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H O SUMMER 2 0 1 8


TABLE OF CONTENTS Student Spotlight (starts on p.3)

Mina Woo, Editor, Assistant Editor-in-Chief

Sports (starts on p.5) Caroline Dolan, Editor Meghan Galligan, Editor

Community News (starts on p.9) Julia Remick, Editor

Reviews (starts on p.12) Gabby Yepes, Editor

National News (starts on p.14)

Matthew Fiore, Editor Brandon Noll, Editor

College List (starts on p.17)

Kaylah Bozkurtian, Editor-in-Chief & Design Editor Ms. Skolnik, Faculty Advisor

NOTE: The opinions expressed in the following articles DO NOT represent the opinions of the administrative staff at GCHS, merely those of the writers themselves. 1


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR: Dear Reader, As my time on staff at the ECHO and in attendance at Garden City High School comes to a close, I find myself looking back on the ways that both this publication and myself have changed over these past four years, alongside everyone else. Past editors I’ve worked closely with have moved on to “bigger and better” things, namely college (both at home and abroad), and now I’m doing the same. I don’t know where the time has gone. It feels like just a few months ago I walked into the ECHO lab--now the robotics lab, funnily enough--without a clue as to what I was getting myself into; once this issue is published, I’ll have walked out of the ECHO lab for the final time, and passed the metaphorical torch on to the next generation of journalists. Not only that, but I’ll be taking with me a seriously bolstered patience threshold and attention span, those muscles having been built up by hours upon hours of staring at a computer screen in the plodding journey to get three issues out each year. (Believe me, there are few things more satisfying than mailing the final proof off to our principal, Mrs. McLaughlin.) Ultimately, though, the lesson I’ll be carrying to college from high school is one about the importance of relationships--with coworkers, peers, students, and teachers alike. I certainly couldn’t have pulled this paper together without help from the writers, editors, and fellow formatters that dedicate their time and effort to each publication. I’d like to extend a special show of thanks to Ms. Skolnik, our faculty advisor (and my AP Literature teacher this past year), for reigniting in me a love of not only journalism but writing in general. As I look to the future, I know that the skills I’ve honed and connections I’ve made while here at Garden City High School will serve me well. I also know that I’m leaving the ECHO in good hands.

Sincerely,

Kaylah Bozkurtian Editor-in-Chief 2


VALEDICTORIAN: Brandon Gong by Mina Woo A researcher, musician, runner, and reader--to name just a few of his qualities--our brilliant and talented valedictorian, Brandon Gong, will be attending Harvard University in the fall, where he hopes to either pursue a degree in economics or continue research in the area of neuroscience. Though incredibly humble, Brandon is the bearer of countless accomplishments and honors throughout his time at the high school. Brandon was selected twice as a Siemens Competition National Semi-Finalist, and was twice named a Neuroscience Research Prize National Finalist by the American Academy of Neurology. He is also an eighttime All-County musician, most recently performing as the principal oboist of the All-State Symphonic Band, and captain of the varsity cross-country team, selected as an All-County runner during the 2018 spring track season. Among his multitude of honors, Brandon says he’s definitely most proud of his research honors, as he dedicated much of his free time to projects that he found personally intriguing. Our valedictorian has

an array of interests in many different areas. Outside of school, Brandon loves to play the oboe and piano and is an avid runner. He also deeply cherishes the Classics, as the president of the Latin Honor Society and Latin Club, enjoys participating in competition math, and can never turn down a good book or a good nap during his brief moments of free time. Brandon says his time at GCHS has prepared him for his future, as he learned his limits and how to push them. He says, “staying busy occasionally puts a strain on academics, and knowing how to prioritize your obligations is one of the most critical life skills there is.” Brandon exclaims that he has been influenced by and learned so much from all of his teachers during his time at GCHS, and he “could not have asked for more talented or more knowledgeable teachers.” He would especially like to thank Mrs. Crawford, Mrs. Dolan, and Dr. Gordon, who wrote his college recommendations and whom he owes so much to for improving his understanding of their subject matters. When asked about his favorite high school memo-

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ry, Brandon says that there are too many to count – those rare moments of true laughter in every class (some more than others), every band concert under Dr. McCrann, going undefeated during league play with his mile relay team, and every minute spent with friends. In his parting words of wisdom and advice for other GCHS students and underclassmen, Brandon says, “follow what you want to do, truly. This whole “preparing-for-college” phase can seem suffocating at times, but no matter how difficult life may feel at times, know that you will always end up at a place where you belong. And be compassionate about what you express to others – sometimes you come off differently than what you think, and there’s no need to hurt anyone’s feelings, ever.” Outstandingly well-rounded and talented in academics, music, and athletics, Brandon is truly a modern day “Renaissance man.” Along with his natural talent and intelligence, his admirable work ethic and genuine compassion towards others promise his bright future. Good luck and congratulations, Brandon!


