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BENCH (CONTRIBUTORS) journalism

photography

Dan Lombard

Carl Fourie Catherine Kotze Gallo Images Jean-Pierre Vidot Jeremy Ward Justin Klusener

The ultimate online sports magazine

contents Cover Feature stuart white is sa’s “speed racer” Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

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Issue 24, january 2 0 1 6

Main FeatureS

sport development

lee-anne sets the “pace” in sa women’s golf

nathi ngubane growing development hockey in KZN

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Justin Klusener,

Carl Fourie & Catherine Kotze

08

sam cele KZN’s “Queen of the Waves” Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

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jeremy ward leads ep rugby to victory Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Gallo Images & Jeremy Ward

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erin gallagher Seventeen year old swimming sensation Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

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jaco engelbrecht throwing for the stars Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

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woo-jun son shining her light on Golf Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Catherine Kotze & Jean-Pierre Vidot

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Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

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stuart white is sa’s “speed racer”

off ” White capped Stuart “Stuwie x 2nd at the Vorte ing h finis by 2015 the Italy and won in up C Rox World Rok Vortex Junior frican A h Sout . the third time for ip h Champions

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

Grey College


Cover feature: go karting

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

The road to a successful year of karting started with his 6th place finish at IAME X30 European Championship in March. Stuwie had to contend with the rain but the experience he gained driving in the rain would prove invaluable later in the year. “It was quite difficult to drive in the rain but I managed to do it. The experience of driving in the wet really helped me during the World Cup,� said the Grade 9 Grey College learner.

time There was little to rest as fourteen ie year old Stuw by was nominated outh Motorsport S his Africa to represent e CIK-FIA country at th Trophy cademy A Karting in May. The academy consisted of

Rok Cup International Final 2015

51 drivers

and from 35 countries Spain, took place in rance. Belgium and F

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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stuart white is sa’s “speed racer”

He finished 7th overall with his best finish an unbelievable 4th at Le Mans in France where he started in 15th position. He recorded the fastest lap in the race. He got to meet Formula One drivers Daniel Ricciardo, Max Verstapen, Ralf Schumacher and Jauno Trulli during the course of the academy, and felt inspired by their presence.

uge honour to h a “It was definitely must say I and frica A h represent Sout h Africa for out S Motorsport thank you to by F1 legends ed h atc w . Being nominating me see them to nice as w me. It really inspired supporting their roots and to returning drivers”. of the next generation

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


Cover feature: go karting

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Stuwie added his third South African Vortex Junior Rok Championship title to his trophy cabinet with strong performances in all four rounds. He won the Port Elizabeth and Vereeniging rounds while finishing 2nd in Cape Town and 3rd in Durban to be crowned king of the track in 2015. “It is always special to be a South African champ. This is my home and nothing gives me more satisfaction than winning this title.” Stuwie won a paid entry to the Vortex Rok World Cup where he had a very successful qualifying race with which he qualified for the final. During the final Stuwie was pushed wide in a corner which saw him fall to 5th but did well to fight his way back to 2nd in the last lap. Stuwie crossed the finish line in 2nd place, a mere 0.072 seconds behind the winner, and won a complete kart for his efforts. “It rained for much of the practice rounds so we had our work cut out for us. Luckily it cleared up just before the qualifying rounds. I had a good race and got to compete with the best karting racers in the world.

The Italian and French F4 teams contacted us shortly afterwards and we are negotiating with them to start in 2017,” explained Stuwie.

It will be much of the same in 2016 as Stuwie wants to race as much as possible in South Africa and overseas. “Baby Vettell” as he is known would like to secure a few podium finishes on the European circuit while he continues to do well in his academics. This is no easy feat for a young man who spends a large portion of the year outside of South Africa, but then again Stuwie does not do “easy”.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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lee-anne sets the “pace” in sa women’s golf

lee-anne

Hugenote High School

sets the

“pace”

in SA Women’s Golf Full name: Lee-Anne Pace Date of Birth: 15 February 1981 Place of Birth: Paarl, South Africa High School: Hugenote High School tertiary education: University of Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States of America ranking: South Africa - 1; World – 50 sponsors: Investec, Pearl Valley Golf Estate, Titleist, Mercedes Paarl

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


main feature: golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: : Justin Klusener, Carl Fourie & Catherine Kotze

Lee-Anne Pace is the number one ranked ladies golfer in South Africa and backed up her ranking when she won the South African Ladies Open for a second time earlier this year. She has Olympic aspirations and is determined to do even better on the course in 2016. Game On Magazine recently caught up with Lee-Anne to chat about her time in the States, life as a professional golfer and some of her favourite things!

