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Cover Image First Birthday combo All past covers & a cake

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All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/ photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the country garden come grow with us group, redbubble or the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013

GARDEN TRIPOD A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine Issue

12 June 2013 Garden Tripod Web Site www.gardentripod.com

Welcome to the Garden Tripod Magazine and the Country Gardens Come Grow With Us group in RedBubble

Claudia Dingle

Kathy Reid

AlisonPhillips

Marilyn Grimble Jeffrey Van Daele

Morag Anderson

LisaMM

Regal Blue .. 15 Group members choice .. 117 Micropropagation Part 5- .. 44

Kimberly P-Chadwick .. 76 Ramblings from the Office Temp .. 83 1 Watercolour & 40 photographs of buildings .. 100 Watercolour Dreams ~ Stephie Butler .. 50

Wings and Fins .. 58 Radiant ~ Bette Devine .. 30

garden tripod A Redbubble Country Gardens come grow with us Group Members Magazine Welcome to our 12th edition of the Garden Tripod. WoW, we are a year old today ... party time !!! Lots of red-bubbles and a birthday cake complete with a candle .. wonder who will blow out the candle ..... Yes.. the office dog is getting good at blowing out birthday candles now ! Continuing from last month we are still showing text in the raw, as it has been written, rather than trimming and tidying. We felt we was loosing contact with the person. So spelling mistakes and grammatical errors are now included for free, and we meet the real people, unpolished, unaltered. Some of the awesome selection of images for you this month are including Regal Blue challenge and the spotlight of last months Revel in Red challenge winner Bette Devine. We can also reveal who our Office Temp is .. and show a wonderful selection of her photography, it has been suggested that I reveal my self as the founder and editor of the magazine .. But due to my being incredibly shy, please do not expect this to be anytime soon. In this months issue we have a look at some amazing images showing buildings, all from the Country Gardens come grow with us group .. Along with a birthday special of Country Gardens come grow with us group members choice .. fabulous choice from PollyBrown, ctheworld, Marilyn Grimble, bubblehex08 and Qnita

There is a wonderful collection of wings and fins, showing sea birds and a collection of underwater images from the very talented photographer Michael Powell. Also the wonderful world of Dragonfly's from Kimberly P-Chadwick Excited to announce the news of an amazing exhibition with one of our RedBubble members Celeste Mookherjee. Its is open until the 26th of June, at the PS Zask Art Gallery in Rolling Hills Estates, California. The show is a mix of photography and digital media. The concept of the show is art in "New" media - meaning computer generated...digital.   It includes digital painting, video, 3D digital sculpture and more.from ten artists. Celeste Mookherjee has six matted and framed photographs in the show. More images and information about the exhibition can be viewed in the Country Gardens come grow with us forum page. Wandering into The Book Group in RedBubble we have a delightful view of Stephie Butler’s book Watercolour Dreams, this book has been placed first in the resent group challenge and is available through blurb books. Finally .. Must say a very big thank you to Ruth Lambert for founding the Country Gardens come grow with us group. João Figueiredo, who had faith in this publication and encouraged me to make it special. Nicole W. our Office Temp, with the very interesting ramblings .. I would also like to thank all the wonderful members in RedBubble who have made this (our first year) of the Garden Tripod a joy to edit. Richard Fenwick for providing the info on how to do our own Micropropagation. All the people who enter their images into the Country Gardens come grow with us group, allowing these images to be shown in the magazine. Also the non group members who quickly reply to my requests to show their images within these pages. Oh and naturally REDBUBBLE ... who without creating this sharing and friendly community there would be no Garden Tripod Magazine. Not forgetting Issuu for providing a free E-magazines service, Wix for a free web page and a wonderful supporter for funding the domaine name and basic Wix web page hosting. Oh and thank YOU .. the reader .. who without you there would be no point to the magazine.

Now lets get this party started !!!!! and raise a glass to the Garden Tripod Magazine Stay Safe Agen the Editor and Founder of Garden Tripod Princess Summer the Office News Hound

A little word from our

Silly really as I was up half the night worrying about what was going to happen, and it was a wonderful day.

Office News Hound Hi Folks .. I am officially the office dog for the Garden Tripod Magazine. This month the magazine is all grown up and is one year old.. there was a party and everything. Again I was not allowed to eat the cake, but tried to blow out the candle on it anyway. I got presents and a fancy dog biscuit.

I have to go and play with my new birthday toys now, so hope you enjoy the wonderful drawing Keeping Watch by  Marie Brown I have chosen, and the news of Celeste Mookherjee exhibition, thats on till the 26th June, if your in the area. it’s well worth a visit Stay Safe Princess Summer

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 8

Graphite pencil drawing

Keeping Watch by Marie Brown

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 10

Zask Gallery Contemporary Art

Promenade on the Peninsula 550 Deep Valley Drive - #151 Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274 310 429 0973 pszask@gmail.com

Current Show: Imagined Realities in New Media May 11 - June 26, 2013 hours: Tuesday through Friday 1:15 - 6 pm Saturday 11 - 6 pm Sunday Noon - 4 pm closed Mondays Zask Gallery is dedicated to the exhibition and promotion of contemporary art by emerging and established artists whose works reflect sensitivity to social, environmental and humanitarian issues.

Bee on scarlet paintbrush

Bee-licious dahlia

Celeste Mookherjee EXHIBITION NOW ON The show Imagined Realities in New Media opened on Saturday the 11th of May at the PS Zask Art Gallery in Rolling Hills Estates, California. The show is a mix of photography and digital media. The concept of the show is art in "New" media - meaning computer generated...digital.   it includes digital painting, video, 3D digital sculpture and more.from ten artists and runs through the 26th of June. Celeste Mookherjee has six matted and framed photographs in the show IN PRINT Published on Blurb: A 60-page photo book, Art in Nature: A Little Book of Nature’s Wonders.

