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Issue 18 December 2013

Horticultural Science Technology & Art


Cover Image WinterTime - Downy Woodpecker by Lynda McDonald

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013


GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art

18 Issue

December 2013 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com


GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art

www.gardentripod.com 6 Office News Hound 9 Katie Freeth, The Culture of Plants 15 Still Life / Floral Art Catalogue & Challenge Results 53 Spotlight, Brian Haslam 68 Marilyn Cornwell, The Romantic Garden 71 The Romantic Pose Challenge Catalogue 90 Spotlight, Jenny Dean 109 Ramblings from the Office Temp 111 Featured 36 127 Romantic Garden Contest Top Ten 135 Peaceful Morning at Blue Horse Rescue


garden tripod Horticultural Science, Technology & Art Welcome to our 18th edition of the Garden Tripod. Gosh ... issue 18 and the festive season is here again .. how romantic ! So we have a few romantic challenges appearing in this edition. one is from the POD web site Fine Art America .. and you don't need to have any connection with America to be a part of this site.. The Garden Tripod set the challenge and we had over 200 entries ... so the full catalog is available via a link and only the amazing top ten are in this main edition. Along the same theme we have teamed up with the RedBubble All Glorious Lilies group and set a The Romantic Pose Challenge, this group is hosted by one of our supporters Marilyn Cornwell, who has also written an article about romantic gardens. So chocolate and flowers .. thats romantic .. yes we have an article about chocolate from regular Katie Freeth. Also a rambling on how christmas goes in Nicole W household .. its sound wonderful. Continuing from last month we are still showing text in the raw, as it has been written, rather than trimming and tidying. We felt we was loosing contact with the person. All spelling mistakes and grammatical errors are now all included for free, and we can meet the real people, unpolished, unaltered. So we hope you have a super holiday and enjoy this edition of the Garden Tripod & we will be back in the New Year with lots of features and a amazing collection of your images.

C.M


A little word from our

Office News Hound Hi Folks .. I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine.

Its that season to be jolly.. the festive time of year .. I can see a big box of presents for me on top of the cupboard and as yet no tree has arrived at the cottage, but I think last year there was a small tree with little lights shining out from its branches, and small balls hanging off its branches. I am a sighthound, so know nothing that surrounds this festive time of year, but its a bit of a mixed emotion time for my folks. They enjoy meeting old friends and greatly miss friends that have left this world. So my duties as the office dog, as I see it is to keep everyone entertained. Sit on laps, sing or howl along to the tunes on the radio, and try not to eat chocolate. (chocolate is toxic for us dogs ... but ooooo it sure smalls nice) So enjoy your festive holiday and look forward to the New Year .. (Don't tell anyone, but I heard talk of the Garden Tripod maybe going into hard print sometime in 2014 ... so will keep you posted on that .... ) Guess I am trying to say .. woof :) Stay Safe Princess Summer


Garden Tripod December 7


Garden Tripod Magazine wishes all its readers a very Happy Christmas


The Culture of Plants Katie Freeth

The Culture of Wealth or the Wealth of Culture?


T

heobroma cacao – the cocoa tree - Chocolate

The people of Adelaide are very fond of chocolate – in all its manifestations such as hot and cold milky drinks, alcoholic cocktails, ice cream and gelato, desserts, cakes and, of course, in its ‘naughty but nice’ confectionery form. Working as a walking tour guide delivering Chocolate Tours around the City got me thinking about the diversity, oddity and inter-dependence of the plants of commerce. At the outset, the cacao tree –Theobroma cacao was at the forefront of this pondering; but expanding my thoughts a little further, I realise that without some of the other plants of commerce production of chocolate would not be what it is today. Chocolate played a special role in both Mayan and Aztec cultures. Beans were presented to the gods and cocoa drinks were served during sacred ceremonies. But these drinks were bitter – made from only the cocoa nibs the drinks resembled modern baking chocolate mixed with water. In the early 1500s conquistadores exported chocolate to Spain where it became the coveted and fashionable drink of the Spanish nobility. The Spaniards added flavourings such as allspice, cinnamon, chilli powder, nutmeg, allspice and vanilla – already plants of commerce, the demand for which was increased by their use in chocolate drinks. Sweetening with honey or agave syrup followed. After about a century, Spain lost its monopoly on the market and the rest of Europe became addicted to chocolate drinks. By the 1700s “chocolate houses” were a common sight in France and England. By the 18th century production was widespread across Europe and the introduction of the steam engine facilitated mechanised bean grinding, reducing costs and making chocolate affordable to all.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobroma_cacao

Cacao fruits on the tree

Theobroma cacao, is a small, evergreen rainforest tree, growing at the lower canopy level. As with wine grapes, cocoa beans have different characteristics depending on the variety, the place of origin and the post-harvest processing. Theobroma cacao is found around the world primarily in remote areas of Central and West Africa, Southeast Asia and Central and South America. In 1753, Carolus Linnaeus (the father of plant taxonomy) named the tree Theobroma cacao – from the Greek meaning Food of the Gods; Linnaeus was dissatisfied with the name cocoa for such a magnificent plant! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobroma_cacao

Cacao flowers.


