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cOmmeNTary

thinking out loud

Keep UNO in Division I

T

According to a study commissioned by concerned UNO alumni and presented to UL System President Randy Moffett in July, the net cost of staying in Division I compared to Division II would be less than $100,000. Sponsors of that study — all of whom support keeping UNO in Division I — include former UNO and NBA basketball coach Tim Floyd, LSU head baseball coach Paul Mainieri (a UNO alum), former UNO athletic director Ron Maestri, and former New Orleans Saints executive Jim Miller, who also has served as UNO’s athletic director. These folks know college athletics as well as anyone. Their opinions should matter. Moreover, all other schools in the UL System, including some with enrollments and budgets similar to that of UNO, compete in Division I. All those schools also provide institutional support

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No other fouryear college or university in the UL System competes in Division II.

for their athletic programs, whereas UNO eliminated such support in 2009. If the other UL institutions can afford Division I, why can’t UNO? Some will no doubt argue it’s too late to reverse the decision to move to Division II. That’s simply not true. The move is not scheduled to become official — or complete — until the 2012-13 academic year. What’s more, UNO has received a “non-compliance waiver” from the NCAA through 2012-13, so there’s no “risk” in reconsidering the decision at this time. Local and state leaders have urged the UL System and UNO officials to suspend the reclassification process until an independent review of that decision has been conducted. We agree with that approach. We urge UL System officials to commission an immediate, independent analysis of UNO’s athletic classification. UNO’s new chancellor and all of its students, faculty and alumni deserve nothing less.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

he University of New Orleans’ (UNO) transition from the LSU System to the University of Louisiana (UL) System is underway, and already several major challenges confront the Lakefront campus. In addition to changing its governing structure, UNO is without a permanent leader — and its future in Division I of NCAA athletics is in jeopardy. Officials in the UL System have named a search committee to vet candidates for the position of UNO president, and that committee is rightly focused on picking the best person to lead UNO in the future. Meanwhile, the university’s athletic programs need immediate attention — and help — from the UL System. For decades, UNO proudly took its place among the best academic institutions in Louisiana while also fielding nationally competitive teams in basketball, baseball and other sports. In its early years, UNO competed in the “small college” sector of the NCAA, then in 1975 moved into the NCAA’s more prestigious — and more fitting, given UNO’s size and home in New Orleans — Division I. Unfortunately, budget constraints in the wake of Hurricane Katrina (along with pressure from the LSU System office) forced previous UNO administrators to cut institutional support for athletics and to seek reclassification of UNO athletics in the NCAA’s Division II. We think that move was a serious mistake, one that was made in haste without adequate input from the larger UNO community and without a full study of all its ramifications. We urge reconsideration. In purely budgetary terms, moving down to Division II could be a virtual wash. And academically, it could impose a greater burden on student athletes. While it’s true that it costs less (on the surface) to play in Division II, the practical realities of competing against other Division II schools will add some costs to UNO’s athletic department. Consider, for example, that no other four-year college or university in the UL System — UNO’s new home — competes in Division II. In fact, no other college or university in Louisiana competes in Division II. Worse yet, UNO’s closest rival in the Division II Gulf South Conference would be more than 300 miles away — as opposed to potential in-state Division I rivals in the UL System. Moreover, most if not all of UNO’s likely opponents in Division II are located more than 500 miles away. That kind of travel will force student athletes to miss more classes than competing against much closer rivals in Division I. The push for Division I thus is not just about prestige and competition; Division I would be better for student athletes as well.

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DEAR MARY, Washington Square park is located in the Faubourg Marigny and is bounded by Elysian Fields Avenue and Dauphine, Frenchmen and Royal streets. The land originally belonged to Claude DuBreuil. Subsequent owners include Mathurin Dreux, Balthazar Mazan, Lorenzo Sigur and Pierre Marigny. Marquis Bernard Xavier Phillippe de Marigny de Mandeville inherited the land in the early 1800s after his father’s death. The young Marigny ordered a wide central avenue to be built along one side of the faubourg, with a landscaped neutral ground — Elysian Fields Avenue. He also set aside land for a large public square, which he named in honor of the first U.S. president, George Washington. Beginning in 1805, Bernard divided his huge estate into small lots designed for residential development. Lots continued to sell well into the 1820s, and the new neighborhood grew rapidly. It was populated by diverse ethnic groups including Spanish, French, Italians, Germans, Irish and free people of color. Washington Square was developed almost immediately. On March 17, 1843, The Daily Picayune reported on improvements at the park: “Posts at the distance of about 30 feet apart are to be connected with each other by means of iron chains.” This was the first fence around the park. The iron fence was installed in 1853 — the same fence that surrounds it today. The park, normally a quiet place for relaxation, was the scene of great confusion on Oct. 13, 1899. A steer being led on board a ship broke loose and headed down Royal Street. Perhaps attracted by the grass and flowers in the park, the bull dashed through the gateway, terrifying visitors, who ran for safety. After trampling the flowers and

Washington Square Park in the Faubourg Marigny was named for President George Washington. generally wrecking the place, the steer was roped by police officers and thrown down. One officer stood on its neck crying “Victory!” as onlookers cheered from the other side of the fence. The steer was returned to the ship. In 1904, there was talk of removing the fences around parks in New Orleans. Several fences, including the one around Lafayette Park, were removed, but the very expensive fence around Jackson Square was left untouched, as was the one surrounding Washington Square. In 1924, the park’s character changed when it was transformed into a playground. The residents of the Washington Square area gave the New Orleans Recreation Department permission to use the park for recreational activities, but residents later wanted it back. In 1973, concerned members of the Faubourg Marigny Association expressed their displeasure that the park was being used for recreational purposes and claimed it was destroying the beautiful grove of oaks that surrounds the park inside the fence. The residents won, and the park eventually was returned to a “people’s park.” In 1975, the entire Faubourg Marigny was placed on the National Register of Historic Places, and the neighborhood began a surge of revitalization. Before that it had suffered a decline dating from the Civil War, during which time the neighborhood was considerably poorer than when it was created. New investment in the area beginning in the mid1970s substantially reduced blight and increased property values. In 1990, there was a movement to change the name of Washington Square to Morial Memorial Park in honor of the late Mayor Ernest “Dutch” Morial, our first African-American mayor, who had died the previous year, but this never came to pass. Morial’s name graces the city’s convention center.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < QUOTES OF THE WEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > “Excuse me, excuse me — no, I’m going to finish. I’ve never <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < < been > > > >treated > > > > >like > >this > > >in>my > > lifetime > > > > > >and > > I>won’t > > > >have > > > it. > >…>Please >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> don’t be so rude.” — City Council President Jackie Clarkson at a < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < District E town hall meeting in eastern New Orleans last week.

scuttle Butt

Mayor Mitch Landrieu invited Clarkson and other city officials to the meeting, one in a series of town hall discussions on the 2012 city budget. The crowd booed Clarkson when she entered the meeting and interrupted her as she defended her record in the eastern part of the city and her memories of growing up in the segregated 1940s and ’50s. “This city is on the best roll I’ve seen since I was a child,” she said. “For those of you who are also my age, is this not just like the ’40s and ’50s?” “Teams of city employees will be dispatched throughout the city to photograph, count, log, remove and dispose of bandit signs and litter. Any bandit sign will be removed, disposed of, and the owner will receive a fine of $25 per sign, or $50 per sign if attached to a tree. Community service is possible for repeat offenders. Fines for littering and illegal dumping range from $150 to $5,000, with the possibility of community service and jail time for repeat offenders. These penalties are determined by the city’s Municipal Court.” — A release from the Sanitation Department explaining the city’s new rules for “bandit” signs, effective immediately after an “amnesty” period ends on Sept. 9.

FIRE ON THE BAYOU

SOS: Avondale in Distress

Save Our Shipyard activists and Avondale Shipyard workers at a 2010 rally. The Pray for Avondale campaign begins Sept. 9. PHOTO COURTE SY SAV E OUR SHIPYA RD

BY ALE X WOODWARD

hanging the conversation” is a strategy used by spin-doctors and politicos on all levels to get people talking about something other than the topic that needs to be discussed. For advocates hoping for a future for Avondale Shipyard, the conversation isn’t about the plight of the facility but rather how to save it. “A year ago it was, ‘That’s a damn shame.’ Now

C

BoUQuets Raj Diwan,

PAGE 13

it’s, ‘What do we do about Avondale?’” says Nick Unger, a national coordinator for the AFL-CIO. The shipyard is scheduled to close by 2013 but has been downsizing since last fall when the first wave of layoffs hit. Rolling layoffs (every 60 days) affect 4,500 workers, Unger says, and about 8,000 other jobs in neighboring communities also are at risk. Unger and community activists, union leaders, businesses and shipyard employees represent Save Our Shipyards (SOS), a campaign to keep the shipyard in the public eye. Billboards, flyers and posters hanging in nearby shops and restaurants read in large, bold letters, “Save Our Shipyards.” “Today it’s not a closed shipyard, but an open shipyard with people thinking about what comes next,” Unger says.

c'est what? WARREN BUFFETT ADVOCATES RAISING TAXES ON MILLIONAIRES AS A WAY TO CUT THE U.S. DEBT. DO YOU AGREE?

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PAGE 11

Do you agree with the decision to close City Hall early when the Saints play at home on a weekday?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

a resident of LSU Health Sciences Center’s School of Dentistry General Practice Residency Program, was one of four people nationally to receive a Student Servant Leadership Award presented by the Academy of Dentistry International. The award recognizes Diwan’s volunteerism, which includes founding the student-service organization Making Impressions. The organization provided more than 1,000 people with oral health screenings, dental supplies and one-on-one education.

Warren and Jodie Singer

recently contributed $10,000 to the Louisiana Wildlife Federation, the state’s oldest conservation organization. The donation comes in the wake of budget-straining disasters such as Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, as well as last summer’s BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. The nonprofit conservation education and advocacy group was founded in 1940 and aims to protect the state’s wildlife and fisheries.

KID smART,

an arts integration and education program, received a 2012 grant from the MetLife Foundation Partners in Arts Education Program. The money will be used to broaden the scope and impact of KID smART’s programming at Mary Bethune Elementary School. KID smART, founded in 1999 by Allison Stewart and Campbell Hutchison, currently has programs in 10 schools.

Marlon Defillo,

former assistant New Orleans police chief, was found in a 33-page Louisiana State Police report to have “an incredibly poor memory or he has been deceptive,” and lacked “both good judgment and maturity” in handling the death of Henry Glover — a case in which five NOPD officers were charged with felonies. Glover’s burned body was found Sept. 2, 2005, inside a destroyed Chevrolet Malibu parked on a levee. Defillo retired from the NOPD last month.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

WHILE NEGOTIATIONS AND DEBATES DISCUSS THE FUTURE OF THE MULTI-BILLION-DOLLAR AVONDALE SHIPYARD, THE SAVE OUR SHIPYARD CAMPAIGN TURNS TO AREA CHURCHES FOR SUPPORT.

While last week’s Bayou Sauvage marsh fire raged for several days, New Orleanians’ concerns poured out on Twitter and Facebook (with pictures of fog-like conditions), and the state turned to Bambi — buckets, that is. The 500-gallon Bambi buckets, hoisted by Louisiana National Guard helicopters, dumped 160,00 gallons of water on the blaze Aug. 30, a day the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) declared an ���air quality precaution” day, with the smoke creat-

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WITh dEcrEASING dEMANdS fOr NAvAL  shipbuilding,  Northrop  Grumman  announced  last  year  that  it  was  consolidating  its  shipbuilding  by  closing  Avondale,  the  smallest  of  its  shipyards  (others  are  in  Newport  News,  va.,  and  Pascagoula, Miss.) The company acquired  Avondale  in  2001,  and  in  2003  it  began  “modernization”  renovations  —  a  $112  million  project  using  $56  million  in  state  funding.  Gov.  Mike  foster  said  in  a  statement  at  the  time,  “I  want  to  thank  Avondale’s  employees  for  being  the type of productive people who make  it  possible  for  a  company  like  Northrop  Grumman to come here and stay here. It’s  because  of  employees  like  you,  who  are  proud  of  their  work  and  who  do  it  right  the  first  time,  that  companies  want  to  come to Louisiana.”     The  four-year  renovation  project  and  production at the shipyard both were hit  with  delays  following  hurricane  Katrina 

in  2005  and  were  further  impacted  by  rising  production  costs.  By  July  2010,  Northrop Grumman announced it would  close the shipyard.     In  March  2011,  Northrop  Grumman  lumped its shipbuilding in with its spinoff  group,  shipping  magnate  huntington  Ingalls.  That  company  is  seeking  a  $310  million  subsidy  from  the  Navy  based  on  huntington  Ingalls’  presumption  that  closing Avondale will save the feds more  than $600 million. The Navy, however, is  only  authorized  to  give  the  shipyard  $27  million, according to SOS, and in July, an  audit by the U.S. department of defense  disputed  the  shipper’s  estimate  of  what  the Navy would save.     To survive, Avondale must consider selling the shipyard to a commercial buyer. AvONdALE  ShIPYArd  OPENEd  IN  1938  and  served  as  the  Navy’s  largest  U.S.  shipbuilder,  beginning  with  World  War  II. Its $2 billion annual impact in the state  makes  it  one  of  the  state’s  most  lucrative  businesses,  ranking  right  behind  Louisiana’s $2.25 billion seafood industry.  The  shipyard  currently  is  building  two  ships to be completed by 2013.     A  research  group  headed  by  faculty  from  the  University  of  New  Orleans,  Loyola  and  Tulane  Universities  and  Southern  University  at  New  Orleans  comprise  the  Avondale  research  Project,  which  looks  at  the  impact  Avondale  has  had  on  the  region  historically  and  what  its closing could mean to the region, says  Steve  Striffler,  UNO  anthropologist  and  project researcher.      “The hope, aside from the more scholarly aspect of it, (is) trying to generate or  contribute to a public discussion,” he says.  “If  you  said,  ‘In  a  year  from  now,  we’re  going  to  close  the  LSU  campus  in  Baton  rouge,’  we’d  be  talking  about  it  every  day, 24 hours a day. .... It’s not that far an  exaggeration  to  suggest  this  can  have  that kind of an impact.”     researchers estimate the loss of more  than  4,500  jobs  at  the  shipyard  could  have  a  trickle-down  effect  throughout  the  surrounding  community  that  may  result  in  a  loss  of  7,000  to  10,000  additional  jobs  ranging  from  car  dealerships  and banks to restaurants and churches.     “It has historically been kind of one of  those  rare  places  where  you  can  pretty  much leave high school and get a career  (at  Avondale),  starting  relatively  low  on  the ladder, but they effectively offer a college education there, the way they train  people,”  Striffler  says.  “The  problem  of  course, not always, is it tends to be very  specialized.  You’re  the  world’s  greatest  painter of the exterior of a ship, but that  doesn’t  mean  it  translates  into  a  highpaying  job  outside  that  sector.  ….  When  they  lose  their  jobs,  there  are  close  to  no alternatives for some of them. That’s 