Bumblebee on dahlia Celeste Mookherhee has had 20+ years of experience as a technical editor in the environmental consulting industry, but her abiding passion for even longer has been and is photography, especially nature subjects.  For this show we selected her portraits of Bees and other insects in their natural course. Celeste Mookherhee Artist Statement

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 12

Ants in paradise

Wasp on milkweed

Zask Gallery Contemporary Art Promenade on the Peninsula 550 Deep Valley Drive - #151 Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274 310 429 0973 pszask@gmail.com

Swallowtail sipping from a thistle

Current Show: Imagined Realities in New Media

May 11 - June 26, 2013 I like Celeste's work in focus on the insects, bees all of which seem to be threatened by man's interference -   pesticides and habitat destruction etc.   Surrounded a gallery full of abstract and imaginary futuristic images, Celeste's work brings us back to simple nature...as it is and should be.  It is very refreshing and inspiring. Peggy Zask PS Zask Gallery

hours: Tuesday through Friday 1:15 - 6 pm Saturday 11 - 6 pm Sunday Noon - 4 pm closed Mondays Zask Gallery is dedicated to the exhibition and promotion of contemporary art by emerging and established artists whose works reflect sensitivity to social, environmental and humanitarian issues.

Love is blue by Celeste Mookherjee

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 14

Regal Blue majestic, fit for a king/queen/prince/princess, grand, impressive, imposing, splendid, superb, magnificent, noble, proud, stately, dignified, exalted, glorious, striking, spectacular, awe-inspiring, breathtaking, sumptuous, opulent, fine, luxurious, deluxe, lavish, resplendent, monumental, palatial, august, distinguished, great; splendiferous, ritzy, posh; splendacious,

38 Entries ~ 107 Votes 1 Winner

Bluebell View by BlueShift

Bluebell Forest, East Sussex by Ludwig Wagner

Regal Blue Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 16

Bluebells - Surrey by BlackhawkRogue

Single Bluebell in Prehen Woods, Derry by George Row

Catalogue

Simplicity so complicated by jonolaf

Glorified Morning by sherln

Forget-me-not by marens

Looking UP The Wisteria by WildestArt

Blue poppy 2 by cclaude

Regal Blue Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 18

Sea Holly by Yannik Hay A Sea of Blue by ienemien

Surrounded By.... by Sharon House

Going Soft by Joy Watson

Catalogue

Rosemary Flowers by Fay270 Lupinus polyphyllus by João Figueiredo

The Blues by baneling

Anemone by ElsT

Beautiful blue by Ana Belaj

Regal Blue Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 20

Anemone Blanda Macro by Astrid Ewing Photography

Blue Trumpet Flowers (Lochroma warscewiczii) by Elaine Teague

A bee on a flower by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography)

Monet....Unleashed and Wild ! by Nancy Richard

Catalogue

Blue Star of Day by Mui-Ling Teh

Texas Hill Country in Bloom by Mary Campbell

I love irises . . . . Kilmore, Victoria, Australia by Margaret Morgan (Watkins) The Texas Bluebonnet by Dragonfly River Studios

Regal Blue Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 22

Feeling Blue by Debbie Oppermann

Dances With Butterflies by paintingsheep

Blue by EbyArts

Catalogue

Love is blue by Celeste Mookherjee

BIGNONIACEAE – Catophractes alexandri by Magaret Meintjes

Regal Blue Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 24

Cornflower by Jeffrey Van Daele

Catalogue

Snow Caps by Laurie Minor

Blue Seating For Two by Sandra Foster

Dream in blue by bubblehex08 Blue wave by Arie Koene

Hydrangea Bouquet ~ by Lamp Light by SummerJade

Hyacinth by AnnDixon

Regal Blue Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 26

Regal Blue majestic, fit for a king/queen/prince/princess, grand, impressive, imposing, splendid, superb, magnificent, noble, proud, stately, dignified, exalted, glorious, striking, spectacular, awe-inspiring, breathtaking, sumptuous, opulent, fine, luxurious, deluxe, lavish, resplendent, monumental, palatial, august, distinguished, great; splendiferous, ritzy, posh; splendacious,

38 Entries ~ 107 Votes 1 Winner

Regal Blue Winning Image

Cornflower by Jeffrey Van Daele Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 28

Joint Second Love is blue by Celeste Mookherjee A Sea of Blue by ienemien

Third Place Sea Holly by Yannik Hay

Runners Up Bluebell Forest, East Sussex by Ludwig Wagner Bluebell View by BlueShift The Texas Bluebonnet by Dragonfly River Studios Bluebells - Surrey by BlackhawkRogue Forget-me-not by marens Going Soft by Joy Watson

Spotlight Feature

Revel in Red Radiant. by Bette Devine

Bette Devine I’m a retired teacher who spent a lot of the time during the15 years following early retirement exploring and photographing my country, Australia,travelling alone in my campervan. I used a medium format camera, a Pentax 645. Recently I handed my many transparencies to the Australian Conservation Foundation for their exclusive use, so,regretfully, none of those photos can be shown on Red Bubble. I have copies of many of them but it is unlikely that I will travel again to those beautiful and far away places. I do not, however, regret the early gifting of what was to have been a bequest to the ACF. I now use a Pentax K7 DSLR and am still finding out the possibilities of digital photography. I am at my happiest when alone in the bush with my camera. In the past, my work was used by conservation agencies, state government conservation departments, a stock photo library, calendar companies and a few other outlets. A folio of my landscapes was published in Wild Magazine. Yearly, over sixteen years, my photos appeared in the ACF’s Wilderness Diary or their Desk Calendar. Nowadays, photography is mainly for my own pleasure and done fairly close to home since it is now much harder for me to travel far. Please don’t use or copy any image without permission first!

Bette Devine

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 32

Alogyne huegli Commonly called native hibiscus. A tall spreading shrub, usually with purple or lilac flowers, This is the white form. Widespread in Western Australia and in the Lofty Ranges of South Australia. A very popular garden plant This one photographed at the Maranoa Gardens, Balwyn, Victoria.

Flower Collection

Johnny Jump-up

Halgania cyanea

Viola tricolor. Family: Violaceae

Rough Halgania. Family: Boraginaceae.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 34

Eremophila

Canna

Eremophila nivea hybrid.

Canna tropicana. CANNACAEAE.

Rose Cone Flower

Native Storksbill

Isopogon formosus x dubius. Cultivar 2007. Family: Proteaceae.

