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The ultimate online Sports Magazine!

ISSUE 12, FEBRUARY 2015

The ultimate online sports ma Also IN THIS ISSUE

bRendon KonKi

PAddy uPton on PARenting & CoAChing

ALvIro PeTerSeN

JUSTINE ASHER SPORTS WOMAN 0F THE YEAR WITH A DISABILITY 2014

Ashleigh

MooLMan Pasio

★ 2014 sPortswoMan of the year ★

PortIa sPorts star modIse of the year 2014

amaZInG

GracE

LEGoTE


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GAME ON TEAM Founders; Dave White | Michael Janse van Rensburg

contents The ultimate

GURU (Managing Editor) Dee Hean | marketing@gameonmagazine.co.za QUARTERBACK (Creative Director) Michael Janse van Rensburg | michael@camouflage.co.za REFEREE (Sales Director) Dave White | white.dave78@gmail.com PLAYMAKER (Art & Creative Senior Designer) Raymond Q Nkomo | ray@camouflage.co.za LINEBACKER (Senior Designer) Kerry Kruger | kerry@camouflage.co.za Eye In The Sky (Chief Photographer) Dr Henry Kelbrick | medsport@mweb.co.za BEAN COUNTER (Financial & Office Administrator) Erika Kruger | admin@camouflage.co.za PUBLISHER CAMOUFLAGE VISUAL SOLUTIONS (PTY) LTD APP AVAILABLE ON iTunes | Android Market HEAD OFFICE 180 Blackwood Road, Clubview, Centurion Gauteng | South Africa Tel | +27 12 654 9833 Fax | +27 86 532 7880 Web | gameonmagazine.co.za

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BENCH (CONTRIBUTORS) wilhelm de swardt Journalist

Cover FeatureS cover STORY

Ashleigh Moolman Pasio Heading Here Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos by Gallo Images

MAIN STORIES Portia Modise “I learned from my brothers” Words: Name Surname | Photos: Name Surname

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Justine Asher Moving forward one wheel spin at a time Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

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YOUTH STORY Grace Legote Africa’s Amazing Top Rhythmic Gymnast Words: Olivia Darby | Photos: Provided

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ColumnS HEALTH AND FITNESS Wenda Nel Healthy Eating for Active Adolescents Words: Wenda Nel | Photos: Reg Caldecott

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Heike Kotzé CrossFit The ultimate fitness programme! Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Henry Kelbrick

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Waldo Van Heerden – Part 1 THE YOUNG ATHLETE AND THE RISK FOR INJURIES Words: Waldo Van Heerden

Dan Lombard Freelance Journalist

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Parenting AND COACHING

Mary-Ann Dove

Paddy Upton Parenting & Coaching Children for Success

Neil Greig Waldo Van Heerden

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photo: Provided

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Mary Ann Dove Spectator Behaviour at Youth Sporting Events

Olivia Darby Wenda Nel

Words: Mary-Ann Dove, founder www. positivesportparent.com

freepik.com

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO BACK PAGE MEDIA

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The ultimate online sports magazine

online sports magazine I ssue 1 3 , F e b rua ry 2 015

YOUTH Features

PROFESSIONAL PROFILES

athletics

RESUME

Vorentoe High School Nurturing Young Talent

43 46

Mary Ann Dove

GOLF Luca Filippi Lighting the green on fire

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SOCCER Brendon Konki Write down that name!

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Coaching Focus Rugby Affies’ Sakkie One of the true visionaries of SA Schools rugby

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Swimming Grant Kritzinger On SA Swimming Development for the Olypmics

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Upliftment & Development Cricket Alviro Petersen Breaking new boundaries!

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SPORT and ACADEMICS hpc SA’s top Sporting Career & Academic Training Centre

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PRESS RELEASE CRICKET Varsity CUP Cricket To Break The Boundaries Of T20 Rules

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Rugby Varsity Cup Rugby 2015 is going to Rock!

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PROFESSIONAL PROFILE:

Basketball Maritzburg College At the summit of basketball

Waldo Van Heerden

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Ashleigh Moolman Pasio “Live Passionately!”

“Live Passionately!”

Ashleigh

Moolman Pasio

★ 2014 Sportswoman of the Year ★ “Remember, life is all about choices. You choose to win or to lose. When things don’t go right, there is always a left. Choose to focus on the positives. No one owes you anything, but you owe it to yourself to follow your heart. Dream big and make it happen. Choose a purpose driven life and live passionately!” www.ashleighcycling.com/message-from-my-heart-choose-happiness/

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


COVER Feature: CYCLING

Words: Dee Hean | Photos: Provided

Game On had chosen to do an article on Ashleigh prior to her being nominated and winning the 2014 Sportswoman of the Year Award, so we were truly delighted when her award was announced, as it added another dimension to our interview with her. When asked how she felt about the award, “I was humbled to win that evening, but I was humbled again when I realised why I had been selected. Being Sportswoman of the Year wasn’t just about what results I had achieved, I think it was also about how I achieved them. The award is proof that passion is productive” Not only is Ashleigh inspirational, but she has so much to share that will support our young aspiring lady cyclists in finding their groove in the sport. I would also describe Ashleigh as a highly motivated young woman, which is not surprising, given some of her life experiences thus far, which have developed a deep sense of purpose and drive that come from the heart. Ashleigh is a strong woman! She

is a friendly, open, passionate woman, who knows she has something important to contribute to life, especially in women’s cycling. Finding purpose is what most people seek in their lifetime; some just get a clearer picture earlier in life than others. In her last year at school she was involved in a serious horse-riding accident, which left her in a coma for 10 days. She had an operation to release cranial pressure as a result of breaking the basal skull bone and the prognosis was not very good. The doctors painted the worst scenario for her anxious parents and predicted that she would not finish school, or ever be the same again, but “luckily I made a miraculous recovery and finished school with 7 distinctions but I realised that, in that moment, I could have died at any point throughout that whole situation, but I didn’t, and that there is greater meaning for my life. As a Christian, I believe that God saved me for a reason and that today, I am here to do something. For many years I didn’t know what it was and, after finishing school, I went onto study Engineering at Stellenbosch University. It was there that I met my husband, Carl, who was also studying Engineering. He comes from a sporty background and was a Springbok athlete at the time. The sporting side of varsity was not easy to manage, in addition to my studies, as my course was demanding. I started to get involved in the triathlon but I don’t swim too well, so I changed course to the duathlon, but was plagued with running injuries, and this forced me to be on a bike.” From the first moment of riding with Carl, he would tell her, “you’ve got talent, you could be World Champion one day, and that is quite a big thing to say. I actually didn’t believe him at first, but he kept reinforcing it, which inspired me to take it more seriously. Then, the thought “well maybe this is what I am here to do to spread my passion (after falling in love with the sport) for cycling, which is why I share my stories, my passion and my lessons. I feel that is a role I can play in inspiring others. That is what is important to me – more than the

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Ashleigh Moolman Pasio “Live Passionately!”

“Live Passionately!”

Ashleigh

Moolman Pasio

★ 2014 Sportswoman of the Year ★

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


COVER Feature: CYCLING

Words: Dee Hean | Photos: Provided

results, which are, of course, very important – because that is how you attract people’s attention, but more than that, I want to inspire others to find their passion and to pursue it and to set goals, in any area of their life.”

“Cycling is the fastest growing recreational sport in South Africa, and I have realised that we need to start developing some depth, in terms of talent. It is wonderful to see the progress that is being made in schools that are starting to include cycling in school sports, so that the youngsters can have the opportunity to be exposed to it at a young age and in a more protective environment”. Ashleigh’s blog www.ashleighcycling.com is full of insights, humour and candid reflections of her personal experiences and growth through professional cycling. She writes from the heart, and I would recommend you visit her blog (90 posts), it’s a great read. From “What I learned from a Bowl of Oats”: “Whether I’ve crashed out or climbed up onto the podium, each race has given me a small nugget of knowledge that helps me

to improve and, the truth is, I’ve learned the most from my mistakes. But, as I learned at Emakumeen Euskal Bira, learning from your mistakes isn’t enough… The power data was telling me I could do better. I had always thought I was racing on my limits but there was no proof in the pudding. Far from being disappointed, I was excited because I knew exactly what I could do. Like swapping out the rice for oats, I just needed to have the courage to act on what I had just learnt.” From “More than You See”: “ In

cycling, it comes down to one day, one race, one moment and at the end of the season it’s easy to value yourself by your race results (or lack thereof). But an athlete is more than a list on a sheet of paper, more than a podium finish, more than DNF, more than a medal. While I’m proud of my race accomplishments, especially my Commonwealth success, I also value how I survived so many disappointing race days and still raced like I could win the next one. I value how I fought to believe in myself when self-doubt threatened to

knock me down. Most of all, I value that this season I learned that I am more than my race results.” From “In Between Races”: “Race days come and go but we’re still a team in between and the more little things you know about your teammates the easier it is to get the big things. Over the past month of racing, I’ve realized the stronger we are between races, the stronger we will be in the races. Coordinated socks may not win us races but it definitely gives our team an edge!” From”Message From My Heart: Choose Happiness”: “Life is

short; rather than living a life of dissatisfaction and envy, let’s choose to live a life of happiness. Lets choose to be content with our circumstances and what we have. And if not content, let’s strive to actively influence positive improvement and change”. “I highly value my degree in chemical engineering, and, believe it or not, the lessons I learned while studying have been invaluable to my success as an athlete. I use the analytical mindset I learned everyday, and who is to say I won’t one day practice as an engineer. However, I know I have found

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Ashleigh Moolman Pasio “Live Passionately!”

something I truly love and I couldn’t give up cycling for a career that would always (right now) be second in my heart”.

“I’ve said it before: with risk comes reward. For many, it would be too risky giving up engineering for a less stable, uncertain career in cycling but, for me, it was worth it to pursue my true passion! Today I find myself living my dreams, traveling the world, pursuing my passion, learning new things about myself every day, meeting amazing people and I couldn’t be happier. I meet many people who say they wish they could do what I’m doing, but the truth is they are wishing they had the strength to risk it all and live out their true passion!” I have learned so many valuable life lessons through my career in cycling, and Perseverence is one of the biggest, not to give up in the face of adversity or challenge. I don’t feel anything in life is a waste (experiences) business lessons are all valuable and will all play a role one day in whatever route I take after cycling. I would love to have kids, it is the objective one day, in my opinion its not really possible to have kids and compete, you probably could, but the focus for me right now is on cycling. This is our 2014 Sportswoman of the Year! And she is Proudly South African! Ashleigh, we are proud to have you on our Podium, and flying our flag. We wait in anticipation as we watch you climb the mountain of success.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

SIDEBAR Age:

29 years young,

Height:

1.63 m short,

Weight:

more or less 50 kg,

Patriot:

proudly South African.

Born in:

Pretoria, South Africa on the 9th of December 1985

Attended:

Eunice Girls School in Bloemfontein.

Tertiary Stellenbosch University : Qualified Chemical Engineer Education: Cycling career:

Pursuing a career as a professional cyclist with Bigla Pro Cycling team in Europe and Momentum Biogen in South Africa

Ashleigh describes herself I live half the year in Riebeek Kasteel, South Africa and the other half in Girona, Spain; constantly chasing summer days and good weather. I cook quality food, cycle the mountain roads of Girona, and love family time in South Africa. I am somewhat of an all rounder on the bike, but my strength is definitely climbing. My character is that of a hard working, dedicated and motivated individual. I have a weakness for good coffee, dark chocolate and like to sleep late. My goal is to promote women’s cycling in a totally testosteronedriven world. I am driven by passion and purpose. Life and the greatness of God inspires me and pushing my body to the limits everyday reminds me how wonderfully and beautifully we are made!


Main Story: SOCCER

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

She won the 2014 Sports Star of the Year Award, after excelling for South Africa’s women’s national football team, Banyana Banyana, but Portia Modise won’t take any of the credit and hopes that her prestigious award will inspire other women in sport.

Portia Modise

Sports

Star

of the Year

2014

Age Height Accolade Personal Best Position

31 1.62 M Sports Star ‘14 100 Goals Forward Midfielder

I learned from my brothers

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Portia Modise I learned from my brothers

Portia Modise

I learned from my brothers

Born in White City township, Soweto, 31 years ago, Portia Modise started her primary school days in Soweto and went on to do her junior secondary at Dlambulo, and completed high school at Ebhongo High in Dlamini section. Growing up in a big family, the current Banyana leading goalscorer, with 100 goals for her country, launched her football career by following her brothers and cousins when they went to play and ended up getting hooked on the game. “I grew up surrounded by my brothers and cousins, who would take me to their matches around the township. That’s how I ended up getting to love the game – I learned from my brothers,” reveals Portia.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


Main Story: SOCCER

Words: Backpage Media | Photos: Backpage Media

“I started taking part in street football and I quickly realised that I was good at it. Soon afterwards, I joined Jomo Cosmos ladies and went on to play for teams like Soweto Ladies, Palace Super Falcons and Croesus Ladies, were I gained valuable experience. I was selected for Basetsana (Under 20 Women’s team) and was promoted to Banyana Banyana and the rest is history.” When asked about what makes her tick and whether she received coaching from any structured organisation, Portia reveals that training and maintaining her fitness level keeps her spirited and she never received proper coaching.

