Page 1

The ultimate online Sports Magazine!

ISSUE 18, JULY 2015

The ultimate online sports ma NEW SPIN DOCTOR IN TOWN

★ WATCH EDDIE ★ BOWL! vIDEO LINK INCLUDED

Tasneem

COZYN

18

World

Champion at

WIMBLEDON 29 JUNE - 12 JULY 2015

WAtCh the First 3 DAys oF WiMbleDon through the MAgAzine!

CramP!!!!! What is this Pain?


ADVERTISING FOR ADVERTISING CONTACT melody@gameonmagazine.co.za 082 375 1362

GAME ON TEAM Founders; Dave White | Michael Janse van Rensburg GURU (Managing Editor) Dee Hean | deehean@gameonmagazine.co.za QUARTERBACK (Creative Director) Michael Janse van Rensburg | michael@camouflage.co.za REFEREE (Sales Director) Dave White | dave@gameonmagazine.co.za PLAYMAKER (Art & Creative Senior Designer) Raymond Q Nkomo LINEBACKER (Senior Designer) Kerry Kruger PROPS MASTER (PR & Support) Dez Erasmus | dez@gameonmagazine.co.za Eye In The Sky (Chief Photographer) Dr Henry Kelbrick PUBLISHER CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD APP AVAILABLE ON iTunes | Android Market | Windows HEAD OFFICE 180 Blackwood Road, Clubview, Centurion Gauteng | South Africa Tel | +27 82 606 6736 Fax | +27 86 666 0205 Web | gameonmagazine.co.za DISCLAIMER While every effort is made by TEAM: GAME ON to ensure that the content of our magazine is accurate, CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD and GAME ON magazine cannot accept any responsibility for errors that may occur, or for any significance of applying the information contained herein. Statements by contributors and media submissions are not always representative of either CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD or GAME ON magazine’s opinion. No part of the GAME ON magazine may be reproduced in any form or stored without prior written permission from CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD and/or GAME ON magazine. CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD and GAME ON magazine supports and encourages responsible practices with regards to all sports, activities and the conservation and protection of our planet and all inhabitants.

© Camouflage Visual Solutions (Pty) Ltd and Game On

BENCH (CONTRIBUTORS) Dan Lombard

The ultimate online sports magazine

contents Cover FeatureS cover STORY Eddie Leie is The News Spin Doctor in Town Words: Lunga Ntuli | Photos: Backpage Media

Tasneem Cozyn “Karate Kid” World Champion at 18 Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Stephen Judge

Philna van Veijeren

Wayne Price The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016 Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Dee Hean VarSity Sports (Backpage media) Sophie Thompson freepik.com

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO BACK PAGE MEDIA

10

Carling Black Label Cup Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

16

MultiChoice Diski Challenge Words: Phumzile Ngcatshe | Photos: Backpage Media

22

Wimbledon 2015: Tennis Anyone? SA’s at Wimbledon – watch online with us! Words: Dee Hean | Photos, videos & live feed courtesy of www.wimbledon.com

26

Dan’s Player to Watch Sikhumbuzo Notshe Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

30

Anton Raimondo is Developing Sitting Volleyball in SA Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Provided

32

Jeanette Bensted-Smith My “Comrades Therapy”

36

Niku Kruger on Rugby in the US of A Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Brian Medcalf

52

MAIN STORIES

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Karien Jonckheere

04

42


Issue 18, July 2015

YOUTH Features Golf: Eleonora Galletti “taking the stairs to success”

46

Badminton: Badminton SA goes to World Team Championships force

50

Swimming: Ayanda Maphumulo KZN’s Queen Of The Water

56

Sailing: Long Brothers It’s in the genes

62

Development Features Volleyball: Anton Raimondo is Developing Sitting Volleyball in SA

07

Wheelchair Basketball: Amawheelie Boys Working hard to compete internationally

58

Cycling : SA Schools Cycling is driving cycling skills developMent

86

HeaLth Focus Muscles: Cramp! What is this PAIN?

64

Food: To Snack… Or What to Snack? that is the question!

68

Rowing: Top 10 Health Benefits

74

sporting News

PRO CYCLING: Ashleigh MoolmanPasio wins Auensteiner Radsporttage in Germany

84

CYCLING DEVELOPMENT: SA Schools Cycling is driving cycling skills development

86

CRICKET: Dane Vilas Surprised By Proteas Call-Up

88

NETBALL: Bongiwe Msomi: I Am Not Afraid Of Hard Work

90

RUGBY: Middelburg High School Turns Heads

92

CRICKET: A Bright Future for KZN Cricketers

93

DEVELOPMENT: Klofies setting the pace with their Sports Science Department

94

TENNIS: Lucas Sithole & Dylan Alcott Win 2015 French Open Doubles Title

96

PARACYCLING: Supa Piet (du Preez) Breaks Long Distance World Record

97

FOOTBALL: Harry Edge New Zealand “KIWI” Joins PSL

98

MIND SPORTS: Ancients Wargames - 2015 IWF’s 18th World Individual Championships

99

HOCKEY: South African named Tournament Director for Rio Olympics

100

PARACYCLING: Justine Asher takes two gold medals in Italy

77

CRICKET: Ontong Backs Hendricks To Impress

101

RUGBY: Extended Springbok squad announced!

78

FOOTBALL: South African Football Has The Potential

102

MOUNTAINBIKING: Westaway fights back to win Sondela MTB Classic

79

FOOTBALL: Pirates Face A Stiff Challenge

104

MOTOCROSS: Round 3 of the Monster Energy TRP MX Nationals

80

GYMNASTICS: An African Afternoon

106

SWIMMING: World student games beckon for Madibaz swim twins

82

RUGBY: Smit waves goodbye to du Plessis brothers

107


Eddie Leie New Spin Doctor In Town

NEW SPIN DOCTOR IN TOWN age: 28

SPIN BOWLER

Perseverance is the one word that best describes new South African leg spinner Eddie Leie and his cricketing career journey. Leie, is the new face in South Africa’s T20 squad for the upcoming tour to Bangladesh.

University of the Witwatersrand

Many will ask themselves who he is and where he comes from after he was selected for the Proteas T20 squad. Leie’s story is one of determination, grit and complete stubbornness after appearing only three times for the Lions in a five year span. He made his first class debut for the Lions in 2005, played his second game in 2007 and his third in 2010, but today he is one of the most well-respected and often feared spinners in the country. “I had to persevere; I think that is one word that can better describe where I come from. It was never easy at all. I mean I saw the guys that I started progressing and I was just left behind. Determination and hard work became my friend, I worked extremely hard on my game even when nobody was watching me,” said Leie.


Main Feature: Cricket

Words: Lunga Ntuli | Photos: Provided

The 28-year-old said he nearly gave up on his cricketing life when he was dropped from the Wits first team at one point in his career. “There was an emergency that made me go home for a weekend. Whilst I was training in the nets alone at home I received a call saying that I have been dropped from the first team because I missed a training session. In that moment I had two options, I could just throw everything away or I could continue training in the nets. I chose to train,” said Leie with a glimmer in his eye. “When I came back I was indeed dropped to the second team and I took the challenge. I took wickets and trained as if I was still part of the first team. Soon after that I was brought back to the first team.” He learned many of his bowling skills from watching YouTube…….”I’m serious. I learned my ‘googly’ through watching clips of Danish Kaneria bowling and my ’flipper’ from a combination of Shane Warne, Anil Kumble and Kaneria, I would watch the videos a few times to see how they did it and go to the nets and try to do the same thing. That was how I learned.” Mastering those styles takes more than emulating heroes on YouTube videos; and it was from skills nurturing from an expert in the form of a Lions’ coach, Geoffrey Toyana who has overseen the rise of Quinton de Kock, Chris Morris, Temba Bavuma and Phangiso, and his success rate as a coach comes down to his people skills. “Geoff has made a big difference to all of us because of the way he backs us and lets us be ourselves,” Leie explains. “And he is selfless - if we want to stay after training to do more, he stays with us. Sometimes, after nets, I go to do some work in the middle and then Geoff comes with me. I am a hard worker, I want to give 120%, so it’s nice to have a coach who does the same.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

5


Eddie Leie New Spin Doctor In Town

Speaking about his call up to the T20 Protea side, Leie said he did not expect it at all and it came when he was just moving to a new apartment. “God is good at all times and his ways are perfect,” continued the leg spinner. “I mean I was just busy with relocating and I received a call from Andrew Hudson. When he called I didn’t even think it was the Andrew Hudson who played for the Proteas, and when he told me that I have been selected for the T20 squad I was just speechless. You know when you have wanted something for far too long and then it finally happens, you just become humble about it.” Although he had to spend most of his time waiting for players like Aaron Phangiso and Imran Tahir to be away in order to be granted an opportunity to play, Leie says he always knew that his time would come and he plans on grabbing it with both hands. “This was a learning process for me, but I did not give up. I bided my time and told myself that whenever I get my opportunity to play I must make sure that I grasp it with both hands. I now want to make sure that I use this opportunity of representing the Proteas very well,” added the Potchefstroom-born player. “I think it is every cricketers dream to play in the four day game and as much as I am happy to be in the T20 it gives me a chance to work hard and eventually play test cricket for the Proteas. My support structures have been amazing and I have received advice from a number of different coaches and former Proteas players as well.” Leie was also nominated for the ‘Ram Slammer of the Season’ at the recently concluded 2015 Cricket South Africa Awards. The nomination in itself meant the world to the spinner and he encourages other people to never give up on their dreams.

6

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Cricket

Words: Lunga Ntuli | Photos: Provided

Moreover, his solid performance in the Ram Slam T20 Challenge led to a successful auction bid from the St Lucia Zouks in the Caribbean Premier League. It’s not every day that a player like the West Indies legend Chris Gayle makes a recommendation for a player to be auctioned in the Caribbean Premier League, but that’s exactly what happened for Leie. “It was a real honour for me to get a recommendation from Gayle and it all just shows that perseverance and hard work is important,” said the leg spinner. For Leie cricket is not just a career to him, but rather it is his entire life at present because it has opened up so many opportunities for him. It was the very same sport that he started playing with stones in the gravel which saw him enrolling at the Wits University after matric through courtesy of a scholarship. The player goes on to say that the hardships of life have always been there as he was raised by a single parent, but cricket was able to give him education.

“From an early age I received a cricket scholarship which meant that my Mother could relax about paying for my education. I mean I received the best education in the country and after matric I enrolled for a Bachelor of Education which I pushed until Masters Level, but could not finish it because of cricket. I am currently doing an LLB and that is why I want to encourage every young person to make sure that they focus on their studies and also excel in sports.”

“It is important for black kids to make sure that when education opportunities come their way they grasp them with both hands. We don’t know what the future holds and should anything happen I have my education and family support to fall back on.”

“My Mother supported me with everything she could and cricket took care of my education,” explained Leie.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

7


Eddie Leie New Spin Doctor In Town

NEW SPIN DOCTOR IN TOWN WATCH ThIS YOUTUBE VIDEO for more

ABOUT EDDIE Eddie Leie is a South African cricketer who plays for Lions in domestic cricket. He is a leg break bowler. He has played for the South Africa A cricket team and was awarded a High Performance contract by Cricket South Africa in 2015.

Born: November 16, 1986, Potchefstroom Career statistics First-class debut

Scorecard

Border v Gauteng at East London, Jan 27-29, 2005

Last First-class

Scorecard

Dolphins v Lions at Durban, Mar 19-22, 2015

List A debut

Scorecard

Combined Gauteng-North West XI v Zimbabweans at Potchefstroom, Feb 16, 2005

Last List A

Scorecard

Warriors v Lions at East London, Feb 8, 2015

Twenty20 debut

Scorecard

KwaZulu-Natal Inland v Gauteng at Pietermaritzburg, Jan 20, 2013

Last Twenty20

Scorecard

St Lucia Zouks v Trinidad & Tobago Red Steel at Gros Islet, Jun 21, 2015

8

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


KINGJAMES 30946

14 routes 5 cities a whole lot of flying With flights, cars and hotels, kulula.com is the best place to go when you want to go places. O.R. Tambo |

Lanseria |

Durbs |

Cape Town |

George |

East London Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

9


Dan Lombard The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016

The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016 Arnold Schwarzenegger is a man synonymous with bodybuilding. He dominated the 1970s winning seven Mr Olympias while also winning four Mr Universe titles, one as an amateur. His ‘can do’ attitude has seen him add, amongst other things, serviceman, actor and politician to his resume. In 1970, Mayor Jim Lorimer organised a Mr World contest in Worthington, Ohio. He included bodybuilding in the tournament to attract the public and invited Arnold as his star attraction. Arnold declined as he was set to compete in London at the Mr Universe. Jim stood his ground and organised transport for the then 23 year old Arnold to return to Ohio after the London competition.

10

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: BodyBuilding

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Arnold ended up winning both contests and promised Jim that once he retired from bodybuilding they would come up with a contest of their own.

Fast forward 45 years……. and South Africa is on the brink of hosting the continent’s first Arnold Classic. The festival is set to take place on the weekend of the 27-29 May 2016 at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg. Wayne and Michelle Price of Gentle Giant Promotions are the people who are responsible for bringing the iconic sports festival to South Africa. “In 2000, I took a team to the Arnold Classic in the USA. Arnold mentioned that they would like to expand the contest in the future. This year the Arnold Classic has featured in Spain, Brazil and Australia. It is now our turn and we’re very excited, especially as Arnold will attend the festival,” explained Wayne. The festival is not just about weightlifting and bodybuilding but includes disciplines such as martial arts, cheerleading and fencing. An estimated 10 000 athletes are expected to compete at the sports festival and as a former strongman it is easy to see where Wayne gets his enthusiasm from.

Arnold Schwarzenegger

wayne price

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

11


Dan Lombard The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016

Wayne started his strongman journey while still at school. He followed a gym programme to bulk up for rugby until he reached a point that he realised he would like to do weightlifting professionally.

Wayne went on to being named South Africa’s Strongest Man in 1991 and competed in three World’s Strongest Man competitions. He has conquered several feats as a strongman including pulling a Boeing ‘Jumbo Jet’ in 1998. But pulling a 20 ton truck with 19 other strongmen from Pretoria to Cape Town in 2003 is the legacy Wayne will leave.

WATCH The YOUTUBE VIDEO for more

12

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: BodyBuilding

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

“I have always looked up to Kevin McNamara. I remember the Sunday Times doing a full page spread on Kevin many moons ago. I cut out the photo of him and stuck it to my cupboard. His unwavering support both during and after my career is why I am where I am today.”

“Achieving these feats proved to me that the impossible can be done. More importantly I was able to organise these events successfully which has helped me in my business. The truck pull was special because we managed to raise a lot of money for cancer”. Wayne’s career was cut short after tearing his pectoral muscle while training for an event. The tear was so bad that the muscle could not be surgically reattached. He has fond memories of his career and wants to share the excitement of weightlifting and bodybuilding with his fellow South Africans. “I really enjoyed competing. I got to travel around the world and made incredible friends. I even competed with my wife who used to work for me. I always tell people that it was cheaper to marry her than to pay out her leave pay. Her support was what got me through the tough times as she understood what I was going through.”

“I struggled to come to terms with the reality that I wouldn’t be able to continue competing. I saw five or six of the top specialists in the space of a week. They all agreed that my career was over. It was a very difficult time in my life.”

The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016 Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

13


Dan Lombard The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016

“What made me realise that it wasn’t the end of the world was when my daughter Francé was born. We were told that we would never be able to have children so when Michelle fell pregnant it was a sign that there were bigger things in store for us. A couple of years later I had a moment where I was angry that I couldn’t travel the world anymore. But then I realised that if I was busy travelling I would not be able to spend time with her. That was the moment I let go of the negativity.”

14

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Francé price

The Arnold Classic is coming to South Africa in 2016


Main Feature: BodyBuilding

Wayne believes that interest in power sports has dwindled in South Africa due to a lack of exposure and funding. Another problem is that athletes can only participate from a certain age due to health risks.

“I believe that a person below the age of 18 should not go anywhere near weights. I take this and doping very seriously. We don’t want anybody to get hurt because of the sport. There are competitions for junior athletes which focus on a more gymnastic routine. Hopefully the Arnold Classic will revive the interest in the sport,” said Wayne. There is a lot running on the success of the inaugural Arnold Classic South Africa. Minority sports have now got a platform to showcase what they can offer. With Wayne’s enthusiasm and determination the Arnold Classic could become a highlight on the South African sporting calender.

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Sports that will feature at the Arnold Classic South Africa 2016 STAGE

FLOOR SPACE

1. Amateur Bodybuilding

1. Amateur Fencing

2. Pro Bodybuilding

2. Amateur Strongman

3. Model Bikini Search

3. Archery

4. Pole Fit Championship

4. Arena Softball 5. Armwrestling 6. Badminton 7. Big Chess 8. Boxing 9. Cario Tennis 10. Chess 11. Cross Fit 12. Cue Sport 13. Cycling 14. Dance Sport 15. Darts 16. Fitness sport aerobics 17. Fun Run 18. Gymnastics 19. Handball 20. Judo 21. Karate 22. Long Drive 23. Majorette and Cheerleading 24. Martial Arts 25. Powerlifting 26. Pro Strongman 27. Ringball 28. Table Tennis 29. Taekwando 30. Tenniquoits 31. Tug a War 32. Volleyball 33. Wall Climbing 34. Weightlifting 35. Wrestling

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

15


Carling Black label cup

The Carling Black Label Cup (CBLC) has become South Africa’s traditional curtain raiser to a new professional football season, but it is an event with a twist which gives fans a big say on how the match turns out. We take a closer look at the event ahead of the fifth edition, which will be played on August 1.

16

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Soccer

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

How does the CBLC work? The CBLC is an annual preseason friendly match between Soweto clubs Kaizer Chiefs and Orlando Pirates – the two most successful and best supported teams in South Africa – which takes place at the FNB Stadium in August. It is the spiritual successor to the now defunct Telkom Charity Cup, an event which saw fans vote for four teams to take part in a one-day tournament and raised millions of Rands for various charities around the country.

