Issuu on Google+

garden tripod Horticultural Science Technology & Art

Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty Brief Beauty

Somewherebetweengaudyanddelicateyoufal lagainstaskyofDufybluedecoratingthelands capeonlybrieflyComefrostyoullwitheryours oftseductivefloweretshardeningalmostovern ightintoveinedandbrittlespectresofyourlushn essBloomonbrightbeautywhilethesummers unstillshinesforlikeusallyou’llsoonbenothing butamemoryifthatSomewherebetweengaud yanddelicateyoufallagainstaskyofDufyblue decoratingthelandscapeonlybrieflyComefro styoullwitheryoursoftseductivefloweretshar deningalmostovernightintoveinedandbrittle spectresofyourlushnessBloomonbrightbeau tywhilethesummersunstillshinesforlikeusally ou’llsoonbenothingbutamemoryifthatSome wherebetweengaudyanddelicateyoufallagai nstaskyofDufybluedecoratingthelandscape onlybrieflyComefrostyoullwitheryoursoftse ductivefloweretshardeningalmostovernighti ntoveinedandbrittlespectresofyourlushness Bloomonrightbeautywhilethesummersunst illshinesforlikeusallyou’llsoonbenothingbut amemoryifthatSomewherebetweengaudyan ddelicateyoufallagainstaskyofDufybluedec oratingthelandscapeonlybrieflyComefrosty


Cover Image Brief Beauty by RC deWinter Somewhere between gaudy and delicate you fall against a sky of Dufy blue, decorating the landscape only briefly. Come frost you’ll wither, your soft seductive flowerets hardening almost overnight into veined and brittle spectres of your lushness. Bloom on, bright beauty, while the summer sun still shines, for like us all you’ll soon be nothing but a memory, if that. © 2013 RC deWinter ~ All Rights Reserved

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/ photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013


GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art Issue

15 September 2013 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com


GARDEN TRIPOD Horticultural Science Technology & Art

www.gardentripod.com 8

Office News Hound

10 Exhibition & News 11 Single Tree Catalogue & Challenge Results 45 Spotlight, Lucinda Walter 58 Andrea Durrheim, Planning for Biodiversity 60 Country Gardens come grow with us Features 76 Katie Freeth, Alternative Culture 83 Spotlight, Lynn Gedeon 95 HolyOther, Scribblings with colour 107 A subterranean view from Nick Coburn Phillips


OFFICIAL CALENDAR Calendar Size A3 (297 x 420mm / 11.7” x 16.5”) Please remember to set the start date of the calendar when ordering

http://www.redbubble.com/people/gardentripod/calendars/10524004-garden-tripod

GARDEN TRIPOD www.gardentripod.com

On Sale Now http://www.redbubble.com/people/gardentripod/calendars/10524004-garden-tripod


garden tripod Horticultural Science, Technology & Art Welcome to our 15th edition of the Garden Tripod. We are now independent. So images and articles can be included from outside Redbubble. We will also still be working closely with all the RB members, so no change there. We just felt that it was time to move the Garden Tripod magazine forward. With this comes a small change, there is a new backdrop to the webpage and a members only area. Advertising has also been added at the end of some of the pages on the website, this is to make sure google find us in web searches, Please don't click the advertising as it will take you away from the Garden Tripod web page, and is not part of our own advertising. If any revenue is gained from the advertising it will all be put back into the hosting and publishing fees for the Garden Tripod magazine Continuing from last month we are still showing text in the raw, as it has been written, rather than trimming and tidying. We felt we was loosing contact with the person. All spelling mistakes and grammatical errors are now all included for free, and we can meet the real people, unpolished, unaltered. Also do give our new calendar a little look .. its been a joy to assemble, and remember all the profits go back to the artists that have work featured in the calendar. In this months Garden Tripod we have the Single Tree feature challenge, Its interesting as the tree was to have some text as to why it was important to the photographer/artist. We also have four awesome spotlight features .. The first is last months sunshine challenge winner Lucinda Walter. Then we have another challenge winner from the Book Group by Lynn Gedeon. HolyOther has shown her drawings with cogs this time introducing colour, and lastly we have an amazing view of a subterranean view from Nick Coburn Phillips. New to Garden Tripod is the Country Gardens come grow with us feature pages. Some of you may have noticed the fancy little copy of the feature in the groups feature gallery, well now you know why its there. The features will be shown quarterly, so the next three will be shown in the Decembers issue... Gosh its almost Christmas !!!


Three important facts about your editor 1. Has an allergy to Tea 2. Holds a BA Hons Degree in Fine Art 3. loves promoting horticulture from around the world


A little word from our

Office News Hound Hi Folks .. I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine.

I have a confession ~ I totally love FOOD ! I know that as I am a fully paid up member of the Saluki gang I am not meant to be too interested in food ... BUT HOW I LOVE FOOD... Even if its not good for me and my waste line never appeared after I lost the puppy fat... I just replaced it with adolescent fat. My favorite food is .......... hummm ... well everything really .. how can a little hound choose when there are so many tasty things out in the world. So I like biscuits, cake, candles, porridge, eggs, rice, sausages, pies, chairs, tables, shrubs, flowers, roots and trees.... I am often being chased around by my folk as they try to remove bits of very tasty nosh from my chops.. So I have a message for all those anorexic Salukis out there ... EAT .. its lovely .. I am on the second day of my diet and its no fun ... but have been promised that if I loose some pounds I can have a few of my treats back .. I just love the look of the image posted by Barbara Wyeth called Artichoke .. O I can just taste it now .... its so fresh .. from the garden to the scanner .. do you think if I printed it up I could eat the image ... darn .. the ink is toxic !!!! OK back to the freezer ... oops .. I mean drawing board Stay Safe Princess Summer

8 Garden Tripod 15


Artichoke

by Barbara Wyeth From the garden – to the scanner


Exhibition News

Jacki Stokes is exhibiting at the

The Artists’ Garden Art Exhibition RHS Garden Rosemoor, Devon 06 Sept to 22 Sept Every Day, 11am - 5pm Normal Garden Admission Over 80 of the South West’s most talented artists are involved in this exciting and colourful exhibition of naturalistic pictures, prints and cards created using a variety of media. The focus is on gardens and plants as well as landscapes, seascapes and wildlife pictures and the range of images is eclectic in both style and price. All the work exhibited is for sale.

Mt Wilson & Mt Irvine Photography & Art Exhibition 26th & 27th October 2013 This year’s exhibition has been expanded with invitations being sent to a local Mt Wilson Jewellery artist as well as local sculptors. I’m sure this will increase the interest to visitors and locals alike. Remember that all work needs to be of the Mt Wilson and/or Mt Irvine area.