definitely a concern.”     The shipyard now needs a savior, financially  speaking.  In  May,  a  $1.48  million  grant,  the  largest  of  its  kind,  from  the  department  of  defense  was  awarded  to  the  Louisiana  Economic  development  office  to  find  possible  solutions  for  Avondale.  That  grant  followed  a  push  from Sen. Mary Landrieu and rep. cedric  richmond,  d-New  Orleans,  urging  thencommerce  Secretary  Gary  Locke  to  help  ease the potential economic disaster following the closure. Sen. david vitter and  rep.  Steve  Scalise,  r-Metairie,  also  have  voiced similar concerns to other agencies.     In a statement released after the grant  was  announced,  Gov.  Bobby  Jindal  said,  “As  I  have  said  from  the  beginning,  we  will  do  everything  we  can  to  secure  the  future  of  Avondale,  the  workers  who  depend on jobs there and the communities  around  them  that are  all  tied to the  work there.”     The  Save  Our  Shipyards  and  Pray  for  Avondale  campaigns  are  uring  the  congregations to write or email elected officials to push that message, because they  likely will pay more attention to what the  community  and  politicians  say  and  take  action than if only shipyard workers were  making the pleas.     “Some  folks  can  hear  [what  congregations  and  public  officials  say]  clearly  who  can’t  hear  other  folks  saying  the  exact same words,” Unger says. “You can  bemoan the fact that exists, or recognize  the  fact  that  exists  and  do  something  about it.”  AvONdALE  MAchINIST  rAY  MErcIEr   has  worked  at  the  shipyard  for  37  years.  he  helped  co-organize  the  Pray  for  Avondale  campaign,  and  personally  got  40 churches on board.      Union  Summer,  a  10-week  internship  the AfL-cIO organized in which students  work  with  communities  and  laborers,  is  behind  the  Pray  for  Avondale  campaign.  Union summer places 45 interns in eight  cities, including New Orleans. Other organizations  backing  the  weekend  include  Interfaith  Workers  Justice,  Shir  chadash  conservative Synagogue and the National  Baptist  convention of  America,  the  largest black Baptist convention with millions  of members across the U.S. hundreds of  Louisiana churches and schools under the  direction of Aymond and the archdiocese  also have a role in the weekend’s services.     “The message of the archbishop is not  ‘What  a  shame  it  will  be  when  it  closes,’  but  rather,  ‘Let’s  bring  the  power  of  prayer and god’s blessings so people can  find a way for it not to,’” Unger says. “The  Avondale workers can realize their hopes.  That  treats  it  not  as  inevitable  but  as  something  that  gets  worked  out.  This  is  in the realm of the possible. Avondale can  be saved.” 

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

    This  year  the  campaign  that  started  in  July  2010  turned  to  another  community  to  keep  the  conversation  going  and  raise  Avondale’s  profile  through  word  of  mouth.  More  than  100  congregations  ranging from Avondale and New Orleans  to other parts of the state and representing  all  faiths  will  participate  in  a  Pray  for  Avondale  weekend  Sept.  9-11.  “We’re  treating [the congregations] as a member  of the community,” Unger says. “Each of  these  congregations  is  doing  something  inside  the  congregation,  which  means  that  the  number  of  people  reached  is  magnified tenfold, a hundredfold.”     An  SOS  pledge  letter  addressed  to  congregations  (and  signed  by  several  pastors,  church  presidents,  interfaith  organizations  and  an  imam)  reads,  “The  faith  traditions  that  inform  our  deepest  commitments  remind  us  that  we  have  a  moral  obligation  to  stand  together  with  our  brothers  and  sisters  who  work  at  Avondale  in  faith  and  solidarity.  We  invite you and your congregation to join  the growing community working to save  Avondale Shipyard.”     Archbishop  Gregory  Aymond  wrote  a  letter to parish pastors about the Pray for  Avondale  weekend,  calling  members  of  the  Archdiocese  of  New  Orleans  to  join  the  campaign.  “A  diverse  group  of  faith  leaders  are  joining  together  to  lift  this  situation  up  in  prayer  so  that  God’s  will  may  be  done,”  Aymond  wrote.  “Let  us  come together and ask God’s blessings on  the  workers  and  their  families  that  their  hope may be sustained.”     “A  year  ago  when  the  closing  was  announced,  nobody  thought  it  could  be  saved,” Unger says. “It was just a fact of  companies closing and the shipyard closes. Everyone thought it should be saved. It  wasn’t that you had to convince people of  the should, the question was the could.”

11


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scuttlebutt

page 9

The ST. Pierre Swindle

Mark St. Pierre, the former City Hall technology contractor who was convicted in federal court in May for his role in a multiyear, multimillion-dollar swindle, was sentenced Sept. 1 to 210 months — or 17 1/2 years — in prison. St. Pierre will begin serving his sentence Oct. 14.

U.S. District Court Judge Eldon Fallon denied prosecutors’ request that St. Pierre be ordered to pay the city $911,000 in restitution — the same amount St. Pierre was convicted of handing out in bribes to former city chief technology officer Greg Meffert, his wife Linda, and former city director of management information systems Anthony Jones between 2004 and 2007, in return for millions in no-bid contracts Jones and Meffert funneled to businesses St. Pierre controlled. St. Pierre has, however, been ordered to forfeit $3.2 million for his role in the conspiracy. In a statement to the court, St. Pierre presented himself as a community leader and a devoted father, thanking Fallon for the three months he’s been able to spend with his wife and children between the guilty verdict and his sentencing. “We are a family of great faith,” St. Pierre said. “We have faith in God and faith in the legal system.” Pleading for leniency for his client, attorney Eddie Castaing called St. Pierre a community leader, a devoted father and a good man who has many friends. Castaing pointed to the more than 150 letters sent to the court on St. Pierre’s behalf. St. Pierre’s family and friends attended the hearing, some audibly crying throughout. Fallon was unimpressed. “On Thursdays beginning at 2 p.m. every week, I sentence people for their crimes,” Fallon told St. Pierre in court. “They most often appear alone (or with only their lawyers). They have little education, no resources. ... It’s no excuse, but it is something of an explanation. Their American Dream has become something of a nightmare. None of that is applicable to you. ... You let your family down. You let your friends down. You really let your community down.” The 210-month sentence was at least two-and-a-half years shorter than federal prosecutors were seeking. A pre-sentencing report by the U.S. Department of Probation recommended a 20- to 24-year sentence for St. Pierre. Castaing presented 22 objections to that report, including that it wrongly recommended sentence enhancements for perjury and for St. Pierre’s role as a “leader” in the conspiracy. Fallon accepted the latter argument, to a degree, ruling that St. Pierre acted as a manager, not a leader — still a sentence enhancement but a smaller one. — Charles Maldonado CoRRECTioN In the Best of New Orleans 2011 readers poll results (Cover story, Aug. 30), we printed an incorrect address and phone number for Moldaner’s, which was voted No. 3 in the Best Local Camera Shop category. The correct information is Moldaner’s, 7808 Maple St., Suite D, 866-6757. Gambit regrets the error.

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ing a “possible health issue.” Wednesday also registered on the Air Quality Index (at level “orange,” which sits below the unhealthy “red” and above the moderate “yellow”), continuing an alert streak that began Aug. 28. Those warnings were based on what the DEQ termed“particulate matter” in the smoke. So what was in that? And what exactly was burning? The marsh in Bayou Sauvage is a mix of grass, groundcover and trees. When burned, it produces carbon dioxide and particulate matter, which DEQ air quality assessor Tim Bergeron describes as small particles of ash and soot that become airborne after they’re combusted. “Particulate matter is a lung irritant,” he says. “People who have respiratory problems, elderly folks — they’ll need to take the necessary precautions. You shouldn’t have prolonged activity outside when air quality is in the unhealthy or sensitive range.” Monitors also looked for sulfur dioxide (present, but not alert-worthy) as well as nitrogen oxide and toxic hydrocarbons. DEQ air quality monitors registered high Air Quality Index levels as far as Port Allen and Baton Rouge. City health commissioner Karen DeSalvo says emergency rooms saw a slight increase in respiratory complaints and concerns of smoke inhalation, though a statement from the mayor’s office said the fires “pose little to no threat to citizens.” Former Mayor Ray Nagin discussed it on Twitter, his current medium of choice. On Tuesday he wrote, “Air quality disaster in N.O. First casualty was truth. BS, nothing can be done. During K we used helicopters. Fire boats? Come on leaders.” He later responded “Finally!” to news that Mayor Mitch Landrieu announced a state of emergency. Landrieu met with Gov. Bobby Jindal’s staff and other agencies Tuesday, and Jindal ordered the Louisiana National Guard helicopters to dump water over the site — though Landrieu noted the efforts barely made a dent. Using mapping data from the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, officials estimated 65 percent (or 1,015 acres of the 1,552acre site) burned. A smaller fire (24 acres) broke out 500 yards from Chef Menteur Highway, but Landrieu press secretary Ryan Berni told Gambit on Wednesday that the Bambi bucket drops contained it. — Alex Woodward

13


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Cake Walk hen it comes to happy hour, almost everyone has a vice of choice. Some people unwind over gin and tonic. For others, it’s cupcakes. “We have occasional happy hours,” says Claudia Melgar , owner of The Kupcake Factory (800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com). “We will call one on Twitter if we’re having a slow day. It’s definitely a popular thing.” When I visited Kupcake Factory, a line of professionally attired customers were picking out cupcakes: red velvet topped with swirls of cream cheese icing, wedding cake flavored with almond and topped with vanilla buttercream icing, and strawberry garnished with fresh fruit. “We use farmer’s butter and the heaviest possible cream,” says Melgar, who dovetailed her love for baking into a successful business in 2008. “All our cakes are buttermilk-based and made from scratch. There’s nothing we have that is pre-made.” At The Kupcake Factory, cupcakes A rotating roster of flavors keeps customers checking the website to see when their are baked fresh daily from scratch. favorite is scheduled to return. “The regulars are definitely looking at the menu, and we do change flavors with the seasons,” Melgar says. “For fall, we’re bringing back pumpkin and peach strudel, and adding to the lineup a pineapple upside-down cupcake.” All the cupcakes are baked fresh daily at The Kupcake Factory’s Metairie location. “We bake to sell out, because we are baking daily,” says Melgar, who donates unsold cupcakes to area hospitals, women’s shelters and police departments. She also offers day-old cupcakes for $1 off the original price. “Day-old cupcakes will be a little more dense, but some flavors taste better the next day — chocolate, banana, any of the fruit flavors intensify a little.” Cupcakes sell for $2.50 each, with discounts for bulk purchases. Melgar also offers custom fondant cakes and soon will add cookies, cake balls and brownies to the menu, but she says cupcakes will always come first and foremost. “Cupcakes are great things for social gatherings — everyone can cut them up and sample the different flavors,” she says. “It’s a fun thing to do for sure.”

W

The NEW ORLEANS HOME + INTERIOR DESIGN SHOW (www.neworleanshomeshows.com) at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center (900 Convention Center Blvd., Hall J, 582-3071; www. mccno.com) Friday, Sept. 9 through Sunday, Sept. 11 features hundreds of interior designers, artists and other vendors offering products and services for indoor and outdoor areas of the home. The show also includes celebrity appearances, a design challenge, seminars and lots of decorating ideas. Admission is $9 for adults ($5 for military personnel with IDs). KENNETH’S STUDIO FOR HAIR (2100 St. Charles Ave., 528-8585; www.kennethsstudio.com) is offering a special facial for $35 through Sept. 15. Brides and grooms can sign up for a free consultation about all-natural skin care products and makeup on the first Wednesday and Thursday of each month. Reservations are required. Lisa Carey of NATURAL SKIN CARE (166 Laroussini St., Westwego, 340-3429) will conduct the consultations during a series of Natural Skin Care Bridal Shows at the Marriott Hotel (555 Canal St.). The Habitat for Humanity RESTORE (2830 Royal St., 943-2240; www.habitat.org/restores) is collecting used books through Sept. 30 for the Books 2 Prisoners program, which provides free books to promote literacy among inmates.

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fact, two of the most hotly contested elections on the Oct. 22 ballot are likely to be Republican-versus-Republican brawls — the races for lieutenant governor and secretary of state. The stakes are high, and one high-powered Republican already has come out against two GOP incumbents. It’s more than another round of elections; it’s a culture war for the heart, mind and future of the Louisiana Republican Party. LOUISIANA’S BLUE-TO-RED SEA CHANGE SEEMS TO HAVE happened quickly, but it’s been a long time in coming, say veteran political experts. They cite several factors. Hurricane Katrina literally swept away at least 100,000 Democratic voters, but Louisiana already was trending Republican. “Katrina, for a host of reasons, accelerated the trend,” says historian Bob Mann, a professor of mass communications at LSU and former press secretary to Democratic Gov. Kathleen Blanco. “It certainly cost the Democrats the

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

t wasn’t that long ago — a mere five years, in fact — that Louisiana stood out among southern states as a Democratic stronghold, a “blue” island surrounded by a “red” sea. At this point in 2006, Democrats held six of seven state offices and one U.S. Senate seat. Today, only one statewide elected official is a Democrat: U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu. The Democrats’ woes don’t end there. Qualifying for a host of state and local offices is Tuesday through Thursday (Sept. 6-8), and the Blue Party is virtually devoid of standard bearers in statewide contests. Though some have flirted with the idea, no major (read: well-financed) candidate has emerged to carry the Democratic banner against Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal. (See, “Holy Snoozer, Batman,” p. 24.) Most other statewide GOP incumbents could enjoy the same fate. While that normally would elicit a chorus of hurrahs among GOP loyalists, the dearth of Democratic opponents doesn’t mean that all Republican incumbents will get a free ride. In

17


TRUNK SHOWDOWN

P

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Governor’s Mansion, which then led to many other problems for Democrats.” A year before Bobby Jindal’s juggernaut victory in the 2007 gubernatorial primary, Republican state Sen. Jay Dardenne won a special election as secretary of state, and Republican state Rep. Jim Donelon won a special election as commissioner of insurance. Along with Jindal capturing the Governor’s Mansion, the GOP won five of seven statewide offices up for grabs in ’07. In one instance, state Treasurer John Kennedy switched from Democrat to Republican shortly before qualifying and won re-election easily. Since then, the two statewide offices won by Democrats in 2007 have gone Republican. Attorney General Buddy Caldwell, who was elected as a Democrat, switched to the GOP, and Dardenne won a special election for lieutenant governor when Democrat

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Former GOP congressman Anh “Joseph” Cao has said he plans to run for attorney general. On top of all that, Mann says, the recent round of reapportionment and redistricting solidified the GOP’s hold on the Legislature and most Bayou State congressional seats. Republicans enjoy a majority in both the state House and Senate for the first time since Reconstruction. So what’s left for Republicans to do but beat up on one another … much as Democrats used to do when the GOP was a marginal factor in statewide politics? That’s exactly what we’ll see in the races for lieutenant governor and secretary of state — and possibly attorney general. It’s shaping up as one helluva show.

Incumbent Attorney General Buddy Caldwell switched from Democrat to the GOP after he was elected and may face off against fellow Republican Anh “Joseph” Cao. Mitch Landrieu won the 2010 mayor’s race in New Orleans. Dardenne was succeeded as secretary of state by his top assistant, Tom Schedler, also a Republican. Add to all that Barack Obama’s election as president in 2008. “For many reasons, including race, Obama’s election drove more nominal white Democrats into the arms of Republicans,” Mann says. “Obama got only 14 percent of Louisiana’s white vote, so I think it’s pretty clear that he’s really hurting the Democrats in Louisiana as the standard bearer of the party.” Baton Rouge-based political pollster Bernie Pinsonat of Southern Media and Opinion Research agrees. “Put Barack Obama’s picture next to a picture of a Democratic candidate in Louisiana, and he or she loses just about every time,” says Pinsonat, who has worked for Republican as well as Democratic candidates.