Pelargonium australe. Native Geranium. Family: Geraniaceae.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 36

Flannel Flower #2 Actinotus helianthi Family: Apiaceae

Tatters hybrids of the sunflower species,

Autumn Collection Autumn Trees of the Melbourne Region

Sturdy

Weeping Tree.

A sturdy little cherry tree in the

An autumn tree in the

National Rhododendron Gardens,

National Rhododendron Gardens,

Olinda, Victoria, Australia.

Victoria, Australia.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 38

Cherry Tree in Autumn

Oak Avenue

a long avenue of cherry trees on a hill top

Taken at Gisborne,

at the National Rhododendron Gardens,

a Victorian country town

Olinda in the Dandenong Ranges, Victoria.

Life Cycles #2. Westernport Bay, Victoria, Australia.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 40

Waterfall Collection

Triplet Falls #3 Great Otway National Park, Victoria,Australia.

A3 ~ Calendars RB Technical Specs

Tough wire binding and hanger Stunningly sharp digital printing Start the year with the month of your choice 200gsm satin art paper with a tougher cover

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 42 Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 42

www.redbubble.com/people/bdevine

Bette Devine

RB Technical Specs

Custom made with skilled hands 5 high quality timber frame finishes to suit your decor 3 archival quality matboard colors to compliment your art Exhibition quality Box or Flat frame styles Premium Perspex, clearer and lighter than glass Archival quality Kodak Endura paper

Please don’t use or copy any image without permission first!

Micropropagation

Part 5-

Hello In this issue I would like to discuss my favourite topic. It’s a subject that I specialized in when I was at college and the one technique which I feel is much undervalued. Issue 8 – Advantages, Disadvantages, Nutrient gel Issue 9 – Plant initiation/New start, Problems Issue 10 – Multiplication, Rooting Issue 11 – Weaning, Aftercare

Issue 12 - Equipment required for home tissue culture

We have a competition to win a Plant culture Kit at the end of this article, to enter email your answer the Garden Tripod Magazine at gardentripod@yahoo.com Winners are selected at random and will be announced in the next issue

Please Note: Views, comments are my own and any products discussed in this article are not endorsed by myself or Garden Tripod Magazine.

Micropropagation

Part 5 –

Equipment required for home tissue culture Basic Micropropagation can be performed at home, in a kitchen or spare room this can give good results. Its best to avoid a carpeted room as any movement often dissipates dust and bacteria into the air. That’s the advantage of a tiled, wooden or vinyl floor; it can easily be sterilized using a household cleaner. Equipment required •

A sterile still air cabinet used to transfer plants.

A fish tank on its side makes an ideal transfer cabinet. Any perspex or glass chamber with dimensions of 50 cm (length), 40 cm (height) and 40 cm (depth) could easily be made into a transfer cabinet. •

A pressure cooker or microwave.

[DO NOT use Aluminum Foil in the Microwave] For sterilization of media, instruments, water, paper etc. [Once sterile don’t open until you are ready to use the equipment in the transfer cabinet] • Glass jars (baby food jars are excellent) and take away food containers with lids which can withstand the heat inside a pressure cooker are ideal vessels to use. •

Scalpel and forceps.

• White Tile + A4 white copy paper, cut to size, can be sterilized and used for a sterile cutting surface. • A spirit lamp containing Mineralised Methylated spirit [Purple or Clear] for flaming the instruments. [DO NOT use Methanol as it is toxic!]. • Hand held spray bottle containing 70% alcohol solution e.g. Mineralised Methylated spirit to spray the transfer chamber, jars and other surfaces. • Dilute chlorine solution for a New Start e.g. 1/4 dilution of the household bleach for use in surface sterilization of plant material.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 46

Micropropagation

Part 5 –

Media Preparation Most of the ingredients indicated below can be purchased using the local super market or a health food shop. [With this recipe there is no need to buy expensive weighing scales] · Two cups of rain water. · A quarter cup of sugar. · Fertiliser stock: 1/2 tablespoon all purpose 10:10:10 (N.P.K.) water-soluble fertiliser in 1L of water: use one cup of stock for this recipe. · Inositol tablets (500 mg): 1/2 tablet. · Vitamin tablet with thiamine: 1/2 tablet- Any multivitamin tablet may be used. · Agar flakes: 4 tablespoons. Preparation of Multiplication and Rooting media •

Add 1/2 cup of fresh or tinned coconut milk.

Replacing the coconut milk with 1/2 cup of green tomato puree or adding and 1/2 teaspoon of malt or 1/2 cup of freshly squeezed orange juice may produce different responses. • Ensure that the pH of medium is always between 5 and 6 using narrow range pH indicator tape. Adjust pH if necessary, with acid. E.g. Citric acid or base e.g. bicarb soda. • Mix the ingredients in a saucepan and gently boil until the agar has dissolved, stirring continuously to stop the agar sticking and subsequently burning at the bottom of the pan. • Dispense into empty glass jars, using a ladle, so that the medium is about 2 cm deep. •

Cover and process in a pressure cooker.

Cook for 15 minutes after the pressure is reached. Please note: • Always take great care when embarking on any home Micropropagation. • Comply with all advice given in MSDA Data Sheets for the safe use and handling of products / chemicals. • Good practice should always be upheld while working in a Micropropagation Lab.