10 Garden Tripod 15

Entry forms and other inquiries to bevwoodman46@gmail.com. For full details see page 119


Garden Tripod Supports Country Gardens come grow with us group challenge

A Single Tree Catalogue


A Nest of Robins In Her Hair by paintingsheep

12 Garden Tripod 15


Trees" is a lyric poem by American poet Joyce Kilmer, written in February 1913. First published in Poetry: A Magazine of Verse that August, it was included in Kilmer’s 1914 collection Trees and Other Poems. I think that I shall never see A poem lovely as a tree. A tree whose hungry mouth is prest Against the earth’s sweet flowing breast; A tree that looks at God all day, And lifts her leafy arms to pray; A tree that may in summer wear A nest of robins in her hair; Upon whose bosom snow has lain; Who intimately lives with rain. Poems are made by fools like me, But only God can make a tree. This young tree is situated in the middle of a long sloping hill in Bristol, UK. Near the top are some benches where people stop to eat lunch and sometimes feed the squirrels. Dogs on their walks chase the squirrels, who then run up the branches of this tree. Ravens often sit on top and watch the show. Not sure what tree this is..the leaves are large and it may be sycamore…please confirm if you know for certain. Dedicated to Calvin

A Nest of Robins In Her Hair by paintingsheep


From my past I set myself free But that place is still a part of me This image was used for my artwork A year went by in a single day ; and just as that artwork tells a story of time, this tree tells many stories as it shows the roots of its birth; carrying its past to this present day. In many ways, we ourselves always carry our past with us; we will feel nostalgic when we come back to, or be reminded of, a thing or a place we left or put away long ago; and no matter how good or bad our past was, and whether we got over it or not, the past is still an important part of us. This incredible tree was one of the first I saw when I visited the Singapore Botanic Gardens. I think it is a banyan tree, but not 100% sure. In April 2013 it was reported that, an application for the garden to be listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site was made in December 2012 Taken with a CASIO EX-FC 100 on June 28, 2011.

14 Garden Tripod 15

Where Life Begins by Mui-Ling Teh


The Tree in the Field at Cades Cove by SummerJade Cades Cove is an isolated valley located in the Tennessee section of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. The valley was home to numerous settlers before the formation of the national park. Today Cades Cove, the single most popular destination for visitors to the park, attracts more than two million visitors a year because of its well preserved homesteads, scenic mountain views, and abundant display of wildlife. On the 11 mile loop through Cades Cove there is a field with a tree which everyone wants to photograph. Park as soon as you can, walk to the fence and take your turn! On this day it was raining and when the sun did try to break through, it was glaringly bright. Dark rain clouds hung over the mountains and quickly moved back in to block the sun. Thunder is loud in the mountains and it echoes


I looked out of my window summer and winter at the big old pine tree on the corner The hurricane Sandy decided that one hundred years was old enough for this pine tree. So Sandy snapped it in half. It taught me that no thing is forever and that every day begins a new life.

Shattered Pine by Kenneth Hoffman

16 Garden Tripod 15


A very old tree with its twisted gnarled roots showing above the ground, the roots spread for several meters around the base of the tree I have stopped and stared at this tree on many occasions, wondering just what it has seen over the years of its long long life and how much more will it see when I am long gone

An old timer by LoneAngel


This 60 Ha tree park is spectacular. There are trees here from all over the world in various sections of the park. A worthwhile visit at any time of year, particularly in Autumn when the deciduous trees are changing their colour. There are a few walks around this park and they have been marked with ‘route arrows’ so no fear of getting lost. Walk amongst gigantic oak trees in the deciduous area, do the length of the ‘Pear Walk’ and see beautiful Chinese Pistachios turning deep red.The Golden Valley Tree Park has a portfolio on Red Bubble and a link from there to its own web site. More of my Parks and Gardens Photography M o r e o f m y Tr e e s Photography Golden Valley Tree Park

Chinese Pistachio by Elaine Teague

18 Garden Tripod 15


One afternoon I went on a jacaranda tour with my camera, wandering through local neighborhoods where the trees were blooming (in Long Beach, California, USA). When the jacaranda trees bloom, I can hear them calling my name. I usually respond by making closeup photos of the blossoms, but this time I wanted to capture the stately grace of an entire tree and use a Lensbaby optic to convey the dreamy quality of the blossoming branches. Of the many jacaranda trees I photographed that afternoon, this one spoke to me and even seemed to dance as the breeze played among her blossoms. This image was composed in c a m e r a ( n o c ro p ) a n d o n l y minimally processed. (Olympus E-5 & Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35, f/4, 1/2500 sec., ISO 200, afternoon sun, handheld)

Jacaranda dreams by Celeste Mookherjee


Walking home after a glorious hot day and a walk on Whitstable beach just found this moment on the streets with the long shadows of the tree and golden evening sunshine! Trees in streets add so much to urban life! The location is on the corner of Woodlawn Street and Cromwell Road in Whitstable and is a tree I walk past every day. Many people pass by and don’t recognize the beauty of urban trees, so this is to celebrate the fact that they are very important to our surroundings too, whether in summer like this one, or bare branches in winter!

20 Garden Tripod 15

Summer Magic by Touchstone21


Underneath tree canopy, showing gnarled trunk of old Acer Palmatum in autumn colour. Victoria, Australia. Age increases beauty and character.

Twisted. by Jeanette Varcoe


Taken in Brisbane, Australia. Jacarandas bloom late October and all of November in Australia. When these trees are flowering, it means that the years final exams are on for university students.

22 Garden Tripod 15

Jacaranda tree, Australia by PhotosByG


Winter Oak in Morden Park, London Photograph of an oak tree in Morden Park, London, by Ludwig Wagner United Kingdom by ludwig wagner. Winters in London can be bleak and lonely and this image reflects just that, although it also means that things can only get better.


A windswept ash tree in Morwenstow; in my eyes it sums up all the dark and powerful elements of Cornwall that remind me of Daphne Du Mauriers novels I used to read as a teenager. I walked parts of the Coast Path last winter and got to see some awsome places which inspired the novelist.

24 Garden Tripod 15

Windswept by Alexandra Lavizzari


I love the way there limbs move in the breeze. I see freedom to move when looking at this tree. Photo was taken on a golf course in Scituate Ma.

Standing alone in a winter storm by debraroffo


Apple Blossoms With Bird House In Appleville by Sandra Foster shot of the apple

I was really trying to get a blossoms but couldn’t leave out the birdhouse. Minolta DiMAGE S414 This apple tree located in back yard – Fort St John BC, Canada. Meaningful to me to see the beautiful blossoms and apples hang from it every fall and a great place to see and hear the birds through out the year.

