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Issue 20 February/March 2014

Horticultural Science Technology & Art


Cover Image White cyclamen flower in bloom by Ekl75

www.redbubble.com/people/ekl75 www.observationsoflife.co.uk

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2014



GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art Issue

20 February/March 2014 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com


garden tripod Horticultural Science, Technology & Art Welcome to our 20th edition of the Garden Tripod. Welcome we are now back as an epublication. It was a huge step to take publishing with Mag Cloud and I have to say a real experience, mostly good. On the down side the freedom we have with the layout styles was greatly reduced in the printed version. Image files had to be of print quality 300dpi and most in RedBubble could only be shown small as the files were small. Then their was the number of pages, to keep the publication within affordable reach of most artists and photographers the publication had to be quite narrow in its content. So along with the extra time it takes to prepare and edit the paper based magazine, we decided for the time being to return to the e-publication. Not saying the paper based publications will not return, but with a total of 4 sales and 3 downloads the figures speak for themselves.

Our cover page this month is showing a cyclamen .. we thought this as very fitting as we have come full circle with this publication.

! Other meanings for the cyclamen are: ! 1

In white magic circles, Cyclamen are listed as a plant which brings happiness

! The secret meaning is friendship. ! 2

3

The flower symbolism associated with cyclamen flowers is resignation and goodbye. This symbolism makes cyclamen especially appropriate for gifts for friends who are retiring or relocating.

!

!

At the Garden Tripod we see the flower as a sign of coming full circle, so no one is leaving, but we are relocating back to the e-publication

!

Also the Garden Tripod has almost come of age 21 .. ok its months not years .. but who knows where we will all be in 20+ years time, so lets enjoy the now ‌ and propose a toast to the Garden Tripods 21st edition.

So giving a lot of thought to the Garden Tripods future it will stay as an e-publication to the short term, hopefully reviewing the option of hard printing again in the not to distant future. On a brighter note, the Garden Tripod hope to be starting its year book quite soon. So anyone wanting to put their name down for inclusion into the year book just leave a message in the contact form at the magazines web site www.gardentripod.com.

!

!

!

As always we are including real text, so grammatical errors and spelling mistakes are all included free of charge.

! 1

www.cyclamen.org www.smell-the-flowers.com 3 www.karlsenfineart.com 2

C.M


8

Office News Hound

10 Ramblings from the Office Temp - Nightlife 12 I Spy with … Catalogue & Challenge Results 48 Spotlight, Sooziii 54 Marilyn Cornwell, All Glorious Lilies 55 All Glorious Lilies Challenge Catalogue 89 Spotlight, Missmoneypenny 95 Katie Freeth, The Culture of Plants 100 Calendar Feature Joy Witson 108 Calendar Feature Bette Devine

! !

In Memory of Wanda Raines BRIDGE CITY, UNITED STATES


Sketch Book by The Agency


A little word from our

Office News Hound Hi Folks ..

!

I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine.

! Guess who's been to the seaside, and loved it.. The thing I noticed most about the seaside was blue .. The water and sky were so blue and I think blue has to be my favourite colour. So for my choice of pics this time I have 2 wonderful blue images from the same photographer, Bette Devine. Thank you Bette for these amazing images. I could see these as prints hanging on my wall, if I had a wall! my little bedroom is smallish and the walls are quite tight to my basket, with no head hight, (I think my room is also called a dog crate) so no room for photographs‌ but who knows if my folks win the lotto then I can have a bigger bedroom with space for lots of photographs.

!

Guess I am trying to say .. woof :)

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Stay Safe Princess Summer


"Blow the wind southerly...." by Bette Devine

Regeneration. by Bette Devine


Nightlife

As beautiful as your garden is by day, have you ever considered what’s going on there….at night?

!

If you are anything like me, you are probably sleeping at night. But many other creatures are waking up when the night falls, trying to find food in the relative safety of darkness, do a little hunting, scavenging or maybe even a little maintenance on dens and other necessary stuff that animals do.


 Have you ever been outside in your garden at night, to just listen to the sounds, and feel the presence of all of those many creatures? I have, and I can tell you….it’s worth it!

!

Out of sheer curiosity, I have spent a few hours outside in the dark, and I was shocked with the amount of action I got to hear and even see after my eyes adjusted to the darkness. I didn’t expect that much action, at all. Here`s what happened:
 I sat down as comfortable as possible on a low chair that’s usually used for fishing, brought a flashlight and a bottle of water, and surrounded my spot with pieces of bread, some chicken food and some bird food. (Hey I know most seed eating birds sleep at night, but other animals eat that food too)and I just sat there and waited. The moon was hiding behind the clouds, so it was really dark, and a little bit scary.