“Doing what I love, not to please someone, is my motto and, more than anything, I love training and keeping fit,” added Portia. “I never received coaching or help to become a professional player, the only help I can talk about is mixing with the guys as they play better. I associated with them and they were good in teaching me, you know, in relation to (football) basics and so on.” Her personal advice to other young and aspiring footballers, especially women, Portia

“Everybody has struggles and problems but there must be that drive to overcome the obstacles and succeed in life. There’s nothing that beats a passionate individual – we just have to believe in making our lives a success, despite the challenges. I’d say, even though we all come from different backgrounds, everyone needs a role model – someone to look up to - someone who inspires us. Life is easier that way.” said,

Although football managed to put the Modise family name on the map, she revealed that if it weren’t for the game, she’d be a social worker because she loves helping people. “I think social work would have been my career if it weren’t for soccer because helping people is in my blood. But then I don’t regret choosing football because I’m just crazy about the game, and I’m thinking of taking coaching courses. I need to help the young and upcoming players improve their game – I know there are girls out there with the hunger to achieve and I will be there for them.” Although Portia first donned the Banyana Banyana jersey back in the year 2000, she was crowned Sports Star of the Year last year by Minister of Sport, Arts and Recreation, Fikile Mbalula. The player with 117 caps for her country simply says:

“I felt that my hard work was finally noticed and it was an honour to receive such an award particularly as I am the first woman to be awarded. I always wanted to put a mark in what I do and the award was just something that beautifully acknowledges my work throughout these years. I competed with great athletes and to come out tops was unbelievable – I hope that my award opens doors for other women to win and follow suit.”

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Portia Modise I learned from my brothers

SIDEBAR Statistics Modise joins an elite group of 13 players to have ever scored 100 goals or more for their country. The 31-year-old is the only African player to have achieved this feat. Modise’s 100 goals in 117 games puts her third, in terms of her goals-pergame ratio, of players who have netted over 100 goals for their country: her 0.85 goals/game, only puts her behind the retired duo of Julie Fleeting and Elisabetta Vignotto, who have an impressive 0.97 goal/game average. United States’ Abby Wambach leads the way, with 171 goals in 225 matches for the Stars and Stripes, with the 34-year-old still very much an active member of her side, as her tally continues to rise. The only male soccer player to score over a century of goals for his country, was Iran’s Ali Daei, who scored 109 goals in 149 matches in his 13-year career, before retiring in 2006. The highest male international goal-scorer still active for his country, is the Republic of Ireland’s Robbie Keane, on 65 goals.

Sports

Star

of the Year

2014 12

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


MAIN STORY: handcycling

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Justine Asher, one of a few competitive South African female handcyclers, added a different title to her trophy cabinet when she was awarded Sportswoman of the Year with a Disability at the South African Sports Awards held in November last year. Only two years into competitive cycling and Asher’s athletic carrer is booming! She has already taken top spot on the podium many times; including four wins in the H2 class of the UCI Road Cup races and two wins at the 2014 UCI World Championships.

SPORTS WOMAN 0F THE YEAR with A Disability 2014

Justine Asher

Moving forward one wheel spin at a time

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Justine Asher Moving forward one wheel spin at a time

Justine lead an active lifestyle before being involved in a car accident that left her a C7 incomplete quadriplegic in 1989, soon after matriculating from Plumstead High School in Cape Town. She has dedicated her life to achieving as much independence as possible. In the process, the former model obtained her Diploma in Graphic Design from Cape Technikon, married her husband, Shaun, whom she jokingly admits to meeting in a bar, and is the mother of two teenage daughters. She also runs a real estate business with her husband. “I don’t really have a motto or quote that I live by. I just get up and do it. I only discovered handcycling recently but I have always kept fit by swimming and I dive whenever my schedule permits. I’m an active person at my core,” says Asher. Handcycling is more than just a sport for Asher, as she cycles recreationally with her family. This allows her to unwind from her tough training schedule. “My goal is to be selected for the Paralympic team that will compete in Rio De Janeiro in 2016. I cycle for my club, Maties in Stellenbosch, nationally and internationally. I’m a part of the High Performance team, so training is gruelling. My coach, Tom Paulsen, pushes me hard and the results are beginning to show.”

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


MAIN STORY: handcycling

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

SPORTS WOMAN 0F THE YEAR with A Disability 2014

“When I first started cycling, the hills felt like Everest. I can’t help but chuckle at the thought because now, I rush down hills at 80km/h and I realise I have found my calling. I feel completely free whenever I ride,” explains Asher. As inspiring as Asher is, her own sources of inspiration stem from different people. Nelson Mandela, Mother Theresa and fellow handcyclist, Pieter du Preez, are a few of the people she looks up to. Her support structure provides a different source of inspiration.

“My family and friends treat me as they treat other abled-bodied people: equally. There is no special treatment and I love and respect them for that. My journey has been difficult and if it were not for the special people in my life, I wouldn’t be where I am today.” This year will prove to be an important year as Asher sets out to achieve her dream of winning a Paralympic medal and, judging by her success thus far, there is little that stands in her way.

Justine Asher Moving forward one wheel spin at a time Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Justine Asher Moving forward one wheel spin at a time

Sidebar Asher on... Becoming involved in hand cycling: The first step is to join a club. To handcycle competively, you need to qualify for nationals and then do well enough to compete internationally. The rest is just hard work, eating healthy and never giving up.

The difficulties of hand cycling: ain

The biggest hurdle is the cost. A bike is not cheap, averaging R60000. This excludes other equipment. It helps to get sponsors but this too, is difficult. There is not a lot of money in the sport in South Africa. I'm currently without any sponsors at the moment.

Her SA Sports Award:

ce

ad

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Sp

Ra

Ro

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When they called out my name I was taken aback. I never expected to win. I was nominated along with Kgothatso Montjane (tennis) and Adri Visser (swimming), who are equally deserving of such an accolade. I'm honoured.

2014 Race finishes 1st

Currently ranked 1st in Women's H2 class

1st

UCI World Championships Para-Cycling Road Race — Greenville, SC

1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st

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USA

USA

Spain

Spain

Italy

Italy

UCI World Championships Para-Cycling Time Trial — Greenville, SC UCI World Cup Para-Cycling Road Race — Segovia UCI World Cup Para-Cycling Time Trial — Segovia

e rg o e

UCI World Cup Para-Cycling Road Race — Castiglione UCI World Cup Para-Cycling Time Trial — Castiglione South African Road Para-Cycling Championships

RSA

South African Time Trial Para-Cycling Championships RSA

RSA

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OCC 42 km Road Race — George

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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G CC

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Justine Asher Moving forward one wheel spin at a time


YOUTH STORY: Gymnastics

Words: Olivia Darby | Photos: Provided

AMAZING

GRACE LEGOTE AFRICA’S TOP RHYTHMIC GYMNAST In 1992, when Lenah Legote named her baby daughter Grace, it was a most fitting and somewhat prophetic choice. The definition of grace is:

‘Elegance, or beauty of form, manner, motion, or action.’

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Grace Legote Africa’s Amazing Top Rhythmic Gymnast

I am confident that, never before in the history of time, has a human being been more aptly named than 22 year old, Grace Legote, South Africa’s top rhythmic gymnast. At 1.7 metres, weighing a mere 45 kilograms, Grace’s miniscule frame is supported by long, slender legs that go on for miles. One would be forgiven for thinking that her exquisite physique was genetically engineered for rhythmic gymnastics. Russian gymnastics coach, Tatiana LavrentchoukViser, in collaboration with Susan Herselman, founded the Klerksdorp School of Gymnastics, a non-profit community initiative. Tatiana, who first met Grace when she was eleven years old, said, “It appeared as if Grace floated on a cloud when she moved.” Tatiana knew that Grace’s physique, agility and effortless fluidity of movement were the perfect combination of a rhythmic gymnast, and so their journey as coach and pupil began. Typically, professional gymnasts start their training at around five or six years old, so a lot of hard work was required to get Grace up to competition level. Little Grace embraced a rigorous and demanding training schedule and it was not long before her hard work and dedication paid off. She performed well on the South African competitive circuit and in 2005, with only two years of training under her belt, she won the Junior Sportswoman of the Year award. By 2009, Grace had progressed to senior level and competed at her first World Championships. Since then, she has competed extensively internationally and the sheer volume of Grace’s accolades, trophies, titles and medals is testimony to her undiluted brilliance.

She qualified to compete in the 2014 Commonwealth Games and her experience in Edinburgh is the highlight of her career and the achievement of which she is most proud. She performed beautifully throughout the Games and, had it not been for a most unfortunate and uncharacteristic error in her final ribbon routine, she would have won a bronze medal. Nonetheless, Grace performed excellently at her first Commonwealth Games, achieving an outstanding 5th place in the clubs final; 7th in the ribbon final; and 10th in the individual all-round category.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

In the 2014 African Gymnastics Championships, Grace sealed her claim to being the top rhythmic gymnast on the African continent, by winning the individual all-round category. She went on to win a further four gold medals in the team, ribbon, clubs and ball categories, in addition to a silver medal in the hoop category.

At the 2014 Commonwealth Games, Grace unnerved the competition; she proved she was real contender and world stood up and took notice. In addition to raw talent and technical expertise, Grace has got another ace up her sleeve! She has definitely got the x-factor – that magical star quality that sets her apart from the rest….the ability to captivate an audience. She wowed the crowd – they were mesmerized by her.


YOUTH STORY: Gymnastics

Words: Olivia Darby | Photos: Provided

Grace (who, let’s face it, was a very long way from home) was ‘the people’s favourite’ and had quite the following! The spectators were not alone; journalists and commentators, from all over the world, lauded her praises; and Grace got more press coverage than many higher scoring contenders. The English are steadfast and unrelenting in their patriotism, sometimes mercilessly so! Grace’s appearance, resplendent in full flight, on the front page of The Guardian Newspaper, is without doubt, the ultimate compliment. In the world of athletics, where performance is so often determined by units of measurement – a numbers game of time, height, length or weight – rhythmic gymnastics adds a welcome dash of Hollywood glamour and a hint of Cirque de Soleil to the proceedings. To watch Grace perform, is a rare treat indeed and every routine leaves me filled with wonder and awe. This is a description of approximately 4 seconds of one of Grace’s ball routines: she throws the ball in the air, she leaps, swirls, somersaults, rolls onto her tummy, catches the ball between her head and foot and then uses her perfectly arched back as a ramp to generate momentum for the ball to take flight again. The logical side of me cannot compute how it is physically possible to successfully execute so many manoeuvres, within a matter of seconds. In the absence of a logical, scientific explanation, I can only put it down to magic. Prepare yourself to be enchanted, awe-struck and spellbound by a very special brand of magic, weaved by South Africa’s very own inimitable Amazing Grace Legote.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Grace Legote Africa’s Amazing Top Rhythmic Gymnast

GETTING TO KNOW GRACE A LITTLE BETTER: Q: I know that you are at college at present – what course are you studying? A: “I am studying towards a qualification in Sports Management at Centurion Academy. It’s difficult to juggle studying and training but I enjoy it very much and the Academy is amazingly supportive.” Q: How do you plan on using your qualification? A: “I want to become a coach at the Klerksdorp School of Gymnastics, where I was trained.” Q: What is a typical day for you? A: “During the week, I attend classes at college from 8.30am to 2.30pm and I train from 2.30pm to 7.30pm. Then I eat dinner and work on assignments for college. I also train on Saturdays for four to five hours.” Q: What do you love about rhythmic gymnastics? A: “I love the music, the costumes, the choreography but I think I like performing for an audience the most. By the time I perform a routine, I have practiced it so many times that I don’t have to consciously think about what I am doing – it seems to come naturally. I feel like I come alive when I perform.” Q: What is the most challenging aspect of being a gymnast? A: “You need to practice, practice, practice and remember to never give up.” Q: Do you have to follow a certain type of eating plan to ensure top performance? A: “I need a lot of energy to train properly but it’s very important that I don’t gain weight. We are supposed to follow a high-carb, low fat diet but I am very lucky because I have always been able to eat whatever I like, without putting on weight. To be honest, I love junk food and probably eat more of it than I should!” Q: Do you have a mentor who you look to for guidance and support? A: “Yes. My coach, Tatiana – she has supported and advised me from the beginning of my career.” Q: When you train for an event, do you put your own sequences together, or do you work with your coach to do this? “Tatiana’s choreography is amazing because she knows how to put together a routine that emphasises my strengths and compliments my style. Tatiana incorporates my ideas into the choreography so I have got to the point in my career where it’s team effort.”

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

Q: Your results are consistently high for all pieces of apparatus – do you enjoy them all equally? A: “I love the ribbon and the hoop the most and I like the ball the least….but, funnily enough, my highest ever score was for a clubs routine that I performed last year at the Austrian Grand Prix.” Q: Your costumes are gorgeous, who does them? A: “Tatiana and I decide on a design and colour scheme and then we make a few sketches, which Tatiana then sends to a seamstress in Russia, who makes them up for me and sends them back to South Africa.” Q: How does your family feel about your achievements and do they get a chance to watch you perform? A: “They are very supportive of me – I don’t know what I would do without them! Unfortunately, they don’t get to watch me perform very often – only when it’s a local competition.” Q: What is the highlight of your career so far? A: “Definitely the Commonwealth Games last year! I was so excited when I found out that I qualified – I went completely crazy – it took ages for me to compose myself again. It was an amazing experience!” Q: Do you have any competitions that you will be attending in 2015? A: “In February, I am going to Moscow to compete in the 2015 Russian Grand Prix. In August, I am competing in the World Championships in Stuttgart, Germany, which is really important because I have to finish in the top twenty in order to qualify for the Olympic Games.” Q: What is your ultimate goal – what do you still want to achieve? “I want to go to the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio.” What do like to do on the odd occasion that you get time off? “I love spending time with my Mum and my little brother and sister. For twelve years, I have been best friends with Sibongile, who I met at gymnastics school. She stopped gymnastics some time back and she is studying at college at the moment but we see each other whenever we can.”   You have a hectic schedule – is there any time for a boyfriend?