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser, a Republican, is running for lieutenant governor. BECAUSE OF JINDAL’S OBVIOUS national ambitions, many view the race for lieutenant governor as a race for governor. Few expect Jindal to complete his second term. At least, not if he has anything to say about it. That makes Dardenne’s reelection effort a de facto race for governor. The only thing it lacks, at least as of a week before qualifying, is a large field. PAGE 20


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Democrat Caroline Fayard has hinted she may enter the race for secretary of state.

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Dardenne, 57, is a former Baton Rouge state senator who captured the secretary of state’s job in 2006 after Fox McKeithen died in office. Dardenne defeated a Democratic colleague, thenstate Sen. Francis Heitmeier of Algiers, and former GOP state chair Mike Francis, an arch-conservative businessman from Crowley who questioned Dardenne’s conservative bona fides. Dardenne beat Democrats Caroline Fayard and state Sen. Butch Gautreaux — as well as four more “conservative” Republicans — in the special election for lieutenant governor last year. Once again, his credentials as a “true conservative” were called into question. That’s the script again this year, only this time it’s shaping up as a headto-head contest between Dardenne and Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser. And Nungesser already has pulled in a major endorsement — from U.S. Sen. David Vitter, who is making a play for control of the state party. Jindal has not issued an endorsement in the lieutenant governor’s race. In fact, many suspect he favors Nungesser — but the governor has been quiet on this and other fronts lately. Moreover, Jindal has shown sev-

eral times since taking office that he has no coattails. Not so for Vitter. In addition to flexing his muscle, Vitter is settling an old score. In the wake of the senator’s prostitution scandal, Dardenne flirted with running against Vitter. On top of all that, Nungesser has a load of personal money to throw at the race. For his part, Nungesser makes quite a target his own self. Federal investigators are looking at contracts, FEMA project worksheets and other parish records that were the subject of a scathing state legislative audit last year. The audit concluded that Nungesser may have violated the law when he approved certain contracts for hurricane recovery work without approval of the Plaquemines Parish Council. The feds are said to be looking at parish payroll records as well. In his defense, Nungesser said at the time that the parish was under a post-Katrina emergency declaration that authorized him to sign the contracts. No doubt Dardenne will use the audit against Nungesser. Neither man has been shy about breaking out the long knives. Nungesser, 52, was first elected Plaquemines Parish president in 2006 and re-elected last year. “I feel we need somebody more engaged, with more energy, somebody who’s not gonna say, ‘That’s not my job’ when there’s a crisis,” he says, adding that Dardenne

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was virtually invisible during the BP oil disaster, which gave Nungesser a national profile. “If you care enough, you can do so much more.” Dardenne scoffs at that suggestion. “I was secretary of state when the BP oil spill happened,” he says. “I was doing my job as secretary of state. The responsibilities of that job did not require me to jump in front of a TV camera like he did.” PAGE 22


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Nungesser’s primary theme, like others before him, will be that Dardenne is not a “true conservative.” He says Dardenne was not anti-abortion as a state senator and that he voted for taxes — particularly the Stelly tax reform plan of a decade ago. Vitter’s endorsement of Nungesser echoed that theme. Dardenne’s reply: “This is a ploy that’s been used by my previous Republican opponents. I’ve been elected statewide three times. I have refuted those allegations each time. Anyone who knows me knows of my conservative credentials.” Dardenne took some swipes of his own, noting that Nungesser

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House Speaker Jim Tucker is running for secretary of state against incumbent Tom Schedler, a fellow Republican. endorsed him a year ago after initially considering a run for lieutenant governor. Dardenne also pointed out Nungesser’s contributions to several high-profile “liberal Democrats,” including California’s U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer. “I wrote checks to help the lady who was the chair of the Senate committee that could influence the Army Corps of Engineers,” Nungesser says. “We needed her to help us. … I did everything possible to help my parish and my state. That wasn’t good for my political career, but I’d do it again to help my parish and my state to get the flood protection that we need.” Regarding his endorsement of Dardenne last year, Nungesser says he backed St. Tammany Parish President Kevin Davis in the primary, then supported Dardenne against a Democrat. “I backed Jay because I’m a conservative Republican,” he says. “But if you look at Jay’s voting record, he’s not a conservative Republican.” This race is just warming up. It’s going to get a lot hotter by Oct. 22. THE CONTEST FOR SECRETARY OF state promises to be equally intense, with the possibility of a Democratic

entry as well. Fayard, who made an impressive show against Dardenne in the race for lieutenant governor in 2010, has hinted she may run against interim incumbent Schedler this year. If she runs, she could be the most — or the only — high-profile Democrat on the statewide ballot. Fayard told Gambit last week that she will announce her intentions this week. She offered no hint as to what her decision might be. Meanwhile, House Speaker Jim Tucker already is running against fellow Republican Schedler. Here again, it didn’t take long for the fireworks to begin. The day Tucker announced, Schedler unloaded on the speaker for supporting the ill-fated legislative pay raise of 2008. “Not only did he vote for it, but he also was the author and the ringleader of the effort to pass it,” Schedler says of Tucker. Actually, the bill’s author was thenstate Sen. Ann Duplessis. When told that, Schedler said, “He must have handled it on the House floor.” Tucker doesn’t deny supporting the pay raise, but he notes it was vetoed by Jindal and since then has died down as an issue. Schedler points to at least one recent statewide poll that shows the vast majority of voters would not support lawmakers who voted for the raise. “We made a mistake in making it effective for the same term,” Tucker says of the raise. “We fixed that by passing a constitutional amendment, and we got no raise. At the end of the day, we heard from our constituents and fixed it. And I said from the beginning that I was not going to take [the raise]. I was always going to give mine to charity.” Tucker pauses, then adds, “Those in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.” That’s an allusion to the fact that the former senator had two simultaneous homestead exemptions in St. Tammany

Incumbent state Treasurer John Kennedy, a Republican, has no challengers.


Incumbent Tom Schedler is seeking re-election as secretary of state.

Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain, a Republican, seems headed for re-election unchallenged. endorsed Tucker several weeks ago, as did the state sheriffs’ association. The state assessors group has endorsed both men. Both Tucker and Schedler promise to do more to improve voter turnout and to make the office more user friendly for businesses. Tucker adds a shot at Schedler for closing down museums as a result of a budget cut. Schedler notes that the budget was cut by the Legislature — led in part by Tucker. IF THERE’S ANOTHER RACE WITH THE potential for fireworks, it’s the one for attorney general. Incumbent Buddy Caldwell won the job in 2007 as a Democrat, then switched parties earlier this year. Even as a Democrat, Caldwell ingratiated himself to Republicans by joining GOP attorneys general from other states in challenging President Obama’s health care reforms. Caldwell was the first Democratic AG to do so. Former Republican Congressman Anh “Joseph” Cao recently announced his plans to run against Caldwell, but since then he made a failed bid for state education superintendent. Cao did not return Gambit’s calls to his office and cellphone. Cao’s website proclaims, “The people of Louisiana deserve better from our Attorney General. We need a principled leader who will crack down on government malfeasance and white collar crimes, enforce the jurisdiction of the Louisiana Constitution, and who will fight to hold BP fully accountable for the damage they’ve done to our economy,

our environment, and our people.” Caldwell issued a statement to Gambit noting he is “now in the middle of a very large suit to make sure that BP and other responsible parties properly compensate Louisiana and the citizens of our great state for damages caused by the Deep Water Horizon Oil Spill disaster. I am also working to ensure those who manufactured toxic Chinese drywall are held responsible for the damages they have caused to our state.” Cao put up $100,000 of his own money when he announced but has shown little in the way of fundraising since. As of late July, Caldwell had nearly $500,000 on hand — and the ability to raise a lot more in a hurry if needed. Caldwell also picked up several key GOP endorsements, including that of Vitter. Farther down the statewide ballot, the three other GOP incumbents may have an even easier time getting re-elected than Jindal. As of press time, no one had announced against Treasurer John Kennedy, Insurance Commissioner Jim Donelon or Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain. In many ways, this year’s statewide ballot will be a mirror image of what it used to be like for Democrats before the 1970s. Back then, all the action was on the Democratic side; the GOP barely registered — literally and figuratively. Democrats still have more registered voters than the GOP, at least officially, but the voting patterns clearly favor Republicans. “The Republicans are entering new territory,” says pollster Pinsonat. “They have fewer and fewer Democrats to run against, so they’re running against each other — just as Democrats used to do. The term ‘RINO’ — Republican In Name Only — is now a hot-button campaign issue.” That, and anything else candidates can throw at one another.

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Parish, which is not legal. The exemptions were the subject of an investigative report on WWL-TV. “I can understand someone getting two exemptions for one year,” Tucker says. “That can be an honest mistake. But two or three years in a row?” In this contest as well, Vitter has come down against the incumbent. He

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“Does a man’s reach exceed his grasp? Depends on what he reaches for.” — Batman

24

ake no mistake: Gov. Bobby Jindal is the Batman of the fall ballot and all of Louisiana is his Gotham. Jindal even has his Alfred in Timmy Teepell, one of the brightest GOP minds in the nation, back on the trail this go around, not as campaign manager but as strategist and consultant. Jindal also has a pile of cash that’s as big as all other statewide candidates’ war chests combined — just like Bruce Wayne’s fortune — and it buys him lots of cool stuff like commercials, donor databases and interns. They’re both men of mystery, Jindal and Batman. They share ties to DC — the Hill and the comics publisher, that is — but the analogy starts to fade after that. The governor wouldn’t stand a chance against Killer Croc, and Batman would have little chance against Bayou state lawmakers. So why all the Batman references? It’s about the only way to make this year’s race for governor interesting — and less irrelevant than the comings and goings of ex-Gov. Edwin Edwards. To help you dive into the narrative, here’s a primer.

M

THE CHARACTERS

The Incumbent: Bobby Jindal wants a second term, and he’s likely

Gov. Bobby Jindal, Republican to get it. He rode into office on a wave of unprecedented support from Christian voters and rural areas in north Louisiana, a blueprint crafted by Teepell that remains in high gear today. Although his name is no longer mentioned in connection with the 2012 presidential election, Jindal’s national ambitions cannot be ignored. Recent weeks have seen him raising money in Minnesota and New York. The Challenger: Tara Hollis is a Democrat from Haynesville. Until


!

recently, she was employed as a fulltime schoolteacher. She stepped out of the classroom to make as serious a run as she can against Jindal. Without other viable options, Democrats have warmed to Hollis, who may have a future in politics after all this is over. She’s also another example — in addition to New Orleans attorney Caroline Fayard and governor-turned-mentor Kathleen Blanco — of why women may yet play a big role in crafting the New Louisiana Democratic Party. The Dabbler: State Sen. Rob Marionneaux of Livonia, another Dem, has been dipping his toes in the gubernatorial waters for months. He even commissioned a poll, which showed what everyone else already knew: that Jindal is kind of like Batman — flawed but popular. At press time, Marionneaux had still not announced his intentions. Most expect him not to make the race, which virtually hands Jindal a second term.

THE SUPERPOWERS

PLOT LINES Jindal’s campaign bought up TV time statewide last month for the governor’s latest commercial. It focuses on job creation, which is the theme of Jindal’s re-election campaign. The new ad is a 30-second spot called “Spirit of Louisiana.” It highlights major economic

A Celebration of Six Years of Recovery Broadmoor Development Corporation’s First Gala Fundraiser

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$100 in advance, $125 at the door Call Alyssa at 504 • 309 • 2571 or alyssa@broadmoorcorp.com Tara Hollis, Democrat developments in practically every corner of the state. Hollis is taking a different approach. She’s taking Jindal to task on his “gold standard in ethics and transparency” — a reference to the governor’s package of ethics and transparency bills that seemed to tighten the screws on everyone but the governor. In addition, she’s targeting the state’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program. Recent media reports have shown that many participants have been saddled with substandard work while others continue to wait on checks. A contractor connected to the program has been arrested for fraud. Administration officials have taken responsibility for oversights and contend the problems are being addressed. If Jindal had an opponent with real money and a taste for blood, this scandal could have cost him. But with no money to get her message out, Hollis is not likely to land any body blows on Jindal. The governor’s ongoing efforts to privatize some state services (such as the Office of Group Benefits) have likewise given Hollis a line of attack, but that topic, while important to state workers, strikes most voters as a yawner. The story line behind this narrative is … no story. At least one political expert says that’s no surprise. “The first and most important explanation for the lack of competition for the office of governor is that Bobby Jindal has done a decent job PAGE 26

Honorary Co - Chairs

Verna Landrieu, Moon Landrieu & Walter Isaacson

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

In this story line, money is the root of all power, and Jindal stands alone in that category. According to his July 14 campaign finance report, the governor has nearly $9 million in the bank, $2 million of which he raised this year. That’s a daunting figure. If, as expected, Jindal fails to draw a more serious challenger by the time qualifying closes at 5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8, it will be difficult for him to spend even half that amount between then and election day, Oct. 22. Even if he spends $1 million a week, he’d still have about $3 million left at the end of the day. Hollis has a more interesting financial narrative. She has raised only $3,500 thus far. Talk about David and Goliath. In late July, she reported to the state Ethics Administration a mere $950 in the bank. So far she has spent only $2,400, but Hollis has benefited from much more in free media exposure. Blanco, for her part, has been shaking the bushes to help Hollis raise money in recent weeks. Marionneaux had about $209,000 in his war chest in late April (the last reporting date for state lawmakers). He raised $36,000 last year and spent $15,000.

You are cordially invited to attend

25


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

page 25

26

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overall, as rated by the voters,” says Pearson Cross, chair of the Political Science Department at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette. “A corollary of this is that Bobby Jindal is a Republican governor in a state that has become majority Republican. … Although some of the bloom is off the rose, as revealed by recent polls, there is no major impetus to replace Bobby Jindal because of his performance in office.” Cross adds that Jindal is “adept at making sure the public knows about his successes and the areas where Louisiana is progressing.” A second explanation for Jindal’s lack of opposition, says Cross, is money. “Twenty or 30 years ago it was still possible to run for governor with a regional base, either in New Orleans, Acadiana, or north Louisiana,” Cross says. “Politicians who had only regional visibility could expect to gain the necessary visibility (and stature) through the campaign process and the informal networks that traditionally elected governors — sheriffs’ associations, courthouse gangs, and the Democratic Party organizations. “Today, politicians with only regional bases have difficulty running successfully for governor because what it takes to get elected has changed. Instead of an appeal to various groups and elites, today the gubernatorial hopeful has to have the money to make big media buys in all of the eight markets in Louisiana. Thus, a statewide campaign for a relative unknown has an entry fee of perhaps $2 million just to purchase credibility and name recognition with no guarantee of electoral success.” Viewing the current landscape through that prism, Cross says there are no candidates with a viable chance of unseating Jindal. “Looking down the road,” he says, “the race to succeed Bobby Jindal is being waged now, with the jockeying for the most important and visible down-ticket positions. Thus, the real action in this year’s election is for the lieutenant governor’s seat and the secretary of state’s seat.”