!

Didn’t have to wait long, my first encounter was with a shrew-mouse. A cute little mouse with a long nose that didn’t see me sitting there in the dark, or he just didn’t care I was there as he started to look through the food for something of his liking. When he got something tasty, I could hear him making a cute high pitched sound and as I was wondering if he was talking to me, a second mouse showed up. It looked like he called for his family to join him.

!

This was amazing, they were inches away from me, just doing their thing, and I got to watch! I sat as still as I could, but I couldn’t help a little movement when I saw the two little mice get startled and run off. I was wondering what startled them, hoping it wasn’t me, and for a few moments I didn’t see anything else moving. But

Garden Tripod 20

then there he was….Mr. Rat himself. Or maybe it was Miss Rat, I couldn’t tell. Now like probably most of you, I’m not too fond of rats. They gross me out just by thinking about the sharp teeth, the snake-like tail and the flees they might be carrying around, but seeing a rat this close in its more or less natural habitat sort of changed my attitude towards them. He was actually kind of cute! His fur was thick and beautiful, with a darker stripe across his back and he used his little paws as we use our hands, for grabbing food.

!

The next visitor wasn’t a stranger to me. It was the little hedgehog I have been feeding for over a year. He grabbed some of the food, and then decided it was time to go elsewhere first. I knew he would be back later, that’s just the way a hedgehog is, they walk several miles every night, in search for food. He stopped for a quick drink from my pond, and then he was on his way.

!

Then it got quiet for a while, for a good reason. I heard an owl scream, right above my head. I couldn’t see him in the dark, but he made his presents known to all the little mammals in the neighbourhood.

!

It took a while before I got to see my next visitor, and it was a surprise. It was an European mink! Now as an owner of chickens, I didn’t like to see this one in my garden, because he would not turn away a couple of baby chicks for a meal. But since I didn’t have any babies at that moment, I wasn’t too worried. He walked right by me, and I couldn’t help but notice its beauty. Just as I was warming up to him a bit, he took a leap into the dark and the next thing I heard was the death screams of a little mouse. I know that’s how nature works. But it probably was one of the mice I had seen earlier, and I felt bad for the little creature. There must have been a zillion other mice in the neighbourhood, but the mink just had to pick one of “mine”. I decided I had enough for one night, and went to bed. And in spite of what happened to the mouse, I felt privileged to had been a part of my gardens nightlife, and I will surely do it again some night.

Nicole W.

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siblings by TheAgency


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

H

Catalogue Garden Tripod Supports Country Gardens come grow with us group challenge

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I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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Hong Kong Orchid Tree

New Beginnings - Soft and Tender by Kerryn MadsenPietsch New leaf growth of a Hong Kong Orchid Tree (Bauhinia, white-pink flowers) growing in the home garden, near Innisfail, Far North Queensland, Australia.

Camera/Shoot Details
 Handheld Pentax K10D 18-55mm F3.5-5.6
 1/20sec, @F5.6, ISO 140, FL.55mm


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HUMMINGBIRD

Venezuelan feast

This beautiful little buy hummingbird was spotted in Margarita, Venezuela.

by hummingbirds

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A rufous hummingbird coming in for a snack at my backyard feeder.
 Two images merged and one layer of texture.
 Winlock, Washington
 Nikon D300 ~ 80-400mm lens

Snack Time by TeresaB


Hoverfly by Lyn Evans Image taken with a Canon EOS 500D and 150mm macro lens Bi-colour filter added in PS

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HOVER-FLY Garden Tripod 20

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Fancy Tri-color Hibiscus ~ Magical by SummerJade This tri-colored hibiscus is one of the many beautiful flowers growing in the gardens around the Peirce home, which is at the center of the Longwood Gardens. In 1700, a Quaker family named Peirce purchased this property and established a working farm. Joshua and Samuel Peirce began planting an arboretum on the farm in 1798. The farm was purchased in 1906 by Pierre du Pont so he could preserve the trees, and from 1907 until the 1930s Mr. du Pont created most of what is enjoyed today, a magnificent horticultural showplace.

Canon EOS REBEL T1i, Canon Zoom Lens EF-S 18-55mm.
 Adjusted in Corel Paint Shop Pro.
 Location: Kennett Square, Pennsylvania (USA).
 Season: spring, May 15th.

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HIBISCUS


White Red Hibiscus by ienemien Lovely Hibiscus, flowers in the sun.
 Wild flowers on Island Crete

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Pink Hibiscus. by Bette Devine Hibiscus aff splendens 2000
 Family: Malvaceae
 Qld, NSW, Australia.