Micropropagation Part 5-

Competition 2 lucky readers could win a Plantlet Culture Kit (Great gift for budding gardeners over 7 yrs old) Just answer this simple question – What does the phloem and xylem do? Winners are selected at random and will be announced in issue 12 Good luck

Plantlet Culture Kit for Tomato, Potato and Sweet Peas

To enter email your answer the Garden Tripod Magazine at

gardentripod@yahoo.com Winners are selected at random

Please Note: Views, comments are my own and any products discussed in this article are not endorsed by myself or Garden Tripod Magazine. Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 48

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Book your place by calling 0800 731 82 81

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Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 50

Welcome Stephie Butler The Book Group Challenge Winner

www.redbubble.com/groups/the-book-group

Watercolour Dreams by Stephie Butler

Live to Dream... Watercolour 1/2 sheet Arches 140lb watercolour paper Mostly W/N paints

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 52

Wild in Samburu Pure Watercolours Arches 140lb Paper W/N paints

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 70

Last Dance

Pure Watercolour on Arches 140lb Paper

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 54

Honesty

Pure Watercolour painted from still life. Arches 140lb Paper W/N Paints

I don’t ever remember a time where I didn’t at least draw, if not that, I would be creating in some way. Taking art as an option at school, then going on to a career as a draughtswoman, which I gave up to start a family. Painting on cakes with food colouring led me to take up painting again. I started more seriously around 2004 when taking up watercolours for the first time. I’m almost entirely self taught, mainly through practice and experimenting, although since then, I have attended a few workshops. Frankie Cummings, and more recently Trevor Waugh whose work I greatly admire. Watercolour is my first love, but more recently I have tried oils and pastels. Most subjects inspire me, but over the past year I have come to love portraits and those of children in particular, and am now accepting commissions.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 56

stephiebutler.com stephiebutler.blogspot.co.uk redbubble.com/people/stephiebutler stephie-butller.fineartamerica.com zazzle.com/stephiebutler

Wings and Fins Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 58

Flock of seagulls in the sea and in flight, Marseille, France. by Sami Sarkis

Osprey in Flight by Paul Wolf

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 60

Those Beautiful Pelicans by fototaker

The Approach by Kathy Baccari

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 62

Under Water with Michael Powell

The Wall Michael Powell

Michael Powell

Clown at Fisherman's Wharf Taken at Fisherman’s Wharf, Okinawa, Japan

Michael Powell

Feather Star Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 66

Falso Clown on Green Anenome

Michael Powell

Catfish Madness

Michael Powell

Christmas Tree Worm

Michael Powell

Dancing Moorish Idols..

Anenome Shrimp

Michael Powell

Dude I'm sooo Sleepy! Taken at Yomitan “Blacktop”, Okinawa, Japan.

Michael Powell

Look I can Fly~!

Michael Powell

© Michael Powell

Garden Tripod 11 ~ page 82

Turtle at Runway Lights Michael Powell

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 76

Kimberly P-Chadwick dragonfly |ˈdrag(əә)nflʌɪ| noun ( pl. dragonflies ) a fast-flying long-bodied predatory insect with two pairs of large transparent wings which are spread out sideways at rest. The voracious aquatic larvae take up to five years to reach adulthood.

Male

Female

Blue Dasher Blue Dashers (Skimmer Family) Tucson, Arizona Canon Powershot SX10IS Blue Dash is abundant in the East, less so in the Southwest where standing water is limited. This dainty, pale blue species is a familiar inhabitant of still waters surrounded by reeds or cattails. Watch for it at wildlife-refuge ponds, the edges of lakes created for water treatment or fishing and even back-yard lily ponds. Territorial males take prominent perches, often stems bent over the water, from which they frequently dart out to chase of intruders.

The snow white face of this species distinguishes it from the similar Western Pond-hawk with which its frequently occurs: note: the Pondhawk’s bright green face and habit of perching on the ground. Kimberly P-Chadwick

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 78

Male

Female

Mexican Amberwing Skimmer

Tucson, Arizona Canon Powershot SX10IS Females amberwings have browner bodies and mostly clear wings with various darker markings that aid in identification. Many observers have noted that these tiny dragonflies with patterned wings resemble wasps of the family Vespidae. Which I can agree since there were some there and it was confusing to see from a distance... Thus the wasp pattern of female amberwings may confer some degree of protection from predators, including other odonates and perhaps more importantly birds. The Mexican Amberwing occurs from Southwestern New Mexico to southern California and southern Nevada, and ranges

south into Mexico. It is widespread from Sea level to several thousand feet in elevation, but does not occur in the high mountains or dense forests. What for them on vegetation at pond and lake edges or the slower backwaters of streams. Like other amberwings they will occasionally sit on top of shrubs or weedy growth some distance for the water. Unlike Eastern and Slough Amberwings, Mexican Amberwings lacks well defined spots or stripes on the side of the the thorax. Females have darker bands of orange & black that cross the wings partway. Kimberly P-Chadwick

Male

Roseate Skimmer Roseate Skimmer Tucson, Arizona Canon Powershot SX40 HS Belonging to the genius that nearly twenty skimmers that inhabit the American tropics. Males of many of them are a shade of red, but few are a powder blue or patterned with other colors. Females of the more northerly species are brown. Three species inhabit the U.S. of which one is widespread in the Southwest.

unlikely to be confused with any other Southwest dragonfly.

With it’s maroon thorax, un-patterned bright pink abdomen and plain wings and adult male is

Kimberly P-Chadwick

Roseate's inhabit pond and lake edges, streams, and flooded roadside ditches occasionally showing up at ornamental water gardens and livestock ponds.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 80

Male

Flame Skimmer Tucson, Arizona Canon Powershot SX40 HS

Belonging to the genius that nearly twenty skimmers that inhabit the American tropics. Males of many of them are a shade of red, but few are a powder blue or patterned with other colors. Females of the more northerly species are brown. Three species inhabit the U.S. of which one is widespread in the Southwest.

With it’s maroon thorax, un-patterned bright pink abdomen and plain wings and adult male is unlikely to be confused with any other Southwest dragonfly. Roseate's inhabit pond and lake edges, streams, and flooded roadside ditches occasionally showing up at ornamental water gardens and livestock ponds. Kimberly P-Chadwick

Male

Blue-Eyed Darner Tucson, Arizona Canon Powershot SX110IS The colorful Blue-eyed Darner is a widespread western dragonfly that’s especially common in the Southwest. It belongs to the group known as mosaic darners (named for their ornate abdominal patterns) which are mostly found in the northern states and Canada. three of the mosaic darners extend south into this region and three more tropical species have established populations in the Southwest.

In flight this species glowing blue eyes will be your first clue to its identity. When one hangs off a reed, note also its pale blue face and the dark brown thorax with slender, pale blue stripes. Above the complexly patterned blue, black and brown abdomen is marked with alternating pairs of large and small blue spots. the female is similar but the blue is replaced with pale green, the thermal appendages are rounded and she has a dark line across her face. Kimberly P-Chadwick

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 82

Ramblings from the Office Temp ~ An interview with

Nicole W.