And then? If there’s no need for a runoff after the Oct. 22 primary, several peripheral questions will soon be answered. Political insiders already are wondering if Teepell will return as Jindal’s chief of staff. Teepell took a temporary leave earlier this year to run Republican campaigns in other states,

State Sen. Rob Marionneaux, Democrat and his performance only boosted demand for his services. When he left this time, he cleaned out his office completely and has yet to commit to being part of the next Jindal administration. Sources say Teepell could move to Washington to join the GOP’s professional campaign staff, which will focus on U.S. Senate races in 2012. From there, he could make even more friends for his protege, Bobby Jindal. And then there’s Jindal. As soon as the votes are counted, speculation will begin as to his next move. Will he be asked to be part of a GOP ticket next year? If not, but if a Republican wins the White House, will he land a Cabinet job? And if nothing comes his way in 2012, will he run against U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu in 2014? Many say that third option is the most likely scenario. But that means he’ll have to serve another three years as governor — and a lot could happen in those three years. Batman has remained popular through the generations, but few Louisiana governors have been able to keep voters happy through two terms. Whatever the future holds for Bobby Jindal, his story will remain a pageturner — even if the current plot line has more “YAWN!” than “POW!” Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 33 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

FILM

39

ART

42

STAGE

48

Katy Perry with Janelle Monae

EVENTS

49

CUISINE

55

SEPT

08

Katy Perry’s “California Dreams” tour gets downright cerebral with support from Janelle Monae, the diminutive R&B visionary who upstaged the main-stagers at the 2010 Voodoo Music Experience and whose Fritz Lang-obsessed, “Tightrope”-walking, flashbackto-the-future 2010 LP The ArchAndroid should sound fresh for another half-century or so. Tickets $47.60-$62.90 (includes fees). 7:30 p.m. Thursday. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3822; www.neworleansarena.com

New Orleans Seafood Festival

TROMBONE SHORTY RELEASES A NEW ALBUM BY ROGER HAHN n last year’s Backatown, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews made his major-label debut by pulling off the difficult feat of blending New Orleans roots music with contemporary R&B and hip-hop influences. His follow-up, For True, hits the streets Tuesday, Sept. 13, and it follows the same basic formula as Backatown, but with a harder-edged, more aggressive sound, deeper songwriting and more confident playing from start to finish. It also features an impressive line-up of guest stars, including Jeff Beck, Kid Rock, Warren Haynes, Lenny Kravitz, Ivan Neville, and R&B phenom Ledisi. The array of co-writers — from Kid Rock and Ledisi to Cyril Neville and Lamont Dozier of the legendary Motown writing team Holland-Dozier-Holland — is equally impressive. After touring almost constantly behind his mainstream success, Shorty will bring it all back home Monday night with an album-release party at Tipitina’s that promises to be a real New Orleans musical throwdown. For True opens with “Buckjump” — built on horn blasts from the Rebirth Brass Band and rhythm-track rapping from 5th Ward Weebie — and the album is loaded with references to Big Easy street culture on cuts like “Dumaine St.,” “Mrs. Orleans,” “Big 12” (for Andrews’ dad), and “Unc” (for Treme Brass Band stalwart “Uncle” Lionel Batiste), as well as a couple of

O

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue release For True next week. PHOTO BY KIRK EDWARDS

short musical interludes — “Lagniappe, (Part 1)” and “Lagniappe, (Part 2)” — featuring Galactic drummer Stanton Moore. But it’s the songwriting collaborations that really stand out, especially on “Do to Me,” which features Jeff Beck and was the album’s first single, released in August, and “Roses,” both co-written with Boston singer/songwriter Ryan Montbleau. Some of the lyrics on “Roses,” a melodic follow-up to Backatown’s gorgeous “One Night Only” — also cowritten with Montbleau — reference Andrews longing for the Crescent City: “I got on a plane in Amsterdam/ And set my sights on Japan/ Touched down and looked out over the sea/ I’m thinking about home again.” “Yeah, I miss New Orleans all the time,” Andrews says, during a call from a tour bus weaving through northern New England. “I feel like I’ve traveled the world, but I haven’t seen it. Someday I’m going to find the time to go back and revisit places without my instrument and just really enjoy it, and learn a little about the history. But right now, as long as I can stay healthy and my lips stay in shape, I’m going to continue doing what I’ve already been doing for the last 20 years. I’m on a mission, really, to represent New Orleans and all the great music it’s brought to the world. I definitely want to be one of those people to let the world know New Orleans is still alive, and that it’s still kickin’.” All the time on the road was a contributing factor PAGE 31

9-11

The New Orleans Seafood Festival fills Lafayette Square with live music, art vendors, cooking demonstrations and food and drink for a long weekend. Performers include Kermit Ruffins (pictured) & the Barbecue Swingers, Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys, Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew and others. Free admission. 4 p.m.-8 p.m. Fri., 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Sat., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun. Lafayette Square, 500 St. Charles Ave.; www.neworleansseafoodfestival.com

Jitney

SEPT

09

In the eighth play in August Wilson’s Pittsburgh cycle, Becker (Will Williams) runs a gypsy cab company that serves the Hill District, a neighborhood many licensed cabs avoid. When his son Booster (Sam Malone) comes home from prison, their garage erupts in turmoil at the same time as the city is threatening to close down the unlicensed company. Tickets $20, $18 students/seniors. 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 3 p.m. Sun. 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com

Vivian Girls with Widowspeak and Au Ras Au Ras

SEPT

11

Still learning to play their guitars on their first two paintpeelers, Brooklyn’s Vivian Girls sound almost accomplished on their third release, March’s Share the Joy (Polyvinyl), a dashing ensemble of girl-group flirts, psychedelic haze and garaged fury. Fellow New Yorkers Widowspeak and New Orleans’ Au Ras Au Ras open. Tickets $8. 10 p.m. Sunday. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855 PAGE 31

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Get Shorty

SEPT

29


PAGE 29

to For True’s harder-edged sound, Shorty says. “All the touring makes getting to the studio the hardest part now. We didn’t have much time in the studio to record this one. So the sound is probably more a direct impact of touring and playing as hard as we can.” The band has grown into its increasing stature and the trappings that come with it, including studio resources. But Andrews is still growing. “I don’t really feel comfortable yet doing a whole set of lyrics, so on that part I’ll reach out to other people, and work with them,” he says. “What I’m trying to do, when I go into the studio, is to try and make music that people, who’ve never seen us live and might not know New Orleans music, can still really relate to.” Touring isn’t new for Andrews, but it did help him think about music differently. “Right before I went on tour with Lenny Kravitz in 2005, I started listening to music less as a student and more as an audience member. Touring with Lenny gave me a real understanding of what I wanted to do, which is to make the music interesting to someone who doesn’t necessarily understand how that music works, what’s going on inside

it. Basically, I’m trying to give the audience music that has the stuff I want in it, but can still be something they can easily understand.” Regardless of his ability to translate New Orleans music for contemporary pop consumption or the crowd of rock ’n’ roll headliners he now mingles with, he’s still the same Trombone Shorty locals have known for years — who made his New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival debut at 4 years old, appearing onstage with a delightfully surprised Bo Diddley. When asked about Monday night’s homecoming album-release show, he said the only name on the guest list he was sure of besides Ivan Neville, whose hometown band Dumpstaphunk opens the proceedings, was 5th Ward Weebie. “But,” he said, the anticipation clear in his voice, “you never know who’s going to come walking through the door that night. I mean, this is New Orleans, you know?”

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THE

PAGE 29

Culture Collision

SEPT

07

Is He Dead?

SEPT

09

In 1897, Mark Twain famously told a reporter “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated,” and a year later he penned Is He Dead?, in which an impoverished painter fakes his own death to finally make some money off his art while he masquerades as a woman. The comedy was discovered in 2002 and is being staged by the NOLA Project in cooperation with the UNO Department of Film, Theatre and Communication Arts. Tickets $12 general admission, $8 seniors/students/ UNO faculty and staff. 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2:30 p.m. Sun., through Sept 18. UNO, Robert E. Nims Theatre, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, 280-7469; www.nolaproject.com

Eden Brent

SEPT

10

Pianist Eden Brent made her mark in blues, collecting several awards following her 2008 release Mississippi Number One. Her follow-up, 2010’s Ain’t Got No Troubles, was recorded in New Orleans (with the help of bassist George Porter Jr. and Hammond B3 master Jon Cleary), and its boogie woogie sound is sunny, joyous and at times a bit jazzy. Tickets $12. 9 p.m. Saturday. Chickie Wah Wah, 2828 Canal St., 304-4714; www.chickiewahwah.com

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 06 > 2011

Local performing and visual arts organizations and nonprofts host a happy hour/ season preview at the New Orleans Museum of Art. More than 50 organizations from theaters and dance groups to museums and arts festivals will offer information about upcoming events, season subscriptions and ticket and membership deals. At 8 p.m., the party moves to the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, where DJ Matty will spin music and there will be a cash bar. Free admission. 5:30 p.m.-10 p.m. Wednesday. NOMA, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle; www. culturenola.org

31


LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

A True MID-CITY

MUSIC

NEIGHBORHOOD

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 6 BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Company, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 9 BLUE NILE — Dana Jessen & Friends, 10

BMC — Spillway, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic & Matt El DeOrazio, 7; Alijah Jett & the Perfect Forth, 11 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 GENNARO’S — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jason Marsalis, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 6

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — Michael Hebert, 8; The Emilonius Quartet, 9

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 6; Soul Project, 9:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell & Thais Clark, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

SIBERIA — Endall, Ancient VVisdom, Ryan McKern, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 10:30 BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Nervous Duane, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tom McDermott & Meschiya Lake, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 DISH ON HAYNE — Kermit Ruffins, 6

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

HOUSE OF BLUES — Hank III, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hope Toun, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

SIBERIA — Deadbeat Darling, Blackbelt Band, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, 12 THREE MUSES — Mike Hood, 4:30; Mario Abney, 7

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 8 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & Friends, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 9

BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Lil’red and Big Bad, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Texas Funeral, 11 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

ONE EYED JACKS — O’Death, Why Are We Building Such A Big Ship?, 10

WED

THE REVEALERS 09 REGGAE NIGHT SEP

10

SEP

9PM

CHRONIC DEATH SLUG

W/ CHAOS AEON AND THE DEVILS RAIN

10PM

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till FRI:

Ladies Night- FREE Drinks Domestic & Well

SAT:

Karaoke

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

KERRY IRISH PUB — Paul Tobin, 10 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Traveler, 7; The Abney Effect, 10; Strange Roux & Grant Watts (upstairs), 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli Band, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30

MON 9/5

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 9/6

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 9/7

Up Close & Personal

THU The Trio featuring 9/8 Johnny V & Special Guests FRI 9/9

Flow Tribe

SAT 9/10

Good Enough For Good TImes

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 9/11 & 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

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BLUE NILE — Aloke Dutta, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

08 POCKET ACES BRASS BAND 9PM

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

07 U.S. NEROS & FRIENDS

SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

KERRY IRISH PUB — Patrick Cooper, 9

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

SEP

TUE

RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 8

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30

9PM

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny J feat. Derek Huston, 8:30

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 6

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Up Close & Personal feat. Cornell Williams & Big D Perkins, 10

SEP

THU

THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, Reverend Robert Rockefeller, 7:30

06 WASHINGTON

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — Marc Stone Band, 7

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WED 9/7

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THUR 9/8

PAUL TOBIN (POST SAINTS GAME) 10PM CHIP WILSON 5PM HURRICANE REFUGEES 9PM SPEED THE MULE 5PM HESSLA 9PM BETH PATTERSON 8PM

FRI 9/9 SAT 9/10 SUN 9/11

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HALF WAY TO ST. PATRICK’S DAY WEEKEND COMING SOON!!

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

HOUSE OF BLUES — Black Star, Stooges Brass Band, 8

BAYOU PARK BAR — U.S. Nero & Friends, 9

SEP WALTER FREE BLTS “WOLFMAN”

FRI

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

BANKS STREET BAR — Micah Mckee’s Songwriters Showcase, 8; Major Bacon, 10

MUSIC BAR

SAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Wednesday 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

33


MUSIC

LISTINGS

NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Katy Perry, Janelle Monae, 7:30

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — Ogden After Hours feat. Helen Gillet, 6

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

WED 9/07

BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

BLACK & GOLD

THU GAME DAY PARTY 9/08 $2 HIGHLIFE & PBR FRI

9/09

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 9:30

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. Phillip Manuel, 6

BROWN SAT IMPROV COMEDY 8:30PM 9/10 MAINLINE BRASS BAND 10:30PM

608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

HOUSE OF BLUES — Los Lonely Boys, 9

ROYAL PALM — Philip Melancon Jr., 6:30

SIBERIA — Cough, Fat Stupid Ugly People, Impressionable Youth, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — John Rankin, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

TARPON JOE’S BAR AND GRILL — Minus Linus, 9:30 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

34

Friday 9

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FRIDAY • 9/9 • 9 pm

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S H a M r O C K Pa r T Y. C O M

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

gAme RentAls • PBR PInts jameSon ShotS

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

3-6pm DAILY • happy hour $2 mondayS

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

FOUNTAIN PARK CENTRE — Burger ’N’ Fries, 7

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Nero, Cookie Monsta, Shanook, Unicorn Fukr, 9

TBA

THE CYPRESS — Awaken December, Iridescence, & Bear, The Gentleman, 7

BANKS STREET BAR — Electric Hamhock, Bunga, 9 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

BAYOU PARK BAR — Revealers, 9 BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Mumbles, 9; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10:30 BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Senayit, 8; Troy Turner Band, 10; The SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 12:30 a.m. BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Nick Ray, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Meta the Man, Dongles, King Ray, 7; Alternate Resodant, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5:30

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30

CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5

HERMES BAR — Ingrid Lucia, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Signal Path, Floozies, Said Sound, Young Hedons, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Rusty Brothers, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — David Reis, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Meschiya Lake, midnight JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 5; Hurricane Refugees, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFAYETTE SQUARE — New Orleans Seafood Festival feat. Stooges Brass Band, 4:30; Rockin’ Dopsie Jr., 6:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7; Clockwork Elvis, 10

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Blair Crimmins, 10; Young Fellaz Brass Band, midnight

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Flow Tribe, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30; Mumbles, 12:30 a.m.