Photographed at the Maranoa Gardens, Balwyn, Victoria, Australia.

The Reddest Red is Hibiscus Red by paintingsheep


Hyacinths by Arie Koene Lisse – the Netherlands

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HYACINTHS Garden Tripod 20

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I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HENS

Hens And Chicks - Digital Art by Sandra Foster


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HOLLYHOCK

Double Hollyhock by trueblvr Garden Tripod 20

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Purple Hollyhock by autumnwind


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HYDRANGEA

Hydrangea Hottie by Penny Smith

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Fear not for the future, weep not for the past. by Astrid Ewing Photography

To Everything There Is A Season by MotherNature


Hydrangea #1, La Mirada, CA USA by leih2008

Hydrangea by Elaine Teague

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Open-Air Archway by MaryinMaine This was taken at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church in Kennebunkport, Maine. On certain days, the grounds are open and people can go in to picnic, to walk around, or to take photos. It is a beautiful place, right on the ocean. There are flowers, ocean views all around, and a lovely stone Church.
 There are several varieties of flowers, but the most prominent are the huge hydrangeas.

Hydrangea by Joy Watson


Many of the homes in Edgartown, on Martha’s Vineyard, have picket fences, and lovely flowering gardens, often showcasing hydrangeas which seem to thrive in the island’s soil.

Garden Tripod 20

Hydrangea Moment by phil decocco

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Alone...Yet Not by enchantedImages Oak leaf hydrangea and chamaecyparis in my November garden.
 Panasonic DMC FZ28
 RAW file processed in Silkypics

Didn't I show you my blue hortensia? by bubblehex08


Hydrangea by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography) Taken at the Chalice Well, Glastonbury

My Hydrangea by Margaret Stevens

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Hippie on a nice winters day by PhotosByG Hippeastrum at Roma St Parklands, Brisbane, Australia.

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HIPPEASTRUM


Hostas by Fay270 Summer Hosta leaves rendered in poster form. iPhone image in the back yard. Post-processing using iPhone apps.

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HOSTA Garden Tripod 20

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Hosta Starting by WildestArt

Morning Crystal Dewdrops... by Carol Clifford Early morning dewdrops appear like crystals on a large leafy hosta plant in the Abkhazi Gardens in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada,

Camera: Nikon D7000 – Lens: Nikkor 70-300mm


Hostas

ORIGIN modern Latin, named after Nicolaus T. Host (1761–1834), Austrian physician.

Hostas on a rainy day by cclaude Hostas on a rainy day in a Pennsylvania garden

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Hepatica by goddarb These are very early spring flowers and bloom from April through May. This is a RoundLobed Hepatica due to the shape of the leaves. The 6 to 10 petals are really sepals. Colours range from blue to pink to white. They are commonly known as Liverwort or Johnny Jump-Ups. (Information from Ontario Wildflowers)

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HEPATICA


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HORSE

Buttercup in the Buttercups by wolftinz

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Wells Fargo Horses by heatherfriedman These horses are part of a team that pulls a recreated Wells Fargo stage coach around Old Town, San Diego, for tourist fun.

Arty Horse by lynn carter artwork at Stourhead, Wiltshire


There was a group of wild horses eating and going back and forth all day long on a narrow sand trail of the " Las Galeras" beach on the side of the ocean right in front of my hotel room in the Samana region of the Dominican Republic.
 I just happen to be taking a stroll down the path when this poor little baby choked on some coconut scrap on the ground he was trying to swallow, he looked pretty funny and was ok afterward…

Choking 1-2-3 by Carole Boudreau

Best Friends by Alexandra Lavizzari

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Prickly pear cactus (opuntia), captured as-is – really! Photographed in the cactus garden of South Coast Botanic Garden (Palos Verdes, California, USA). No Photoshop nudging or squishing, just a slight crop and minor sharpening. (Olympus E-510 & Zuiko 35mm macro, f/4.5, 1/125 sec, ISO 100, late afternoon sun, handheld)

Don't go breaking my heart by Celeste Mookherjee

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HEART


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HONEY

Brown Honey Eater

Honey Eater in a bottle-brush bush. Gladstone. 
 Canon EOS 1100D

Garden Tripod 20

by Margaret Stanton

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Have a seat at the Honey Farm Shop by Marilyn Harris Nestled in the small rural village of Chudleigh is “The Honey Farm”, a specialised retailer of honey and honey related products, including Active Manuka Honey.

Chudleigh lies in one of the prettiest valleys in Tasmania. All round the village dairy cows lazily graze on lush green grassy meadows. Whilst in the back drop the majestic Great Western Tiers rise formidably in all their splendour. Chudleigh is 15 kilometres west of Deloraine, along the B12 which connects Deloraine with Mole Creek and Cradle Mountain.

