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details. According to public records obtained by the station, Sgt. Bradley Rhodes of the NOPD 2nd District billed the city more than $250,000 since November 28, 2010, through a company called Bradley Rhodes Security Consulting, which he formed in September 2010 — a month after Hosli’s company was formed. Invoices show Rhodes’ company billed for work done at the city’s impound lots, booting yard and Administrative Hearing Center (where appeals from parking tickets are heard), with Rhodes charging a 10 percent supervisor’s fee. It gets better. Shortly after news broke about Rhodes’ consulting company, it was revealed that Morton — who conducted the audit of Hosli’s 8th District command — had ties to an outside LLC himself. Amid all this, Serpas sent an email to NOPD brass reminding them that NOPD

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Unregulated paid details have been wearing away NOPD’s integrity for decades. rules bar officers from forming any business entity for the purpose of billing, receiving compensation, or offering services of paid details. A day later, on May 5, Landrieu announced the immediate suspension without pay of Hosli and Public Works Director Robert Mendoza until the investigation is complete. (Serpas was absent from the mayor’s announcement; the mayor said the chief was attending a mandatory training session in Baton Rouge.) Abuses of the paid detail “system” have been around for generations, but Landrieu and Serpas now own this scandal. The problem is theirs to solve. As the chief drafts his proposed reforms, we suggest he look no further than Jefferson Parish, where the Sheriff’s Office manages all paid details. We further suggest that an independent auditor periodically be hired to audit detail assignments to assure fairness and integrity. Somebody at NOPD, literally, has to start policing the police — and shutting off the drip-drip-drip of petty corruption.

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bsent from the fawning 60 Minutes profile of Mayor Mitch Landrieu on May 1 was any mention of the latest scandal to rock the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD). The report mentioned some of Landrieu’s challenges battling crime and blight, which easily rank as top priorities after Hurricane Katrina, but it ignored the growing scandal over unregulated paid details and their corrupting effects at NOPD. Specifically, there was no mention of the private company formed by 8th District Commander Maj. Edwin Hosli to examine New Orleans traffic camera photos. On one hand, crime and blight are torrents compared to the dripdrip-drip of the traffic-cam mess; but a steady drip, over time, can wear away stone. Unregulated paid details have been wearing away NOPD’s integrity for decades. The facts are these: In response to a lawsuit challenging the legality of citations issued via traffic cameras, the courts ruled that police officers must manually review and confirm each alleged offense. Hosli then set up a company, Anytime Solutions LLC, to provide the needed officers on paid details. By September, he had a contract with the city’s traffic camera vendor; his contract was approved by the city’s Department of Public Works (DPW). Hosli then hired off-duty NOPD officers to work paid details (at $35 an hour) reviewing the photos. Among the hires were NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas’ son-in-law, officer Travis Ward, as well as one of the chief’s bodyguards. New Orleans Inspector General Ed Quatrevaux is investigating the circumstances surrounding Hosli’s company and its contract, as is independent Police Monitor Susan Hutson and NOPD Deputy Chief Arlinda Westbrook, head of the department’s Public Integrity Bureau. On April 29, the New Orleans chapter of the NAACP sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice asking the feds to investigate as well. Even before this scandal broke, Landrieu had ordered Serpas to conduct a thorough review of the paiddetail system and to recommend reforms by Friday, May 15. Two weeks ago, Landrieu further ordered that Hosli’s contract be canceled and that all violations alleged via traffic camera photographs be reviewed by NOPD’s Traffic Division. That should have been the policy all along. Then — drip-drip-drip — an internal NOPD audit of the 8th District surfaced. The audit, by Capt. Frederick Morton of the NOPD Inspections Unit, found even more problems with paid details, including questionable recordkeeping and evidence of officers splitting shifts, which is against NOPD policy. Shortly thereafter, Fox 8 News reported that Hosli was not the only NOPD officer to form a private company to manage paid

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Gypsy Moth training Retired silent movie plane he was using for ABOUT 25 YEARS AGO, WE LIVED star Marguerite a flying lesson crashed. AT 922 BURDETTE ST. IN NEW Clark Williams When Harry PalmORLEANS. ACROSS THE STREET AT rented this house erston Williams was on Burdette Street 925 BURDETTE IS A LARGE, TWOborn in Patterson in STORY FRAME HOUSE THAT SITS ON during the 1930s. 1889, his family owned ABOUT A QUARTER OF THE BLOCK. the local cypress mill and had made a FOR YEARS IT HAS BEEN OCCUPIED BY fortune exporting the processed lumber EDWARD J. IRELAND FAMILY, AND IT IS around the world. RUMORED THE HOUSE WAS BUILT BY Wedell and Williams made a good WEEDLE WILLIAMS OF AVIATION FAME team. Williams, a millionaire, put up the 100 YEARS AGO. BUT NO ONE, INCLUDmoney and Wedell designed the planes. ING THE IRELAND FAMILY, KNOWS FOR The Wedell-Williams Air Service may have SURE. HOW DO I FIND THE ANSWER? had the largest private fleet of aircraft in MILTON HILBERT the world at the time. In 1918, Williams married Marguerite DEAR MILTON, Clark, a glamorous and popular silentmovie star. She gave up fame and attenYou ask Blake, of course. The person you refer to as Weedle tion from her adoring fans to live in the Williams was actually Jimmie Wedell and relative obscurity of Patterson. However, Harry Williams, who formed a famous she and Williams spent much time in aviation partnership — but did not build New Orleans and stayed at the home of the house on Burdette Street. Williams’ Harry’s father, Frank B. Williams, at 5120 widow, Marguerite Clark Williams, did St. Charles Ave. Harry Williams died on May 19, 1936, lease the home for a while during the late when his plane crashed near Baton 1930s, however. James Robert “Jimmie” Wedell was born Rouge. As a tribute to her late husband, in Texas City, Texas, in 1900. He dropped Marguerite donated the Harry P. Williams out of school, but had a keen interest in Memorial Airport in Patterson to the mechanics and aviation. Wedell learned to state of Louisiana, but served as president fly but was not allowed to be a pilot in the of Wedell-Williams Aviation Company, U.S. Army because of an accident that left which she inherited when her husband him blind in one eye. Nevertheless, during died, until it was sold to Eastern Airlines. She also made New Orleans her home, the 1920s he earned money barnstorming across the state and giving flying lessons. moving in to her father-in-law’s mansion In 1927, Wedell moved to New Orleans, on St. Charles. When the house was sold, and in 1929, he collaborated with wealthy she rented two houses, including the one Louisiana businessman Harry Williams on Burdette Street, where she lived until to form Wedell-Williams Air Service in she moved to New York City in 1939 to live Patterson, La. The company built high- with her sister Cora. Marguerite Williams died on Sept. 24, speed planes, gave flying lessons and operated passenger, charter and mail ser- 1940, from complications following a heart attack, and her ashes are entombed vices. It also established an airport. Wedell flew planes in a number of races in the Williams’ family vault in Metairie and gained a reputation for his piloting Cemetery. She was 57 years old when she ability as well as the speed of his planes. died and left an estate worth $565,563. The former Williams mansion on St. In fact, The Wedell-Williams 44 won more Charles Avenue is now the Milton H. races than any other plane of its day. Wedell died on June 24, 1934, when the Latter Memorial Library. HEY BLAKE,

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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“We don’t need to spike the football.” — President Barack Obama, explaining why the U.S. chose not to release photos of Osama bin Laden’s corpse.

The Coming Waters

“He goes and finds the nearest African-Americans and kicks them while they’re down.” — State Sen. J. P. Morrell, criticizing Gov. Bobby Jindal’s suggested merger of the University of New Orleans and Southern University of New Orleans.

HOW DOES A CASH-POOR STATE DEAL WITH A MAJOR OIL SPILL RECOVERY AND RECORD FLOODING? WE’RE ABOUT TO FIND OUT.

POLL VAULTING

BY JEREMY ALFORD

T

The Mississippi River at the Rigolets, from the air. The Upper Mississippi River is carrying more water than in any other time in history. “This is not something that may happen, it will happen,” Harrison says, referring to flooding. Lawmakers at the hearing also lamented the possibility of opening up the Morganza Spillway, which has remained closed since 1973. It was only opened that year because of complications at the Old River Control Structure. An executive staffer close to this year’s preparations says state officials have been “shocked” in some cases to see how “antiquated” some of the flood protection systems are along the river. The Bonnet Carre Spillway was scheduled to be opened Monday, May 9. If both the Morganza and Bonnet Carre are opened, coastal Louisiana from eastern St. Bernard Parish to the Atchafalaya Basin and beyond will experience record or near-record levels of backwater flooding. SOME PEOPLE VIEW SUCH A DECISION AS A CHOICE TO relieve pressure on protections for Baton Rouge and

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THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

a program that recruits thousands of kids to sell lemonade in one day, drew close to 5,000 children from south Louisiana to raise money for the charities of their choice on May 7. Lemonade Day began in 2007 and last year drew more than 30,000 kids nationwide. The local sponsors were Georges Enterprises and Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers. In addition to connecting kids to local charities, Lemonade Day also fosters entrepreneurship and character development among youth.

New Orleans City Park

was named one of “America’s Coolest City Parks” in the April 2011 issue of Travel + Leisure. The magazine noted City Park’s magnificent live oaks and cited several events that take place in the park, including the relatively new Rock ’n’ Roll Mardi Gras Marathon. T + L recommended travelers visit on Thursday evenings, “when the Botanical Garden throws genteel parties with mint juleps and performances by ensembles like the New Orleans Ragtime Orchestra.”

Allen Toussaint

was honored May 3 for his achievements in Louisiana music. Deacon John Moore oversaw the ceremony as a plaque was installed at the Toussaint family home at 3041 College Court. Toussaint, a member of the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame, composed many of his songs in the house, including the New Orleans classic “Mother-in-Law.” Ernie K-Doe’s version of the song reached the Billboard charts 50 years ago last week.

Joseph Meisch,

who once supervised the New Orleans Police Department Homicide Division, was fired May 3 by Police Chief Ronal Serpas for his role i covering up the shooting of Henry Glover. After a monthslong investigation, Meisch was found in violation of several NOPD rules, including neglect of duty, for not reporting what he knew about the incident to superiors. Meisch had testified in the federal trial of officers in the Glover case under a grant of immunity from prosecution.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

he tension in the room is palpable and no one — from the flacks to the hacks — wants to stay on the agenda. From freshwater diversions to stresses on coastal habitats, a legislative hearing held last week on the ongoing recovery from last year’s BP oil disaster couldn’t help but veer into matters related to Louisiana’s expected flooding problems moving downriver. “There’s more water on the Upper Mississippi River right now than any time in history, period — in any time in history,” says Garrett Graves, chairman of the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. “This overwhelms the volume of water that was in the river in 1927, 1937, 1997, 2008. An extraordinary flow is coming down the river.” That water levels are expected to be above crest for seven to 10 days doesn’t inspire much confidence. Graves says there are “vulnerabilities everywhere from the levees in Baton Rouge to the levees in south Louisiana.” State Rep. Joe Harrison, R-Napoleonville, has called for the Louisiana Department of Insurance to begin working with residents in low-lying areas and those who might experience backwater flooding. It’s a lesson learned from Hurricane Katrina and the many other storms that have plagued the coast. If there’s going to be a challenge in the process, it’ll likely involve insurance coverage. Harrison has urged the state insurance department to be proactive now in places like Morgan City.

Southern Media & Opinion Research (SMOR) released a poll May 2 that showed mixed news for Gov. Bobby Jindal, good news for Sen. David Vitter, and overall dissatisfaction with state lawmakers. The poll of 600 likely voters was conducted by phone April 19-23 and carries a plus-or-minus 4 percent margin of error. Jindal’s “positive job rating” remained unchanged since the last SMOR poll in November 2010, standing at 55 percent, while his “negative job rating” increased 1 point to 44 percent. Jindal’s statewide TV ad campaign, which debuted since the last poll, seemed to have little effect; registered voters who said they would “definitely” vote to re-elect Jindal in the fall fell from 39 to 35.6 percent. In a statement, pollster Bernie Pinsonat said Jindal didn’t seem to be in any danger, but “his approval ratings are the same as the fall and have actually gone down over the course of his term. That’s significant, considering Jindal is regarded as a reform governor.” Polling better than Jindal was Vitter, with a 58 percent job approval rating. That correlates inversely with President

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 10 > 2011

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and gas wells during the drilling phase,” says Bob Harper, undersecretary for the Department of Natural Resources. “They focus on blowout prevention issues that the inspectors are expected to check very closely and document that these are in compliance.” Then there are the issues of money to cover all of Louisiana’s damages from the Gulf disaster. Graves says BP so far has ponied up $14 billion as the responsible party, and the federal government has expended about $900 million from its oil spill trust. The Natural Resources Damage Assessment process on the federal level will yield money for local projects, but it could take up to 10 years to complete the brick-and-mortar process. More immediately, BP is expected to pay as much as $22 billion in fines under the federal Clean Water Act. Louisiana’s congressional delegation is working to steer about 80 percent of the cash to Gulf Coast states for ecosystem restoration. BP recently put up a $1 billion “down payment” on its Clean Water Act fines, Banta says, and the process of divvying up the money will begin with each state receiving an equal allotment of $100,000 — despite the fact that 92 percent of the most heavily oiled shoreline is in Louisiana. “I know it’s not fair, but it was a tough negotiation,” Banta says. According to Peggy Hatch, secretary for the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality, BP likewise faces fines on the state level that could equal more than $300 million. “But they haven’t been levied yet,” Hatch told the committee. Aside from what the rivers do to south Louisiana, it’s safe to say major flooding could put last year’s oil disaster in a different perspective. Bob Graham, a former U.S. senator from Florida and a member of President Barack Obama’s Oil Spill Commission, warned as much last month during a visit to New Orleans. Over the past several months, more than one event has bumped the oil disaster from the front page — conflicts overseas, a national recession and even pop culture curiosities. “All those things and others have tended to draw the public’s attention away from what happened on April 20,” Graham says. Nonetheless, oil disaster recovery efforts continue. Businesses are still looking for ways to survive. People are dealing with economic losses and health concerns. And all of these challenges will remain come June and July, long after the big, muddy creek has risen and subsided. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ jeremyalford.com.