The cacao tree offers not only chocolate but also food for thought! The fruits or pods emerge directly from the trunk and branches, almost from ground level upwards. The cocoa beans of commerce are the seeds that grow inside the pods, in a covering of white pulp. The tree’s leaves can move through a 90degree angle, from horizontal to vertical, to capture maximum sunlight and protect the younger leaves. Although some cacao trees might be in excess of 200 years old, most only yield marketable beans from five to about fifteen years of age. Cacao trees have a surprisingly delicate constitution and need intensive tending. Trees must be protected from the wind and the sun; fertilised regularly and constantly watched for pests and disease; farmers lose, on average, 30-40% of their crop each year to pests and disease (figure from World Cocao Foundation1). Careful pruning practices are used to maintain shorter trees to facilitate easier harvesting. Ripe pods may be found on the cacao trees at any time, and in most countries of production the main harvest lasts several months. Another smaller harvest – the mid-crop – lasts for several additional months. Changes in weather can dramatically affect harvest times, causing fluctuations from year to year, even on the same farm. The average yield is about 20-50 beans per pod, depending on the variety.

coca pod

According to the World Cocoa Foundation(1), 70% of the world’s cocoa come from West and Central Africa; the majority of it is grown on nearly 2 million small, independent, family farms less than 2 hectares in size. Cocoa is essential to the livelihoods of over 5 million smallholder cocoa farmers worldwide and is now a multimillion dollar/pound Sterling industry. Post harvest, the cacao pods are split (usually with a sturdy stick!) and together with most of the inner white pulp, discarded. The inner beans are piled into heaps, covered with mats and fer mented. Fermentation is crucial to the development of our much loved chocolate flavour and lasts 3-7 days. Beans are then dried for several days. Recently, solar driers have been introduced to parts of Ecuador, where harvest-time weather is usually poor. This has improved the quality of the drying process, raising the price of beans and thus farmers’ incomes. Dried beans are shipped to processors around the world.

Inside the cocoa pod, Baracoa, Cuba by krista121

Garden Tripod December 11


T

heobroma cacao – the cocoa tree - Chocolate

The roasted and processed beans are the origins of that which we lovingly know as cocoa, hot chocolate drinks and chocolate itself. Beans are ‘shelled and roasted’ or ‘roasted and shelled’ depending on the product required. The resulting “nibs”, or the insides of the beans, are ground into a paste. Heat is generated in this process and the cocoa butter in the nibs melts, creating “cocoa liquor”. In spite of the name, the product is non-alcoholic and is solid at room temperature! Processors may further refine the cocoa liquor (often with alkali solution – a process known as “dutching”) to intensify the chocolaty flavour. Cocoa liquor may be divided into cocoa butter and cocoa cakes – the latter for grinding into powder. So how is chocolate made? Cocoa liquor is mixed with additional cocoa butter, sugar (frequently powdered sugar), vanilla and/or milk – again depending on the end product required. The mixture is conched – placed in large agitators to stir and smooth the mixture; the longer the conching, the smoother the chocolate – from a few hours to 3 days or more! The resulting liquid chocolate is stored until required. History repeats itself and we see that already, in our modern processing, plants of commerce such as sugar (cane sugar Saccharum officinarum); vanilla (Vanilla planifolia syn V. fragrans) have been used to make chocolate; More will be used to make the delights that we love to eat and drink; for example nuts; fruits and spices are vital in the manufacture of chocolate confectionery and drink products.

roasted cocoa beans

cocoa nibs

Perhaps more about these at a later date! Acknowledgements (1)The World Cocoa Foundation implements, manages, and participates in economic, social and environmental stewardship programs at the grassroots level for independent family farmers in 15 cocoa-producing countries around the world. http://worldcocoafoundation.org/ Haigh’s Chocolates, Adelaide, SA for providing the cocoa pod, beans and nibs shown in my photographs Katie Freeth

chocolate indulgence


Cacao Tree © by Ethna Gillespie


GARDEN TRIPOD WOULD LIKE TO THANK   krista121 , Ethna Gillespie

&

Wikipedia Images

FOR ALLOWING THEIR IMAGES TO BE INCLUDED WITHIN

T C HE

ULTURE OF ARTICLE

P

LANTS


Still Life / Floral Art Catalogue Garden Tripod Supports Country Gardens come grow with us group challenge

Garden Tripod December 15


Interpretation of Still Life


Antique Elegance by Lea Weikert Garden Tripod December 17


It was a Spring Day by EbyArts


White Azalea ~ in the Spotlight by SummerJade Garden Tripod December 19


Avocados and lilac by bubblehex08


Coral Pink Still Life by Kathilee Garden Tripod December 21


High Key Tulips by goddarb


The Bottle Says "Goddess" by Sandra Foster Garden Tripod December 23


Azalias by Fay270


Not a Still Life But Still Dead by wolftinz Garden Tripod December 25


Hydrangeas in a Green Vase by © Janis Zroback


Barside by phil decocco Garden Tripod December 27


Floriade 2011 - Mask & Roses by Larry Lingard-Davis


Still Life On Sicilian Cart by TonyCrehan Garden Tripod December 29


faded beauty by metriognome


Little Green Bottles Sitting in the Window by Gabrielle Lees

Garden Tripod December 31


Astract in orange by RightSideDown


Spring-flowers in a flowerpot by Arie Koene Garden Tripod December 33


Interpretation of Floral Art


Duo in the Limelight by hummingbirds Garden Tripod December 35


I can sing a rainbow by ElsT


sunshine activates happiness by Astrid Ewing Photography Garden Tripod December 37