Honey is one of the world’s oldest folk remedies. It has been used in ancient times by the Egyptians and the Greeks. Honey was also used extensively in medicine until about 50 years ago when pharmaceutical companies began to promote the use of antibiotics. Since then many bugs have become resistant to these antibiotics and honey is again coming into the mainstream. There are many healing and health benefits of Honey!


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

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HOUSE

Blue Mountain resort by John Velocci

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Hollyhock House Built in 1918 by waddleudo Victorian cottage. The shot was of the entire facade originally. Then I cropped it closer and then I cropped it closer! Sometimes showing less is better! Buckminster Fuller, the famous engineer, inventor, architect and philospher made this phrase famous: “Less is more.”

Central California.
 Nikon Coolpix S500 point & shoot camera.
 June, 2012

A vineyard near Meknes, center of Morocco. The area of Meknes is known for its agricultural products and the best Moroccan wine.

Target: old house! by jhawa


*Pink Blooms Garden View* by DeeZ (D L Honeycutt) A view of the Biltmore Gardens Greenhouse through some lovely pink bloomed stems, Asheville, North Carolina Canon EOS Rebel T2i 75-300mm lens

Cottage In The Country

pretty thatched cottages situated in the Tarrants in Dorset

by naturelover

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I Spy with my little eye something beginning with

H

HA-Y-IN-STYLE

Ha-Y-In-Style by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon


I Spy with my little eye something beginning with ….. H

Top Ten Results

7 6 4 3 3

7 4 4 3 3

Double Hollyhock

Purple Hollyhock by autumnwind

by trueblvr

Buttercup in the Buttercups by wolftinz

Cottage In The Country by naturelover

Snack Time by TeresaB

Hoverfly by Lyn Evans

Didn't I show you my blue hortensia?

by bubblehex08

Hyacinths by Arie Koene

Don't go breaking my heart

by Celeste Mookherjee

Hostas on a rainy day by cclaude

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Joint Winners

Double Hollyhock by trueblvr

Purple Hollyhock by autumnwind

I Spy with my little eye something beginning with ….. H


Spotlight Feature sooziii BLACKTOWN, AUSTRALIA

The Old Lock Watercolour

sooziii Single, all alone and fancy free; I live in Australia in Sydney’s Western Suburbs with one very spoilt dog and two equally spoilt cats to keep me company. I am a Buddhist. An artist, love watercolours, oils, coloured pencils, charcoal; a computer nerd and a voracious reader. I have been painting since a young child and use oils and acrylics. But my first love will always be watercolours. My father was an excellent artist and he put a paintbrush in my hand around 6 and I haven’t put it down since. I am self-taught except for his suggestions; sadly I lost his wisdom in 1999 but I think he would be pleased.

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Watercolour

Nasturtium by sooziii


"Lotus" by sooziii

The lotus is rooted in deep mud and its stem grows through murky water. But the blossom rises above the muck and opens in the sun, beautiful and fragrant. In Buddhism, the lotus represents the true nature of beings, who rise through Samara into the beauty and clarity of enlightenment.

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Hello World by sooziii

"Field Mouse" by sooziii .

Eye See You by sooziii


Come Wiz Me to ze Casbah by sooziii Fatima, of the Seven Veils by sooziii

Well - Hello There Ladies! by sooziii

Camel Tales Garden Tripod 20

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The Beauty of the Oasis by sooziii


sooziii

www.redbubble.com/people/sooziii www.sooziiiart.blogspot.com.au


All Glorious Lilies Marilyn Cornwell GRIMSBY, CANADA

Before creating this group, I’d never thought about the biological classification of plants. I got to know their names so that I could get the plants I wanted for my garden. I didn’t look at classification beyond that.

!

When I got involved in the All Glorious Lilies Group on Redbubble, I started to look into plant classification in a purposeful way. I wanted the group to have a variety of flowers – more than Lilium. These are the original flowers known as Lilies. They are familiar flowers – they are bulbs with a single stem of multiple six-petalled flowers. There are so many variations of size, shape and how many flowers on a stem. I’ve seen most of them. My brother, Dr. Brian Bergman, is a lily hybridizer. He has been hybridizing lilies for about 30 years and has a hybridizing field of about 100,000 plants.

!

I thought that it would be possible to enlarge the group based on the entire Lily family and the Lily name. I decided to go up to the family level – Liliaceae. I checked out the Lily family and got a shock. Going to the family level meant hundreds of genera were included – everything from asparagus to iris to onion.