SALUTATORIAN: Kaylah Bozkurtian by Mina Woo Curious, diligent, and passionate are three of many words to describe our salutatorian and very own ECHO Editor-in-Chief, Kaylah Bozkurtian. She will be attending Wake Forest University in the fall, enrolled on a visual arts scholarship. Her leadership in GCHS will continue to the Wake Forest community, where she will act as a sort of ambassador, being mentored by one of the professors in the department while also getting to network with alumni in the Winston-Salem art community, and her job on campus will be to get other students involved in the arts. As of now, Kaylah’s major is undecided, though she is tentatively considering English and looking to double-minor in Spanish and Studio Art. In the meantime, Kaylah says that she is going to be working on her own art and writing, for art competitions and publication, respectively. Kaylah states that GCHS has prepared her academically for her future; “attending GCHS has made me a firm believer in the merit of hard work; the classes I’ve taken and teachers I’ve learned from have all rewarded genuine effort and interest.” In particular, Kaylah says that Mr. O’Hagan, her APUSH and AP Gov teacher, has been a big influence in the way she views citizenship and political activism. “He was instrumental in get-

ting me involved in the Empire Girls State mock-government camp held annually, which I participated in last summer, and my time in his class has encouraged my pre-existing plans to exercise my rights.” In addition to academics and classes, Kaylah says her fondest memory from the high school is the physics field trip to Six Flags in her junior year. She exclaims that it was the reward for getting through one of the toughest classes she’s ever taken, and she got a fair share of funny slow-motion videos and a Kingda-Ka tee for her troubles. A curious student with a variety of interests, Kaylah is actively involved in several clubs at school and also does much hobby work in the arts in her free time. A member of Fashion Club and the ECHO since freshman year, she held leadership positions for both in her senior year. Outside of organized activities, Kaylah enjoys drawing, creative writing, listening to music, and even composing. Our talented 2018 salutatorian has had an array of accomplishments during her years at the high school. Kaylah says she is proudest of two: first, that her artwork has been in the Long Island’s Best exhibition at the Heckscher Museum, and second, that she was this year’s recipient of the English Department’s Opie Award

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for creative writing, as it is a passion of hers. When asked about what motivates her, Kaylah explains, “I’m honestly not entirely sure. Part of it is definitely general fear of failure, but I think the bigger part is that I feel like I’m letting myself down when I don’t do everything I need to do to the best of my ability. I don’t like doing anything halfway.” She looks to both of her grandmothers as role models, women Kaylah describes as “some of the strongest and most genuine people I’ve ever met in my life” with the admirable ability “to always keep a positive outlook and warm personality.” For her parting words of wisdom to other GCHS students and underclassmen, Kaylah advises, “only involve yourself in what you can handle! The threshold is different for everybody, but don’t go crazy trying to push yourself, because your health and sanity will suffer big-time if you do.” Talented, hard-working, and intelligent, it is an enigma how she manages her time and stays successful between all her interests and passions. A special thank you to Kaylah for all her hard work and time over four years on the ECHO newspaper. Without her leadership and countless hours of editing and formatting, each publication of the paper would have been truly impossible.


Sports

Girls Track Races to Success by Katherine Wallace

This year, the Garden City High School girls track team was ranked first in its league. Many members of the team continued on from the regular season to run in the Divisions Meet at Great Neck North High School; despite rain and tough competition, several girls qualified for the county championship meet. Among them were Jamie Derkasch,

Kim Villoni, Emily Pogozelski, Victoria Ernst, Gianna Buckley, Lauren Mistretta, Erin Studdert, Paige Going, Brooke Edwards, Caity Bianchi, and Emily Andreuzzi. The county meet was held at MacArthur High School, where the girls raced against some of the best teams in Nassau County. Garden City’s 4-by-800 re-

lay team placed third in the meet, behind Great Neck North and Wantagh. Overall, teammates and coaches alike agree that Garden City had a very successful spring 2018 season, and the team seeks to perfom even better in the cross-country season this coming fall.

Girls Varsity Golf by Alexis Grace Spera

The Garden City High School Girls Varsity Golf team had a successful season this past spring. The team is comprised of students from seventh grade to twelfth grade who are then divided into three teams all coached by Mr. Reid Sclafani and Mr. Jim Malone-the Practice Squad, the White team, and the Maroon team. Both White and Maroon teams play nine holes of match play against other towns. Depending on the scores each girl has and the team’s average, the team

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or individuals can qualify for the county tournament. From Maroon, the girls who qualified were Claire Haggerty, Katherine Mulvihill, Rosie Sweeney, Kelly Brennan, Margaux Griffin, Mary Kate Saunders, and Stephanie Knechtges. From White, the girls were Grace Mullahey, Mary Haggerty, Katherine Coffey, Emily Butler, Emma Sutcliffe, and Lauren Oxenham. Congratulations on a great season!


Sports

Trojans Win it All by Meghan Galligan & Caroline Dolan

The Trojans were ready to get their revenge this lacrosse season against the John Jay Indians after being defeated by them last year in the New York State semi-finals. The boys earned their well deserved State Championship title after their hard work all pre-season and persistence throughout the regular season. With a regular season record of 16-3, the Trojans walked into the playoffs with great confidence. The first round of playoffs the boys went up against Long Beach. The 20-3 win boosted the team’s confidence as they proceeded to the second round against Southside. The nail-biting South Side game had everyone on their toes as the teams unexpectedly went into overtime with a score of 2-2. The sudden death overtime ended with senior Liam Curtin’s winning goal with an assist from

junior James Basile. This game set the boys up for the Nassau County Championship against longtime rival, Manhasset. With the annual Woodstick Classic not resulting in GC’s favor, there was a lot of anticipation for this game. Luckily, the Trojans came to win! GC took the Nassau County Championship Title from Manhasset with a 15-5 win. With a week to prepare for the Long Island Championship, the boys practiced every day. The Long Island Championship game was a blowout against Harborfields with a final score of 12-3. The next game was the long awaited John Jay State Semifinals. Luckily, the game was held in our backyard, Adelphi University, so the crowd gave the GC boys something of a home-field advantage. Junior Justin Coppola repeatedly won the faceoffs, giving the Trojans posses-

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sion. GC entered halftime with a commanding 7-0 lead. Senior goalie Teddy Dolan stood his ground as he made many key stops. The game ended in a 14-4 victory and a celebration of the team’s hard work paying off as they earned their stop in the State Championship game. As the boys traveled up to Rochester, they knew this game would not be easy. They would be playing Victor, the 3 time defending champions. The Trojans put up a great fight as they took the winning goal with 4 second left, avoiding overtime. Congratulations to Boys Varsity Lacrosse on an amazing season and good luck to the seniors.