Rose Splendour by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch

Daffodils In Blue by WildestArt


Double Orange

by John Velocci Garden Tripod December 39


Stemming From Music; Astroemeria by paintingsheep


Dream on ..... by Marilyn Grimble

Autumn Tulips by Brian Haslam Garden Tripod December 41


pink lilies by ANNABEL S. ALENTON

Season for Orchids by Lynn Gedeon


Too shy to open my heart to you... (Shamrock Wild Flower, Axalis Specie) by Qnita

Purple Wildflower from the Free State, South Africa by Dawid Groenenstein

Garden Tripod December 43


Rose of Melbourne by VenturAShot

One red rose by Celeste Mookherjee


Little White Peacock in a Field of Colour by Mui-Ling Teh

Morning Fog,Iris by debraroffo

Garden Tripod December 45


Colourful Beds of Hyacinths and Tulips - Keukenhof Gardens by kathrynsgallery

Daisies by Touchstone21


Single Apricot Hellebore by edesigns14

Golden Fall by Lotus0104

Garden Tripod December 47


Floral Steps by AnnDixon

Tiny Miracle by reflector


Floral Art Challenge

Top Ten Results Little Green Bottles Sitting in the Window by Gabrielle Lees

7 Double Orange by John Velocci

4 Autumn Tulips by Brian Haslam

4 Avocados and lilac by bubblehex08

3

Antique Elegance by Lea Weikert

2

It was a Spring Day by EbyArts

6 Duo in the Limelight by hummingbirds

4 Coral Pink Still Life by Kathilee

3 One red rose by Celeste Mookherjee

2

The Bottle Says "Goddess" by Sandra Foster

2

Garden Tripod December 49


Floral Art ! Challenge

Clear Winner

Little Green Bottles Sitting in the Window

by Gabrielle Lees Garden Tripod December 51


Beech by Brian Haslam


Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography

Creative Leaf Challenge

Spotlight Feature Leaf by Brian Haslam

Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art

Garden Tripod December 53


Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art

Lisianthus by Brian Haslam


Lavatera by Brian Haslam Garden Tripod December 55


Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art

Snowdrop 4 by Brian Haslam


Polyanthus 1 by Brian Haslam Garden Tripod December 57


Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art Scanner-grams Scanography Scanner art

Cyclamen by Brian Haslam


Garden Tripod December 59


Photograph


Pots by Brian Haslam Garden Tripod December 61


Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital

Foxglove by Brian Haslam


Poppy by Brian Haslam Garden Tripod December 63


Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital

Clematis 2 by Brian Haslam


Clematis 1 by Brian Haslam

Garden Tripod December 65


Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital Photograph Garden Digital

Ripple by Brian Haslam


Dahlia 1 Sold 1,000 copies to a Hotel

Brian Haslam PAIGNTON, UNITED KINGDOM

Garden Tripod December 67


The Romantic

What did Shakespeare write in Romeo and Juliet? “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” and that was in 1600. In 1794, Robert Burns wrote “My Love is Like a Red, Red Rose". based on traditional sources in 1994. We’ve had romantic garden thoughts for centuries, and gardens have been places of romance since the Garden of Eden. We know a Romantic Garden when we experience it, don’t we? An expression like “Romance is in the Air” comes to mind. It points to the Romantic Garden as filled with the scent of flowers – roses, lilies, carnations, lilacs, tulips, orchard blossoms, irises – these are some of the most romantic flowers. They are delicate and pretty and their scent brings extra delight. There is a sense of magic in the garden when we see and smell these beautiful flowers. There’s more to the Romantic Garden than pretty flowers and delightful smells: “The hours I spend with you I look upon as sort of a perfumed garden, a dim twilight, and a fountain singing to it. You and you alone make me feel that I am alive. Other men it is said have seen angels, but I have seen thee and thou art enough.” ~George Moore George Moore brings out the additional elements. A Romantic Garden has soft light. It is shadowy and shaded to bring privacy and intimacy to the space. Shade and shadows can be found in a Romantic Garden – sometimes with garden houses, or arbours, trellises and gazebos. In these spaces a fountain brings the delight of the sound and sight of water. This makes the space attractive and allows it to be a place of intimacy To have closeness and intimacy with another is the true purpose of the Romantic Garden. “Two souls with but a single thought, Two hearts that beat as one!” ~ John Keats John Keats truly understood the nature of intimacy and the rendezvous. And so a Romantic Garden has a rendezvous. And a path takes one to that rendezvous. It might be a curving path that makes the journey and destination mysterious. The path can have stops along the way, with benches and arbours to allow one to linger. The path can be straight and reveal its promise at the end. These paths spill with soft flowers in pretty colours – pinks, blues, and soft whites. The path is a critical element for the Romantic Garden and is the link to the intimacy awaiting us at the destination. The path needs some appeal to entice one to the destination. There will be pots overflowing with flowers, benches and chairs, and plantings that intrigue and entertain.