All Glorious Lilies is a group in Redbubble, whose pictorial theme is Lilies. It showcases images of plants and flowers who have ‘Lily’ in their name.

!

I did more research and came upon the DNA research by The Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew (RBG Kew) who had completed The Plant List. One can find the resource at www.theplantlist.org. This landmark international resource is a working list of all land plant species. It catalogued the Liliaceae family by what was DNA related. The list was smaller by far.

!

I added the aspect of including everything with Lily in the common name. These are familiar and favourite flowers – Lily of the Valley, Lily of the Nile, Torch Lily, Spider Lily, and so on. The first list was created and posted. And then the list started to grow as artists added images with of flowers they knew of with ‘Lily’ in the common name. Exploration and discovery became an aspect of the group and continues with new additions in the last week, including the Whitsun Lily – England’s wild narcissus.

!

This issue of the Garden Tripod showcases the latest All Glorious Lilies Challenge entries and winners. The Challenge allowed for everything named Lily – but no Liliums. The result is a display of the wide variety of flowers with ‘Lily’ in their common names. It seems so much more fun to show rather than write about all these great flowers. Marilyn Cornwell

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All Glorious Lilies Interpreting Lilies (by family and name) in all their beauty in traditional and photo images

Anything BUT Lilies The Challenge

!

This challenge is for all the NON-LILIUM flowers in the group. These include ALMOST everything on our Handy Lily List. It is a long list – and the excluded flowers are at line 7 – Lilium those are the excluded flowers. This means NO martagons, stargazers, casablancas, Easter Lilies, tiger lilies, trumpets, etc.


Red Jacobean lilly by Helenvandy

Red daylily by KSKphotography

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Calla Lilies Dreaming by BlueMoonRose

Passion in red by Marilyn Grimble


Dragon Lily Detail by Carole-Anne

Reaching Toward Heaven by vigor

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Bows and Strings and First Violins by paintingsheep

The Garden 8 Ginger Torch Lily by Alison Hill


in the middle of darkness by jhawa

Angelic Wings by Kathilee

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Quartet Of Amaryllis. by Terence Davis


Just Peachy! by Sandra Fortier

Pink Daylily by Anita Pollak

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Top Left

Ice Princess by Rusty Katchmer Top Right

Hot Chocolate by Jan Clarke Lower Left

Calla Lily by Joy Watson


Top Left

Perfectly elegant by Celeste Mookherjee Top Right

Basken In The Light by George Link Lower Right

untitled by Laurie Minor

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Pale yellow tulip by PhotosByHealy

Whispy Beauty by Rocksygal52


tulip trance by LisaBeth

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Delicacy by Cee Neuner

Tulip Variations by TonyCrehan


Golden Tulips by Graeme Hyde

*Tulip Painting* by DeeZ (D L Honeycutt)

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Florist, do you have something in red and yellow? by Arie Koene

Our Red and Yellow Tulips by John Butler


Springtime Red Tulips! by Pat Yager


Strictly Come Dancing by Astrid Ewing Photography

Rainbow Tulips by Susan Duffey Ink painting inspired by tulips at the Eden Project, Cornwall.
 Using both water based inks and acrylic inks on 300gms watercolour paper


Delicious purple by bubblehex08

Tulips in the Breeze by Elaine Teague

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Between the Tulips by ienemien

Tulip Time by AuntDot


Beautiful Stars by WildestArt

Hosta Blossom And Buds by Sandra Foster

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Sicilian Honey Lily by missmoneypenny

Dreamy Haze by ElsT


Colorful duo by Newstyle

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Top Left

Parramatta Flower by Penny Smith Top Right

Too Shy by Evita Lower Left

Dianella Longiflora by Michael Matthews


Agapanthus x 2 by Ruth S Harris

Summer Haze by Karen E Camilleri Garden Tripod 20

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window and tulips.. by JOSEPHMAZZUCCO


Last of the lilies. by Jeanette Varcoe.

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Nymphaea Attraction by Jo Nijenhuis

Water Lily by Martha Medford


Softly spoken are Waterlilies by Virginia McGowan

Crisp, Gently Pink Waterlily in the Hot Mediterranean Sun by Georgia Mizuleva

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Opening up by steppeland

Purple Fantasy by Barbara Brown


Water Lily - White and Yellow by cclaude

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In the Garden of Alice by Marilyn Cornwell


Pink Lotus Flower by hummingbirds

Sunshine and Flowers

Blessed are those whom walk in his shadow; Lei Hedger Photography, La Mirada, CA USA by leih2008

Garden Tripod 20

by MotherNature2

Page 86


White Magic Of The Pandora by Atılım GÜLŞEN


Anything BUT Lilies

13

9 8 7 7 6

Sicilian Honey Lily by missmoneypenny

9 8 7 7

Between the Tulips by ienemien

Calla Lily by Joy Watson

Perfectly elegant by Celeste Mookherjee

Purple Fantasy by Barbara Brown

Agapanthus x 2 by Ruth S Harris

Red Jacobean lilly by Helenvandy

Last of the lilies. by Jeanette Varcoe.