OAK — Cristina Perez, 6; Jayna Morgan, 10

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Thomas Johnson & the People, 9:30 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Way Goners, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Top Cats, 9:30 SIBERIA — Goatwhore, Parabellum, Serpentis, BlowerMotor, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Herlin Riley & Friends, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Ben Polcer, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — The Rat Pack tribute show, 8

THREE MUSES — John Royen, 4; Debbie Davis, 6:30; Jason Stewart, 10 TIPITINA’S — DJ Soul Sister’s Birthday Jam feat. David Torkanowsky, Walter “Wolfman” Washington, Terrence Houston, Roderick Paulin, Shane Theriot, Khris Royal & DJ Soul Sister, 10

TULANE UNIVERSITY — Star & Micey, 4

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 10 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Carlo Ditta Blues Trio feat. John Sinclair, 9 ATCHAFALAYA — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. BANKS STREET BAR — Snow Blind feat. Ronnie Snow, Unfinished Bizness, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

BAYOU PARK BAR — Chronic Death Slug, Chaos Aeon, The Devil’s Rain, 10

BLUE NILE — Kristina Morales, 7; Strange Roux, White Colla Crimes, 9; Spyboy CD release feat. Karl Denson, 10

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Treme Funktet feat. Corey Henry, 9:30; Ashton & The Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Joe Krown, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson & Camille Baudoin, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Revenants, 7; Bass Line Bums, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Eden Brent, 9

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers, 9

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 THE CYPRESS — Bellaport, Yellow Light Accelerators, Streetcar Samba, 7

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — George French Band, 10 DRY DOCK CAFE — Some Like it Hot!, 7

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 PAGE 36


IRVIN MAYFIELD’S NOJO JAM

MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 34

preview

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

Every Wednesday at 8PM New Orleans’ Premier Jazz Venue

NO COVER • 7 NIGHTS A WEEk • 8PM MON-SAT • 7PM SUNDAYS

SUNDAY

4, 11, 18, 25

SEPTEMBER 2011 7PM TYLER’S REVISITED FEATURING

GERMAINE BAZZLE & PAUL LONGSTRETH

MONDAY 8PM THE ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND

5, 12, 19, 26

TUESDAYS 9/6 & 9/20 9/13 9/27 WEDNESDAY

ALEXEY MARTI & URBAN

MINDS

GERALD FRENCH

8PM

JASON MARSALIS THE SESSION THE DAVID PULPHUS GROUP 8PM

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S NOJO WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

THURSDAY 1, 8, 15, 22, 29

FRIDAY

Saturday, Sept 10 - 8PM irvinmayfield.com

7, 14, 21, 28

WITH SPECIAL GUEST

JAM

8PM SHAMARR ALLEN 8PM

2, 9, 16, 23, 30

LEON “kID CHOCOLATE” BROWN

SATURDAYS 9/3 9/10 & 9/24 9/17

8PM

JOE kROWN SWING BAND ALEXEY MARTI & URBAN MINDS SHANNON POWELL

300 BOURBON STREET • NEW ORLEANS 504.553.2299 • WWW.SONESTA.COM

For schedule updates follow us on:

IMJazzPlayhouse

DeaD nation presents

Star Power

Before Mos Def (pictured) became a movie star and one of the world’s best MCs for one Rawkus Records release in 1998, he and Talib Kweli were Black Star: an ephemeral duo whose eponymous joint debut sold poorly but told plenty — of mutual appreciation for their color and culture, and of mutual opposition to the murderous factions that at the time were threatening to consume hip hop like a cancer. Both warmer and cooler, more melodic and less canonical than Mos’ emphatic follow-up Black on Both Sides, it skillfully borrows from all manners of black artists — Slick Rick to Gil-Scott Heron, Boogie Down Productions to Toni Morrison — to weave a celebratory mosaic of black artistry. Musically, it’s a two-man brass band, with Mos the tuba, all choppy and blustery, and Kweli the trumpet, smooth and unflappable. Lyrically, Mos separates himself as a self-professed “real-life documentarian,” dividing his staccato chides like a metric savant: “I find it’s distressing, there’s never no in-between/ We either n—s or kings, we either bitches or queens/ The deadly ritual seems/ immersed in the perverse/ Full of short attention spans, short tempers and short skirts.” The pair’s divergent paths have made the long-promised Black Star 2 into a carrot on a string (it was first announced in 2005). With this surprise monthlong tour — billed as a start-to-finish Black Star performance — that string is getting shorter. The Stooges Brass Band opens. Tickets $43. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

SEPT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

06

36

Black Star 8 p.m. Tuesday House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

w / KYle turleY Band

50 Years of hits on sale now!

HERMES BAR — Leroy Jones Quartet, 9:30

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — New Orleans Artists Against Hunger and Homelessness Benefit feat. Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs, Khris Royal & Dark Matter, Stooges Brass Band, 8 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Alexey Marti & Urban Minds, 8; Hot 8 Brass Band, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

october 2, 2011 Mahalia Jackson theater 801 N. RampaRt StReet, New ORleaNS, la

7pM • all ages

ticketS alSO at all ticketmaSteR OutletS, the mahalia JackSON BOx Office, OR By calliNg 1-800-745-3000

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed The Mule, 5; HessLA, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFAYETTE SQUARE — New Orleans Seafood Festival feat. Vivaz, 11 a.m.; Amanda Shaw & the Cute Guys, 1; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 3; The

Wise Guys, 5; Jon Cleary’s Philthy Phew, 6:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. T’Canaille, 2; Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 9:30

THE MAISON — Kelcy Mae, 5; Ramblin’ Letters, 7; Enharmonic Souls, 10; Jermaine Quiz (upstairs), 10; One Mind Brass Band, midnight

SIBERIA — Giant Cloud, Hawks, Astorian Stigmata, 8

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; The SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 11

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Good Enough for Good Times, 10

SMITTY’S AFTER HOURS — Mo Jelly Band, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Topsy Chapman & Solid Harmony, 8 & 10

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — The Rat Pack tribute show, 8

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

THREE MUSES — Lisa Lynn, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

OAK — Andrew Duhon, 9

OLD POINT BAR — Ian Cunningham, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — My Graveyard Jaw, Country Fried, 9

RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Big Al & the Heavyweights, 9

TIPITINA’S — The Weepies, 8; Gravity A, P.Y.M.P., MC M@ Peoples, The Zen Lunatic, 11 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9


FILM

FEATURE

Best and Worst Summer Movies BY GEORGE PRENTICE

L

Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer star in The Help. PHOTO BY DALE ROBINETTE/© DREAMWORKS II DISTRIBUTION CO. LLC

Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2. The production values in the final installment of this modern classic were only surpassed by fine acting from these kids who grew up before our eyes. Raunch is still king (and sometimes queen) : R-rated comedies reigned supreme with The Hangover Part II, Bad Teacher and Horrible Bosses making us cringe and laugh at the same time. But Bridesmaids was the best of the bunch. It was a hoot, and a sequel can’t come soon enough. Not-so-super: Captain America wasn’t half bad. X-Men: First Class was pretty entertaining if you could ignore January Jones’ acting. The other guys in capes were pretty lame — Green Lantern and Thor were laughably bad. And memo to Ryan Reynolds: Take a break and stop making so many movies. Kid friendly? Really?: Kung Fu Panda 2, Judy Moody, Mr. Popper’s Penguins, Monte Carlo, The Smurfs, Glee Live. Ugh. In no particular order, I thought the best films of the summer of 2011 were Buck, Harry Potter, The Help, Midnight in Paris, Super 8, The Tree of Life and X Men: First Class. I thought the worst were those that couldn’t come close to meeting expectations: Cowboys and Aliens, Friends With Benefits, Larry Crowne, Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides and Transformers: Dark of the Moon. My overall grade for summer movies 2011 is a C plus. George Prentice is a writer for the Boise Weekly.

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A HAPPY MADISON PRODUCTION NICK SWARDSON “BUCKY LARSON: BORNMUSICTO BE A STAR” CHRISTINA MUSIC RICCI WITH DON JOHNSONWRITTENAND STEPHEN DORFF SUPERVISION BY MICHAEL DILBECK BRYAN BONWELL BY WADDY WACHTEL BY ADAM SANDLER & ALLEN COVERT & NICK SWARDSON PRODUCED BY ADAM SANDLER JACK GIARRAPUTO ALLEN COVERT NICK SWARDSON DAVID DORFMAN DIRECTED BY TOM BRADY starts fridaY, sePtemBer 9

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

ate August has its traditions: saying goodbye to baseball, sno-balls and lazing by the pool and saying hello to Saints gear, over-filled schedules and school backpacks. For moviegoers, August is all about transition. Most of the summer blockbusters have come and gone, and September clears the deck for what traditionally is Hollywood’s serious season. Most Oscar-worthy films are neatly packed into the calendar’s fourth quarter. But before we put away the summer of 2011, let’s examine a not-so-great and notso-terrible season at the movies. The past is always present: Some of the most critically and commercially successful efforts this summer took us back in time. It was a surprise to learn that World War II was won single-handedly by Captain America. What a shock to discover that the Cuban Missile Crisis was averted by none other than the X-Men. And it turns out that Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin kept a pretty big secret when they encountered Transformers while moonwalking in 1969. The most fun I had at the movies this summer was watching old-school Super 8, still my favorite film of the year thus far. And Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris turned out to be his most successful film in decades by having his hero — thank goodness it wasn’t him this time — step through a time portal, waltzing through the City of Lights with Cole Porter, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Pablo Picasso and Gertrude Stein. It was a total delight from a filmmaker I had given up on years ago. Pixar isn’t perfect: Cars wasn’t all that interesting, so it wasn’t surprising that no one was clamoring to see Cars 2. In the worst-reviewed and lowest-grossing Pixar flick in decades, this clunker was instantly forgettable. What a lemon. A first-rate disappearing act: Harry Potter said goodbye with class in Harry

39


FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Send in the Clowns

In Alex de la Iglesia’s absurdly dark, funny and violent The Last Circus, a family of performers can’t escape fascism and the Spanish Civil War. Javier’s father was a circus performer until he was conscripted to fight against the nationalists in the Civil War in 1937. In 1973, at the end of the Franco regime, Javier has lived a tragedy filled life and been resigned to the role of the sad clown. He is terroized by the sadistic happy clown Sergio and falls in love with Natalia, a beautiful acrobat married to Sergio. It opens Friday at Chalmette Movies.

UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX

OPENING FRIDAY BUCKY LARSON: BORN TO BE A STAR (R) — Nick Swardson

plays Bucky Larson, a nerd from the Midwest who moves to Hollywood to follow in his parents’ footsteps and become a porn star.

CONTAGION (R) — A lethal

airborne virus spreads rapidly across the world in the drama starring Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude Law, Kate Winslet and Laurence Fishburne.

THE LAST CIRCUS (R) — The Spanish Civil war overshadows a twisted love triangle between rival circus clowns and a trapeze artist. Chalmette Movies WARRIOR (R) — A man trains for a mixed martial arts tournament and is forced to confront his estranged older brother, a former MMA fighter.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS ABBOTT & COSTELLO: COLGATE COMEDY HOUR (NR) — The

cafe screens the comedymusical variety series. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

FUNNY GIRL (G) — Barbra Streisand stars in the 1968 biopic of comedian Fannie Brice, which traces her life from her early days in vaudeville to her career with the Ziegfeld Follies. Tickets $5.50. Noon Friday-Saturday and Sept. 14, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com THE ROOM (NR) — This “comedy” has been called “the Citizen Kane of bad movies.” Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 3631117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

WYNTON MARSALIS & ERIC CLAPTON PLAY THE BLUES (NR) — The film captures the

two musicians’ collaboration performance from Jazz at Lincoln Center. 7:30 p.m. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14, Wednesday.

Scan for movie times.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Bay’s giant robot series. AMC Palace 20, Grand

41


ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Faculty

exhibition, through Sept. 24. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com — “Ash

Column,” drawings by Angela Driscoll, through Oct. 2. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

Saturday

September 10th

2nd Saturday Each Month 10am - 4pm Local Art and Artists

on the Riverfront in Madisonville

madisonvilleartmarket.com

ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www.antieaugallery.com — “Gambling for Souls,” circus banners by Molly McGuire, through Oct. 10. Opening reception 6 p.m. Saturday. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Preci-

pice,” paintings and constructions by Kathleen Loe, through Oct. 1. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Blueprints: Reflections of Modern Design,” works on canvas by Nell Tilton, through Sept. 24. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

42

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com —

Paintings by Andrew Bucci, David Rex Joyner and Stephan Hoffpauir, through Sept. 24. Artists’ reception 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “And

the Earth Begot ...” works by Michele Basta, through Oct. 8. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE. 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com —

Works by Martin Wohlgemuth, Jules Chatelain and Wes Foreman. Artists’ reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wednesday.

DIGEST. 723 Louisa St.; www. digest.723louisa.org — Mono-

types, watercolor, paintings and mixed media by Patch Somerville, Cayla Zeek and Mark Waguespack, through September. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Fear is a Man’s

Best Friend,” paintings by Jeremy Willis, through Nov. 5. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

Inspired Minds The Ogden Museum’s current offerings are of interest, especially the photography shows, but the big surprise is the Alexa Kleinbard and Jim Roche collection of visionary outsider art. Both are artists themselves, and their collection suggests a mixed-media installation in its own right, as well as a fresh take on what outsider art can mean. Most folk art has ranged from cute to weird in exhibitions often anthropological in tone, but here the spirit of each artist, forcefully or quietly, reaches out and grabs you. They all have a story to tell, and if you make eye contact, they also will make you listen. It’s a world of self-taught artists acting under orders from God or gods, known or unknown, and you are there to witness marvels large and small. Of them, the substantial painted wood carvings of Tallahassee, Fla.’s O.L. Samuels are hard to miss. An 80-year-old former tree trimmer brought back from the dead after a fall, Samuels creates mythic or demonic beings that radiate an otherworldly joie de vivre. Edna (pictured), a wood sculpture of an intricately painted woman with an intense visage, is eerily alive, dominating the space in front of a wall of “religious” paintings by Roger Rice, an ordained minister in Oklahoma. While some preachers merely condemn lewd or scandalous behavior, Rice shows us precisely what he means in some of the most graphically lurid images the Bible ever inspired. Conversely, Daniel Pressley’s paintings depict ordinary slices of life imbued with vibrant magic/realist intensity, as do Remy Mott’s inexplicably haunting paintings of women, or Sylvanus Hudson’s iconic Heart With Cross, with its homespun voodoo overtones. What they all have in common is a sense of reinventing the world we thought we knew, as if these artists had traveled to a rustic parallel universe in a backyard space capsule and come back with souvenirs for all to see. It’s wonderful stuff. — D. Eric Bookhardt

Self-Taught, Outsider T H R U and Visionary Art from S E P T. the Collection of Alexa Kleinbard and Jim Roche Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600, www.ogdenmuseum.org

18


Single Tickets On Sale Now! New Orleans Ballet Association

FOr BeST SeATS, PiCk 3 Or MOre AND SAve!

NOBA

ART

LISTINGS

on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

Dance

2011-12 Mark Morris Dance Group

44

Jacoby & Pronk Contemporary Dance Artists

photos: Marty Sohl, Nan Melville, Zhen Qian, Sarah Silver, Karsten Staiger, Herbert Migdoll

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

October 22 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

November 11 & 12 – Lupin Hall, NOCCA Co-presented with The NOCCA Institute

Shen Wei Dance Arts

March 2 & 3 – Lupin Hall, NOCCA Co-presented with The NOCCA Institute

Complexions Contemporary Ballet April 21 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

The Joffrey Ballet

May 12 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

Official Hotel

gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Blueprints: Reflections of Modern Design,” works on canvas by Nell Tilton, through Sept. 24. CARROLL GALLERY. Newcomb Art Department, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2228; www. tulane.edu/~art/carrollgallery — “Text/Image,” a group exhibition featuring works that integrate text and images, through Sept. 22.