Unlike an official competitive match, where only the coach and his technical team has a say in the starting line-up of 11 players which he sends out onto the pitch, the CBLC gives supporters the chance to pick their own line-ups via online voting and also effect one substitution for each team.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

17


Carling Black label cup

In addition, one lucky supporter for each team wins the ‘Champion Coach’ experience. This allows them to meet the team and help them prepare at their training sessions ahead of the match, attend the pre-match briefing, watch the CBLC live from the dugout and make one live substitution for the team during the match.

The CBLC also allows Carling to plough back into the game, raising funds for football development and their Coach the Coaches programme, which, in association with the South African Football Association, sees young coaches from around the country given high-level instruction in order to elevate the standard of play in the lower leagues.

How do supporters vote and enter the competition? In order to cast a vote for their favourite line-up, fans over the age of 18 must purchase a specially marked bottle of Carling Black Label beer and look out for the unique underliner, which will allow them to vote. By dialling *120*660*underliner code# on their cell phones (at a cost of 20 cents per 20 seconds) or visiting www. carlingblacklabel.co.za, they can easily select their starting line-up and lead their team to victory. An exciting innovation in this year’s Carling Black Label Cup is that supporters who purchase a 750ml Carling Black Label will be given two votes to influence the biggest game in the country. Those supporters who cast their votes can win great prizes, including a share of R3-million worth of airtime, match tickets, and a ‘Champion Coach’ experience with either Orlando Pirates or Kaizer Chiefs.

18

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Soccer

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

Wh at c a n f a n s e x p e c t t h i s y e a r ? The biggest news heading into this year’s Carling Black Label Cup is that Kaizer Chiefs will have a new coach and captain. At the time of writing, the Amakhosi had just confirmed the departure of Coach

Stuart Baxter, a man who led the club to two league titles and two cup trophies in just three seasons in charge, as well as defender Tefu Mashamaite, the Captain and reigning Player of the Season.

In addition, Chiefs also lost the services of goalkeeper Itumeleng Khune, former BafanaBafana striker Katlego Mphela, Mandla Masango (their leading goal scorer across all competitions from last season) and the veteran midfield duo of Siyabonga Nkosi and Josta Dladla. In short, the team in gold and black come into the CBLC very much in a stage of transition and rebuilding. Pirates, in contrast, look like they will keep much of the same playing staff (with a few new additions sure to arrive between the time of writing and the day of the CBLC) and have shown faith in Coach Eric Tinkler. The former Bafana Bafana midfield hard-man took over the Buccaneers on a caretaker basis in December last year when Vladimir Vermezovic resigned from his post as head coach and has overseen an impressive improvement in the team’s results. One of the most interesting aspects in the build-up to this year’s CBLC is that the teams should enter the match in very different stages of preparation. While Kaizer Chiefs will have had a traditional preseason programme, Orlando Pirates will have already been involved in competitive action due to their participation in the group stage of the CAF Confederation Cup (a continental competition which runs through the course of a calendar year). In theory, Chiefs should be fresher and possibly fitter than their opponents, but Pirates will still be in the ‘groove’ of playing full-blooded competitive football – though it’s also a possibility that their players could be injured or fatigued, given that their continental commitments effectively mean they have not had a rest period for more than a year.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

19


Carling Black label cup

Regardless, the 2015 Carling Black Label Cup promises to once again be a great appetiser for the new season to come. It inevitably fills the FNB Stadium, which can hold over 90,000 fans, and gives supporters a rare chance to pick the line-up of their choice – something many wish they could do every week!

20

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Soccer

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

The four previous CBLC matches have seen Pirates claim the trophy three times (all after a penalty shootout win), while Chiefs’ only win arrived in 2013 when they edged their arch rivals 1-0.

P a s t r e s u lt s 2011

Pirates

0-0

Chiefs

(Pirates won 4-3 on penalties)

2012

Pirates

1-1

Chiefs

(Pirates won 5-4 on penalties)

2013 Chiefs

1-0

Pirates

2014

0-0

Chiefs

Pirates

(Pirates won 6-5 on penalties)

Th i s y e a r ’ s C B L C d e ta i l s Kaizer Chiefs v Orlando Pirates

FNB Stadium, Soweto

Saturday, 1 August, 2015

15h00 CAT kick-off

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

21


Multichoice Diski Challenge Title On The Line

#asidlali

TITLE

ON THE LINE Launched in August 2014 by the PSL and television broadcasting partners, the MultiChoice Diski Challenge lived up to expectations of handing second choice (academy) players an opportunity to taste competitive football. Now with the 2015/16 football season fast approaching the title is on the line once more. History of the event and a word from the sponsors The programme was launched by the Premier Soccer League chairman, Dr Irvin Khoza and Imtiaz Patel, Group CEO for MultiChoice South Africa which included life skills and leadership development for players and an internship programme to develop broadcasting skills amongst the youth. However, the benefit for players was there for all to see as the University of Pretoria was crowned the inaugural champions after beating cross-town rivals, Mamelodi Sundowns.

22

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Soccer

Words: Phumzile Ngcatshe | Photos: Backpage Media

“We want to make a real and lasting difference in South Africa,” said Patel. “The MultiChoice Diski Challenge will expose young players to a range of development opportunities on and off the field and will also give young production interns the necessary exposure and skills to succeed in the broadcasting industry. MultiChoice is extremely proud of this programme which is all about creating opportunities for the next generation of young South Africans.” Speaking about the initiative which was hailed by many current and former football players in the country, Khoza said the comprehensive nature of the programme that they’re running with MultiChoice means that we will produce well-rounded and better equipped players. “We aim at producing equipped players for life on and off the field. The competitive nature of the Premier League is such that young players quite often struggle to make the transition into the senior sides,” said Khoza. We believe that this programme can be the game changer in facilitating the talent development pathway for up and coming players.” The event kicked-off in KwaZulu-Natal in September 2014 and ran until March 2015 with the winners walking away with a floating trophy and a life changing trip to Holland for a four-day training camp with the Royal Netherlands Football Association (KNVB) and their top youth coaches, as well as a match against a top Dutch team.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

23


Multichoice Diski Challenge Title On The Line

The winners: University of Pretoria In the Group stages Tuks played seven games, won three, drew two and lost two. However, their nine goals in seven group games saw them acquired 11 points as they qualified for the quarterfinals. In the quarterfinals they beat Orlando Pirates 5-2 after coming from behind to earn victory. Goals from Botshelo Mfulwane, Mpho Maruping and Khethukuthula Zwane, including a brace from Denver Mukamba saw them earn a spot in the semifinals. In the semis, their assignment was to see off fellow Tshwane side, SuperSport United, and they did so by beating them 3-2 on penalties in Port Elizabeth. Again, Mfulwane, Dikgang Ngcobo and Siphelele Luthuli converted their kicks to set up a date against Mamelodi Sundowns in the final. The final was a firecracker when the sides from the capital city clashed. The match finished in a scintillating 2-2 draw and was set to be decided via penalty shoot-outs.

Mfulwane opened the scoring in the 12th minute, but Sundowns got the equaliser seven minutes later through defender Rheece Evans. Rodney Ramagalela gave Sundowns the lead thereafter, but Ngcobo levelled maters when he converted a penalty with eight minutes remaining to send the game into a dreaded penalty shoot-out. Sly Moasala’s men were crowned inaugural champions, however, when Mfulwane and Ronald Ketjijere scored their spot-kicks to give Tuks the win after their opponents only had a single successful penalty.

24

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Soccer

Words: Phumzile Ngcatshe | Photos: Backpage Media

Mfulwane reflects on the tournament: “It was great I must say, the whole tournament was a brilliant idea and we benefitted a lot from it,” said Mfulwane. “It was my first season as a professional and we had to beat good teams despite some people writing us off. We were not focused on what was said but focused on doing great things on the field of play. “I could’ve been crowned the top goalscorer and I came short with one goal as I scored four goals in total - I’m proud I must say. My dream or vision from now on is to go all the way and become a regular in the PSL side, then that’s when I can focus on perhaps joining the national team. “Above that, the idea is to defend the cup and be brave once again next season because this is an avenue for us to grow as youngsters.

“As champions, I believe the rewards were fitting because we went to Europe (Holland) and played good experienced sides, drawing 2-2 with PEC Zwolle and then losing 2-0 to Hans Vonk’s Heerenveen. We learned a lot and there’s nobody who’s going to take that experience from us. I’d like to thank the club, the PSL and the sponsors for the opportunity.”

TITLE

ON THE LINE Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

25


Wimbledon 29 JUNE — 12 JULY 2015

WIMBLEDON 29 JUNE - 12 JULY 2015

Wimbledon is the most famous and respected of international tennis tournaments. Anyone who loves tennis, sits glued to their television/internet live feeds to see who will be crowned champion this year. We will share more on Wimbledon 2015 in our August issue, but we wanted to share the lead up and first days of Wimbledon 2015 with you to whet your appetites as to what we will bring you in next month’s issue. Enjoy!

GET LIVE SCORES HERE Wimbledon 2015 Preview

0.00 / 2.17

Wimblewatch Day 1

0.00 / 3.19

Day 1 – 29 June 2015 Highlights

Play of the day

SA is at Wimbledon 2015 - On Day 1, SA’s Kevin Anderson got off to a winning start at Wimbledon, seeing off Frenchman Lucas Pouille 6-2, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. The bigserving,fourteenth seeded South African is in fine form, having reached the fourth round in each Major in 2014 as well as at the Australian Open in January 2015, Anderson reached the Queens Club final, the last grass court tournament prior to Wimbledon, before losing 6-3, 6-4 to Andy Murray Kevin Anderson

0.00 / 2.10

0.00 / 0.29

Day 2 – 30 June 2015 Highlights

0.00 / 2.16

0.00 / 0.29

Feel the excitement of Wimbledon - Day 3

0.00 / 0.55

26

Play of the day

Feel the excitement of Wimbledon - Day 3

0.00 / 0.55

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Tennis

Words: Dee Hean | Source: www.wimbledon.com

Wimbledon fun facts Prize Money (2015) • Singles Champions: £1.88m. Total: £26.5m About Centre Court • 15,000 seats. Finals matches scheduled to be played on Centre Court: • Saturday 11 July 2015: Ladies' Singles, Men's Doubles, Mixed Doubles • Sunday 12 July 2015: Men's Singles, Ladies' Doubles. Clothing - players Predominately in white rule introduced in 1963. 'Almost entirely in white rule' introduced in 1995. Clothing submitted to Club for comment earlier in year. Both Grand Slam and WTA rules stipulate recognised tennis attire. Decision on the day as to whether clothing/players' turnout is suitable at discretion of Referee. Guidelines: • • • • • • •

No solid mass of colouring Little or no dark or bold colours No fluorescent colours Preference towards pastel colours Preference for back of shirt to be totally white Preference for shorts and skirts to be totally white All other items of clothing including hats, socks and shoes to be almost entirely white.

Grass Championships playing height 8mm. Court grass composed of 100% rye grass (changed from 70% rye/30% red fescue in Sept 2000 for better wear and tear properties) Courts grass (gen) 2015 41 in total. 19 Championships grass courts (Centre + Nos 1-19, less 13) plus 22 grass practice courts in Aorangi Park and at Southlands College. Fastest Serve (All Time) Men: 148mph - Taylor Dent – 2010 Women: 129mph - Venus Williams - 2008 Aces – most (All time) Men: 212 - Goran Ivanisevic (CRO) 2001 Ladies: 57 - Alexandra Stevenson (USA) 1999, Serena Williams (USA) 2008 Umpires • 350 on duty comprising mostly British plus 60 from overseas. • British are members of Association of British Tennis Officials.

Times of Play • Grounds open at 10:30am. • Start on Courts 2-19 scheduled for 11:30 daily • Start on Centre and No.1 Court scheduled for 1.00pm daily except for the Men’s and Ladies’ Finals at 2.00pm. • Close of play: Approx 9.00pm depending on weather, light and matches state. Staff • Around 6,000 staff are taken on for Championship • Seedings – how it works MEN The seeds are the top 32 players on the ATP Ranking list, BUT then rearranged on a surfacebased system. The formula is: • • •

Take the ATP Ranking points at 22 June 2015. Add 100% points earned for all grass court tournament in past 12 months. Add 75% points earned for best grass court tournament in 12 months before that.

LADIES The seeding order follows the WTA ranking list, except where in the opinion of the comittee, a change is necessary to produce a balanced draw. Balls 54,250 used during The Championships period. Stored at 68 deg F. New balls after first seven games (to allow for warm-up), then after every 9 games. Subject to availability after use balls sold daily to LTA-affiliated clubs and to spectators in the grounds. £2.50 per can of three. Proceeds go to LTA’s Wimbledon Balls for Schools Scheme. Yellow balls used for first time in 1986. At start of day 48 tins taken onto Centre and No.1 Courts and 24 on all outside courts. • • • • •

Strawberries & Cream Usually Grade I Kent strawberries of the highest quality Around 28,000 kg consumed during the Fortnight. Around 8615 punnets (2100 kg) containing minimum of 10 berries consumed daily, Served with over 7,000 litres of fresh cream.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

27


Wimbledon 29 JUNE — 12 JULY 2015

142,000 portions of strawberries served in 2012.

To ensure utmost freshness, strawberries are picked the day before being served, arrive at Wimbledon at around 5.30a.m where inspected before being hulled. Price of strawberries & cream for punnet of not less than 10 berries + cream:2014- £2.50. Catering Wimbledon is the largest single annual sporting catering operation (1800 staff) carried out in Europe. Average quantities supplied by Championships’ caterers FMC. • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

350,000 cups of tea and coffee 150,000 bottles of water 207,000 meals served 230,000 glasses of Pimm’s 190,000 sandwiches 150,000 bath buns, scones, pasties and doughnuts 130,000 lunches are served 100,000 pints of draught beer and lager 60,000 sausage baguettes 40,000 char-grilled meals served 32,000 portions of fish and chips 30,000 litres of milk 142,000 portions of English strawberries 28,000 bottles of champagne

• • • • •

15,000 bananas (for players) 60,000 portions of ice cream 12,000 kg of poached salmon and smoked salmon 7,000 litres of dairy cream 6,000 stone baked pizzas

Racket Stringing Championships stringing team string on average over 2,000 rackets comprising 60% for men, 40% for women. In total this adds up to over 40 miles of string. The Queue and General Security • • • • • • • •

The 2015 Queue does not start until 8:00am on Sunday 28 June. £5.00 fee (proceeds donated to charity) to be levied on storage of camping kit. Ground entry security procedures will be at an appropriately high level. On-day sales queue in Wimbledon Park leading to off-site search/scanning operation. All ticket holders searched on entry. Only one bag per ticket holder allowed. No larger than 16x12x12ins (40x30x30cm). No hard-sided hampers, cool-boxes or brief cases allowed into the grounds. No Left Luggage facilities inside the grounds.

Novak Djokovic & Petra Kvitová; 2014 Winners.

28

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Tennis

Words: Dee Hean | Source: www.wimbledon.com

Official Suppliers 2015 • Slazenger: Official Ball - 1902 • Robinsons: Official Still Soft Drink - 1935 • Rolex: Official Timekeeper - 1978 • IBM: Official Supplier of Information Technology - 1990 • Hertz: Official Car - 1995 • Lanson: Official Champagne - 2001 • Ralph Lauren: Official Outfitter - 2006 • HSBC: Official Banking Partner - 2008 • Evian: Official Bottled Water - 2008 • Jacob’s Creek: Official Wine - 2011 • Lavazza: Official Coffee - 2011 • Stella Artois: Official Beer - 2014 • Jaguar: Official Car - 2015 Tickets The Ticket Office is open for all ticketing queries, including the Public Ballot. Normal opening hours for the Ticket Office are Monday to Friday from 9.00 - 17.00 (excl. Bank Holidays).

Tel: +44 (0)20 8971 2473 (UK); +44 (0)20 8971 2386 (Overseas). Fax: +44 (0)20 89712528 (UK); +44 (0)20 8971 2528 (Overseas). Please Note: The Ticket Office is available for all ticket and ballot enquiries but is NOT a Box Office. They do not sell or reserve tickets over the telephone. Grounds • Church Road site: 13.5 acres. Plus car parks: 42 acres • Capacity (grounds):39,000 spectators in the grounds at any one time.

WIMBLEDON 29 JUNE - 12 JULY 2015

Wimbledon Master Plan

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

29


Dan’s Player to Watch Sikhumbuzo Notshe

dan’s player to watch:

Sikhumbuzo

Notshe Wynberg Boys’ High School

The Stormers have been a forerunner in Super Rugby for the last several seasons with Western Province proving their mettle in the Currie Cup as the reigning champions. Their success is not just down to an exceptional matchday squad but their talented players waiting in the wings.

30

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Watch Sikhumbuzo Notshe

DHL Stormers INterview


Main Feature: rugby

Loose forward Sikhumbuzo ‘Skuna’ Notshe was born in King Williams Town in the Eastern Cape but finished school at Wynberg Boys’ High School. He represented Western Province across all age group Craven Weeks and was selected for the South African Under-18 High Performance team in 2010 and South African Schools team the following year. His passion was fostered in a rugby mad home but feels more emphasis should be placed on tournaments like the Community Cup and Vodacom Cup. It was his school rugby days that would define his future. “I grew up in a rugby family where my Dad, uncles, cousins and brother are all fanatical about the game. There was no other sport but rugby.They’ve all supported me to get to where I am today and I looked to them when deciding on my rugby future. Them and my Mom.” “I decided to give rugby a crack while still at school. The idea was always there as I had represented Western Province at all age levels but what I think convinced me to play professionally was when I attended a few Super Rugby games at Newlands during my final year at Wynberg Boys’. I wanted to be a part of it and so I started training harder.”

“Craven Week definitely gave me the springboard to launch my career but I think too much emphasis is placed on youth weeks. A lot of players only develop after school. Marcell Coetzee is one such player. The Community Cup has also unearthed a few diamonds.” Skuna made his Vodacom Cup debut for Western Province against Boland Cavaliers in 2013. He played an integral role in the Vodacom Cup semifinal against the Blue Bulls earlier this year. Vodacom Cup has been an important stepping stone for the young flanker but he feels it is time for bigger and better things. “The Vodacom Cup is an amazing tournament. I still remember how I was bullied in my first match. You grow into the Vodacom Cup. You play with a great bunch of mates and you improve your rugby. I really enjoy the Vodacom Cup but I want to rise up the ranks now. I want to establish myself in Super Rugby and hopefully go on to representing South Africa.” It is the dream of every rugby player to meet his heroes. Skuna has not only met his heroes, he has trained and played alongside them. Interestingly he doesn’t rate his Super Rugby debut against the Reds in Brisbane last year as his best rugby moment to date.