White Magic Of The Pandora by Atılım GÜLŞEN

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Bows and Strings and First Violins by paintingsheep


missmoneypenny MONMOUTH, UNITED KINGDOM

The Nectaroscordum siculum (Sicilian Honey Lily) is a hardy bulbous perennial grown for its subtly beautiful late-spring flowers. This garlicscented onion relative is native from France to Turkey. Shot taken with a Canon EOD 450D and Canon 38-76mm lens fitted with a lens reversal adapter. The image was then given high key treatment and a vignette to soften

Sicilian Honey Lily by

missmoneypenny

was voted the most popular entry in this challenge


Bronllys Castle by missmoneypenny

Herb garden by missmoneypenny

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Water logged by missmoneypenny


Hell Fire Pass by missmoneypenny

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River Mist by missmoneypenny

Kymin view 5 by missmoneypenny


Hi, my name’s Chris. I live in the beautiful county of Monmouthshire.
 When I was 10 I was given a Brownie 110 for a school trip – not a single shot came out! But ….. the photography bug was born. 
 My interests are broad in both subject & style leading to a diverse portfolio – check out My Directory at http://www.missmoneypenny.talktalk.net/ to see just how varied my style & products are. I hope you enjoy your visit, my sites have been created with you in mind.

missmoneypenny

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Fashion

The Culture of Plants

Katie Freeth Private gardens were once the domain of only the wealthy. Great rivalry grew amongst wealthy landowners who employed landscape gardeners to develop landscapes that led to style movements mimicked by all. To achieve the novelty that created these trends, plant hunters travelled the globe returning to their home country with seeds, cuttings, whole plants – anything to increase the palette for the designers. As a consequence our gardens today are fashioned from plants with global provenance. !

!

Private gardens were once the domain of only the wealthy

I have always had a passion for the genus Mahonia, species of which were introduced to cultivation in Europe in the19th century. The glorious and intense golden yellow of its flowers, brightening a stark winter garden are a joy to behold. Flowering occurs from late winter into spring or from autumn into winter – the ideal revitaliser for the winter garden, when, in the crisply cold air, mahonia stands out as the perfect adornment to a garden – the golden flowers often peeking out from beneath blanket of snow. Coupled with this, many offer foliage of deep glossy green or startling bronze- purple. !

!

The size and arrangement of the leaves can be impressive, particularly in larger species and hybrids such as M. x media and its cultivars.

Mahonia x media 'Charity'

!

Mahonia comes in many guises, shapes and sizes and yet beyond botanical collections, or the UK National Collection at the Savill Garden in Surrey, they are relatively unknown and certainly underused.!

!

original seedling selected by Sir Eric Savill for the Savill Garden

Mahonia russellii.


Mahonia aquifolium, widely known as the Oregon grape, was the first species to be introduced to Britain in 1823, from western N. America. Mahonia japonica is one of the most commonly grown, popular for its tough, hardy nature, bold foliage and spreading or drooping racemes of highly fragrant lemon yellow flowers in February and March. Despite its name M. japonica was introduced to cultivation, from China in the 19th century and is not native to Japan. Mahonia fortunei was introduced to Europe in the 19th century by Scottish botanist and plant collector Robert Fortune. !

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But mahonia has had a dark side. In the landscape world, particularly during the 1970s, if there was a difficult space to fill in a municipal planting, what was chosen? Good old Mahonia aquifolium; M.

Mahonia japonicum

Inappropriate planting of Mahonia aquifolium

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Mahonia aquifolium flower

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Mahonia aquifolium 'Atropurpurea' japonicum or sometimes, but less often, M. x media ‘Charity’. Why these choices? Because these Mahonias seemed able to survive any conditions thrown at them, with virtually no care and attention! Planted inappropriately, they struggled along in hostile concrete planters, between walls, on roadsides always challenged and uncared for, with the result that their image was of a ragged, ugly, unkempt plant with little merit and certainly minimum “garden” appeal.!