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New Orleans at the cost of Acadiana. “If there’s ever a choice between Morgan City and New Orleans, we know who the choice is going to be,” Morgan City Councilman Larry Bergeron told The Advertiser in Lafayette last week. The impact of freshwater on coastal marshes also could devastate oystermen still trying to recover from last year’s oil disaster. State Rep. Reed Henderson, D-Chalmette, says oystermen in his district are only 10 percent whole from their losses so far. “Now I have the Bonnet Carre about to open up and put freshwater into St. Bernard and freshwater into Lake Borgne and kill what I have left,” he says. The Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission was expected to hold an emergency meeting late last week to determine whether some of the oyster beds could be relocated. Commissioners are expected to open the oyster season early in some areas to allow an early harvest. Henderson adds that commercial fishermen in his area are bringing him accounts of slimy oysters, crabs with short life spans and others with small pinholes in their shells. Wildlife officials say both the oyster slime and lethargic crabs — meaning they’re live when harvested, but dying before market — are naturally occurring phenomena related to bacteria and other factors. “The United Houma Nation Tribe, they were experiencing crabs not having a good shelf life when they get back to the dock,” says Drue Banta, counsel for the Governor’s Office of Coastal Activities. “They said they weren’t able to sell them because they were dying in a very short window of time.” Officials have no immediate explanation for the reported pinholes. That’s more bad news for crabbers. Casey LeBlanc, owner of Cajun Crab Connection on Bayou Des Allemands, says his company has gone from working 10 boats a day to about three. Complications from flooding won’t help. “Buyers had signs out, ‘Louisiana Blue Crabs Served Here,’ so they took that down,” LeBlanc says. “They went from customers requesting them to telling them they don’t want them no more. They scared they, you know, might have dispersant in them or whatever.” While last week’s hearing did veer into the river stages, it also addressed issues specific to the oil disaster. For example, on the other side of the Gulf coin, oilmen face changes. Enhanced state oversight of blowout preventers has become a major initiative, especially since it was considered a large factor in the demise of the Deepwater Horizon rig. At one time, Louisiana officials allowed inspections to be confirmed verbally. “We basically have developed a specialized form we use for inspecting oil

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Barack Obama’s 58 percent disapproval rating in Louisiana. Vitter spent much of the last year raising money and positioning himself against Obama in the state. Most of all, voters seem to be generally grouchy. Almost 69 percent said state tax money was not being spent wisely, and 60 percent said lawmakers acted in their own best interest, not that of the state, in the recent redistricting session. There were two exceptions to the anti-tax, anti-government mood: 66 percent of voters were up for raising cigarette taxes (Jindal has already said he won’t allow it), while 75 percent said they didn’t trust BP to do the right thing when it came to oil disaster cleanup and fund disbursement and favored government involvement in the process. Remember the flap in 2008 when a bipartisan majority of state legislators voted to increase their own salaries? Politicians are hoping you don’t. A whopping 86 percent of those polled said they would not re-elect a lawmaker who voted for his or her own pay raise. To see how your representative voted, go to www.votesmart.org/issue_keyvote_member.php?cs_ id=19855. — Kevin Allman

Anti-Bullying Bill up for Committee Vote

Drill Bill: Vol. 2

The U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 1230 (the “Restarting American Offshore Leasing Now” Act), which aims to accelerate leasing in the Gulf of Mexico and reopen 3 million acres off the coast of Virginia previously closed during the drilling moratorium that followed the Gulf oil disaster. Supporters of the resolution say its mission is to “expand American energy production, create jobs and generate revenue for taxpayers.” The resolution enters the U.S. Senate amid rising fears about high gas prices over the summer. In 2008, a Democratcontrolled Congress let a moratorium on drilling in the Outer Continental Shelf expire. This time, once again, the gas gloves are off. Voting in favor of the resolution on May 5 were Louisiana Republicans Rodney Alexander, Charles Boustany, Bill Cassidy, John Fleming, Jeff Landry and Steve Scalise, as well as Democrat Cedric Richmond, who last month said, “[BP] should be able to drill, as long as they follow the same rules that everybody else is following. … The permitting process has been revamped and they’re making sure that the safeguards are in place so we don’t have another Horizon accident. ... If BP can make it through that, then I think they should be allowed to drill.” The nay votes on the House floor included all but two House Democrats —Florida’s Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and North Carolina’s Walter Jones. Heather Emmert, Gulf States organizer with Environment America, said in a statement that the bills “double down on offshore drilling instead of protecting sensitive places, making drilling safer, increasing liability for economic damages, or doing anything to restore the Gulf. In effect, Congress is telling oil companies and the drilling agency, ‘Forget the Gulf oil spill, forget the Oil Spill Commission recommendations, and full speed ahead on drilling.’” A White House statement said it opposes H.R. 1230 as it would “undercut critical reforms” committed to “safe and responsible” drilling. — Alex Woodward

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The Louisiana House Education Committee is set to consider a bill that would expand the reach of the state’s anti-bullying law as it applies to public schools and students. House Bill 112, by Rep. Austin Badon, D-New Orleans, will be heard in the committee, which Badon chairs, on Thursday, May 12. The current state law against public school-related bullying specifically exempts six parishes — East Baton Rouge, Livingston, East Feliciana, West Feliciana, St. Helena and Tangipahoa. Those parishes rank among the most conservative in the state. Current law also does not expressly protect students from bullying based on race, color or sexual orientation. The existing law merely defines harassment, intimidation and bullying in general terms. Badon’s bill would remove the exceptions and make the law applicable statewide. It also would define harassment, intimidation and bullying to include “any gesture or written, verbal or physical act by a student directed at another student … that is reasonably perceived as being motivated by any actual or perceived characteristic, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, sexual

orientation, gender, gender identity or expression, physical characteristic, political persuasion, mental disability or physical disability, as well as attire or association with others identified by such categories.” Supporters of the bill are bracing for opposition from conservatives based on the protections extended to students in terms of sexual orientation, and gender identification or expression. — Clancy DuBos

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Jindal’s ‘Romney Problem’ f you’re trying to figure out why Gov. Bobby Jindal is so hell-bent on privatizing Louisiana’s group health benefits program, consider Mitt Romney’s predicament. Romney wants be the Republican nominee against President Barack Obama next year, but five years ago he signed a sweeping universal health care bill into law as Massachusetts’ governor. That hardly sets him apart from Obama, who did the same thing on the national level. Romney’s likely primary opponents can’t wait to out him on that one. Wags already are talking about “the Romney problem” on the issue of health care reform. Supporters of universal health care praise the Massachusetts law (the state’s current governor recently presided over a five-year birthday party for the law and wondered why Romney didn’t attend), while opponents, including Republicans, claim it will bankrupt the state. Given that kind of ideological divide on the national level, and given Jindal’s transparent national ambitions, our governor’s drive to sell or privatize Louisiana’s state employee health plan makes perfect sense … for Jindal.

I

From his perspective, Jindal cannot afford to have a Romney problem when he makes his move to go national. In fact, his problem could be worse than Romney’s — the Louisiana plan actually works. So much so that it has a $520 million surplus. In a move Shakespeare (“The first thing we do … kill all the lawyers”) would have applauded, Jindal fired the guy who turned around Louisiana’s Office of Group Benefits (OGB). Tommy Teague, former chief executive officer of OGB, had the audacity to criticize Jindal’s sale/privatization plan and praise the agency that provides excellent health benefits to more than 225,000 state employees, retirees and their families. Teague was given no reason for his termination on April 15 (the timing could not have been lost on Jindal, a rabid anti-tax guy). Jindal initially proposed selling the group benefits plan via a Wall Street firm, but that idea ran into so much opposition that the governor — who doesn’t even need legislative approval to do what he proposes — has since scaled back his plan to a mere “privatization” of the health insurance portfolio. For the quarter-million or so people who depend on the office for their insurance

benefits, the result is the same: potentially higher premiums and/or less coverage. A number of public officials — including several elected Republicans — have told me privately that the OGB provides outstanding service. All express a shared fear that privatizing the office will affect them adversely. On a related front, Team Jindal has refused to turn over a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed privatization plan to Legislative

Jindal’s problem could be worse than Romney’s — the Louisiana plan actually works.

Auditor Daryl Purpera. Jindal’s office says the analysis by Chaffe & Associates is not yet complete — and even if and when it is, it’s part of Jindal’s “deliberative process” and therefore its disclosure is not required. Purpera says that exception does not apply to the requests from the legislative auditor, who must render an annual opinion on the state’s financial condition. Perhaps most telling was Jindal’s recent comparison of the debate over his proposal to last year’s fight over Obama’s national health care reform program. Commissioner of Administration Paul Rainwater has said this debate is about “smaller government … less government … efficient government.” In other words, it’s about ideology, not actual numbers. On the numbers, Jindal’s argument fizzles. The Legislative Fiscal Office says the staterun plan has only 10 percent administrative overhead; the national average for private plans is 15 percent. That extra 5 percent is what employees will have to make up via higher premiums — or reduced coverage. But hey, that’s their problem. If Jindal gets his way, at least he won’t have a Romney problem.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

o n s Wonders TS ON EW TWISITE: N E M O S FAVOR AN OLD SIC

AS THE CL LEANS NEW OR LL EVOLVES. SNO-BA

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or Metairie native Lori Mascaro, summer evenings growing up during the early 1970s meant walking to a nearby sno-ball stand, often barefoot and usually with a gaggle of siblings and young neighbors. Some always ordered the same flavor, she recalls, while others, night by night, progressed alphabetically through the many colorful varieties. Forty years later, Mascaro’s enthusiasm for snoballs not only remains, it has been empowered by the eager sno-ball enabler she found in her husband Matt. Sometimes they have snoballs for dinner. Plenty of New Orleanians share this passion and would likely tip their sno-ball cups to Mascaro. Uniquely local — stands are embedded in neighborhoods and found everywhere — and often misunderstood by outsiders, the cheap, garishly-colored, ubersugary sno-ball is more than an icy treat. It’s a way of life in New Orleans, part of this city’s hands-on culture and an obsession some New Orleanians never outgrow. “In New Orleans, people have a sno-ball like other people have a coffee,” says Ashley Hansen, who runs Hansen’s Sno-Bliz, the legendary Uptown sno-ball business her late grandparents Mary and Ernest Hansen started in 1939. “You see fathers and daughters coming in together, people come from the office, it’s an outing where you get a sno-ball and you catch up. Sometimes you look around and there isn’t a single kid in line here.” But if you’ve been visiting the same sno-ball stand for years, PAGE 18

This blueberry-pineapple sno-ball from Beaucoup Juice is made with fresh natural juices.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

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you might be missing out: Like every other New Orleans food, sno-balls are evolving as people experiment and put their own spins on the frozen treat. A sour pickle sno-ball, anyone? As MArceL PrOust hAd his MAdeleine and all the memories called forth by that pastry, local corporate communications consultant Jim Lestelle has the sno-ball, especially those from a stand located just two blocks from his childhood home in Old Metairie during the 1950s. heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forgotten the name of that stand but none of the excitement of visiting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;the ordering windows always seemed so high off the ground, and the man behind the counter so larger than life,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;i would plunk my dime on the counter way above my head and call out to sometimes-unseen figures, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;i want a 10-cent red, please,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; because â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;redâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was my favorite â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;flavor.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Once, the owner allowed me inside the stand to operate what seemed like a giant crank on the iceshaving machine. i was in heaven.â&#x20AC;? such memories penetrate many New Orleaniansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; brains like the sweetest syrup plunging through the

sno-ball cup. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sugary aroma of the flavors perfuming the air around sno-ball stands. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the chugging and whupping of the sno-ball machines. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the sound of the screen door slapping shut at hansenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, the log seating arrayed around salâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sno-Balls on Metairie road and the chinese food take-out containers into which Williams Plum street snowballs dispenses its â&#x20AC;&#x153;pail sizedâ&#x20AC;? treasures. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the excitement that mounts along the hairpin turns of Jefferson highway in harahan as the family car approaches the neon-lit facade of ro-Bearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s snowballs, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the thrill for children of being able to buy snoballs with their own hoarded change. For these and countless other, highly personalized reasons, the sticky fingers, stained shirtfronts and frozen palates of the sno-ball experience are powerfully evocative for New Orleanians. sno-balls are totems of a New Orleans youth, and to taste them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even, sometimes, just to recall them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is to tap a wellspring of sensory memory. â&#x20AC;&#x153;i hate to say i ever get homesick, but i come home for three reasons: to see mom, to go to domiliseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Po-Boys page 20

BeATrIX SoFA Sophia Morris has been eating sno-balls at Lou Louâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Metairie since her grandmother took her there when she was 6 months old.

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Many New Orleanians never outgrow their passion for sno-balls.

Cover Story

Standout

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our favorite sno-ball (and perhaps even your preferred spelling of the word) might go back to whichever stand delivered that first formative experience with the local frozen wonders. for those who branch out to new turf, however, the diversity of stands and their flavors is enormous and grows each season. Here are a few standouts across town to consider and some of the flavors they’re bringing to the game: Beaucoup Juice 4713 Freret St., 430-5508; www.beaucoupjuice.com for a lighter alternative, freshsqueezed juice goes over the ice at this hybrid juice bar and sno-ball stand. Try the singularly refreshing pineapple juice snoball made with mint harvested from the nearby edible Schoolyard at Samuel J. green Charter School.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

Droopy’s snowBalls 6560 Jefferson Hwy., Harahan back in Harahan this season after a brief stint in Metairie, Droopy’s is now in a strip mall close to its original location. one oddity here is the sour pickle sno-ball, and there’s an option to have an actual pickle stuck in the cup.