26 Garden Tripod 15


The Baobab has one of the longest known tree lifespans, many recorded to live between 2000 and 5000 years. A mature Baobab tree, such as this beauty, can store up to 120,000 litres of water. A very useful water source in the desperately dry Northern Territory of Australia.

Baobab Tree by V1mage


This is my tree that inspires me strength. It may be solitary but it is very strong.

28 Garden Tripod 15

Lone Tree in Dry Land by Yannik Hay


My family goes to the town beach during the summer in Vermont. This evening last week happened to be a perfect sunset night! It was a little chilly to swim but I got some amazing sunset shots‌.I love the tree silhouette quite beautiful!

Silhouette Sunset by Lotus0104


An illustration of Erasmus’ In Praise of Folly – A venerable Japanese maple in the gardens of Winterthur Museum in Delaware (USA)

30 Garden Tripod 15

L'Eloge de la Folie by cclaude


Near Lake Te Anau, on the South Island of New Zealand, an early morning misty fog settled over the landscape and created a backdrop for this single tree. It represented, to me, the singular beauty of this country

Tree In The Fog by phil decocco


I often drive past this tree in my neighbourhood (Newcastle, NSW, Australia) and love the fact that it is my favourite colour much of the year (it is one of my top 50 features of my neighbourhood). It is the only element of the lovely garden that is outside the fence, a sentinel to tell me I am nearly home.

32 Garden Tripod 15

Purple Tree from near me by KazM


One single tree is blooming on April 1st. (Luxembourg, Europe) It certainly made my day!

The magnolia tree by bubblehex08


This Morton Bay Fig tree was photographed in a park on the shores of the S w a n R i v e r, W e s t e r n Australia. The shapes these trees grow into are wonderful.

Morton Bay Fig Ficus macrophylla by Eve Parry

34 Garden Tripod 15


This is a tree sitting by a winter wheat field in E. Arkansas USA, I love this tree. It looks so forlorn and worn. Its barely hanging on. I’ve shot it in all seasons. Taken 12, 2012 with a Nikon Coolpix, straight from the camera. I don’t recall it ever having leaves. I love how it leans, the wind is so fierce here on the Grand Prairie that even telephone poles tend to lean….

Leaning Tree by WildestArt


Banyan Tree by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon

This tree is a special tree that sits outside the HANA acrylic on fabric

36 Garden Tripod 15


Seen on a grassy area just above the beaches at La Jolla, California. This tree speaks to me….every time I see it.. I am awed by what seems to be a strength to su r v iv e … t h e c it y h a s n e v e r removed it , it remains like this year round…bent but not broken….a lesson to humans….

Bent & Weary...Making a Statement by heatherfriedman


A Quiver tree against the quintessential African sky. Near the Namibian border, but in South Africa, this tree represents home to me, in all its complex, unusual beauty..

Making a stand by Karen01

38 Garden Tripod 15


A tree on the horizon near Elton in the Peak District in the county of Derbyshire, taken just after sunset. 1/3 second exposure with a fast zoom. Edited using Photoshop CS with an extra layer added.

The One Tree by Paul Green


This photograph was taken in Tasmania (Australia) near a town called Richmond.

40 Garden Tripod 15

Against the sun by Jocelyn Parry-Jones


One Winner

Standing alone in a winter storm by debraroffo was voted the most popular entry in this challenge with 13 votes.

I love the way there limbs move in the breeze. I see freedom to move when looking at this tree. Photo was taken on a golf course in Scituate Ma.


Top Ten Results

13

Standing alone in a winter storm by debraroffo

5 Baobab Tree by V1mage

4 Chinese Pistachio by Elaine Teague

4 Lone Tree in Dry Land by Yannik Hay

4 Tree In The Fog by phil decocco

42 Garden Tripod 15

6 The One Tree by Paul Green

4 Against the sun by Jocelyn Parry-Jones

4 Windswept by Alexandra Lavizzari

4 The Tree in the Field at Cades Cove by SummerJade

4 Jacaranda tree, Australia by PhotosByG


Peek-a-boo by Nicole W.


Ramblings from the Office Temp ~ Nicole W. ~ Is off on a Ramble be back in time for the next issue

44 Garden Tripod 15


Spotlight feature Sunshine challenge winner

Lucinda Walter Facebook Fine Art America RedBubble See Me 500px  


Arizona Poppies Wildflowers – Poppies appear after winter rains to showcase the arrival of Spring here in the desert of Arizona.

Country Gardens come grow with us Winning Challenge entry 46 Garden Tripod 15


Tulips & Daffodils in Black & White


Photographed at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska, MN. The Arboretum features more than 1,100 acres of magnificent gardens, model landscapes, and natural areas-from woodlands and wetlands to prairiewith extensive collections of northern-hardy plants. Tour the Arboretum on 12.5 miles of garden paths and hiking trails. Walk the close gardens and walk or drive ThreeMile Drive to see more gardens and collections. Limited access to Three-Mile Drive in winter for vehicle traffic (pedestrian traffic remains open). Winter Wonder bus tours are available Thursdays and Saturdays (check times and fees at Visitor Center. Circulators offering step-on and step-off service to three destinations throughout the Arboretum will start in 2013. The University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum is part of the College of Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences at the University of Minnesota. Our mission is to be a growing resource for horticultural and environmental information, plant conservation, research and education; to inspire and delight a growing visitorship with quality plants in well-deisgned and maintained displays, collections, model landscapes and natural areas.

Day Dream

Floribunda Roses These Floribunda Roses were taken in October by Buffalo Lake, MN. Sometimes an early frost will take these flowers but 2011 was a glorous year for flowers & colors of the leaves.


Colors of Autumn Afternoon at the Park Fall Time Along the River Underside Beauty

Photographed in many locations in the northern suburbs of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Fall Reflectionsy by Lucinda Walter 50 Garden Tripod 15


The Bowl Mission San José de Tumacácori was established in January 1691 by Jesuit Father Eusebio Francisco Kino. It is located at the town of Tumacácori, Arizona and is open to the public from t h e Tu m a c á c o r i N a t i o n a l Historical Park visitor center. It is the site of a Franciscan mission that was built in the late 1700s and it takes its name from an earlier mission site founded by Father Eusebio Kino in 1691.

52 Garden Tripod 15

The Granary Pottery (detail) by Lucinda Walter


by Lucinda Walter

Open to the Sun Bloom of Arizona’s State Flower – Saguaro

Time for a Treat Arizona’s State Flower – Saguaro. This is the time of year that the flowers just start to open. Here many buds have formed on the Saguaro and a couple are open, much to the delight of the Cactus Wren. The Cactus Wren, the state bird of Arizona, is reaching into the flower for the sweet nectar. The wrens actually build their nests in the Saguaro. Photograph was taken in my neighborhood.