The Garden Tripod Office Temp

Its the Garden Tripods first birthday .. So as a little Thank You to our Office Temp we thought it would be good to show case some of the images and have a little interview with our office temp, Nicole W.

FLOWERS Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 84

not gonna make it

Muted

Untitled

dying

Who are you. Who is the real person behind the heap of paper work in the corner of our virtual office.

Who am I‌.. My name is Nicole, and I have been 28 years old for many many years now. I just love being 28. Don't you ever deny Im 28, or tell me you don't believe me. Because you are as old as you believe. I was born and raised in the Netherlands, and I will probably stay here until the end. Although Id like to move to a nice warm country like Greece, my husband made it clear thats not going to happen. We will see about that once we reach that age where we don't have to work anymore.

A little over a year ago I bought my first Nikon SLR camera, and started to take photography more serious. Im addicted ever since and I feel naked without my camera. After watching me for a few months my husband decided to try photography as well, and he also got hooked. So now we go out as often as life allows us, to all kinds of places. Nature, macro, urbex, boats, cities, pets‌. I haven't specialized in anything yet,, I just try everything and always try to learn from others. And thats why I like RB. Seeing other peoples work gives me inspiration and ideas. Looking back at my first photos, I realize I have grown, and Im still growing. RB is a great way to measure that, because where I used to think I could never be half as good as the average artist on RB, I know have over 600 single features and a lot of works with 500+ views and people buy my stuff! Im still amazed at that :-)

FOX Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 86

On the move

I know Im beautiful

ugh

It is clear to see within your images you have an understanding of birds, along with patience to achieve a perfectly balanced image What is the make and style of camera you use and are you taking RAW or JPG images of your subject. Also do you find that you are using a similar camera setting for most of your shots.

make and style of camera: I use a Nikon D7000, and although Im still getting to know all the ins and outs on the camera, I hardly ever use the auto setting anymore. The birds require a very high shutter-speed of course, and for the boats and urbex photos I use bracketing with a higher aperture, as I like them most in HDR.

Bird photography, or any other animal take patience but also a lot of effort. You have to go places, and find the spots where they are at. I cant count the hours I have spend in the woods, waiting for that deer to come out and play in the open field, before it would get too dark. And the amount of bird- and hedgehog food I use to get them in my garden is immense lol. I always shoot JPG, RAW is something I still need to figure out :-)

BIRDS Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 88

Im depressed...

finch II

little willow tit

Master of balance

In past issues of the garden tripod, you explained how you made a little hide to photograph birds and small animals within your garden. Are you now able to create this hide when out photographing in a wider environment. You display a strong theme of the colour green in a lot of your nature images , are these natural or textures added in post Image production

Oh yes the “hideâ€? in my garden‌.thats fun. I just feed the birds and hedgehogs, and managed to attract many of them, especially the birds. I hide in my living-room, behind the closed curtains and after a while the birds don't seem to mind that big lens sticking out. But it can still take hours before you manage a few good shots. Last year I made a large birdbath next to the feeding spot. The birds love that, and drink after eating, or take a bath. I also used branches to make it look very natural, and allows me to take natural pictures of birds on a branch.

I also use a hide in the woods. Thats a spot where the birds know they get fed, and gives me the opportunity to photograph typical wood birds that wont come in my garden. But sometimes a camouflage net in front of the open car window gives you fabulous opportunities too. You just have to be creative. The green in my nature pics is natural. The right aperture setting will give you the blurry background. But I like to pick spots with a green background, like a hedge or trees, on purpose. After all, nobody likes a bird with an ugly building on the background right?

GREEN Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 90

Male dragonfly

The great spotted

Looking UP

Is that a nut???

squirrel

Blue tit, punk version

Insect

The collection of Butterflies you have shown display vibrancy along with understanding of their natural environment. Are your butterflies enticed to pose with a sugar solution or are they natural On average how many butterflies escape your camera before you get the perfect shot.

Oh the butterfly photos are a total cheat. We don't see many different butterflies in this country, its just too cold and wet, but we do have many butterfly farms around, and I visit them regularly. One of our more famous Zoo`s has a very large butterfly garden. Its an indoor place with a tropical environment, built specifically for tropical butterflies. Its really the only opportunity I have, but even though there are many many butterflies in that garden, it still requires patience to capture them, especially because I use my macro lens, and I don't like to capture butterflies on a food-source. I have to wait until they decide to sit still on a flower, and stay there for a few seconds. I usually spend a whole day at a butterfly farm, and get home with maybe 30 pictures.

For those who would like to try, I have a good piece of advise‌ try going there on a school-day :-)

BUTTERFLIES Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 92

Lay my wings to rest

Amazing Brown Butterfly

Untitled

owl butterfly

Oh blue

Your Boat collection of images are very dynamic and show some interesting angles of boat parts that could go unseen by a non nautical person. How long have you been photographing boats & do you have a boat of your own. Do you have a favorite time of day for photographing boats.

I first started to photograph boats on a citytrip in Friesland. I had to delete most of those pictures, because I obviously had no clue of what I was doing. So after looking at those pictures for a while, I learned what I did wrong and I decided to go back to Friesland and try again. I would just drive around until I found a harbor, and then looked for a specific kind of boat, usually sailboats. At first I had real trouble trying to find a good angle, trying to actually show something. I kept producing snapshots LOL. But after a while I started to get the hang of it, and got a better

understanding of what should be in the picture, and what should be left out. Ever since, I love photographing boats, although I don't have any knowledge of them, and I don't own a boat myself. I just shoot what I like. Boats are best photographed when its sunny, early in the morning or even midday. But for dramatic work you best wait until good storm clouds appear and use them as your background. Problem is, we don't have that many storms :-)

BOATS Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 94

Boat in renovation, do NOT enter Part IV

boat

Gear

Things you find on a boat

Big boat, Little boat

anchor

In your URBEX images you often depict an image of a single chair. Personally I find these images the most poignant as they portray a feeling of desolation, in a way only something that has been in direct contact with a person can. Yet they are still retaining an air of impersonality. What first drew you to URBEX photography. When you are setting up your composition are you selecting or seeking out the abandoned chair or is this a subconscious action.