YOUTH STORY: Gymnastics

Words: Olivia Darby | Photos: Provided

She giggles cheekily and says, “I have been seeing a guy called Katlego for the past two months. I don’t get to see him that often but he’s very understanding and supportive of my career.” Do you have a sponsor/s? “I get limited funding from the Gymnastics Federation, which I am very grateful for but I don’t have a sponsor, which makes competing internationally very difficult. The standards overseas are so high - I would love to spend some time training in Russia, so I can get more international experience but unfortunately, it’s just too expensive”

On this answer, Game On’s Olivia Darby writes: I am astonished to hear this information and can’t help but feel a little angry. Grace is a 22 year old woman, who has given half her life and thirty hours of training a week to be the best not only in South Africa, but in Africa too! It doesn’t seem fair that she doesn’t have a sponsor – she richly deserves all the funding she needs to gain experience on the international circuit, particularly with the 2016 Olympics rapidly approaching. I know I will do my utmost to get the word out about Grace to potential sponsors and we welcome any suggestions or ideas from our readers.

(Please email to olivia@gameonmagazine.co.za) Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Wenda Nel Healthy Eating for Active Adolescents

AVOID TOXINS

E

N

HYDRATE

L Y

LI VING —

WENDA

IDE TO H EA

H

L

S

GU

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CONSISTENTLY BALANCED DIET

EXERCISE

The nutritional needs of adolescents are influenced by their rapid growth in height, increased weight, changes in body composition and their individual levels of physical activity. The different changes, including cognitive and emotional functioning, have a direct impact on the nutrient needs and dietary behaviours of adolescents. Parents and the teens themselves need to understand how these developmental changes can affect nutritional status.

Healthy Eating 22

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


HEALTH Feature: DIET GUIDELINES

Words: Wenda Nel (Registered Dietitian SA) | Photo: Reg Caldecott

The following are general dietary guidelines for the adolescent:

Dietary Guideline Explanation •

Enjoy a wide variety of nutritious foods from all the different food groups on a daily basis

A variety of foods means eating more than one type of food at each meal, eating different foods on different days & preparing food in different, healthy ways, to ensure that we receive all the nutrients our bodies need. Different food groups include Protective, Energy & Body Building Foods.

Eat starchy foods every day

Starchy foods supply the body with energy. Examples include cereals, bread, rice, potatoes, pasta. Choose wholegrain where possible.

Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables every day

Vegetables & fruit supply lots of vitamins & minerals & other substances that are good for our health. Eat at least 3-5 portions of vegetables and 2-4 portions of fruits per day.

Meat and meat alternatives should be eaten daily

Foods from animal sources provide the body with protein & iron to maintain healthy & strong muscles. Eat small portions of these foods daily. Examples include red meat, chicken, fish, eggs.

Milk and milk products should be taken daily

Dairy provides a unique combination of all the nutrients. It helps with hydration and provide a rich supply of calcium to build and maintain strong bones.

Eat dry beans, split peas and lentils regularly

These foods are rich sources of protein – needed to build, repair & maintain our body’s muscles & tissues – as well as fiber. Eat these foods at least 3 times a week.

Do not skip meals

Eat small, frequent meals – 3 main meals with snacks in between. Especially when you are active, it helps to provide continues energy throughout the day.

Drink lots of clean, safe water

Enjoy drinking clean, safe water . Drink at least 6 – 8 glasses per day.

Use fats in small amounts

Choose healthy fats and meal options. Boil, bake, grill, poach, steam or microwave foods. Avoid fried and deep fried food, such as takeaway food. Healthy fats include olive/canola oil, olives, almonds, avocado, peanut butter etc.

Be Active

Being active and eating healthy are the best ways to prevent us from gaining weight or developing osteoporosis, high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes. Exercise for at least 20 – 30 minutes most days of the week.

Eat breakfast every day

Eat something within an hour after waking up. To eat breakfast on a consistent basis tend to better nutritional profiles and provide adequate energy for cognitive function.

for Active Adolescents Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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CrossFit The ultimate fitness programme!

CrossFit The ultimate fitness programme! Whether you are a youthful 16-year-old, or elderly at 70, CrossFit will be exactly right for you! CrossFit claims to ensure that their athletes stay strong and functional for the duties of everyday life.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

Heike KotzĂŠ,


HEALTH Feature: FITNESS TRAINING

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photo: Henry Kelbrick

This is how one of Pretoria’s many CrossFit Gyms, or “boxes” as they are officially called, tries to persuade fitnessoriented people to give their sport a go. According to the organisers of the annual CrossFit Games, the winner of the individual CrossFit competition, be it man or woman, will be one of the fittest athletes on earth. But what is CrossFit? Heike Kotzé, an instructor at the CrossFit Tijger Valley box in Pretoria, replies in four words:

“the sport of fitness.”

“CrossFit is a strength and conditioning programme with the aim of improving, among other things, cardiovascular and respiratory endurance, stamina, strength, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. It advocates a perpetually varied mix of aerobic exercises, gymnastics (body weight exercises), and Olympic weight lifting. CrossFit’s specialty is not to specialise.“ “There is only one workout prescribed for everybody who comes to CrossFit. Rather

than having one workout for older women and another for hard-core athletes, there’s one workout every day, that is completely scalable based on your skill. For example, if the workout calls for squats with 60kg but you can only do squats with the bar (22kg), then that’s where you’ll start. If you’re injured and cannot do squats at all, a similar movement will be substituted, and if the number of reps is too many for your current ability, it will be reduced. As you get stronger and more experienced, you’ll work your way towards eventually doing the workouts as prescribed.”

“What makes CrossFit unique for me, personally, is that there is never a moment when you can say that you have mastered everything and that there is nothing more to achieve. The constant challenge is always to set the bar higher and strive to push yourself to new limits.” “But CrossFit is not merely about blood, sweat and tears. The fact that everybody does exactly the same training, creates a feeling of camaraderie amongst participants because they are all suffering together. At the end of a session each of the participants experiences a sense of achievement. A training session usually ends up being a huge endorphin rush. “

What does a Crossfit class entail? According to Heike, in her classes participants can usually expect to do 60 seconds of push-ups; 60 seconds of kettlebell swing; 60 seconds of goblet squats holding a kettlebell and 60 seconds of box jumps. These exercises are usually repeated a few times. For endurance, participants could be expected to run 400m, doing 15 overhead squats in between.

“The challenge for a CrossFit instructor, is to continue changing the training programmes so that the participants do different movements every week. We also encourage people to do extra running and swimming to improve their endurance.” The professional competitive side of CrossFit is quite profitable. The male or female athlete who wins his/her respective category at the CrossFit Games stands to win nearly R3 000 000. There is also a team category at the Games with a first prize offering of R500 000. Heike was part of a South African team who qualified for CrossFit Games in California. “Under the circumstances I think we did OK, but it was quite an eye opener. It made me realise that we as South Africans still have a lot to learn before we will really be competitive at the Games.

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CrossFit The ultimate fitness programme!

At the moment the Americans and Australians are dominating. Surprisingly, CrossFit is also quite popular in Iceland. During the Games it was expected of KotzÊ and her teammates to do nine strenuous workouts over four days. The important requirement was to do as many repetitions as quickly as possible during each workout. A team was therefore as good as its weakest member. Heike’s goal for this year is to qualify for the individual category of the CrossFit Games. She admits that she will have to work much harder to accomplish this.

Sceptics raised concerns that CrossFit promotes a potentially dangerous atmosphere that encourages people, particularly newcomers to the sport, to train beyond their limits, resulting in injury, and Heike agrees that it could be a problem.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


HEALTH Feature: FITNESS TRAINING

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photo: Henry Kelbrick

“It is up to us as instructors, to guide newcomers to ensure that they train within their limits. I always stress that it is not good to overdo things by training with weights that are too heavy at a too early a stage, especially if you have not been exercising on a regular basis. That is when you are really at risk of getting injured. It is the same with any other sport.” Asked if athletes from other sports will benefit by doing CrossFit, Heike’s emphatic response was “yes”. “Rugby players, especially, could benefit. I have been considering contacting the national netball coach to suggest that the players fit in at least one CrossFit class per week. To be fit and strong is beneficial for anybody who regularly participates in other sports.”

Sidebar Heike Kotzé is the daughter of Hennie and Hanlie Kotzé, who were both exceptional athletes in the eighties. Hennie represented the Springboks as a 400-hurdles athlete. In his heyday he held the South African record and he is also a former South African hurdles champion. As a coach he helped LJ van Zyl to improve the SA record to 47.66s and to win the gold medal in the 400-hurdles at the 2006 Commonwealth Games in Melbourne. Last year he coached Cornel Fredericks, the winner of the gold medal at the Games in Glasgow. Hanlie is a former Springbok high jumper whose best jump of 1.88m places her 9th on the South African all-time list for high jumpers. Hennie (jnr.) earned national colours in the 110-hurdles and is a former African champion. His best time of 13.64s places him 5th on the South African all-time list. At school Heike was also a keen athlete who, in her matric year, won the heptathlon at the South African and African Junior Championships. She also represented South Africa’s Under-19 netball team. She stopped playing netball after a serious injury. She became involved with CrossFit after watching the Games on television.

CrossFit The ultimate fitness programme! Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Waldo Van Heerden THE YOUNG ATHLETE AND THE RISK FOR INJURIES – Part 1

THE YOUNG ATHLETE AND THE RISK OF INJURY – Part 1 For young athletes, sports activities are more than play. Participation in sport improves physical fitness, coordination, and selfdiscipline, and gives children valuable opportunities to learn teamwork, however, bearing in mind that young athletes are still growing, they are at a greater risk of injury than adults. The consequences of overdoing a sport can include injuries that impair growth, and may lead to long-term health problems. Fortunately, many youth sports injuries can be prevented. Some of the more effective ways to prevent these injuries include age-specific coaching, appropriate physical conditioning, and proper use of equipment. In addition, coaches and parents can prevent injuries by fostering an atmosphere of healthy competition that emphasises confidence, cooperation, and a positive self-image, rather than just winning.

Differences between Child and Adult Athletes Children Are Still Growing

The young athlete is not a smaller version of an adult. Children’s bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments are still growing, making them more susceptible to injury. In addition, there are significant differences in coordination, strength, and stamina between children and adults.

Children Vary in Size and Maturity

Young athletes of the same age can differ greatly in size and physical maturity. Grade school students are less likely to experience severe injuries during athletic activities because they are smaller and slower than older athletes. High school athletes, however, are bigger, faster, stronger, and capable of delivering tremendous force in contact sports.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


HEALTH Feature: SportS Injuries

Words: Waldo Van Heerden, BA. Hons. Human Movement Science - Biokinetics | Photo: Henry Kelbrick

Children Can Injure Growth Plates

Growth plates are the areas of developing cartilage at the ends of long bones, where bone growth occurs in children. The growth plates are weaker than the nearby ligaments and tendons. A twisted ankle that might result in a sprain in an adult, could result in a more serious growth plate fracture in a young athlete. Growth plate injuries have the potential to disrupt the normal growth of bone.

Common Youth Sports Injuries Acute Injuries

Acute sports injuries are caused by a sudden trauma, such as a twist, fall, or collision. Common acute injuries include broken bones, sprains (ligament injuries), strains (muscle and tendon injuries), and cuts or bruises. Most acute injuries should be evaluated by a doctor. Prompt first aid treatment should be provided by coaches and parents when the injury occurs. This usually consists of the RICE method: rest, applying ice, wrapping with elastic bandages (compression), and elevating the injured arm, hand, leg, or foot. This usually limits discomfort and reduces healing time. Proper first aid will minimise swelling and help the doctor establish an accurate diagnosis.

Overuse Injuries

Overuse injuries occur gradually over time, when an athletic activity is repeated so often, parts of the body do not have enough time to heal between playing. Examples of overuse injuries include throwing injuries in the elbow, Achilles tendinitis, and shin splints. Coaches may have more difficulty spotting less severe problems because the pain is low grade and the athlete often ignores it. Repeat injuries may turn into overuse conditions, which can put the athlete on the sidelines for the rest of the season. To keep athletes in the game long-term, overuse injuries need to be diagnosed and treated by a Physician, Physiotherapist or Biokineticist as soon as possible. Parents and coaches should be aware of the more common signs of overuse injury.

These include: • Pain. This pain cannot be tied to an acute injury, such as from a fall. The pain often increases with activity • Swelling • Changes in form or technique • Decreased interest in practice

In the growing athlete’s musculoskeletal system, pain from repetitive motion may appear somewhere besides the actual site of the injury. For instance, a knee ache in a child or adolescent may actually be pain caused by an injury to the hip. Whether an injury is acute or due to overuse, a child who develops a symptom that persists, or that affects his or her athletic performance, should be examined by a doctor. A child should never be allowed to “work through the pain.”