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

“Siya [Kolisi] and Nizaam [Carr] were my schoolboy heroes with Schalk Burger at the top. When I first met the guys it was amazing. Training next to Schalk was like a dream come true. The feeling hasn’t really subsided as I never thought I’d be where I am now. It’s a privilege.” “It was quite something to make my debut off the bench especially as Nizaam and Siya were selected to start. The buildup was quite special as I was not part of the initial touring squad and flew in a week before the match. I capped off my debut with a try.” “But my favourite Super Rugby game has to be the win against the Cheetahs at Newlands this year. The week before, the Vodies team beat the Blue Bulls to qualify for the final and I was selected for the Super Rugby match day squad off the back of my semifinal performance. I managed to grab another try which is always great.” Skuna is just beginning his journey as a professional rugby player. His ability to marry his natural talent and resolute work ethic will see him climb to the upper echelons of South African rugby. With 2015 being a World Cup year and the subsequent retirement and relocation of players, his emergence has proven to be quite timely.

Fast facts Full name: Sikhumbuzo Notshe

Provincial caps: 30 (8 tries)

Date of Birth: 28 May 1993

Super Rugby caps: 5 (2 tries)

Place of Birth: King Williams Town, Eastern Cape

Vodacom Cup debut: against Boland Cavaliers in Ceres, Western Cape (2013)

School: Nomlinganiselo, Wynberg Boys’ High School

Currie Cup debut: off the bench against EP Kings in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape (2014)

Height: 190 cm Weight: 100 kg

Super Rugby debut: off the bench against the Reds in Brisbane, Australia (2014)

Position: Loose forward

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

31


Anton Raimondo developing Sitting Volleyball in SA

Anton Raimondo developing Sitting Volleyball

in SA

When Anton Raimondo went on holiday to South America a number of years ago, he didn’t realise just how much of a lifechanging experience it would be.

32

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Sitting volleyball

Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Provided

On a motorbike tour with his father and brother in Argentina, the Capetonian took a turn on the wrong side of the road, crashed into an oncoming truck and instantly lost his leg. Having initially battled for his life and then endured months of plastic surgery and rehab, Raimondo eventually returned to normal life – which at that stage was in London. That’s where he was introduced to the Paralympic sport of sitting volleyball. The sport, which is played chiefly by amputees, is similar to the standing version but is contested on a smaller court with a lower net with the players seated on the ground during play. A part of the player’s body between the bottom and shoulders must always be in contact with the ground when they make contact with the ball.

Anton discovered he was pretty good at the sport and quickly rose up the ranks, eventually competing at international level. Thanks to a British passport from his father, he was selected for the British team that competed at the London Paralympics in 2012 – another life-changing experience. On a trip home in 2010, however, Raimondo discovered that sitting volleyball was not a sport played in South Africa. He made the decision that after the Paralympics, he would return to the country to introduce the sport.

“There was a fair amount of planning and preparation work in early 2014. Through word of mouth, doing talks at amputee groups and putting up lots of posters and handing out flyers, we got a small group together and started our first training session at UCT in Cape Town in May 2014,” he explained. “We have been playing every week since and building the sport with more and more players joining all the time. The response has been really positive. Almost everyone who tries the sport is hooked pretty quickly and many of the players who joined in the beginning few sessions are still with us. The challenge is getting the word out there so that more people are aware and have the option to join.” Raimondo has also launched the sport further afield. “We have also introduced the sport to the Limpopo province where three senior sports clubs and three schools have taken on the sport and are excited by it. We intend expanding into other provinces shortly,” he explained.

Asked about the level of talent he’s spotted so far, he reckoned: “We have witnessed some great talent in players already. South Africa is full of natural sports people and anyone who has determination and basic ball skills could pick up the sport fairly quickly.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

33


Anton Raimondo developing Sitting Volleyball in SA

“It’s a sport that is fully inclusive. It can be played by a mixture of abled and disabled, male or female players up to national level. Internationally though, it is only available for disabled players and male and female teams are split. “

playing at the last Paralympics was 13 and the oldest over 50. As one needs good core strength and use of your arms for moving on the court and playing the balls, disability tends to be restricted to lower limb only. “

“It is great as the sport appeals to a wide age range. For example, the youngest person

“Amputees and people with polio in their lower limbs are fairly common but anyone

with restricted movement or damaged limbs, even fairly minor injuries such as injured joints or tendons, can qualify internationally.” Raimondo himself is still involved in the British team, travelling to various tournaments with them. But he’s loving the fact that he can play at home in Cape Town now too.

“Sitting Volleyball is a fast-paced, competitive and inclusive team sport. It keeps me fit. I love the camaraderie that you have within a team. I like the strategy that is involved and that you get to hit balls really hard. I also like the challenge of a sport that it is played at international level, for example in World Championships and the Paralympics.” Anton Raimondo

34

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Sitting volleyball

Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Provided

“The reason I would like to share it with others is I have experienced the benefits that the sport brings to my life as a player and so the biggest motivation to sharing is the idea that the same benefits could be created on a large scale for a whole country. “

“There is a real chance that, with commitment and the right infrastructure, South Africa

could be represented at world competitions and it would be amazing to help make this happen. Of course, in building sitting volleyball in South Africa, there is also the bonus that I get to play the sport here too.”

Watch Anton Raimondo Discuss Sitting Volleyball

We encourage people to contact us if they would like to join the sport or help build the sport in their area. We can help with training, equipment and in other ways that support the establishment of sitting volleyball. Our email address is: contact@paravolley.co.za or phone Tina on 084 553 4182. Take a look at our Facebook page for more information. Search “ParaVolley South Africa”.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

35


Jeanette Bensted-Smith My Comrades therapy

Jeanette

Bensted-Smith My Comrades

Therapy

The human spirit is an unbelievable and mystical enigma. We have the ability to achieve the most amazing things if we put our minds to it in order for us to improve as people. Running Comrades is not for the faint hearted, and Jeanette Bensted-Smith chose to run Comrades this year as therapy not for guts and glory, a medal or for fun‌ She ran it as her own personal form of therapy to come to terms with a very painful time in her life. She shares her personal journey with us‌

Full Name: Jeanette Bensted-Smith Date of Birth: 5 November 1984 Hometown: Germiston Running club: Sunninghill Striders Official Comrades time: 11:53:31

36

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Main Feature: Personal growth

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

GOM: What made you decide to run the Comrades? JBS: I have always enjoyed the discipline of training and rowed at a national level when I was at school. During varsity I wasn’t really involved with rowing (something I regret!) after Varsity the club structure of rowing doesn’t really support rowing too seriously. I was training hard at the gym, weights etc but one day I realised training hard without a goal in mind is really pointless and makes it difficult to stay motivated. I started running a little bit with a few of my neighbours and entered a 10 km race and absolutely loved it, ran my first 21.1 km and loved that even more. I had an idea that I would like to work towards a marathon, but everyone around me made it seem like it was something impossible so I kind of lost interest. The big turning point was in May 2014 (incidentally around Comrades time) my Dad was diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer. It was a horrible, horrible time because I am so close to my Dad and I just couldn’t even imagine losing him. Our lives were reduced to chemo weeks and non chemo weeks. I just really needed something else to focus on. I remember sitting on the couch one day with my laptop and I made the decision to enter my first marathon (at this point I hadn’t run in months!). Right there and then I entered a half marathon every weekend up to the Soweto Marathon. I don’t know what made me do it, but that day I entered

especially before the official Comrades season began, strength training in the gym.

Jeanette Bensted-Smith

the Comrades thinking to myself that if I didn’t qualify I just wouldn’t run (I also didn’t tell anyone about my crazy idea until I realised I actually could qualify). I found an amazing coach, Marcel Viljoen, and when I told him about the Soweto Marathon he just nodded and said “two months to train for a marathon is pushing it, but it’s ok, you can do it”. I trained really hard, following his programme. I ran my first marathon in November and ran fast enough to qualify for Comrades! There was no turning back after that! GOM: When did you start training and what did your training involve? JBS: I started training in September 2014 to run my qualifying marathon. To qualify you have to run a marathon (42.2kms) in under 5 hours. Traditionally the Comrades season really only starts in January, but I think getting my qualifying marathon out the way the year before gave me a great training base to start. Generally my programme involved running about 2 to 3 training runs (between 8 and 12 kms) during the week, 2 track sessions a week (sprint training for speed and strength), a long weekend run (between 2125 kms) and as often as I could

I’ll be honest and say I didn’t always do every session on my programme. If I didn’t feel well I rested, if something came up which prevented me from running, I let it go. The most important thing is to listen to your body. I think that’s how I managed to stay relatively injury free, even though I was a novice. GOM: What was the most difficult part of your training? JBS: Training properly takes up a lot of time! Especially if I wanted to fit in strength training I would have to train in the morning and evening. It is difficult to juggle training with all the other demands in life, work, family, church commitments and making time to spend with my boyfriend. GOM: Did you follow any special diets? JBS: Not really, at first I tried Tim Noakes LCHF diet and I found I really needed carbs with all the training and having a very physical job. I generally try to eat as healthily as I can. GOM: Did you get any help/ advice from experienced runners and did it help you? JBS: I have a great coach who is always on hand to help me, he is very experienced and also a Comrades runner. I also have met many experienced runners during races who I kept seeing at every race and I learned so much from them.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

37


Jeanette Bensted-Smith My Comrades therapy

I actually generally made a beeline for a runner with a Comrade’s cap during races and would fall in step with them for a couple of kilometers to pick their brain and hear about their experiences. I have met and made so many friends this way and have learned some amazing stuff! The running community in general is amazing, the Comrades Facebook group is another way I have learned a great deal because many Comrades legends are a part of the group and will often offer advice if asked.

I think what helped was breaking my Comrades training into smaller, easy to manage bits because starting to train in September for a race 9 months away is difficult. I broke it into training for my qualifying race (September - November), training for another marathon to try improve my seeding (January to March), training for two ultra marathons (March April) and final Comrades prep and tapering in May.

GOM: Were there times during your training where you felt like giving up and if so how did you overcome those feelings?

JBS: I didn’t think it would be but it actually is quite expensive. The races themselves range from R70 to about R250) which is a lot cheaper than cycle races for example.

JBS: I sometimes felt frustrated because sometimes I just didn’t feel like it and getting up early in the morning to train was utterly exhausting some weeks when I was also stressed out with work etc.

38

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

GOM: Is preparing for and participating in the Comrades expensive?

What gets expensive is buying shoes (I went through about 3 pairs during the 9 months!) which will easily cost over

R2000 per pair. Also some races require staying overnight at a hotel (and related expenses) if they’re far away. I paid a lot of money to physio’s in the 9 months of training. I picked up the occasional niggle which needed to be sorted out before they became full blown problems. In the month or two before Comrades I had a standing physio appointment every week just to make sure I stayed injury free. GOM: What went through your head moments before the gun fired signaling the start of your first Comrades? JBS: I was so petrified (my boyfriend and my Dad left me at the entrance to the seeding pens) that I had a full blown meltdown and was in tears. I had gone into the race having trained so well and I got sick a few days before the race. I knew as I lined up I shouldn’t even be starting as I wasn’t


Main Feature: Personal growth

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

completely well. I was actually worried I was going to hurt myself by running, but I knew I had to try after training so hard. Then the strangest thing happened, before the national anthem was played, Coldplay’s “Sky Full of Stars” rolled out over the sound system. That song had become the song that always made me think of my Dad and the time when he was sick. It really felt to me like God was telling me that I was going to be fine and to remember why I had started this Comrades journey in the first place. I think the people around me must have thought I was a little odd, crying during the national anthem is quite normal on the start line but crying for a Coldplay song not so much! The enormity of the day ahead is quite overwhelming on the start. I had never run more than

50kays in one go during my training, and the thought of having to run another 38 kays was difficult to comprehend, especially because the first half of the uprun is known to be the most challenging of marathons and then you have to do another one after that!! GOM: What was the hardest part of the run? JBS: The course is extremely tough. The hills are unbelievably steep and relentless especially in the first half of the up run. I drove the course the day after the race, and I can tell you now if I had seen the hills, I would never have started. Not being completely well was also tough because my breathing was affected a bit, so I was working harder than I would usually. Being at the back of the crowd meant that I was running quite close to the cut off time which is quite stressful, and I spent a

Jeanette Bensted-Smith lot of time doing calculations in my head which becomes almost impossible the longer the day goes on! GOM: What did you enjoy most? JBS: I was struggling terribly at one point, and just as I thought I would actually get into one of the rescue vehicles (or ’vulture vans’ as they are termed by runners), the Comrades legend Vlam Pieterse who leads the sub 12 hour pacing bus came towards me. He gave me a big hug and told me to ‘hop on’. Vlam Pieterse has run 24 Comrades and traditionally leads ‘Vlam se Bus’ every year into the stadium with under 15 minutes to spare. He has never failed to lead a bus in.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

39


Jeanette Bensted-Smith My Comrades therapy

I knew if I hopped on the bus and kept with his pace I would make it. It is quite an indescribable feeling running in a bus, especially one that big. At any one time there are upwards of 100 runners all running together in a huge bunch. You literally feed off everyone’s energy and you can’t stop running because with so many people around you, you would be flattened. I stayed on the bus for about 30kays until I felt strong again, and then ran the rest of the distance with two of my clubmates. The crowds are quite special, your name is on your race number so you are identified by name as you run past. The crowds will literally give you the shirt off their backs if you asked them! Some stranger rubbed sunscreen on me somewhere at about 60 kms, by that stage my brain wasn’t working too well I even needed help with that! GOM: When did you realise that you’d make the cut off and receive your medal? JBS: As we ran into Pietermaritzburg, the streets were lined with supporters for about 4 kms to the finish. I felt strong and I looked at my watch and realised I had more than enough time to get to the stadium. It was the first time I felt relaxed the whole day! GOM: Did you look to anyone for inspiration? JBS: That’s a tough one, there are many great runners who inspire me, but actually it’s the amazing people I meet on the road every time I run, each with a unique story as to why they are training for the Comrades that motivate me.

40

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

The Comrades is just such a special journey, it’s not just the day itself; it’s all the days leading up to the moment you stand in your starting pen. Although it’s about finishing it’s really how hard you have to work to line up at the start, injury free and ready to face the day. GOM: What would you like to say to the average Joe/Jane contemplating running the Comrades. JBS: The Comrades is really a race anyone can do, actually should do! Obviously you have to do the training to prepare your body to endure the physical brutality of the day, but Comrades is actually all about the mind. For upwards of 9 hours you will wrestle with yourself and pretty much challenge everything you’ve thought about yourself. In fact up until the last few kays it was the quietest race I’ve ever been a part of. Usually during races everyone chats, but on Sunday especially when we weren’t around crowds and painfully climbing long stretches of road, the runners were mostly silent. Every single person on the road fighting an inner battle to not give up and keep going. You simply cannot come out the other end of Comrades, even if you haven’t managed to finish, the same person.

I read this somewhere before the race, I have no idea who wrote it, but it sums up the Comrades really well: ‘There is a defining moment in each person’s life when the true measure of who they are is tested. They will be judged, and more importantly, they will judge themselves on how they answered in that moment of truth. On Comrades day, that moment has arrived. You can no longer escape your moment of destiny, than you can recapture it, once it has passed. You have the opportunity to define absolutely who you are. Seize your moment for greatness, knowing that when your time came, you were not found wanting’.


Main Feature: Personal growth

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

41


niku kruger Rugby in the US of A

Rugby in the

US of A The abundance of talented rugby players in South Africa creates an environment where there is over supply and under demand. The majority of players will continue to slog it out in South Africa and wait and hope for an opportunity to perform at a professional level, but 24 year old Niku Kruger decided to explore opportunities overseas and try his luck in the United States of America, and his decision is starting to pay dividends. Full Name: Niku Arne Whitlock Kruger Date of Birth: 9 October 1991 Hometown: Pretoria, South Africa High School attended: Pretoria Boys High School University attended (and degree): University of Pretoria: Certificate in Sport Science. Kutztown University (Pennsylvania, USA): Biology Pre-Medical

42

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Playing position: Scrumhalf in both 7’s and 15’s Teams represented: Pretoria Boys 1st XV, Tuks U19, Bulls Academy, Pumas U19, Kutztown University, Collegiate All American, USA Selects

University or Pretoria


Main Feature: rugby

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Supplied

GOM: Who has supported you?

GOM: When and why did you start playing rugby? NK: I started playing rugby when I was six. I had moved schools from a private Catholic school to an Afrikaans school in Brooklyn, Pretoria. I grew up watching rugby with my Dad and he had always said that I should play, so when we moved I finally had the opportunity to play. I started playing ’Bulletjie’ rugby, that what it was called back then, and my Dad was our coach. The love for the game just grew from there. GOM: Did attending a traditionally strong rugby school aid your development and if so, how? NK: I have two older brothers who both attended Boys High, so I grew up watching the likes of ‘Chilliboy’ Ralapelle and Brett Sharman play on Brooks Field. Seeing how men like that could inspire such a large group of people just made me want to put that jersey on. Playing for a strong rugby school helps you develop as a player because you have great players around you. Plus your coaches are top quality and they expect a lot from you as a player. The foundation that was instilled in me through the years I spent at Boys’ High definitely laid a path that has helped me to achieve on the rugby field.

NK: As I have played rugby over the years, there have been many people that have supported me and pushed me in the right direction. My parents have been my greatest supporters. They have been there for me through thick and thin. It’s been an emotional ride, through injuries and such, but my parents have never questioned my decisions. Two significant people that have pushed me to a new level are Doc Jones and Larry Chester (my coaches from Kutztown). Traveling halfway across the world to play rugby is not an easy thing to do, as you leave everything behind that you are comfortable with. You have to build a new support system and I struggled in the beginning to find my feet. But as the months went on, I found my niche and the place I was comfortable in. Larry Chester has pushed me to new levels physically in the gym and on the field. Doc Jones is a man I have a huge amount of respect for. He is more than just our Head Coach. He is like a father to me. Doc has pushed me and believed in me when I didn’t even believe in myself. GOM: Who inspired you?