Top, Spindletree Walled Garden Lower, Hortulus Farm Hydrangeas


Garden

So these are the elements of the Romantic Garden. These are things we intuitively know when we experience them: • flowers – roses, lilies, carnations, lilacs, tulips, orchard blossoms, irises, wild flowers • scent in the air from these blooms • water – its sounds and sight that delight • the secluded destination – perhaps a gazebo, a garden house, a trellis, or an arbour • the garden path that leads one to the destination And so it is that with its theme of love, the Romantic Garden is one of the great garden experiences. Many people today think of the Romantic Garden as something they visit in a great public garden. Places such as Chiswick House, Sissinghurst, Stowe Garden in England and Monet’s Giverny in France come to mind. These great historical gardens have lavish structures,

rolling lawns, and gorgeous floral displays. It needn’t be the case as creating a garden with Romantic elements is within easy reach. Our gardens in modern suburbs can gain Romantic flare. We would start by planting a few spring blooming trees like Magnolia, Cherry and Dogwood, and small varieties are available. Then one would ensure there is a garden path whose edges are covered by the spilling flowers of pinks, white, and blues. An arbour over the path with roses, wisteria, clematis and honeysuckle would be a perfect focal point. Of course, that all-important path would be present. Finally, separating the garden into ‘rooms’ with shrubs, hedges or lattice fences will create smaller intimate spaces. Any of these will give our garden a sense of Romantic charm, and make it an inviting place. Marilyn Cornwell

Longwood's Wisteria Magic Garden Tripod December 69


Marilyn Cornwell Has hosted the

All Glorious Lilies The Romantic Pose Challenge

Catalogue

Walk With Me The Edwardian Way by Marilyn Cornwell

Detail : Hortulus Farm Hydrangeas

Garden Tripod December 71


Bellwort --- Spring 2013 by T.J. Martin


Ruffles Have Ridges by Kathilee

Sweet dreams by EbyArts

Garden Tripod December 73


Lily of the Valley

by missmoneypenny


Arum Lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica)

by Elaine Teague

The Garden 8 Ginger Torch Lily

by Alison Hill

Garden Tripod December 75


Love

by PKGPhotography


You must remember this, a kiss is just a kiss, a sigh is just a sigh by Celeste Mookherjee

Lily in the Valley (for Carol) by vigor

Garden Tripod December 77


Simply this by Laurie Minor

Pink lily by Ana Belaj


Romantic Lily by AnnDixon

Inside Pink; Alstroemeria werdermannii, La Mirada,CA; USA by leih2008

Garden Tripod December 79


Easter Lily

by WildestArt

Another Time

by Marilyn Cornwell


Two Lilies by Mikhail Palinchak

Alstromeria Blossom

by Sandra Foster

Garden Tripod December 81


Lounge room Lillies by Margaret Stanton

Floral Seduction by Lynn Gedeon


Dream bouquet by pdsfotoart

Waterlily Yellow by cclaude

Garden Tripod December 83


pas de deux by lucyliu

Lady Lily by Eileen McVey


Delicate by Jenny Dean

The Debutante by AuntDot

Garden Tripod December 85


Sunshine and Flowers by MotherNature2


Tulips

by ElsT

Shy tear

by RightSideDown

Garden Tripod December 87


Lilac Beauty

by Penny Smith

Tulip Variations

by TonyCrehan


All Glorious Lilies The Romantic Pose Challenge

Top Ten Results 20

15

12

12

Delicate by Jenny Dean

pas de deux by lucyliu

11

Bellwort --Spring 2013 by T.J. Martin

10

Floral Seduction by Lynn Gedeon

9

The Garden 8 Ginger Torch Lily by Alison Hill

Lily of the Valley by missmoneypenny

Lily in the Valley (for Carol) by vigor

10

Ruffles Have Ridges by Kathilee

9

You must remember this, a kiss is just a kiss, a sigh is just a sigh by Celeste Mookherjee

8 Two Lilies by Mikhail Palinchak

Garden Tripod December 89


Clear Winner & Spotlight Feature All Glorious Lilies The Romantic Pose Challenge

Delicate by Jenny Dean


Garden Tripod December 91


A J

bout enny Dean

I have always been a family snapper but started taking photography more seriously when I started putting my pictures on red bubble in 2007. Since then I have worked hard at improving my techniques but am still very much an amateur with a passion for pictures.


Delicate - Australian wildflowers by Jenny Dean Garden Tripod December 93


Seed Head by Jenny Dean Garden Tripod December 95


Little Sunbird

baby sunbird in my garden.

Tucked Up - sunbird nesting in far north Queensland

Mellow Yellow - sunbird  Jenny Dean far north Queensland

Garden Tripod December 97


Wings - ulysses butterfly

Cairns Birdwing Butterfly

David and Goliath - butterfly  Jenny Dean far north Queensland

Garden Tripod December 99


Reflections - pink waterlilly by Jenny Dean

Tropicana - ginger flower by Jenny Dean

Pig's Tail by Jenny Dean

Garden Tripod December 101


Things are looking up...

Smiley Face - border collie

Soccer Dog 2 - border collie by Jenny Dean

Garden Tripod December 103


Chicken Licken

Bergo's chookie Red Rooster by Jenny Dean

Garden Tripod December 105


Delicate by Jenny Dean


Untitled by Nicole W.

Garden Tripod December 107


Ramblings from t h e O f f i c e Te m p

Happy Holidays by Nicole W.