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Waldo Van Heerden THE YOUNG ATHLETE AND THE RISK FOR INJURIES – Part 1

HOW TO KEEP THE RISK LOW FOR SPORT INJURIES Many sports injuries in young athletes — particularly elbow and knee injuries — are caused by excessive, repetitive stress on immature muscle-bone units. Medical professionals are seeing an increase in overuse injuries because many young athletes are focusing on just one sport and are training year-round. Specific tips to prevent overuse injuries include:

• Limit the number of teams in which your

child is playing in one season. Kids who play on more than one team are especially at risk for overuse injuries. • Do not allow your child to play one sport year round - taking regular breaks and playing other sports is essential to skill development and injury prevention.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


HEALTH Feature: SportS Injuries

Words: Waldo Van Heerden, BA. Hons. Human Movement Science - Biokinetics | Photo: Henry Kelbrick

SIDEBAR Strategies for Preventing Youth Sports Injuries There are several strategies that coaches, parents, and athletes can follow to help prevent sports injuries. Most importantly, athletes should:

• Be in proper physical condition to play a sport

(a pre-participation sports physical examination can be very useful in screening for potential problems) • Know and abide by the rules of a sport • Wear appropriate protective gear (for example, shin guards for soccer, mouth-guard in rugby and body padding for cricket) • Know how to correctly use athletic equipment (for example, correct size tennis racquet for age and strength) • Always warm up before playing • Stay hydrated • Avoid playing when very tired or in pain

Proper Training

Young athletes need proper training for sports. They should be encouraged to train for the sport, rather than expecting the sport itself to get them in shape. • Young athletes also should follow a regular conditioning program (in conjunction with their coach) with incorporated exercises designed specifically for their chosen sport. In addition, a wellstructured, closely supervised weight-training regimen may modestly help youngsters prepare for athletic activities.

Because young athletes are still growing, they are at a greater risk of injury than adults. The consequences of overdoing a sport can include injuries that impair growth, and may lead to long-term health problems

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Waldo Van Heerden RESUME

Coaching Experience: (2007-2011) 2009-2011 (2009,2011-2012) 2014 2014

Geraldine Pillay 100m (11,34s) & 200m(23,3s) SA Senior Champion Isabel le Roux 200m (22,89s) SA Senior Champion Rikenette Steenkamp 100mH (13,4s) SA Youth, Junior and Senior Champion Erika Kleynhans 100mH (13,48s) Bronze Medal SA Senior Championships Werner Pretorius 110mH (14,09s) SA U/23 Champion 2014, 5th senior SA Championships

Mariska van Dyk 2014 400m(54,76s) Silver medal at SA Youth Championships 2014, 4th place at SA Senior Championships. Madia Ehlers 2014 100m(12,10s) & 200m(24,7s), SA Youth girls 100m Champion 2014 and Silver medalist 200m SA Youth Championships 2012

Zanri van der Merwe 100m (11,7s) & Long Jump (6,34m) SA Junior Champion

P RO F ESS I ONA L & Acad emic Work Experience (2000-2003) Institute for Sport Research (University of Pretoria) (2003-2008) Hpc (University of Pretoria) South African Track and Field Athletes (Geraldine Pillay, Ofense Mokgawane, Hannes Hopley, (2003-) Elizna Naude, LJ van Zyl, Annika Smit, Oscar Pistorius, Cornel Fredericks, Godfrey Mokoena, PC Beneke, Anneri Ebersohn, Wenda Theron) (2003) South African Cricket players (Martin van Jaarsveld) (2012-2013) Springbok Rugby Players ( Zane Kirchner) (2002) Blue Bulls Merit A rugby team (2013) Blue Bulls Currie Cup Team ( Speed and conditioning consultant) (2001-2003) South African Institute of Rugby (2000-2003, South African Netball team 2010-2012) (2000-2003, 2012) South African U/21 Netball team (2000-2003, Gauteng North Netball team 2011-) (2003-2005) Highperformance Soccer academy (2001) Body Kinetics Centre (CSIR) (1997-1999) Interfit Gymnasium (2006-2007) Springbok Rugby team (2004-2007, Tuks 1st Netball team 2009-) (2008) German Swimming squad (2007-2010) South African Aerobic Gymnasts (2006-2011) Sunshine Tour Golf players

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


HEALTH Feature: SportS Injuries

Waldo van Heerden Reg. Biokineticist (HPCSA), Coach, Occupation:

Strength and Conditioning Consultant. BA Hons. Human Movement Science (Biokinetics) 2000 (University of Pretoria) Qualification: Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist (NSCA)-2002

RESUME Work Experience CONTINUED (2007-) South African Judo (2007-2011) Professional tennis players (2006,2012-) South African Hockey players (2012-) Tuks 1st Hockey teams Men and Women (2011-) Tuks Athletics club (2013) Hpc Athletics Academy (2014)

NPL Netball League Gauteng 1 team- Jaguars Heavyweight SA Boxer

2014 (Paul Schafer) African Heavyweight Champ 2007-

Coaching at University of Pretoria (Tuksathletics),

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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PADDYUPTON

Paddy Upton On Parenting and Coaching Children for Success

Paddy Upton on Parenting and Coaching Children for Success Article based on an interview with Paddy Upton by Wilhelm de Swardt

“If you do that again I will smack you.”

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


PARENTING & Coaching: How to SUCCEED Guide

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photo: Supplied

These words of ‘encouragement’ were shouted by a dad to his nine-year-old boy who was playing scrumhalf. The opposition scrumhalf was breaking past the little boy time and again, clearly upsetting Dad who was humiliated by his son’s lack of rugby skills. Ironically, Dad himself did not look like somebody who has ever played a day’s sport in his life. He was wearing sandals and rugby shorts and a T-shirt that stretched tightly across the massive mound of his paunch.

coach proudly told me that he always pushes ‘his girls’ to their maximum abilities. When asked if he was not concerned that they might burn out before even reaching matric, he shocked me with the following answer: “I don’t care if they get burned out. All that matters to me is that they perform at their best while they are still at school because it helps to market the school. Anyway, there are no real opportunities for girls to excel in sport once they have finished school.”

This is a true story and, unfortunately, it was not a once-off event. I have personally witnessed numerous similar events and anybody who regularly attends schools sports will agree that it is a shockingly common occurrence to see angry parents venting their frustration because their kids are underperforming according to their high standards.

Again this was not a once-off happening. There will definitely be coaches who agree with this viewpoint.

There are also known cases of truly talented athletes or rugby players, who perhaps could have represented South Africa at the Olympic Games or Rugby World Cup, totally cracking because they could not handle the pressure any longer. Perhaps the athlete’s parents did not verbally abuse him. They were actually very supportive, in fact overly supportive. For example, a boy would be promised R100 for every time he scored a try for the first team or R100 for every time he won a 400m race. Breaking school records would bring in an extra R100 and a very special price tag was attached to breaking a South African record. The boy eventually got caught up in trying to make money and sport became a business to him. He experienced himself as a failure if he did not ‘earn’ any money during a game or race. In short, he lost all sense of enjoyment. Eventually everything just became too much for him and he stopped participating in sport. But obsessive parenting is not the only way talented young athletes can be prevented from fulfilling their ambitions. Some years ago I had a conversation with an athletics coach at one of Pretoria’s more prestigious high schools. The

This short-sightedness of coaches is one of the reasons for the current crisis in South African women’s sport. The cruel reality is that we do not have female world beaters in any sport in South Africa at the moment.

Paddy Upton has successfully coached a variety of elite sports and business teams, as well as talented individuals, to take their game to even greater heights. Some of the definite highlights in his career were to help two international cricket teams (South Africa and India) to achieve the world number one ranking, as well as helping India to win the Cricket World Cup (2011). He also helped the bottom-ofthe-log underdogs, the Rajasthan Royals, to the reach the final of the Champions League (2013). Paddy’s success can be partially ascribed to his ability to clearly distinguish between being obsessive and being supportive. “It is like planting seeds in a flowerbed and then working yourself up into such a frenzy that you start shouting at them, hoping that it will make them grow faster. Getting all worked up is definitely not going to help at all. The only way to get the seeds to grow properly is to plant them in fertile soil and continue to regularly give them the right amount of water and nutrients. If you give too much water, which, in this context should be seen as praise or acknowledgement, you will drown the seeds. On the other hand, if you withhold the water and nutrients, the plants will wither and dry.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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PADDYUPTON

Paddy Upton On Parenting and Coaching Children for Success

“The reality is that if you plant two tomato plants next to each other, sometimes one may grow only to two feet and the other to three feet. Each plant grows according to its own unique potential. A good gardener realises this and strives to create a healthy environment for the seeds he plants, enabling each plant to grow to its own potential. “Some parents and coaches tend to openly express their frustration when a player fails. This does not go unnoticed and often leads to the player becoming scared of making mistakes. The single biggest obstacle to success is the fear of failure that sits within the six inches between a player’s ears. “ “Let’s take cricket for example. Any person who plays cricket finds himself in a ‘failing game’. Even the best batsman in the world is only able to convert 50% of his innings into a good score. This means that 50% of the time a batsman goes out to bat he is bound to fail. Another good example is the final of a swimming gala. It is guaranteed that seven of the eight swimmers who take part will fail because there can be only one winner. Before anybody can even hope to win, he or she has to be completely comfortable with losing. “But losing is OK. What is not OK is taking shortcuts in your efforts to give somebody a reasonable chance to succeed.”

“Unfortunately the focus on winning is overwhelming. It seems to me that people think winning is a result, which it is not. Winning is a process that enables you to be smart enough to consistently do the right thing in the right way, day in and day out.”

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

Children who start specialising in a specific sport at a too young age can be a problem. “In my opinion kids should not be forced to specialise before the age of 13. But one needs to take into consideration that there is always the exception to the norm. For me the distinction lies in whether the child is specialising because he is driven by somebody else, for example a coach or parent who has his own agenda, or specialising because he really wants to do so himself, in accordance with his own natural talent. “In sports there is a massive scrapheap of people who never made it themselves. They will, therefore, never know whether or not they were able to make it. The scrapheap is even bigger because kids often quit because they are sick and tired of being forced to do things they hate.

If you should ask any sportsperson who made a real contribution to the development and eventual success of children, you will almost always hear words like: “They believed in me;


PARENTING & Coaching: How to SUCCEED Guide

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photo: Supplied

they listened to me, they supported and encouraged me; they nurtured me; they allowed me to make mistakes and I was allowed to be myself.” Words that you will never hear are: “They shouted at me; they pressurised me; they forced me to do things I did not want to do.” “A rebellious athlete is one who begins to dislike the sport and eventually hate the sport and its environment. At times, their anger may be channelled covertly to the person who pressurised them.”

Sidebar Paddy Upton has successfully coached a variety of elite sports and business teams, as well as talented individuals, to take their game to even greater heights. Some of the definite highlights in his career were to help two international cricket teams (South Africa and India) to achieve the world number one ranking, as well as helping India to win the Cricket World Cup (2011). He also helped the bottom-of-the-log underdogs, the Rajasthan Royals, to the reach the final of the Champions League (2013). Paddy’s success can be partially ascribed to his ability to clearly distinguish between being obsessive and being supportive. “Paddy’s work is ground breaking and desperately needs to be developed and advanced further in this country…it represents one of the leading edges of thinking in the field of coaching.” Professor Tim Noakes - Renowned Sport Scientist “Paddy has the most amazing ability to bring the best out of people.” Shane Watson - Australian Cricketer

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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PADDYUPTON

2015 Workshops with Paddy Upton How to “up to your Game� as a coach! Paddy Upton in association with Game On Magazine will be hosting a series of one day workshops in 2015 for Coaches and Educators in Gauteng, Cape Town and KZN. Paddy recently presented a Coaching Workshop at Affies in Pretoria which was a totally sold out within an hour of the workshop becoming available! If you would like to attend one of his amazing workshops next year, contact us on marketing@gameonmagazine.co.za with your details: (Name, School, Position (e.g Rugby Coach), Cell number), or go to the Game On website and submit your details via the advert on the home page. We will contact you and send you the dates for your area.

Join Paddy and acquire new skills in getting the best out of your team and students and take your coaching to a whole new level.

The ultimate online sports magazine

www.gameonmagazine.co.za


PROFESSIONAL PROFILE: SPORTS SCIENCE

MARY ANN DOVE PROFILE Mary Ann has an honours degree in Sports Science from the University of Cape Town and is currently studying towards her MSc, where she is focussing on the “Socio-environmental factors affecting player development from junior to elite level in South African cricket”. In addition, she has coaching and psychology qualifications. She has been involved in sport all her life as a participant (provincial gymnast), scientist, consultant and manager of youth and senior teams and has worked with developmental to Olympic level athletes across a wide spectrum of sports. She has served as a member of the Olympic Foundation, Manager of the Southern Gauteng women’s hockey team and other team management positions. Mary Ann has spent 25 years in the corporate world gaining business consulting, leadership development, project management, facilitation, lecturing and coaching experience. She now runs her own business, Performing 4 Success, which specialises in developing individuals and teams to achieve sustainable performance goals in business and sport. Current sporting clients include – the Nashua Cape Cobras Cricket team, Sports Science Institute of South Africa, SA Rugby 7s and SA Rugby Players’ Association, as well as work with a number of primary and secondary schools and individual sportsmen and women. In 2011, Mary Ann founded Positive Sport Parent (www.positivesportparent.com) which provides parents with authoritative information that enables them to inspire and encourage their children’s sporting participation. Whether children participate in recreational and school sport or pursue more serious, elite level sport, PSP contains a rich source of knowledge that enable parents to support their children as best they can. As part of PSP, Mary Ann delivers talks and workshops to schools, clubs, sporting federations and representative teams. A focus in 2015 will be on upskilling young coaches through a workshop on the EQ of Coaching. She is still a very active, but less competitive sportswoman and refularly participates in running, tennis, cycling. In 2009, Mary Ann successfully summited Mt Kilimanjaro. In her spare time… she is mother to her 20 year old son and 18 year old daughter.