LEE-ANNE PACE PLAYER INTERVIEW

lee-anne sets the

“pace”

in SA Women’s Golf

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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lee-anne sets the “pace” in sa women’s golf

lee-anne pace GOM: How and why did you start golf? LP: My father introduced me to golf when I was 18. I caddied for him on the weekend and learned how to play. GOM: Who has supported you throughout your career? LP: My family, coaches and friends. I’ve got an amazing team around me helping me to achieve my goals. GOM: You studied in the States? Did you play golf there? What are the differences between the two countries in terms of ladies’ golf? LP: I played golf for the University of Tulsa. Ladies golf is huge in the US and is very well supported.

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

GOM: Are you able to play golf full time or do you have a day job? LP: I play golf full time.

GOM: You turned professional in 2005, talk us through the trials and tribulations of chasing the professional dream? LP: My breakthrough came in 2010 when I won the Order of Merit on the Ladies European Tour but my focus was always on competing against the best in the world on the Ladies Professional Golf Association Tour. I am there now and loving it. It seriously is the best job in the world.


main feature: golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: : Justin Klusener, Carl Fourie & Catherine Kotze

lee-anne pace GOM: You’ve won 10 professional tournaments, which is your favourite and why? LP: The SA Open in 2014 at San Lameer. I had my family there and it was an amazing experience. Playing for your country and family is always an honour.

GOM: You have joined an elite group of golfers to win the SA Women’s Open back to back. Talk us through your 2015 victory and your thoughts on winning it back to back? LP: I’m so honoured to be one of the golfers to win the SA Open

twice. My goal is to win it three times in a row. This year the SA Open conditions were tough but I’m very happy I pulled through. I’m very impressed by the standard of golf in South Africa as it has improved tremendously. I think the start of the Ladies Sunshine Tour has helped us to create a platform for South African golfers to excel. We now have the Chase to the Investec Cup with the prize money increased to R1 million which creates a challenge for everybody in South Africa.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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lee-anne sets the “pace” in sa women’s golf

lee-anne pace GOM: What does your training programme entail?

GOM: What is your favourite shot and the most difficult?

LP: I train in the gym six or seven days in a week and practice on the course five to seven days. I usually take the weekends off to spend with my family and friends.

LP: I love iron play and most difficult is probably a 40 m bunker shot.

GOM: Do you have any pre-tournament rituals that you do to prepare? LP: I take 25 min on the range, 10 min of chipping and 15 min of putting before I head out.

Lee-Anne Pace Holes Long Bunker Shot for Eagle on 18th at LPGA KEB Hana Bank Championship Oct 16, 2015 GOM: What needs to change in order to get more South African girls/women to play golf? LP: There is already more interest with the start of the Ladies Sunshine Tour and the Chase to the Investec Cup. It creates a challenging platform for us to compete on and gives the amateurs a chance to compete against professionals.

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


main feature: golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: : Justin Klusener, Carl Fourie & Catherine Kotze

GOM: Ladies golf, much like most female sports, does not get much of the limelight. What would you say to aspiring young female golfers? LP: It’s important to believe in yourself and your abilities. Work hard and be patient and the results will come.

GOM: What do you do when you’re not on the golf course? LP: I read, watch series and spend time with my family. GOM: What are your goals for 2016? LP: I would like to compete in the Olympic Games while chasing a top ten ranking in the world.

lee-anne pace

Some of Lee-Anne’s favourite things Favourite movie? Pretty Woman Favourite food? Sushi Favourite quote? “It is what it is”

She also loves surfing! Lee-Anne Pace learns to surf with Mick Fanning

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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sam cele KZN’s “Queen of the Waves”

Full name: Samukelisiwe Cele

Date of Birth: 11 August 1998

Place of Birth: Mthwalume-Siphofu, KZN

High school: Durban Girls’ Secondary School

Stance: Natural (right footed)

Sponsors: Bilt Surfboards, Roxy, Island Style and Lotto

Seventeen year old Durban ripper, Samukelisiwe Cele, made history when she became the first Zulu girl to compete in a World Surfing League event at the Ballito Pro presented by Billabong last year.

Sam Cele

Durban Girls’ Secondary School

KZN’s “Queen of the Waves”

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


main feature: surfing

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

She surfed incredibly well and finished in an impressive 3rd in the Open Women’s Division. She competed in the Billabong South African Junior Championships were she was knocked out in the semifinal. She enjoyed the intense competition at the Ballito Pro and is hopeful that more black girls start riding waves.

“It was exciting to take part in a competition like the Billabong Pro. It was also pretty cool that they made a big deal about me and my heritage. I’m proud to be the first Zulu girl to achieve this. I hope more girls will start surfing because of my story,” said Sam. Sam’s meteoric rise as one of the country’s top female surfers began in 2012 when Sam and her brother, Seluleko, joined what is now known as the Sisonke Surfing Outreach at UShaka Beach situated on Durban’s Golden Mile under the guidance of Sandile Mqadi. “I’ve always seen the sport as crazy. I love aqua sports and used to swim. My parents, who are our biggest supporters, wanted us to do something other than sitting at home so my brother and I started surfing. Sandile could not continue to coach us due to time constraints and we started training with Alvin Mtatshi,” explained Sam.