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

Stephen Petronio Company

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CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

January 21 – Mahalia Jackson Theater

FOr SiNGle TiCkeTS ONly, 800.745.3000 TiCkeTMASTer.COM

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

522.0996

Official Airline

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — Paint-

ings by Andrew Bucci, David Rex Joyner and Stephan Hoffpauir, through Sept. 24.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the

Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www. woodartandmarketing.com —

Hand-carved woodworks by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

WE BUY AND SELL

traditional • contemporary • vintage chair $39

office chair $29

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Jump ’N’ Jive,” oil paintings

by Perry Morgan III, through Sept. 29.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists chair $39 matching ottoman $19

sofa sleeper $99

C/FLiquidators Canal Furniture

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3534 Toulouse St (at Bayou St. John) | Mid City | 504-482-6851 Monday: 10 am-6pm | Tues-Sat:10am-5pm | 504-442-5383

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “Foot-a-Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 —

Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Bending the Curve,” acrylic on panel by Michael Kessler, through Sept. 25. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Summer Showcase,” works

by 16 gallery artists, through Sept. 17.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paint-

ings by George Schmidt, ongoing.

THE GEORGES GALLERY. Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 8375204; www.mpcds.com — “The

Colorful of Wonderful,” paintings by Terrance Osborne, through Thursday.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Impact,” works by Bernd Haussmann, ongoing, First Tuesday-Saturday of every month. “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed

media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing.

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 6716363; www.dcc.edu — “Boys/

Bunnies/Singles/Doubles,” works by Alex Podesta, through Sept. 27.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, litho-

graphs and other works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “Sunstruck,” paintings

by Carol Hallock, through September.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — No Dead Artists National

Juried Exhibition, a show featuring 14 emerging artists, through Sept. 24.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery. com — Paintings by Don Picou

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — Alumni exhibition,

through September.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — Paintings by Billy

Solitario, through Sept. 24.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — Venetian

glass mosaics by Randy Sanders; “Capture the Moment,” clocks made from vintage and collectible vinyl albums by Judy Di George; oil paintings by Sean Friloux; all through September.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www. louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com PAGE 47


46

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ART

PAGE 44

— Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — Acrylic and oil on linen by Matthew Abbott, through Sept. 24. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Fascinate Me: A Culinary & Sculptural Extravaganza,” culinary sculpture by Jean-Luc Albin of Maurice’s French Pastries, ice carving by Dawson, chocolate sculpture by Cloud Candi and 3-D designs by The Bikery, through September. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Pictures for Books,” photographs by Thomas Roma; “Jazz People: New Orleans Portraits,” photographs by Lee Friedlander; “Pop Shots,” Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol; all through Oct. 9. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Priscilla Busch, Natalie Nich-

ols, Andrew Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George

Rodrigue, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers

details. Submissions deadline is Sept. 23.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Artist William Pope seeks photographs that respond to the questions “when you dream of New Orleans, what do you dream of?” and “when you wake up in the morning, what do you see?” for a video installation for events celebrating the opening of Prospect.2. Email blinkprojectNOLA@gmail.com for details. Submissions dealine is Sept. 15.

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 444 Erlanger St., (985) 646-4375 — Annual Artists of the Year

exhibit, through September.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works

by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s

the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. Emerging and established artists and curators can apply for an opportunity to exhibit in the Bywater gallery during the 2012 season. Email bob@press-street.com or visit www.press-street.com/ antenna for details. Application deadline is Oct. 1. CRESCENT CITY BLUES & BBQ FESTIVAL T-SHIRT. Creative Allies

hosts a contest to create the design for the festival’s official T-shirt. The winner also receives a $400 cash prize. Visit www. creativeallies.com/contests for

PROSPECT.2 OPENING EVENT.

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com — Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing. HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA youth artists, ongoing. JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “The Unconventional

Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing. NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner, ongoing. NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 8913381; www.neutralground.org —

Work by local artists, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September. SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

ST. JOE LOFTS ARTISTS COMMUNITY. 923 Constance St., 982-5638; www.stjoelofts.com — “Night in White,” a group

show featuring resident artists, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith,

ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi

Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “The Center Cannot Hold,” paintings and drawings by Brooke Pickett; “Drip: The Music of Water in New Orleans,” sound installation by John Kleinschmidt and Andy Sternad; “Patterns and Prototypes: Early Paintings by Tina Girouard and Robert Gordy,” curated by Dan Cameron; all through Sept. 25. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th Star:

Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic

Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us —

“Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — “Roosevelt, Rockwell, and

the Four Freedoms: America’s Slow March from Isolation to Action,” original posters by Norman Rockwell and museum

artifacts, through Nov. 13. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Drapetomania: A Disease

Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass; both through Oct. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Thalassa,” a 20-foot-tall

suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “The Elegant Image,” figural bronzes from the Indian Subcontinent from the collection of Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “A

Technological Terrarium,” mechanical, kinetic, electronic and biological sculpture, through Sept. 12. “Self-Taught, Outsider and Visionary Art from the Collection of Alexa Kleinbard & Jim Roche”; “Spotlight on Mississippi,” paintings, drawings and sculpture by Mississippi artists; “Mississippi Photographs: 1860s-Present”; all through Sept. 18. “Mississippi Mud: The Potters of Mississippi”; “Looking to Learn,” works by New Orleans Center for Creative Arts visual art students, through September. “Whispering Pines,” photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16. OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass works, ongoing.

47


STAGE

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER THE CONE OF UNCERTAINTY: NEW ORLEANS AFTER KATRINA.

Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre. com — Jose Torres-Tama uses bilingual texts, film projections and a variety of characters to comment on the issues facing New Orleans immediately after Katrina. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. FOOTLIGHT FRENZY. Playmakers

Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — In the farce, a desperate PTA group produces an ambitious benefit play to try and save their bankrupt School for Unusual Children. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, then 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday starting Sept. 16. Through Sept. 25.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

IS HE DEAD? University of New

48

Orleans, Performing Arts Center, Robert E. Nims Theatre, 2807468; www.uno.edu — Theatre UNO and The NOLA Project present the play adapted from a lost script written by Mark Twain, in which an unsuccessful French painter fakes his death to achieve wealth. Tickets $8$12. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday, through Sept. 18. JITNEY. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com — August Wilson’s drama depicts the African-American experience in 1970s Pittsburg through his portrayal of men working as jitneys, or unlicensed taxi cab drivers. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday, through Sept. 25. THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — In Roger Bean’s jukebox musical, an all-girl quartet in the 1950s sings through the hits of the era. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sept. 18, through September.

THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE.

Slidell Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www.slidelllittletheatre.org — The musical follows a naive small town girl who moves to New York amid the Roaring Twenties to find a new life for herself. Tickets $19 general admission, $14 children. 8 p.m.

GET IN ON THE ACT Friday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

THE GUMBO REVUE WITH REGINA & TRU. Michael’s on the

Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 2673615; www.michaelsonthepark. com — Regina Adams and Tru Demille host the drag revue. Call 948-4167 for details. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. HOT STUFF. AllWays Lounge,

2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Becky Allen, Chris Wecklein and Harry Mayronne perform in the comedy cabaret. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Saturday.

SLOW BURN BURLESQUE.

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The burlesque troupe presents “Sick and Sexy,” featuring special guest Scarlet Rose of the March Fourth Marching Band. Tickets $15 general admission, $20 VIP seating. 11 p.m. Saturday.

AUDITIONS BALLET HYSELL. New Orleans Dance Academy, 5956 Magazine St., 899-3780 — The company holds auditions for its production of The Nutcracker. Call 897-5505 for details. Dancers ages 5-11 audition at 1 p.m.; dancers 12 and older audition at 3 p.m. Sunday. CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS.

Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street, ; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 4530858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

DELTA FESTIVAL BALLET. Tulane University, McWilliams Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5105 ext. 2; www.neworleansshakespeare.com — The company holds auditions for its youth production of The Nutcracker. Call 888-0931 or email deltafestballet@aol.com for details. There is a $10 audition fee. Girls ages 7-11 audition at 1 p.m., ages 12-18 audition at 2:30 p.m.; boys ages 7-13 audition at 2:30 pm. Sunday. SYMPHONY CHORUS OF NEW ORLEANS. Loyola University, Col-

lege of Music, 6363 St. Charles Ave. — The principal chorus of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra holds auditions for its 2011-2012 season. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 525-

weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday.

review

COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Storm of Protests

“LBJ, LBJ, how many kids did you kill today?” I heard this somewhat nauseating chant on the streets of New York City, where I had gone to join an anti-Vietnam War rally. Those were the 1960s, and no one wanted to be drafted and sent to fight in southeast Asia. I bring up this anecdote apropos of The Cone of Uncertainty: New Orleans After Katrina, Jose Torres-Tama’s original one-man show. Uncertainty has nothing to do with Vietnam, but Torres-Tama — like the Vietnam protesters — is virulently sarcastic about the American dream. The show may be shocking to audiences unaccustomed to such gritty rhetoric. The stage is flanked by the American flag and the Confederate flag. The flag of the American Revolution is in the background. A table draped in a red cloth bears a variety of votive candles and Voodoo ceremony paraphernalia, and at times, TorresTama seems a shaman. He wears a black outfit with a silver vest, a red, white and blue neckerchief and a tight-fitting cap (he says he shaved his head in mourning for Hurricane Katrina). “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the products for which it stands …” So begins his assault on what he sees as the great lie of the American dream. During much of the show, he wears a black mask and gloves with bones painted on them. He shakes a bamboo rattle and, in both English and Spanish, chants “I am death, I am official death, I am the death of the poor.” He also informs us that all poets’ tongues will be ripped out. He taunts Americans for speaking only English. Finally (seeming to read the minds of his audience) he says, “I’m sick of this rattle.” Torres-Tama was born in Ecuador and as a child immigrated to the U.S., but he espouses some Latino attitudes toward so-called American exceptionalism. U.S. involvement in Latin America has rarely been in support of freely elected democracies, for example, in Guatemala and Chile among other nations. Torres-Tama performs intensely. He balances the death figure with offhand asides, like “You’ll get the jokes on your way home.” There are stretches of deep feeling, and one of the most suspenseful stories is about Torres-Tama’s escape from flooded New Orleans on a stolen Jefferson Parish school bus in the company of Allen Toussaint. Uncertainty is worlds away from witty, smooth cabaret comedy. It will appeal to a different audience. With such certainty of his views, Torres-Tama occasionally overplays his point. Uncertainty at times seems to be searching for a place to end. Excellent video footage taken immediately after the hurricane by William Sabourin O’Reilly is incorporated in the show, and Billy Atwell’s original music adds to the ominous ambience. But, to go back to the comparison with Vietnam. We’re currently engaged in two prolonged bloody, expensive wars and there are no protests. Not a peep. Maybe we need more performance artists to arouse us from our uncertainty. — Dalt Wonk

SEPT

8-11

Cone of Uncertainty: New Orleans After Katrina 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 298-8676; www.shadowboxtheatre.com Tickets $10

2111 or visit www.symphonychorus.org for details. Tuesday and Sept. 13. THE WOMAN IN BLACK.

Playmakers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — The theater holds auditions for its November production of Stephen Mallatratt’s horror play. Call (985) 789-4024 for details. 7 p.m. Monday and Sept. 13.

DANCE

NEW ORLEANS BALLET THEATRE.

NOCCA Riverfront Lupin Hall,

2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — The ballet company presents George Balanchine’s “Who Cares?” Tickets $20 students, $30 general admission. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

COMEDY

CALL FOR THEATER

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday.

RUBY PRIZE. Southern Rep will award a $10,000 prize, a 10-day writer’s retreat, development workshops and readings at Southern Rep New Play Bacchanal to a female playwright of color. Visit www.southernrep.com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 15.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 6 KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through ageappropriate activities. Tickets $10 members, $12 nonmembers. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 8 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOUR S. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Pre-registration is required. Call 293-4721 or email jcohn@ longuevue.com for details. Admission $12 members, $15 nonmembers (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 10 GIRL SCOUTS WORKSHOP: PRETZELS. Southern Food

& Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood. org — Participants can make homemade pretzel dough and pretzel shapes at the event for Girl Scout troops. Admission $3 per scout. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

KIDS CRAFTING NATURE.

Bayou Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego, 736-7140 — Children of all ages join the park staff in learning a new nature topic each month, and participants will get to create

and take home a craft based on the topic. 2 p.m. STEAMBOAT NATCHEZ FAMILY CRUISE. Steamboat Natchez,

Toulouse Street Wharf, 586-8777; www.steamboatnatchez.com — The cruise features children’s musical entertainment, trivia games with prizes, food and more. Admission $15 general admission, $7.50 children ages six to 12, free for children under 6. Boarding starts at 11 a.m., cruise at 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 6 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

658-4100; www.noma.org — Local arts organizations provide information on upcoming events, ticket promotions and more at the happy hour event, which also features drinks, light food and an after party in the Sculpture Garden with DJ Matty. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. general admission, 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. after party. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m.

NATIVE PLANT GARDENING .

DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

NEW ORLEANS ROSE SOCIETY MEETING . Whitney Bank

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — LSU master gardner Bonnie LaBorde Johnson leads the presentation. 7 p.m.

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m.

Training Room, 1441 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-6364; www.whitneybank.com — The group discusses fall pruning and care. Call 368-6885 for details. 7:30 p.m.

MAKE IT THROW. 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The Krewe of Chewbacchus presents a night of crafts and a screening of Dr. Who. Visit www.chewbacchus.org for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

African American Museum, 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 5661136; www.noaam.com — The Young Leadership Council and Literacy Alliance of Greater New Orleans host the kick-off party for its latest selection, Dan Baum’s Nine Lives, for the citywide literacy project. Visit www.onebookoneneworleans.com for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Wednesday 7 BEHIND THE SCENES OF “THE PACIFIC” WITH HUGH AMBROSE . National World

War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The historical adviser for and author of the companion book to the HBO miniseries The Pacific presents a Q&A, screening and book signing. Free admission. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873; www.covingtonfarmersmarket.org — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. CULTURE COLLISION 3. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle,

ONE BOOK ONE NEW ORLEANS KICKOFF PARTY. New Orleans

STAGE HYPNOTIST DR. Z.

Obelisk Wine Bar & Art Gallery, 22 St. Ann Drive, (985) 674-4215; www.obeliskwinebar.com — The hypnotist presents his Las Vegas-style comedic show. Visit www. theamazingdrz.com for details. Tickets $10. 8 p.m.

Since 1906

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 8 CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. First Baptist Church of New Orleans, 5290 Canal Blvd., 482-5775; www.fbcno.org — The church hosts “I Can Cope,”

CENTRAL GROCERY CO. Italian, French, Spanish & Greek Specialties

Thanks for voting us #1

Muffaletta!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

LITTLE MASTERS. Longue

EVENTS

923 Decatur St., NOLA 70116 Tuesday - Saturday 9am-5pm

49


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego — The park ranger leads a hike though all three park trails, and discusses park history, geology, wildlife and more along the way. 10 a.m. KAYAK-ITI-YAT SAVENGER HUNT. Bayou St. John, at

Orleans Avenue — The kayak scavenger hunt benefits the Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association’s Re-Bridge project, which seeks to rehabilitate the the Dumaine and Magnolia Bridges. Visit www.kayakitiyat.com/scavenger-hunt for details. Admission $100 per team. 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

LOCAL THREADS. Staple Goods,

1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — The art gallery hosts events in conjunction with the St. Claude Arts District’s second Saturdays openings. This week’s event includes a performance by One Mind Brass Band, a fashion show featuring local artists and designers, and a gallery exhibition with Righteous Fur & Friends. 4:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

MARCH TO THE MARSH.