Sports

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Sports

CONGRATULATIONS, TROJANS!

photographs courtesy of Meghan Galligan & Caroline Dolan

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Community News

Festa Della Primavera by Julia Remick

After hard work and preparation, the Italian Club hosted La Festa della Primavera at the Garden City High School. Festa is a celebration for the coming of spring. Students, family, friends, and alumni gathered in the festively decorated cafeteria to enjoy Italian food, music, and dancing. Every year the Italian students perform the Tarantella, a traditional

Italian folk dance, and invite guests to join in. The proceeds from Festa will be used towards the Carlo Mazarese Scholarship for Garden City students of Italian. This event is a special tradition because it is a joyful celebration that brings the community together during a busy time of year. This year’s Festa was particularly special because we

Heart-to-Heart The Heart to Heart Club at Garden City High School has collected books, bookshelves, and room decor. The materials were used to set up a book nook in the Robert J. McMahon Children's Center in Sea Cliff, which serves children and adolescents with developmental disabilities. Ahead of the trip to the site, club members sort-

by Julia Remick

ed and organized the books by reading level, and at the site itself, students used donations from the community to set up a warm and inviting reading area replete with rug, bean bags, and bookshelves brimming with books. The students and teachers involved hope that the warm environment will foster a love for reading.

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honored Signora Brunetti who is retiring this year. Both current and past students spoke fondly of their time spent with Signora in room 106. The event would not be possible each year if not for her passion and dedication. Although we are sad to see her go, we are grateful for the curiosity and appreciation for learning she has gifted us with.


Community News

POPS Concert by Lana Hess

On Wednesday, May 30, the Garden City High School hosted a very special “Evening at the Pops” inspired by and dedicated to celebrating the life of former student Robert “Bobby” Menges (10/21/979/8/17). Vocal Jazz, Women’s Chorus and Chamber Choir all sang under the direction of Amanda Conte and Stephen Mayo, respectively. The highlight of the evening featured the combined efforts of Wind Symphony, Wind Ensemble and Alumni Band Members under the direction of Dr. James P. McCrann. They performed the world premiere of “In the Mourning, Shouts of Joy” which is an original composition by Stephen Melillo, commissioned by the Garden City H.S. Trojan Club and Principal Nanine McLaughlin. Bobby Menges, lifelong Garden City resident, was diagnosed with neuroblastoma when he was 5 and again at age 10, and was healthy until early 2016 when his cancer returned. Bobby made a lasting impression at Garden City H.S. where he was class President for four years, a member of the G.C.H.S. Marching Band, a varsity wrestler and named Long Island Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s “Man of the Year” in June 2014 after raising almost

$95,000 in ten weeks. In addition to all these accomplishments, Bobby is best remembered for his infectious smile and zest for life. As the evening’s music program states, “Against the greatest of odds, he will forever endure in the hearts of the countless lives he touched.” The band’s performance mesmerized and emotionally moved the packed audience and prompted a unanimous, spontaneous and universal standing ovation. Forty year resident of Garden City, Frances Costa, said,”the music was emotionally moving and I felt privileged to witness it.” Band director of the Middle School, Jennifer Iovino, participated as part of the Alumni Members and said, “You could feel the added passion and emotion everyone put into their performance on concert night. It was truly incredible.” For the whole audience, the musical piece was captivating and the effort and dedication of the musicians reflected as a beautiful tribute to the inspiring life of Bobby Menges. As Dr. McCrann so eloquently stated prior to the performance,”It is only through music that the full spectrum of human emotion can be realized and conveyed to others.” It was truly a Special Evening at the Pops!

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Community News

Science Research Symposium The 12th annual Garden City Science Research Symposium took place on Tuesday May 29th. All science research students from freshmen to seniors presented their research findings from their projects over the course of the year to parents, teachers, and administrators in a final culminating symposium. It was a very successful year for science research students, with students winning various honors from Siemens, Neuroscience Research Prize, Regeneron, Chemagination, Long Island Science Congress, Broadcom Masters, Medical Marvels, and the Garden City Environmental Advisory Board. The ceremony started with the student poster reception, in which students’ project poster boards with procedures, conclusions, and future plans decorated the GCHS library. Science research students explained their findings to parents, teachers, and other curious science research students walking around. After some time, the graduating seniors presented their impressive senior projects one by one at the podium to the audience. In describing the seniors’ projects, Dr. Gordon, the high school’s Science Research teacher, says, “projects were based on student's interests in a wide

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variety of areas such as; energy, environmental science, biomedicine, food chemistry, behavioral sciences, and sports physiology and psychology. To me, it's important to begin research with a topic that is personally meaningful to you." Some senior project titles included Ashley Boccio’s “How do SNPs in the Coding & Noncoding Region of DNA Affect a Drug's Interaction with the Body?”, Kieran Brown’s “The Effect of Pool Water on Freshwater Protists”, Connor Cowie’s “Preliminary Study: Glucose Biosensors in Food Samples”, Brandon Gong’s “The Protective Effects of a Caffeoylquinic Acid Derivative on Neurobehavioral Dysfunction in a Fruit Fly Model of Alzheimer’s disease”, Thomas Grlic’s “Investigation of Noise and Particles Associated With Leaf Blowers”, John Mignone’s “Increasing Palmitate Absorption in Aqueous Solutions Via Addition of Lipase”, and many more. All the science research students, myself included, would like to thank Dr. Gordon for his hard work and dedication in helping us with projects, fostering our curiosity in any ideas we had, and making it such a successful year.