Top Billing features surfing star Sam Cele

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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sam cele KZN’s “Queen of the Waves”

Sam has done so well in such a short space of time that she has secured sponsorships from Roxy, Island Style, Lotto and Bilt Surfboards. Jason Ribbink, renowned big wave surfer and owner of Bilt Surfboards, is a long-time friend of Sam’s father and he was one of the key people that encouraged Sam to start surfing. Jason is impressed with how quickly Sam has established herself on the South African surfing scene. “I met her Dad a while ago and he wanted them to start surfing. Her uncle is one of the top surfing judges in South Africa so she has a bit of pedigree in the family. I gave her a board that was more suited to her strengths which saw her improve rapidly. Her determination is what sets her apart. Sam and Seluleko will go onto becoming prolific surfers,” said Jason.

Sam completed her schooling at Durban Girls Secondary School last year and said that training was difficult to manage during the course of her school years. She would like to pursue a career in the media or as a psychologist but is focused on improving her technique for now.

Sam Cele

KZN’s “Queen of the Waves”

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


main feature: surfing

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

“Training is the hardest thing as it is time consuming. I trained the most during the school holidays. I will have a lot more time on my hands now that school is done so I can push for my surfing aspirations.” Sam would like to emulate her surfing idol, Alana Blanchard, by competing on the WSL Women’s World Championship Tour and to one day be crowned world champion. She certainly has the potential and the drive to succeed and in time Durban may yet have another World Champion surfer.

Sam Cele

KZN’s “Queen of the Waves”

Anne Wright sits on the Surfing South Africa’s Board of Directors and is the Patron of Ethekwini Surfing:

“I provide a kind of mentorship role for Sam and have been doing so for about seven years. I am a Director on the board of Surfing South Africa and the Patron of Itekweni surfing. I would say that I am a type of mentor to Sam I have watched her since she joined our programme some 7 years ago we are very close and I try to guide her with her goals in Surfing. I would say that Sam has great potential she is a natural on a surfboard and with the right assistance and guidance from SSA I feel she can go right to the top of competitive surfing.”

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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Jeremy Ward jeremy ward leads EP Rugby to Absa U/19 Provincial Championship victory

leads ep rugby to victory Full name: Jeremy (Jem) Charles Ward Date of Birth: 10 January 1996 Place of Birth: Port Elizabeth, South Africa High school attended: Grey High School Tertiary education: Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University Position: Centre Teams represented: Eastern Province Grant Khomo, Eastern Province U/18 Craven Week, NMMU Young Guns, Eastern Province U/19

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

Grey High School


main feature: rugby

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Gallo Images & Jeremy Ward

The Eastern Cape is renowned for being a factory that produces exceptional black rugby players but not much else. The South African rugby fraternity sat up and took notice of the 2015 Eastern Province U/19 team that won the Absa U/19 Provincial Championship final against the more fancied Blue Bulls in October. It is not the win itself but the fact that the team had no big names to speak of that makes this story so special. Former Blitzbok and EP U/19 coach Mzwandile Stick took a bunch of misfits and moulded them into a championship winning team which was captained by inside centre, Jeremy Ward. Jeremy, or Jem, finished school at Grey High School in Port Elizabeth. He is a local boy through and through and believes that playing rugby was a natural progression.

“I went to school at Grey Junior where rugby was instilled in us from a young age. My Dad, Ernest, was never a big rugby player but I grew up in a sports mad household. So I’ve definitely gotten my love for the game from my upbringing,” said Jem.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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jeremy ward leads EP Rugby to Absa U/19 Provincial Championship victory

The EP U/19s were not a massive unit if compared to previous victorious teams. In fact, the Blue Bulls scrumhalf who started in the final, Stephan Enslin, was taller than both EP lock forwards. The team adopted a game plan akin to what worked for Japan when they beat the Springboks during the Rugby World Cup and made up in skill what they lacked in size and strength.

“We were a large group of unknown players. In one of our first meetings we said if we going to do this we must do whatever we can to win. Coach Mzwandile told us that he wants to qualify for the semifinals after the season reached halfway. It was a long process but we did it,” said the former South African Schools waterpolo player.