54 Garden Tripod 15

The saguaro cactus (Carnegiea gigantea) is one of the defining plants of the Sonoran Desert. These plants are large, tree-like columnar cacti that develop branches (or arms) as they age, although some never grow arms. These arms generally bend upward and can number over 25. Saguaros are covered with protective spines, white flowers in the late spring, and red fruit in summer. Saguaros are found exclusively in the Sonoran Desert. The most important factors for growth are water and temperature. If the elevation is too high, the cold weather and frost can kill the saguaro. Although the Sonoran Desert experiences both winter and summer rains, it is thought that the Saguaro obtains most of its moisture during the summer rainy season. You find this cactus in southern Arizona and western Sonora, Mexico. At the northern portion of their range they are more plentiful on the warmer south facing slopes. A few stray plants can also be found in southeast California. The saguaro is not currently listed as threatened or endangered. Arizona has strict regulations about the harvesting, collection or destruction of this species. With the right growing conditions, it is estimated that saguaros can live to be as much as 150-200 years old. Saguaro are very slow growing cactus. A 10 year old plant might only be 1.5 inches tall. Saguaro can grow to be between 40-60 feet tall (12-18m). When rain is plentiful and the saguaro is fully hydrated it can weigh between 3200-4800 pounds.

Magnificant Bloom of the Saguaro


The Porch of the Caryatids of The Erechitheion The Erechiteion is located in Athens, Greece on the Acropolis. The Erechtheion, built 421 and 407 BC, is a unique and elegant temple best known for its Carytid Porch with six draped female figures (Caryatids) as supporting columns. Here you can see only 4 with the city of Athens in the background.

56 Garden Tripod 15


I love to take photos! Pure & simple. I like capturing moments in everyday life, landscapes, cityscapes, nature and people. I love to follow the light! So come on a journey with me and see my world. Thanks so much for stopping by to look. “Sometimes I do get to places just when God’s ready to have somebody click the shutter.” Ansel Adams “A true photograph need not be explained, nor can it be contained in words.” Ansel Adams “The difference between a good photographer and a great photographer is. A good photographer takes good photography. A great photographer cares more about the essence of his/her subject matter than the photograph. If he/she can capture the essence of the subject matter in a photograph and convey it to just one other person, then that photograph has succeeded in becoming a great photograph.” Ansel Adam As an avid student of Adams, his quotes describes my approach to capturing light — the essence of all great photographs and my personal philosophy. From early days of my photography, I have actively pursued a wide range of images where shadow, light and composition unite to create powerful emotions. Whether I’m here in Green Valley or in faraway places, I’m immersed in an environment where God is constantly providing subjects that are just a click away. I translate my vision by listening, observing and following the Light! With the inspiration of the Sonoran Desert, and the techniques studied from other photographers, I have everything I need to pursue my passion. Hopefully, through my visions, I can share the awe-striking beauty of the world with people everywhere. “A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed.” Ansel Adams “Photography, as a powerful medium of expression and communications, offers an infinite variety of perception, interpretation and execution." Ansel Adams Lucinda Walter copyright ©2013

Spotlight feature Sunshine challenge winner

Lucinda Walter Facebook Fine Art America RedBubble See Me 500px  


Horticulture

Developers and landscape designers need to consider the natural habitat in order to make appropriate plant choices. Afromontaine forests are highly diverse eco-systems under threat

PLANNING FOR BIODIVERSITY By Andrea Durrheim, Horticulturist, New Plant Nursery

Biodiversity is a buzz-word that is doing the rounds and if the noises that legislators are making are any indication, it will soon bring about new laws. Of course, there is already the long list of plants that have shown themselves to be invasive, taking over from natural vegetation in various parts of the country. However there are many more issues at stake here than Bluegum trees! Biodiversity can be defined as ‘the totality of genes, species, and ecosystems of a region’. The implication here is that a species, or even a genotype that does not naturally occur in an ecosystem is alien. This means that an ‘indigenous’ plant species could easily be alien to an ecosystem within the borders of South Africa.Then too, an introduced genotype that does occur naturally in an area is by definition as alien as a rose bush in the karoo! The train of thought that is being followed goes like this:Any alien plant could become an invasive plant or otherwise affect the gene pool. Given that it is impossible to tell whether or not an alien is invasive until the damage is done, dare we plant anything that does not belong, especially in sensitive ecosystems? On the surface, the logical reaction is to ban all trade in alien

plants without a permit.This is already the case, but the regulations have not yet been worked out. (Will we all take cover of the sight of the plant police and their travelling herbarium?) Because it would be unconstitutional to kill an entire industry through legislation, we can be sure that regulations will allow for trade in ornamentals, but the industry likely to be affected most is the landscaping industry. While biodiversity regulations are less likely to impact on urban developments, it may, in the near future, become a fundamental principle that developers, landscape architects and landscapers will have to take into account in any area where development impacts on ecosystems. In so-called ‘sensitive ecosystems’ this already applies.A developer may for example be given the go-ahead to execute his plan, but only on certain conditions – one of these being the use of plants that naturally occur in the area. A refinement of this occurs when the developer is required to plan for re-introduction, not only of the species, but also of the genotype that occurs on the site. There are good reasons for this requirement, although on the surface it may seem excessive. Widespread species differ in their genetic composition from one place to another. Sometimes the difference is clearly visible and sometimes it isn’t.The danger of introducing ‘alien genes’ is that they could breed with local plants diluting or taking over the natural gene pool.This could result in a plant that is so successful that it becomes a ‘weed’ that suppresses the natural vegetation by excessive competition. Genetic diversity will decrease in the population of the affected species, with possible effects on the plant population’s survival of adverse conditions

Andrea Durrheim

Seven species of wild treasure. In the centre is Watsonia fourcadei, Hermannia saccifera (in front of Watsonia), Phylicia sp (needle-like leaves), Hydrocotyle sp (round leaves), Ficinia filliformis (grass), Ursinia (finely divided leaves in foreground).The fern is Pteridium aquilinum and the restio in the background is Thamnocortus.

38

landscape sa - September 06

58 Garden Tripod 15

Nylandtia spinosa thrives on harsh, exposed coastal dunes.