Reviews

LOVE YOURSELF: TEAR by Kaylah Bozkurtian

As the first Korean pop album to debut as #1 on the Billboard 200 charts, BTS’s Love Yourself: Tear is a polished passion project from the seven-member boy group. With eleven tracks spanning various genres and a run-time of forty-four minutes, Tear is the continuation of an ongoing musical “storyline” with its roots in BTS’s earlier albums. The members have discussed it as being their most personal album to date, tackling topics like insincere relationships, insecurity, and uncertainty about one’s future aspirations. Interestingly, the album is home to both a designated intro and outro, the former being the R&B-influenced “Intro: Singularity”, performed as a solo by one of the group’s main vocalists (Taehyung Kim), and the latter being the rap-exclusive “Outro: Tear”, performed by the group’s trio of rappers (Suga, RM, and J-Hope)-the duality between the two perhaps the best tes-

tament to the album’s variety. Standout songs in between include radio single “FAKE LOVE”, a heavier pop track with an infectious hook; the Latin-pop-influenced “Airplane Pt.2”; and the upbeat “Anpanman”, a tribute to a beloved Japanese children’s book character with a coming-of-age twist. A consistent synth presence ties the album together, and while none of the tracks feel out of place, some of them belong more in the category of standard pop fare (for example: “Love Maze”, “Magic Shop”, and “So What”) and are therefore less memorable. This fact does not, however, negatively impact Love Yourself: Tear’s status as a very easy listen. New fans and casual listeners alike may be surprised to hear notable amounts of English on the album and mistakenly attribute that presence to BTS’s recent skyrocket to international stardom. A quick look back at the group’s earlier work will

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prove that assumption misplaced, as they and the k-pop industry in general seem to have always possessed an international sensibility. While it is nice for American audiences to have an additional point of reference when experiencing music from across the globe, it’s important to remember that it was the music and lyrics, not simply the language in which they were sung or their point of origin, that placed Love Yourself: Tear at the top of the charts.

DRAMA HIGH

by Sarah Fetherston

Drama High by Michael Sokolove is nonfiction book about a school in a working class Pennsylvania and its theatre program. The director leads the students through big successful productions of new plays. It revolves around the program at the school when the director decides to put on a show that some people think is inappropriate, as well as the drama that takes place amongst the students in the program. It’s a great book for teens who love theatre. I loved it and would give it five stars!


Reviews

INFINITY WAR If you like superheroes, stop reading now! You’re bound to be devastated if one of your favorites doesn't make it through Infinity War, the new Avengers movie. Keep in mind, this is one of a two part series, so do not expect everything to wrap up neatly in the end. This movie is a culmination of over ten years of superhero cinema and spans the entire Marvel Universe, hence making two movies necessary. Avengers: Infinity War is the ultimate showdown between Thanos and all of the Avengers. Thanos, of course, has a insane plan for the universe and the superheros need to stop him. Directors Anthony and Joe Russo oversee

by Lana Hess

this giant conflict with an amazing cast of Robert Downey Jr. (Ironman), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Mark Ruffalo (Hulk), Chris Evans (Captain America), Scarlett Johansson (Black Widow), Benedict Cumberbatch (Dr. Stange), Tom Holland (Spiderman), Chadwick Boseman (Black Panther) and Chris Pratt (Peter Quill)-- just to name a few! The fact that all of these stars signed up to be in the same movie is a small miracle; movie fans can delight in picking out their favorites, especially among the “Chris’s”! The directors expertly weave the divergent characters and story lines into one complete overarching epic. Due to this be-

ing a monumental task, the movie itself is almost three hours long. Dedicated movie fans will love the character development, such as the clash of egos when Ironman (Robert Downey Jr.) and Dr. Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) meet but newcomers to the series may be overwhelmed and confused. To celebrate the end of the school year, go ahead and binge watch all the Marvel movies before this one! If you do, you’ll most likely join all the other Marvel fans who are anxiously awaiting Part II. Then you can spend the summer dreaming up the millions of possible endings.

Born on the Fourth of July by Emma Rubino

Born on the Fourth of July is a true story of courage, struggle and perseverance told by Vietnam War veteran Ron Kovic. The inspiring story has gone on to fill shelves, become a star studded movie and inspire one of the biggest albums of all time. Ron Kovic was just a high school student when he decided he wanted to become a Marine after hearing a presentation in school. Soon after he was shipped off to military training which was a difficult challenge unlike anything this young Long Islander had ever experienced. Once in Vietnam the war was unlike anything he could ever have imagined. Witnessing innocent people being ruthlessly killed

and almost being killed himself, Ron’s strong desire to be in the war quickly disappeared. He was shot while in Vietnam causing him to become paralyzed from the waist down and changing his life forever. He was shipped from hospital to hospital with other wounded veterans, hating the war and hating his life. Kovic describes his struggles with PTSD and finding his place after returning home. The eagerness Kovic once felt to support his country and be a hero was transformed into a hatred for war and everything it stood for. After being hesitant about actively speaking out against the war Ron is convinced to take a stand after

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seeing the continuous college protests against the war. Ron soon becomes an advocate to end the war and participates in anti-war rallies, devoting his life to spreading the truth about the realities of war. Born on the Fourth of July is an important story for students to encounter as it gives them a greater insight into the life of a soldier and the struggles they face when they return home. This book inspired many, including Bruce Springsteen who after reading it wrote the album Born in the USA. The message of the book is far reaching and important for people to understand.