Mary Ann Dove

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Mary Ann Dove Spectator Behaviour at Youth Sporting Events

Spectator Behaviour at Youth Sporting Events There is an alarming increase in inappropriate parental behaviour at youth sporting events worldwide. Many of us have witnessed parents shouting, screaming and even swearing at their children, the referee/ umpire and coaches during sports events. In some instances there has been physical abuse and in extreme cases, weapons used. Is this what youth sport is all about or have we somewhere along the way, “lost the plot?� Research published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology in 2008 found that the control orientation of parents leads to ego defensiveness, which in turn, leads to anger and aggressive spectator behaviour. This anger resulted from uncaring, unfair and incompetent behaviour from coaches, referees, participants and fellow parent spectators. Is it perhaps that we have become too obsessed

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with the results of games/ events and more focussed on winning rather that the performance of the individual child and/or the team? Youth sport should be concerned with the holistic development of the child for longterm participation in physical activity and a healthy lifestyle. It is about learning and developing skills, gaining confidence, enhancing self-esteem, displaying sportsmanship, bonding with friends and teammates and having fun. All of these are eroded by inappropriate parental behaviour. Parents role in youth sport is to positively encourage, motivate and support their child in his/her own chosen sporting endeavour. This support should be limited to financial, logistical and emotional support in the form of understanding, empathy and positive communication.


PARENTING: Spectator Behaviour

Words: Mary-Ann Dove, founder www.positivesportparent.com

Research has shown that children want their parents to display a moderate level of involvement in their sporting activities. By behaving inappropriately as described earlier, parents can cause their children to become embarrassed, stressed and distracted leading to increased pressure, decreased performance and often feelings of guilt if they don’t achieve their parents’ standards. Every loud screaming parent or adult spectator is viewed by young children (under 14 years old) as being aggressive. Studies show that children can’t tell the difference in behaviour and simply group it as violent and feel emotionally and even physically threatened. These reactions and emotions do not support positive sporting development and may lead to children dropping out of sport all together.

Two contrasting stories from young sports people demonstrate the role of parents in their sporting lives, Dear Dad.... The Game Isn’t Fun Anymore

READ MORE

My Beautiful Parents Getting Me to Succeed

and

READ MORE

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Mary Ann Dove Spectator Behaviour at Youth Sporting Events

Guidelines for appropriate parental side-line behaviour for positive youth sports experiences • • •

• • • • • •

• • •

• • •

Your child is a person first and an athlete second – treat them as such Praise and support your child’s effort and performance, rather than focus on winning or losing Never ridicule or berate your child for making a mistake, not performing or winning, regardless of the fact that he/she tried their best or that the opponents were superior Don’t criticise your child’s performance – provide constructive and positive feedback Don’t make a public spectacle of yourself Don’t run up and down the side-lines shouting advice or run onto the field to debate a decision Refrain from coaching your child from the side-lines Support the coach in performing his/her role Remain in the designated spectator area until after the game – don’t interfere with the participants Choose an appropriate time to provide feedback to coaches and officials Cheer for your own child and team Show respect for the opposition and officials Avoid using foul language or derogatory comments when speaking to your child, coach, officials and other spectators Control your emotions at all times - stay calm and composed when watching your child participate Behave in a dignified manner at all times Be a role model for other parents Provide unconditional love during both successes and failures

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Youth Feature: athletics

V

ENTO OR

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

E

Vorentoe

High School

Nurturing Young Talent Vorentoe High School, affectionately known as “Vories”, was recognised as the School Team of the Year at the South African Sports Awards late last year, after their athletics team were identified as the best school sports team in the country. Vories is a school that prides itself on the development of raw talent in an academically oriented environment. Education always comes first.

“The most important thing for us at Vories, is to get our students prepared well enough to be able to pass their final Grade 12 examinations. That is our core value,” says Vories athletics scout and Life Orientation teacher, Oupa Maruping.

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Vorentoe High School Nurturing Young Talent

Oupa explains that Vories is a school that seeks to develop athletes into top performers and only athletes from disadvantaged backgrounds are considered.

“I do not even look at athletes who finish in the top three. We believe that these individuals are already developed, so I look at the rest of the Top 10.” Hans Saestad, principal and athletics head coach, is excited about what this year will bring. Last year, the athletics team took nine medals (five gold, two silver and two bronze) at the National Cross Country Championships. He believes that the culture of the school has changed since South Africa became a democracy and both staff and learners have embraced the change.

“As one can see by our school name, we were once an Afrikaans medium school. We are now solely an English school. The way things have changed is phenomenal. The majority of our athletes come from rural areas. Vories is making a difference to the lives of learners who may

not necessarily have had the opportunities to better their situation.” Hans describes winning School Team of the Year at the SA Sports Awards, as a humbling experience. The award is the most prestigious that Vories has received in their 77 year history. Derrick Mokaleng, a member of the middle distance team who is in contention for the 2015 captaincy, feels that the award is testament to the environment fostered at Vories.

“I’m proud to be a part of Vories. Winning School Team of the Year was unbelievable. We worked hard and our positive attitude is something Mr Saestad instIlled in us. Looking at the season ahead, we want to win more medals and hopefully, take top honours at the SA Sports Awards again. It will be difficult, as some of our team mates have finished school but we have the talent to rebuild and achieve greater things,” said Derrick.

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Youth Feature: athletics

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Derrick’s personal goal for 2015 is that he would like to return from the SA School Athletics competition with a podium finish. He believes that, with his team’s determination, hard work and his own trust in God, there is little that stands in their way. Vorentoe High School has emerged as a school with the ability to produce champions because of the development of athletes with a desire to be the best. It would come as no surprise to see a few Olympic athletes from Vories flying the South African flag high in a few years time.

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High School Nurturing Young Talent Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Maritzburg College At the summit of basketball

Maritzburg College

at the summit

of basketball Maritzburg College is a school that has a proud sporting heritage. College has produced a number of rugby, cricket and hockey players who have gone onto achieving higher honours in their sporting codes. Basketball, however, is not a sport typically associated with Maritzburg College. That is now a thing of the past, as the College 1st team ended last year unbeaten, both provincially and nationally. Current head coach, Arnold Moseya, credits the change in success to College headmaster Chris Luman and former 1st team coach, Michael Campbell, who increased the amount of teams from a handful to four or five per age group. “The moment of the season was when we won the St. John’s tournament early last year. We played against the top schools in South Africa as well as neighbouring African countries. Having finished unbeaten means that there is little to achieve in 2015, so besides from maintaining our win rate, we would like to get more boys playing basketball,” said Arnold. Basketball in South Africa is still a developing game. Infrastructure and availability of finances make it difficult for players to have a professional career. The National

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Basketball League is the only professional competition in the country but according to Arnold, the remuneration is too small to allow players to focus only on basketball.

Arnold Moseya

This is illustrated by 27 year old Arnold who is a qualified FIBA (International Basketball Federation) referee but has to juggle his basketball commitments with his job at SAB Miller, where he is an accounts manager, and his life at home with his fiancée Mbali Ngubane and seven month old son, Swazi. Arnold believes that universities are paving the way for basketball to grow as a sport. Many of the top universities in South Africa offer comprehensive bursaries for talented players including the University of the

Witswaterstrand, NWU-Vaal and the University of Pretoria. There are even options to study abroad and play basketball.


Youth Feature: Basketball

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

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Maritzburg College At the summit of basketball

Talent scouts rarely come out to South Africa but America's National Basketball Association's Basketball Without Borders hosts an annual camp in Johannesburg, where NBA stars fly out to assist players with their game development. Njabulo Biyela, the captain of College's basketball 1st team for 2015, echos his coach's sentiments about opportunities to play post school. Njabulo has been playing basketball since he was three and his love for the game is undeniable. He is realistic about the possibilities of pursuing basketball professionally. "I have no plans as yet to play basketball after school as I'm prepared to go wherever the interest in my playing ability is. Wits and Tuks are two options that I have thought about but nothing is concrete. One of my goals is to be selected for the SA Under-18 team which will give me a clearer picture of where my future lies," said Njabulo. The rise of basketball in the country is something that pleases Njabulo especially within in his school. The support of College staff and boys have made it possible for basketball to shine. At this rate basketball at Maritzburg College is well on it's way to attaining a spot amongst the big sporting codes.

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Youth Feature: GOLF

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Luca Filippi lighting the green on fire The average 15 year old is still coming to terms with being a newcomer to high school. Balancing academics, extramural activies, home commitments and maintaining a social life, are a few of the responsibilities that young teenagers have too juggle. Luca Filippi, from Milnerton in Cape Town, has an extra task at hand: to maintain his competitive edge on the golf course.

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Luca Filippi Lighting the green on fire

Luca Filippi lighting the green on fire

Luca will be in Grade 10 at Milnerton High School this year, after moving from Rondebosch Boys High School. He explains that the reason for the move is attributed to transportation issues, as it took 45 minutes to and from Rondebosch every day. This is precious time he would rather have spent on the greens practising. Milnerton High offers golf as a school sport, something that Luca plans to do as an extramural activity. He, like many other young athletes, tends to focus on his sport of choice and he also is an avid Chelsea soccer supporter. “My Dad says that I started playing golf when I was still in nappies. I played my first competition when I was nine and I have never really looked back,” said Luca. The Links at Fancourt is his favourite course in South Africa because of it’s difficulty and breathtaking views, whilst the competition of which Luca is most fond is the Junior British Open 2014, where he represented South Africa and came 12th.

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Luca is a member of the Ernie Els and Fancourt Foundation, who provide him with sponsorship, in addition to Adams Golf, TaylorMade and Adidas. His sponsors cover costs such as practice fees, travelling and accommodation. This sponsorship gives Luca the ability to focus solely on golf in order to become a better competitor. His competitive edge is so refined that even family games are taken seriously as he is the current table tennis champion in the Filippi home. His family are a constant source of motivation, especially his Dad, Daniel.


Youth Feature: GOLF

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

“My Dad once told me that you should never give up until you’ve reached the last hole. He has been instrumental in my golfing career so far.” Daniel, a former provincial surfer, has two more gifted sons. Stefano (18) finished his schooling at Rondebosch last year top of his class, while Franco (17) excels in paintball. He and his wife of twenty years, Marcelle, decided to devote their lives to their children.

Sidebar 1 They said it..

Outside of his father, Luca looks up to Rory McIlroy because he never gives up and always comes back stronger. On the South African front, Luca tries to model his golf game and life around Gary Player. Unlike Gary, Luca is determined to finish school and go onto university, just in case golf doesn’t work out.

“Parents play a vital role in their children’s early success. We share our time evenly amongst our kids and although we promote competition, we support our kids equally,” explains Daniel.

“My school work takes a backseat more often than not, as I’m away so much. Special arrangements are made for me, which I’m grateful for. I’m not sure (yet) what I want to study at university but I would like to have something behind my name,” said Luca.

“Luca has the ability and the desire to go very far. I am proud of what he has achieved to date and I will be there every step of the way. No matter what happens, I always tell Luca that in thirty years time I’d like to still hit a few balls on the course with him.”

The near future for Luca is all about golf and the young maestro has already set himself a monumental goal: to win all four majors (The Masters, PGA Championship, The Open and US Open) and become one of a few South Africans to have achieved a career grand slam.

Grant Hepburn, Luca's golf coach: I have been working with Luca for about three years now. He has everything to go far in the sport. He can definitely compete on the world stage. He still has a lot to do, as being a professional is not just about talent and determination but if he carries on the way he is now, it is only a matter of time. Outside of his natural talent, he is a wonderful young man to work with, his manners and attitude are impeccable. Hannes van Nirkerk, The Ernie Els and Fancourt Foundation: The Foundation membership is by invitation only, so the fact that Luca is a part of it tells you that he has the talent. Talent is not everything, as members have to buy into what the foundation stands for. We provide assistance with school fees, coaching fess, equipment, transport. Basically whatever is needed for Luca to be competitive.

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Luca Filippi Lighting the green on fire

Career highlights 2014

2014

1. Ranked no 1 in SA for u15

13. Represented South Africa at the Italian Junior Open, Biella, Italy (top 4 ranked u17 players from 20 countries invited)

2. U19 SA Boys Champs 2nd place 3. U15 Fishriver Interprovincial winner (by record 14 shots) 4. Challenge Cup winner, Fancourt

14. WP Elite Squad member 15. Ernie Els Fancourt Foundation member

5. Milnerton Junior open, winner 6. Royal Cape Men’s open winner 7. Curro International Junior 4th place 8. Atlantic Beach Mens open 5 place th

9. Selected for WP U23 team

2015 16. U19 Noom, Durban Country Club, 2nd (lost in play off) 17. U19 Rondebosch Junior Open, winner

10. Selected for SAGA U23 team 11. Selected for WP U19 IPT 12. Represented South Africa at the Junior British Open, West Lancashire, UK (top ranked boy and girl u16 from 63 countries are invited)

18. U19 Durbanville Junior Open, winner (back to wins in January)

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Youth Feature: SOCCER

Brendon Konki Words: Neil Greig | Photos: Backpage Media

Write down that name!