MASON LECTURE SERIES.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Raymond Callahan, author and professor emeritus of history at the University of Delaware, discusses “Churchill and his Generals.” Free admission. Reception 5 p.m. to 6 p.m., lecture 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET NEW LOCATION GRAND OPENING . Holy Angels

Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket.org — The farmers market celebrates its new location with usual market offerings, plus live music, cooking demonstrations, children’s activities, free health screenings and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock

Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger conducts an open fire cooking demonstration that includes

Superdome, 330 Loyola Ave., (888) 782-9722 — Michael L. Merritt presents “Mississippi River Levee Shrinkage Cracks” at the luncheon meeting. Call 561-8980 or visit www.nogs. org/nogs_events.html for details. Admission $30. 11:30 a.m.

NUNEZ HISTORY LECTURE SERIES. Nunez Community

HANDS TO HEARTS FUNDRAISER . Muriel’s Jackson

ACT STUDENT VIDEO CONTEST. High school juniors and seniors are invited to make videos creatively expressing their reasons for taking the ACT college entrance exam for a chance to win scholarships to the colleges of their choice. Visit www.actstudent. org/videocontest for details. Submissions deadline is Sunday.

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave. — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. Sundays. Through Feb. 26.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

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COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP GRANTS. The New Orleans

Jazz & Heritage Foundation awards grants to local arts and educational programs. Visit www.jazzandheritage. org for details. Application deadline is Tuesday. PITCHNOLA . The nonprofit

Social Entrepreneurs of New Orleans seeks contestants for its elevator pitch competition (Oct. 6) that features celebrity judges and awards cash prizes. Pitches should relate to social and/or environmental problems in New Orleans.

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Sunday 12

Sunday 11

OCH ART MARKET. Zeitgeist

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse.com — Wedding Style Magazine hosts the event featuring wedding experts, more than 100 exhibits, floral displays and more. Call 525-2743 or visit www.stylemywedding. info for details. Tickets $10 in advance, $15 at the door. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

College, 3710 Paris Road, Chalmette, 278-7497; www. nunez.edu — History professor Ron Chapman discusses “The Bicentennial of Louisiana Statehood.” Free admission. 7 p.m.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The indoor and outdoor market features locally made arts and crafts and food. Visit www.ochartmarket.com for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

WHO’S WHO IN “I DO” BRIDAL SHOW. Fair Grounds Race

Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www. visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

Square, 801 Chartres St., 568-1885; www.muriels. com — Chef Gus Martin prepares a special menu for the event, which will benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana. The fundraiser also features music by NOCCA jazz musicians and a silent auction. Admission $75. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK.

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum unveils a display of steel from the World Trade Center from the USS Arizona, one of the American battleships sunk at Pearl Harbor, at the event, which also features a military band performance and a ceremony. 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Visitors learn about the incredible beauty, species diversity and importance of the marsh. 11 a.m.

PINK RIBBON FLING . House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 3104999; www.hob.com — The fundraiser benefiting the Cancer Association of Greater New Orleans features music by Rockin’ Dopsie and the Zydeco Twisters, a buffet, an open bar, silent auction and raffles. Call 293-2618 or visit www.cagno.org for details. Admission $125 patron party, $75 general admission. Patron party 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., 8 p.m. general admission.

SEPTEMBER 11 TEN YEAR ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION . National

m ake all of our signature recipes dail y.

GUIDED HIKE. Bayou Segnette

a discussion of the recipe and history of the dish being prepared along with the process involved in open fire cooking. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m.

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

51


EVENTS

LISTINGS

Visit www.seno-nola.org/pitchnola for details. Application deadline is Wednesday. PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

Q’N FOR KIDS BARBECUE FUNDRAISER. The nonprofit

mentoring program Each One Save One seeks amateur barbecue teams for its Sept. 17 fundraising event. Call 896-9979 or visit www.eachonesaveone.org for details. Application deadline is Wednesday.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 8334024 or (800) ACS-2345; www. cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

52

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail.com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers

Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information. CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer court-appointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans. org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marketum-

brella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@ degashouse.com for details. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@ handsonneworleans.com or visit www.handsonneworleans. org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details. LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS. Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www. la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org. LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www. lowernine.org or email lauren@ lowernine.org for details. MAKE A MOVE. Volunteers are

leries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details. PITOT HOUSE . Volunteers are

needed on Saturdays in August and September to help spruce up the historic home’s parterre garden before the fall season. Call 482-0312 or email info@ louisianalandmarks.org for details.

PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach afterschool program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach. org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

needed for the New Orleans Mission’s free, one-day event on Oct. 12 that will offer struggling individuals a variety of services including medical check-ups, eye screenings, foot care, legal services, grooming, employment assistance, food, toiletries and more. Call 4514282, email signal@hero-farm. com or visit www.neworleansmission.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details.

residents to assist the New Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

WORDS

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/ summercamp for details. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its gal-

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM . The program allows

ALAN GERSON . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author discusses and signs The 9-11 Comic Book. 2 p.m. Sunday.

CHRISTOPHER BUEHLMAN .

Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs Those Across the River. 5:30 p.m. Friday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073;

www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m. FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

JASON BERRY. Maple Street

Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author discusses, reads from and signs Render Unto Rome: The Secret Life of Money in the Catholic Church. 6 p.m. Friday.

JENNY WINGFIELD. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author signs The Homecoming of Samuel Lake. 6 p.m. Wednesday. MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar. com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. NAYANA CURRIMBHOY. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs her book Miss Timmins’ School for Girls. 1 p.m. Saturday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music

and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. THE WELL: A WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal

Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola. org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details.

WOMEN’S NATIONAL BOOK ASSOCIATION MEETING .

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The New Orleans chapter of the group meets at 7 p.m. Monday. WRITE, NOLA! POETRY FESTIVAL .

Gallier Hall, 545 St. Charles Ave., 565-7457 — The festival features workshops, a town hall-style meeting, forums and open mics, culminating with a showcase at the Howlin’ Wolf (907 S. Peters St., 529-5844). Visit www.writenolafestival. wordpress.com for the full schedule and other details. Saturday-Sunday.

CALL FOR WRITERS POETIC SOUL CONTEST. 411 NOLA hosts the competition to honor the publication of the second edition of poet Asia Rainey’s book Soul Chant. There is a $5 entry fee per poem. Email contests@411nola.com or visit www.411nola.com for details. Submissions deadline is Nov. 2. WORKSHOP IN FICTION/ NONFICTION . Arts Council of

New Orleans, 818 Howard Ave., Suite 300, 523-1465 — James Nolan teaches a 12-session fiction and creative nonfiction workshop on Tuesdays from Sept. 20 to Dec. 13. Call the Arts Council to register. WRITING WELL-CRAFTED FICTION . Author Stephen Rea

(Finn McCool’s Football Club) teaches the 10-week class starting Sept. 27. The class is open to writers of all levels. Visit www.loyno.edu/wpc for details. Registration deadline is Sept. 13.


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200 BOTTTILOEN WINE COLLEC

$5/ticket or $20 for 6 tickets

• Mondo • Nonna Mia Cafe & Pizzeria • Ralph's On The Park • Ruth's Chris Steak House • Salu Small Plates & Wine Bar •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

AND

Select Brands PRESENT

9TH ANNUAL

PARTICIPATING GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 06 > 2011

54

THURSDAY 6-9

CITY PARK PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS

•••••••••••

WINE DISTRIBUTORS

•••••••••••

IN THE BOTANICAL GARDEN

• Doerries International • Glazer’s of Louisiana • International Wine & Spirits • Mystic Vines • Paul Bologna Fine Wines • Republic National Distributing Company • Select Wines • Uncorked Importers & Distributors of Fine Wine • Wines Unlimited

Live Entertainment

OCTOBER 20PMth

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

GOURMET

••••••••••

• The Chophouse in St. James Hotel

OVER 200

CUISINE WINES $65 AT THE DOOR $55 IN ADVANCE $45 GROUP DISCOUNT

A WINE, SPIRITS, FOOD & MUSIC EVENT benefiting The Big Easy Awards Foundation

DISCOUNT FOR 6 OR MORE

Limited Availability CALL 483-3129 Purchase tickets online at

bestofneworleans.com MESCHYA LAKE Big Easy Awards Best Female Entertainer 2011


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> BRUNCH BY BAJEUX <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Rene Bajeux has been making his mark on the Rib Room > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >(Omni Royal Orleans Hotel, 621 St. Louis St., 529-7046; www.< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <ribroomneworleans.com), where he took over the executive chef spot in May. The latest change is a new jazz brunch format on Sundays. Three-course meals range from $28 to $35 WHAT and include unlimited sparkling wine, appetizers like smoked Bayou Hot Wings salmon or oysters Amandine, and entrees like a beef debris omelet, shrimp Creole with a bacon waffle or redfish with WHERE andouille hash. 6221 S. Claiborne Ave., 865-9464; AFTERNOON DELIGHT www.bayouhotwings.com Muriel’s Jackson Square (801 Chartres St., 568-1885; www. WHEN muriels.com) hosts an event from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Lunch and dinner daily Sept. 11, benefiting the youth mentoring group Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana. Hands to Hearts — An AfRESERVATIONS ternoon on the Square is a cocktail party and charity auction Not accepted with food stations for casual grazing, an open bar and live jazz by NOCCA music students. Admission is $75 per person. Call HOW MUCH Muriel’s for tickets. Inexpensive

am

B

WHAT WORKS

Well-crafted sauces, shrimp, alligator and frog legs

five 5 IN

Five Righteous Veggie Burgers

WHAT DOESN'T

13 MONAGHAN

CHECK, PLEASE

A loose-packed black bean burger is served on French bread.

There’s no comfortable place to eat at the shop. A new joint for tasty lunch on the run or game-day takeout

517 FRENCHMEN ST., 942-1345 www.13monaghan.com

BOOKOO BBQ

3701 BANKS ST., 202-4741 www.bookoobbq.com

A spicy mix of black beans and garlic is topped with creamy “Boo Bang” sauce.

COWBELL Allen Nguyen and Kyle Makepeace opened Bayou Hot Wings.

Winging It

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY IAN MCNULTY

ith the NFL’s regular season now safely upon us, a lot of fans will say they were never worried at all. But you don’t hear such bluster from Allen Nguyen and Kyle Makepeace. As contract negotiations dragged and there was talk of a truncated season, they were sweating it. That’s understandable. The two twentysomethings opened Bayou Hot Wings in May near the Tulane and Loyola campuses with the hopes their business would hit its stride as the fall semester and football season began. Chicken wings aren’t technically a seasonal food, but there’s an undeniable — and for some, almost instinctual — surge in the demand that coincides with football season. Despite a tense summer, things have worked out pretty well after all, and Bayou Hot Wings is ready for prime time. This is a small wing shop essentially serving handmade fast food with enough unique touches and endearing character to stand apart. This is a place, for instance, for people who consider a few pairs of fried frog legs awash in garlicParmesan butter with a side of sweet potato fries and a longneck bottle of Mexican sugarcane Coke to be their happy meal. Nguyen and Makepeace take the time to marinate their wings, and they make their own sauces and dressings, from a chunky, lemony remoulade that makes a better fire extinguisher than traditional blue cheese, to a roster of wing sauces that range from

W

teriyaki sweet to incendiary. The standard bearer here is called bayou sweet heat, and its main ingredient, Crystal hot sauce, is a tipoff that it’s more tangy than hot. Step up a level and the peppery bayou beast proves very hot, though still more thrilling than painful. But beware of the hot sauce the kitchen reserves for its “beast challenge,” a spice tolerance contest that comes with a detailed legal waiver. I won’t go near it, especially not after seeing terrifying photos of past contenders, who look like bloodied zombies smeared red with sauce. Wings are the stars, but part of the fun of eating here is pairing the sauce menu with other local goods — like the respectably sized shrimp, bits of fried alligator and frog legs. I don’t have high expectations of a burger from a wing joint, but this one is surprisingly solid, with an irregular patty cooked to a crisp edge. Steak fries were limp and rather plain, and their best use is being a starchy sop for really spicy wings or as something else to dunk in the sauces. Order a Hubig’s pie and they’ll offer to drop it in the fryer, crisping it and heating it through. Bayou Hot Wings is a nice-looking place, but it’s very small and offers just a narrow, cramped ledge for people opting to eat there. But for wings that hardly matters. Just as football time is prime wing season, prime wing habitat is back home in front of the TV.

A varied mix of vegetables is ground together and griddled crisp.

PHIL’S GRILL

3020 SEVERN AVE., METAIRIE, 324-9080; 1640 HICKORY AVE., HARAHAN, 305-1705 www.phils-grill.com

Potatoes, zucchini, tomatoes and other vegetables make a frittata-like patty.

TRU BURGER

8115 OAK ST., 218-7285 www.truburgers.com

A thick, fried cake is made of beans and shredded beets.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Gewurz Gewurztraminer

MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA / $10-$11 RETAIL

Gewurtztraminer thrives in the mild summer temperatures and constant cooling Pacific fog banks of Mendocino County. This bottling offers heady aromas of spice, apricot, lychee nuts, tropical fruits and rose petals. On the palate, the medium-bodied wine exhibits lemon zest, tea, ripe pear, peaches and an engaging minerality. Drink it with spicy Thai or Indian cuisine, grilled or fresh fruit, aged or cured smoked meats or fish, charcuterie and cheeses. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle, Dorignac’s and Langenstein’s in Metairie. Drink it at: Mr. B’s Bistro and La Cote Brasserie. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

A NEW WING SPECIALIST HAS FOOTBALL FOOD DOWN PAT.

8801 OAK ST., 298-8689 www.cowbell-nola.com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

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OUT2EAT page 56 VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St.,

361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $ MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

985/626-4476

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985/345-6789

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

Laid back fun since 1934 OPEN DAILY - HAPPY HOUR UNTIL 7PM 1201 BURGUNDY ST

(CORNER OF GOV NICHOLLS)

(504)522-9715

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/COSIMOSBAR

serving new orleans'

favorites

Po-Boys, Pizzas & Plates

including Seafood Muffeletas, Italian Meatballs, Veal Marsala, Mirliton Casserole, Fettucine Alfredo, Grilled Chicken or Grilled Shrimp Salad, Gumbo and more. 3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metai-

rie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4648884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 2673328; www.thekupcakefactory. com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 FIFTY 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-

5638; www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

www.therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The


OUT2EAT

Green Parrot Nursery 201 NASHVILLE AVE. NASHVILLE & THE RIVAH

(504) 894-1100 www.greenparrotnursery.com

and Bistro FRESH GREEN FRIENDLY

Have a Drink at our New Bar! 3903 CANAL ST

(CORNER OF N. SCOTT)

MID-CITY, NEW ORLEANS 561.6585 | WWW.ECOCAFENO.COM

a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

THE

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D AVA ELIVE IL A RY BLE !