Christmas We are not supposed to wish anyone a Merry Christmas anymore, because that could offend people with other religions. Fine, call it whatever you want, because when I wish someone a merry Christmas, I don’t mean to offend, I simply mean for someone to have a good time with their family and their traditions, because no matter what you call it, it’s the most special holiday of the year. As most people are dragging their boxes of decorations down from the attic, start their annual fight with tangled up strings of Christmas lights, kill a tree maybe and visit all kinds of Christmas markets, I have started a new tradition. As over the years I started to simply dislike the family Christmas dinners, not because of the company, but because of all the money spend, the work, (the family matriarch usually spends days working in the kitchen, only to see their work vanish in just a couple of hours), the special foods that you find yourself not even liking that much most of the time, the commercial influence…..I felt like this could not be the true meaning of Christmas, for any religion. Last year I decided to do things a little different, I decided to make Christmas more about being with family, spending quality time together. First we skipped the presents. Christmas isn’t about that. Stores try to make you feel guilty for not buying the biggest gifts and spend the most money, to show your love for your family. Wow, that’s the message we give to our kids right? We know better. Second, I decided to have our family dinner outside, in the garden. We weren’t going to just eat it outside, we were going to actually cook outside! I can tell you, it was the greatest Christmas ever. How did we do that you ask? As simple as can be. I took out the bbq and a few large outdoor cooking pans. Made a wood fire and made traditional winter food. Just your everyday food like green pees soup and stew . A ham on the bbq and some fresh baked bread to top it off. As for drinks….gluwine, hot chocolate (with a little extra in it for the grownups) and some recipes with rum in them didn’t just add a lot to the general mood, it also helped keeping us warm. And the best thing….you let everyone cook! I found my family really enjoyed stirring the soup and mind the other food too while having a warm drink, and chitchat with everyone else, until the food was ready to eat. It put an end to the rigid table setting at the traditional dinners where you talk to those that site around you, and not to the ones at the other end of the table. And that brings me to your next question….isn’t it too cold outside to have a family dinner? No it isn’t. Because you make sure it isn’t, by having this campfire to sit around, and every kind of other outside heaters you can get your hands on and position them around the table. And with the wine, the rum, the tea and the hot chocolate mixed with the food, nobody will get cold. Just tell them to wear a winter coat and good shoes. Because Christmas is not about how you look or what you are wearing now is it? One more thing you need to consider when doing all this: Christmas isn’t complete without decorations, so make sure you have plenty of lights and candles, and add nice and shiny stuff all around. Maybe even decorate a tree or a bush, or even a fence, have a nice tablecloth and napkins, add pillows for comfort and cozyness and you`re set! This may not be for everyone, but I know Im not the only person in the world that feels this way about the traditional family dinner. So for those likeminded people out there…here`s a way out of that and a way in to a simpler, warmer kind of celebration, with way better values than the commercial world forces upon us. But no matter how you decide to celebrate, I wish everyone the best time. Happy holidays!!

Garden Tripod December 109


Untitled by Nicole W.

Little cutie by Nicole W.


Featured 36

September ~ October ~ November

Garden Tripod December 111


White flower, blue sky by ElsT Gnarled II by Wendi Donaldson Nashi Pear Blossom by Joy Watson Wither’d Leaves That Fly Before The Gale by paintingsheep White tulip by lezvee Fall on the Blue Ridge 4 by virginian

Oculi. by Jeanette Varcoe. Burst of Spring by Lozzar Flowers & Art Arum Green Phase by WildestArt White Anemones by Barbara Wyeth Four O’Clock by Fay270 PurrWhite! by Doug Norkum

November


White flower, blue sky by ElsT

Nashi Pear Blossom by Joy Watson

Burst of Spring by Lozzar Flowers & Art Garden Tripod December 113


Gnarled II by Wendi Donaldson

Arum Green Phase by WildestArt

Oculi. by Jeanette Varcoe.


PurrWhite! by Doug Norkum

White Anemones by Barbara Wyeth

White tulip by lezvee Garden Tripod December 115


Fall on the Blue Ridge 4 by virginian

Wither'd Leaves That Fly Before The Gale by paintingsheep

Four O'Clock by Fay270


Untitled by Peter Wiggerman Roses – Young and Old by goddarb Great blue tit by Nicole W. Seduction Roses by Gabrielle Lees The Walled Garden – Lost Gardens of Heligan by BlueMoonRose camelia with raindrops by Lozzar Flowers & Art

Sweet Gold Bunny Rosebud, Spring. by Rita Blom Blue Tit by jessiejoe YELLOW FLOWERS by Vitta Solitude Path by Wendi Donaldson POPPIN’ PINK !! by ctheworld Orange Tree by PollyBrown

October Garden Tripod December 117


Blue Tit by jessiejoe

Great blue tit by Nicole W.

Untitled by Peter Wiggerman


Roses - Young and Old by goddarb

YELLOW FLOWERS by Vitta

Sweet Gold Bunny Rosebud, Spring. by Rita Blom

Garden Tripod December 119


Seduction Roses by Gabrielle Lees

POPPIN' PINK !! ^ by ctheworld

camelia with raindrops pink birthday card by Lozzar Flowers & Art


Orange Tree by PollyBrown

Solitude Path by Wendi Donaldson

The Walled Garden - Lost Gardens of Heligan by BlueMoonRose Garden Tripod December 121


Starflowers Blue by Clare Colins Garden Home by Sandra Fortier And then there was light! by Bob Daalder Little Shed in the Lavender Garden…by Carol Clifford Lilac Bouquet by kkphoto1 The Summer House by Fara

Flower – Westfield, NJ – Private paradise by Mike Savad Agapanthus after the Rain by AnnDixon Garden Along the Fence ^ by ctheworld Violet Vinca by paintingsheep Spring Bluff by PhotosByG Clematis by ElsT