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Hansen’s sno-Bliz 4801 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-9788; www.snobliz.com It can seem like time stands still inside Hansen’s, yet in recent years intriguing new flavors have emerged including anise, ginger, limeade and satsuma. Crushed pineapples or Marshmallow fluff are among unique toppings here, while a simple dose of Martinelli’s brand apple juice over the “sno” makes a guilt-free treat. plum street snowBalls 1300 Burdette St., 866-7996; www.plumstreetsnoball.com Kick back on the homemade, double-sided park bench in front of this vintage backstreet gem and dig into sno-balls served in Chinese restaurant takeout containers (protectively wrapped in plastic for your shirt’s sake). Plum Street’s new king cake flavor is so convincing you’ll look for a plastic baby at the bottom of the cup. ro-Bear’s snowBalls 6869 Jefferson Hwy., Harahan, 737-5013 Shining like a neon monument in Harahan, ro-bear’s specialty is

cream flavors including the oh-sonew orleans Creole cream cheese. on the savory side, you can get stuffed artichokes and hot tamales here, too (though not in a snoball ... yet). sal’s sno-Balls 1823 Metairie Road, Metairie, 666-1823 a Metairie classic since 1960, Sal’s has evolved some unique flavor combinations like “pink squirrel” (cream of nectar with almond) and “sock it to me” (bubble gum and ice cream flavors). Sal’s unusually late closing time (10:30 p.m.) makes it a popular afterdinner stop for adults. snowizarD snoBall sHoppe 4001 Magazine St., 899-8758; www.snowizard.com This Uptown stand is the place to try the newest creations from ronnie Sciortino, the tastemaker behind the SnoWizard brand flavor concentrates. Chai lattea, based on chai tea, is one offbeat option, and cherimoya, based on the South american fruit of the same name, has a custardy, mellow berry taste. stop Jockin’ sno-Balls 3600 St. Bernard Ave., 288-9545; www.stopjockinla.com Stop Jockin’ has the usual array of sno-ball flavors but this 7th Ward business gets a shout out for the moxie to combine a sno-ball stand and a hair salon under one roof. Take a little off the sides and put some condensed milk on top. sweet sHack snowBalls 1716 Stumpf Blvd., Gretna Just entering its second season, this West bank newcomer has a drive-through window and special sports-themed flavors like Saintsation (chocolate and ice cream flavor) and LSU (grape and ice cream flavor).

page 18

and to get a sno-ball — not necessarily in that order,” says Corrie Scully, a television producer in Hollywood who grew up in the 1980s eating sno-balls in Lakeview. “There is no point in going home for Christmas because you can’t get a sno-ball then. It’s just sugar and water, but you can’t get sugar and water like that anywhere else.” DefInIng a Sno-baLL IS eaSy: IT’S SHaveD ice with flavored syrup. but it’s instructive to consider what a sno-ball is not and a sno-ball most emphatically is not a snow cone, a slushie or an Icee. While most of those more common derivations of flavored ice are hard and crunchy or smooth and liquidy, a sno-ball should have the soft, fleecy texture of freshly fallen snow. This feathery effect is achieved by maintaining the proper ice temperature, keeping a very sharp blade in the ice-shaving machine and applying just the right slow, steady pressure while operating that machine. flavors might superficially coat the surface of a snow cone’s ice and drain to the bottom, but they should penetrate into the very essence of a properly made sno-ball. and while snow cone flavors are often predictable, sno-ball flavors are wildly variegated, from almond to wedding cake to the iconic creamy vanilla flavor known as nectar. for those who grew up eating them, however, the difference goes far deeper than ice texture or flavors. In a 2010 story on shaved-ice refreshments of all sorts, New York Times food writer Julia Moskin opined that “(a) snoball is to a snow cone as Warren beatty is to Shirley MacLaine: closely related, but prettier, smoother and infinitely cooler.” fLavoreD ICe HaS been popular for ages, though the sno-ball local residents know it today was the special product of thrift and ingenuity during the great Depression. early in the last century, such treats were commonly made by vendors using palmsized hand tools that resembled carpentry

Jessiona Bryant and Robert Renfurm share an all-natural sno-ball from Beaucoup Juice.

planers and had names like gem Ice Shaver and arctic Ice Shaver. It was a laborintensive process to shave a cup full of ice, but a slew of inventors and entrepreneurs eventually began devising machines to speed up the work. Samuel bert of Dallas generally gets credit for introducing the first motorized ice-shaving machine at the Texas State fair in 1919. records from the U.S. Patent office show many others around the country were on the same path, filing patent applications for such machines from the 1920s on. ashley Hansen’s grandfather ernest Hansen hand-built his first sno-ball machine after hours at the riverfront machine shop where he worked. The first prototype, which he dubbed the Sno-bliz, is on display at Hansen’s Sno-bliz. ashley says it was made in 1934, and a second version, which ernest Hansen built in 1939, is still used today by the staff at this landmark shop. The Depression also spurred the late george ortolano to build his own iceshaving machine, which he hoped would boost business at the corner grocery he ran at Magazine and Delachaise streets. In 1936 ortolano named his machine the SnoWizard, says his nephew, ronnie Sciortino, who runs the sno-ball machine and flavor company SnoWizard Inc., which marks its 75th anniversary this year. “numerous people around the country invented ice-shaving machines, but none of them succeeded in the commercialization of manufacturing them like Uncle george did,” Sciortino says. “He had the winning combination of a design that was page 22

Cover Story page 20

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easy to use and the marketing he put behind it to spread it across the city.” Ortolano’s relatives also ran corner grocery stores around New Orleans, and they wanted to sell sno-balls too, Sciortino says. In this way the family essentially colonized New Orleans neighborhoods with satellite SnoWizard locations. The inventory these grocers had on their shelves formed the basis for some of today’s sno-ball fundamentals, notably the vanilla extract that underlies so many flavors and the topping of condensed milk. Ortolano began promoting his machine at school fairs around the city and across the South, Sciortino says, enticing other entrepreneurs to enter the sno-ball business — and to buy their machines and flavors from him. “With the machine, you could fill up a cup (with shaved ice) in 10 seconds, so now you could make a business out of selling sno-balls,” Scortino says. Ortolano’s brother Frank later devised a small, shed-like modular building that could be easily deployed at different locations and taken apart for storage during the off-season. He marketed them to SnoWizard customers as “snoball stands.” By the 1960s, Sciortino says, “these sno-ball stands were all over the city, and it was like the snow cone never existed. It was sno-balls here, and it was just part of your language.” Today Sciortino runs the lone SnoWizard stand on Magazine Street, while from its River Road headquarters SnoWizard Inc. manufactures 400 to 500 new machines per year. In addition, Sciortino directs a huge and diverse flavor concentrate business. Trained by the late New Orleans chef and food developer Warren LeRuth, Sciortino crafts more than 150 flavor concentrates used by sno-ball stand clients across the country. He also produces a line of vanillas and other flavorings for bakeries and ice cream parlors. THe eveR-evOLvINg ROSTeR OF SNOball flavors (see sidebar p. 20) means there is always something new to try, and new stands continually pop up to feed this New Orleans passion. Local customers know the product intuitively and the cost of entry is relatively low (SnoWizard

“starter packages,” which include everything from the machine and flavors to cups and counter sponges, range in price from $2,753 to $9,878). The upshot is that New Orleanians from all walks of life try their hand at the sno-ball business. This spring, Charles Leach, the local party DJ known as Captain Charles, opened Captain C’s Snoballs and Nachos along a stretch of Washington Avenue already thick with sno-ball competition. A few blocks down the street is Red Rooster Snowballs near Harmony Oaks, the new residential development that replaced the C.J. Peete housing project, and within a snowball’s throw from there is Hanno Snowball Stand, just off LaSalle Street. gretna-based private investigator Mark Avery also opened a sno-ball business last summer, inspired by the lines of customers he saw at other stands on the West Bank. “My kids were getting to the age where they were old enough to work, so I thought, ‘Here’s something where they can learn about business and serving the public and being responsible,’” Avery says. He set up Sweet Shack Snowballs on Stumpf Boulevard next to his Deep South Investigations office and added a drivethrough window. As the season has warmed up, customers have lined up. “It’s a recession-proof business,” Avery says. “People can always afford $1.50 or $2 for a sno-ball.” even WDSU-Tv news anchor Camille Whitworth has gotten in on the action, starting a sno-ball catering service called Sno-Ball Baby last year. From tents and booths, she makes sno-balls on-site at events ranging from benefits to ballgames to political rallies. The sight of a well-known local Tv personality serving sno-balls takes some customers by surprise, but Whitworth explains Sno-Ball Baby as a flexible side business that also indulges her personal obsession with the treat. “It’s fun,” she says. “I love sno-balls, and I can’t imagine a better way to spend my free time than making people smile. My favorite thing in life is to see an adult with a blue tongue or a red tongue;

they just go for it. That’s a badge of honor in New Orleans.” Many stands offer a short list of sugarfree flavors as alternatives to the saccharine wallop promised by a traditional sno-ball. But in 2009, Dylan Williams introduced a whole new approach with Beaucoup Juice, a hybrid sno-ball stand and juice bar. Williams uses a traditional SnoWizard machine to shave his ice, but over it he pours his own custom blends of fresh fruit juices, including watermelon, mango and blueberry. Some are blended with agave nectar or sugar, but the end result is far less sweet than the typical sno-ball. Still, he’s learned to tweak his initial business model to accommodate local tastes. “We do have condensed milk on the counter so people can add whatever they need,” he says. Despite these innovations, there appears to be little risk of traditional sno-balls falling out of favor in New Orleans. The allure of fine snow soaked in sugary flavors is so entwined with the city’s identity that some people can’t wait to indoctrinate the next generation. Such was the case with Angie Bonura, who was babysitting her infant granddaughter Sophia one day last year when she brought the 6-month-old to Lou Lou’s Snoballs in Metairie. “She was teething, so they say put ice on that, you know, so I figured it was time for her first sno-ball,” says Bonura. “She got nectar strawberry.” “She’s 18 months (old) now and she has sno-balls all the time,” says Sophia’s mother, Nicole Morris. “Now we say that if Sophia develops a real sweet tooth later, we’ll blame it on her nonna giving her that sno-ball.”

Ronnie Sciortino mixes up sno-ball flavors at SnoWizard, which has been in business for 75 years.

Jack Major Sr. and WDSU-TV news anchor Camille Whitworth are partners in Sno-Ball Baby.

sHTo P aLK

BY MISSY WILKINSON

A New Moon t takes considerable tenacity to move to a foreign country and start a new business. Fortunately, Phong Nguyen, owner of Chinese/Vietnamese restaurant August Moon (3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www.augustmoonneworleans.com), possesses this quality in abundance. After North Vietnam invaded South Vietnam in 1975, Nguyen made 13 attempts to escape, beginning at age 12. Each time, the government captured him and when he was 18, he was ordered to spend a year and a half farming rice in the U Minh labor camp. Nguyen escaped and came to New Orleans in 1989. Two years later, he opened August Moon in a 100-year-old Prytania Street store. Nguyen, who learned Mandarin and Cantonese cooking at a now-defunct Chinese restaurant, says his menu melds restaurant dishes with the home cooking he grew up with in Vietnam. An August Moon original is lemongrass shrimp — crispy shrimp seasoned with sweet onions and lemongrass, served with vermicelli August Moon owner noodles and house-made sauce. Phong Nguyen “Every sauce here — and every single (menu) item — we make from scratch,” he says. (left) and line cook Nguyen estimates 80 percent of his clientele is regular customers, some of whom have visited Tho Dinh serve up Chinese and the restaurant often since it opened. He listens to them and at their request has eliminated all Vietnamese cuisine. MSG from dishes, reduced the amount of oil he uses and added an array of vegetarian options. Any dish can be made without meat, and vegetarian sauces include vegetable extract instead of chicken stock. “The chef is my nephew, and we revise a lot of Chinese cooking so it is lighter, healthier,” Nguyen says. August Moon is expanding to the Westbank, where a second location will open, appropriately, in August. “One reason I got into the restaurant business is because I love to eat,” says Nguyen, who adds he fell in love with New Orleans partly because of its cuisine.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 10 > 2011

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SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON SPRUCE (2043 Magazine St., 265-0946; www.sprucenola.com) now stocks eco-friendly baby and children’s furnishings and decor. Shop and enjoy complimentary cupcakes, Champagne and appetizers from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 14. All baby furniture is 10 percent off through May. OLD NAVY (Citywide; www.oldnavy.com) is holding a flip-flop recycling drive through May 21. Bring old flip-flops to collection bins in any Old Navy store and the shoes will be recycled into playground materials and donated to communities nationwide. FEET FIRST (526 Royal St., 569-0005; 4119 Maga-

zine St., 899-6800; www.feetfirststores.com) has a new accessories boutique in LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER (3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 832-2379; www.lakesideshopping.com). Jewelry, handbags, flip-flops and other accessories are now for sale at Feet First’s kiosk by the food court. THE OLD IRONWORKS (612 Piety St., 908-4741) hosts the PIETY STREET MARKET from noon to

5 p.m. Sunday, May 15. The event features live music as well as art, crafts, vintage pieces and food from more than 40 vendors. Contact Cree McCree at creemccree@gmail.com for more information.

FILM: FILM-O-RAMA WEIRDNESS PAGE 27 STAGE: SHAKESPEARE IN CITY PARK PAGE 41 CUISINE: LIUZZA PALOOZA PAGE 49

DANCE DANCE

REVOLUCIÓN CORELLA BALLET CASTILLA Y LÉON COMES TO TOWN PAGE 27

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In Rubber, Roxanne Mesquida and Stephen Spinella track a murderous tire. PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Split Screen A FESTIVAL OF INDEPENDENT AND FOREIGN FILMS SCREENS AT THE PRYTANIA. BY WILL COVIELLO

F

work better if director Quentin Dupieux had not tried to overtly address filmmaking devices and suspension of disbelief via an audience of observers within the film, but at times their comments on the action are funny, too. Visit www.neworleansfilmsociety.org for a schedule and details. Only a handful of local theaters are open to screening most documentaries and independent and foreign films. Many large chain theaters don’t book films that are available on other media platforms, such as video on demand (VOD). Film festivals, like the New Orleans Film Society’s October event and this showcase provide an opportunity for a very short run on a large screen. With just one screen, Prytania Theatre takes a big risk when booking a little-known film for an entire week, but the concentrated scheduling and appeal of a festival makes it possible to screen all sorts of films, says general manager Eric Ramstead. Some other local venues that schedule art house and documentary films include Chalmette Movies, which with several theaters can fit an odd film in its rotation, and Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, which almost exclusively runs foreign and independent films. The New Orleans Film Society is working with other organizations to sponsor screenings in a variety of alternative spaces. It recently presented King Kong in the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden in conjunction with the New Orleans Museum of Art’s Where Y’Art series. Partnerships with Chalmette Movies and the Prytania Theatre offer society members regular free screenings as well.