NK: That’s a tough question to ask as there have been many people along the way who have inspired me to go up and over any obstacle that lies before me. My biggest inspiration has to be my Dad. He has been the soft voice in my ear always encouraging me to keep going. The line that he always uses when I am struggling to find motivation is, “If it was

easy, everyone would be doing it.” GOM: You spent a year at the Tuks Rugby Blue Bulls Academy after school where you played for Tuks U19. The same year you represented the Pumas in the Under-19 Provincial Championship. Why did you opt to move State side? NK: It was a very big decision to make and it wasn’t easy. I played for the Pumas until the end of 2010 Currie Cup season and I played for Tuks throughout the year. As the season came to an end, my rugby playing career kind of went into a rut. I hadn’t really heard anything from the Pumas for the next season, so I decided to look around and see what other options I had. I applied to a rugby Academy in New Zealand called the Inside Running Academy. They offered me a 50% scholarship to attend their programme for two months. I was really excited and started training really hard to make sure I was in top shape by the time I got there. I was scheduled to leave in early March of 2011. About two weeks before I was supposed to leave, the Bulls Academy called me and asked if I wouldn’t mind playing a trial game for them to help fill numbers. It was great timing because it would give me some game time before I left. With 5 minutes left on the fourth chukka of the last trail game I was put in to play fly-half. I got the ball and got hit from the side and tore my ACL in my left knee. My whole world crumbled in front of me. I spent the next two weeks at doctors’ offices trying to figure out what I was going to do but in the end I couldn’t go. I needed to have surgery. During the weeks before my surgery I was moping around my house and I decided to see what rugby was like in America.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

43


niku kruger Rugby in the US of A

I did some research into universities that played and the first name to pop up was Kutztown. I emailed the coach and told him the situation. Little did I know that this was the start of great things. I saw coming to the States as an opportunity to try something new. The four years that I have spent at Kutztown is something that I can’t explain, I can’t put it into words. GOM: How has Kutztown University assisted your rugby development? NK: Kutztown has aided in my development in many ways. The coaches have instilled a work ethic in me that is second to none. Playing for Kutztown has showed me that you don’t have to play for a big name team. You are the constant variable in any equation. GOM: Will you still be able to represent KU now that you have graduated? Will you be staying on as part of KU’s Graduate programme? NK: Unfortunately, I am done playing for Kutztown. I only had four years of eligibility and those have come to an end. The next chapter of my life is still a bit unknown but I plan on moving to Denver, Colorado and playing rugby for the Glendale Raptors. They are coached by former Springbok centre, Andre Snyman. They are one of the powerhouse rugby clubs here in America and I feel that it will be a great start for my post college rugby career. GOM: You have since represented the USA at college level and international level. Your selection for the Selects is a phenomenal achievement as you’ve now represented the USA’s second team. Was it difficult to turn out for another country?

44

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

NK: South Africa is an amazing place to grow up. We have a really rich rugby culture, and as a young boy growing up you dream of putting on the green and gold and representing your country. Life is a very interesting thing. Just when you think you have figured it out, it confuses you even more. Playing for America wasn’t difficult because all the people that I have met, that I have come into contact with, have embraced me and have made me feel at home. For a nation like the United States to ask me to represent them on the international stage just sends chills down my body. It’s a massive honor to represent the United States. GOM: How did you qualify to play for America? NK: The rule is, if you stay in the country for more than 3 years without leaving for more than a month at a time you qualify to play for that country. Fortunately for me I had to stay in the country because of university so it made the long stay away from home a little easier. GOM: What are the differences between rugby in South Africa and the USA? NK: The biggest difference is the way the US develops their players. Playing the game from such a young age develops your skills in a major way. Here, American football is still the top choice sport for most young kids. USA Rugby has recognized this and is slowly putting systems in place to aid in the development of young players. GOM: Are there many South African rugby players in the USA? NK: There is a decent amount. You can pretty much say there is at least one per team here in the US.

GOM: USA 7’s won their first Sevens tournament in the 2014/15 series and USA Rugby is regarded as a sleeping giant. What could be done differently to aid in the development of rugby in the USA to fast track their success? NK: It’s all about the development of the youth in the country. In order for the sport to grow and for the US to become a powerhouse more people need to play the sport starting from a young age. GOM: What are your immediate goals with regards to rugby? NK: I want to break into the Eagles senior squad and work to make my name a regular in the Eagles camp. I want to keep developing as a 9 and hopefully get my first cap before the end of the year.


Main Feature: rugby

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Supplied

GOM: What would your words of encouragement be for players who wish to spread their wings or players who feel that they have no future in South Africa?

NK: Take the roads less travelled. Don’t be scared to do what others say is impossible. Don’t be scared to chase your dreams. The secret to success is to go to work every day.

Now for some fun... GOM: Which South African team do you support and do you still get to watch a few games? NK: I am a massive Lions fan. Always have been! I wear my Lions jersey every time they play. We can normally catch the games online but sometimes with the time difference it makes it a little difficult. GOM: What do you do when you miss home? NK: That’s simple! I listen to some Bok Van Blerk, Huiwels Fantasties and start a braai. We even braai in the snow. GOM: Have you ever used Afrikaans to communicate so your American friends cannot understand you and do women swoon for your African ruggedness? NK: Knowing Afrikaans does come in handy but at the same time the moment you speak in a different language everyone knows you are talking about him or her. Let’s put it this way... The accent works! GOM: Are you in a relationship? If so, tell us a bit about her. NK: Sorry Dan, but I don’t kiss and tell.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

45


Eleonora Galletti “taking the stairs to success”

Eleonora Galletti

“taking the stairs to success” Golf, as with most sports, is considered a man’s game. The likes of Gary Player and Tiger Woods spring to mind instantaneously with women often taking a backseat in golf. If Eleonora Galletti continues to perform the way she is, the status quo is set to be dumped on its head.

St. Theresa’s School

46

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Youth Feature: Golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

The seventeen year old is fast becoming a force to be reckoned with as an amateur golfer in South Africa. She is ranked 7th on the Women’s Golf South Africa junior rankings. Surprisingly her involvement in the sport began out of boredom. “My sister, Federica, used to play golf and I would tag along. I would pass the time by hitting a few balls around. It just snowballed from there. I won my first competition last year and that’s when I decided I wanted to try and turn pro.” Eleonora is a Grade 10 learner at St. Theresa’s School in Rosebank, Johannesburg where she also excels in netball, representing the Under-16 A team. As the only golfer she is forced to practice outside of school. “I have a lesson on Saturday and play competitions on a Sunday. I feel I could do a lot better if I practiced more but I don’t have the time because of school commitments. I want to do well academically.” She has not given the future too much thought but is considering a move to America to further her golf and studies. Eleonora is an avid traveller having visited Botswana, America, Indonesia and Australia. It is her adventuresome spirit that has spurred her into developing her game.

“I’m thinking of taking a gap year after school to just play golf. Hopefully by then I would have decided if I want to go to the States. I’ve heard a lot of good things about Texas, both golf and education wise. A lot of my friends have gone to America and have excelled so I want to follow in their footsteps.” She is not sponsored so it is up to her father, Mario, to foot a very expensive bill. She would like to be the face of Adidas Ladies golf someday and is aware that if she manages to perform consistently and with excellence on the course, her professional aspirations will follow. “My Dad has been my biggest supporter ever since I picked up my first club. Not just financially, but on a mental level as well. In fact my whole family has supported me. I want to achieve great things with golf but most importantly I want to be happy.” Eleonora is happiest when she is on the golf course and experiences putting to be the aspect she enjoys most. She smilingly admits to never hitting a hole-in-one with her closest attempt just nicking the edge of the hole. She finds golf challenges her and she has a very philosophical outlook to who inspires her and is determined to change the ‘boys only’ attitude that golf clings to.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

47


Eleonora Galletti “taking the stairs to success”

“I get very tense out on the course, but that’s the beauty of golf. It brings me joy to play golf and it is helping me to see things in a more positive light. My inspiration comes from my competitors because I aspire to be better than them. It is what drives me to train so hard. Ivanna Samu is my biggest competitor and a very good friend. I think that is what I like most about the sport.” “My biggest frustration is that there is a view that only men can play golf and that women are not strong enough to play this game. I want to show the world that women can be as good if not better than their male counterparts.” Apart from competing on the Ladies Tour, Eleonora would like to go to the Olympics. Golf has been readmitted to the 2016 and 2020 Games and Eleonora is set on bringing home a medal. She has encouraging words for aspiring golfers.

“It is tough out there. Never give up. One has to take the stairs to success as there is no elevator. Just remember, it takes time.” Time is the only obstacle for the impatient young golfer, but her ability, determination, and tenacity coupled with her passion for golf, will see Eleonora rise up the ranks sooner rather than later.

Fast Facts Date of Birth: 12 February 1998 Hometown: Johannesburg, South Africa Handicap: 1 Golf club: Royal Johannesburg and Kensington Coach: Martin Briede

He said it... Martin Briede on Eleonora’s: Ability: She’s tremendously talented. She does not practice a lot because she’s focused on her studies so everything she achieves is through her talent. She’s an incredible talent. Attitude: Eleonora has a very good attitude. She loves the game and enjoys being out on the course. She has the Italian temperament so she can be fiery as a competitor. Future: I know she is very keen to pursue golf professionally. She learns very quickly and has the personality. It is really up to Eleonora how far she wants to go with golf.

48

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Youth Feature: Golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Eleonora’s achievements Highlights of 2015: Selected to represent South Africa the Astor Trophy at The Grange Golf Club in Adelaide and the Australian Open in Sydney. Tied 1st at the WGSA 72 Hole Teams Championship.

Highlights of 2014: 1st (mix gender team) and 3rd (individual) in the 2nd African Youth Games being part of the South African Team. 8th in the Championship Division (no age limit) of the Sanlam SA Women’s Amateur Stroke Play Championship 2014. 1st in the (Ladies Division) Royal J & K Golf Club Championship. 5th in the Championship Division (Under 18) of the Nomads SA Rose Bowl Championship. 2nd (Under 16) and 5th (Under 18) (Championship Division) in the Nomads SA Rose Bowl Championship. 8th in the (Under 18) Curro SA World Junior International. 2014 Champion of Champions 1st Nomads Silver Strokeplay Championships. 1st in the 36-hole stroke play for the SA Women’s Amateur Championship Matchplay. 3rd in the SA Women’s Amateur Championship Matchplay. 3rd at the Gauteng Junior. 2nd, as a team, in the Pick & Pay Women’s Inter Provincial Championship.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

49


B

Chris Dednam Badminton SA goes to World Team Championships

Sudirman Cup

Badminton South Africa goes to World Team Championships Badminton is the fastest racket sport in the world, with a world record smash of 493 km/h, and with 180 countries registered with the Badminton World Federation. Badminton in South Africa can be played at all age levels, including u/9, u/11, u/13, u/15, u/17, u/19, students, seniors, veterans (>40), masters (>50), grand masters (>55), silver eagles (>60) and golden eagles (>65). South Africa produced two World champions and twelve Olympians since 1992. Badminton in South Africa Badminton is played in all nine provinces in South Africa. Anyone that is interested in playing badminton can get the contact details of the provincial associations on the website of Badminton South Africa (BSA) at http://www.badmintonsa. org. The associations will then be able to assist with the various clubs’ contact details. People can also like our facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/ badmintonsouthafrica.

50

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Wrap of Sudirman Cup The Sudirman Cup is the World Team Badminton Championships, held every two years, and one of the most prestigious titles in the Sport. There is no prize money for this event - just the prestige of playing for ones country. In addition there are valuable BWF (Badminton World Federation) World Ranking points to be earned and this is particularly important for countries in the lower groups, like South Africa, in an Olympic Qualifying period. During the recent Sudirman Cup in May 2015, South Africa lost to Turkey 2-3, Czech 2-3 and Austria 1-4 in our group 3 ties. The two matches that we won in the first two ties were Jacob Maliekal’s singles and Wiaan Viljoen & Andries Malan’s doubles. These three players are the three that are trying to qualify for the Rio Olympics and their wins earn them very valuable world ranking points for qualification, as the Sudirman Cup was the first tournament in the qualification year (May 2015 to April 2016).


Youth Feature: Badminton

Words: Chris Dednam (National Chief Coach) | Photos: Provided

Jacob improved his world ranking from 185 to 167 and the mens doubles combination improved their ranking from 100 to 90. It is also at this Sudirman Cup that Andre van der Merwe passed his technical official assessment and was appointed as BWF Accredited Umpire.

Way forward These performances will boost the confidence of the players as we prepare for the African Games in September where we want to win gold in all the events. In preparing for the African Games as well as to hunt more world ranking points for Olympic Qualification, we will participate in the Mauritius International Tournament in June and the Nigeria International Tournament in July. Although these tournaments are African tournaments, it will be very difficult as a lot of international players enter these tournaments in the Olympic Qualifying period. We are also very proud of Andries Malan and Wiaan Viljoen (mens doubles) and Andries Malan and Jen Fry (mixed doubles) whom qualified for the World Badminton Individual Championships being held in Indonesia during August. After the African Games our tournament participation depends on our funding and we will manage the tournaments very carefully in order to earn maximum points.

Arnold Classic Africa Badminton is one of the official sporting codes participating at the Arnold Classic Africa being held at the Sandton convention Centre 27-29 May 2016. This exciting event will complement the current badminton developmental programs that are on-going in South Africa. This will be the launch of our Premier League in South Africa and we believe that this will bring about success to many aspects of our sporting code. The Premier Badminton Festival will be a high profile competition and this tournament promises to showcase SA’s top badminton players in an exciting, “fast” team tournament with teams competing for the title of Premier Badminton Festival Champions. The teams will consist of 2 men and 2 women and will play against each other in a Sudirman Cup format. This format includes a men’s singles, women’s singles, men’s and women’s doubles and mixed doubles. The tournament will be supported by a number of professional officials, including umpires, service judges and line judges. The tournament will span the 3 days and will ensure continuous high quality badminton on the court.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

51


“Karate Kid” Tasneem Cozyn World Champion at 18

Tasneem Cozyn

World Champion at 18 Not too many South Africans can claim to be five-time world champions by the age of 18.

Muizenberg High School

52

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

But that’s what Cape Town teenager Tasneem Cozyn has already achieved in her karate career – and there’s plenty more to come. The Muizenberg High School student has certainly come a long way since walking her younger brother to karate classes more than 10 years ago.


Youth Feature: karate

Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Supplied

“I’m three years older than him so when I was eight, for two years, it was always my job to walk him to karate as we only live two minutes away from the dojo.“ “After two years my father suggested that I should do karate as well. I tried it out, did a few trial classes, and my sensei/ coach, who is still my coach now, motivated me to keep on doing karate as a sport as he was so positive that I had natural talent.”

That she certainly did and even Cozyn admits, her first world title came somewhat out of the blue.

“I was 14 years old and very nervous. I competed in three events at the Kimura Shukokai International World Championship in Portugal: Kata (movement), Kumite (fighting) and Team Kata (unison movement),” she explained.

“Then I won my first world title for Team Kata with my partners Natalie Faint and Uliana Alekseev. It was very surprising as it was our first international event, we were very overwhelmed and definitely were then much more excited to train harder and defend our title.

“I had a lot of pressure put on me with Kata because that is what I was better at, so I was quite disappointed as I lost my first round, which was difficult for me to handle as I never lost any competitions before that.

“It was definitely an eye opener as the international stage of karate is much more advanced than a regional or nationals here in South Africa. I knew then what to expect, went to the drawing board and started prepping for the next World Championship.”

“I competed in Kumite, placing second. I was extremely surprised as I never trained Kumite a lot, so after that it definitely became my favourite out of the three events

The next two world titles came at the 2012 championships in New York as a 16-year-old.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

53


“Karate Kid” Tasneem Cozyn World Champion at 18

“I was only 16 years old but competed in the 17-18 female division. Being the youngest in the division I was very intimidated, scared and beyond nervous.” Cozyn overcame her nerves, however, to take the Kata and Team Kata titles and once again finished second in the Kumite. And the next time round, competing on home soil at Sun City, she went one better. “I was very confident as it was my third world championship, but a month before I left I got devastating news that I should not compete at the Worlds as I had a very severe lower back injury.”

“Even though I was instructed not to compete, I took it upon myself that I was going to. After making my decision to compete I had the Macsteel Maestros high performance team at the Sports Science Institute at Newlands (my sponsor) help me with physiotherapy as well as rehab training to make my back stronger as well as strapping my back before the competition. “

“Despite being in a great deal of pain I beat my opponent and finally got gold for Kumite, gaining my fifth world title. I wasn’t sure if I was crying because of the pain caused by my back or by the great deal of happiness that it was a world title this time and not silver for the third time. It was definitely one of the hardest-earned, greatest moments of my life.”

54

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

“I managed to win my fourth world title for Kata, defending my previous title, also making it through all the knock-out rounds for Kumite and into the final.” “I was in extreme pain with my back and was on the verge of pulling out, and in tears before I went to go compete in the final, as well as being in tears while fighting due to my back which just couldn’t deal with all the movements. “


youth Feature: karate

Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Supplied

With an excellent work ethic and a passion for the sport, and motivated by the honour of representing her country there is very likely to be many more of those moments. Currently, Cozyn is working towards competing at the WKF Youth Camp and Karate 1 Youth Cup and then the WKF Junior World Championship in Indonesia in November, but is also in search of some kind of corporate sponsorship to fund her dream.

Ultimately the long-term dream would be to one day compete at an Olympic Games, if the sport is introduced into the Olympic programme. “At the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, hopefully karate is chosen to become an Olympic sport.”