Write down the name Brendon Konki and remember it. This young man has the potential to create a name for himself in football, at a time when the focus on youth has never been sharper. By Neil Greig.

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Brendon Konki Write down that name!

FAST FACTS Name: Brendon Konki Club: Kaizer Chiefs School: HeronBridge College (Grade 11) Position: Striker Strengths: Speed and goal scoring Favourite player: Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid)  

One of the positive trends in South African football over the past year has been the amount of young talent rising through the ranks and the excitement generated around quality young players in the country. The MultiChoice Diski Challenge was launched this season and has helped create a much-needed Reserve League structure in the Premier Soccer League and clubs have given their young players a chance to shine in this tournament. Brendon Konki is one such player. The 18-year old has had a taste of Diski Challenge football for Amakhosi as he is groomed for what lies ahead. Adding to the trend of youth development is the fact that the South African national Under 20 team, Amajita, recently won the Commonwealth Cup in Russia, beating Finland in the Final, and signalling a new era of success for the junior national teams. Amajita are set to play in the Africa Youth Championships this year and several of the players who have come through this team are now playing for Bafana Bafana. It was a very young Bafana squad that Shakes Mashaba took to the 2015 Africa Nations Cup, with 18-year-old defender, Rivaldo Coetzee, one of the rising star revelations.

So what does all this mean for someone like Brendon? It means that his career path is brighter than ever, with doors ready to open for him on multiple fronts, should he continue to develop well, keep his head down and focus on his dreams. Brendon is set to do just that, according to those in the know and close to him.

Brendon Konk Write down that name!

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Young Brendon has already made some amazing strides in the sporting world. Last season, playing for the Kaizer Chiefs’ Under 17 side, he netted 40 goals in 31 appearances in the South African Football Association (Safa) Soweto Regional League. He was promoted to Chiefs’ Under 19 team this season and has continued to find the goals under the guidance of coach Arthur ‘10111’ Zwane, who was once a lightning fast winger for the Chiefs first team and Bafana Bafana.


Youth Feature: SOCCER

Words: Neil Greig | Photos: Backpage Media

Like Zwane, Brendon also has pace to burn and with an eye for goal, there can be no stopping him as the future unfolds.

“Brendon is not just like every other kid. He has his own way of doing things. People also wonder about his first name, Brendon, and how he got it. Back in 1996, when Brazil came to play Bafana Bafana here in SA, they had those great players, Bebeto and Dunga.

“Soccer grew up in me,” is

“Well, Brendon was born 26 April 1996, the same day as the game. I wanted to name my boy after Brazil forward Bebeto, but it is a very Brazilian name, so I chose a more patriotic way and went with Brendon instead.

how Brendon describes his life thus far. He started playing very young, by the age of three, and his father, Butityi Konki, has backed Brendon and supported him from the very beginning. When Lucas Radebe was at Leeds United, the ex-South Africa captain autographed a soccer ball for Brendon when he was just three years old. “He had a nappy on but he was already kicking a ball around. From this moment you could already see that he was going to play the game,” is how Butityi describes the early days. Brendon’s dad is Chairman and CEO of BK Investment Holdings Pty Ltd, but even though he is a busy businessman, his involvement as a father, is evident in Brendon’s life. “Brendon got involved with school sport immediately and he quickly became the top scorer in his team. His development was helped by playing at a Manchester United academy when he was at primary school. “From here he was taken to the sports science centre in Pretoria, where he has been monitored and developed ever since,” dad Butiyti recalls. Brendon’s dad says that his son can only speak English and none of the traditional vernacular South African languages, which, he says, gives you a glimpse of Brendon’s unique life.

“Brendon is taken from one of South Africa’s players during that same game and the famous era of Bafana Bafana, named Brandon Silent. You remember him?” As Brendon’s life has evolved, it has become clear that he is not only a talented footballer, but also an athlete and he can play golf. Brendon is currently in grade 11 at HeronBridge College in Gauteng. There he holds the 100 metre sprint record and recently broke his own record with a run of 10.58 seconds. He currently does the 200 metre in roughly 20.9 seconds so pace is definitely a big factor in his attacking ability on the field. Let someone who has credibility behind his name describe Brendon the player. Chiefs and Bafana Bafana forward Bernard Parker says: “Watch out for this boy in the near future, Kaizer Chiefs› Brendon Konki. “He scored closed to 40 goals in the Soweto regional league (U17). He recorded six hat-tricks and five braces.” As Parker points out, goals seem to be something that has always come naturally for Brendon. At age 11 he went to Brazil with Sandton FC and scored two goals as they won the Copa America Cup. He then joined Wits University juniors where he became top goal scorer and then joined Kaizer Chiefs three years ago at U17 level where he was again top scorer. The regular goal scoring led to Brendon being drafted into the Nike Academy in London for a month in late 2014 and this is why he missed some Diski Challenge games for Amakhosi. Along the way Future Life began to sponsor Brendon to help on the nutrition side of his development and famous sports physician Elsa Storm started to train him. “I started playing football when I was 5 years old. My dad bought me my first football and I had a kick around with him; he’s been my biggest supporter ever since,” says Brendon. “It’s a great honour for me to be part of the set-up at Kaizer Chiefs, as they are the biggest football club in South Africa and one of the biggest football brands in Africa.”

There you have it. Brendon is on the move and the doors are open for him to walk through, should he follow instructions from his coaches and keep his head on his shoulders.

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Brendon Konki Write down that name!

sidebar Arthur Zwane – Hard work will do it Kaizer Chiefs’ development coach Arthur Zwane is well placed to comment on Brendon and his potential given that he is the man working closely with him on the field. Here are his thoughts. “I believe the boy has potential but I must say that he still needs to work hard. We need to work harder in our training sessions and as an individual as well. “I’d not like to single him out because that could somehow put him under enormous pressure, but they’re (The Chiefs juniors) all good players. The future is bright and I think they’ll grow as players gradually, they’ll get to the desired level as professionals. We want to them to improve on a number of things as players. “Look, like I said that he’s (Brendon) gifted as a player, he’s got a bright future ahead of him and he’s shown great promise. As a coach, I don’t like to say he can go as far as representing the national side because that will drive him to work towards impressing me or get under pressure to prove that the coach was right.  “I want him to understand that and take each and every day as it comes, work hard and we’ll see when the stage is right for him. At this juncture, he’s promising like many of the others and we need to protect them as they’re vulnerable at their age.  “If we say he’ll go as far as playing for the national team, then he could make mistakes trying to prove his worth but he’s got the ability. We just have to work with him until he’s ready to withstand the pressure and compete at the highest level. Otherwise I see a great player in him for the future.” 

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Coaching Focus: Rugby

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Dr. Henry Kelbrick

Ad qui re cum, voloresequae re

Affies’ Sakkie

one of the true visionaries of SA Schools rugby Fourie du Preez is arguably one of the best scrumhalves ever to play for the Boks. Before being plagued by injuries, Pierre Spies brought great excitement to the game with ball in hand. Wynand Olivier, in his heyday, produced some memorable moments while playing in the green and gold. These three players have much more in common than having played for the Springboks. They all matriculated at Afrikaans Hoër Seunskool (Affies) in Pretoria. All three of them played for the school’s legendary ‘Wit Bulle’ and, most importantly, they were all coached by Sakkie van der Walt.

It would not be an exaggeration to say that Van der Walt has become an institution at Affies rugby. He has been coaching rugby for 25 years at Affies and for 17 of those years, he coached the first team. His involvement in the school’s rugby success can only be described as legendary. During all these years many of the players coached by Van der Walt went on to excel in provincial and international rugby. Of all these players, Fourie du Preez deserves to be specially mentioned as the one who had the most impact on international rugby. Van der Walt refuses point blank to take any credit for Du Preez’s success. He does admit, however, that when he was coaching the young Du Preez at school, he already realised that he was a player who was destined for greatness.

“Fourie is very special, not only because of his rugby talent but also because of his humbleness. In spite of what he has achieved, he remained the same modest person I coached at school. I often use him as an example to young players of how they should handle success. Whenever Fourie is in South Africa, he contacts me and then we have a braai and talk rugby. He is also very keen on helping young players.” In spite of the fact that the Affies first team of last year did not have the best of seasons, nine of the Affies players were signed by the big rugby unions. This proves that Van der Walt has a special touch helping young players onto the road of success. Who knows, in a year or two from now, there might be other Affies players who have begun to climb the international rugby ladder towards fame.

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Affies’ Sakkie One of the true visionaries of SA Schools rugby

Van der Walt’s immediate response to any suggestion that he surely must be an extraordinary rugby coach is:

“I have been lucky. I also have to reiterate that if I had achieved any success at Affies, it was due to a team effort. Any coach can only be as good as the players he is coaching and the other coaches who assist him.” “I definitely don’t know everything about rugby. That is why I won’t hesitate to ask for help from more knowledgeable coaches. I have, for example, asked Johan van Graan, who coaches the Springbok forwards, to help me from time to time. To be successful as a coach, one has to stay clued up with the latest trends in rugby. Luckily, with the

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social media and the internet, it is not hard to do so nowadays. There are some wonderful websites and programmes that enable a coach to interact with some of the current role players in international rugby. I have taken ideas from people such as Dan Carter (All Black fly half), Neil Jenkins (Wales fly-half), Graham Henry (a former All Blacks coach), etc.”

If there is one thing about which Van der Walt feels very strongly, it is that young players at school should not be forced to play to a set pattern. “I want my players to play according to their own visions during a game, providing that they do the basics correctly. As a coach I am a firm believer in

running rugby. This means that I want my players to be adventurous when the right situation should arise.” Being a schools rugby coach for 25 years is a long time in anyone’s book. One cannot help wondering whether Van der Walt ever had other aspirations as a coach. “No, not really,” is his answer. “I was involved with coaching the Blue Bulls Under-19 team a few years ago, but I quickly realised that it was not really what I wanted to do. Outside of schools rugby, internal politics often come into play and I don’t want to be part of it. As the coach of a school’s rugby team, you are not under so much pressure. In other words, my job does not depend on whether my team wins or loses. I am, first and foremost, a


Coaching Focus: Rugby

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Dr. Henry Kelbrick

teacher. Rugby is just a passion. Because rugby is one of the toughest sports, I see it as a way of preparing ‘laaities’ for life after school. One day you are on top of the world and the next day you are rock bottom. This is what life is all about and as a player, you have to learn to deal with it.”

“To get back to rugby, as a school’s coach, I am also more at liberty to experiment and to allow the players to play creative rugby. You are also free to use your own judgement. In senior rugby, a coach is often forced to use certain players because they are contracted. I don’t have that problem.”

Van der Walt’s only regret may be that he never had the opportunity to coach the South African Schools Team. One of the unfair questions to ask any coach is to name the best teams or players he has coached. Van der Walt is no exception, but after some prompting, he named the teams of 1996, 2000 and 2013 as some of the best he has coached. The 2013 team won all of their 14 games. The 1996 team’s performance was equally impressive. They won 24 games and drew one. The only time they lost was when playing in a tournament in New Zealand. In spite of the 2002 team being beaten by Hoërskool Ermelo in the semi-finals of the Beeld Trophy Series, it was still an exceptional team according to Van der Walt. The team boasted players such as Fourie du Preez, Francois Swart, Wynand Olivier and Adriaan Fondse. According to Van der Walt he himself was not a star player. “I played scrumhalf but after school I quickly realised that I was not going to become the next Springbok scrumhalf. That is why I decided to get involved in coaching. When an ankle injury finally brought my playing career to an end, I played for the Pretoria Old Boys for some years. I made it my mission to play in every position for the team because I wanted to gain first-hand experience of what it takes to play tight head prop for example.”

SideBar When Van der Walt was asked to shed light on something unique that he tries to bring to the game as a coach, he immediately mentioned the importance of getting young players to stay focussed and aware of what is happening around them for the duration of a game. “In my opinion, this is something that many coaches (senior as well as school) neglect to do. For me, it is important for any player, even when he does not have the ball in hand, to take note of what is happening around him during a game. Players should realise that most of them, with the exception of the scrum-half and fly-half, would be lucky to handle the ball for 5% of the time the game lasts. A player should ask himself the question of what he should be doing while he is not handling the ball. Most players just do straightforward ball watching. This often means that, when a player suddenly gets the ball, he has no clue of what has been happening around him. This is when he misses out seeing the gaps in the opposition’s defence strategies. “For example, if there is maul in which five or more of the opposition team’s players are involved, a player should realise that the team’s defence would be stretched and that it would be a good time to launch a counter attack by running with the ball. In such a situation it would be foolish to kick the ball away.”

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Grant Kritzinger On SA Swimming Development for the Olypmics

The last time a South African female swimmer medalled was in 1996 in Atlanta. Penny Heyns actually made history by winning the 100m and 200m breaststroke. In doing so, she became South Africa’s only female double Olympic individual gold medallist. At the 2000 Games in Sydney Penny won a bronze medal.