Plants support insect, bird and animal life


Horticulture when they arise. The other side of the coin is that the plant species could be completely wiped out. Given that we are blessed with a floral kingdom that is famed everywhere for its diversity, and that this in turn supports the entire food chain of insects, birds and animals, the importance of maintaining this valuable asset becomes clear. Even from a purely economic perspective it makes sense to use this resource in a sustainable way as it is the basis of our tourism industry. Many of our plants are also proving to be the source for medicines that form the basis of a thriving export industry. The main practical effect this type of thinking will have on the landscaping process will be that planning will have to begin much earlier. Landscapers will have to contract growers in good time to produce site-specific material in order to ensure supply of suitable plant material – it certainly won’t be available anywhere else! Many of the slower-growing species will need up to two years to reach a suitable size although pioneers can be produced more quickly. Either the finished landscape will have to be planned long enough in advance, or a phased approach emulating natural succession from pioneers to climax vegetation will have to be followed.The good news for landscape architects and landscapers is that developers will no longer be able to cut landscaping budgets to the bare bones. However it is well known that there is no such thing as ‘a free lunch’, and in return for the extra recognition, landscapers and growers will have to do their homework in order to reap the benefits! Even when regulations do not require it, we should consider planting species that occur naturally.Aesthetically, this helps to maintain the sense of place appropriate to the area and the plants will support and encourage other forms of life such as insects, rodents and birds. The plants will also tend to thrive provided that they are planted in places that emulate their natural habitat. Very few people have the knowledge to create a landscape using locally indigenous plant material without first surveying the site: plants tend to differ in growth preferences and appearance depending on location. An intimate knowledge of the site and a thorough study of the vegetation before it is disturbed will be essential to successful design and implementation. The challenges ahead will certainly lead to more interesting and diverse landscapes. ‘Formula gardens’ will become less and less of an option, and we will all have to work harder and be more informed about our own natural vegetation (20 300+ species – so many plants, so little time!).There are challenges ahead for nurserymen too.As time goes on and the concept becomes more entrenched, we will be called on to grow plants we may never even have heard of before from site-specific material. Change always brings opportunities as well as threats, and the green industry will have to minimise the threats and make use of the opportunities. All in all, we are in for interesting times and we will have to become ‘greener’ than we have ever been before! lsa Andrea Durrheim obtained her National Diploma in Horticulture in 1994 at Technikon Pretoria and her B.Tech Hort in 2000 from Technikon SA. From 1993-2002, she worked as a grower at various wholesale production nurseries and began working for New Plant Nursery in 2002 growing indigenous plant. She considers this her proudest achievement as it was a goal of hers since her student days.

Thirty square centimeters of biodiversity

Kikuyu and Aloe – who wins?

Wetlands, like afro-montaine forests, are eco-systems under threat. This is a RAMSAR site.

Mountains often have unique vegetation

Inspiration from nature

Babiana is often concealed among taller vegetation. While the natural landscape may seem to offer few ornamental possibilities, there are always hidden treasures that come to light on closer inspection.

Agathosma ciliaris is one of many aromatic Rutaceae called Buchu. South Africa is well known for this medicinal plant

landscape sa - September 06

39


August 2013

Top Row The Wisteria Garden at Longwood by SummerJade Daisy posy with fan by Clare Colins The cottage of everyone’s dreams by RightSideDown Candle Light & Posies by Sandra Fortier Aug. landscape by vigor Potato Vine by Bette Devine

60 Garden Tripod 15

Lower Row glasswing by Nicole W. First in love by hinting Swallowtail in the Red Pentas © by GardenJoy Company…. by Bob Daalder Butterfly album, butterfly Nr.1 by loiteke Phalaenopsis aphrodite (Moon Orchid) & Ferns by MotherNature


The Wisteria Garden at Longwood by SummerJade

The cottage of everyone's dreams

Aug. landscape

by RightSideDown

by vigor


Daisy posy with fan by Clare Colins

Candle Light & Posies

Potato Vine.

by Sandra Fortier

by Bette Devine

62 Garden Tripod 15


glasswing by Nicole W.

Swallowtail in the Red Pentas © by GardenJoy

Butterfly album, butterfly Nr.1 by loiteke


First in love by hinting

First in love by hinting

Company.... by Bob Daalder

Phalaenopsis aphrodite (Moon Orchid) & Ferns by MotherNature


July 2013

Top Row On reflection. by Paul Pasco Alotta Pink by baneling Peter’s Perfect Peppers by paintingsheep Impatiens. by Bette Devine Pristine Lilacs On A Music Pedestal by Sandra Foster Hot Pink Tritonia by Marilyn Harris

Lower Row Strolling Together by jules572 Tatiana Asleep in the Hostas by Marilyn Cornwell Summer time by MarianBendeth Giant Marble by Marian Grayson Stepping Back‌ by Lotus0104 Green Garden ^ by ctheworld


On reflection. by Paul Pasco

Peter's Perfect Peppers by paintingsheep

66 Garden Tripod 15


Pristine Lilacs On A Music Pedestal by Sandra Foster


Alotta Pink by baneling

Hot Pink Tritonia by Marilyn Harris

Impatiens. by Bette Devine


Strolling Together by jules572

Summer time by MarianBendeth

Stepping Back... by Lotus0104


Tatiana Asleep in the Hostas by Marilyn Cornwell

Giant Marble by Marian Grayson

Green Garden ^ by ctheworld


June 2013

Top Row Out of the Fold by Tracy Friesen Magnificant Bloom of the Saguaro by Lucinda Walter fungus by Nicole W. By the garden gate. by Paul Pasco Lotus I by Meeli Sonn Snowdrop Bloom by Joy Watson

Lower Row Tempting by Sandy Keeton NOOROO GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman A Quiet Corner – Mount Wilson, Blue Mountains Sydney – The HDR Experience by Philip Johnson Jacaranda by PollyBrown Quiet Moments by Gisele Bedard Magical Gateway by AnnDixon


Out of the Fold by Tracy Friesen

Lotus I

fungus

by loiteke

by Nicole W

72 Garden Tripod 15


Snowdrop Bloom by Joy Watson

By the garden gate. by Paul Pasco

Magnificant Bloom of the Saguaro by Lucinda Walter Lucinda is one of our featured artists this month


Tempting by Sandy Keeton

A Quiet Corner - Mount Wilson, Blue Mountains Sydney - The HDR Experience by Philip Johnson