Reviews/National News Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future

WONDER A book I highly recommend is Wonder by R.J. Palacio. Wonder is about a kid named Augie who has a deformed face. He is going to school for the first time, and does not know anyone going to his school. His parents are very nervous that he is going to school for the first time, but his Mom makes him go because she thinks it will be best for him. Augie makes friends, but has to deal with bullies throughout the book. He is made fun of and given dirty looks because of the way that he looks. In the end, Augie realizes that everyone is different, and he should be proud to be himself. Wonder teaches many valuable lessons about being kind to others and embracing differences. It is a worthwhile read for any and all! by Will Schieck

This biography of Elon Musk is a very in-depth view of the brilliant mind of the man behind companies like SpaceX and PayPal. The life of this man was very interesting while he grew up in South Africa, then moved to Canada and the USA for college. He turned down a scholarship offer from Stanford to start his first company known as PayPal. After he sold it he risked all the money on a private space company. He became broke and the fate of his life depended on something totally unlikely: a rocket launch. I recommend this book to people who are interested in seeing how successful people in our world think. by Sammy Myers

THE ROYAL WEDDING: A Fairy-Tale Come True by Emma Rubino

On Saturday May 19th, twenty-nine million people tuned in to watch the royal wedding of Meghan Markle to Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex. Viewers were anxious to see the new duchess’s dress in the wake of the most recent British royal nuptials (between Kate Middleton and Prince William), and she did not disappoint. Magazines and entertainment networks obsessed over the simplicity of her plain, offthe-shoulder wedding gown. Aside from just the dress, the whole event was beautifully executed. The ceremony took place inside St. George’s chapel at Windsor Castle, where guests gathered to watch the union of Meghan and Harry. A chorus perfectly harmonized as they performed “Stand By Me”, the rhythmand-blues tune an unusual element of a traditional royal wedding. The bride was led down the aisle with her wedding party in tow, said party including the young Prince George and

Princess Charlotte. Though the seemingly odd customs of the British royal family never fail to captivate viewers, one unusual break in tradition that made headlines during the wedding was that the it was the first time Prince George had ever worn long pants in public. (It is a British custom for boys to wear shorts until the age of eight.) Markle, herself, is very different from the other women who have previously married

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into the royal family. She is an American who plays an active role in fighting for social justice, has acted in movies and tv shows, and is half African American, all characteristics uncommon in the royal family. Ultimately, however, it has been her differences--which some claim make her reminiscent of the late Princess Diana--that have made the world fall in love with the new duchess of Sussex.


National News

A Good Start for

HOLLYWOOD by Alexandra Kucich

Representation in the media is an issue that many minority groups have struggled with since the very conception of the press. Historical game changers like Uncle Tom’s Cabin and To Kill A Mockingbird have paved the way for public awareness of difficulties and discrimination faced by African Americans, but one of today’s most popular sources of representation - film - has failed to carry out this legacy for years. For example, the crowning jewel of Audrey Hepburn’s film career, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, features yellowface, or a white actor imitating an Asian man. Plus, recent hashtags such as #oscarssowhite reflect public outrage with the lack of actors of color in film. But 2018 offers a gleam of hope on the horizon. The blockbuster Black Panther, which has grossed 1.344 billion dollars, features a cast of predominantly black actors living in Wakanda, a nation in Africa that was never colonized. The film frequently refers to white people as “colonizers”, and rightfully so; behind the initial comedic effect lies the power of the film to hold white people of past centuries accountable for the atrocities they committed, and the white people of today accountable for our misuse of privilege. In today’s society that still relies heavily on a framework of systematic racism, the word “colonizers” brings awareness to the issue. To further bring black struggles to light, the film features black protagonists and supporting white actors, a clear reversal of the usual model. Addi-

tionally, the film celebrates black culture in a way that it rarely has before been seen. The Mursi and Surma lip plates, Queen Ramonda's Isicholos, or Zulu headdress, and the Dogon-inspired masks are just a few references to African culture that Black Panther executes flawlessly. Love, Simon, another popular film this year, also brings the struggle of an underrepresented group into the spotlight. The film centers around a gay high school senior, Simon, and his struggles with coming out to his friends and family. For the first time, LGBTQ+ students could see someone they related to on the big screen, in a cinema rather than on Netflix. The characters’ acceptance and understanding for Simon have moved many theatregoers to tears, while the bullying Simon faces demonstrates just some of the challenges gay youth face. However, Simon is played by a straight man, the majority of the characters are white, and there are no lesbians, bisexuals, or transgender individuals. As successful as Love, Simon was in getting a gay coming-of-age story into theatres, it also demonstrates how much further we need to go to truly represent all people in film. Coming out in August this year is Crazy Rich Asians, which boasts Hollywood’s first all-Asian cast in 25 years. More importantly, the trailer reveals that Asian-American director Jon M. Chu has perpetuated no stereotypes. As Allyson Chiu of the Washington Post puts it, “it’s an entire movie about Asians without martial arts or stereotypical