When asked what motivates her to keep up the gruelling sixday-a-week training regime, Cozyn simply says: “I love that between me and my teammates we’re more like family, we’re always there for each other and we definitely motivate each other. Representing my country is extremely motivating as well, and just my overall love for the sport and the support I get.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

55


Ayanda Maphumulo KZN’s Queen Of The Water

KZN’s QUEEN OF THE WATER SHE is quick on the water, tall, well-built and has represented her country in swimming. Now the South African Still Water Lifesaving graduate has been selected to represent the nation in Water Polo. This ‘Queen of the Water’, who hails from KwaZulu-Natal, goes by the name of Ayanda Maphumulo. From the age of ten, Maphumulo was already swimming and breaking records in the South African Local Government Games and today, at 16years-old, she has already represented South Africa and has a bright future ahead of her.

Durban Girls High School

56

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

For Ayanda the journey started as a means of precaution, as her parents looked to keep her safe at all times, on and off the land.

“I started swimming at a very young age; my parents introduced me to the sport so that I can be safe at all times. As far as I could remember I have always been in love with the water,” said the ‘Queen of the Water’, who is now part of the Elite Athlete Development Programme.


Youth Feature: SWIMMING / WATERPOLO / LIFESAVING

Words: Lunga Ntuli | Photos: Provided

Since dipping her toes in water, she has not looked back and has dominated the KwaZulu-Natal swimming rankings which saw her earn her first national call-up in 2013 when she was selected to represent the country in the All Africa Games in Zambia. “This was a great experience for me, in fact a dream come true because I have always had great ambitions of one day representing my country. Although I did not win, I was proud of the experience gained after finishing fifth in the butterfly,” she said. The following year, the Grade 10 Durban Girls College pupil went back to the All Africa Youth Games in Zimbabwe and this time earned a fourth place finish in butterfly and fifth in the breaststroke. As all eyes remain glued on her swimming career, the young lady took the waves of the pool by storm as she started dominating in water polo, a sport she never considered as one of her favourites.

On 30 June 2015, Maphumulo represented South Africa in Water Polo in Serbia after she dominated in KwaZulu-Natal Schools. “It was my teachers that begged me to try out water polo since they knew that I can swim. I decided to give it a try, but I did not know at the time that it will also take me places,” continued Maphumulo. “It is different from my normal swimming and what’s nice about it is that you get to play as a team. I have quite enjoyed the journey and and I enjoyed representing my country overseas.”

Not only does the 16-year-old now hold national colours in Swimming and Water Polo, but she is also doing wonders in the Lifesaving world as she is currently the four-time SA Still

Water Lifesaving gold medallist. “What can I say: I just seem to excel in water and I am just grateful for all the opportunities I am getting. I am honestly enjoying all these sports and the hard work that comes with being the champion. I didn’t know that I would be excelling in other sports, but I guess things are working out well for me,” she said. Many young athletes tend to depend on their talent alone, but Maphumulo made it clear that she is where she is because of a hard work ethic and her determination to never give up.

“I am totally not afraid of hard work. I push myself at training and I do what others don’t want to do. I know that if I want to be best then I must pay the price of practice and hard work,” added the youngster. “The only exciting challenge now is balancing my academics and my sport, but I am handling that well because my parents are very supportive. I mean even the food that we now eat at home is healthy because they want what is best for me.” With all the junior national team goals being achieved, Maphumulo is now setting herself the goal of reaching the 2020 Olympics.

“After matric I want to go and study in California and swim in the USA. To be the best you must compete with the best in the World, so if I swim there I would be able to come back and represent the country and excel in the Olympics. Through hard work and financial support I know that I can achieve my dreams and make other young kids proud of me,” concluded Maphumulo.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

57


Amawheelie Boys Working hard to compete internationally

Wheelchair basketball

Amawheelie hard to Boys Working compete internationally

Sport can help people to lead fulfilling lives especially after one has experienced a significant setback. Cecil Dumond broke his back in an accident on a mine in 1990 and was left as a T12 paraplegic.

58

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Development Feature: Wheelchair basketball

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Amazingly, he still works in the mining industry albeit on a different mine. In addition to his work he is also the Captain of the South African Wheelchair Basketball Team.

Cecil has played wheelchair basketball since 2007 and represents the Anglo Gold Ashanti Lions in the SuperSport Wheelchair Basketball Series. It was his wife who encouraged him to take up sport and believes that it is the team aspect that he enjoys most. “After I married Lydia, she wanted me to keep active. The Lions are based in Orkney where I live so I joined the club. I really enjoy team sports, I played cricket and rugby while at school. An added dimension to wheelchair basketball is that it is not just paralysed athletes but a wide range of disabled athletes who participate. This allows us to have quite a unique team dynamic.” The structures within the country are in place but there is a lack of experience in the national team. The development of wheelchair basketball is gaining momentum with Sasol as the official sponsor of Team South Africa.

“After the London Paralympics in 2012 we lost a lot of players. The former French coach, Franck Belen, was roped in to assist us in our preparations. After the London Games, he implemented a new philosophy of developing locally first before competing on the global stage. Our core players are getting the experience needed and our results against international opposition are improving,” said Cecil. “Sasol’s sponsorship allows us to be semi-professional athletes. Everything we need in order to compete is covered by Sasol. Because we receive no match fees many of the players have day jobs which can prove troublesome when competing due to athletes not getting off from work,” he added. Franck has been at the coaching helm for the past three years and has noticed considerable growth in South Africa Wheelchair Basketball (WBSA). According to the French national, the biggest nemesis South Africa faces is the lack of regular international exposure but feels that the team will be ready for the World Cup in 2017.

Amawheelie hard to Boys Working compete internationally

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

59


Amawheelie Boys Working hard to compete internationally

Amawheelie hard to Boys Working compete internationally

60

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Development Feature: Wheelchair basketball

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

“We had to rebuild the team virtually from the ground up. We don’t have a lot of international competition so losing all that experience was a heavy blow,” said Franck.

“The biggest problem we face is the level of competition available to us and the duration of our season. We don’t play against the top teams as much as we should. In Europe the season runs from August until June. In South Africa we play for a few months. We can see the difference with our national players who play overseas. They’re technically better.” “Despite our problems, we are getting better. We will participate in the Paralympic qualifiers in Algeria later this year and will try our best. As a team we have set our sights on qualifying for the 2017 World Cup. We will continue to grow as a team until then,” Franck added. There are many things that happen behind the scenes in order for a sporting code to function optimally. WBSA CEO Charl Saunders is the man responsible for keeping a boat full of holes afloat.

“The two biggest issues we have to deal with at an administrative level is money and talent identification and recruitment. The majority of our funding is corporate sponsorship who expect a return on their investment. Fortunately we’ve been able to achieve that through televised matches. We are the only wheelchair basketball league in the world that gets TV time. If we receive money from the Lotto it is usually cut by two thirds and is two years late. We do our best to develop the sport with our limited funding,” said Charl. “In terms of development and recruitment we have different programmes in place. From schools and Under-23 right through to seniors. The best way is to develop at school level. We get no help from the Departments of Education and Sports and Recreation. The DoE are only interested in education while there’s no money in the DoSR. Everything we do we have to fund through sponsorship. Affordability and infrastructure are the issues school learners face. A chair can cost in the tens of thousands while schools for the disabled lack the infrastructure.” “Wheelchair basketball is not something that potential athletes strive to participate in. Due to the achievements of Oscar Pistorius and Natalie du Toit, athletics and swimming are the ‘go to’ sports. We try and hold awareness programmes throughout the year to attract and identify talent.”

“If an athlete is identified we try to get them enrolled at Hope School in Johannesburg as part of our Academy but we only have the funds to develop five or six athletes at a time. It is difficult to work in these conditions but I’m happy with what we have achieved considering our difficulties,” Charl said. Wheelchair basketball in South Africa is on the right track thanks to sponsorship and having the correct structures in place. With added sponsorship and the recruiting of talented athletes, South Africa can go to the 2017 World Cup with a competitive team.

Come the 2020 Paralympics they may even challenge for a medal finish.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

61


The Long Brothers Sailing; It’s in the genes

Sailing It’s in the genes for the Long Brothers

Come the weekend, you’ll never find the Long family too far away from the water. In fact, they’re not just near the water but on it – either surfing, fishing or wakeboarding. But it’s sailing that really brings them all together. Dad Gavin, Mom Andy and their three sons, Tiran (20), Dylan (17) and Arin (14) all love the sport and simply can’t be kept on dry land for too long.

Wynberg Boys’ High School

62

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Youth Feature: Sailing

Words: Karien Jonckheere | Photos: Sophie Thompson

Sailing It’s in the genes for the Long Brothers “Gavin sailed as a youngster with his father, and with us living in Marina Da Gama on the water, it was a natural attraction for the kids to get boats and get on the water,” explained Andy. For the Longs, however, it’s not just about having a splash around, they’ve achieved a rather impressive list of accolades over the years, meaning their trophy cabinet at home is well and truly bulging. “We follow the racing circuit, which comprises of Grand Slams, Provincials, Youth Nationals and Nationals which are held all over the country. We are so fortunate to travel our beautiful country and sail at wonderful venues, which we would never have gone to, if not for this sport. “Tiran, our oldest son, started sailing in 2006 with a group of his primary school friends on an Optimist and soon then progressed into the racing circuit. Soon after he was followed by his two younger

brothers Dylan and Arin.” “They all started their sailing careers in an Optimist dinghy and all three boys have represented South Africa in this class and achieved national colours.” “Arin and Dylan go to Wynberg Boys’ High School, who also have a sailing team which they are part of. WBHS have been the inter-school champions for the past two years, beating other competitive schools like Sacs and Bishops.” While they’ve covered plenty of kilometres in South Africa itself, the Longs have been competing internationally for some time as well. From Tunisia to China and Argentina to Italy, the family have been racking up some serious airmiles with their sailing. Arin is the reigning World Champion in the RS Tera class, and will be traveling to the Netherlands in July to defend his title. He was also the 2013

Optimist national champion at the age of 12, and took part in the Optimist African Championships in Morocco in 2014 and placed fourth overall. Dylan, meanwhile, finished in second spot at the Laser 4.7 African Championships held in Algeria last year, and won the Laser Radial national title in April this year in Durban. But for this family it’s about more than just the titles and accolades. “Sailing teachers you fantastic life skills, problem solving, discipline and fitness,” said Andy. You also get to make new friends. The boys are friends with sailors all over the world from all their travels.” “Our family is very close, we spend most of our weekends together. Our lives have always revolved around water sports. Sailing is a good, healthy, sociable fun sport and is a good way to travel locally and abroad. Also it’s good competition with friends if you sail competitively.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

63


Brian Metcalf Cramp! What is this Pain?

Cramp!!!!! What is this Pain?

Cramping, what is it? How does it happen? What causes it? These are the same questions that have been asked time after time by athletes, scientists and coaches. The problem is that the answer to this question all depends on the individual.

By Brian Metcalf

64

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


health Feature: Cramps

Words: Brian Metcalf | Photos: Provided

Let us explore this a little more……

A muscle cramp is a strong, painful contraction or tightening of a muscle that comes on suddenly and lasts from a few seconds to several minutes. It often occurs in the legs. Nighttime leg cramps are usually sudden spasms, or tightening, of muscles in the calf. Almost everyone experiences muscle cramps, which come without warning. What causes muscle cramping is a little of a mystery. Some of the possible reasons that the sports scientists give us are: ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡

Poor blood circulation in the legs Overexertion of the calf muscles while exercising Insufficient stretching before exercise Exercising in the heat Muscle fatigue Dehydration Magnesium and/or potassium deficiency Calcium deficiency in pregnant women Muscle cramps can also occur as a side effect of some medications.

Are these above always the reasons? No, because we are all different. The way our body repairs itself, the rate at which it absorbs and uses essential vitamins and minerals, and the intensity and frequency at which we train is different among us all. The main reason in my opinion for muscle cramping is our diets, they are all different. For a muscle to repair, contract and release, you need certain vitamins and minerals, these are: ≡≡

Sodium is one of the main positively charged mineral ions or electrolytes in body fluid. The body needs it to help maintain normal body-fluid balance and blood pressure, and in conjunction with several other electrolytes, it is critical for nerve impulse generation and muscle contraction.

(Sodium is distributed widely in nature but is found in rather small amounts in most unprocessed foods. In most developed countries, however, a significant amount of sodium is added from the saltshaker)

≡≡

Potassium is the major electrolyte found inside all body cells, including muscle and nerve cells. It works in close association with sodium and chloride in the generation of electrical impulses in the nerves and the muscles, including the heart muscle.

(Potassium is found in most foods, but is especially abundant in fresh vegetables, potatoes, certain fruits (melon, bananas, berries, and citrus fruit), milk, meat, and fish.)

Cramp!!!!! What is this Pain?

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

65


Brian Metcalf Cramp! What is this Pain?

There is a positive correlation between having a poor diet and the increased frequency of cramping especially when you start pushing your body to the limits in sport and exercise.

≡≡

Calcium is involved in muscle contractions, including that of the heart, skeletal muscles, and smooth muscle found in blood vessels and intestines, as well as the generation of nerve impulses. Blood calcium is tightly controlled and regulated by several hormones, including parathyroid hormone and vitamin D.

(The main calcium contenders are milk, yogurt, and cheese, but dairy shouldn’t be the only dietary pit stop to fill up on this nutrient. Leafy greens, seafood, legumes, and fruit)

≡≡

Magnesium, plays an important role in stabilizing adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy source for muscle contraction, and also serves as an electrolyte in body fluids. Muscle weakness, muscle twitching, and muscle cramps are common symptoms of magnesium deficiency.

(Good sources of magnesium are, beans, nuts, whole grains such as brown rice and whole wheat bread, green leafy vegetables.)

≡≡

Carbohydrate, Inadequate carbohydrate stores have also been implicated as a potential cause of muscle cramps. Theoretically, it makes sense that hard-working muscles might experience cramping in association with the depletion of its power source - carbohydrate.

If you look at the possible causes of muscle cramping listed above, and then look at what these 5 nutrients do in the body, there is a positive correlation between having a poor diet and the increased frequency of cramping especially when you start pushing your body to the limits in sport and exercise. As you increase intensity, your body’s demand for these essential nutrients to maintain pH, lactic acid, and hydration balance throughout the whole body increases. So with a high (acidity) processed food diet this will decrease the amount of essential vitamins in the body, which in turn affects muscle contraction.

66

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


health Feature: Cramps

Words: Brian Metcalf | Photos: Stock

Here are a few ways to be proactive and reactive to muscle cramping and spasms: ≡≡

Massaging,

≡≡

Stretching,

≡≡

≡≡

≡≡

Icing the muscle,

≡≡

Taking a bath with Epsom salt.

≡≡

Stay well hydrated.

Warming the muscle,

Eat more foods high in vitamins and magnesium and calcium.

It pays to be preventative and also when something like cramping or muscle spasms do occur, try and identify what possibly causes it, because each one of us is different — so what might be causing cramping in one person, will be different with another.

Cramp!!!!! What is this Pain?

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

67


Brian Metcalf To Snack or… what to Snack… That is the question!

To Snack or… what to Snack… that is the question! Over the years there has been great controversy in the nutrition world over snacking. Do we snack or do we not snack. However you need to ask yourself the question, does my body need a snack? Am I burning off the calories that I am eating at present? How is a snack going to benefit my activities and me? So here are a few signs that are going to tell you that you need to snack.

≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡ ≡≡

If two hours after eating a meal you feel hungry, If you get tired or feel sluggish mid day, If you are trying to lose weight and are exercising, If you go more than 5 hours between meals, If you’re training, playing sport or are active,

If you have answered yes to any of these questions, YOU NEED TO SNACK, but why?

68

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


health Feature: Snacking?

Contributed by: Brian Medcalf / Dee Hean | Photos: Stock

Here are a few things that a snack helps your body with: 1. It helps to maintain your sugar levels. Low sugar levels means that your energy levels drop but also your body goes into starvation and that increases the risk of muscle burning. The more muscle you have, the bigger the risk. 2. Helps with maintaining performance, whether you’re at work, school or university. 3. Helps with recovery. Your body is in a consistent state of repair and even more so when you’re training, exercising or playing sport regularly. 4. Stops you from overeating at meal times. 5. Provides nutrients

By now you have most probably realized that you should be snacking, however what constitutes a snack? Today we have access to more food and types of food than we had 20, 50, or 100 years ago. So what do we need to look for in a snack?

My rule of thumb that I tell my clients and patients is, IF YOU CAN PICK-IT, PLUCK-IT OR PEAL-IT, then you can EAT-IT. This translates to anything natural being your first choice when picking something up to put in your mouth. It is very hard to go purely natural, however it will have far longer benefits. Remember, we have been around for centuries and most of today’s foods have not, so our bodies need food that has been around longer than the ones on the shelves of supermarkets today, that can be digested well and that our body recognizes.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

69


Brian Metcalf To Snack or… what to Snack… That is the question!

Here are some good snacks that can be fitted into your routine that give you a good balance of Protein, Carbs and Fats.

For Kids Veggies — Sliced carrots, cucumber sticks and pea pods. Include a delicious creamy cheese dip/tatziki (cucumber & yoghurt)

SEE RECIPE

Whole Grains — Grill a whole-grain muffin topped with tomato paste and a slice of low-fat mozzarella cheese for a mini-pizza treat. Granola bars, whole-grain crackers and whole-wheat pretzels are perfect for on the go and after school snacks.

Fruit — In summer, smoothies are a great option, mixtures of fruit with yoghurt chilled and in a coldbag or thermos flask. Add some fruit to a blender along with full cream milk and some full cream yoghurt.

SEE RECIPE

Protein — Yoghurt is a snack that is full of protein. Top Greek yoghurt with fresh fruit and nuts for a filling snack. Roll up turkey slices and add a bit of mustard. Finger foods are smart choices for kids as they are easy and less messy than some foods. Cheese is rich in protein and calcium, which is important for strong bones.

Nuts such as cashew or almonds are portable options that are full of fiber. Be aware that many yoghurts now contain non-nutritive sweeteners which are not good for kids! Read the labels. The blood brain barrier (BBB), which normally protects the brain from excess glutamate and aspartate as well as toxins, 1) is not fully developed during childhood, 2) does not fully protect all areas of the brain, 3) is damaged by numerous chronic and acute conditions, and 4) allows seepage of excess glutamate and aspartate into the brain even when intact.