ART

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EVENTS

CUISINE

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SONG FOR MY FATHERS

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M AY

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PHOTO BY HOWARD LAMBERT

In the staged version of his memoir Song for My Fathers, Tom Sancton leads the Preservation Hall AllStar Jazz Band on clarinet and narrates his tale of growing up during the Civil Rights era and learning to play traditional jazz from some of its elder statesmen, particularly George Lewis. Tickets $29 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat.; 6 p.m. Sun.; through May 22. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

M AY

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CORELLA BALLET CASTILLA Y LEON

An accomplished principal dancer for American Ballet Theatre, Angel Corella set out to found Spain’s first classical ballet company in 2001. It wasn’t until 2008 that the troupe debuted, and it didn’t tour the U.S. until last year. It features dancers from around the world and presents an array of short pieces. Tickets $20-$80. 8 p.m. Saturday. Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 522-0996; www.nobadance.com

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SHIGETO

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Closing the triangle between ambient techno, instrumental hip-hop and head-tripping electronica, Zachary Shigeto Saginaw appeals to fans of all three camps on Full Circle, his 2010 fulllength debut. Live vaporized drums, alien-pinged sonar and Last Starfighter laser beams contribute to a whizbang atmosphere of disorienting wonder. Beautiful Bells and Ryan Pearce open. Tickets $7-$10. 10 p.m. Saturday. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com

M AY

LOVERS

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Lovers’ four previous LPs were foreplay for Dark Light (Badman), the 2010 release from the Portland, Ore., female trio. Over a steady march of stiletto synths on backto-back standouts “Figure 8” and “Boxer,” Carolyn Berk’s magnetic couplets go from hot and bothered (“Slip your ship into my sea”) to burrowing in a heartbeat (“What a drag not to know how you feel”). 10 p.m. Monday. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

or the week of Film-O-Rama (May 13-19), the Prytania Theatre’s single screen will feature a greater variety of films than area multiplexes. The weeklong festival’s 17 movies include independent and foreign features, documentaries, grindhouse schlock films and three screenings of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), starring Elizabeth Taylor and Paul Newman. The lineup includes several notable documentaries. The People vs. George Lucas is about the devotees for whom Star Wars is much more than a cult film, it’s almost a religion itself. Page One: a Year Inside The New York Times chronicles daily decisions and big stories against the backdrop of the paper’s struggle to adjust and survive in the age of the Internet. Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams 3-D explores French caves with wall paintings believed to 32,000 years old. Dramatic releases include 13 Assassins, a Japanese drama about feuding samurai warlords. Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami’s Certified Copy garnered French actress Juliette Binoche a best actress award at the Cannes Film Festival. Set in Italy, it is the romantic story of a couple of strangers mistaken for husband and wife, who then get caught up in the pretense. Hobo with a Shotgun is a grindhouse orgy of violence and gore about an extraordinarily principled homeless man who arrives in a town almost literally held hostage by a sadistic entrepreneur who peddles entertainment in the form of outrageous and vicious attacks performed as public spectacles. Rubber is a far less bloody absurdity about a tire that goes on a killing spree. Imagine No Country for Old Men meets The Red Balloon. It would

FILM

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27

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 10 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Matt Aukerman, 8; NOLA Treblemakers, 10

BEACH HOUSE — Candy RiedlLowe, 7

BLUE NILE — Tatsuya Nakatani, Donald Miller, Rob Cambre, 10 BMC — Dana Abbott Band, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7; Jimmy Howell, 11

CIRCLE BAR — Tom Paines, 6

D.B.A. — Young Pinstripes Brass Band, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 THE HANGAR — Revis, 8

HOUSE OF BLUES — Tower of Power, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 6; Truman Holland, 9

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jay B Elston, 9

THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 6; Maryflynn & Prohibition Blues, 9:30 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Browynne Brent, 8; Trevor Bahnson, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Thelonious Monk Institute Ensemble, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9

6; Charley & the Soulabillyswampboogie, 9:30

preview

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Boot Hill, 8

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Two Fools on Stools, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Mojo Trio, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Pugsley Buzzard, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tuba Skinny, 8:30

Wednesday 11

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

12 BAR — Brass-A-holics, 8:30 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 BMC — Peter Novelli, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Battle of the Bands, 8

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Coleman Jernigan Project, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tom McDermott & Meschiya Lake, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

COVINGTON TRAILHEAD — Rockin’ the Rails presents Don Vappie, 5

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Buskers’ Ballroom, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 8 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30 & 9

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Griffin Sample & JD Haenni, 6; Common Snakes, 9:30 MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Salvadore Liberto, 9; Adam Faucett, 10

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

Scandinavian Design Those who know Jose Gonzalez only as a solo artist will peg Junip as his side project, but if anything it’s an origin story. The Gothenburg, Sweden, trio dates back more than a decade, years before Gonzalez introduced himself with a hermetic, frostbitten cover of countrymen the Knife’s 2003 bonfire “Heartbeats,” and its attendant LP Veneer, literally and figuratively one of the quietest million-selling albums ever. He’s no more effusive with Junip — even his nylon-stringed classical guitar seems to whisper — but this revisited genesis is warmer, earthier and spacier, rooted in soil instead of ice due to frictional drums from childhood pal Elias Araya and a contradictory array of wormy organs and beamed-down analog keyboards by mutual friend Tobias Winterkorn. Fields (Mute), their long-awaited 2010 debut, amounts to a tasteful remixing of the transposed tropicalia on Veneer and 2007’s In Our Nature. “Always” wears a tailored fit of Gonzalez’s muted, matte-finished Northern Hemisphere bossa nova, a cryogenic Sea and Cake; “Off Point” is his unplugged take on a fantastic unrecorded rocker. The Acrylics open. Tickets $13 in advance, $15 at the door, $18 VIP (includes DJ set afterward). — Noah Bonaparte Pais

M AY

12

Junip 9 p.m. Thursday Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282 www.republicnola.com

D.B.A. — Jon Cleary, 7; Funkifry’d, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Fitzpatrick, 9:30 DRAGON’S DEN — Bassbin Safari, Noxious Noise, Germ Attack, 10 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Beth Patterson, 3; Colin Lake, 6; Captain Leo, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Peter Nu & Delia Nakayama, noon OAK — Philip Melancon, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Damien Louviere, 5 & 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Debbie & the Deacons, 5; Late as Usual, 9 WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE — George Porter Jr., The Lee Boys, 5

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

Thursday 12

SIBERIA — A Giant Dog, Indian Givers, In Elevators, 10

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30

APPLE BARREL — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 10:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE

BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Beach House All-Stars, 8 BMC — Ramblin’ Letters,

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Michel Bradford, 6; The Deluxe, 9:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Adam Hammack, 8; Buddy Mann, 9; Nate Currin, 10 OAK — Andrew Duhon, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Peter Novelli Band, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Wendell Brunious & Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. Tim Laughlin, 5

PRESERVATION HALL — Tornado Brass Band feat. Darryl Adams, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — Ed Perkins, 8 & 10 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Junip, The Acrylics, Jose Gonzalez DJ set, 9

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Brent &

George, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Chris Ardoin, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9 SIBERIA — Daylight Robbery, Libyans, Sigo Siendo Un Fantasma, Opposable Thumbs, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Warren Batiste Quartet feat. Steve Masakowski, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Mark Penton, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Late as Usual, 9 UNO LAKEFRONT ARENA — Josh Groban, 7:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 13 BANKS STREET BAR — The Bills, 9 BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9 BLUE NILE — Death on Two Wheels, 9

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Johnny Angel & His Swinging Demons, 9:30

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Groovy 7, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — N’awlins Johnnys, Hillbilly Hotel, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Hooch Riders, 4; Dana Abbott, 7; Ty Hall & EZ3, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Paul Sanchez, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8 D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 6; Creole Zydeco Farmers, 10

DEW DROP SOCIAL AND BENEVOLENT HALL — Cristina Perez, King James & the Special Men, 6 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

DRAGON’S DEN — Jack Locke, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — -ish video release party, Killahouse, 10

HERMES BAR — John Rankin Trio, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Los Po-boycitos, Sam Doores & the Tumbleweeds, 10

THE HOOKAH — Don Chezina, DJs Lemonhead, 2Nyce & Tropi, 11

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — New Grass Country Club, 27 Lights, 10 PAGE 30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

MUSIC

29

MUSIC

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

PAGE 29

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IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7; Colin Lake Trio, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Tuba Skinny, 7; Nasimiyu, 10; Ashton Hines & the Big Easy Brawlers, midnight MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Jerry Jumonville, 4; Alex Bosworth, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Sean Ashby, 8; Bloomin’ Onions, 9; John Parker, 10 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Tom Hook & Stephen Dale, noon

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART — Bamboula 2000, 5:30 OAK — Amanda Walker, 6; Cristina Perez Trio, 10

More than just great food...

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Major Bacon, 8

ONE EYED JACKS — Smiley with a Knife, A Living Soundtrack, Black Belt, 9

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MAY 10 > 2011

Showcasing Local Music

30

MON 5/9

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 5/10

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 5/11

CLOSED TO FILM TREME

THU 5/12 FRI 5/13 SAT 5/14 SUN SUN 5/15 3/13

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

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feat. Johnny V., George Porter Jr. + Special Guests

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RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Meanies, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Bucktown Allstars, 9:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Lauren Turner, Band Camp, 9 SIBERIA — Lana Rebel, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Wessell “Warmdaddy” Anderson Quintet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mojo Trio, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Big

Feets, 5; Late as Usual, 9

Saturday 14 12 BAR — April Dawn, 7; Ashcliff, 10

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Shigeto, Beautiful Bells, Ryan Pearce, 10 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

BABYLON LOUNGE — Mad Dog, The Converts, The Pests, 10 BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 7

BANKS STREET BAR — Big Fat & Delicious, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Chronic Death Slug, Orokusaki, 9

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Paula & the Pontiacs, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Lilian Boutte, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Aaron Foret, 9 CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Project, 11

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 THE MAISON — Josh Reppel, 5; Magnitude, 7; Brass Band Bash feat. One Mind, Young Pinstripes, Lagniappe Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — The Mumbles, 11:30 a.m; Kristina Morales, 5; Blues4Sale, 5; Charley & the Soulabillyswampboogie, 11 MUDLARK THEATRE — High in One Eye, Proud Father, 9 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — High Ground Drifters, 7; Jennifer Matthews, 9; Devon McClive, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — New Orleans Ragtime Orchestra, 2 OAK — Jen Howard Trio, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Space Heaters, 9:30

CARROLLTON STATION — Alex McMurray, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 9

CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS — Jazz ‘n the Vines presents Luther Kent, 6:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Dread, Anijarim, One of the Fallen, 8

CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Little Freddie King, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Acoustic Swiftness, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Black Swan, Below C-Level, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — Channel Of Release, 10

HERMES BAR — The IQ feat. members of Iguanas, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES — Power 102.9 anniversary feat. Kourtney Heart, y.luck, 8-9 Boyz, 504 Meezy, Sissy Nobby and others, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF NORTHSHORE — Gorilla Productions Battle of the Bands, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Glen David Andrews, 8; Brass-A-holics, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Soul Express, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Josh Garret Band, Top Cats, 9 SIBERIA — Jacuzzi Boys, Manatees, Die Rotzz, M.O.T.O. Trio, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Herlin Riley Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9

Sunday 15 ARNAUD’S — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Hooch Riders, 9 BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7; Andy J. Forest, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

it Hot, 11 a.m; Alex McMurry & friends, 8

CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Antique Scream, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7 D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Pugsley Buzzard, 9:30

DRAGON’S DEN — Dummy Dumpster CD release feat. Superdestroyers, Unnaturals, 10; Bass Church, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m; The Maine, Augustana, 5:15 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Chad Reeves, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Sunday Brass, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom Mcdermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 5; Javier Olondo, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters feat. Mark Braud, 8

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-holics, 8 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — 726 Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Yat Pack CD release, 6 SIBERIA — High Priest CD release feat. Javelina, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Pfister Sisters, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m.

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Marc Stone, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Butch Fields Band, 1; Rhythm & Rain, 5; Late as Usual, 9

Monday 16 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8

D.B.A. — By & By String Band, 7; Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

DRAGON’S DEN — Mustard Plug, The Lollies, Domenic, 10 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Chad Reeves, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — Jackson Browne, 7:30 THE MAISON — James Copeland Group, 5; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Danielle Thomas, 8; Songwriter’s Symposium, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA — Skate Night, Lovers, I Love You, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7 THREE MUSES — Debbie Davis, 7

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 5; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louviere, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

classical/ concerts FAMILY CENTER OF HOPE —

4422 St. Charles Ave., 8913264 — Sun: Malik Chaney Benefit Concert, 4

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF COVINGTON — 16333 Hwy.

1085, Covington, (985) 8922149; www.fbccov.org — Fri: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra and Symphony Chorus of New Orleans present H.M.S. Pinafore, 7:30

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION — 533 Royal

St., 523-4662; www.hnoc. org — Wed: Sergio de los Cobos, 6:30

LAKEVIEW PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH — 5914 Canal Blvd.,

482-7892; www.lpcno.org — Sun: Sunset Sundays on Canal Boulevard presents New Orleans Vocal Arts Chorale, Inconspicuous 8, 5

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — 1419 Basin St., 525-1052;

www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — Thu: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra and Symphony Chorus of New Orleans present H.M.S. Pinafore, 7:30

ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL — Jackson Square — Sun: JeanBaptiste Monnot, 6 ST. PHILIP STREET — (at Robertson St.) — Tuba Fats Tuesday feat. Sixth Ward International, Shannon Powell & the Treme Rollers, Rebirth Brass Band, Treme Brass Band, 5

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Christian Martin & Andrea Gomez, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

5/18 Red Fang 5/31 The Dillinger Escape Plan 6/1 Eisley

plus The Narrative plus Christie Dupree

6/5 Killing Joke

plus The Crying Spell plus Indicator Dogs

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

THE MAISON — Larry Scala Trio, 11 a.m; Dave Easley Trio, 5; Rhythm Jesters, 7; Low Stress Quartet, 10

Swing, 3; Kristina Morales and the Bayou Shufflers, 6; Pat Casey, 10

MUSIC

PARISH

LISTINGS

31

FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING ALABAMA MOON (PG) — An

11-year-old boy raised in the Alabama wilderness must learn how to make a home in the modern world in the film shot in Louisiana. Chalmette Movies

AFRICAN CATS (G) — The

Disney film captures the reallife love, humor and determination of the majestic jungle cats of the savanna. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 ARTHUR (PG-13) — Russell

Brand stars in the remake of the 1981 comedy about a lovable, but irresponsible, playboy who must decide between love or money. AMC Palace 20

ATLAS SHRUGGED: PART 1 (PG-13) — The film is the lat-

est adaptation of the Ayn Rand novel about a decaying America where all the leading artists, businesspeople and thinkers are mysteriously gone. Canal Place BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BURY THE HATCHET (NR) —