Quiet Moments by Gisele Bedard


NOOROO GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman

Jacaranda by PollyBrown

Magical Gateway by AnnDixon


The Culture of Plants Alternative Culture Katie Freeth Katie Freeth Earlier this year, I moved house to a small town outside the urban sprawl of the Adelaide suburbs. The front garden is not huge but features a “creek” running along the frontage. Our land title carries a local Council endorsement to the effect that we must keep the creek clear as a drainage channel. Recent rain has revealed the reason for this as the water level rises at least 50cm after every heavy shower! Some days this rise has been more … The front garden that came with the house was a large patch of lawn, in poor condition; at the edge of the lawn closest to the building were eight standard rose bushes. Towards the creek and the outer edge of the garden were a few shrubs – some native - and overgrown, weedy banks ran down either side of the creek. Based on my perceived reputation of being “water-wise” and “environmentally aware”, friends were agog to know the answer to their question to me “are you going to do the right thing and plant a native garden?” That set me thinking. What is a native garden? There are only a very few plants that are ubiquitous over a land mass as large as, for example, Australia. Australian Native plants are, as the name suggests, those plants that occur naturally within Australia. Although the Eucalyptus, Grevillea and Acacia genera are, to many, synonymous with Australia, what is native in one region of this vast continent may be very different to those found in another. Native plants tend to grow in a preferred region of specific microclimate and soil types – i.e. they are indigenous to their region. Imagine if you will native plants from the dry soils of Western Australia and those from the tropical rain forests of Queensland – all Australian natives – but very different plants, with very different growing requirements. Many species will not even grow happily in different parts of one State, let alone a different one! But the negative side of this equation is also true. Some species will grow just as well, if not better, outside their native area and thus become a problem. Acacia baileyana, the Cootamandra Wattle, a native of southwest New South Wales, is an attractive garden plant with silver-grey foliage and the classic, soft balls of golden-yellow flowers; but … it will cause “genetic pollution” outside its natural area, being able to hybridise freely with other indigenous species, and in some cases has put these at risk of extinction. The issue is a significant one and the Nursery and Garden Industry Australia in partnership with the Federal Government publishes a series of regional “Grow Me Instead” booklets to help to reduce the number of problem plants around Australia – both native and exotic.

76 Garden Tripod 15


Acacia baileyana, The Cootamandra Wattle, can cause “genetic pollution� outside its natural area, being able to hybridise freely with other indigenous species

Grevillea sp Acacia baileyana blooms

Grevillea olivaceae


Moving away from the controversy of what is “right” or “wrong” let’s go back a step to the idea of the limitations imposed by specific growing requirements. Although there may be lots of species local to where my garden is, not all are suitable – size, form, effect may all colour my choice. Happily, plant breeders have identified particularly attractive or robust natives and by hybridisation of plants sourced from the wild have been able to produce ‘select’ or better forms, which have improved characteristics to their parent species. Perhaps they will flower more often, or for longer; they may be more disease resistant or have a longer life span. The key advantage for us, the gardeners, however, is that the palette of “native” plants is safely increased, because these plants can be grown in a greater number of regions.

Chamelaucium uncinatum 'Raspberry Ripple' Hardenbergia 'Happy Wanderer'

78 Garden Tripod 15


Chamelaucium uncinatum 'Raspberry Ripple'


Let’s have fun and make some comparisons. Wisteria sinensis – planted all over Europe is easily substituted by Hardenbergia violacea ‘Happy Wanderer’ which sprawls and climbs over most things and in most situations. Polygala myrtifolia widely grown in the warmer, drier parts of Europe is easily replaced by Eremophila maculata (Spotted Emu bush), which although smaller is a bird-attracting delight. Chamelaucium uncinatum (Geraldton Wax) is another delight. It is native to Western Australia but our plant breeding friends have helped us here with lots of cultivars such as C. ‘Purple Pride’, C. ‘Alba’ and C. ‘Raspberry Ripple’ giving colours of white, purple, pink – a glorious plant which grows equally well in South Australia! Ironically a visit to my local native plant nursery revealed lots of rosemary plants: Rosmarinus officinalis; R. ‘Blue Lagoon’ and R. ‘Tuscan Blue’ in particular. But “why”? I asked; the simple answer is that as a companion plant to natives the rosemary offers excellent insect pest control. And of course, for a gardening cook, there are clearly advantages as well as the visual pleasure; Rosmarinus ‘Blue Lagoon’ is a particularly floriferous cultivar! But I do enjoy the native rosemary too Westringia fruticosa – although more delicate in appearance, it is salt-spray and drought resistant – a real toughie!

spotted Emu bush flower

Polygala myrtifolia

80 Garden Tripod 15


The upshot of all this study though, is that I haven’t only planted natives in my garden – or even ‘select’ forms of natives. I believe that designed well, a garden hosting mixed exotics (including non-indigenous natives) and natives can work well providing growing conditions and requirements are matched and enough is known about both types of plants to avoid problems to the environment. I recommend a broad planting palette, wherever possible finding native alternatives to familiar exotic garden plants, all the while following sustainable landscape principles such as • • •

• • • •

design to local environmental conditions conserve water by selecting low water use plants select non-invasive plants – the ones that won’t out-compete or hybridise with native species and thus dilute the gene pool of native indigenous species select plants that will not provide a source of plant disease or insect invasion provide habitat and food source for native fauna avoid harmful chemicals and minimise nonrenewable energy consumption use sustainably and locally sourced products and materials

My planting is nearly complete; natives and harmless exotics all sharing the same needs sit side by side, responding to the advance of spring. Forget the misconception that native plants are rather dull. In South Australia birds and insects are important pollinators, so it is easy to find colourful and interesting species. Added to their appearance, of course, once established these natives are tolerant of the hot, dry summers and, without irrigation, will only fail in periods of severe drought – a definite plus! Do something a bit differently – it is fun; get your boots on and try it!

Rosmarinus 'Blue Lagoon'


82 Garden Tripod 15

TheAgency Untitled


The Book Group ~ The Challenge ~ The Winner

Magnified Coincidence by Lynn Gedeon


Hosta in Bloom

Waiting to Bloom

Rue Anemone by Lynn Gedeon


Pink Ruffles Pink Bouquet


Floral Seduction Pretty in Pink by Lynn Gedeon


Garden Pearls

The Pea Blossom Cauliflower by Lynn Gedeon


Secrets in Sepia

Reaching Out

More Golden Fruit by Lynn Gedeon


About Lynn Gedeon ATHENS, UNITED STATES

Finding my passion…. for macrophotography was an evolution that began when I was a university student studying social work and psychology, in the 1970’s. Looking for something fun and unique to do, I took a photography class, not knowing that photography would later become my passion. I loved doing street photography and portraiture, and as time progressed, I enjoyed documenting all of life’s wonderful events and then later I began to focus on the natural world.

I love the mindfulness and concentration it takes to create water drop refractions, to study shadows and light and to look for the smallest and most unique flowers or insects. I love creating simple still life images with natural and reflected light. And, most of all I love learning new things. It is my hope that those who view my work will share in the joy that I have had in creating those works and will be inspired to appreciate our lovely world as much as I do.. Lynn Gedeon

My love for nature, the beauty of spring in Appalachia and the ephemeral nature of wildflowers, culminated in my love for macrophotography. That passion continues today, as I look for new and unusual ways to reveal nature and the world around me.

Nap Time Young Man This is a photo of my husband-to-be from the late 70’s, when I was taking my first and only B&W photography class. I used a Canon AT-1 and developed the image in the class darkroom.