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

Jeremy Ward leads ep rugby to victory “In terms of specifics, we focused on our fitness. We were one of, if not, the fittest teams in the competition. We worked a lot on our skills and not just the backs but the whole squad. We realised we were not the tallest or biggest team so we opted to run the ball and avoid contact,” he added. The EP U/19s suffered their first defeat in the penultimate round of the competition against the Blue Bulls in Pretoria before bouncing back against Western Province a week later. The players were naturally angry at the loss and according to Jem this is the emotion he used to get his charges back on the saddle and is what ultimately helped them to win the competition. “It was roughly around the same time that New Zealand lost to Australia in the Rugby Championship and Richie McCaw came out saying that the All Blacks were angry. It was the same with us. We were angry that we lost but more because we were pulled out of our comfort zone. It knocked us back to earth.


main feature: rugby

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Gallo Images & Jeremy Ward

After that loss we decided to stick to what worked for us in the past and I think the introspection after the loss is when we won the final,” explained Jem.

that they were not ready to let go of the success they built as a unit with the majority opting to stay in Port Elizabeth.

Jem’s stint as Captain was his first leadership role outside of school, but his days as a prefect at Grey High helped him to lead with excellence. He speaks highly of the brotherhood amongst the players but even brothers bump heads from time to time, and Jem is adamant that he cannot take all the credit as it was a collective effort.

“It is daunting not knowing what the future holds. Our Academy Manager, Robbi Kempson, asked us to trust in the system and we have decided to stick with the Kings.”

“I had to start from the bottom and build relationships with each and every player. I had to find out what makes each and every player tick so I could get the most out of them. My job was made easy because of my vice-captain and lock Lusunda Badiyana. What helped us to bond was that the players were part of the Academy. We all lived together and did team activities like paintball that helped us to grow. In terms of conflict management, we had a leadership group of six players that were available if a player had an issue. It really was a group effort in terms of leadership.” The Eastern Province Rugby Union has come under a ton of scrutiny for their inability to pay their players. It has gotten to a point where players have opted to terminate their contracts and SARU has stepped in to assist the struggling union before they return to Super Rugby next year. The U/19s decided

Jem is a young player determined to follow in the footsteps of his heros Jean de Villiers and Ma’a Nonu and establish himself as one of the world’s best centres while chasing his BCom Accounting degree. He knows that the journey can be a long road and is happy to let his career follow its due course. Jem may appear cool, calm and collective in terms of his goals but he is a man who will not be a misfit for very long.

Mzwandile Stick, EP U/19 coach, on Jeremy and his team’s successful campaign “Jeremy led the team with distinction and he has a bright future ahead of him. The players rallied around him and we enjoyed a good relationship as coach and captain. He believed in what we wanted to achieve and this helped us to win the final. We knew our biggest weakness was our size but the players knew it could be done.”

Jeremy Ward leads ep rugby to victory Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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Erin

Erin Gallagher Seventeen year old swimming sensation

Gallagher Seventeen year old swimming sensation, Erin Gallagher, had an incredible 2015 which saw her win 21 gold medals in various competitions including the two she won at the Commonwealth Youth Games in Samoa. Erin has no plans to rest on her laurels this year and has her sights set firmly on qualifying for the Rio Olympics.

Full name: Erin Paige Gallagher Date of Birth: 18 December 1998 Place of Birth: Durban, South Africa High school attended: St. Mary’s DSG Kloof Stroke: Freestyle, backstroke/ breaststroke Sponsor: Arena South Africa 22

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


main feature: swimming

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Erin was born on the 18th of December 1998 in Durban and took up swimming when she was about five so that she could be safe around water. She soon realised that if she trained harder she could make a success of her love of water. “What started out as water safety training soon turned into something

more serious. My mom told me that she could never get me out of the water because I just loved it so much. I made my first KwaZulu-Natal team in Grade 3 and won a gold medal without any training. That was when I realised I could achieve so much more if I trained a bit harder,” said the Grade 12 St. Mary’s DSG learner.

Personal Interview with Erin Gallagher

Erin is a freestyle swimmer by trade and alternates between backstroke and breaststroke depending on how she feels. She believes that school swimming is vital for any young swimmer’s development and with one year left she has the opportunity to cement a few more school records. “My favorite stroke has always been and always will be freestyle; it just comes naturally to me. I often swap and change between butterfly and backstroke depending on which one “works for me” at that point in time.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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Erin Gallagher Seventeen year old swimming sensation

Right now it’s butterfly but who knows, in another month I could be swimming backstroke instead,” said Erin. “I absolutely love school swimming. I think it is so important, as it gives you the opportunity to bond with provincial and national swimmers. A highlight on the KwaZulu-Natal school swimming calender is the DND Gala held at Kings Park Aquatic Centre. The atmosphere is amazing and each time I compete it feels like my first time,” she added. It goes without saying that young athletes generally look up to athletes who have excelled in their discipline but not many get to compete against their heros. Erin got the opportunity to do just that at the 2014 Commonwealth Games when she contested the semifinal against Australian swimmers Cate and Bronte Campbell.