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nerds,” which challenges the “molds [for Asian-Americans], as defined by Western pop culture.” Though Crazy Rich Asians is told from the perspective of a group that is underrepresented and often stereotyped in our media, its greatest accomplishment is simply… being a rom-com. Its familiar style and comedy normalizes the concept of Asians simply existing without heavy western influence. For upcoming films, Crazy Rich Asians is an example to follow. With these films, 2018 has proven hopeful for the future of representation in the media. Finally, people who deviate from society’s “norm” can see themselves in characters they admire; they can be warriors, they can be royalty, they can fall in love like the characters that live throughout most of Hollywood’s history. But this year’s films only offer a taste of what will hopefully be a reality someday. Individuals with disabilities, transgender people, other members of the LGBTQ+ community, dark-skinned people of color, and individuals with mental illnesses are just a few groups that desperately need positive and accurate representation. Plus, film needs to become more intersectional, meaning that characters should represent people who are part of multiple minority groups. For example, when is the last time you saw a deaf South Asian woman in a Hollywood film? When will a Hispanic, transgender man get a turn in the mainstream media spotlight? Hollywood has a long way to go, and 2018 is just the beginning.


National News

STUDENT ACTIVISM TEXAS SCHOOL FROM PARKLAND SHOOTING by Matthew Fiore

by Alexandra Kucich

After tragedy struck in Parkland, Florida, this February, students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School have voiced their opinions on how they feel school security should be improved. At first, students told news reporters their stories when being interviewed - the bang, the horror, and the escape - just hours after the incident occurred. However, as they continued to be interviewed by many news channels from all over the country, many of the high schoolers realized they had an opportunity to voice their opinions and make a difference in schools throughout the nation. Many reached out to President Trump, seeking reform in school security, while others took their own approach to try to ensure that school is a safe place for kids to learn throughout the United States. Students such as David Hogg and Emma Gonzalez have captured the nation’s attention and are using their platform to advocate for change. Boycotts, protests, and the national walkout have all been efforts to try to raise awareness and implement change in school security by student activists. However, school shootings and other incidents of the same nature continue to happen week after week. Although many students from Parkland may be famous in the news for being activists, change has still not been implemented in schools. Though the demand for reform is growing, is our nation willing to implement new security measures? The issue is of extreme importance, but the road to finding a solution has begun.

On Friday, May 18th, in Santa Fe, Texas, a 17 year old student with a gun opened fire on his school. The shooting left ten dead and ten more wounded in its wake. But for an event so heart rending, a certain numbness seems to surround it. The individuals whose lives were cut short are Aaron Kyle McLeod, Angelique Ramirez, Kimberly Vaughan, Cynthia Tisdale, Sabika Sheikh, Chris Stone, Jared Black, Shana Fisher, Glenda Ann Perkins, and Christian Riley Garcia. One survivor from Santa Fe stated that, “It’s been happening everywhere. I’ve always felt it would eventually happen here too.” Perhaps, just as much as in the extreme loss of life, the tragedy of such events lies in the lack of surprise they result in. This particular shooting likely became so publicized due to the tragic mortality rate, but it was not the first school shooting since Parkland on February 14th of this year. No less than thirteen other school shootings have occurred between the two events. Thirteen school shootings that did not make the news. Thirteen school shootings where, though in some cases there were no deaths, there were casualties and emotional scarring. The publicity that a school shooting gets should not be determined by the mortality rate; all survivors deserve to speak out about the trauma they have suffered. The survivors of Parkland certainly have made an impact on the nation. They have spoken out against the NRA, organized nation-wide school walk outs, and their school district has voted against the NRA’s plan to arm teachers. Regardless of political disposition, everyone would benefit from listening to the survivors themselves. In addition to the thirteen shootings between Parkland and Santa Fe, yet another occurred in Noblesville, Indiana on May 25th. Have you seen that in the news? How many more will take place before this article is published?

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Where to, now?

CLASS OF 2018 COLLEGE LIST

JUAN ABAD AGUIRRE PAIGE ACCETTA PHILIP ACINAPURO CAROLINE ADAMS JULIA AFFRONTI JENNA AIOSA TESS ALLEN JACQUELINE ANDREUZZI EMILY APRIGLIANO LOGAN AQUINO STEVEN ASFAR LUKAS BAKER VALERIE BALDEO NICHOLAS BAMBINO NATALIE BARONE KATHRYN BASS THOMAS BEAL JULIA BECKMANN THOMAS BERMEL CAITLIN BIANCHI DAVID BLICKSILVER ANTHONY BOCCIA ASHLEY BOCCIO GIANLUCA BOGNANNO PATRICK BOYLE KAYLAH BOZKURTIAN LAUREN BRIVIO KIERAN BROWN JAMES BUCKLEY QUENTIN BUCKNOR EMILY BURNS ALANA CAMPBELL PETER CANNIZZARO ISABEL CARA NICOLE CASTORO EMILY CERISE JOYCE CHEN MARGARET CHIANG JULIA CHOI CONOR CLARK SIOBHAN COEN DELANY COMERFORD LUKE CONNOLLY