When I first saw Urbex pictures on the internet I immediately knew thats what I wanted to do. I love the “old feel”, decay, rust, withered stuff. Im drawn to it. I just never knew before that places like that existed. But once I discovered that, I didn't hold back. Sure, it can be dangerous, many accidents have happened in abandoned buildings. People falling through the unstable floors, staircases collapsing, beams falling down….so Im very careful, and always carry a first aid kit with me, and make sure I never go in alone and someone knows where I am. Chairs are fabulous, like you said. They tell me someone has lived there, sat on that chair long time ago. It makes you wonder what happened, where did they go, why did they abandon the place, and why did they leave that one chair….

Chairs are found in almost every abandoned building. I don't know why, often its the only thing thats left. So naturally, you use them in your setup. I like the pictures with a window and a chair because its so peaceful. But I try to not move anything, not touch anything on an urbex site. I can move a chair a few inches to get a better composition, but the whole point of urbex is to capture the atmosphere the way you find it. And sometimes I find a great composition, because other urbexers before me didnt obey that rule. Also, I don't like to touch anything in a building that has been abandoned for like over 10 years. Its gross!

URBEX Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 96

Red in the middle

empty

crooked

Untitled

The best spot

Sitting by the window

Ramblings from the Office We all know rain. Some of us get to see it way more than others, personally I live in one of the wettest countries in the world, where it doesn’t just rain a whole lot, we also live with the constant struggle of trying to keep water to stay where it should and not flood the country completely. We are doing a pretty good job so far, but twice a year I see the river rise from its banks up to less than a few inches under the top of our dykes. And I live so close to it…. But groundwater and rain aside, we can still have a lot of fun with water in our garden. When I moved into this house over 11 years ago, the first thing I did was renting a mini digger and dug a large pond in the garden. I soon learned, the bigger the pond, the larger the costs and the worries. But my husband wanted large koi so we didn’t settle for a small pond. In this case, size does matter. Koi are beautiful carps, and because they can be pretty pricey, people usually make special very clean ponds for them. I don’t like those ponds, because they can’t have plants, or any other animals in it, it’s all about the carp. The poor creatures must be bored out of their skull in a pond like that, so I had a long talk with the hubby and we decided on a compromise. It was going to be a very large pond, but we would keep it natural. That meant plants and other animals would live in it. And now…11 years later, we still enjoy a beautiful natural pond with large koi, white goldfish, aquatic turtles, and a lot of plants. Sure, we have had our problems. An impulse buy of three little koi from a shop that didn’t specialize in it resulted in the death of a lot of koi and a sizable vet bill. Also, every 4 or 5 years we have to replace the foil. The first time we learned the hard way, the pond started to leak around Christmas and we had an emergency situation where we would catch the carp and put them in the bathtub, then replace the foil, put water in, let it be for a few days and them put the koi back. It took us over a week and we didn’t have a lot of Christmas celebration. Also we had to bring the turtles out from hibernation, and could not return them to the pond until well in springtime. Ever had a bathtub full of turtles? I did. For months! For those who won’t take the risk of spending Christmas outside in the cold carrying large slippery stinking fish around, there’s the possibility of having a small pond of course, because gold- and other fish are just as adorable to most people. But no matter the size of your pond, it will add a lot to your garden. Be careful with the fish, they tend to multiply very easily and my personal experience consists of days in a row fishing out hundreds and hundreds of little fish because I waited too long with removing them from the pond. Turtles do help in this case, they love a good snack.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 98

Temp ~ Water At one point, I had a couple of gorgeous wood-ducks in my pond. That was so much fun! Especially when they started to lay eggs. It was fun observing the male duck protecting the female on the nest, with nothing to defend with but his colors and his hissing. He did a great job, my dogs wouldn’t come near it. Then the eggs hatched an 9 of the cutest little baby duckies provided an adorable sight for months. Daddy duck went into a submissive state and lost his colors. Another neat invention of nature, in this state he would not harm the babies. As always, babies grow up too fast. I saw them turn into teenagers, and then adults, and before long I realized I had 11 full grown ducks in my pond, and my pond was paying the ultimate price. The plants were eaten, the water looked like bad coffee and eventually the fish started to get sick. I thought maybe having ducks in your pond wasn’t such a good idea after all. I caught them all and gave them to a guy who had special duck ponds and started over with my pond. New water, new plants. It’ll take years before its back to how it was. Turtles on the other hand, have proven to be great inhabitants of my pond. They do very well in the natural environment, because they eat mosquito larves, and other little insects that live in the water. And also they eat leftovers from dead fish, frogs and the occasional bird that falls in. I never have to feed them, all I did was put in large stones and a few branches to give them a place to sunbath, because they need that. So when you consider adding turtles to your pond, be careful with choosing the species. Not all species can live though cold winters when the pond freezes up. For those not blessed with enough room for a pond could consider an ornament. They are available in all size- and price ranges as well as in modern- fun- and more country styles. Just think about where you want to put it, consider the maximum size and go shop! If you choose the right one, it may attract birds too, they always want a nice calm flow of water to take a bath or to drink from. And think of what it would look like in the dark with a nice light on it…. Just remember….the sound of dripping water might make you want to pee more often. So far the fun side of water. Now let’s take a quick look at practicality. Because your garden may have plants in it, and plants need water. For years I used precious drinking water and a hose to provide water when rain wouldn’t. Until I realized only the smaller plants needed it. My trees and large bushes seemed ok after a day of extreme heat. So that had to mean they had access to water and soon it occurred to me how….. Groundwater! So what had I been doing all those years? Tapping drinking water and adding it to the groundwater. There just had to be a better way, so I contacted a farmer with the right equipment and he used a tractor and a high pressure installation and he drilled a well for me, in my garden. Just for a few euros. I purchased a strong pump that creates a lot more pressure than your average kitchen tap, and now im spraying the entire garden from one spot and I’m not spilling any precious drinking water. Now I was lucky because groundwater is never far down in this area. This might not be the solution for all of you. But if it would be, I recommend you take the opportunity. Don’t think it might save you money. Sure, you don’t use gallons of drinking water, but your pump needs power. For those with very low underground water levels, there’s always the possibility to harvest rain. Use a rain barrel, catch the water coming from your roof and use it to water your plants, and make sure water can get between your garden flooring, whatever it’s made of. By keeping as much rainwater in your garden as you can, you help managing water in the whole country. In the wet parts of the world, that means you help preventing streams and rivers from flooding. Nicole W . Office Temp