September


Starflowers Blue by Clare Colins

And then there was light! by Bob Daalder

Agapanthus after the Rain by AnnDixon Garden Tripod December 123


Garden Home by Sandra Fortier

Flower Westfield, NJ Private paradise by Mike Savad

Garden Along the Fence ^ by ctheworld


Little Shed in the Lavender Garden... by Carol Clifford

The Summer House by Fara

Spring Bluff by PhotosByG

Garden Tripod December 125


Lilac Bouquet by kkphoto1

Violet Vinca by paintingsheep

Clematis by ElsT


Fine Art America

Click the cover to view the full catalogue

Painting & Photography

Full Catalogue Garden Tripod Group Contest

Garden Tripod December 127


Grace At Blue Horse Rescue Rabiah Seminole

Always Kiss Me Goodnight Debara Splendorio


Columbine Lee Craig

Historic Gardens I - Sotterley Plantation Beth Phifer

Garden Tripod December 129


In Quiet Places Jane Linders

Puppy Love Thomas Woolworth


Bleeding Hearts Macro Photograph Peggy Collins

Sacred Tulip Lotus Patricia Januszkiewicz

Garden Tripod December 131


Serenity Amanda Bobb

Japanese Garden Douglas Barnard


Fine Art America The Romantic Garden Contest

Top Ten Results 45

Grace At Blue Horse Rescue by Rabiah Seminole

11

Columbine by Lee Craig

6

Puppy Love Thomas Woolwo

5

Sacred Tulip Lotus Patricia Januszkiewicz

5

Serenity Amanda Bobb

15

Always Kiss Me Goodnight by Debara Splendorio

8

In Quiet Places Jane Linders

5

Historic Gardens I - Sotterley Plantation Beth Phifer

5

Bleeding Hearts Macro Photograph Peggy Collins

5

Japanese Garden Douglas Barnard

Garden Tripod December 133


Fine Art America

Grace At Blue Horse Rescue by Rabiah Seminole

The Garden Tripod Welcomes Rabiah Seminole FAA Garden Tripod Group Contest Winner


Peaceful Morning at

Blue Horse Rescue Rabiah Seminole


About

Rabiah Seminole My name is Rabiah Seminole. I live in Chase City, Virginia. I am the Founder/Director of Blue Horse Mukwa Equine Retirement and Rescue Center. We are a 501 c 3 non profit organization that has been going strong since 1999. We are the permanent home to 40 horses. We also rescue dogs and rehome them to suitable families. My photography is an outlet for me. There is an enormous amount of stress involved in rescue work and this is one way I can relax. I was an art instructor in a private school for 5 years and loved to paint and draw. But with the very limited amount of time I have, my camera has become my best friend. I use a Nikon Cool Pix that was a gift from a friend. I use it daily, and whenever a chance presents itself, I snap a shot. All of the proceeds from my photos will go to the rescue. We use 5200 bales of hay a year and 120,000 pounds of grain. Not to mention vet, farrier and other expenses. So everytime one of my images sell...it is helping us to continue our work...Nice to meet you, hope you enjoy my photographs..


The Big Girls


Beautiful Dreamer


The Blue Horse Mukwa Equine Retirement and Rescue Center is a big part of your life and your photography, When did you first start the rescue and why I started Blue Horse Mukwa Equine Retirement and Rescue Center officially in 1999. I saw a great need for placement of horses that had reached the end of their careers or deemed passed their prime by their owners. There were also horses that were neglected and abused  that needed to be cared for. I love horses and always have. My first horseback ride was at age 3 and I was hooked. I have had horses throughout my life. I got a horse 15 years ago that I was boarding at a facility. I saw horses there that were not being really treated with what I considered love and gentleness. I bought a farm and moved my horse to our new home. He needed a pasture mate , I took in a little mare that was lame, her owners were going to put her down because they could no longer use her..The rest is history. "If you build it, they will come."

Do you have a favorite horse I love all of the horses here, each one has a distinct personality. As far as a favorite, it is Gitchie. He is the one that started it all.He is 31 years old now and going strong!!


Storm


Your horse photography is displaying a deep respect for these animals, are the sales of these images your main source of funding for the horse rescue All the proceeds from the sales of any of my photographs that I receive goes directly to the animals here. It is not the main source but every penny goes to them. We are funded through the donations of folks that wish to help us continue our work. We are a non profit organization (501 c 3) so folks may get a tax deduction when they donate to us. We have done Native American Flute concerts with Jeff Ball to raise funds, we do videos, open houses etc. I am hoping that my photographs will touch folks enough that they will purchase them , knowing that they are helping to feed, shelter and care for the horses here.   What is the cost of caring for a single rescue horse in an average year We use 5200 bales of hay a year with an average cost of 5.00 per bale and 60 tons of grain. It runs about 60,000.00 a year just for feed and hay. Then we have farrier fees, vetting and maintenance of the facility.


Hitch


If someone wants you to take a horse for rescue, what would they need to do and how can they contact you We do have a process for "taking" a horse that someone has, that they no longer can care for or that they do not want, they have to provide health records etc. We also have to have the room and currently we are full. We have 40 horses here and unless there is an emergency situation where a horse is in danger of neglect or abuse, we have a waiting list. We do help people that cannot or do not want to keep a horse any longer try to place them with another reputable rescue or home. If we have the space we will consider the unwanted horse. The last thing we want is for a horse to end up at auction where they may go to slaughter . We do everything in our power to make sure that does not happen. Have all the horses you take in getting a forever home with you Horses that come here are here for life. We are a sanctuary. Most of the horses that do live out their lives here have come from pretty bad situations. We have had horses that have been starved, burned and really abused . It takes time to rebuild trust and for the horse to become part of its new herd. Healing is so important and once they are healed they feel secure and safe within their new surroundings. We think all horses are beautiful whether they are lame or blind they still have a life to live. Quality of life is important and as long as they are  safe and happy and loving life, they have a home here.