70

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

SEE RECIPE


health Feature: Snacking?

Contributed by: Brian Medcalf / Dee Hean | Photos: Stock

For Students Carb’s and Nut Butter — For a quick, protein-packed snack, one or two slices of wholegrain bread crisply toasted, spread with 1 tablespoon of Nut butter while it’s still warm allows the creamy nut butter to melt into a rich, velvety texture. The combination of protein and carbohydrates not only satisfies your hunger, but also keeps you full for a few hours. *** Nut butter is different to peanut butter and is made from Almonds (Natures Source make it, available in supermarkets and health stores) Per serving it has one of the least amounts of calories, it’s a good source of protein, and the most fiber of all of the nut butters. Oh, and almonds can play a key role in weight loss. Yoghurt Parfait — Pack a mini cold bag with ice blocks and included a homemade frozen yoghurt made with strawberries, blueberries or raspberries from the grocery store. Alternate layers of yogurt and fruit in a good quality plastic container, freeze it, then pack it (you can also include a freshly squeezed orange juice in the coldbag for breaktime – good Vitamin C source – this makes a divine break time snack in summer. Supercool Trail Mix — Homemade trail mix is easy to make, simple to store and convenient to snack on between classes and extracurricular activities. Goji berries, cacao nibs, raisins, brazil nuts, sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds (1/2 cup of each), pop in a jar in the kitchen or send to school in a bag each day. Nutty Dates — Take pitted dates, open slightly, press a pecan, walnut or cacao bean into the date, they make awesome snacks. Jerusalem Toffees — Nature’s Choice make a delicious snack of oven baked dates. On the other hand you can make your own. SEE RECIPE

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

71


Brian Metcalf To Snack or… what to Snack… That is the question!

For Active Adults Smoothies — Superfood Smoothing (from Rawalicious) can sustain you a whole day if you are on the move and too busy to eat healthily or prepare a healthy lunch for work. So easy to make. Use your blender, add ice (or you can crush it by putting it into a teatowel and using the flat end of a mug to smash it into smaller pieces). Choose a protein powder (like hemp powder/maca/cacao). of your choice, add ice, fruit and nuts (berries or banana). If you would like it to be a little more filling then you can always add milk or full cream yoghurt. SEE RECIPE Fats, Proteins and Carbs — use a combination of mixed nuts (handful size) with dried fruit (if you have a food dehydrator you can make your own) and biltong (try to buy free range grass fed beef, it is just better for you all round). Carbs and Protein – 3 to 4 wholegrain or seed crackers with soft cheese and a sprinkle of chopped fresh peppadews/guacuomole / tahini / hummus (Click on names for recipes) Guacomole

Tahini

Hummus You can buy all of these in your supermarkets these days if you are not able to make them yourself!

72

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


health Feature: Snacking?

Contributed by: Brian Medcalf / Dee Hean | Photos: Stock

Popcorn – without butter, slightly salted with Himalayan rock salt. For those who like spice, premix some smoked paprika and ground Himalayan rock salt (go lightly on the paprika) and you have a healthy and delicious spicy snack.

Snacks must be easy and interesting but also it should be enjoyable. One of the biggest reasons why people don’t snack is because they make it to complex and so I hope that the above ideas will assist you in keeping it simple, boost your energy, stop overeating at meal times and getting into a consistent snacking routine.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

73


Naomi Ring Top 10 Health Benefits of Rowing

the Top 10

Health Benefits of

Rowing It’s one of the more calming sports to do, especially in the early mornings when the water is calm and the setting is peaceful. Rowing is an excellent form of exercise, not only because it is good for your health, but also because it can be done solo or as a team to build teamwork. There is something both relaxing and motivating about being on the water. Once you learn the proper technique, rowing can offer a tremendous amount of physical health benefits, including increased power and strength. But even if you don’t have access to water and a boat, your local gym has rowing machines (ergometer) that simulate the same movement and resistance as being on the water.

Here are the Top 10 Health Benefits of Rowing: Promotes healthy body composition Rowing can help maintain a healthy balance of fat mass and fat-free mass in your body. If an analysis of your body composition indicates that your body fat is high, rowing can be a good way to burn off fat, as it is predominantly an aerobic sport. In fact, you can easily burn up to 600 calories per hour.

Offers low impact exercise with high results

Both competitive and recreational rowing are unique in comparison to most sports because they exercise Enhances cardio-respiratory all of your major muscle groups. system Everything from your legs, back and Rowing enhances your lung’s ability to provide arms are engaged while rowing. In oxygen to the blood, heart and the rest of your addition, rowing is a low-impact body. A lack of cardio-respiratory fitness is sport. When executed properly, closely linked to heart disease. The good news is the rowing stroke is a fairly safe that improving your aerobic fitness can be done in motion, providing little room for short intervals, so it does not take too much time the serious injury often found in out of your day. All you need is 30 minutes of steady contact and high-impact state exercise – or 10 minutes of high intensity sports. intervals – in the boat or on the rowing machine.

74

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Health: Rowing

Words: Naomi Ring of Health Fitness Revolution ‘www.healthfitnessrevolution.org’ | Photos: Stock

Promotes weight loss Competitive rowers expend almost twice the number of calories on a 2,000-meter course as a runner in a 3,000-meter steeplechase. However, since rowing is low impact, you will not experience the same wear and tear on your body and joints as you would if you were a runner. Plus, you build strength in your upper body and core.

Stabilises the body

Helps the heart Rowing in a boat requires the stabilizer Cardiovascular training involves any activity that and neutralizer muscles to fire up. Those requires the use of the large muscle groups of the same muscles might help to avoid a fall or help body in a regular and uninterrupted manner. keep you from hurting your back when lifting a child Rowing is one of the few non-weight bearing or a heavy box awkwardly. Your core, or trunk, becomes sports that exercises all the major muscle stronger and better prepared to handle off-balanced groups. movement. Builds muscle strength The primary muscles that rowers work are the quadriceps, the large muscles in front of your thighs. These muscles are necessary for extending the knee, and they also serve as hip flexors, which allow you to make powerful leg movements. As your quadriceps become stronger, activities and exercises such as walking, jogging, lunges and squats can Improves muscle and be done more efficiently joint mobility and with greater Rowing conditions many different muscles and joints without strength. straining them, making this exercise ideal for those with arthritis or osteoporosis. The muscles and joints experience a wide range of Reduces stress movement during rowing, which will eventually minimize stiffness and increase The consistent and flexibility. If you live a sedentary lifestyle or become stiff after long periods of rhythmic activity inactivity, loosen your muscles and joints by rowing at a moderate pace for 20 to associated with rowing, 30 minutes. combined with being

Offers a full-body exercise A rowing machine works the lower and middle back, hamstrings, calves, gluteal muscles and biceps. Rowing works more body parts than most cardiovascular machines, and it provides a low-impact exercise that people of various fitness levels can complete comfortably.

outdoors on the water, has an unparalleled impact on reducing stress.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

75


The ultimate online sports magazine

INSIDE SPORTS NEWS

Mind Games Tennis Hockey Triathlon Squash Touch Rugby Netball Canoeing Mountain Biking Soccer Cricket Fishing 76

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: Hand Cycling

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

SPORTS NEWS

WATCH The YOUTUBE VIDEO for more info

Justine Asher takes two gold medals in Italy Contributed by Dan Lombard

Current Paracyclist World Champion Justine Asher claimed double gold at the 2015 UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup when she won the 12.8km Time Trial on Friday and the 49.7km road race in Maniago, Italy. According to UCI regulations an athlete can only pick up points at one event per continent. She was awarded the winners jersey for her tremendous effort in Italy. Asher’s performances also earned her the World Cup competition leader’s jersey. Justine had quite an experience, as she explained. “It was one helluva week. I’m super chuffed to have brought back two gold medals as well as the fact that I have more competition in the H2 class which means the sport is growing. On the downside I had a bit of a fall coming down the podium ramp after receiving my second gold medal, my front little wheels of the wheelchair hit a bump on the ramp and I went tumbling out of my wheelchair, and ended up fracturing my foot. I was in a lot of pain and then had to proceed back up the ramp onto the podium to receive the World Cup leaders jersey, masking my pain with a smile…so it seems I can’t leave Italy without injuring my feet because you may remember I broke both feet on my first World Cup back in 2013 in a crash during a rain storm. Then to top it all, my luggage got left behind in Italy on the hotel steps, and we only discovered this once I was at the airport, which was a four-hour trip from the hotel. Fortunately I got it back today as my team manager arranged for someone to drive back there after the Swiss World Cup. I returned home after the Italian World Cup to recover and initiate training towards my second World Cup in a few weeks in Germany and then the World Championships in Switzerland the week after that. I’m just super happy to be back home and training and also really excited about the future competitions.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

77


Dan Lombard Extended Springbok squad announced!

Extended Springbok squad announced Contributed by Dan Lombard | Photos: Denese Lups

Springbok Head Coach, Heyneke Meyer, has announced a 36 man squad for a match against a World XV and the Rugby Championship.

SA RUGBY

The squad includes eight uncapped players in Scarra Ntubeni, Steven Kitshoff, Vincent Koch, Rudy Paige, Faf de Klerk, Jesse Kriel, Franco Mostert and Lionel Mapoe. In addition, 13 players, including Captain Jean de Villiers, have been identified as being injured or doing rehabilitation but are in contention for Springbok selection. They are Lionel Mapoe, Heinrich Brüssow, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Frans Steyn, Coenie Oosthuizen, Lood de Jager, Duane Vermeulen, Cobus Reinach, Pat Lambie, Jaque Fourie, Jan Serfontein and Fourie du Preez. The Springboks face a World XV at DHL Newlands on Saturday, 11 July before taking part in the Rugby Championship. The squad will be cut for the Rugby World Cup in September. Springbok squad: Willem Alberts, Schalk Brits, Schalk Burger, Marcell Coetzee, Damian de Allende, Francois de Klerk, Bismarck du Plessis, Jannie du Plessis, Eben Etzebeth, Elton Jantjies, Bryan Habana, Cornal Hendricks, Zane Kirchner, Steven Kitshoff, Vincent Koch, Siya Kolisi, Jesse Kriel, Willie le Roux, Francois Louw, Frans Malherbe, Victor Matfield, Teboho Mohoje, Franco Mostert, Tendai Mtawarira, Lwazi Mvovo, Siyabonga Ntubeni, Trevor Nyakane, Rudy Paige, Ruan Pienaar, JP Pietersen, Handré Pollard, Morné Steyn, Adriaan Strauss, Heinke van der Merwe, Marcel van der Merwe, Warren Whiteley. Injured/Conditioning squad:  Heinrich Brüssow, Lodewyk de Jager, Jean de Villiers, Fourie du Preez, Pieter-Steph du Toit, Jaque Fourie, Patrick Lambie, Lionel Mapoe, Coenie Oosthuizen, Cobus Reinach, Jan Serfontein, Frans Steyn, Duane Vermeulen.

78

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

SPORTS NEWS


Sports News: Motocross

Words: Full Stop Communications on behalf of Bestmed and ASG Events | Photos: Provided

SPORTS NEWS

Westaway fights back to win Sondela MTB Classic Contributed by: Full Stop Communications on behalf of Bestmed and ASG Events

A solo breakaway in the closing kilometres saw Andrew Westaway snatch victory in the Bestmed Sondela MTB Classic, and with it the lead in the Bestmed National Cycling Series, near Bela-Bela in Limpopo on Sunday. Johannesburg-based Westaway, who finished third in last month’s series opening ultra marathon at Walkerville, covered the challenging 60km course through Sondela Nature Reserve in 2:15:49. He finished more than two-and-a-half minutes clear of nearest rival Gertjie Harmse (2:17:15), with Kai Pritzen rounding out the podium a further 20 seconds back. Westaway said doing well in the seven-race national series would now be his main ambition for the remainder of the season. “This is a good initiative from Bestmed and ASG. “I’ve never done a series thing before and I thought let’s have a bash at it. So I’ve signed up for all of the races except for the one in Paarl.” The 47-year-old, who was also fifth in his age category at the national road champs, said he had enjoyed winning Sondela at his first attempt. “It’s a very different race. It’s flat with lots of sand, but lots of fun.” Westaway, who rides for Parks Cycling, said the overcast conditions had been perfect for racing but that his race had been less than ideal from the start. “I think I was lying about sixth in the first 20km section where there was a lot of sand. I got stuck behind two guys and we lost maybe a minute or two on the front three.” Around the halfway mark, they got onto a district road and the roadie within him kicked on an uphill to leave his companions behind and haul back the leaders. The four stayed together until the last 10km, when Westaway took the lead into what would prove to be a decisive single-track.

“I just rode off the front and then I was alone for the last six kilometres.” In the women’s race, Dimension Data’s Ronel van Straaten completed an impressive hattrick of wins but it was not without a fight. She hung on in a nail-biting finishing sprint to hold off Mandy de Beer, winner of Saturday’s 40km, to take victory by a single second in 2:28:16. Bonny Swanepoel was a distant third in 2:33:14. “I’m very happy with my win,” said Van Straaten, who was still battling the effects of flu. “Because of yesterday’s result, I knew Mandy would be strong and I knew I had to sit with her because I would lose her if I let her ride away.” The 37-year-old Meyerton resident said she and her younger rival had stayed together throughout the race. The next event in the national series is the Bestmed Makro MTB Challenge, which takes place in Port Elizabeth on September 5. For more information, visit www.asgevents.co.za. Join Sondela MTB Classic on Facebook or follow @ SondelaMTB.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

79


Laren Van Der Westhuizen Round 3 of the Monster Energy TRP MX Nationals

Results of Round 3 of the Monster Energy TRP MX Nationals

SPORTS NEWS

Contributed by Laren Van Der Westhuizen of MXSA

Every kid loves playing in the sand, but racing at Rover in PE, takes this to a whole new level. Round 3 of the Monster Energy, TRP mx Nationals moved to the friendly city and whilst the city might be friendly, the track is one mean challenge. The 50cc class has produced different winners at every round. This time around, Zimbabwe’s Emmanuel Bako won both heats and proved he will be a big factor for the remainder of the season. Wian DuPlooy has become ‘Mr Consistant’ and finished 2nd overall ahead of podium newcomer, Luke Grundy. Championship favourites, James Thompson and Barend DuToit could only manage a 4th and a 5th. The 65cc class was dominated by KTM rider, Camden McLellan. Jono Mlimi was 2nd quickest in practice, but was beaten in both heats by Ike Klaasen. Hayden Tully was 4th and Sebastian Wood 5th. Camden McLellan qualified fastest in the 85cc class. He couldn’t keep it there though, as Dalton Venter won both heats ahead of the “sandman” from Cape Town, Justin Sangster. Local man Grant Hutton was 3rd.

80

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Monster Energy TRP MX NAtionals


Sports News: Motocross

Words: Laren Van Der Westhuizen | Photos: Eric Palmer

In the Pro-mini class, Seth Van Den Abeele was quickest on his home track and managed to win heat 1 comfortably. In heat 2, Seth had 2 crashes and allowed championship leader, Cameron Durow to take the win and the overall. Matthew Kruger was 3rd overall by being consistant. Slade Smith had a DNF in heat 1, but came back for a 3rd in heat 2. The 125 class saw all sorts of issues for Dirco VD Westhuizen in practice. After borrowing a bike in practice, he only managed a 5th. They managed to fix his bike in time for heat 1 and he was able to use the frustration to good use, by winning with ease. Charl Van Eerden was able to hold off Joshua Mlimi for 2nd. It went much the same way in heat 2 and Dirco is now the championship leader.

The MX2 class was probably one of the most exciting of the weekend. With the return of international campaigner, Neville Bradshaw, to SA soil, the racing would be of the highest calibre. Maddy Malan, kept his clean sheet of wins in heat 1, with a win over a hard charging Neville Bradshaw. Two of the favourites, Anthony Raynard and Tristan Purdon crashed out of contention. In heat 2, Tristan Purdon redeemed himself with a solid win, breaking Maddy’s win streak. Tristan set lap times faster than the 450 class. Kerim Fitzgerald had a quiet day back in 4th. The MX3 class was a great battle to watch between multiple champ, Ian Topliss, new kid on the block, Dewald Van Der Berg and home town favourite, Stuart Laing. Dewald was just too strong in the sand and with

a win in heat 2, was the overall winner. Ian won heat 1, but a 3rd in heat 2, meant he had to settle for 2nd overall. Stuart Laing doesn’t have the advantage of bonus points, so was 3rd overall. Craig Kruger was a solid 4th. The ladies class saw a new winner in Bo-Dene Scott. She probably has the most sand skills out of the girls there and it showed on the day. Roof legend, Toni Jardine was 2nd and Natasha Rugani rounded out the podium. The support class was won by Mason Buist. Mason had his best ride of the season to keep out Gerhard Grove and Andre Potgieter. The MX1 class is where Neville Bradshaw really shined. He won both heats after decent starts. He was comfortable on the Yamaha and looks like a hard

man to beat for the remainder of the season. Anthony Raynard was the only rider to keep him in check, but 2nd was the best he could do. Sacha Naude had some bad starts, but rode solid to finish in 3rd in both heats. Kerim Fitzgerald was 4th and Zimbabwe’s Jayden Ashwell was a solid 5th.

Round 4 heads to Durban at the ever popular Springfield Dirt mania. This will be the midway point of the season and all riders are hoping to put in good performances.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

81


Full Stop Communications World student games beckon for Madibaz swim twins

World student games beckon for Madibaz swim twins Alard and Alaric Basson Contributed by Full Stop Communications for Nedbank | Photo: Provided

Nedbank Madibaz swimmers and identical twin brothers Alard and Alaric Basson will represent South Africa in the pool at the World Student Games in Gwanju, South Korea, from July 3 to 14.

nelson mandela metropolitan university

SPORTS NEWS

this sporting opportunity is made possible by

82

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: Swimming

Full Stop Communications for Nedbank | Photos: Provided

The Basson brothers made the cut after qualifying at the SA National Aquatic Championships in Durban last month. “The selection was a very exciting moment for both of us. Knowing that all your hard work and sacrifices are paying off is an amazing feeling,” said Alard. The siblings said that participating against the best in the world would give them the opportunity to benchmark their progress. “I have been training well and I’m eager to see what I can do when I’m up against the best,” said Alaric. He will participate in the 50m, 100m and 200m butterfly events, while Alaric will take part in the breaststroke events. The twins said they were expecting a high performance standard and fast times from their rivals.