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Mahonia gracillipes

Fortunately, in 2009, the great plantsman, Roy Lancaster discussed Chinese Mahonia that had been introduced to cultivation in the preceding two decades. Further studies resulted in an informative article by Julian Shaw (Senior Registrar in the RHS Botany Department) in the RHS publication ‘The Plantsman’ in 2011(i) in which new taxa are described and cultivar names validated: subsequently in The Garden (RHS) in 2012 (ii) Roy Lancaster himself writes about this fantastic genus. It is my earnest hope that this will stimulate a revival in the interest in and use of Mahonia in gardens everywhere. Let us make Mahonia the most wanted item from the plant fashion runway in 2014!!

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References:! A Study of the Genus Mahonia; Kate G Freeth; March 1989; (unpublished student work)!

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(i)! (ii)!

Developments in Mahonia; Julian Shaw; The Plantsman March 2011; RHS Publications/ Journals! Mighty mahonias; Roy Lancaster VMH; The Garden December 2013; RHS Media!

! Note: RHS – Royal Horticultural Society! !

Assistance with photographs of M. russellii and M. napaulensis by Mr John D Bond, Curator, Savill Gardens, Windsor!

Mahonia napaulensis

Katie Freeth


www.gardentripod.com Garden Tripod 20

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www.gardentripod.com


Joy Watson

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MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

My name is Joy Watson. I am a photographer living in Melbourne, Australia. In my photography I have a passion. I specialize in the area of macro p h o t o g r a p h y. W h e n capturing my macro work I use natural daylight. I combine daylight with the art of reflecting natural daylight back onto the subject. I invite you to take a journey through my work. The galleries and portfolio include: Black and White work, Floral, Landscapes, Still life photography and more which would embrace any wall.

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Tiny White Flowers by Joy Watson


flower-white-agapanthus-bud by Joy Watson

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Going Around by Joy Watson


Reaching Out by Joy Watson

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flower-pink dahlia by Joy Watson


www.diablojoy.wix.com/joy-watson joy-watson.artistwebsites.com www.about.me/joywatson

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Bush Rose Duet by Joy Watson


Bette Devine Australia

I am at my happiest when alone in the bush with my camera. In the past, my work was used by conservation agencies, state government conservation departments, a stock photo library, calendar companies and a few other outlets. A folio of my landscapes was published in Wild Magazine. Yearly, over sixteen years, my photos appeared in the ACF’s Wilderness Diary or t h e i r D e s k C a l e n d a r. Nowadays, photography is mainly for my own pleasure and done fairly close to home since it is now much harder for me to travel far.

Bette Devine

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Looking toward Bushranger’s Bay from a area which is just outside the Mornington Peninsula National Park which contains it.
 Three images tonemapped in Photomatix.

A different view, different format.
 Westernport Bay, Victoria, Australia.
 Three images merged in Photomatix Pro

Toward Bushranger's Bay. by Bette Devine

Redundant #2 by Bette Devine


The perfect calm before the turning of the tide.
 Flinders, Mornington Peninsula National Park. Mushroom Reef can be seen, revealed by low water. This was taken on the first day of spring 2013.

Quiescent. by Bette Devine

Waiting for the Tide. by Bette Devine Between tides at Shelly Beach, Kilcunda, South Gippsland, Australia.
 Three images fused in Photomatix Pro. Finished in PSC6.

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Ferns and moss-covered logs by Whitehouse Creek in the Yarra Ranges National Park, Victoria,Australia.

By Whitehouse Creek. by Bette Devine


Great Otway National Park, Victoria,Australia.

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Hopetoun Falls. by Bette Devine

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I again took part in a night time wildlife survey in the Yarra Ranges National Park, much of which was destroyed in the terrible fires of 2009. I found this ‘memorial’ of burnt and stripped bark near my watch position.

Memorial. by Bette Devine


Bette Devine

www.redbubble.com/people/bdevine

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Hibbertia obtusifolia. by Bette Devine


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Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc!

The mission of the Rescue, Rehab and re-home, In the Northwest Ohio area. http://angeloncalldogrescue.org twitter @aocdogrescue http://angeloncalldogrescue.org

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Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc! !

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Blue!Horse!Mukwa! Equine!Retirement!! and!Rescue!Centers! Available!From:! www.gardentripod.com!

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www.gardentripod.com!

Flowers!in!Art:! Contemporary! International!Artists! By!Cindy!Ann!Coldiron! ISBN:! 978;0;7643;4239;4!

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www.exhibitionswithoutwalls.com


Contributors: Founder & Editor C Mclenahan

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Treasurer V Gore

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News Hound "Blow the wind southerly…." & Regeneration. by Bette Devine

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Cover image White cyclamen flower in bloom by Ekl75  

! Spotlight features sooziii missmoneypenny Joy Watson Bette Devine

Written Features by Nicole W. Katie Freeh Marilyn Cornwell

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Catalogues I Spy with my little eye something beginning with..