1 Watercolour

The Arid Karoo, South Africa by Maree Clarkson

& 40 photographs of buildings

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 100

Backyard Garden by Jeanne Sheridan

Potential ? by Paul Pasco Home Sweet Home by Marilyn Cornwell

Blue Door by Denice Breaux

Beautiful liquidamber growing in grounds of the Abbotsford Convent by Margaret Morgan (Watkins)

Oriental Plane by karina5

Spring Bluff by PhotosByG

Flowers in the Square by Dragonfly River Studios

Hall Place Gardens by Geoff Carpenter

Holker Hall by Steve Liptrot

Chocolate Box situation by hans p olsen

Pollok House Gardens by ElsT

Lilliput Cottage, Lake District England by AnnDixon

swiss cottage by Gregoria Gregoriou Crowe

A simple garden by Nicole W.

Tulips with a Difference by Elaine Teague Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 106

Autumn Garden ^ by ctheworld

Hyacinths by Arie Koene

Castle of Mey Walled Garden by BronReid

a beautiful vie for H.M. the Queen by supergold

Castelo da Lousã by João Figueiredo

Chateau Villandry Gardens by Karen E Camilleri

"Briadrie" near Maclean, Northern NSW by Peter Bodiam

A House on the Ocean by Sandra Fortier

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 110

Yin Yang Landform by Mui-Ling Teh

Westbury Court Garden by RedHillDigital

Garden Steps by phil decocco An Austrian Cottage. by Lee d'Entremont

Yengo in Spring glorious Spring by heidiypi1

Snowball Flowers Outside The Window by Cynthia48 Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 112

Across the Lake by Astrid Ewing Photography

"Outside the Kitchen Doors..." by Rosehaven

Country Living by lynn carter

Elora Farmhouse by Debbie Oppermann

House - Westfield, NJ - The summer retreat by Mike Savad

The Flower Border - Hidcote by vivsworld

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 114

Flowered Cottages by marens

" The Garden House " by canonman99

Berry Park House, Duckenfield by Gabrielle Lees

Graceful Wisteria by Pat Yager

Group members choice The Country Gardens come grow with us group members were invited to nominate images from the group that they feel summed up for them what was best in the group The members have chosen a truly outstanding selection of images 32 images out of 3725 were chosen by its members to showcase the groups best

You just gotta love garden tools! by Maree Clarkson

Tempting by Sandy Keeton

Rousham Gardens, Oxfordshire by vivsworld Texas Hill Country in Bloom by Mary Campbell

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 118

Take a Seat and Enjoy by karina5

Come and sit among the Lavender by Marjorie Wallace

Morning Tea Under The Magnolia Tree by Gabrielle Lees

The Getaway by Stevie B The Reflecting Garden by Mary Campbell Rousham Gardens, Oxfordshire by vivsworld

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 120

Purple Bicycle by Ludwig Wagner

The Bike Stops Here - Niagara by Marilyn Cornwell

Quiet Moments by Gisele Bedard

Spring Splash by NatureGreeting Cards ©ccwri

Autumn in the Gardens by Cameron B

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 122

MY "GETAWAY" by Magaret Meintjes

The Gazebo by Eve Parry

wild flower garden by supergold

Under the Daisies by Dana Horne

Bisley Portrait by Michael Matthews

Lane of Lupines by jeanlphotos

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 124

Narcissus Garden by MarianBendeth

Passion by Nicole W.

Monet....Unleashed and Wild ! by Nancy Richard

Jarro 9220 by João Castro

Magnificant Bloom of the Saguaro by Lucinda Walter

Sultry by Nicole W.

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 126

Summer Song by Marilyn Cornwell

Peek at the Garden by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography)

Soft Blue... by shelleybabe2

Garden Visitor ^ by ctheworld

Wings on the Lavender by Clare Colins

Secret Garden - Mount Wilson, NSW Australia The HDR Experience by Philip Johnson

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 128

Congratulations to : Cameron B Claire Colins ctheworld Dana Horne ElsT Eve Parry Gabrielle Lees Gisele Bedard jeanlphotos Joao Castro karina5 Lucinda Walter Ludwig Wagner Magaret Meintjes Maree Clarkson MarianBendeth

Marilyn Cornwell Marjorie Wallace Mary Campbell Michael Matthews Nancy Richard NatureGreeting Cards Šccwri Nicole W. Philip Johnson Sandy Keeton shelleybabe2 Stevie B supergold Vicki Spindler vivsworld

Your image has been chosen by the Country Gardens come grow with us group members as the ones that most represent the Country Gardens come grow with us group collection

Š TheAgency

Where the sea meets the land TheAgency

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 130

Canine Notice Board

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Independent advertisement Saluki Snippets

‘Safe in our hands’

The Newsletter for Friends and Supporters of the Saluki Welfare Fund Edited by: C. Mclenahan

Spring/Summer 2013

The mission of the

Saluki Snippets

Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc

the Saluki Welfare Fund, in the UK.