Undecided Bucknell University Boston College Quinnipiac University Saint John's University Fairfield University School of the Art Institute of Chicago University of Delaware George Washington University Saint John's University Western New England University Union College Hunter College University of Richmond SUNY Oswego Cornell University SUNY Purchase Harvard College High Point University Saint Leo University Hofstra University Ithaca College University of Delaware Rutgers University High Point University Wake Forest University Texas A&M University Fordham University Kenyon College SUNY Geneseo Siena College Fordham University Indiana University American University University at Buffalo SUNY Plattsburgh New York University Pennsylvania State University Duke University Binghamton University Marist College Goucher College Villanova University

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CATHERINE CONWAY ANDREW COSTIGAN CONNOR COWIE PATRICK CREAVEN DEANNA CREIGHTON LIAM CURTIN TESS CURTIN ANTONELLA D'AMELIO GABRIELLA DEGIS NICOLE DEIGNAN SAMANTHA DELACRUZ LAUREN DELUCA ANDREW DESANTIS MATTHEW DESIMPLICIIS HANNAH DEWEY MARK DIPIERRO CAROLINE DOLAN EDWARD DOLAN CHRISTOPHER DONOHUE MATTHEW DONOHUE KALEIGH DONOVAN JOHNATHAN DOROTHEOS LIAM DOUGHERTY MADELINE DOWD LAUREN DURAND COLE DUTTON AHMAD ELRAKHAWI HARRISON ERNST BRIANNE ETIENNE ABIGAIL FAIR CHRISTIAN FAULISI OLIVIA FERRARO ANDREW FERREIRA LIAM FERRIS GABRIELLE FERRO RYAN FERYO MATTHEW FLANAGAN THOMAS FLANAGAN LUCAS FRANCO ELIZABETH FULLHARDT ROBERT FURMAN JULIA GABERLAVAGE ELLEN GAINE MEGHAN GALLIGAN ZILIANG GAO RYAN GEORGE GEORGE GERMANO CHRISTINA GIANNONE LIAM GLYNN RACHAEL GLYNN

Boston College SUNY Geneseo Hobart and William Smith Colleges University of Notre Dame University at Buffalo University of Delaware The University of Alabama Marist College Lehigh University Elon University University of Scranton University of Delaware Bentley University Ithaca College Pennsylvania State University Loyola University Maryland Providence College Binghamton University Cornell University James Madison University Villanova University The Cooper Union Rochester Institute of Technology University of California, Los Angeles University of Georgia Lafayette College Rochester Institute of Technology Lehigh University SUNY Maritime College Binghamton University Saint Joseph's University Syracuse University Binghamton University Fordham University Ithaca College University of South Carolina University of Richmond Lafayette College University of Maryland Saint John's University Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology Mount Holyoke College Quinnipiac University Villanova University SUNY Albany Clemson University The Ohio State University Providence College SUNY Delhi Marist College

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GARRETT GOING BRANDON GONG MATTHEW GRANVILLE ALEX GRASSO BRIAN GREENE CALUM GRIBBIN AIDAN GRIFFIN JOHN GRIFFITH THOMAS GRLIC KIERA GUARINO SARAH HAEFFNER LAUREN HAGAN CLAIRE HAGGERTY XIAO HAN MICHAEL HANDAL AJDIN HAXHIMURATI ARTHUR HAZARIAN CARA HEANEY CAROLINE HEGARTY KEELIN HEGARTY KELLY HIGGINS ALEXANDRA HILDRETH SUZANNE HOLOBIGIAN KLEA HYSENBELLI BRIAN INGEGNO SALVATORE INGRASSIA STEPHEN IOVINO GRETA JAYE ALAN JIAN CHRISTOPHER JORDAN TYAIRE JOSEPH EVAN JOZKOWSKI ROBERT KALLEM JULIA KAVAL JULIA KAVAN HOPE KELLY ROSE KELLY ALLYSON KRAFF MORGAN LAFONT GRACE LARIVIERE PATRICK LEGGETT SEAN LEGGETT SOPHIA LEITER MICHAEL LIBEROPOULOS ANNALISE LOBIONDO ROBERT LUCANO COLLEEN MACLAY KYLE MACLEOD CAROLINE MADIGAN GRACE MAGE

Roger Williams University Harvard College Georgetown University College of the Holy Cross Elon University United States Marine Corps Univeristy of Miami Marist College Adelphi University Fordham University Gettysburg College Villanova University Fairfield University School of the Art Institute of Chicago Fairfield University Undecided Fairfield University Binghamton University University of Virginia Loyola University Maryland University of Rhode Island College of Charleston Sacred Heart University Tufts University Sacred Heart University Bentley University Dartmouth College Saint John's University University of California, Berkeley Saint Lawrence University Pace University Duke University Saint Michael's College Pennsylvania State University Brown Unviersity Johns Hopkins Unviersity College of the Holy Cross Albright College Swarthmore College SUNY Cortland Villanova University Quinnipiac University University of Michigan University of Virginia Syracuse University Hofstra University Molloy College College of the Holy Cross Bucknell University Southern New Hampshire University