New Beginnings - Soft and Tender by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch Venezuelan feast by hummingbirds Snack Time by TeresaB Hoverfly by Lyn Evans Fancy Tri-color Hibiscus ~ Magical by SummerJade White Red Hibiscus by ienemien Pink Hibiscus. by Bette Devine The Reddest Red is Hibiscus Red by paintingsheep Hyacinths by Arie Koene Hens And Chicks - Digital Art by Sandra Foster Double Hollyhock by trueblvr Purple Hollyhock by autumnwind Hydrangea Hottie by Penny Smith Fear not for the future, weep not for the past. by Astrid Ewing Photography To Everything There Is A Season by MotherNature Hydrangea #1, La Mirada, CA USA by leih2008 Hydrangea by Elaine Teague Open-Air Archway by MaryinMaine Hydrangea by Joy Watson Hydrangea Moment by phil decocco Alone...Yet Not by enchantedImages Didn't I show you my blue hortensia? by bubblehex08 Hydrangea by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography) My Hydrangea by Margaret Stevens Hippie on a nice winters day by PhotosByG Hostas by Fay270 Hosta Starting by WildestArt Morning Crystal Dewdrops… by Carol Clifford Hostas on a rainy day by cclaude Hepatica by goddarb Buttercup in the Buttercups by wolftinz Wells Fargo Horses by heatherfriedman Arty Horse by lynn carter Choking 1-2-3 by Carole Boudreau Best Friends by Alexandra Lavizzari Don't go breaking my heart by Celeste Mookherjee Brown Honey Eater by Margaret Stanton Have a seat at the Honey Farm Shop by Marilyn Harris Blue Mountain resort by John Velocci Hollyhock House Built in 1918 by waddleudo Target: old house! by jhawa *Pink Blooms Garden View* by DeeZ (D L Honeycutt) Cottage In The Country by naturelover Ha-Y-In-Style by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon

Anything BUT Lilies

Red Jacobean lilly by Helenvandy Red daylily by KSKphotography Calla Lilies Dreaming by BlueMoonRose Passion in red by Marilyn Grimble Dragon Lily Detail by Carole-Anne Reaching Toward Heaven by vigor Bows and Strings and First Violins by paintingsheep The Garden 8 - Ginger Torch Lily by Alison Hill in the middle of darkness by jhawa Angelic Wings by Kathilee Quartet Of Amaryllis. by Terence Davis Just Peachy! by Sandra Fortier Pink Daylily by Anita Pollak Ice Princess by Rusty Katchmer Hot Chocolate by Jan Clarke Calla Lily by Joy Watson Perfectly elegant by Celeste Mookherjee Basken In The Light by George Link untitled by Laurie Minor Pale yellow tulip by PhotosByHealy Whispy Beauty by Rocksygal52 tulip trance by LisaBeth Delicacy by Cee Neuner Tulip Variations by TonyCrehan Golden Tulips by Graeme Hyde *Tulip Painting* by DeeZ (D L Honeycutt) Florist, do you have something in red and yellow? by Arie Koene Our Red and Yellow Tulips by John Butler Springtime Red Tulips! by Pat Yager Strictly Come Dancing by Astrid Ewing Photography Rainbow Tulips by Susan Duffey Delicious purple by bubblehex08 Tulips in the Breeze by Elaine Teague Between the Tulips by ienemien Tulip Time by AuntDot Beautiful Stars by WildestArt Hosta Blossom And Buds by Sandra Foster Sicilian Honey Lily by missmoneypenny Dreamy Haze by ElsT Colorful duo by Newstyle Parramatta Flower by Penny Smith Too Shy by Evita Dianella Longiflora by Michael Matthews Agapanthus x 2 by Ruth S Harris Summer Haze by Karen E Camilleri window and tulips..by JOSEPHMAZZUCCO Last of the lilies. by Jeanette Varcoe. Nymphaea Attraction by Jo Nijenhuis Water Lily by Martha Medford Softly spoken are Waterlilies by Virginia McGowan Crisp, Gently Pink Waterlily in the Hot Mediterranean Sun by Georgia Mizuleva Opening up by steppeland Purple Fantasy by Barbara Brown Water Lily - White and Yellow by cclaude In the Garden of Alice by Marilyn Cornwell Pink Lotus Flower by hummingbirds Blessed are those whom walk in his shadow; Lei Hedger Photography, La Mirada, CA USA by leih2008 Sunshine and Flowers by MotherNature2 White Magic Of The Pandora by Atılım GÜLŞEN

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All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2014


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