Grant Kritzinger

on SA Swimming Development for the Olypmics Words by Wilhelm de Swardt, Photos provided by Grant Kritzinger

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Coaching Focus: Swimming

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Provided by Grant Kritzinger

Since then, there have been quite a few talented female swimmers but none of them made an impact in the international swimming arena and the question to be asked is why? Our ladies who participated at last year’s Commonwealth Games in Glasgow did not feature in the medal lineup, whereas ten of our male swimmers did. Grant Kritzinger, who will have been appointed Head of the Youth Portfolio (15-19 years) at Swimming South Africa by the time you are reading Game On, is confident that the local swimming scene will change drastically over the next few years.

“We are currently running a talent identification system and, more importantly, also a tracking system which enables us to keep track of the progress made by every young swimmer. “We now have information about who is in the system, who are falling out of the system and also whether or not any swimmers are dropping out. The reality is that South Africa cannot afford to lose swimmers before they have fulfilled their full potential. “For example, if a swimmer who was able to swim fast times three years ago suddenly slows down dramatically or decides to quit, we will immediately know about it and we will want an explanation. We are also now in a position to address the problem.

“After studying the statistics of our talent identification and tracking and grading system, I am optimistic that there will be changes in the near future. It is interesting to note that our girls are at the moment pushing out bigger numbers than the boys in training. “It will not be surprising, therefore, if our girls should outperform the boys in international galas in two years’ time. Our current goal is to guide the young swimmers to be at their best at the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. Seeing that the 2016 Games are only about 14 months away, it is more realistic to focus on the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.”

Kritzinger is excited about the new system that was adopted by Swimming South Africa. “I think we are now, for the first time, really able to monitor each of our talented young swimmers.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Grant Kritzinger On SA Swimming Development for the Olypmics

“Our tracking system enables us to grade swimmers. One of the problems in the past was that we did not really have measurable standards in place to compare the times swam by our junior swimmers with senior world records. “So if the time swam in the 100-freestyle by, for example, a 14-year-old girl, is only a few seconds off the world record, what does it mean. Previously, we had nothing against which we could measure it. We didn’t know whether or not she was on track to become a future Olympian. Now that we are able to properly monitor the swimmers, we have a much better understanding of what it takes to excel internationally. “When a swimmer gets an A-plus grading, it means that he or she has the potential to beat the world’s best and is at least able to get a top-six finish at the World Championships. A swimmer with an A-grading should be able to qualify for the finals at the World Championships and a swimmer with a B-grading should be able to qualify for the World Championships.

“An extra bonus is that the grading system motivates swimmers to work harder because they want to be upgraded.

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Coaching Focus: Swimming

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Provided by Grant Kritzinger

“At the moment it is slightly disconcerting that it seems as if the standard of our boys’ swimming is beginning to drop off, while the girls seem to be becoming stronger. Luckily we were able to pick it up and we are encouraging the boys to work harder so that they can become stronger. We are also proactively trying to find out what is causing the relapse in the boys’ performance.” Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Grant Kritzinger On SA Swimming Development for the Olypmics

SideBar In his own words, Grant Kritzinger is a swimming nut. “Swimming was the sport with which I grew up. I always tended to be hyperactive and my parents let me take part in as many sports as possible in order to get rid of my excess energy. In the end I decided to stick with swimming.”

Kritzinger is still an active swimmer himself. Last year he competed at the Dutch Short Course championships, which gave him an opportunity to meet and exchange ideas with various coaches.

Kritzinger was part of the SA Junior swimming squad but after school he received a scholarship from the USA where he obtained a BSc degree in Agriculture Economics and Microbiology.

“I had an interesting conversation with the Dutch Youth Director of Swimming and he explained to me the importance of long term planning. At the World Short Course Championship last year the Dutch swimmers won the most medals, which was mainly due to the implementation of a youth programme five years ago.”

“After going to the USA I did not come back to South Africa to try to qualify for the national team, but instead started coaching at the University of Wyoming and later on at Salt Lake City. “When I came back to South Africa in 2007 I took up coaching when Lyndon Ferns (Olympian gold medallist) asked me to help at Players Club in Pretoria. I was an assistant coach there for two years before being offered a job as head coach in Dubai. I worked there for two years before coming back to South Africa.”

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


Upliftment & Development: CRICKET

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

Alviro Petersen

Breaking new

boundaries!

Alviro Petersen called time on his international cricket career early last month, after representing South Africa in 36 Tests spanning four years. His on-field contribution will be remembered equally to the community work he does off the pitch.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Alviro Petersen Breaking new boundaries!

His decision to retire was based on his desire to give the younger players an opportunity to shine and to focus on his foundation and cricketing school. He has a tender spot for disadvantaged children as he grew up poor in Gelvandale, a coloured township in Port Elizabeth. The Alviro Petersen Foundation is something that means a lot to the man who is one of three Proteas to have scored a century on debut. His foundation focuses on awareness programmes, such as the dangers of drug use and gang affiliation.

“My foundation was started based on the idea that there are always ways to improve your life. Growing up poor meant there were few options for me. That all changed when I was at school and one day, I passed the teacher’s lounge and saw the Proteas walking onto the pitch on television. I decided then and there that I would one day play for South Africa,” said Alviro. Support from different individuals helped him to achieve his dreams and according to the 34 year old, there are just too many to mention. He believes that parents are the first source of motivation for their children.

“If you give 100%, then you have nothing to worry about. Everything will work itself out. An important thing to remember is that winning is not everything; it will never be. As long as you are enjoying what you are doing, that is what counts.” Alviro’s cricket school is a direct result of the support, especially from his parents, he received during the course of his career.

“My cricket school was opened to give young cricket enthusiasts, boys and girls between the ages of five and eighteen, the chance to improve their game. I feel that there is a need for quality coaching in South Africa. At the moment, many schools utilise teachers who may not have the necessary skills to coach correctly. Costs vary depending on what course is chosen and we assist kids who are financially disadvantaged. The school really is for everyone.”

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Upliftment & Development: CRICKET

Words: Dan Lombard | Photos: Provided

His cricket school is growing in leaps and bounds with an indoor centre being built at Curro Aurora Private School in Johannesburg. Alviro will coach more now that he has more time on his hands. Alviro acknowledges his wife, Samantha, for her unwavering support during his career. This year will mark eight years of marriage, after first meeting about ten years ago at a conference. The couple has a two year old son, Jason, who shares his father’s middle name (Nathan).

“My wife is an individual who has taken a backseat in my career. She has sacrificed a lot in order for me to achieve my goals and I’m looking forward to spending more time with my family.” Alviro is still set to play county cricket (in England) and franchise cricket (in South Africa) for at least the next three years. Outside of his foundation and cricket school, Alviro would like to spend more time working on his properties and spending time outdoors. Alviro will remembered as an international cricketer who had the ability to break opposition teams with his batting prowess. He has hopes that his community work will have as much impact, which, with his drive and energy, seems to be a given result and we look forward to watching it grow in leaps and bounds.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Alviro Petersen Breaking new boundaries!

Alviro Petersen

Breaking new

boundaries! SIDEBAR

Alviro Petersens Cricket School: How to book: Bookings for the private coaching sessions can now be done, and the coaching will take place at Curro Aurora Private School. Our aim is to help every cricketer, with any ability, to reach their full potential, and be the best they can be. Facilities include, outdoor nets, fields and a brand new indoor cricket facility, which will be fully functional in January 2015. All our coaches are qualified CSA coaches, and for your security and peace of mind, all our staff are police checked.

Options: * 1 Hour sessions * 1 Hour sessions

Individual

* 1 Hour sessions * 2 Hoursessions

Group [5-12 Players]

2 Players Group [5-12 Players]

Please email: alviro@thecricket.co.za for more information or to book your place.

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Upliftment & Development: SPORT & ACADEMICS

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Reg Caldecott

The Tuks High Performance Centre (hpc) – SA’s top Sporting Career AND Academic Training Centre The Tuks High Performance Centre (hpc) is the place where sporting dreams do come true. At last year’s Commonwealth Games, the World Rowing Championships, the World Sprint Canoeing Championships, the African Athletics Championships and the Continental Athletics Cup, hpc athletes won a total of no less than eleven gold medals, three silver medals and four bronze medals. The hpc golfers and triathletes also notched up some good results. These achievements prove that the hpc’s holistic approach of supporting the athletes with a multi-disciplined team of sports scientists and medical personnel is certainly paying off. The prediction made by Toby Sutcliffe, CEO of hpc, that the hpc sponsored athletes could win seven medals at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio, might even prove to be not far off the mark. But Sutcliffe and his team of experts are not in the habit of taking anything for granted. “I attended a Board Meeting of the Association of Sport Performance Centres before last year’s Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. It was attended by representatives of most of the larger sporting countries.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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hpc SA’s top Sporting Career & Academic Training Centre

“One of the main themes was the importance of being proactive in the management of the build-up of athletes for the 2016 Olympic Games. “Proactive management not only involves an analysis of the athlete’s lifestyle, his mental state and eating habits. It also involves the help of psychologists, if necessary, as well as regular blood tests to check for possible iron and other deficiencies.

“Watching the Commonwealth Games I noticed that some of our athletes who finished in 4th or 5th positions lacked the ability to step up to the next level. If the athletes, coaches and agents would buy into the expertise offered at hpc, we could rectify this by being proactive.” However, the sole drive or goal of hpc’s ‘think tank’ is not merely to ensure that athletes perform at their best at the

“For us at the hpc it is important to ensure that the youngsters find the right balance between training and competing in sport on the one hand and their studies on the other.” According to Sutcliffe, any talented young athlete is welcome to apply for hpc support. “Applicants will be tested and if the results prove to be promising, we will start working with them to help them realise their dreams. We understand that not every youngster will eventually become ‘a jewel in the South African sports crown’ but if we achieve a success factor of 3% to 4%, we have done a very good job.

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Olympic Games or World Championships. It is equally important for Sutcliffe and his team to get involved with the athletes at grassroots level. To take care of this aspect, TuksSport High School and the various hpc academies (athletics, golf, swimming, judo, rowing, canoeing, triathlon, cricket, tennis and soccer) have been established.


Upliftment & Development: SPORT & ACADEMICS

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Reg Caldecott

“As far as funding is concerned, we like to assist wherever we can but unfortunately we don’t have a bottomless pit of money. The challenge is, therefore, to get more businesses involved through the Forever Heroes Trust. “We want to give bursaries to kids who are talented but financially challenged but at the same time we want the parents to understand that, seeing that they have to pay school fees at any other school, they also have to make a contribution at TuksSport. We have found that if everything is free, there is no commitment from the parents. We expect parents to be committed to take care of their kids and not consider the hpc as some kind of ‘warehouse’ where they can store their kids.

“Our future aim is to build on what we have already achieved and to consolidate our position in the South African sports arena.”

According to Sutcliffe, the hpc has intentionally decided not to become involved with any team sport, other than soccer and cricket. “The goal with our soccer academy is to help young players (boys as well as girls) to master the basics of soccer and to ingrain a positive work ethic in each player. It is important that the players understand from a young age, that the only way to guarantee success, is through hard work and dedication. The soccer academy is basically a feeder system to help players get into the Premier League and to play for the various national sides. “We have got the same goal as far as cricket is concerned.” The hpc must certainly be doing something right as far as soccer is concerned, because Tuks has won the Varsity Cup Soccer Tournament for the past two years. Sutcliffe is concerned about the state of South African swimming.

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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hpc SA’s top Sporting Career & Academic Training Centre

“A sport that has gone backwards lately is swimming. If you take the performances by Chad le Clos, Cameron van der Burgh and a few other swimmers out of the equation, there is really nothing to get excited about. This applies especially to women’s swimming. We, at the hpc, want to change this around so that there will be a bigger pool of talented swimmers from which national squads can be chosen.” If there is one thing that Llewellyn van Leeuwen (technical director and head coach at TuksGolf) and Emile Steinmann (senior coach at TuksGolf) do not like to hear, it is South African golfers singing the praises of their rivals during tournaments. According to him, it has become obvious that the golfing skills of our national players are no longer on par with international players. “The reason for this is that in other countries, the young players are exposed to holistic coaching from a young age. It means that, apart from good coaching, they also have access to sports scientists, dieticians, biokineticists and psychologists. “ “At TuksGolf we realise that we can no longer afford not to help our young players. Our coaches, actually the whole hpc team, have the expertise to make a difference for the better. We would love to identify promising young players, aged between 10 and 12, and coach them. The benefit will be that we will be able to work with them for a much longer period. Our main challenge will be to ensure that the players will have mastered all the basic techniques of golf at the age of 16. Every player will be assisted by a team of experts from the hpc.

“We invite the parents of talented young players to contact us. It stands to reason that there will have to be a selection process, because we will not be able to accept everybody.”

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Upliftment & Development: SPORT & ACADEMICS

Words: Wilhelm de Swardt | Photos: Reg Caldecott

SIDEBAR IF YOU HAVE A TALENTED SON OR DAUGHTER THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE CONSIDERED FOR ENTRY INTO THE hpc YOU CAN FIND OUT MORE ABOUT US AT:

www.hpc.co.za OR CONTACT US ON: Tel: [27] 12 362 9800 Fax: [27] 12 362 9890  Email: info@hpc.ac.za Physical Address:  High Performance Centre (hpc)  Burnett Street Hatfield, Pretoria Sport Campus (LC de Villiers)  GPS Co-ordinates: S25° 44’ 58” E28º 14’ 47” Postal Address: PO Box 14622, Hatfield, 0028 

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Varsity CUP Cricket To Break The Boundaries Of T20 Rules

VARSITY CRICKET TO BREAK THE BOUNDARIES OF T20 RULES PRESS RELEASE BY VARSITY SPORT

Everything you thought was T20 entertainment is about to be knocked out of the park, as the inaugural Varsity Cricket season looks to challenge all the rules of conventional T20 cricket. During the six-day jamboree, innovations such as a Power Play Plus Over, Strategy Break and targets on the side of the field that will yield ten runs if hit, will ramp up the action, as eight of South Africa’s top university sides slog it out to be crowned champions.