Erin Gallagher 24

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

“Swimming in the 100m Freestyle semi-final is my best swimming memory to date. I swam against my heroes and achieved my personal best time of 55.67 seconds. My time allowed me to break the South African Under-17 Girls record.”


main feature: swimming

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Her participation at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow gave her the confidence and experience necessary to compete on the international stage and ultimately prepared her for the Commonwealth Youth Games last year where she returned to South Africa with an incredible five medals. “Competing in Samoa was a humbling and exciting experience. Swimming against some of the world’s best was petrifying and inspiring at the same time. I got to know a lot of the swimmers and became really good friends with them. I wasn’t as nervous for that competition as I felt more confident because I knew it was “my gala”. I felt comfortable in my races and I was confident within myself. Everything was where it needed to be and everything just fell into place at the perfect time. Every time I dove into the pool everything around me kind of just froze and everything was so clear, I could picture every stroke from start to finish,” explained Erin. Erin has been training with the Seagulls Swimming Club for the last five years and has a good relationship with her coaches which include the South African Coach of the Year 2015 Graham Hill. She follows a strict diet of chocolate and McDonalds, much to her coaches dismay.

“The only eating plan I’m on is chocolate. I love my chocolate - but I know in a couple of years I might have to sacrifice that to. I always eat two baby cheese burgers, large chips and a McFlurry before every 100m freestyle race. It is my lucky food and I’m sorry, Graham and Delon, but I will never give McDonalds up,” Erin exclaimed with a wry laugh.

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Erin Gallagher Seventeen year old swimming sensation

Young athletes often have to deal with the setbacks of competing without the experience that their older counterparts have. Erin has sacrificed many things on her journey but she does not regret a single thing as it is what she has had to do in order to be one of South Africa’s top swimmers. “Any athlete has to sacrifice something. I train nine times a week so I don’t really have a social life. Saturday is my only chill time and by that I mean catching up on all the series I missed during the week [laughs],” said Erin.

“I had to stop playing other sports including water polo and softball, for which I was awarded KZN colours. I’ve had to deal with injuries this year and losing my Gran, who was without a doubt my biggest fan, so it is not all fun and games. It sometimes sucks but it is worth it when you finally achieve your dream. I also couldn’t have gotten to where I am today without the support of my family, friends, school and sponsor. It is important to surround yourself with a strong support base,” she added.

Erin

The Olympics are only a few months away and Erin is determined to not only qualify but to do well at the global showpiece. She has a rock solid mental plan that she uses to prepare for competitions and it is her hope that it will help others prepare for any difficulty in life.

“For me the most important thing to do to prepare yourself for a competition, is to relax and to trust your abilities. Often the night before or even two nights before my main races, I picture myself swimming it exactly how I want to swim it on the night. But I don’t think about it too much because sometimes that thought can take over my life and just ruin the swim for me. I try to relax as much as possible and focus as much as possible. I trust myself and I trust how I swim my races.”

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

Gallagher

Erin is well on her way to adding her name amongst South Africa’s greatest swimmers. She has already achieved so much that it is only natural to assume her senior career is going to be just as stellar. And Erin Gallagher does not do assumptions. In case you were wondering.


main feature: swimming

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Graham Hill comments: “Erin is an extremely determined young lady and is immensely talented. These two factors are what set the best from the good. She will go far. As for her McDonalds, I had a silver medalist in 2010 who ate McDonalds before a race. Not the best, but different strokes for different folks [laughs]”, said Seagulls Swimming Club head coach Graham Hill.

2014/15 achievements 2014

2015

7 golds

1 gold, 2 silvers

KZN Championships

Cape Town Grand Prix

6 golds, 2 silvers

2 golds, 1 silver

SA Level 3 Championships

Durban Grand Prix

4 golds, 2 silvers

7 golds, 1 silver

Italian Age Group Championships

SA Level 3 Championships

2 silvers, 3 bronze

4 golds

SA Open Senior Nationals

SA Open Senior Nationals

Bronze

5 golds

Relay at BHP Billiton Series (Perth)

Italian Age Group Nationals

Semifinal 100m freestyle

2 golds, 2 silvers, bronze

Commonwealth Games

Commonwealth Games

Swam the Midmar Mile eight times to raise R10 000 for the “Save the Rhinos” campaign

Erin

Gallagher

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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jaco engelbrecht throwing for the stars

jaco

engelbrecht throwing for the stars There is little doubt that South Africa is a nation that produces track and field athletes of the highest quality. Godfrey Mokoena, Zola Budd and Caster Semenya have all flown the South African flag high in their respective disciplines. Jaco Engelbrecht is determined to add his name amongst South Africa’s greatest athletes as he seeks Olympic qualification for shot put.