THE CONSPIRATOR (PG-13) —

Robert Redford directs the story about Mary Surrat’s role in the Lincoln assassination. AMC Palace 20 DYLAN DOG: DEAD OF NIGHT (PG-13) — A world-famous

private investigator must stop a war from ensuing among his werewolf, vampire and zombie clients living undercover in the backstreets of New Orleans. AMC Palace 20 FAST FIVE (PG-13) — Vin Diesel

and Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the Fast and the Furious franchise. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 HANNA (PG-13) — A girl raised

by her ex-CIA agent father to be an assassin is sent on a mission that causes her to question her existence. Grand HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) — In the animated

sequel, a group of storybook characters fight to give good-

Nelle Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird (1960) hit just about every mark of critical and popular success: It won the Pulitzer Prize; it has sold more than 30 million copies; and it spawned a film version that earned Gregory Peck (pictured with Lee) an Oscar. It’s also one of the most notable American 20th century books about racism by a white author. Several years after its publication, Lee stopped talking to the press and has remained a very private figure. Though it breaks no new ground on several issues commonly associated with Lee and the novel, Mary Murphy’s documentary Hey, Boo triangulates a profile of Lee by exploring some of those issues. Lee’s voice is heard only in snippets from a 1964 radio interview. Murphy revisits the similarities between Lee’s childhood in a small town in Alabama and the book’s setting and characters. She rehashes the rumors that Lee’s longtime friend Truman Capote wrote or edited it. On several of these topics, the film’s most charming presence is Lee’s older sister Alice, who was 99 years old and a practicing lawyer when Hey, Boo was filmed. The documentary also features interviews with Oprah Winfrey, Tom Brokaw, Rick Bragg, Andrew Young and several prominent novelists about the book’s impact on them. Mockingbird is still a fixture in classrooms and captures issues of prejudice in a timeless fashion, but it was released as the Civil Rights movement gained steam and resistance became more violent. The film explores how Lee came to write the book, the device of viewing the conflict through a child’s eyes and its unforeseen immediate popularity. The publisher printed 5,000 copies on the first run and wasn’t sure it would sell them all. Named for the novel’s odd recluse Boo Radley, the documentary is a compelling exploration of some of those enigmatic issues. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

M AY

13 20 THRU

Hey, Boo 7:30 p.m. Thu.-Fri. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

natured endings to classic fairytales. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14 HOP (PG) — A slacker acciden-

tally hits the teenage son of the Easter Bunny with his car, and then takes him in while he recovers. Grand, Hollywood 14

INSIDIOUS (PG-13) — A family

begins to experience inexplicable phenomena after their son falls into a coma. AMC Palace 16, Grand

IN A BETTER WORLD (R) — The

Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film takes place in small-town Denmark and a refugee camp in Africa. Canal Place PAGE 35

SCREEN GEMS PRESENTS A MICHAEL DE LUCA PRODUCTIONS/STARS ROAD ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTION IN ASSOCIATION WITH TOKYOPOP “PRIEST” PAUL BETTANY KARL URBAN CAM GIGANDET MAGGIEEXECUTIVE Q LILY COLLINS WITH STEPHEN MOYER AND CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER MUSIC BY CHRISTOPHER YOUNG PRODUCERS GLENN S. GAINOR STEVEN H. GALLOWAY STU LEVY JOSH BRATMAN PRODUCED BASED ON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL BY MICHAEL DE LUCA JOSHUA DONEN MITCHELL PECK SERIES “PRIEST” BY MIN-WOO HYUNG WRITTEN DIRECTED BY CORY GOODMAN BY SCOTT STEWART

STARTS FRIDAY, MAY 13

cHEck locAl lISTINgS FoR THEATERS AND SHowTIMES

IN IN THEATERS THEATERS IN IN

AND AND

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

Aaron Walker directs the documentary on Mardi Gras Indian culture in New Orleans. Chalmette Movies

You Don't Know Boo

33

ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET St., 899-8182 — Group exhibition featuring Anthony Carriere, Hayley Gaberlavage, James Henderson, Susan Madacsi, Caroline Sokol and Wanda Sullivan, through June 8. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing.

review

FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington — Eliza-

beth Brown, David Henson, Tracy Lambert, Keith Villere and Stephanie Schoen, through June. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

GALLERIES OPENING 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Intricacies of

Dialogue: Ink, Thread, Metal,” works by Margaret Hull, Niki Fisk and Meg Turner, through June 4. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Coun-

terfeit,” works by Louviere + Vanessa, through June. Artists’ reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — “My Mom Says

My Work Has Really Improved,” a group exhibition of artists’ childhood work displayed next to recent work, through June 5. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Stay Crazy,” mixed-me-

dia works by Mason Saltarrelli, through June 11. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Some Restrictions

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

May Apply,” multimedia by Jessica Goldfinch, glass works by J. David Lindsley and prints by Jesse Shaw, through June 4.

36

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Cellular Automata,” works on paper by Taney Roniger; “Fire,” works by Leah Bailis and Andrew Suggs; “Man Up,” works by Claire Rau; all through June 5. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Coun-

terfeit,” works by Louviere + Vanessa, through June.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Works

by Tony Benjamin and R. Tucker Fitz-Hugh Jr., through Thursday.

AIA NEW ORLEANS CENTER FOR DESIGN. 1000 St. Charles Ave., 525-8320; www.aianeworleans. org — “Disappearing New

Orleans,” a satellite exhibition from the American Institute of Architects, through Friday. ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Abstracts and

portraits of musicians by Gary Patterson and Marion Barnes, through May 23. “The Art of Dr. Seuss: Rare Editions Collections,” prints and sculpture by Dr. Seuss, through May.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Cheryl

Finfrock, jewelry by Shea Yetta, neon and acrylic sculptures by Anne Ashley and photographs by Laura Cox, through May 30.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Paintings

by James Barsness; “Postcards From Plaquemines,” oil paintings and drawings by Simon Gunning; both through June 25.

ASYLUM. 608 Julia St., 525-4633 — “Horses,” works by Joshua

Walsh, through May.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “I Love You, Good-

night,” folk tales written and illustrated by Cameo Olson, through Wednesday.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com — “Fit for Consumption,” a group exhibition curated by Aaron McNamee, through June 5. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads

tween Two Thoughts,” abstract ink and watercolor drawings by Robert Lansden, through May 28.

of Memory: Spain and the United States,” a travelling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, through July 10. Opening Wednesday.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org —

“Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art,” through July 17. Opening reception 6 p.m. Friday. SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Be-

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the Blue

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

DEITY ARTS OF THE EXTREME ORIENT. 2001 Magazine St., 529-3171; www.deitynola.com —

“Gum,” handmade dolls by Miss Oblivious, needle work and drawings by Lee Kyle and paintings by Sherry Dooly, through

Different Animals

One of the great things about the Ogden Museum of Southern Art is its insightful way of presenting artists in a context revealing how they were influenced by — and influenced — their surroundings. Or at least, such was the case until it staged this infelicitous dual exhibition of Walter Anderson and John Alexander. Despite related origins and subject matter, it is hard to imagine two more disparate artists. Born in New Orleans in 1903, Anderson evolved into a hermit in Ocean Springs, Miss., spending long stretches of time communing with nature on uninhabited Horn Island in the Gulf. A solitary mystic, his vision was as singularly ethereal as Van Gogh’s. Born in Beaumont, Texas, in 1945, Alexander has been a New York fixture since the early 1980s. A one-time neo-expressionist, he now bills himself as a nature painter, cranking out decorative conversation pieces like the ones in this show. So instead of wild world mysticism, Alexander gives us something more like a day at an upscale zoo, including an occasional wine glass in his animal compositions, or a cross-dressing monkey. There’s nothing wrong with that, but compared to Anderson he can seem glib. Worse, his extroverted canvases tend to overwhelm the rather muted selection of Anderson pieces, a group that includes many small watercolors on typewriter paper like Blue Crab (pictured), so it’s like trying to hear a softspoken poet above the din at a noisy cocktail party. It doesn’t work well. Alexander has overreached before — he once scored a retrospective at the Smithsonian only to receive scathing reviews from The Washington Post, and when the show traveled to Texas, the Houston Press billed it “Alexander the Mediocre.” Ironically, an Alexander show at the Ogden might have made sense if it hadn’t been paired with Anderson. Both Henri Matisse and “Blue Dog” painter George Rodrigue occasionally painted figures in landscapes, but that doesn’t mean they would benefit from being exhibited together. The same holds true here. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JUL

24

One World, Two Artists: Works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org

June 5.

artists, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “In My End is My Beginning,” hand-sculpted clay vessels by Eileen O’Donnell, through June 2.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “Foot-a-

779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www. jazzandheritage.org — Creative Allies Art Contest & Exhibition, through May 18.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

“The American Sector,” a group exhibition of paintings featuring Terry Kenney, through May.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “May I Have a Revolution

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Ghost Fleet,” sculpture and works on paper by Raine Bedsole, through May 22. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “The River,” a group

invitational exhibit featuring local and regional artists, through May 17.

Please,” works by Dan Tague, through June 1.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Conversation,” paintings, prints and drawings by Jill Moser, through June 2. ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 671-6363; www.dcc.edu — Delgado Fine

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “I Can Fly: Songbirds

& Singers, On a Wing and a Prayer,” paintings and prints by Jon Langford; “Long Live the Living,” paintings by Leslie Staub, through May 28.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans

is Alive,” acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing.

Arts Student Exhibit, through May 29.

MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie,

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. PAGE 38

ART

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

PAGE 36

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Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 2055 Second St., Slidell, (985) 646-4375 —

Michalopoulos, ongoing.

CLASSES NOW REGISTERING! Mosaics, bookbinding, calligraphy, metalsmithing, drawing, oil painting, mask making, print making, watercolors, pen and ink, portraiture, stained glass mixed media and much more!

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martinechaissongallery.com — Photographs by Aaron Ruell, through June 1.

RS TRY OU CH N AT LUDAY! TO

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle

Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Glass

spring flowers by Teri Walker, hand-blown drams and quaichs by Dave Lindsley and Stephen Kraft, hand-pulled prints by Melissa Clark and Tish Douzart, through May.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “Deep Blues Outsider Menagerie,” a group exhibition of music-inspired works, through May 28. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www.newmanschool.org — Sculpture by Sally

Heller, through May.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen

Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

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RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by Ri-

cardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue,

ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 3663602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

Hand-blown glass works, ongoing.

“comfort food incarnate”

Happy Hour Food and Drink Specials from 5-6:30pm 200 Julia St • 504-304-6318 www.feastneworleans.com

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti

H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N.

“Salad Days,” a juried student art exhibition, through June 10.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery. com — “Downlow,” mixed-media paintings on oil and canvas by Gretchen Weller Howard, through May. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart.org — “Hanging by a Thread: Contem-

porary Fiber Artists of Louisiana,” through Saturday.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 9420200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel

Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing. STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Intricate

Terrain,” works by Maysey Craddock, through June 22.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

TROUSER HOUSE. 4105 St. Claude Ave. — “The Glass Menagerie,” a group

exhibition of glass works, through May 30.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — Works by Sarah Stiehl,

through Sunday.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will

Smith, ongoing.

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS “MIXED MESSAGES: MULTIRACIAL IDENTITY PAST & PRESENT”. The gal-

lery seeks artwork with multiracial themes that has not been previously exhibited for the New Orleans Loving Festival, an event sponsored by Charitable Film Network and Press Street. Email mail@charitablefilmnetwork.org for details. Submission deadline is May 23.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond

Barthe: Builder of Pictures,” an exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through June.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits

of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — “Then & Now,” works by 14 artists who have exhibited at the center, curated by Dan Cameron, through June 12. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict the

colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants. LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features

props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Before

During After,” photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through Aug. 31. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items; both ongoing. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc. org — The Supreme Court of Loui-

siana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169,

569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 5661136; www.noaam.com — “Dancing

String Bean,” paintings and drawings by Eugene Martin, through May 28. “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection, through May 28. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — “Different

Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through Sunday. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” and “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits on

19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “Art & Jazz:

Preservation Hall at 50,” “New Orleans Craft & Design,” through July 24. “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes, through July 24. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. Patrick F. Taylor Library, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Elemental” and “New Orleans

Architecture Now,” satellite exhibitions from the American Institute of Architects, through Friday.

OLD URSULINE CONVENT. 1100 Chartres St., 529-3040 — “France in America,” photographs by Arielle de la Tour d’Auvergne, through June. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing.

TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www. africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits works

that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Ernie K-Doe hit “Mother-in-Law,” the theater hosts a production of the play to benefit the New Orleans Musicians Clinic. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday. DANCING WITH THE MOM.

Cutting Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — Rose Marie Sand’s play follows four friends, who call themselves the Mother’s Day Club, from 1965 to the present. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday through May 21, 2 p.m. Sunday.

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the stage musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26.

ORANGE FLOWER WATER. Elm

Theatre, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre.org — Two friends begin an adulterous affair that results in disastrous consequences in Craig Wright’s drama. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

REFLECTIONS: A MAN AND HIS TIME. Anthony Bean

p.m. Friday. SLOW BURN BURLESQUE.

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The burlesque troupe presents “Hollywood Babylon.” Tickets $15 general admission, $20 VIP. 11 p.m. Saturday. TROIS BELLES VOIX. Actor’s

Theatre of New Orleans, WTIXFM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Chelle Duke, Gina Abromson and Louise Cappi sing in the cabaret show celebrating romantic Broadway and contemporary standards. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through May 28, 2:30 p.m. Sunday and May 22. No show May 27.

AUDITIONS BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

GUIDE ME, FATHER. La Nuit

Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — Former Councilman Oliver Thomas tells his own story of crime, punishment and redemption. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through May 22.

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www. ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 3639001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday. CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community

HAIRSPRAY. Slidell Little

SONGS FOR MY FATHER. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Live readings, historic video, photography and live musical interludes bring jazz clarinetist Tom Sancton’s memoir to life. Tickets $29 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through May 22.

JINDALIWOOD SQUARES.

THE TAVERN. Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — George M. Cohan’s comedic mystery takes place on a dark and stormy night after a group of people encounter a mysterious wanderer. Call 893-1671 for reservations. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through May 29.

College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

LET FREEDOM SWING. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum seeks performers for its retrospective musical highlighting 1940s jazz and swing. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 5281944 ext. 287 for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Jason Kerzinski’s dark comedy follows a man selected by God to hunt down Osama Bin Laden. Tickets $7. 9 p.m. Thursday and May 19, 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday and May 20-21, 7 p.m. May 22.

Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www. slidelllittletheatre.org — A plump teen gets her dream of dancing on a popular 1962 TV show and tries to use her newfound stardom to racially integrate the program. Tickets $19 general admission, $14 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Chris Champagne’s show of monologues, sketches and rants is a one-man romp through local politics. Call 330-9117 for details. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday through May 21.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM. Sydney and Walda

Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The NOLA Project presents an outdoor production of the Shakespeare play. Call 6584100 or visit www.noma.org/ nolaproject for reservations. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 students and seniors, $6 children. 7 p.m. Friday through May 27. MÉLANGE A’ TOI. Michalo-

poulos Studio, 527 Elysian Fields Ave. — The performance brings together three performing artists from three

TITUS ANDRONICUS. The Old

Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 9084741 — In the Neutral Ground Ensemble’s performance of the Shakespeare tragedy, all eight cast members portray the title role. Visit www.neutralgroundensemble.org for details. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50

DANCE CORELLA BALLET CASTILLA Y LEÓN. Mahalia Jackson Theater

for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., 525-1052; www. mahaliajacksontheater.com — The classical ballet company from Spain, lead by dancer Angel Corella, performs. Call 5220996 or visit www.nobadance. com for reservations. Tickets $20-$80. 8 p.m. Saturday.

OPERA OPERA RETURNS TO BOURBON STREET. The Inn on Bourbon

Hotel, 541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www.innonbourbon.com — Vocalists from Bon Operatit! perform. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

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BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 10 KINDER GARDEN: CREEP, CRAWL & FLY. Longue Vue House and

Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of gardens through age-appropriate activities. Admission $10 members, $12 non-members, $5 each additional adult. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

TODDLER TIME. Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 12 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

LITTLE MASTERS. Longue Vue

Saturday 14 CELEBRATION OF THE YOUNG CHILD. Delgado Community

College, Isaac Delgado Hall, Drama Hall, third floor, 6166066; www.dcc.edu — The event for children ages 1 to 8 years old and their families features hands-on activities, music and an appearance by Curious George. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

CHILDREN’S ART WORKSHOP.

Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Jewelry designer and metalsmith Margo Manning leads the workshop themed “Spring Flowers.” Pre-

registration is recommended. Email artboxrhino@gmail.com for details. Admission $5. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. HANDS ON FAMILY WORKSHOP: CODE SCHOOL. National World

War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The workshop for children ages 8-12 teaches how to write in five secret code languages, send Morse code, test lie detection abilities and experiment with recipes for invisible ink. Pre-registration is required. Call 528-1944 x229 or email lauren.handley@nationalww2museum.org for details. Free with museum admission. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. MUSIC FOR ALL AGES. New

Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/jazz/index.htm — The Treme Brass Band hosts the children’s music workshop. 11 a.m. to noon.

PAT ROIG & JOANNE MEHRTENS.

Le Jouet, 1700 Airline Drive, 837-0533; www.lejouet.com — The children’s book authors read from Jockamo Knows Gumbo. 10 a.m.

SIBSHOPS NOLA . Audubon Zoo,

6500 Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — The group provides support, information and recreation opportunities for children ages 8-13 who have siblings with disabilities. Call 943-0343 or email sibshopsnola@yahoo. com for details. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. Through June 11.

Sunday 15 SEEKING SATCH AUDITIONS. New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/ jazz/index.htm — The park hosts auditions for the children’s trumpet contest that provides a chance to play in local and national shows. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 10 CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The hospital hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 456-5000 for information. 6 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. The weekly market

features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West

Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m.

EUCLID RECORDS TRIVIA NIGHT.

Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

preview Net Gain

The Plaquemines Parish Seafood Festival celebrates with a weekend of live music, seafood and more. Rockin’ Dopsie & the Zydeco Twisters, Sammy Kershaw, Adam’s Attic, Bag of Donuts and the Big River Band are among the headliners on the festival’s two stages. There’s a Seafood Queen pageant, kids’ area, amusement rides and more. Food vendors offer an array of local seafood and other dishes. Proceeds from the festival benefit area charities and organizations, which in recent years have included the American Cancer Society and Children’s Hospital. Tickets $5, children 12 and under free. — Marta Jewson

M AY

1215

Plaquemines Parish Seafood Festival 225 F. Edward Hebert Blvd., Belle Chasse, 394-6328; www.plaqueminesparishfestival.com

Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The game tests knowledge of New Orleans and non-New Orleans music trivia, and prizes include bar tabs, record store gift certificates and more. 8 p.m. Tuesdays. HBA SPRING SCHOLARSHIP GOLF TOURNAMENT. Money

Hill Country Club, 100 Country Club Drive, Abita Springs, (985) 892-3300 — Proceeds from the tournament benefit college scholarships to students in St. Tammany and Washington parishes. Call (985) 882-5002 or email jessica@sthba.org for details. Admission $125 (includes green fees, golf cart, drinks, lunch and dinner). Noon. HISTORIC HOUSE WORKSHOP: DESIGNING THE INTERIOR OF YOUR HISTORIC HOME .

Preservation Resource Center, 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — Valorie Hart, a design consultant at Perch and author of the home decorating blog Visual Vamp, leads the workshop about interior design. Stephanie Bruno discusses and signs her book New Orleans Streets: A Walker’s Guide to Neighborhood Architecture at the event. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. LOUISIANA CONNECTIONS ACADEMY INFORMATION SESSIONS. Homewood Suites

Covington, 101 Holiday Square Frontage Road — Representatives from the tuition-free virtual public school host sessions for families. Call (800) 382-6010 or visit www. connectionsacademy.com/ louisiana-school/home.aspx for details. 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. There is another session 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Days Hotel (3400 S. 1-10 Service Road W., Metairie).

MÉLANGE A’ TOI WORKSHOP.

Michalopoulos Studio, 527 Elysian Fields Ave. — The workshop by the touring production is for actors, dancers, musicians and other performers, and it includes sessions about improvisation, character development and music. Admission $25-$100. 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.

PROFESSIONAL WOMEN OF ST. TAMMANY SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS LUNCHEON. Keith

Young’s Steakhouse, 165 Hwy. 21, Madisonville, (985) 8459940; www.keithyoungs.net — The annual luncheon awards more than $15,000 in scholarships to Northshore women pursuing their education. Visit www.pw-st.org for details. Admission $24 members, $29 non-members. Noon.

TEA ON TUESDAY: YVONNE LAFLEUR . Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Yvonne LaFleur discusses the inspiration behind her clothing and fragrance lines. A traditional tea service follows the presentation. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. Admission $25 members, $30 non-members. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Wednesday 11 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS MEETING .

Delk & Morrison, 1010 Conti St., 529-4939 — The New Orleans chapter of the group meets. Call 529-4939, email eva@delkmorrison.com or visit www. asidneworleans.org for details. Free for first-time nonmembers, $20 for subsequent meetings. 5:30 p.m.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter.org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LAKEVIEW MARKETPLACE.

Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www.harrisonavenuemarketplace.org — The Lakeview Neighborhood Association presents an outdoor event with live music, food, drinks, handmade crafts and activities for kids. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. LOCAL WINEMAKER SERIES. Cork

& Bottle, 3700 Orleans Ave., 483-6314; www.cbwines.com — Wine proprietor Neil Gernon of Vending Machine Winery and Cult California is the guest at the tasting. Reservations are required. Admission $25. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE. Global Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. PARALLELS: STANLEY HAINSWORTH & JAMIE BALDRIDGE. Design Within

Reach, 3138 Magazine St., 8916520; www.dwr.com — AIGA, the International Interior Design Association and the American Society of Interior Designers host the third edition of the presentation series. Visit www.aiga.org for details. Admission $10. 6:45 p.m. to 9 p.m.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group conducts

tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

ST. TAMMANY PARISH MASTERS GARDNERS. St. Tammany Parish

Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 8936280; www.stpl.us — Linda Franzo discusses the herb rosemary for the program. 1 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 12 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library, 913

Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA GOLDEN EAGLE DINNER.

Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 595-5511; www. sheratonneworleans.com — The dinner and ceremony presents artist George Rodrigue with the Distinguished National Eagle Scout Award. Call 889-0388 for details. 6 p.m. CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. First

Baptist Church of New Orleans, 5290 Canal Blvd., 482-5775; www.fbcno.org — The church hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 957-5226 for information. 6:30 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. THE REV. C. WELTON GADDY.

Abita Springs Town Hall, 22161 Level St., Abita Springs, (985) 892-0711 — The author, frequent television commentator

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Pre-registration is required. Call 488-5488 ext. 410 or email kchulvick@longuevue. com for details. Admission $12 members, $15 nonmembers (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

EVENTS

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2:00

and authority on religion and politics lectures on the topic “2012: Let’s Not Make It A Race For Pastor-In-Chief.” 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

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SAINTS & SINNERS LITERARY FESTIVAL .

The festival celebrates the GLBT literary community with panel discussions, master classes and other events. Visit www. sasfest.org for the full schedule and other details. Thursday through Sunday.

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LISTINGS

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE. Ashe Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

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Friday 13 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/ DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 9139073; www.fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

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ALIENS ARE COMING: FEARS OF A BROWN INVASION & THE VILIFICATION OF LATINO IMMIGRANTS IN THE USA. Tulane

University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 314-2200; www. tulane.edu — José Torres-Tama, the creator of the one-man show Aliens, Immigrants and Other Evildoers, presents a multimedia lecture that includes a 10-minute excerpt of the show. 7 p.m.

Medic al Cen ter – West Bank Camp us TM

GRACE HOUSE WOMEN OF SUBSTANCE LUNCHEON . Audubon Tea Room, 6500

Magazine St. — The women’s substance abuse treatment facility hosts its annual luncheon and silent auction. This year’s luncheon honors author and magazine editor Bev Church, Times-Picayune columnist Nell Nolan, and business owner Dottie Reese. Call 821-7135 or visit www. gracehouseneworleans.org for details. Admission $85. 11 a.m. silent auction, 12:30 p.m. luncheon.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK .

44

Armstrong Park, North Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION BENEFIT DINNER. St. Tammany Art Association, 320

N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8928650; www.sttammanyart.org — NPAS preforms and chef Carlos Morales prepares a special five-course dinner for the fundraiser. Admission $65. Call (985) 892-8650 for details. 6 p.m. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of OHS_PartyInThePark_Ad_Gambit.indd 1

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Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

WORLD COCKTAIL WEEK/DAY PARTY. Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — The celebration features food, cocktails and music. Admission $20-$35. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Saturday 14 ANIMAL RESCUE NEW ORLEANS “PUP” CRAWL . The Bulldog, 3236 Magazine St.,

891-1516; www.draftfreak.com — Guests can bring their dogs to the pub crawl beginning at the Bulldog and continuing on to The Balcony Bar, Tracey’s, Rendezvous Tavern, and ending at The Bulldog. Visit www.animalrescuene-

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

worleans.org for details. Admission $25. 11 a.m. BROAD STREET BAZAAR. 300

N. Broad St., corner of Bienville Street — The monthly market features health screenings, jewelry, food vendors and more. Call 561-7495 or visit www. broadcommunityconnections. org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

CAN I EAT THAT?. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The site ranger leads a hike focusing on edible plants that can be found along the nature trail. 10:30 a.m.

CHARTER SCHOOLS TEACHER FAIR. Xavier University

Student Center, third floor ballroom, 4980 Dixon St., 486-7411; www.xula.edu — The event provides an opportunity for certified teachers to have interviews with school principals and administrators and to learn more about working at charter schools. Pre-registration is recommended. Call 267-7239 or visit www.eastbankcollaborative. com for details. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING.

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The concert, silent auction and film screening raises funds for the Hope for Haitian Children Foundation, which is building a new orphanage and school for Fepe Orphanage in Haiti. Call (404) 543-3318 or email hfhcf@yahoo.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. FRERET STREET ART CRAWL.

Freret Street, 4400-5000 blocks; www.thenewfreret. com — Galleries in the area host open studio events. Visit www.thenewfreret.com for details. 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between

GROW MO’ BETTA SUSTAINABLE GARDENING SERIES. Hollygrove Market

& Farm, 8301 Olive St., 4837037; www.hollygrovemarket. com — The program topic is “Home Orchards and Urban Bee-Keeping.” Call 864-2009 or email ariel@noffn.org for details. Admission $5. 3 p.m. THE HISTORY OF THE FUTURE, BEYOND THE BORDER OF MEXICO AND THE U.S. Tulane

University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium, 314-2200; www.tulane.edu — The panel discussion explores the history, policy, ecology, economics, art, literature and energy issues related to the Mexico/U.S. migration in the 21st century. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS KIDS PARTNERSHIP MENTOR RECRUITMENT EVENT.

Thurgood Marshall Early College High School, 4621 Canal St., 483-6120 — The event features local community programs looking to recruit mentors for youth ages 7-21. Visit www.nokp.org/ becomeamentor for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS LADIES ARM WRESTLING BRAWL . Rusty

Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail. org — Arm wrestlers assume professional wrestling-esque personas and compete in theatrical bouts to raise money for Women With a Vision. Visit www.wearenolaw.wordpress.com for details. Free admission. 8:30 p.m.

SALON DE JEANNE D’ARC .

Bienville House Hotel, 320 Decatur St., 529-2345 — The Joan of Arc Project presents the full day of free talks and presentations about Joan of Arc that culminates in a costume presentation and workshop. Visit www.joanofarcparade.com for details. Free admission. Noon to 6 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SCAVENGER HUNT. Bogue Chitto

Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger leads a scavenger hunt along one of the park’s hiking trails. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

STEAM FEST. The Fly Dock,

behind Audubon Zoo (6500 Magazine St.) at the river — The original Audubon Park Steam Engine and last surviving Louisiana-built steam locomotive returns for the festival, which features children’s activities, music, food, model trains, live music and more. Visit www.lasta.org for details. Tickets $5-$10. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

TOTALLY RAWSOME DEMO & TAPAS. Whole Foods Market,

3420 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-8225 — Christina DeLeon leads a raw food demonstration, and chef Glen Hogh from Vega Tapas Cafe prepares his choice of gourmet tapas. Free admission. Noon to 2 p.m.