Duiter Bosman CEO: Varsity Cup

The Power Play Plus Over can be called at any time during the batting innings. The call can only be made once the bowler is at the top of his mark for the new over and a change of bowler cannot be made once the Power Play Plus Over has been signalled. All runs scored during this over will be doubled, while any wicket that falls will cost the side five runs. These runs will be added to the extras column for the next six balls, with the runs deducted for losing a wicket also deducted from the extras column. Extras, such as wides and no-balls, are also doubled during the Power Play Plus Over. Should a batsman lose his wicket during this over, he will be out, but the over will continue until it is completed.

Jurie Roux CEO: SARU

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

varsitysportsSA


PRESS RELEASE: CRICKET – VARSITY CUP

Words: Name Surname | Photos: Provided

Which teams will be participating? UJ, UWC, Tuks, Maties, Pukke, NMMU, UCT, Kovsies The Targets on the side of the field will be erected between the boundary rope and the perimeter fence on the square boundaries on either side. Should a batsman hit these targets he, and the batting team, will be awarded ten runs. These runs are added to the batsman’s total. Such innovation will be encouraging attacking play and could see a batsman score as many as 20 runs off a single ball and will ensure that the action never stops. The Strategy Break will be taken after the tenth over and will allow team management, as well as substitute fielders of the bowling team, to go onto the field to discuss their approach for the next nine overs. The batting side will also be allowed to receive water from a teammate. The tournament will also be played with pink balls. This offers spectators and possibly, future South African cricket players, a first-hand look at the future of cricket. The action-packed tournament is just another way Varsity Sports continues to innovate and break ground in the South African sporting landscape.

Why are they using pink balls? New innovation Do you have a fixture list that we can publish? Please see below (pg. 71) WHAT WILL THE WINNERS RECEIVE? THEY GET TO Go to the redbull campus clash final in India Will scouts for Proteas or Provincial Sides be there? We hope so

#VarsitySports #VSCricket Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Varsity CUP Cricket To Break The Boundaries Of T20 Rules

SIDEBAR: About Varsity Cricket Varsity Cricket is one of the sporting codes of Varsity Sports. The competition will have its inaugural season in 2015, with South Africa’s top eight universities playing each other in a week-long tournament. The winner will have the opportunity to represent South Africa at the Red Bull Campus Cricket World Final.

Cricket South Africa supports Varsity Cricket. Varsity Sports is a highperformance competition platform that enables South African universities to compete against one another in a number different sporting codes. These codes are athletics, hockey, cricket, football, beach volleyball, 7s rugby and netball.

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015


PRESS RELEASE: CRICKET – VARSITY CUP

Words: Name Surname | Photos: Provided

VARSITY CRICKET FIXTURES 2015 The ultimate online sports magazine

VARSITY CRICKET FIXTURES 2015 Tuesday Field

Senwes Park

Pukke A

09:00 - 12:00

UJ

12:20 - 15:20

Pukke B vs

UWC

Tuks vs Maties

Pukke vs NMMU

UCT vs Kovsies

Pukke A

Pukke B

Maties vs UWC

Pukke vs Kovsies

UJ vs Tuks

UCT vs NMMU

Pukke A

Pukke B

09:00 - 12:00

Tuks vs UWC

UJ vs UCT

12:20 - 15:20

Kovsies vs NMMU

Pukke vs Maties

TBC

TBC

09:00 - 12:00

UJ vs Kovsies

Tuks vs UCT

12:20 - 15:20

NMMU vs UWC

15:30 - 18:30

UJ vs Maties

19:00 - 22:00

Tuks vs NMMU

Wednesday Field

Senwes Park

09:00 - 12:00 12:20 - 15:20 15:30 - 18:30

Kovsies vs Maties

19:00 - 22:00

Pukke vs UCT

Thursday Field

Senwes Park

15:30 - 18:30

UCT vs UWC

19:00 - 22:00

NMMU vs Maties

Friday Field

TBC

15:30 - 18:30

Tuks vs Pukke

19:00 - 22:00

Kovsies vs UWC

Saturday Field

TBC

TBC

TBC

09:00 - 12:00

UCT vs Maties

Pukke vs UWC

12:20 - 15:20

UJ vs NMMU

15:30 - 18:30

Tuks vs Kovsies

19:00 - 22:00

UJ vs Pukke

Sunday Field

Senwes Park

09:00 - 12:00

Semi-Final 1

12:30 - 15:30

Semi-Final 2

16:00 - 19:00

FINAL

B

C

Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

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Varsity CUP RUGBY 2015 is going to Rock!

Varsity Cup Rugby 2015 is going to Rock! COMBO: PRESS RELEASE BY VARSITY SPORT; INSIGHT BY Dan Lombard

The FNB Varsity Cup presented by Steinhoff International is in its eighth year, after a highly successful inaugural competition in 2008. It is already a highlight on the rugby-mad South African’s sporting calendar. This inter-university rugby competition sees eight of the country’s top universities go head-to-head to take home the title (and a substantial cash reward). The eight teams play in a single round, followed by a semi-final and a final that determines the FNB Varsity Cup Champion presented by Steinhoff International. Varsity Cup is managed by an executive committee, chaired by current SARU CEO, Jurie Roux.

“This is a new test from Varsity Cup that, we believe, the world of rugby will look favourably upon after the World Cup,” Jurie Roux CEO: SARU

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

– Jurie Roux

FNB Varsity Cup, had a successful launch at the Copperleaf Golf Estate in Centurion on Monday, 26 January 2015. Varsity Cup, preparing for it’s eighth installment, has cemented itself as the premier university rugby competition in South Africa. Apart from making waves in the fight against violence against women and children, the competition is setting the benchmark for law trials in the rugby world.


PRESS RELEASE: Rugby – VARSITY CUP

Words: Dan Lombard And Dummett & Co. | Photos: Provided

Law changes that were first tested in the Varsity Cup and have since been absorbed into World Rugby’s law book: •

increasing the match day squad to 23 (an additional prop on the bench) is now used in internationals and most competitions, and the points system where a penalty or a drop goal are now worth two points and three for a conversion.

Australia’s Buildcorp National Rugby Championship used the new point system in their inaugural season last year. The 2015 season will see the reintroduction of the White Card rule. This rule allows coaches and captains to refer decisions for review to Television Match Officials (TMOs) during games, and it was first introduced during the inaugural Varsity Cup competition in 2008. The system is back this year and is endorsed by the South African Rugby Union (SARU). Coaches and captains will have the ability to query a decision or passage of play, if they feel that

something was missed by the referee and his assistants. Former Springbok captain and founder of the Varsity Cup, Francois Pienaar, believes that the white card rule will ensure that the correct decisions are made. The competition will also be sticking with its innovation of using two referees, following the success of the trial last season. This year will also see the defending scrumhalf not being allowed to encroach on his opponent once the ball has been fed into the scrum. It is hoped that this will encourage a more attacking brand of rugby. The Varsity Cup, along with its sub-competitions (Varsity Shield, Koshuis Rugby and Young Guns) would like to increase the spectators’ experience this season. Fan parks will be erected at universities when they play away from home, so students can still enjoy the game with their fellow supporters. With new rules, also comes a new format and this year’s Young Guns and Koshuis competitions will see the eight teams split into two pools with four teams in

each. The teams will play each other across pools meaning each team will play four matches. The points log will be combined and the final will be contested by each teams at the top of the two groups at the end of the group fixtures. There is extra incentive to perform as the final will be played at the team leader’s home ground. The newbies from the Central University of Technology (CUT) from Bloemfontein will make their bow this year after winning promotion from the Varsity Shield. Duitser Bosman, CEO of Varsity Sports, believes that this will further strengthen the quality of the competition.

“CUT did extremely well in last year’s Varsity Shield competition and I am very excited to see how they do in this year’s Varsity Cup. They have great structures in place and I am sure they will cause an upset or two,” Bosman quoted.

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Varsity CUP RUGBY 2015 is going to Rock!

Duitser Bosman, CEO of Varsity Rugby, understands the importance of university rugby especially in a World Cup year. He said that attendance at sporting events around South Africa show a significant decline while the opposite is true for Varsity Rugby.

Duiter Bosman CEO: Varsity Cup

“Last year’s final amplified the game so much that universities are preparing more intensely. In a World Cup year, the Springbok coach will build up to the global competition and then bring in new blood after the show piece. The Varsity Cup players are definitely getting better, so we will see more players going onto higher honours.” — Duiter Bosman

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Game On Magazine, February: Issue 13, 2015

“Last year’s final amplified the game so much that universities are preparing more intensely. In a World Cup year, the Springbok coach will build up to the global competition and then bring in new blood after the show piece. The Varsity Cup players are definitely getting better so we will see more players going onto higher honours.” said Duitser. To ensure that the competition continues to bring out the best in young rugby talent, only bona-fide students can take part in the tournament. The final addition to this year will see Varsity Cup implementing a new social awareness campaign using social media to highlight the importance of standing up against the abuse of women and children. The Pink Rose Challenge will see players and management, particularly men, post a photo of themselves and a pink rose, pledging to show respect and unconditional love towards the women in their lives and then challenging their opponents to do the same. The 2015 edition of the Varsity Cup, is set to be even more thrilling than previous years. The game in South Africa is growing stronger each year and Varsity Rugby is an essential cog in the wheel. So who are you backing?

SIDEBAR FOR THE SUPPORTERS: To make it even easier to back your boytjies, Varsity Cup replica jerseys from Maties, Ikeys, Tuks and UJ will be available to purchase at selected at Edgars Active stores across the country. This is another way in which the Varsity Cup is catering for its loyal supporters, who really want to back their boytjies in every which way possible. Throughout the tournament, fans will enjoy non-stop action with cheerleaders, giveaways, new rules and unique university presentations creating ‘Rugby that Rocks’.


PRESS RELEASE: Rugby – VARSITY CUP

Words: Dave White CEO Game On Magazine | Photos: Provided

The ultimate online sports magazine The Varsity Cup this year has a few new rules being trialled. 1.

Dave WHITE and Francois Piennaar

WHAT GAME ON SAYS ABOUT VARSITY CUP RUGBY In my personal opinion, the Varsity Cup is one of the most important competitions currently on the sporting calendar. I’ve always felt, before the competions inception a few years ago, there was a gaping hole left where players were falling between the cracks in being lost through ie financial difficulties or even possibly late development. It closes the gap between school rugby and professional rugby and at the same time, offers the players an education. The support each team receives is staggering, which, I believe is down to brilliant marketing and backed up by a great brand of running rugby. I’d like to take this opportunity to say this competition wouldn’t have been possible without the the initial sponsorship from FNB and Steinhoff, and more recently, from Cell C and Spur Steak Ranches.

The new scrum half rule where his offside line is the tunnel where the shoulders of the opposing props meet. He may not pass the middle of the tunnel and move further than 1 metre from the scrum until the scrum ends.

Wow – I’m so happy to see this law being brought in. I’ve always thought a scrum should be an attacking opportunity or an opportunity to clear the ball, depending where you are on the field. Scrummies have been playing  on the edge of the laws for years now getting away with impeding the opposition’s scrum. We will rate his opinions using thumbs ups on a scale of 1-3

2.

Free catch rule.

If any player catches a ball from an opposing kick before it touches the ground, the referee will play free kick advantage. Another great example of thinking out the box in an attempt to stop aimless kicks down field. Hopefully  this will open games up to more running rugby and better game plans from teams. Rugby over the years, has had way too many teams kicking aimlessly and hoping for the best. I can’t wait to see how this law plays out

3.

Points for kicks.

Conversions 3 points Penalties 2 points. Another good law which is really going to lead to open, running and attacking rugby being played. This law means the fly half can’t just be good looking, have nice hair and a great physique and being used solely as a kicking points

machine. They really are going to have to step up their game and think quickly to keep control or else they’ll be found wanting. Use a thumbs up image please with this comment next to it: Great law for enterprising and running rugby. Great law for enterprising and running rugby

4.

The White card rule.

This will be known as a Team Challenge. Each team will have the right to 1 challenge in each half. If the challenge is successful the teams 1 challenge will remain intact. Only the captain and coach will be allowed to challenge a decision. A challenge will be indicated during stoppages in play by the referee, who will raise a White Card. What can I say about this law, other than its about time and I know a huge amount of Springbok supporters who will agree with me. I respect referees and the decisions they make but unfortunately they do occasionally make mistakes. Great

5.

Two referees per game.

Now I wish you could see the joy in my face. This law should have been introduced from when rugby first started. It is just impossible for referees to have eyes everywhere, especially in rugby. My only concern is whether the referees will be able to work together effectively. “One thing’s for sure - I can’t wait to watch it all unfold!”

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OF GAME ON Lawprint supports the development of youth sports in South Africa in association with Game On

your succe s s is

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