Springs Technical High School

Full name: Jacobus Petrus (Jaco) Engelbrecht Date of Birth: 8 March 1987 Place of Birth: Springs, South Africa High school attended: Springs Technical High School Tertiary education: University of Johannesburg

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


main feature: athletics

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

jaco

engelbrecht GOM: How and when did you get involved in shot put? JE: I started off as a sprinter because I loved athletics. I picked up a bit of weight when I was younger so I couldn’t run anymore. My father started making me throw bricks on my grandfather’s farm but I had no idea what his intentions were. I started competing in shot put when I was 10 but I had to compete in the Under-11 age group as there wasn’t an Under-10 category. I made the Gauteng Championships with the older boys and 18 years later I’m still enjoying it. GOM: What is the toughest thing about shot put? JE: I’d say the technique. You can be strong and explosive but if your technique is off your throw will be effected. GOM: Who do you look up to? JE: I look up to Adam Nelson in shot put because of the aggression and intensity he brought to the sport. Outside of shot put I look up to my father. He is a down to earth man. He puts others before himself and is a man that many can count on. GOM: Who has been your support base? JE: My family and my coach, Pierre Blignaut.

GOM: You have achieved several medal finishes, which one do you cherish the most? JE: My most cherished medal will surprise people as it is not one of my international medals but a domestic medal. In 2011 I won gold in the USSA Athletics meet. I was leading until the last throw where I was overtaken by the Maties athlete who threw 19.0m. My personal best at the time was 18.3m so I had to dig deep. I managed to throw the shot put 19.42m and won the gold. It was an amazing tournament with the UJ and Maties support sitting alongside each other cheering us on. GOM: Who has been your toughest competitor? JE: I always say that I am my toughest competitor. I sometimes struggle with my confidence and can be unbeatable or amateur depending on my confidence. It has gotten better over the years.

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jaco engelbrecht throwing for the stars

GOM: Walk us through your training programme? JE: This year was tough because I didn’t have much time between work and studying. I went into the World Champs only having trained every second day for an hour if I was lucky. In 2016 I’ll have more time as my studies are now done. I usually train six days of the week which includes gym work, cardio and throwing. This is my conditioning phase which can be difficult as I have to train three times a day between work commitments. My training will intensify as I prepare to qualify for the Olympics. GOM: Do you follow a specific eating plan? JE: I try to but because I am quite busy and drive quite a bit it, it is easier said than done, but I try not to take in too many carbohydrates and keep my protein intake high. GOM: What has been your worst injury? What happened and how long did it take you to recover? JE: I have been lucky with injuries up to this point. I have a recurring groin injury that I hurt when I was still doing discus back in 2011 but I am able to compete with it. It just hampers my training in the gym a bit at times and that can have an effect on my throwing. GOM: Are you sponsored? If not, are you assisted financially? JE: Unfortunately I have no sponsors or any financial assistance.

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

jaco

engelbrecht


main feature: athletics

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

GOM: Do you have a day job? JE: I am a Business Studies and Life Orientation teacher at Hoёrskool Randburg. GOM: What changes would you like to see in South African athletics so the country can achieve more medal finishes? JE: We need financial support as athletes. The reason that rugby and cricket players can compete and do so well is because that is their job and they get paid to train. If we put those same players in day jobs and let them fund themselves and only train after they are done at work, you will see a different team that won’t be able to compete against the best like they are doing now. I strongly believe that if we as athletes could train full time, we can compete with the best in the world.

GOM: If you could invite any three personalities to dinner, who would they be and why? JE: Adam Nelson so I could pick his brain about training and get tips from him. Jennifer Aniston as I’ve always had a huge movie crush on her and lastly the Rock because he’s amazing. GOM: Favourite quote? JE: Impossible is NOTHING!

Jaco’s coach, Pierre Blignaut, on his athletic ability

I have been working with Jaco for the past 6-7 years and I believe his biggest problem is that he is an amateur competing in a professional world. That is the biggest issue that South African athletes struggle with. Jaco has the best technique that I have seen in shot put. He has yet to qualify for the Rio Olympics but I have no doubt he will.

GOM: Shot put is a strength sport that comes with potential health risks. What advice would you give to young athletes who want to pursue the sport? JE: You need to be patient. Don’t try and go too hard too soon in the gym. One needs to work smart. If you want to get too strong too quick, that’s when the injuries occur.

Achievements from 2011-present

GOM: What would you say to motivate youngsters to follow athletics? JE: If you have the passion for the sport, do it for the love not the fame and glory because that’s not what it is about. GOM: What are your goals for 2016? JE: I want to be the South African and African champion and would like to throw 21m or further. I’d also like to qualify for the Olympics and reach the final.

Just for fun... GOM: What do you do in your off time? JE: Between my work, my studies and my training I don’t have much off time but when I do get some time to myself I spend it with my fiancée and our baby girl. Sometimes I’ll have a braai with my best friend when I’m not busy and he’s not travelling.