WRITING WORKSHOP. United Teachers of New Orleans, 4718 Paris Ave., 304-2160; www. utno.org — Students at the Center, Andover Bread Loaf Writing Workshop and United Teachers of New Orleans offer a free monthly writing workshop for New Orleans public school teachers. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 15 ABITA ARTISTS. 9th Street

Gallery, 71377 St. Mary St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

Tuesday-Saturday 10:30am-close Sunday 11am-close

LIVE MUSIC...CREOLE-INSPIRED, CARIBBEAN-INFLUENCED CUISINE... ARTISINAL RUM

EVERY FRIDAY Latin Beats with Fredy Omar con su Banda

Fabulous courtyard dining!

EVERY SUNDAY Salsa Night with Javier Olondo and AsheSon

SUNDAY 11am-3pm featuring Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark

Antiques & Interiors

wholesale to the public. over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

& decorators alike 300 Jefferson Hwy.(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

BARK IN THE PARK. Zephyr

Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www. zephyrsbaseball.com — Guests are encouraged to bring their dogs to the New Orleans Zephyrs game against the Tacoma Rainiers, which features giveaways, pet pictures and other promotions. Half of proceeds from levee tickets benefit the LA/SPCA. Tickets $6-$10. 2 p.m.

DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE. New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. FAUBOURG MARIGNY IMPROVEMENT ASSOCIATION HOME & GARDEN TOUR .

Washington Square Park, 700 Elysian Fields Ave. — The selfguided walking tour of homes and gardens in the Faubourg Marigny is themed “Artists in Residence,” and features the homes of artists including James Michalopoulos, filmmaker Jim Gabour, screenwriter and author Glen Pitre and authors Troy Gilbert, Jerry Edgar and David Lummis. Call (888) 312-0812, email info@ faubourgmarigny.org or visit www.faubourgmarigny.org for details. Admission $20. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. PAGE 46

THURSDAY

Steak & Seafood Platter Special Live Music 7PM- till

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

FEPE ORPHANAGA IN HAITI FUNDRAISER. Ashe Cultural

Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

437 Esplanade Ave. at Frenchmen 504.252.4800 www.mojitosnola.com

45

EVENTS

First Communion PRAYER BOOKS

LISTINGS

PAGE 45 FORESTIVAL. A Studio in the

Woods, 13401 Patterson Road, 394-5977; www.astudiointhewoods.org/sitw — A Studio in the Woods, the Tulane University artists retreat, hosts the celebration of art and nature featuring displays from resident artists, interactive art activities, performances, an auction and more. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. HOME SHOW. Lambeth House,

150 Broadway St., 865-1960; www.lambethhouse.com — The event features a tour of five apartments, as well as professional antique appraisals, live music and refreshments. Call 865-1960, ext. 114 for details. Admission $20 in advance, $25 at the door. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LAND TRUST FOR SOUTHEAST LA POLO “FRIENDRAISER”. John

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” 5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

Thursdays at Twilight Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

46

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Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Tim Laughlin Traditional Jazz Clarinet with contemporary influences

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Spring Roll, salad roll highly recommended

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Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

Melton’s Folsom Equestrian Center, 16191 Hwy. 40, Folsom, (985) 845-3403 — The annual fundraiser features polo, food, children’s activities, live music, pony rides and live and silent auctions. Call (985) 276-8000 or email info@ltsl.org for details. Tickets $25 general admission, $15 students. Noon to 5 p.m.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. PIETY STREET MARKET. The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 908-4741 — The market offers art, flea market merchandise, food, drink and live music. Noon to 5 p.m. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM.

Audubon Zoo, Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — Liz Shepard, founder of LifeCity, discusses how her company helps individuals and businesses achieve greater sustainability. Call 780-8889 or visit www.louisiana.sierraclub.org/neworleans for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Monday 16 FREEDOM RIDERS: FINISHING THE RIDE . Ashe Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The street festival, reception and film screening honoring the 50th anniversary of the 1961 Freedom Rides and the end of the 2011 Student Freedom Bus Ride includes some of the original Freedom Riders. Free admission. Street fest 5 p.m., reception 6 p.m., film screening 8 p.m.

UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball. com — The Zephyrs play the Salt Lake City Bees at 7 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. The Zephyrs play the Tacoma Rainiers at 6 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Monday. Visit www.zephyrsbaseball.com for details. WORLD SERIES OF POKER . Harrah’s Casino, 1 Canal St., 533-6000; www.harrahs.com — The tournament includes 11 events, with buy-ins ranging from $175 to $10,000 for the No-Limit Hold ’Em championship event. Visit www.wsop. com for the full schedule and other details. Through May 22. NEW ORLEANS VOODOO.

New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www. neworleansarena.com — The VooDoo plays the Tampa Bay Storm. Visit www.aflvoodoo.com for details. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS L’OREAL PARIS WOMEN OF WORTH. Ten women dedicated

to volunteerism and community will be awarded money for their charities of choice. Visit www.womenofworth.com for details. Application deadline is June 30.

WORDS 17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — The event features spoken-word poet Kataalyst Alcindor. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. ABBY RIKE. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Working it Out. 5:30 p.m. Monday. DIVA DAZE BOOK SIGNINGS.

Afro-American Book Stop, 7056 Read Blvd., 243-2436 — The store hosts authors Beverly Jenkins, Ann Clay, Laconnie Taylor Jones and others. Noon Saturday.

from A Moment in the Sun. 6 p.m. Wednesday. JULIE SMITH & GREG HERREN . East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The young adult mystery writers sign and discuss their books. 7 p.m. Wednesday. KATHRYN STOCKETT. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs The Help, and there will be a preview of the upcoming film adaptation of the same name. This is a ticketed event. 5 p.m. Saturday. KATIE CROUCH . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from The Magnolia League and Men and Dogs. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.

MARTHA HALL FOOSE . Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author signs A Southerly Course. 6 p.m. Friday. M.O. WALSH. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The author signs and reads from The Prospect of Magic. 7 p.m. Tuesday. NELL DICKERSON . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Gone: A Photographic Plea for Preservation. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. SAINTS & SINNERS LITERARY FESTIVAL HEAVENLY DECADENCE MENU. Faubourg

Marigny Art & Books, 600 Frenchmen St., 947-3700 — The event features authors Troy Gilbert, Jerry Edger, Jacques Soulas, Rebel Satori, David Lummis and others signing their books. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

CALL FOR WRITERS SWAMP LILY REVIEW. The

Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The author signs Congo Square: African Roots. 3 p.m. Sunday.

online journal of Louisiana literature and arts accepts submissions for its fall issue. The journal publishes poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, art and photography. Email swamplilyreview@gmail.com or visit www.swamplily.com for details.

JOHN SAYLES. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

FREDDIE EVANS. Ashe Cultural

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

SATURDAY, JUNE 11, 2011 • 10AM-4PM

47

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <BAJEUX’S BACK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >French-born chef Rene Bajeux was named the chef at the Rib < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Room (621 St. Louis St., 529-7046; www.ribroomneworleans. com) in the Omni Royal Orleans Hotel. A certified French Master Chef, Bajeux made a name for himself locally at the Windsor Court Hotel’s Grill Room before opening his own, now defunct, Rene Bistrot in 2001. Most recently, he was chef at San Antonio’s Brasserie Pavil.

am

B

GETTING DOWN ON THE FARM WHAT

Liuzza Palooza WHEN

11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday, May 15 WHERE

3600 block of Bienville St., www.liuzzapalooza.org HOW MUCH

$5 admission, kids 12 and under free

Hollygrove Market & Farm (8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www. hollygrovemarket.com) has grown into a hub for local produce and urban farming education. Next Monday, May 16, the public is invited to party on its premises at the market’s Party in the Garden fundraiser, featuring food and cocktails from 20 Hollygrove patrons including Cure, Iris, Martinique Bistro and the Three Muses. The event begins at 6 pm, and advance tickets cost $35.

five 5 IN

Five Great Soft-Shell Crabs

CLANCY’S RESTAURANT

6100 ANNUNCIATION ST., 895-1111

Hans Limberg, Raymond Edler and Greg Reggio helped organize Liuzza Palooza to benefit Michael Bordelon. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Raising the Schooner A FUNDRAISING FOOD FESTIVAL BENEFITS A MID-CITY RESTAURATEUR. BY IAN MCNULTY

A

and makes people want to step up.” The list of participating restaurants includes the Taste Buds’ Zea Rotisserie Grill, Ruth’s Chris Steak House, crawfish caterer Mr. Mudbug, iconic wienie vendor Lucky Dogs, Broussard’s, Galatoire’s and others. Drago’s Seafood Restaurant will deploy its “charbroiling engine,” an old fire truck converted to a mobile grill for its famous oysters. Most dishes will sell for $5 each. All proceeds from the day will help defray Bordelon’s medical costs as he recovers from the accident. On the night of Feb. 5, after closing Liuzza’s, Bordelon was waiting in his car at a traffic signal on Canal Street when he was struck by a speeding drunk driver, according to his family members. He spent a week in a coma and a month in the hospital and today rehabilitation continues for the brain trauma he suffered. Treatment has already exhausted his insurance coverage, his family says. This calamity was quickly followed by another tragedy for the family. A week after the wreck, his sister Shanette died of cancer at age 59. Her husband Raymond Edler is running the restaurant while Bordelon recovers. In 2006, Liuzza’s reopened after its post-flood repairs to once again stand as that classic New Orleans neighborhood restaurant so many people conjure in their hungry imaginations, whether they live in the neighborhood, across town or across the country. This Sunday, supporters from just as wide a range will converge for Liuzza Palooza to rally for the man who made it so.

MANDINA’S RESTAURANT

3800 CANAL ST., 482-9179 www.mandinasrestaurant.com

Get soft shells done amandine-style — in a brown butter sauce as burly as gravy.

SEITHER’S SEAFOOD

279 HICKORY AVE., HARAHAN, 738-1116

Order a straight-ahead platter of perfectly seasoned and fried crabs.

STANLEY

547 St. Ann St., 587-0093

www.stanleyrestaurant.com

Eggs Stella features soft shells clutching poached eggs and frothy hollandaise.

SUKHO THAI

1913 ROYAL ST., 948-9309; 4519 MAGAZINE ST., 373-6471 www.sukhothai-nola.com

Soft shells are stir fried and served in an aromatic, Thai-style yellow curry.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Hess Allomi Cabernet Sauvignon NAPA, CALIFORNIA / $20-$28 RETAIL

For this bottling, winemakers harvested fruit from 35 different blocks of the Allomi vineyard. It has flavors of blackberry, black cherry, vanilla, cedar and sage. Drink it with grilled steak, roasted meats and game. Buy it at: Hopper’s, Vieux Carre Wine & Spirits, Elio’s Wine Warehouse, Rouses, Wine Seller, Schiro’s Bar, Dorignac’s, Martin Wine Cellar and Langenstein’s in Metairie, Habanos, The Wine Market and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Brennan’s, Brick Oven Cafe, Charlie’s Steak House, Clancy’s, Dooky Chase, Eiffel Society, The Embers, Harrah’s New Orleans, Impastato’s, Mr. B’s, Muriel’s, The Steak Knife, Pascal’s Manale, Ralph’s on the Park, Vincent’s, Restaurant Cypress Restaurant. — Brenda Maitland and Nathan’s Restaurant

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

fter Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, Michael Bordelon had his hands full rebuilding Liuzza’s Restaurant & Bar, the Mid-City restaurant he and his sister Shanette Edler operated together. But through it all, Bordelon took time to encourage his friend Scot Craig to reopen his business, Katie’s Restaurant & Bar, another neighborhood joint a block down the street. “Mike is as good as it gets,” Craig says. “He worked his tail off getting Liuzza’s back open, and when he wasn’t doing that he was helping me. We’re neighbors, not competitors.” So when Bordelon was severely injured in a car crash earlier this year, Craig got involved organizing a benefit for his friend, and many others were just as eager to help. The result is a mini-festival called Liuzza Palooza planned for Sunday, May 15, in a large lot across Bienville Street from Liuzza’s. Restaurants will sell special dishes and bands including zydeco player Rockin’ Dopsie Jr. and y’at rockers the Creole String Beans will perform. There also will be auctions, kids activities and Louisiana seafood cooking demonstrations. “We initially planned this as maybe a block party, but as soon as word got around and people started getting on board we knew it was going to be a lot bigger than that,” says Greg Reggio, a partner in the restaurant management company the Taste Buds, which is producing Liuzza Palooza. “In the restaurant business, we get calls to do food for events all the time. But when it’s one of your own it really resonates

In an modern Creole classic, soft shells are cold smoked and then fried.

49

COUPON

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > “Since > > > > > 1969” >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

plants ostrocck cohloid rs

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices. There also are fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638; > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > > > www.555canal.com — The lobster mac

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Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

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METAIRIE

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WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Ha-

rahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue including St. Louis style spare ribs, burgers and breakfast. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers burgers, sandwiches and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 8617890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast items and sandwiches like the signature Chef’s Voodoo Burger. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City

Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, fries with cheese or gravy and more. No reservations. Dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — The kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE —

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita

Springs, (985) 892-0205 — The half-slab rib plate contains six slow-cooked ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne

Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking such as pan-seared redfish St. Louis topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, Swiss or pepper Jack or blue cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-smoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — The Brie cheese press is turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-

1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There are also sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave.,

865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans. com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road.,

Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations ac-

cepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette St.,

Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N.

Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-

4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans Memo-

rial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie

Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — The Fat Elvis is banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. There are many other options as well. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

and cheese combine lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia St.,

304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.

oaknola.com — Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. . No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette.Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 5251486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSY NAIL — 1100

S:2.281”

Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

ITALIAN

Cured salmon is one of the tapas dishes served at Santa Fe Tapas (1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915; www.santafetapas.com).

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features

St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia

St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TO THE

S:10.833”

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur

SOON

S. Peters St.

Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

COMING

Tchoupitoulas

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

51

OUT2EAT available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-

7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen

St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

52

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu

of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942

— Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared

Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN

— 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.

COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

LA

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CLASSIFIEDS Itty Bitty Inky

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

DOMESTIC AUTOS

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

‘08 HONDA CIVIC COUPE EX ‘08 VW JETTA SE

$14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA $14,995 504-368-5640

2010 HYUNDAI IMPREZA $11,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $10,995 504-368-5640

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

54

NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

90 & 120 min. Available 5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Alicia

LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual

call (504)575-9171

‘07 JEEP WRANGLER

\APPLIANCES

CHATTY CAT

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Cuddly, Grey striped adult male cat.