“Going into the tournament I am aware that it will be challenging but I will learn a lot about racing and international competition,” said Alard. “I am aiming to swim my personal best so I can make myself and my country proud,” added his brother. Although it will be the first time that the 19-year-olds will be competing at the student games, it is not the first time that they will be representing their country. They participated in the Fina World Junior Swimming Championships in Dubai in 2013 and last year travelled to Botswana for the Youth African Championships.

“Wearing the green and gold has always been my dream since I started swimming, so achieving this is an emotional experience for me,” said Alard. “It’s always humbling to know that people look up to you for your achievements and see you as a representative of the country,” commented Alaric. The first-year building students have been putting in long hours in the water and gym in the run-up to the competition in a bid for performances that will catch the eye of selectors for next year’s Olympic Games in Rio. “We both agree that mental preparation is also of the utmost importance to ensure maximum success though,” said Alard. “It’s very easy to lose focus when every day is a routine of aching muscles and early mornings.

To see how Nedbank “Makes Things Happen” at NMMU click here

“But you have to look forward to what you want to achieve and focus on it with a positive attitude.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

83


ASHLEIGH MOOLMAN-PASIO WINS AUENSTEINER RADSPORTTAGE IN GERMANY

ASHLEIGH MOOLMAN-PASIO WINS AUENSTEINER RADSPORTTAGE IN GERMANY

SPORTS NEWS

Contributed by Bigla Pro Cycling Team PR

ASHLEIGH MOOLMAN-PASIO (BIGLA PRO CYCLING TEAM) CLAIMED SUNDAY’S 127KM STAGE AND THE OVERALL GC WIN IN THE AUENSTEINER RADSPORTTAGE IN GERMANY WHICH TOOK PLACE FROM 5-7 JUNE.

84

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: Cycling

Words: Bigla Pro Cycling Team PR | Photo: Craig Dutton “pics2go.co.za”

Ashleigh MoolmanPasio delivered a superb performance during Sunday’s final stage of Auensteiner Radsporttage by winning the stage after crossing the line solo. The result also earned her the overall lead to top off a successful weekend by the Bigla Pro Cycling Team. “It was an incredible team performance,” a delighted Moolman-Pasio said at the finish. “Every one on the team did everything they could and Lotta [Lepistö] and Vera [Koedooder] really did an exceptional job and so did Nicole [Hanselmann]. It’s really great to take the win solo, especially for the confidence. This was only a preparation race after coming from a long training camp. To win it especially on the weekend of [Team Manager] Thomas’ birthday. It’s a great day for the team.” The South African National Champion had to earn the victory as she was closely marked by the Liv-Plantur team and others. With her trailing Sabrina Sultiens who was second on the overall classification by only one second at the start of the day, the bonus seconds at the intermediate sprints were always going to be a factor. Lepisto played the perfect support role by winning the first two sprints. MoolmanPasio decided to shed the

group with 55km to go when she put in her first serious attack. This led to a lead group of 7 riders, including Sultiens. However, the yellow jersey Rozanne Slik (Parkhotel Valkenburg) was distanced. Moolman-Pasio then put in several attacks that were closely marked. Eventually as the race approached the 20km to go mark, she made the decisive move. “I waited for the second half of the circuit to really open it up. The climb was steep but it was quite short. Every time I attacked on the climb they were able to follow. Sometimes it got to my head where I started thinking can I make it. On the second last climb I attacked and I continued to drive it over the top and it was quite a technical descent and that’s where I made the difference. I got gaps on the corners and after the last corner I drove it and I got away. It gave me a lot of confidence to keep driving it and get out of sight,” she concluded. The victories today are the first two of season for BPCT on European soil. It brings Moolman-Pasio’s individual win tally to six. Earlier in the year she won the South African National Road and Time trial title and did the same in the African Continental Championships.

On Friday, Ashleigh Moolman-Pasio (Bigla Pro Cycling Team) posted the second fastest time in the 6.3km TT in the Auensteiner Radsporttage, a three-day stage race in Germany. Moolman-Pasio recorded a 7th place finish in the 96km second stage from Ilsfeld to Auenstein, which placed her 3rd in the GC on Saturday, and she went on to claim the race win on Sunday in a 127km stage from Ilsfeld to Auenstein and with that, the overall GC win.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

85


cycling south africa SA Schools Cycling is driving cycling skills development

SPORTS NEWS

South African Schools Cycling (SASC) is driving cycling skills development to young school goers in a very big way, and the inaugural Solomon’s Primary Schools MTB Development Series, presented by SASC, is making huge inroads into the growth of cycling and cycling development at schools. Comprising three events, the brand new series in Gauteng held its first event at Montana High School in Pretoria North on Saturday 2 May. Almost 100 learners attended, where they rode various obstacles on the school field in order to hone their cycling skills, all contributing to the success of the event. The focus of the series is cycling development, and the learners discovered skills development, an understanding of basic regulations, mountain bike protocols, safety issues and the role of the commissaire.

SA Schools Cycling is driving cycling skills development Contributed by: Cycling South Africa

86

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: DevelopmentAl: Cycling

Words: Cycling South Africa | Photo: Supplied

Ten teachers also attended a Level 1 Coaching Course, which was organised by Elize Nieuwenhuizen. Starting on the Friday, the course ran for three days, imparting valuable knowledge to the attendees. SASC President, Deon Steyn, said: “What this means for us is that 10 teachers will be sitting in 10 high schools with 1 000 learners each, providing a total of 10 000 learners with access to coaching skills. This is amazing!” Steyn also thanked Cycling SA General Manager, Mike Bradley, for organising the funding to get the coaching courses going. Plans are underway to host the next coaching course in the Free State in June. Adding to the success of the Solomon’s Primary Schools MTB Development Series, the popular Gauteng Spur High School MTB Series presented by Anatomic took place at Curro College Hazeldean at the weekend. Over 584 enthusiastic and eager riders representing 50 schools in Gauteng took part in the “Spur Tour de Plot”. “Unfortunately we had to exclude the neighbouring provinces as we could see early that the event was just getting too big,” said Steyn, who is also the Gauteng Series Director. “Over 500 riders is a lot to handle, and if the North West Province, Free State and Limpopo were also in attendance, we would’ve had over 750 riders in Hazeldean.” The learners, aged between 14 and 18 years of age, raced against each other in their respective age groups for a chance to claim the medals on offer. For details on how the racing unfolded, and for the results, visit: http://highschoolmtb.co.za/spur-tour-de-plot-2015. The next event is the Spur Tour de Dal presented by Anatomic, which takes place at FH Odendaal Hoërskool in Pretoria on 25 July 2015.

About SASC South African Schools Cycling (SASC) is an Associate Member of Cycling South Africa, and is promoting the development of the sport of cycling at school and grass roots level, breaking down the barriers to entry throughout South Africa.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

87


Backpage Media DANE VILAS SURPRISED BY PROTEAS CALL-UP

DANE VILAS SURPRISED BY PROTEAS CALL-UP Words: Backpage Media

sports news

Cape Cobras wicketkeeperbatsman Dane Vilas has admitted that he was surprised to be named in South Africa’s Test squad for July’s tour of Bangladesh. Vilas will stand in for AB de Villiers, who is on paternity leave, and act as reserve wicketkeeper for Quinton de Kock. “I was quite shocked and very surprised when Andrew Hudson (convenor of selectors) called me,” said Vilas in late May when named in the Proteas’ squad. The 29-year-old scored 499 runs in the Sunfoil Series in the 2014/2015 season and averaged 55.5 in the One Day Cup competition. “Obviously, if I was to be selected for South Africa in a case of injury, it would be the fulfilment of a dream for me. It would be the pinnacle of my career if I am drafted into the SA team for a Test against Bangladesh. But I will prepare as if I am going to play,” Vilas continued. “I am quite pleased with my development as wicketkeeper the past few seasons. I have worked hard on drills and on watching footage on YouTube to improve. I have also touched base often with Ryan Cook and Wendell Bossenger to evolve as a wicketkeeper. A few seasons ago when Mark Boucher was at the Cape Cobras, I also discussed my wicketkeeping skills and ways to improve at length with him.”

88

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: cricket

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

Proteas Test squad: Hashim Amla (Nashua Cape Cobras, captain) Elgar (The Unlimited Titans) Reeza Hendricks (Knights) Faf du Plessis (The Unlimited Titans) Stiaan van Zyl (Nashua Cape Cobras) JP Duminy (Nashua Cape Cobras) Quinton de Kock (The Unlimited Titans) Vernon Philander (Nashua Cape Cobras) Dale Steyn (Nashua Cape Cobras) Morne Morkel (The Unlimited Titans) Aaron Phangiso (bizhub Highveld Lions) Simon Harmer (Warriors) Temba Bavuma (bizhub Highveld Lions) Kagiso Rabada (bizhub Highveld Lions) Dane Vilas (Nashua Cape Cobras).

Bangladesh tour itinerary: July 5 - 1st T20 International, Dhaka July 7 - 2nd T20 International, Dhaka July 10 - 1st ODI, Dhaka July 12 - 2nd ODI, Dhaka July 15 - 3rd ODI, Chittagong July 20 - 1st Test, Chittagong July 30 - 2nd Test, Dhaka

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

89


Lunga Ntuli Bongiwe Msomi: I Am Not Afraid Of Hard Work

DUT

DURBAN UNIVERSITY OF UNIVERSIT

TECHNOLOGY

Durban University of Technology

Podcast

BONGIWE MSOMI: I AM NOT AFRAID OF HARD WORK Contributed by: Lunga Ntuli | Photos: Provided

It has become almost a dream for every young South African girl to compete at the level of Proteas netball Vice-Captain Bongiwe Msomi, following her excellent skills in the court. She is quick, always running and gives it her all, but she had to pay a price to be where she is today.

Thabiso Mosia speaks to Proteas Netball ViceCaptain Bongiwe Msomi

SPORTS NEWS

Early this year, Bongiwe made a name for herself when she was selected to play for a United Kingdom club - Surrey Storms in the Netball Superleague, making her only the third South African to compete at this level. Not only did she make the team, but she also had a positive impact in the team’s success of winning the league and earned some player of the match awards. “It was such a great experience and a dream come true for me. I think it is every netball player’s dream to compete at the highest level as possible.

90

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: Netball

Words: Lunga Ntuli | Photos: Provided

So when this happened to me I knew that I now had more responsibility and it not just about me but the country where I am coming from as well,” said the 27-year-old wing and centre specialist. Surrey Storm player-coach Tamsin Greenway described her as a dynamic player who offers something different.

“I saw her playing at the Commonwealth Games and that’s when I first approached her – that’s how long it’s been going on. She’s such a dynamic player. What I loved about her was that she offered something completely different – really quick, nippy and defensively strong,” Greenway said. In the Brutal Fruit National Netball Tournament 2015 she walked away with the Best Centre player award. Speaking about her provincial team winning the championships, she said she is proud of how the team has progressed.

“Winning awards doesn’t necessarily mean much to me, although I must say that it’s a great feeling to be appreciated for what you do. I am inspired by breaking records and becoming the best I can possibly be. To know that I

had an impact in our KZN team winning the tournament makes me feel great,” she said. Bongiwe said playing in England has helped her a lot and she now sees the game differently and wants to improve the standard. “There is a huge difference in terms of standards as compared to the UK. I am always cautious that I perform at my peak because I know that getting there is easy but maintaining it is hard. For each and every game that I play, I aim at giving it my all because this is my life netball is more than just a sport to me and that is why I am not afraid of training hard,” said the calm Bongiwe, who is fondly known as ‘Boh’. Today she might be everyone’s favourite player, but the road to success for Bongiwe Msomi was not as rosy. At some stage she dominated in the Under-21 national team but did not catch the eyes of the national selectors.

Her coach at that time, Marchelle Maroun, said ‘when she finally makes it nobody will take her out’. A few years later she broke in to the SA senior team and on her debut game she won the player of the match award.

“My journey has never been easy at all. I had to persevere and keep on working hard. There are players that I grew up looking up to, and yes, at times I would feel as if my chance won’t come, but I still believed that in the right time I get the call up. “ “When I was first selected for the Proteas it was the most amazing feeling and I told myself that I am not going to go backwards anymore, but I am going to work hard and be the best I can possibly be. But I must say that it not easy at all, I know that some players watch me play and wish they can play like me but there is lot of hard work, dedication and sacrifices that I had to make and still make to be where I am today,” she said.

Her advice to young people who would like to excel in sport? “They must follow their passion. Where you are born or how much money you have should not determine your destination. If you can dream it, you can realise it – as long as you work hard to reach your goal.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

91


Johanette van Heerden middelburg high school turns heads

Back (from left to right): Je-André Gouws, Mark Benecke, Ruan du Plooy Front (From left to right): Ahmed Moti, Ruben Terblanche. Absent: Yonela Billie. middelburg high school

Contributed by Johanette van Heerden

SPORTS NEWS

MIDDELBURG HIGH SCHOOL TURNS HEADS Middelburg High School, a small school of 180 learners in the Karoo, has proven that large numbers do not always guarantee success. Perseverance and a positive mindset are the components which enable a team to excel against all odds. Middelburg High School is often challenged to compete against teams from much bigger schools, in order to play enough matches for the season. The first rugby team has already played more than ten matches and lost only two. Middelburg High School succeeded in beating teams from much larger schools like Volkskool, De Aar and Hangklip (Queenstown). When the rugby season kicked off, the team was not regarded as strong opposition, however as the season has progressed the team has shown its talent and has drawn compliments and acknowledgement from other coaches and teams. The first rugby team attended the Arthur Johnson Sport

92

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Week in Mossel Bay. Six of our first team rugby players were then selected (from a group of 400 players) to be included in an exclusive group of 22 players, who will tour to Ireland to play 3 matches against the country’s top rugby schools. They are Mark Benecke, Ruan du Plooy, Je-André Gouws, Ahmed Moti, Ruben Terblanche and Yonela Billie. Middelburg High School has proven that small schools can also establish a proud rugby tradition. The team of 2015 is reaping the benefits of hard work, team spirit and confidence. The motto of the team is:

Respect your opponent, but have faith in your own skills.


Sports News: cricket

Words: Brian Lee – Backpage Media | Photos: Provided

SPORTS NEWS

A BRIGHT FUTURE FOR KZN CRICKETERS Words: Brian Lee – Backpage Media | Photos: Provided

The future looks bright for two KwaZulu-Natal cricketers, Daniel Mduduzi Sincuba and Lungile Kwela, who have both been selected for the National Cricket Academy intake this year. Daniel is already playing first class cricket and he has been a regular batsman-wicketkeeper in the Sunfoil Dolphins’ set-up and has scored two half centuries this year. What makes this special in particular for Daniel, is that all the Proteas players had to go through this route. Daniel said he is honoured at receiving the opportunity and is looking forward to continue working hard. “It is an absolutely great feeling for me to be selected for the national cricket academy and I am excited about it. As you know, to be a Protea one day you have to go through this process,” he said. “I also think that I am privileged because I have already tasted being in the Dolphins’ set-up, so I

know where to work hard at and improve.” The former Northwood pupil said he was not really one of the top cricketers at high school, but through hard work he managed to get to where he is today. “I didn’t really think that I would make it this far, but one thing that I have done is work hard. Being in the academy is amazing because I am with the best U-19 cricketers in the country who are also working as hard as I do,” he added. Sincuba said his ultimate goal is to now improve from the fourday format of the game and be a regular in all the formats in the Dolphins’ set-up. On the other hand, Lungi Kwela made the female national academy

team and this spinner has been a regular member in the KZN ladies team for almost seven years. “I am happy that my dream of playing for the national team is coming to reality. I am grateful, but I know that there is lot of hard work that I need to put in. There were times where I wanted to give up on the game but all is coming well at the end,” said the 22-yearold lady. To top it all, Linda Zondi, who is a former South Africa U-19 wicketkeeper-batsman has been appointed as the head of selectors for the Proteas. Zondi has been instrumental in the development of cricket in KZN and has produced and offered a number of opportunities to young black cricketers.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

93


Dan lombard Klofies setting the pace with their Sports Science department

Klofies setting the pace with their Sports Science department Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Supplied

Hoërskool Waterkloof (‘Klofies’) in Pretoria prides itself for being an institution of excellence both in the classroom and on the sports field.

Hoërskool Waterkloof

They have developed an advanced facility, the Department of Medical and Sports Science, which provides learners with the best opportunities to succeed in their chosen sporting discipline. This department specialises in three core areas.

Medical: • Klofies has a fully equipped medical room for general issues but also where major medical issues can be dealt with. • The medical division makes sure that the injured person follows the medical plan - Injury, Doctor, Physiotherapist, Biokineticists, Sport science clearance, Return to play. • The medical plan is implemented to help each athlete with an injury to decrease injury time and prevent future injuries.

94

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

sports news


Sports News: Klofies

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Supplied

• Klofies has doctors on call that assist in emergencies and to consult injured athletes. • The medical team has a portable first aid room that the school runs during sport events, both home and away. • The medical team has two full-time Basic Ambulance Assistants. • Both the medical and sport science teams are qualified to perform basic life support. • There two full-time biokinetics and one sport and exercise technology student.

• The department has a medical doctor to safely clear students for return to play.

• Klofies is endorsed by Concussion South Africa.

Sport Science: • The school has some of the most high tech equipment available for sport science field testing including a fusion smart speed system and an InBody 170 scale.

Concussion:

• Klofies incorporates the principals of sports periodization to effectively manage sport conditioning in the appropriate time allocation

• Klofies has a recognized concussion management programme up and running. The school tests baseline cognitive function at the beginning of each season for sport participants in rugby, hockey, netball, cricket and mountain biking.

• The department has three sport scientists and one sport science student from the University of Pretoria.