Rescue, rehab and re-home, in the Northwest Ohio area. http://angeloncalldogrescue.org

http://www.facebook.com/angeloncalldogrescue

twitter @aocdogrescue

This is a News Letter for

For details of how to subscribe please send an e-mail to: salukisnippets@yahoo.com

Editor TheAgency Cover image First Birthday combo All past covers & a cake   News Hound Keeping Watch by Marie Brown Zask Gallery Contemporary Art  Feature An interview with Nicole W. The Garden Tripod Office Temp

Spotlight Bette Devine Stephie Butler

Ramblings from the Office Temp Featured Micropropagation Part 4 Richard Fenwick Wings and Fins Osprey in Flight by Paul Wolf Those Beautiful Pelicans by fototaker The Approach by Kathy Baccari Flock of seagulls in the sea and in flight, Marseille, France. by Sami Sarkis Under Water with Michael Powell dragonfly Kimberly P-Chadwick

Welcome New Members AlisonPhillips Claudia Dingle Jeffrey Van Daele Kathy Reid LisaMM Marilyn Grimble Morag Anderson

Contributors: Regal Blue Challenge Catalogue Bluebell View by BlueShift Bluebell Forest, East Sussex by Ludwig Wagner Bluebells - Surrey by BlackhawkRogue Single Bluebell in Prehen Woods, Derry by George Row Simplicity so complicated by jonolaf Glorified Morning by sherln Forget-me-not by marens Looking UP The Wisteria by WildestArt Blue poppy 2 by cclaude Sea Holly by Yannik Hay Surrounded By.... by Sharon House A Sea of Blue by ienemien Going Soft by Joy Watson Rosemary Flowers by Fay270 The Blues by baneling Beautiful blue by Ana Belaj Lupinus polyphyllus by João Figueiredo Anemone by ElsT Blue Trumpet Flowers (Lochroma warscewiczii) by Elaine Teague

Anemone Blanda Macro by Astrid Ewing Photography A bee on a flower by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography) Blue Star of Day by Mui-Ling Teh Texas Hill Country in Bloom by Mary Campbell The Texas Bluebonnet by Dragonfly River Studios I love irises . . . . Kilmore, Victoria, Australia by Margaret Morgan (Watkins) Feeling Blue by Debbie Oppermann Dances With Butterflies by paintingsheep Blue by EbyArts Love is blue by Celeste Mookherjee BIGNONIACEAE – Catophractes alexandri by Magaret Meintjes Cornflower by Jeffrey Van Daele Snow Caps by Laurie Minor Dream in blue by bubblehex08 Hydrangea Bouquet ~ by Lamp Light by SummerJade Blue Seating For Two by Sandra Foster Blue wave by Arie Koene Hyacinth by AnnDixon

Garden Tripod 12 ~ page 132

1 Watercolour & 40 photographs of buildings The Arid Karoo, South Africa by Maree Clarkson Home Sweet Home by Marilyn Cornwell Backyard Garden by Jeanne Sheridan Potential ? by Paul Pasco Blue Door by Denice Breaux Beautiful liquidamber growing in grounds of the Abbotsford Convent by Margaret Morgan (Watkins) Oriental Plane by karina5 Flowers in the Square by Dragonfly River Studios Spring Bluff by PhotosByG Hall Place Gardens by Geoff Carpenter Holker Hall by Steve Liptrot Lilliput Cottage, Lake District England by AnnDixon swiss cottage by Gregoria Gregoriou Crowe Chocolate Box situation by hans p olsen Pollok House Gardens by ElsT A simple garden by Nicole W. Tulips with a Difference by Elaine Teague Autumn Garden ^ by ctheworld Hyacinths by Arie Koene Castle of Mey Walled Garden by BronReid

Group Members Choice

You just gotta love garden tools! by Maree Clarkson Tempting by Sandy Keeton Rousham Gardens, Oxfordshire by vivsworld Texas Hill Country in Bloom by Mary Campbell Take a Seat and Enjoy by karina5 Come and sit among the Lavender by Marjorie Wallace Morning Tea Under The Magnolia Tree by Gabrielle Lees The Getaway by Stevie B The Reflecting Garden by Mary Campbell Rousham Gardens, Oxfordshire by vivsworld Purple Bicycle by Ludwig Wagner The Bike Stops Here - Niagara by Marilyn Cornwell Quiet Moments by Gisele Bedard Spring Splash by NatureGreeting Cards ©ccwri Autumn in the Gardens by Cameron B MY "GETAWAY" by Magaret Meintjes The Gazebo by Eve Parry

ADVERTISEMENTS Exhibitions Without Walls Contemporary International Artist” Angel On Call Dog Rescue, Inc

a beautiful vie for H.M. the Queen by supergold Castelo da Lousã by João Figueiredo Chateau Villandry Gardens by Karen E Camilleri "Briadrie" near Maclean, Northern NSW by Peter Bodiam A House on the Ocean by Sandra Fortier Yin Yang Landform by Mui-Ling Teh Westbury Court Garden by RedHillDigital Garden Steps by phil decocco An Austrian Cottage. by Lee d'Entremont Yengo in Spring glorious Spring by heidiypi1 Snowball Flowers Outside The Window by Cynthia48 "Outside the Kitchen Doors..." by Rosehaven Across the Lake by Astrid Ewing Photography Country Living by lynn carter Elora Farmhouse by Debbie Oppermann House - Westfield, NJ - The summer retreat by Mike Savad The Flower Border - Hidcote by vivsworld Flowered Cottages by marens " The Garden House " by canonman99 Berry Park House, Duckenfield by Gabrielle Lees Graceful Wisteria by Pat Yager

wild flower garden by supergold Under the Daisies by Dana Horne Bisley Portrait by Michael Matthews Lane of Lupines by jeanlphotos Narcissus Garden by MarianBendeth Passion by Nicole W. Monet....Unleashed and Wild ! by Nancy Richard Jarro 9220 by João Castro Magnificant Bloom of the Saguaro by Lucinda Walter Sultry by Nicole W. Summer Song by Marilyn Cornwell Peek at the Garden by Vicki Spindler (VHS Photography) Soft Blue... by shelleybabe2 Garden Visitor ^ by ctheworld Wings on the Lavender by Clare Colins Secret Garden - Mount Wilson, NSW Australia -

The HDR Experience by Philip Johnson

YOUR CHOICE

submission deadline : July 31, 2013

All The Materials Contained May Not Be Reproduced, Copied, Edited, Published, Transmitted Or Uploaded In Any Way Without the artist/ photographers Permission. These Images/writings Do Not Belong To The Public Domain. All images and information within the Garden Tripod magazine are the responsibility of the owner/artist/writer/photographer & not the country garden come grow with us group, redbubble or the Garden Tripod magazine 2012-2013


Garden Tripod 12