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BRENNAN MAGGIO JILLIAN MANLEY JOHN MARCELLINO LAUREN MARCOUX RYAN MARESCA JILLIAN MARINO MEGAN MARSHALL NATALIE MARTIN MAGGIE MCANDREWS MICHAEL MCAULEY JOSEPH MCDONAGH SARAH MCDONALD SHANNON MCDOUGAL MICHAELA MCGOVERN KERRY MCHUGH JACK MCKERNAN WILLIAM MCLAUGHLIN JULIA MCNALLY CONNOR MCNEILL KEVIN MCNIFF JACK MCSHANE COLIN MCVICAR JENNIFER MEDJID MIKAYLA MEHLING PETER MENOUDAKOS ISABELLA MERCANDETTI GABRIELLA MERINGOLO LAYNE MEYER MARK MICHON JOHN MIGNONE VICTORIA MISERERE SHEILA MOHAN ERIN MOLLOY KIERNAN MONACO MORGAN MOODY STEVEN MORALES HANNAH MORAN JACQUELIN MORRIS LIAM MULDOON KATHERINE MULVIHILL JORDAN MURRAY BRADLEY NAEGELE ALEXA NALLAN AMANDA NASTASI JULIA NEESER LAUREN NELSON FAITH NIX COLBY NOLAN SEAN NORTON VICTORIA NUZZOLO

Bentley University Rensselear Polytechnic Institute Stevens Institute of Technology Five Towns College Columbia College Hofstra University Providence College Virginia Tech University of South Carolina Bentley University Union College SUNY Purchase College of the Holy Cross Villanova University Lehigh University Fordham University Muhlenberg College Bucknell University Fordham University University of New Haven Ithaca College Marist College Boston College The Ohio State University SUNY Maritime College University of Pittsburgh Georgetown University Fordham University Saint John's University Binghamton University SUNY Oneonta Sacred Heart University Binghamton University University of Delaware Molloy College Binghamton University Adelphi University Iona College University of Utah University of Delaware Villanova University Rutgers University Unviersity of Richmond Fordham University Pennsylvania State University Fordham University Fordham University University of California, Santa Barbara Bucknell University Messiah College

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CHISOM NWAEKE DANIEL O'CONNOR JOHN O'HARE KELLY O'KEEFFE JOSEPH OSTAPOW OLIVIA OSTROWSKI MILLER OVERBECK ADDIE OVEREND REGAN PADALA ABIGAIL PAISLEY MICHELLE PARENTE KIERAN PASKEWITZ JESSICA PEDONE JOSEPH PERRINI FLORENTIA PETRIDES ANGELA PHILIPPIDES KYLE PLETCHER IAN PLUMMER MELODY POMPAY THOMAS POOLE THOMAS POWDERLY AVA PRIME ALEXA PYATSKY MARENA RAMIREZ KAITLYN RANDAZZO KATHERINE REILLY SEAN REILLY MARGARET RICEMAN CAROLINE RIEGER DESTIN RIVERA MARC ROBAYO SEAN RODE MICHAEL ROMANO ALEXANDER ROSADO NIEYKA ROWE ASHLEY RUBIN JENNA RUHL MICHELLE SALAZAR MATTHEW SAUCHELLI CATHERINE SCHICK MICHAEL SCHWANTNER MAXIMILIAN SCHWENK ANDREA SCISCENTE PAUL SEKAS AIDAN SERKES HAILEY SHAFRAN JEAN SIMMONS SPENCER SINGER JOHN SKAHILL LAUREN SKRAMKO

SUNY Buffalo State Duquesne University Stony Brook University Marist College Clemson University Lehigh University University of Georgia Tulane University University of Delaware University of South Carolina University of Richmond Hobart and William Smith Colleges College of William and Mary University of Miami Sacred Heart University University of Maryland Texas A&M University Union College United States Coast Guard Academy High Point University Indiana University Cornell University Manhattanville College Northeastern University Sewanee - The University of the South Loyola University Maryland Boston College University of Wisconsin Georgetown University University of Conneticut Nassau Community College Binghamton University SUNY Albany Saint John's University Gap Year University of Alabama Clemson University Nassau Community College Purdue University Duke University SUNY Geneseo Tufts University Marist College Binghamton University Loyola University Maryland College of Charleston Fairfield University Elon University Loyola University Maryland University of Maryland

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MEGAN SLOVENSKY MACKENZIE SMITH TYLER SOUTAR ALEXIS GRACE SPERA STEVEN SPIRAKIS KYLE STEINBACH VIRGINIA STEINER ANN SULLIVAN NOELLE SWEENEY ANDREW TANG DEREK TANG ANDREW THOMPSON KEVIN TIERNEY KATHERINE TOLLNER RYAN TRABOLD JAMES TRABULSI CHRISTINA TRIMBOLI JOHN TYNAN DEAN VAN NOY ALEXIS VARANO SYDNEY VOTRUBA SARAH WALKER CATHERINE WALLACE RYAN WALSH DEANNA WEISENBURGER MELISSA WHITNEY OWEN WIELAND JENNIFER WISE SEUNGMIN WOO SAMANTHA WU TYLER WUCHTE GABRIELLA YEPES ANDREAS YIOUPIS KALIE YUEN CONNOR ZAROU SHIRLEY ZHANG RYEEM ZIA

SUNY Plattsburgh Trinity College, Dublin Boston College Fordham University University of Rochester Providence College Iona College Gettysburg College Vanderbilt University Georgetown University Boston College Binghamton University Elon University College of Charleston University of South Carolina Elon University SUNY Cortland Drew University Baruch College Cornell University Loyola University Maryland Fairfield University Quinnipiac University University of Massachusetts - Amherst Stony Brook University James Madison University Saint Michael's College University of Delaware Brown Unviersity Fordham University Fairfield University University of Florida Farmingdale State College Bucknell University University of Conneticut Pace University New York University

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Summer issue  

Check out the news from GCHS! This issue includes a listing of seniors' college plans.

Summer issue  

Check out the news from GCHS! This issue includes a listing of seniors' college plans.

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