• In the case of a concussed student, personnel perform after injury tests to determine the severity of the concussion, thus allowing the department to properly monitor recovery and enforce safe return to play. • The school’s main goal is to avoid second impact syndrome and to limit long term cognitive deficits.

• Klofies conducts sport testing to collect data on the individual, this data governs the parameters of the conditioning programs. • The department allocates programmes according to phases of difficulty (Phase 1 is base-training while the last phases are more advanced). An individual will be put on the appropriate phase for his/her physical capabilities.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

95


WTSA Lucas Sithole & Dylan Alcott Win 2015 French Open Doubles Title

SPORTS NEWS

LUCAS SITHOLE & DYLAN ALCOTT WIN 2015 FRENCH OPEN DOUBLES TITLE

Contributed by Wheelchair Tennis South Africa | Photos: Provided.

South African wheelchair tennis quad ace Lucas ‘Twister’ Sithole and Dylan Alcott captured their first French Open title in doubles competition on team debut. The pair played magnificently and stunned top seeds Antony Cotterill and Andy Lapthorne both from Great Britain 6-1 6-4 to claim their fourth crown this year playing together. It completed a remarkable week for the pair, who did not drop a set in the entire tournament. In the Quads Singles event, World no.1 and top seed David Wagner crashed the South African world No.4’s hope of taking the French Open title when he toppled Sithole 6-1 6-4 in the semi-final round. The two were meeting for the fourth time this season. Sithole won his last clash against Wagner, in the final of the Airports Company South Africa SA Open in April and he earned a rematch after eliminating Shraga Weinberg of Israel 6-3 6-2. “I love playing in the French Open and although I was hoping for a singles title, the doubles title is a huge achievement for me. It is always a great experience participating in the Super series tournament and I would like to thank the game sponsor, Airports Company South Africa for the opportunity and my doubles partner Dylan Alcott” said Sithole.

“Alcott is the best partner and we play very well together, this is the beginning of great achievements with him” Sithole added.

96

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

Wheelchair Tennis South Africa

Watch LUCAS SITHOLE

SABC Morning LIVE INterview


Sports News: Paracycling

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Supa Piet breaks long distance world record Contributed by Dan Lombard

SPORTS NEWS

SA’s Paracyclists had a great 3 week European tour, with everyone returning home with medals and Pieter du Preez broke the T51 10 000m world record in dramatic fashion at the Swiss Series Para-Athletics on Sunday, 7 June. He shaved off 16 seconds from the record that was set in 2010 with a time of 35:50.96. He had already set new African records in the 200m, 400m, 800m, 1 500m and 5 000m earlier in the series. The Road World Champion then nailed the flat yet technical Time Trial circuit at the 2015 UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup in Yverdon-lesBains, Switzerland, from 14-16 June. He established a lead very early in the race, claiming the gold medal by more than two minutes ahead of his closest rival. The victory gave Du Preez the confidence he needed for the road race to blow his competition away and claim his second gold medal of the weekend.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

97


Harry Edge New Zealand “KIWI” Joins PSL

New Zealand “KIWI” Harry Edge JOINS PSL Words and Photo contributed by Backpage Media

The University of Pretoria have announced the signing of New Zealand holding midfielder Harry Edge. The player joins fellow Kiwi’s Jeremy Brockie and Michael Boxall in South Africa (both play for SuperSport United). AmaTuks revealed that they spotted the 21-year-old Edge, while in the Netherlands after winning the Multichoice Diski Challenge. Chief Scout Paul Mathews and Head Coach Selaotse ‘Sly’ Mosala saw the lanky 1,91m tall midfielder when they played PEC Zwolle on their MDC tour of the European country. “When we played against Zwolle in Holland I liked his athleticism and the fact that he plays forward all the time, he plays centre mid, but can also slot in at central defence,” said Mathews. “At Tuks we are very good defensively, but we need to keep the ball more and attack more and we thought he would be a natural replacement for Mpho Matsi (who has signed with Mpumalanga Black Aces). We hope this move will work out for us and he can slot right in and make Tuks the place for him to grow and achieve great things.” Edge admitted that he hasn’t watched a lot of South African football, but is looking forward to plying his trade in the country.

SPORTS NEWS

University of Pretoria

98

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

“When I saw them (Tuks) against Zwolle they were quite fast and they attacked all the time. I only played in the second half of the match so I did not really get too much time against them,” said Edge. “I have not followed South African football, but I watched a few videos of Tuks and in one they were playing against Pirates. I like how they play, it’s a bit different style of football than what I am used to, very attacking, very direct, and I will do my best to fit right in.”


Sports News: E-SPOrts - Mind Games

Words: Dee Hean | Photos: Provided

Ancients Wargames - 2015 IWF’s 18th World Individual Championships

SPORTS NEWS

Contributed by: Dee Hean | Photos: Provided

According to Colin Webster from Mind Sports South Africa, “Wargames is a game much like three dimensional chess wherein players use representations of historical armies to determine which player has the greater tactical abilities. Older players who did officer training would remember the game as a ‘TEWT’ (Tactical Exercise without Troops) and such training has been used by the military since 1820.” The top male/female titles respectively go to: St John’s College pupil,

Jason Batzofin & Hoërskool Linden pupil

Elishia Retief St John’s College

Hoërskool Linden

Jason retained his Ancient Wargames period title after a tough fight at the IWF’s 18th World Individual Championships at the Lugogo Sun, Swaziland. Living in Observatory, Johannesburg, Jason won the Gauteng Schools Championships and the Johannesburg Regional Championships. He also finished in tied second place at the 2015 MWEB Mpumulanga Provincial Championships. After what Jason considered to be an unsatisfactory Mpumulanga Championships, Jason re-looked at his strategies and army choice. The effort that he put in paid dividends as he captured the title of Junior World Champion, which he has now won for two consecutive years. Although Jason is convinced that he can win the title again in 2016, he now has his eyes set on the senior title. Elishia Retief has consistently demonstrated her tactical abilities in the Ancients Wargames throughout the year. The Roodepoort resident has managed to win every single female title in South Africa since 2014, as well as the 2014 Female World Championship for Ancients Wargames title. At the 2015 World Championships held at the Lugogo Sun, Swaziland recently, Elishia ripped her opponents apart, Webster recounted.”As she demolished her opponents, she further entrenched herself as the top female wargames player in the world in order to retain her title.” Colin Webster commented, “It is no surprise to see Elishia once again, and rightfully so, take her place in the 2015 Protea Squad.” Elishia has now won the title for two consecutive years.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

99


Dan Lombard South African named Tournament Director for Rio Olympics

SPORTS NEWS

South African named as Hockey Tournament Director for Rio Olympics

South African

Contributed by Dan Lombard | Photo: Provided HOCKEY ASSOCIATION

Sheila Brown, 59, has been named as the tournament director for hockey at Rio Olympic Games next year. Sheila is a colonel in the South African Police Service and performs her administrative duties after hours. She got involved with the administrative side of hockey in the mid 1970’s and has been an official at several high profile hockey events including the Beijing and London Olympics. The Olympic Games are no stranger to Brown having served as a judge in Athens (2004) and then as an Assistant Tournament Director in Beijing (2008) and London (2012). ‘So I indeed feel privileged to have been afforded all these appointments. As far as I am aware no official from Africa has attended as many Olympic Games. ‘

‘To be appointed to the Olympic Games means more than anyone can ever imagine. Just as athletes strive to attend Olympic Games so do officials. This is really the pinnacle of any official’s career. I also do believe my appointment is a tremendous advert for SAHA (SA Hockey Association). As everyone knows hockey is struggling with regards to funding and most

100

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

SOuth African Hockey Association

people involved make huge sacrifices to be able to participate in their roles. ‘Even with the lack of funding SA hockey has produced, and continues to produce, many word class umpires and officials who are respected throughout the hockey world. This shows the true dedication of the SA hockey family.


Sports News: Cricket

Words & Photos by: Backpage Media

ONTONG BACKS HENDRICKS TO IMPRESS Words & Photos by: Backpage Media

Cape Cobras bowler Beuran Hendricks has made a strong return from injury and was recently selected for the Proteas T20 squad for a tour to Bangladesh in July. Hendricks suffered a stress fracture in 2014 and spent several months out of action after representing South Africa in five T20-Internationals. The 24-year-old left-arm quick bowler recovered from the setback and is on course to establish himself in international cricket. Hendricks particularly impressed when he claimed seven for 74 against the Dolphins in the final four-day Series match of the 2014/2015-season. He also caught the eye while representing the Cape Cobras in the One Day Cup final against The Titans. “I am happy Beuran is selected. He showed some signs that he is getting back into form in his final few games (in the Indian Premier League while representing the Kings X1 Punjab),” said Justin Ontong, the Cape Cobras captain. “I won’t say the old Beuran is back and that he is performing at 100 percent of his potential, but it is about self-confidence, and Beuran must still regain that. We know all about his potential.” Ontong was at the helm of the Cape Cobras when Hendricks claimed 28 wickets in 11 matches in the domestic T20 Challenge in 2013/2014. The Cobras lost the final by two runs against the Dolphins, but won the domestic T20 Challenge in emphatic style in the 2014/2015-season.

Cricket South Africa

“I am confident Beuran is just one match away from his best in the T20-format,” Ontong added.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

101


backpage media SOUTH AFRICAN FOOTBALL HAS THE POTENTIAL

SUNDERLAND HEAD OF DEVELOPMENT SAYS ‘SOUTH AFRICAN FOOTBALL HAS THE POTENTIAL’

SPORTS NEWS

Words: Backpage Media

Through the years South African football has produced some of the world’s finest players including Lucas Radebe, Quinton Fortune, Mark Fish and Steven Pienaar, but does the nation need to make the next step forward to reach its potential? Graham Robinson, Head of International Football Development at Barclays Premier League club, Sunderland AFC, believes the nation needs to start taking advantage of its privileged position. “If I’m very honest, African football is very positive, my feelings are that South African football has to take advantage of its privileged position compared to other African countries, as they have got a lot of investment and strong infrastructure,” said Robinson. “It now needs to be shown on the international stage. In the last CAF Cup they produced a lot of young talented players and now it’s about those players in their respective leagues and clubs been given the right grounding and tools to develop as players.” The well-travelled coach, who started his player career in his native South Africa before later moving to the UK, has been working closely with Sunderland’s South African football club partner, Bidvest Wits, and believes they are making great strides as part of their youth development programme.

102

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: soccer

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Provided

“We work closely with Bidvest Wits for the benefit of both clubs and often share ideas. I visit the club four times a year to assist in their ongoing youth development programme and we are starting to see an improvement in the players, which is credit to the staff at Wits,” added Robinson. “The big thing for the club is that they are starting to identify players at a younger age and they are much more organised in their structure. This season six players from their academy have moved up the academy roots to the first team squad which shows you that the system is working.”

As part of Graham’s role at Sunderland AFC, the coach regularly works with the Barclays Premier League and The British Council, on their Premier Skills initiative, which focuses on developing community coaches and referees in chosen territories, to further support local community projects. “I think it’s very important that the coach’s structure continues to grow and develop, they need to start engaging players at a younger age group so they can get the fundamentals right from the start at any coaching level,” explained Robinson. “As raw talent and ability can’t get you everywhere, you need to have some structure and support along the way and through the Premier Skills initiative we are starting to see progress on the ground in the local communities. “The initiative offers the community coaches the skills to engage with players at a much earlier age, teaching them the basics of phases of play and having that role in a team, so that when they do get picked up by an academy in their teenage years they have a better understanding of the game. “There is an opportunity for South Africa, it’s just harnessing it, and making sure those players coming through the ranks are supported at the start so it’s not just a waste of time.”

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

103


backpage media PIRATES FACE A STIFF CHALLENGE

Orlando Pirates confirmed a place in the CAF Confederation Cup group stage on Friday June 5 with an emphatic 4-1 (6-1 on aggregate) victory over Guinea’s AS Kaloum Star in the playoff round. The Buccaneers are the first South African team to reach the group stage of Africa’s second-tier club competition since Mamelodi Sundowns in 2007 and will be aiming for a place in the semifinals. However, standing between them and a berth in the final four are three tough Group B competitors: Zamalek, CS Sfaxien and AC Leopards.

Pirates have faced all three before in African club competition: Zamalek and Leopards were in Bucs’ Champions League group when they reached the final in 2013, while Sfaxien beat the Soweto side 1-0 in the semifinals of the 2006 Champions League. Zamalek are the most well-known of the trio, with the Egyptian giants having claimed five Champions League titles in their history. Known as the ‘White Knights’, Zamalek are currently coached by Jesualdo Ferreira and enjoy a big lead at the top of their domestic championship. The Cairo-based side, like Pirates, received a bye through to the first round of Confederation Cup preliminaries. They then defeated Rwanda’s Rayon Sports (6-1 on aggregate), FUS Rabat of Morocco (3-2) and DR Congo club SM Sanga Balende (3-2) to earn their place in the group stage.

PIRATES FACE A STIFF CHALLENGE Words & Photos: Backpage Media

SPORTS NEWS

Thamsanqa Gabuza of Orlando Pirates celebrates a goal during the Caf Confederation Cup match between Orlando Pirates and AS Kaloum

104

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: soccer

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Provided

Next up is AC Leopards of Congo, who won the Confederation Cup in 2012. They hail from Dolisie and are known as ‘Les Fauves de Niari’ (the Beasts from Niari). Coached by Senegalese Lamine Ndiaye, Leopards were beaten in the final preliminary round in the Champions League before ‘dropping’ into the Confed Cup, where they overcome Nigeria’s Warri Wolves 4-3 on aggregate in the playoff round. Finally, Tunisia’s CS Sfaxien are three-time winners of the Confederation Cup (2007, 2008 & 2013) and could be considered the group favourites given their pedigree in the competition. Known as the ‘Juventus of the Arabs’ because of their striped black and white kit, Sfaxien are coached by former Portuguese professional Paulo Duarte. Sfaxien, like Leopards, lost in the final preliminary round of the Champions League but advanced to the group stage of the Confed Cup thanks to a relatively comfortable 3-1 aggregate victory over Ivory Coast giants ASEC Mimosas in the playoffs.

Sifiso Myeni of Orlando Pirates celebrates a goal with teammates during the Caf Confederation Cup match between Orlando Pirates and AS Kaloum

Pirates’ CAF Confederation Cup Group B fixtures: 26-28 June – AC Leopards v Orlando Pirates 10-12 July – Orlando Pirates v Zamalek 24-26 July – CS Sfaxien v Orlando Pirates 7-9 August – Orlando Pirates v CS faxien 21-23 August – Orlando Pirates v AC Leopards 11-13 September – Zamalek v Orlando Pirates

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

105


Team South Africa South African Afternoon

Team South Africa is comprised of gymnasts and officials from Gauteng, KZN, Northern Cape and the North West. These participants will feature in numerous smaller group performances in the week. In addition to these performances a special 1 hour “South African Afternoon” show entitled “An Afternoon in Africa” will be held on the 16th of July. This show will encompass all South African participants including 22 gymnasts from Zimbabwe and 27 gymnasts from Australia! “An Afternoon in Africa” will highlight the plight of the rhinos and continues as the performers wake up to a brand new day. Through gymnastics and dance, the vibrancy, energy and colours of Africa will be on display at the South African Afternoon.

Click Here TO purchase tickets

South African Afternoon

SPORTS NEWS

106

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015


Sports News: Rugby

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Provided

SPORTS NEWS

SMIT WAVES GOODBYE TO DU PLESSIS BROTHERS Contributed by : Backpage Media | Photos : Supplied

Former Springboks captain and now CEO at the Cell C Sharks rugby team, John Smit has poured out his heart about the departure of Bismarck and Jannie du Plessis as well as Willem Alberts. The trio of senior players, who have contributed so much to the KwaZulu-Natal club played their last match on Saturday, 14 June 2015 when the Sharks took on Stormers at Growthpoint KINGS PARK in their final Super Rugby game of the season. “These three gents have played an instrumental and invaluable role at the Sharks over the years.  It is naturally disappointing to lose this calibre of players that have given so much to Sharks rugby.  As in many senior statesmen’s careers they felt the time was right to experience something different abroad,” said Smit. “We will never forget the many courageous performances from these three players, the countless outstanding performances and steals from Bissy, the rock solid anchor at tight head in Jannie and the enforcer in Willem.  Not to

mention Jannie playing the victorious Currie Cup Final in 2013 with a broken hand.” Smit said he would like to thank them for their commitment, dedication and outstanding contribution to the franchise. “On behalf of The Sharks I take this opportunity to thank them for their dedication, commitment and outstanding contribution to the franchise. We wish them and their families the very best for this new chapter they are embarking on,” added the CEO. Bismarck’s career at the Cell C Sharks is now in its 11th year, having made his senior rugby debut when he joined the Durban franchise in 2005. To date he is the most capped Sharks player ever at Super Rugby level, with 130 appearances. He has also accumulated 39 Absa Currie Cup caps, the number reflective of his Springbok duties where he has represented South Africa 70 times. Jannie joined the Sharks in 2008 after representing the Cheetahs between 2004 and 2007.  He has appeared 118

times for the Cell C Sharks at Super Rugby level and has 62 Test match appearances behind him. They both played in two Rugby World Cups – in 2007 and 2011 - and together share the record (42) for most Springbok Tests as brothers. On the other hand Willem made his debut for the Cell C Sharks in 2010 after moving to Durban from the Lions and has accumulated a total of 92 appearances (73 in Vodacom Super Rugby and 19 in the Absa Currie Cup competition) as well as 32 Springbok caps. The Sharks have also signed loose-forward Philip van der Walt who will join up with the side for the upcoming Absa Currie Cup competition which kicks off in early August. The 25 year old joined French Pro D2 club Biarritz in 2014 but has returned to South Africa, having played his senior rugby for Free State in the Currie Cup and the Cheetahs in Vodacom Super Rugby between 2010 and 2014.

Game On Magazine, July: Issue 18, 2015

107


Proud SPONSOR

OF GAME ON Lawprint supports the development of youth sports in South Africa in association with Game On

your succe s s is

Lawprint is accredited Level 1 BEE Status

our

succ e

ss

Tel: 011 805 3880 www.lawprint.co.za

Gom july 15' issue 18  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you