2011 Gold - USSA

Gold - Southern Regional Championships Silver - All African Games Bronze - SA National Championships 7th - World Student Games

2012 Gold - USSA

Bronze - SA National Championships

2013 Gold - USSA

Champion - Varsity Sports Athletics Silver - SA National Championships 5th - World Student Games

2014 Gold - SA Open Championships

Silver - SA National Championships Silver - USSA

2015 Gold - USSA

Gold - Southern Regional Championships Silver - SA National Championships 6th - World Student Games 25th - IAAF Beijing

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

31


woo-ju son shining her light on Golf

woo-ju son

shining her

light on Golf Full name: Woo-Ju Son Date of Birth: 18 February 2001 Place of Birth: Johannesburg, South Africa High School: Curro Aurora (Grade 10) ranking: 1 - Junior; 5 – Senior handicap: Scratch home club: Eagle Canyon Golf Club

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

Sanlam SA Women’s Stroke Play Championship photo by: Catherine Kotze


main feature: golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Catherine Kotze & Jean-Pierre Vidot

Woo-Ju Son, 16, is currently the top junior ladies amateur golfer in South Africa. She is only in Grade 10 and has already sunk a hole-in-one and is destined for great things. Game On Magazine recently caught up with Woo-Ju to find out more about this golfing sensation.

shining her

light on Golf GOM: How, when and why did you start golf? WJS: I was first exposed to golf through my parents. I fell in love with Little Tiger clubs while at the Pro Shop and begged and pleaded with my parents to buy them for me. I was three when I started but got my first golf coach, Phil Simmons, when I was five. I decided to pursue golf because Phil told me I could go professional one day and be number one. GOM: Who do you look up to in golf and why? WJS: I admire Lydia Ko. The first time I watched her play on TV she looked so confident and happy. She is also the youngest golfer to win the Ladies Professional Golf Association Tour. GOM: Any specific people that have supported you? WSJ: My Mom and Dad have supported me from the very beginning. My

woo-ju son

school has been very accommodating and help me to catch up when I’m away competing. My current coach, Stephan Spies, Phil, my friends and last but not least the Gauteng golf team. GOM: Most challenging thing about golf? WJS: To control your emotions/mind after a bad shot and to never give up until the ball goes in the last hole. GOM: Favourite shot and most difficult shot? WJS: My favourite shot is chipping/ pitching and the most difficult shot is my approach shots. GOM: Your most cherished memory and why? WJS: My most cherished memory is when I had three eagles in a row at the Randpark Country Club at the 11th, 12th and 13th holes.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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woo-ju son shining her light on Golf

GOM: Do you play golf for your school? WJS: Yes, I play golf for my school. There is a Primary and High School A and B team. We play twice a week.

Woo-Ju won the Women’s Division by 10-strokes at the World Amateur Golf Audi Reunion on Reunion Island in April last year photo by: Jean-Pierre Vidot

GOM: Your favourite tournament and why? WJS: I don’t have a favourite tournament but my favourite tournaments are the WGSA tournaments because without their help and the sponsors we wouldn’t get the privilege to compete. GOM: You competed in Germany in August. Where did you finish and talk us through the experience?

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

WJS: It was weird to compete in a country where the first language is not English but it was a good learning opportunity. I finished in the Top 20 and had an average tournament. I shot 74 on the first day in the rain wasn’t too bad but I struggled on the second and third day. My shots and short game were not working for me.


main feature: golf

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Catherine Kotze & Jean-Pierre Vidot

shining her

light on Golf

woo-ju son

GOM: Have you ever hit a hole-inone?

GOM: Do you have goals outside of golf?

WJS: I have hit two hole-in-ones on the third hole of the Zwartkops course in Centurion.

WJS: To live my life and have fun with what I have and who I have in my life.

GOM: What are your golf aspirations for next year? And beyond?

GOM: What do you do for fun?

WJS: In 2016 I would like to be the number one junior and senior golfer in South Africa. I’m committed to training as hard as I can in order to be the number one in the world.

WJS: I love to draw and listen to music. I love to hang around, sometimes alone and with my friends.

GOM: Do you participate in other sports? WJS: I have participated in lots of sports like swimming, hockey, soccer, tennis, netball and athletics. I really do enjoy playing sport. GOM: Any other notable achievements outside of golf?

GOM: Who is your toughest competitor and why?

WJS: I have played the piano since I was a small girl. I love playing the piano and have received diplomas and trophies for piano. I started playing in high school tournaments when I was six.

WJS: My toughest competitors are Ivanna Samu and Kaleigh Telfer. We have been friends for a long time but we are also rivals competing for the same rankings.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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Nathi Ngubane is growing development hockey in KZN

Nathi

Ngubane is growing development hockey in KZN Nathi Ngubane is a Durban hockey legend who has been running the INK Hockey Club for the past 22 years. This is an incredible feat considering he had never played the game at any level. Game On Magazine caught up with Nathi to find out more about a man who is helping township youngsters shine on the hockey scene. Full name: Nkosinathi Ngubane Date of Birth: 13 February 1966 Place of Birth: Durban, South Africa High School attended: Inhlakanipho High School Tertiary education: UKZN (B.Ed Honours). I have finished six course modules for my Master’s Degree (Public and Administration) to start my dissertation if everything goes well next year.

