodge on Gregory (last year’s dance was at the Historic German House). LGBTQ+ and allied youth dressed to Stand OUT in every color of the spectrum got down to some of their favorite songs all evening. The event was free to all youth 13-21 and encouraged and welcomed any and all orientations, identities, and expressions. The dance-off was one for the ages! It was an epic night of socializing, dancing, music, and fun.


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JULY 19 SASSY IN THE SOUTH WEDGE

LOCATION: South Wedge DATE: Thursday, July 19 PHOTOS: Rowan Collins, Dawn Fox


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JULY 20 ROC PRIDE PEP RALLY + SILENT DISCO LOCATION: Cobb’s Hill Park DATE: Friday, July 20 PHOTOS: Fiona Jones Pep Rally organized by Action for a Better Community’s Heart2Heart Committee. Speakers from ABC, Jordan Health, and Center for Youth, among others. Silent Disco featured three DJs spinning mixes for every taste.


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JULY 21 ROCHESTER PRIDE PARADE LOCATION: Park Avenue DATE: Saturday, July 21 PHOTOS: Fiona Jones, Bess Watts WINNERS: Muther’s Favorite (best overall float): 140 Alex Bar & Grill Stonewall LORA, (Lesbians of Rochester & Allies) Ruby Slipper: Spilling the Tea with Chasmar & Jazzelle Rainbow People’s Choice (voted on through Yapp App): Trillium Health

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JULY 21 ROCHESTER PRIDE FESTIVAL LOCATION: Cobbs Hill DATE: Saturday, July 21–22 PHOTOS: Fiona Jones, Bess Watts

HOSTS: Samantha Vega, Dee Dee Dubois, Miss Deelicious MUSICAL PERFORMANCES: Deborah Cox, Flower City Pride Band, Ada Vox, Nick & Six, Charles Emanuel, Reverend Yolanda, Daughters of ArT, Champagne Brown, Max Doud DJS: DJ Logek, DJ Solid Bear, DJ Hector, DJ Citizen Jane. DRAG PERFORMANCES: DeeDee Dubois, Miss Deelicious, Samantha Vega, Mother Nature, Anna Nicole Star, Nevada Reign, MJ ThrilherNightly, Mercedes Sulay, Vanity Faire, Wednesday Westwood, Cassanova The King, Destiny Spice, Vanessa LeRoux, Justin Stylez, Ginger Kaikai, Kiki BañañaHammøck, Gizelle Dellagoodhead, Aziza Bijou, Li’l Eazy, Lady Meteorite, Eva Flow, Frankie Starr, Vivian Darling. STAGE SUPPORT: Anthony George, Kate Sweeney, Laz Watts. HOSPITALITY TEAM: Matt Perdue, Brandon Greene INTERPRETERS: Nikki Cherry, AnnaMarie Unger, Danica Zielinski, Michael McCarthy, Haley York, Kari Todesco, Samantha Geffen, Christopher Coles, Eric Severson, Wany Jefferson, Matt Schwartz, Danny Maffia, Joseph Fox, Dan Eastman,

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Dear Community, On behalf of UR Medicine, we wish to reiterate our sincerest apologies to Cori Smith and his family for the poor experience they had with our healthcare system. UR Medicine provided Mr. Smith with appropriate medical treatment, but we let him down. We could have and should have been more sensitive to and respectful of his needs as a transgender man. We met with Mr. Smith and his family more than a year ago and listened intently as he shared the story of his care experience, the good aspects and the bad. We expressed how sorry we were then for not providing the welcoming, supportive and affirming environment of care he deserved; and we apologize again today. We can and will do better. Mr. Smith taught us so much. In doing so, he has been a catalyst for UR Medicine, helping to accelerate and expand the work underway to improve healthcare delivery for our transgender community. Strong Memorial Hospital is spearheading the efforts with plans to extend them to our affiliate institutions. We have already removed gender identifiers from patient wristbands and the identification stickers used to label documents at both Strong and Highland Hospitals. We are happy to officially change a person’s name and gender in our electronic health record (EHR) system to reflect their legal status. We can also accommodate those who are transitioning but have not yet made changes to their legal name and/or gender, including listing their preferred name, gender identity and pronouns prominently in their medical chart. As part of this process, we have clinicians who can review the limitations of our electronic systems and discuss any potential risk to making changes in the EHR to ensure we do not compromise patient safety. Our Golisano Children’s Hospital has offered Gender Health Services since 2015, providing a broad spectrum of clinical care and support for transgender youth and young adults. Last year, we convened an advisory group of clinicians as part of an initiative called THRIVE: Transgender Healthcare Respecting Individuals, Valuing Everyone. The team is comprised of healthcare providers from gynecology, adolescent medicine, endocrinology, behavioral health, speech therapy and other clinical services, all of whom are committed to improving the quality of care we provide to our transgender community. This team now serves as a formal advisory committee to our medical executive committee. More than 2,000 of our clinicians and staff members received training focused on care for the transgender community including “LGBT patients: Addressing disparities and healthcare needs.” This education covers health disparities that LGBT patients face due to societal stigma, discrimination, and denial of their civil and human rights. It also discusses how UR Medicine is working to alleviate these disparities and improve the care of LGBT patients. We have hosted two full-day conferences dedicated to addressing the health and wellness of transgender individuals in recent years. At least 15 restrooms in public areas have been converted to all-gender facilities across the medical center complex. UR Medicine has been recognized as a leader in LGBT healthcare equality by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, but we still have much work to do. Looking toward the not-too-distant future, we are exploring new and innovative models to deliver care to our transgender patients. We want to work more closely with our transgender community and have plans to reach out for guidance and input as move forward with this work. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to again express how truly sorry we are for Mr. Smith’s and his family’s experience and for letting us share UR Medicine’s efforts to ensure healthcare for our transgender community reflects our values: Integrity, Compassion, Accountability, Respect and Excellence. Michael S. Leonard, MD, MS Associate Chief Quality Officer University of Rochester Medical Center

Jackie Beckerman, MPH Chief Patient Experience Officer University of Rochester Medical Center


THANKs TO OUR 2018 SPONSORS! *Registered riders train for FREE at M/Body leading up to the Ride! Excludes M/F 5:30 am, M/T 5:30 pm, Sat 10 am

Empty Closet, August 2018  
Empty Closet, August 2018  
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