The Old Boy

by Rabiah Seminole


You also care for dogs within the rescue, what is this old boys story This old boy walked up my driveway. He was skinny,covered in ticks and exhausted. He was a cast off after hunting season. I took this photograph of him, after he had had a meal, a drink of water, ticks removed and he laid his head down to rest. I think people forget that all creatures need and deserve those things, and it is cruel to leave any animal to starve or die of exposure. He was about 12 years old and is still hanging in there.

You have an exhibition of your images soon My exhibition ''Photos for a Cause" is scheduled for Feb11-March 11 2014 at the MacCallum Moore Gardens in Chase City, Va. It is a fund raiser for mythe rescue and for the gardens . The reception is Feb 16th. Recently I was involved in an exhibition that benefited my rescue and Hospice care. It is exciting to do outreach and know that my work can help.


Ms.America

by Rabiah Seminole

Into the mist

by Rabiah Seminole


Big Cherokee by Rabiah Seminole

Rowdy

by Rabiah Seminole


Old is Beautiful


Some of your animal photography is showing immense compassion and empathy for the plight of the abandoned and unwanted, combined with the relief of finding a kind home. are there many cases that you just cannot help. I hope that my work does show compassion for those that have been cast aside and will bring awareness to what unfortunately is caused by human beings. We can all make a difference, by not turning away. To me, those that turn away from abuse or neglect are as guilty as the one inflicting the abuse. We save as many as we can and have had a great success rate. But there are some that are so far gone that all we can do is offer them honor, dignity and respect and show them love and make sure that they are humanly euthanized by a veterinarian.

Do you ever photograph the animals that are first with you showing fear or poor condition I always record the condition of the horse/ dog upon arrival for our records. It is amazing to watch the transformation through photos of a horse or dog and see how their eyes show peace instead of fear or suffering after they have gotten the care they need and deserve.


Whose out there


Would you say that your photography is a safety release from the sometimes very emotional stressful events that can happen during the day to day running of a rescue/ retirement home Most definitely, It has become a major stress relief for me. I use to paint and draw, but do not have anytime to do that anymore. My camera has become my paint brush and I love it.  I keep it with me everywhere I go and would love to be able to do more with it. What is your ideal photographic equipment .. and what are you using now Right now I am using a Nikon Cool Pix  P510. It is a nice camera. I would love to have one with interchangeable lenses for really more detailed close ups . I was given this camera as a gift. I cannot afford to buy what I would like to have, everything goes to the animals !


Dusk


chickory


Have you formally studied photography, if yes where and what level of qualification did you achieve No I have never formally studied photography. I have studied art and taught art at a private school. Who from the masters of art or photography is your biggest influence within your images. There are so many incredible photographers and artist in this world. I love the artist Georgia O'keefe and her study of flowers. I love Ansel Adams and his use of light. It would be unfair to try and pick a modern day photographer .. there are so many talented and gifted people with vision. I love seeing what they see and trying to look at things from a different angle.

Rabiah Seminole Founder/Director Blue Horse Mukwa Equine Retirement and Rescue Center www.bluehorsemukwa.org rabiah-seminole.artistwebsites.com


Rabiah Seminole Chase City, Va - United States All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013


www.exhibitionswithoutwalls.com

Garden Tripod December 157


The Official Garden Tripod Magazine Calendar

Garden Tripod January Fay270 Looking Out February Bette Devine Prelude March Sandra Foster Clematis Seeds Macro April Sandra Fortier Anchors Away! May bubblehex08 Vertical Garden June Celeste Mookherjee Pink fireworks tipped with gold July

vigor Garden Fence August Ludwig Wagner Still Life with Geraniums September CADavis Drops of Rain October

Qnita Autumn…

November João Figueiredo She didn’t know I was hunting her December TeresaB A Treasured Ornament


Garden Tripod December 158


January Elaine Teague Catching the Sun February Joy Watson Shining Light - Daffodils March

lezvee Orchid 

April Morag Anderson Parsley flowers May MotherNature Chicory Wildflower - Cichorium intybus L. June Nicole W. Pink stands out July Rosehaven "Beautiful Ladies..." August Bob Daalder Summer breeze... September CountryGardens White Hydrangea October LoneAngel Yellow and Pink Rododendron November kalaryder Banksia Menzies December Lois Bryan Poinsettia

The Official Country Gardens come grow with us Group Calendar

Country Garden Flowers

Garden Tripod December 161


Notice Board Rescue, rehab and re-home, in the Northwest Ohio area.

The mission of the Rescue, rehab and re-home, in the Northwest Ohio area.

Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc http://angeloncalldogrescue.org http://www.facebook.com/angeloncalldogrescue twitter @aocdogrescue


Garden Tripod December 163


Contributors: Editor & Treasurer TheAgency C Mclenahan Cover image WinterTime - Downy Woodpecker by Lynda McDonald   News Hound

Spotlight features

Peaceful Morning at Blue Horse Rescue by Rabiah Seminole Jenny Dean

Features by Nicole W. Katie Freeh Richard fenwick Marilyn Cornwell

The Culture of Plants with Katie Freeth

Inside the cocoa pod, Baracoa, Cuba by krista121 Cacao Tree © by Ethna Gillespie Cacao fruits on the tree Cacao flowers. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theobroma_cacao

Question Corner with Richard Fenwick

Parsnip by Sandra Foster Wild Parsnip / Pastinaca Sativa by cherryannette

Group Features Nov:

White flower, blue sky by ElsT Gnarled II by Wendi Donaldson Nashi Pear Blossom by Joy Watson Wither’d Leaves That Fly Before The Gale by paintingsheep White tulip by lezvee Fall on the Blue Ridge 4 by virginian Oculi. by Jeanette Varcoe. Burst of Spring by Lozzar Flowers & Art Arum Green Phase by WildestArt White Anemones by Barbara Wyeth Four O’Clock by Fay270 PurrWhite! by Doug Norkum

Oct:

Untitled by Peter Wiggerman Roses – Young and Old by goddarb Great blue tit by Nicole W. Seduction Roses by Gabrielle Lees The Walled Garden – Lost Gardens of Heligan by BlueMoonRose camelia with raindrops by Lozzar Flowers & Art Sweet Gold Bunny Rosebud, Spring. by Rita Blom Blue Tit by jessiejoe YELLOW FLOWERS by Vitta Solitude Path by Wendi Donaldson POPPIN’ PINK !! by ctheworld Orange Tree by PollyBrown

Sep:

Starflowers Blue by Clare Colins Garden Home by Sandra Fortier And then there was light! by Bob Daalder Little Shed in the Lavender Garden…by Carol Clifford Lilac Bouquet by kkphoto1 The Summer House by Fara Flower – Westfield, NJ – Private paradise by Mike Savad Agapanthus after the Rain by AnnDixon Garden Along the Fence ^ by ctheworld Violet Vinca by paintingsheep Spring Bluff by PhotosByG Clematis by ElsT

Fine Art America Challenge top ten Grace At Blue Horse Rescue Rabiah Seminole Always Kiss Me Goodnight Debara Splendorio Columbine Lee Craig Historic Gardens I - Sotterley Plantation Beth Phifer In Quiet Places Jane Linders Puppy Love Thomas Woolworth Serenity Amanda Bobb Japanese Garden Douglas Barnard Bleeding Hearts Macro Photograph Peggy Collins Sacred Tulip Lotus Patricia Januszkiewicz


Floral Art ! Catalogue

Antique Elegance by Lea Weikert It was a Spring Day by EbyArts White Azalea ~ in the Spotlight by SummerJade Avocados and lilac by bubblehex08 Coral Pink Still Life by Kathilee High Key Tulips by goddarb The Bottle Says "Goddess" by Sandra Foster Azalias by Fay270 Not a Still Life But Still Dead by wolftinz Hydrangeas in a Green Vase by © Janis Zroback Barside by phil decocco Floriade 2011 - Mask & Roses by Larry Lingard-Davis Still Life On Sicilian Cart by TonyCrehan faded beauty by metriognome Little Green Bottles Sitting in the Window by Gabrielle Lees Astract in orange by RightSideDown Spring-flowers in a flowerpot by Arie Koene Duo in the Limelight by hummingbirds I can sing a rainbow by ElsT sunshine activates happiness by Astrid Ewing Photography Rose Splendour by Kerryn Madsen-Pietsch Double Orange by John Velocci Stemming From Music; Astroemeria by paintingsheep Dream on ..... by Marilyn Grimble Autumn Tulips by Brian Haslam pink lilies by ANNABEL S. ALENTON Season for Orchids by Lynn Gedeon Too shy to open my heart to you... (Shamrock Wild Flower, Axalis Specie) by Qnita Purple Wildflower from the Free State, South Africa by Dawid Groenenstein Rose of Melbourne by VenturAShot One red rose by Celeste Mookherjee Little White Peacock in a Field of Colour by Mui-Ling Teh Morning Fog,Iris by debraroffo Colourful Beds of Hyacinths and Tulips - Keukenhof Gardens by kathrynsgallery Daisies by Touchstone21 Single Apricot Hellebore by edesigns14 Golden Fall by Lotus0104 Floral Steps by AnnDixon Tiny Miracle by reflector

All Glorious Lilies

The Romantic Pose Catalogue

Bellwort --- Spring 2013 by T.J. Martin Ruffles Have Ridges by Kathilee Sweet dreams by EbyArts Lily of the Valley by missmoneypenny Arum Lily (Zantedeschia aethiopica) by Elaine Teague The Garden 8 - Ginger Torch Lily by Alison Hill Love by PKGPhotography Lily in the Valley (for Carol) by vigor You must remember this, a kiss is just a kiss, a sigh is just a sigh by Celeste Mookherjee Simply this by Laurie Minor Pink lily by Ana Belaj Romantic Lily by AnnDixon Inside Pink; Alstroemeria werdermannii, La Mirada,CA; USA by leih2008 Easter Lily by WildestArt Another Time by Marilyn Cornwell Two Lilies by Mikhail Palinchak Alstromeria Blossom by Sandra Foster Lounge room Lillies by Margaret Stanton Floral Seduction by Lynn Gedeon Dream bouquet by pdsfotoart Waterlily - Yellow by cclaude pas de deux by lucyliu Lady Lily by Eileen McVey Delicate by Jenny Dean The Debutante by AuntDot Sunshine and Flowers by MotherNature2 Tulips by ElsT Shy tear by RightSideDown Lilac Beauty by Penny Smith Tulip Variations by TonyCrehan

Garden Tripod December 165


All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/ artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013


Garden Tripod 18