92 Garden Tripod 15

Photo of my cat, Rory, taking a nap. She loves being photographed so much that I had to turn off my camera sound so that she wouldn’t come running! Taken with Canon T2i and 100mm lens; f/9, 1/100s, ISO 400


A Death So Mysterious

Magnified Coincidence by Lynn Gedeon


Question Corner

Q. A.

with Richard Fenwick

Richard has got stuck on a fact finding mission, so no question this month

 

new dates arriving soon

94 Garden Tripod 15

If you have a question for Richard Just send an e mail to gardentripod@yahoo.com Please say where in the world you are sending from, along with images you have taken yourself that may be shown as part of the reply. Please label your email Question Corner Richard will reply to one question each month in the Garden Tripod


ReVisit


I’ve started another cog picture, but I’ve gone about the process a bit differently. I used to draw a series of linked circles, then filled in the patterns and details. This time, I’ve designed each cog as I have gone along. I think it might make it more organised/balanced, and allows me to create greater depth.

96 Garden Tripod 15

ReVisit HolyOther Cogs with Colour


First I start the outline drawing of the image, I think the balance of the composition is more elegant this time.


When complete the outline is sharpened up with a 2D pencil and ready for colour.

98 Garden Tripod 15


Starting by adding black lowlights then gradually building up the colours using watercolour pencils


The lower left cog I tried to make look a little like malachite

100 Garden Tripod 15


Building up the colour and now thinking about the background. Thinking of making it look like parchment


The paper buckles as the water is added

102 Garden Tripod 15


106 Garden Tripod 15

TheAgency Untitled


A subterranean view from

NICK COBURN PHILLIPS MARINE SCIENTIST & UNDERWATER EXPLORER.


Rainforest rain and groundwater adds to the ‘diversity’ of cave systems. Limestone rock erodes easily due to the porosity and softness of calcium carbonate and the process of dissolution into acid. Weak carbonic acid forms between water and carbon dioxide and rainwater already slightly acidic passes through the atmosphere and soil layer ~ mixes with CO2 and forms carbonic acid. Acidic water passes through fractures ~ crevices and cavities and further dissolves limestone ~ enlarging the network of passageways. These “solutional” caves ~ usually take more than 100,000 years to grow large enough for a human to be able to pass through.

108 Garden Tripod 15

AND THEN THERE WAS LIGHT by NICK COBURN PHILLIPS


Sarawak is one of two Malaysian states on the island of Borneo. Known as Bumi Kenyalang (Land of the Hornbills) ~ Sarawak is situated on the northwest of the island ~ bordering the Malaysian state of Sabah to the northeast ~ Indonesia to the south ~ and surrounding Brunei. Sarawak has vast areas of both lowland and highland rainforest. However ~ Sarawak has been hit hard by the logging industry and the expansion of ‘monoculture’ tree plantations and oil palm plantations…

110 Garden Tripod 15

SARAWAK JUNGLE by NICK COBURN PHILLIPS


NIAH THE EDGE! by NICK COBURN PHILLIPS 300 miles up the coast from Kuching ~ hidden in the forests of Miri are the Niah Caves and the surrounding park ~ spread over 3,140 hectares of peat swamp and dipterocarp forests and massive limestone outcrops within which the caves are concealed. The oldest modern human remains discovered in Southeast Asia were found at Niah ~ making the park one of the most important archaeological sites in the world.

112 Garden Tripod 15


Borneo ~ the third largest island in the world ~ divided between Indonesia ~ Malaysia and Brunei ~ was once covered with dense rainforests ~ but along with its tropical lowland and highland forests ~ there has been extensive deforestation in the past sixty years. In the 1980s and 1990s the forests of Borneo underwent a dramatic transition. They were levelled at a rate unparalleled in human history ~ burned ~ logged and cleared ~ and commonly replaced with agricultural land ~ or palm oil plantations. Half of the annual global tropical timber acquisition currently comes from Borneo. Furthermore, palm oil plantations are rapidly encroaching on the last remnants of primary rainforest. Much of the forest clearance is illegal. “We must ‘see the wood through the trees’ and re-conciliate the ecosystem”.

114 Garden Tripod 15

SEE THE WOOD THROUGH THE TREES by NICK COBURN PHILLIPS


THE PATH TO SUCCESS by NICK COBURN PHILLIPS I thought the best way to describe this image was through a poem ~ the last sentence being most fitting. Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and sorry I could not travel both, and be one traveler, long I stood, and looked down one as far as I could, to where it bent in the undergrowth; then took the other, as just as fair, and having perhaps the better claim, because it was grassy and wanted wear; though as for that the passing there, had worn them really about the same, and both that morning equally lay, In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sigh, somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I‌I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. The Road Not Taken ~ Robert Frost

116 Garden Tripod 15


TheAgency Untitled

118 Garden Tripod 15


Exhibition News

Mt Wilson & Mt Irvine Photography & Art Exhibition 26th & 27th October 2013 This year’s exhibition has been expanded with invitations being sent to a local Mt Wilson Jewellery artist as well as local sculptors. I’m sure this will increase the interest to visitors and locals alike. Remember that all work needs to be of the Mt Wilson and/or Mt Irvine area. Entries forms close Friday 11th October 2013 Entry fee – $20 per artist (NOT per entry)* A special drop off day has been arranged at McGrath’s Hill McDonalds for Sunday 13th October strictly between 8 am and 11 am Entry of work needs to be received at Mt Wilson by Thursday 24th October 2013 You may offer your work for sale with 25% of each sale donation to the Mt Wilson & Mt Irvine Fire Brigade Over the weekend the local ladies of the Fire Brigade will be cooking up a storm with plenty of home made goodies (make sure you try their pies) as well as cold drinks and tea and coffee. On the Saturday from 6 pm will the official opening with wine & cheese. Exhibition dates: Saturday 26th October & Sunday 27th October 2013 Exhibition times will be from 10 am to 4 pm (Gold coin entry) Official opening Saturday 26th October 2013 from 6 pm ($5 entry) This year there will be a special package: for $20 you will gain entry to the exhibition as well as entry to the beautiful gardens of Nooroo, Merry Garth and Bisley. This will also include a photo walk by leading photographers at 11 am and 1 pm on Saturday in Bisley and/or Merry Garth. Remember this is a major fund raising event for the Mt Wilson & Mt Irvine Fire Brigades who do a wonderful job in the Blue Mountains with fire, storm and rescue operations, being first responders to MVA accidents and canyon/bush walking/trail bike incidents.

Entry forms and other inquiries to bevwoodman46@gmail.com.