Hercules loves to enjoy the company and atten. of ppl, children, dogs, & other cats. Lives to cuddle & purr. Please contact Tracy- tbkestler@cox. net 504-975-5971

Elijah

Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

VANS

ELECTRIC RANGE

Husky/ Shepherd mix

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license no. in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown) Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

A Touch

Satchmo is a 2 yr old, male. Super sweet, playful spirit. Good 2 everyone, incl. cats, dogs, and kids. If int. Please contact Tracy- tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

1989 JF CACHET

2004 AARON NEVILLE CACHET $100. Call (504) 330-6501.

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

MAPLE Kennel #A12728014

LOST/FOUND PETS GREY CAT LOST MID-CITY

SHINY GREY TABBY WITH PURPLE COLLAR, LAST SEEN ON THE CORNER OF SAINT ANN ST. AND ORLEANS RIGHT NEXT TO CITY PARK. NAMED SAILOR. VERY FRIENDLY, SMART, AND LOVED! IF FOUND OR IF YOU HAVE ANY INFO PLEASE CALL (504)444-8557 OR (337)281-8797. PLEASE HELP BRING SAILOR HOME!!

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS UP IN SMOKE

Tobacco, pipes, hookahs, vaporizers & more! 11am - 7pm daily Come visit us at our new location! 2101 MAGAZINE STREET (504) 899-0005 www.upinsmokeneworleans.com

Maple is a 1-year-old, spayed, Lab mix. She’s all about the treats, gives kisses and would LOVE to attend an obedience class with her new family. Maple will require TLC during her complimentary heartworm treatment. To meet Maple or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

of

Aloha

50# Sweetheart. Young, loves everything and everyone. VetCk/Vacs/ Neut./Hsbkn/microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136.

Weekly Tails

Prof. Longhair. $100. (504) 330-6501

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

KOJAK

NICK, BEAGLE/TERRIER MIX

Buddy boy is sweet and gd with other dogs.Loves to play w/toys. Best in home w/no sm kids. all med done and house broken. Please contact CINDY foxcfox@cox.net 504-451-9335

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

ART/POSTERS

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

Catahoula mix, male

18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

Kit Kit

DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

$15,995 Call 504-368-5640

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Advertise in

60 MIN

$50

MERCHANDISE

$15,995 Call 504-368-5640

CARGO VAN

Employment

SPECIAL

‘06 HONDA PILOT EXL

Great for work! Ford E250 van with trailer hitch, V8,134,000 miles, Gray. $4750/OBO. 504-861-2626

Rentals &

Swedish & Deep Tissue Therapeutic Massage

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968 Local non profit no kill animal rescue +adoption org needs volunteers to sell chocolates or place in their business to raise $ to help the animals .Please call 504 888-1338.

BASHFUL

4 Door, $12,995 504-368-5640

$11,995 Call 504-368-5640

Real Estate

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

$7,995 504-368-5640

‘06 HONDA ODYSSEY

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

ALLEY CAT

‘02 MERCEDES C230 Kompressor

Free Ads: Private party ads for

Deadlines:

Young Rottie/Aussie girl is looking for a new home. She is about 40 lbs, super sweet and housebroken. Please email for more info.

IMPORTED AUTOS

Leather, sunroof $14,995 504-368-5640

Kirin

Abandoned Dog Needs Home

4 dr, fully loaded, in excellent condition. Looks and drives lie new. Only $3888. Call 247-8862.

‘09 MAZDA 3 merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

PET ADOPTIONS

05 FORD TAURUS SE

Online: When you place an ad in

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

PETS

BARRIE Kennel #A12384441

Barrie is a 2-year-old, neutered, DSH with buff coloring. He’s very curious and prefers to come to meet you vs. being picked-up—then it’s snuggletime. To meet Barrie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

CLASSIFIEDS ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN

is our greatest dream. Endless love, joy & security await. Desiree & Dave, 1-888-503-2129. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

LEGAL NOTICES BID NOTICE

BID NOTICE The CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY YOUTH AGAINST DRUGS FOUNDATION is seeking bids for REPLACEMENT HOUSING. Work includes construction of a 1,074 sf building at 3211 N. Robertson St and a 1,855 sf building at 1540 Piety St and associated sitework. A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on May 19, 2011 at 3211 N Robertson St, NOLA. Bid deadline: May 26, 2011 at 4:00pm. Sealed bids to be submitted to CCYADF and delivered to Julien Engineering, 3520 Gen. DeGaulle Dr, Suite 1045, NOLA, 70114. Bid documents available at New Orleans Reproduction, 824 Union St, NOLA ph 504.522.4271 upon receipt of non-refundable payment. Instructions detailed in bid documents.

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1399 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $49.50 Gulf States Air (504) 464-1267

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

CLEANING/JANITORIAL CRISTINA’S CLEANING SERVICE

Let me help you with your Cleaning Needs including After Construction Cleaning Residential & Commerical Licensed & Bonded 232-5554 or 831-0606

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE Residential & Commerical AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING Light/General Housekeeping Heavy Duty Cleaning Holiday Cleaning Supplies Provided Fully Insured & Bonded Locally owned & service NOLA area for over 19 years. (504) 250-0884 (504) 286-5868

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

EMPLOYMENT

DELTA SOD

EMPLOYMENT

TREE MEDICS

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471 $50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru May Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

LANDSCAPING SERVICES LAWN MAINTENANCE

Licensed and Degreed Horticulturist. (504) 913-3952

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

EMPLOYMENT

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR FRONT DESK AGENT

Hampton Inn & Suites Convention Center. 7am-3pm & 3pm-11pm Apply in person, 1201 Convention Center Blvd.

ACCOUNTING/BOOKKEEPING

VOLUNTEER

Bookkeeper

Work easily and earn weekly payment; This firm specializes in managing the bookkeeping, accounting, tax, and financial matters for entertainment industry performers and executives, and other high net worth individuals. This position is responsible for maintaining the accounting records of the company and the integrity of all financial and operational data. It’s easy work for you. Its fun and you will be glad to work. Send your inquiry/resumes to: mr.avan.smith@gmail.com

AGENTS & SALES MAKE 1K- 4K WEEKLY

Elevated Marketing Strategies is an internet marketing and advertising company based in Arizona. CURRENTLY SEEKING CLEAN, ENERGENIC, MOTIVATED, SELF CONFIDENT INDIVIDUALS WHO WISH TO MAKE $2K TO 5K PER WEEK. OUR CLIENTS ARE BIG SPENDERS WHO NEED HIGHLY PROFESSIONAL ONE ON ONE COACHING AND SUPPORT - YOU MUST HAVE SALES BACKGROUND AND BE ABLE TO CLOSE BIG DEALS. CALL 912-4093349 or 480-406-5059

HEALTH/FITNESS

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

RETAIL SALESPERSON PT/FT

Needed for small yarn shop in Fr Qtr. Some knowledge of Knitting & Needlepoint helpful but not req’d. Please call for details betw 11am-6pm, 522-4451.. Ask for Stacy.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS

CERTIFIED PERSONAL TRAINER

with a positive, happy outlook at our Upscale Studio. Experience a plus. email resume to info@x-trainers.com

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

SERVERS/HOSTESSES Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar & Restaurant New Orleans is looking for some energetic, fun, professional and dedicated servers/hostesses for morning and evening shifts. Hourly rate & gratuity. If you want to work in a fun high volume atmosphere, please come by Lucy’s at 701 Tchoupitoulas Street between the hours of 2pm and 4pm, Monday through Thursday ONLY. Our staff is high energy with great personality and brings the Surf culture to the concrete jungle of the warehouse environment. If you feel that you can enhance the Lucy’s world then come over and apply and talk to our management team. Shifts for the mornings start between 9am and 10am and end between 2pm and 4pm. Evening shifts start between 4pm and 6pm and may last as late as 2am. We don’t require set shifts but you must be available more than 3 days a week for either morning or evening shifts. Come work in the Surf Culture, bring the joy of a laid back but consistent environment to your friends and ours. — Please no phone calls —

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

* Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

55

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe HARAHAN

SLIDELL

GENTILLY

WAGGAMAN

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

BAYOU LIBERTY AREA

4 Bdrm home in Park-like setting! Close to the River! Wood Floors! Large Rooms! Garage and Carport! Garage currently used as a game room. $279,500. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates C: 504-669-4677 • O: 504-838-7649 Licensed in Louisiana, USA

Elegant Contemporary, 2 MASTER SUITES, 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths, 2 Wood Burning Fireplaces, 4,000 Sq. Ft. Rear Yard. Wide Gate Street Access. Park Like Setting. $299,500.

Call Property New Orleans Susan (504) 231-2445 or Greg (985) 640-7221

RIVER RIDGE

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

GENERAL REAL ESTATE $99/month. $0 down, $0 interest, golf course, national parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l airport. Guaranteed financing, no credit checks. Pre-recorded msg. 800-631-8164 code 4057 www. sunsiteslandrush.com

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE

1,420sq. ft, lot 62x120. Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors throughout, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 minutes from St. Matthews & St. Rita. REDUCED! $184,000.

OLD METAIRIE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

LOT IN OLD METAIRIE

56

Ready to build on. House down & lot filled twice. 73 X 73. Great location. Reduced to $100,000. 504-669-3810

METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $149,900. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 740 N RAMPART

1350 sq ft, zone VCC-2, across from Armstrong Arch, corner of St Ann. $1750. Contact: 504-908-5210

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

9012 Rosecrest Lane

METAIRIE LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

Reduced! $184,000

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

Call (504) 915-3220

227 CODIFER BLVD

Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

METAIRIE TOWERS

NEED HELP? Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

KENNER 3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $1000/mo. 504913-4803.

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

Rent $970/mo 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

ALGIERS POINT

Call (504) 483-3100

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

Furn lr & kit, c-a/h, incls appls, pd wtr & cable, w/d, fncd yd nr Xavier Univ. $600/mo. 504/319-3727

To Advertise in Call (504) 483-3100

CBD 339 CARODELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

BYWATER STUDIO (2 apts)

BROADMOOR

REAL ESTATE

Located between Chartres and Royal, furn. including linens, kit ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water, the works - $850/mo free laundry on site Call Gloria 504-948-0323 .

To Advertise in

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

BROADMOOR STUDIO

BYWATER STUDIO

REAL ESTATE

THERAPIST OFFICE SPACE

Victorian Building in Lower Garden District. Fridays Only. Call 670-2575 for information

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Downstairs avail. mid July, upstairs avail end of May. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, 900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist 4133 Palmyra

Mid City, 2,100 sq ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath singlestory home on oversized double lot across from Jesuit. Call Jean-Paul 504-818-6032

6612 Canal Blvd.

Mediterranean style living in Lakeview. Entertainer’s dream: Sliding glass doors behind spacious living room opens to pool & patio. 4 bedroom/ 3 bath. Renovation completed in 2007. $355,000

Jean-Paul Villere 504-818-6032

Sean Gerowin 504-669-0342 4921 Freret • 504-818-6032

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE GENTILLY

1014 WASHINGTON AVE

SINGLE FAMILY HM

Across from Pontchartrain Golf Course! 4 BR/2 BA, CA&H. Built In electric. No smokers. Avail now! $1500/mo + deposit. Call 504-491-9834

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1600. 504-301-7239

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $700/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

3508 Cleveland Ave.

1b/1b fur kit w/stove/fridge. wind unit. 1 1/2 blks to canal/Jeff davis $525 water incl. no pets. Joseph 504453-9679

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CHARMING CARRIAGE HSE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

2011 GEN PERSHING Beautiful Neighborhood!

3 BR 2 BA, Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apt you’ll see. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Lots of closet space. Offst Pkg, Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smokers, no pets. $1800. Paula 504-952-3131

AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

5419 STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT 2218 GENERAL PERSHING

Adorable gated condo. 1 bdrm/1bath. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $1100. Call (504) 432-1034.

GRT LOCATIONS!

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 2100 BARONNE 2BR/1.5 ba, hdwd flrs, w&d hkups, Newly renov. $850/mo 891-2420

S. FRONT - NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP

Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

HARAHAN

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 2707 ST. THOMAS

2 BDRM Camelback double. CA&H, all wd flrs. $675 per month + deposit. Call (504) 416-5923.

RENTALS TO SHARE HOUSEMATE - METAIRIE

Renovated, spacious. 1800 sq ft. Medium size BR. Wireless internet & Direct TV in den and util incl. $500. No pets, no smokers. 377-8768

OLD METAIRIE CLUB GARDEN

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. Cat only. $1156/mo. Must make LESS than $33,000/year. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

2 stories 1200sf, off St Charles, gated, secured, brick patio, LR, cathedral ceils, w/view, hdwd flrs, 2 tiled ba, br & stdy. Furn kit, wd, 1 yr lse. Dep req. $1500. 1831 Marengo St. 891-1263

1408 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" $1200

1 Blk to St. Charles

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

7301 Sheringham Dr.

Well maintained traditional home in great demand area of Harahan. Beautiful original flooring, plenty of storage space, sprinkler system, never flooded. 3 bds/2 ½ baths, wonderful sunroom and study. $499,000

33 naSSau Dr. Excellent location in Old Metairie Club Garden. Flooded in Katrina, perfect opportunity for renovation, original marble flooring in foyer and two original marble mantels. Great backyard for entertaining and outdoor cooking. 4 br/ 3 ½ baths. $890,000

Beau Box • 504.525.5354

912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency" $675

4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000 A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

941 St. Ann

Gorgeous Victorian home in the French Quarter or a corner lot with gated PARKING for 2! 2/2, 1551 sq. ft. Beautiful, MUST SEE!

Patti Faulder

Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management

MY SPECIALIZATION IS YOU! Personal & Customized Services. Historic Homes Specialist & Luxury Homes Trust Someone Who Knows The Market…

Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com

900 St . Peters St. L3. Condo

Beautiful! 2 bdrms, 2 ba, parking, all amenities.

1125 Cadiz, Uptown

Absolutely Charming! 1780 sq. ft, 2BD/2BA

504.905.7473 8601 Leake Ave • New Orleans pattifaulder@gmail.com www.pattifaulder.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

59

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN UPTOWN & OCHSNER • 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > maY 10 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 55

62

131 BROOKLYN AVE. CLASSIC SHOTGUN. Excellent location, minutes from Uptown. High ceilings. Hardwood & slate flooring. Furnished kitchen. Whirlpool. New central A/C.Well maintained home w/large backyard & off street parking. Right near levee. Great for bike riding & dog walking! Owner/Agent $110,000

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663


Gambit's Sno-ball Issue