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


sport development: hockey

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

GOM: It is clear that you have a passion for hockey, how did you get involved with hockey? NN: In 1993, Gillian Daniels attended the Kwamashu Community Games and held a few development hockey programmes. I was attracted to the game because of how similar it is to soccer which is what I played while growing up. I asked her to visit Inanda where I was teaching at the time and I invited 22 schools to participate in a Coaching the Coaches course. 2015 marks 22 years that I’ve been involved with hockey.

GOM: Did you play hockey at a high level? NN: I had never played hockey before as the sport didn’t exist in township high schools when I was in school. GOM: What is INK? NN: INK stands for Inanda, Ntuzuma and Kwamashu which are the three township areas that the hockey club serves. We are affiliated to KwaZulu-Natal Coastals Hockey Association and have junior and senior teams for boys and girls. Our senior boys have been promoted to the first division while our senior girls play in the fourth division. GOM: How and why did you get involved with INK? NN: I received a complaint from my students about not having hockey at high school level so I started the INK Hockey Club.

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Nathi Ngubane is growing development hockey in KZN

Nathi

Ngubane GOM: What are the biggest issues that you have to deal with as a coach of an underprivileged hockey club? NN: Not having the proper facilities. We were promised an astroturf by the muncipality in 2008 but nothing has been done since. The project manager let us down but negotiations have started again. Transport is also an issue as the kids have to get to training and many cannot afford it. Parental support or the lack thereof is a major problem we face. GOM: Are you assisted in anyway in terms of financial aid, kit etc. If so, who are the people responsible? NN: We don’t receive any funding at the moment but we are going apply for Lotto funding. The Ethekwini Municipality Sport & Recreation Department does assist us with transport. I’d like to thank Minister Fikile Mbalula and General Secretary Aleck Moemi who donated equipment for 50 of our players.

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


sport development: hockey

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

GOM: What does a typical week’s training involve? NN: We do training at the various schools after hours. We only have proper club training during the school holidays as in term we have to wait for an open time slot at Queensmead Hockey Stadium. GOM: Do you provide your athletes with specific eating plans? NN: No, these kids come from poor background families and cannot afford eating plans. GOM: What are your goals for INK in 2016? NN: We would like to have a few of our players in the Under-21 national team next year and take the club to Germany. We would also like to get the girls and boys teams promoted to their next divisions.

GOM: What has INK achieved under your guidance? NN: Nine of our boys have received high school scholarships. Six at Glenwood High School, two at Northwood Boys and one at Durban High School. Our Under-12 boys participated in the World United Games in Austria last year and won silver. This year we hosted a hockey tournament with our sister club, Riverside Hockey Club, which included a German team Sportgarten. We also conduct life orientation programmes which has allowed us to change the behaviour and attitude of many players. We are also getting a fair amount of interest from white players who want to join INK.

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39


Nathi Ngubane is growing development hockey in KZN

Nathi

Ngubane GOM: Have any of your players gone onto higher hockey honours? NN: The boys that received the high school scholarships were awarded with Under-12 and Under-13 KZN colours. Two of our boys were invited to the SA Schools national camp but we are still waiting to hear if they made it. Our goal is to have a few players in the national squad for the 2022 Commonwealth Games. GOM: Do you coach other clubs? NN: I coached the Durban University of Technology Ladies team in 2013. We didn’t do very well in the league but we won our group. GOM: You coached the South African Under-12 boys as they competed in Austria earlier this year, talk us through the experience?

NN: The boys were selected from INK to represent

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Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016


sport development: hockey

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

South Africa and the Ethekwini Municipality at the United World Games. The boys were identified for their talent and it was for this that they were chosen. We lost 3-2 to Germany in the final and the boys were naturally disappointed. But they played well and we even received a message from the German team that said we were their toughest competition. GOM: As a coach you have insight to what needs to be done in order to grow the game in South Africa. In your opinion what needs to change? NN: Many things need to change but people are scared to tell the truth. We need to change the current system of selecting players just because their parents played at national level years ago. I feel we need selectors from all races and these selectors need to visit underprivileged clubs as well and not only scout during the Interprovincial Tournaments. Money received by federations should be used to develop the game in rural areas and townships only as this is where hockey needs the most attention. The last thing that needs to change is that black communities need to stop seeing hockey as a white man’s sport.

GOM: SASCOC has refused SA from competing at the Olympics. What are your thoughts on this decision? NN: I’m not sure why they refused our national teams to compete because they did very well to qualify. I feel sorry for them.

Game On Magazine, January: Issue 24, 2016

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