Exhibition News

Jacki Stokes

is exhibiting at the RHS Garden Rosemoor, Devon

White rose (Rosa Rugosa Alba) A vibrant watercolour painting of a white rose. W & N Artists quality watercolour paint on NOT paper. Copyright Jacki Stokes 2011 This painting received the Best Watercolour Award in the 2012 Taunton Art Group Annual Exhibition.

The Artists’ Garden Art Exhibition 06 Sept to 22 Sept Every Day, 11am - 5pm Normal Garden Admission Over 80 of the South West’s most talented artists are involved in this exciting and colourful exhibition of naturalistic pictures, prints and cards created using a variety of media. The focus is on gardens and plants as well as landscapes, seascapes and wildlife pictures and the range of images is eclectic in both style and price. All the work exhibited is for sale.

120 Garden Tripod 15


Publishing News

ienemien OOSTERWOLDE, NETHERLANDS Dear Friends, I am so Proud !!!! … that the WWF The World Wide Fund for Nature In Dutch : WNF Wereld Natuur Fonds, selected TWO Photos for their New Book: Levende Planeet: De Aarde in al haar elementen Living Planet: The Earth in al her Elements

In the ELEMENT FIRE

From About 1000 entry’s they picked two of mine!! I a m s o P ro u d t o b e between all these great photographers! Love and Waterheart for the Element Water

Boek 'Levende Planeet' Geef 39,95 of meer en ontvang het boek 'Levende planeet' De prachtige natuurbeelden die wij bij het WNF dagelijks onder ogen krijgen, bleken steeds vaker afkomstig te zijn van natuurliefhebbers met oog voor natuurfotografie. Dat heeft ons geïnspireerd om dit keer een fotoboek uit te geven met de meest treffende natuuropnames, gemaakt door onze eigen vrienden. Adembenemend mooie en intrigerende beelden, afkomstig van vrienden als Frans Lanting, Humberto Tan en André Kuipers, maar ook van donateurs, vrijwilligers, medewerkers en misschien wel van jou. 'Levende planeet' toont onze gezamenlijke liefde voor de natuur, in al haar vormen met prachtige beelden. Het laat zien dat de natuur van ons allemaal is. Van jou, van ons en hopelijk van alle generaties na ons... Samen geven we de aarde door! Jouw gift helpt daarbij.


Canine Notice Board

Independent advertisement

Canine Notice Board

Independent advertisement Saluki Snippets

‘Safe in our hands’

The Newsletter for Friends and Supporters of the Saluki Welfare Fund Edited by: C. Mclenahan

Spring/Summer 2013

The mission of the

Saluki Snippets

Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc

the Saluki Welfare Fund, in the UK.

Rescue, rehab and re-home, in the Northwest Ohio area. http://angeloncalldogrescue.org

http://www.facebook.com/angeloncalldogrescue

twitter @aocdogrescue

122 Garden Tripod 15

This is a News Letter for

For details of how to subscribe please send an e-mail to: salukisnippets@yahoo.com


www.exhibitionswithoutwalls.com


Contributors: Editor & Treasurer TheAgency C Mclenahan Cover image Brief Beauty by RC deWinter   News Hound Artichoke by Barbara Wyeth

Exhibitions & News Bev Woodman Jacki Stokes ienemien

Spotlight features Lucinda Walter Lynn Gedeon HolyOther NICK COBURN PHILLIPS

Features by Nicole W. Richard Fenwick Andrea Durrheim Katie Freeh

Random

Peek-a-boo by Nicole W. Untitled by TheAgency

124 Garden Tripod 15

feature Country Gardens come grow with us group

The Wisteria Garden at Longwood by SummerJade Daisy posy with fan by Clare Colins The cottage of everyone’s dreams by RightSideDown Candle Light & Posies by Sandra Fortier Aug. landscape by vigor Potato Vine by Bette Devine glasswing by Nicole W. First in love by hinting Swallowtail in the Red Pentas © by GardenJoy Company…. by Bob Daalder Butterfly album, butterfly Nr.1 by loiteke Phalaenopsis aphrodite (Moon Orchid) & Ferns by MotherNature On reflection. by Paul Pasco Alotta Pink by baneling Peter’s Perfect Peppers by paintingsheep Impatiens. by Bette Devine Pristine Lilacs On A Music Pedestal by Sandra Foster Hot Pink Tritonia by Marilyn Harris Strolling Together by jules572 Tatiana Asleep in the Hostas by Marilyn Cornwell Summer time by MarianBendeth Giant Marble by Marian Grayson Stepping Back… by Lotus0104 Green Garden ^ by ctheworld Out of the Fold by Tracy Friesen Magnificant Bloom of the Saguaro by Lucinda Walter fungus by Nicole W. By the garden gate. by Paul Pasco Lotus I by Meeli Sonn Snowdrop Bloom by Joy Watson Tempting by Sandy Keeton NOOROO GARDENS, MOUNT WILSON, NSW. by Phil Woodman A Quiet Corner – Mount Wilson, Blue Mountains Sydney – The HDR Experience by Philip Johnson Jacaranda by PollyBrown Quiet Moments by Gisele Bedard Magical Gateway by AnnDixon

A Single Tree Challenge Catalogue A Nest of Robins In Her Hair by paintingsheep Where Life Begins by Mui-Ling Teh The Tree in the Field at Cades Cove by SummerJade Shattered Pine by Kenneth Hoffman An old timer by LoneAngel Chinese Pistachio by Elaine Teague Jacaranda dreams by Celeste Mookherjee Summer Magic by Touchstone21 Twisted. by Jeanette Varcoe Jacaranda tree, Australia by PhotosByG Winter Oak in Morden Park, London by Ludwig Wagner Windswept by Alexandra Lavizzari Standing alone in a winter storm by debraroffo Apple Blossoms With Bird House In Appleville by Sandra Foster Baobab Tree by V1mage Lone Tree in Dry Land by Yannik Hay Silhouette Sunset by Lotus0104 L'Eloge de la Folie by cclaude Tree In The Fog by phil decocco Purple Tree from near me by KazM The magnolia tree by bubblehex08 Morton Bay Fig Ficus macrophylla by Eve Parry Leaning Tree by WildestArt Banyan Tree by WhiteDove Studio kj gordon Bent & Weary...Making a Statement by heatherfriedman Making a stand by Karen01 The One Tree by Paul Green Against the sun by Jocelyn Parry-Jones


Brief Beauty by RC deWinter Somewhere between gaudy and delicate you fall against a sky of Dufy blue, decorating the landscape only briefly. Come frost you’ll wither, your soft seductive flowerets hardening almost overnight into veined and brittle spectres of your lushness. Bloom on, bright beauty, while the summer sun still shines, for like us all you’ll soon be nothing but a memory, if that.

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/ photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013


Garden Tripod 15