K A E T S MB BO

K

R STEA

TENDE

S ODNES W/GO ENCH ON FR AD. BRE

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE —

DAMAGED ART WORK? Paintings • Prints • Frames • Mirrors Photos • Sculpture • Glass • Ceramic Professionally Restored

The New Orleans Conservation Guild, Inc. 13 years in New Orleans 3620 Royal St • In Bywater 10-4pm • Mon-Fri [504] 944-7900 www.art-restoration.com

www.SaintInsurance.com We are your full service, insurance solution agency! We’ve saved Louisiana residents thousands on their home, auto, life, boat & business insurance If you want to save real money now on your insurance, call 1-866-660-6800 or go to www.saintinsurance.com 803793

755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood

po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave.,

265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of poboys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Bara-

taria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees.

Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches.


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-

7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

The best kept secret in New Orleans

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

thanks New Orleans for voting us one of the top 2 spots

Plant sales & rentals

for specialty sandwiches!

1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

5004 prytania st • 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a section of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$ CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www. crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transconti-

nental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

purchase 12 months

receive 6 months ALSO OFFER:

FREE

Zumba • Yoga • circuit Kettlebell • KicK boxing 2246 Florida ave. • Kenner • corner of

W. napolean & Williams Blvd. (504) 464-4688 • fit4lifenola@gmail.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

61


CLASSIFIEDS ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/ Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

DOMESTIC AUTOS

IMPORTED AUTOS

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

‘06 LEXUS IS 350

Online: When you place an ad in

‘07 INFINITI M35

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

$22,995 504-368-5640

‘’09 NISSAN SENTRA $10,995 504-368-5640

‘’09 TOYOTA YARUS $11,995 504-368-5640

Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

$19,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $17,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘09 SUBARU FORESTER AWD $16,995 Call 504-368-5640

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

NOLA

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 yo, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136 ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SPECIAL

60/90 minutes avail.

$50

8:30am-9pm • M - F

1 HOUR

Swedish & Deep Tissue Appts

5 min from Elmwood LA Lic# 520

call

After September 16, claims should be mailed to: 15821 Ventura Blvd. Ste. 535 Encino, CA 91436 (818) 905-0151

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

504.317.4142

Email: headshotfilm@gmail.com

Weekly Tails

MERCHANDISE WANTED

Peedie is a 10-month-old, neutered, Pointer mix. He wants nothing more than to be right next to you all the time! Peedie knows how to sit, enjoys playing with toys and is SUPER-affectionate. To meet Peedie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

WANTED: WAR SOUVENIERS

German, Japanese, U.S. Helmets, Daggers, Swords, Flags, Guns, Civil War. ALL MEMORABILIA. Call 985-722-7051

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

PEEDIE Kennel #A13527412

6wk sweet m kitten striped cat Archie is fun & full of gusto. If interested Please contact Traci-tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

Alexa

Purrfect 8 wk old adorable & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs and will be spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Princess Leila

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed, shots, rescue 504 462-1968

Louisiana accounting offices wil close on September 16, 2011.

ADOPTIONS

PET ADOPTIONS

Alicia Summer Special

Headshot Film Productions, LLC has completed photography.

Through then, send claims to: 1231 Prytania Street, FL4 New Orleans, LA 70130 Phone: (504) 521-6205

Fiberglass, Green Bull. heavy duty. Cost $250. Sell for $125. Call 782-8418

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

NOTICE

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

MISC. FOR SALE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

Advertise in

Elijah

STEP LADDER 12’

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

BYWATER BODYWORKS

DSH, Gray/Brn/Blk Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1yo, Neut.Vacs/Vet Ck/ litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & gentle! Great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

BID NOTICE: The CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY YOUTH AGAINST DRUGS FOUNDATION is seeking three bids for REPLACEMENT HOUSING. Work includes construction of a 1,074 sf building at 3211 N. Robertson St, a 1,855 sf building at 1540 Piety St, and a 2,012 sf building at 3155 N. Claiborne Ave., and associated sitework. A mandatory pre-bid conference will be held on Sep. 8, 2011 at 3211 N Robertson St, NOLA. Bid deadline: Sep. 15, 2011 at 4:00pm. Sealed bids to be submitted to CCYADF and delivered to Julien Engineering, 3520 Gen. DeGaulle Dr, Suite 1045, NOLA, 70114. Bid documents available at New Orleans Reproduction, 824 Union St, NOLA ph 504.522.4271 upon receipt of non-refundable payment. Instructions detailed in bid documents.

LAFITTE Kennel #A13650928

Lafitte is a 2-year-old, neutered, DSH with gray tabby/ white markings. Lafitte is Mr. Laidback; mellow, affectionate and loves to be cuddled. To meet Lafitte or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Employment

MERCHANDISE

‘10 VOLVO S40

$12,995 504-368-5640

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

Rentals &

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

‘10 Mitsubishi Galant

WANTED TO PURCHASE

Real Estate

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

CASH FOR CARS

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

CHATTY CAT

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

LEGAL NOTICES

Adorable male 12 wk old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

$20,995 504-368-5640

Adopting your newborn would be my life’s greatest joy. Will give a child a life of security and endless love. A great family, education, and wonderful home awaits. Expenses paid. Please call Ria at 1-888-851-4935.

BID NOTICE

Caffe

$7,500 504-812-5975

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m.

Maggie- sweet & loving dog. She is blind, but gets around very well by hearing & excel scenes of smell Loretta 504-715-0674

$11,995 504-368-5640

‘05 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Blk. Cocker Spaniel sweet loving

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR

WANT TO ADOPT

63


EMPLOYMENT

CLASSIFIEDS LEGAL NOTICES

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ADAMS COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED

CAUSE NO.: 2010-770 GERALDINE SEWELL, PETITIONER SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF ORLEANS TO: ALL BORN, KNOWN, ABSENT OR UNKNOWN HEIRS OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED, TOLLIVER CARTER, CYNTHIA ELLIS, SHAREE JACKSON, TERRY JACKSON AND ANTONY JACKSON WHO ARE NOT TO BE FOUND IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI AFTER DILIGENT INQUIRY You have been made a respondent in the Petition to Determine Heirs filed

within the Court by Geraldine Sewell, seeking a judicial determination of the heirs of Catherine Ellis, Deceased. You are summoned to appear and defend against said petition filed against you in this action before the Honorable George Ward, July 28, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., at the Adams County Chancery Court Building, Natchez, Mississippi, and in case of your failure to appear and defend a judgment will be entered against you for the things demanded in the petition. You are not required to file an answer or other pleading but you may do so if you desire. ISSUED UNDER MY HAND AND SEAL OF THIS COURT, this the 7 day of June, 2011.

Tommy O’Beirne, Chancery Clerk Adams County Chancery Court Clerk By: R.M. EDMOND D.C. Publish Dates: JUNE 14, 2011, JUNE 21, 2011, JUNE 28, 2011

Jackson, Mississippi 39225-2546 (601) 355-2022 (601) 355-0012 fax

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Affordable Fast Gutters LLC

64

Local Family Owned & Operated. All work guaranteed. Fully insured. 6” Seamless Gutters; Half -round 6” Seamless Gutters; Facia; Soffit, Patio Covers & Carports. Free Est. 504-838-9885

CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL

Self Cont & Stationary Compactors. Rentals, Sales, Service. Roll Off Containers (15 -40 Cu. Yds.) Const, Comm’l, Indus, Residential, Maritime. Free Quotes, Same Day Serv, No Delivery Fee. Porta-Let Serv Now avail. RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO. INC. 835-1696

Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

JEFFERSON FEED

Pet & Garden Center GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST The Only Certified Grade A St. Augustine Sod For New Orleans Conditions. Save with our Do-It-Yourself Lawn Maintenance Program. 733-8572.

Trees Ready For HURRICANE SEASON?

TREE MEDICS $25 OFF Trimming $50 OFF Tree RemovaL Thru August Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

PEST CONTROL Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

JOHN D. GIDDENS, ESQUIRE (MSB # 9357) John D. Giddens, P.A. Post Office Drawer 22546

HOME SERVICES

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

TERMINIX

OF COUNSEL:

SERVICES

* Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

AIR COND/HEATING GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1499 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $79.50 Gulf States Air (504) 464-1267

MERVYNS Heating & A/C Service

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

EMPLOYMENT EARN $75-$200 HOUR

(Now 25% Off), Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class &. Portfolio. AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665 Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

AUDITIONS ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Ten Hi Gin, Loop,TX, has 2 positions for agricultural equipment operator. 3 mos. Expierience; able to obtain DL in 30 days or have clean MVR; tools, equipment, housing & daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $10/hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 10/1/11 - 12/16/12. Apply at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6810141.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

PLUMBING Earl’s Plumbing & Heating

Complete Plumbing Service & Under Slab Repair Specialist. THE FLOW MUST GO ON! $25 off any plumbing service thru 9/16/11. LMP #521. Call 888-8888. www.earlsplumbingandheating.com

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

EMPLOYMENT

MISC. HOME SERVICES LIKE NU

GUTTER CLEANING & REPAIR. Make your old stained gutters look new at a fraction of the cost of replacing them. Lic & Ins. Free Est. Family owned & Operated. Call Mike, 504-236-3238 (cell) or 504-235-3329.

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

ASSISTANT SOUS CHEF HOURLY LINE COOK BUSSER SERVER HOST/HOSTESS

We offer competitive wages and benefits. Apply in person at 700 Conti Street Mon - Fri 9am to 4pm Email: employment@royalsonestano.com Fax: 553.2337 EOE/Drug Free Workplace


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Call (504) 915-3220

Reduced! Asking $169,000

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $216K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $365K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS OLD METAIRIE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Met Rd

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE REDUCED PRICE!

1,420sq. ft, lot 62x120. Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors throughout, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/ open backyard & additional shed. 5 minutes from St. Matthew & St. Rita. REDUCED! $169,000.

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

EAST NEW ORLEANS LOOK NO FURTHER! $175,000

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

7516 Ebbtide Dr. 3/2, Mstr w/jac tub & dbl vanities, wbfp, hdwd flrs, ss appl, vltd ceils, granite, custom closets, fnced yd, 2 car garage, tiled patio, auto sprinkler 504-421-4841.

455 Phillip Street, $ 239,000

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www.JudyFisher.net

817 Amelia Street, $239,900

GENTILLY

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL

$174,900

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

1323 Esplanade A&D $165k-$185k

Rustic charm on this unique home fashioned from joining two separate cottages. Great flowing floor plan and with a second front door that’s great for working from home. Off street parking.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Shadows fall as light as feathers from the tree lined Ave. Quality & detail throughout this historic restoration. A :1BD/1BA grnd flr condo. D: 2BD/2BA 2nd lvl condo. Hi ceil & orig wd flrs. Granite counters & stainless appl in kitchen. Whirlpool tub. The pool is cool! In the trendy Treme. Bank must approve short sale.

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901. 812 Esplanade #2 $170k

This condo has lots of pizzaz. Located on the ground level. One bed one bath French Quarter condo with brick paver floors. Separate but efficient kitchen. Lots of windows overlooking patio allow lots of light to stream in. Use of laundry and pool across the courtyard. You’ve gotta see it. Open to best offer!

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

Spacious raised basement duplex. Craftmen windows, built-ins, large balconies. Wd flrs up & down. Lg basement. Off st. pkg. $359,000. Jennifer Pearl, Realtor. Cell 504-258-5724, Ofc 488-0950. www.jennifervpearl.com

CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $148,000. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352 To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

1809 Burgundy $238k

Lights! Camera! Action! Zoom in for a close up look at this beauty. This house has the qualities, originality and style of something spectacular, but needs facelift. Shotgun style with 12’ ceil, orig pine flrs, transom wndws and frpl mantle in every room. Trad flr plan: kitch, BA & laundry at rear. Back deck/ brick patio w bedding along edges.

919 St Philip # 6 $224,000

Spacious one bedroom located in the lower French Quarter. Nice open floorplan with new flooring throughout. Splashy renovated tiled bathroom. Local grocery store is conveniently located nearby. Lush courtyard. Only a few blocks from your favorite restaurants and festival attractions.

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@fqr.com

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 2320 - 2322 LOWERLINE

504.949.5400

sampochesells.com

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000

3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Was gutted to the studs in 2004/05 and underwent a high quality renovation. 3 independent bedrooms, 2 full baths, master with whirlpool plus nice walk-in closet, off street parking in a great close to town location.

REAL ESTATE

65


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE WEST BANK

CARROLLTON

TERRYTOWN

434 Bruce Ave, 3 BR, 1.5 BA, patio, util rm, carport, lg liv/din, kit w/oven, refrig, cabinets, cooktop. Lg yd. Lse $1000/mo. No smoke. 451-0913.

ESPLANADE RIDGE

8216 FIG

Good landlord looking for good tenant! 1 blk off Carrollton. 2br/1ba, 1/2 dble, hdwd flrs, CA&H. $850/mo Call Chuck at 504-236-3609

1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

MID CITY ALGIERS POINT

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep., No Pets. Call 225-802-6554 email dicklea@cox.net

BROADMOOR BROADMOOR 1/2 SHOTGUN DBL

2BR/1.5BA. Hrdwd flr. Cen. A/H, w/d. $1100/mo. 1819 S. Lopez St. 1 yr lse req. + sec. dep. Avail. 10/1. 504-5770938.edgeglow@yahoo.com.

3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $650/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

332 S. JEFF DAVIS

Renov 2 br, furn kit, w/d, dw, cen a/h, wd flrs. No pets. $750/mo. Call 4275791 or 298-4802.

4511 CANAL ST

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

Efficiency $575; On red streetcar line Includes water and WiFi. Call 504-782-6564

SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available 10/1. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1006 WASHINGTON AVE

1 BR, 1200 sf, furn, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, d/w, w/d, gated parking, pool, no pets, $750/mo. Lse. 504-458-6509.

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 10/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS

824 Royal - 2 bd/ 2 ba ...................... $3500 830 St. Philip - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $3000 5224 Sandhurst Dr. - 3 bd/2ba ............... $1300 539 Dumaine - Studio/1ba ..................... $1100 823 Ursulines - 1 bd/ 1 ba ..................... $850 539 Dumaine - 1 bd/1ba ...................... $800 718 Frenchmen - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $750 CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT CBD CONDO WITH BALC

441 Gravier cor Magazine. Large 1 bdrm, 1 ba, with garage parking, huge windows, fully equippped kit, w/d. Avail Sept 1. $2035/mo. S. Talbot 504-9759763. TALBOT REALTY GROUP

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804 2227 Joseph 2br/2ba "Gargantuan Uptown Dbl" $1600 87 Egret 2br/2ba "Sanctuary Living" $1275 1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" $1100

FOLSOM FRENCH COUNTRY BRICK HOME FOR LEASE 4 br, 3 ba, Jacuzzi & full shower, 9 ft ceil, antique pine flrs, porches, 2 car gar, sep workshop. Loc on 6 acres 10 min N of I-12 off Turnpike Rd. 50275 Huckleberry Ln. $1950/mo. 985-7969130. lapolofarms.com

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

504-949-5400

1 br + study, total renov, SS appls, wd flrs, gar pkg. Mardi Gras parade rt. $1700. Debbie w/L&B, 952-09591

215 MILLAUDON

Great landlord looking for great tenants! Near Tulane Univ., 1 br, 1 bath, CA & H, equip’d kit, fenced in yard. $695 Call Chuck, 504-236-3609.

3921 CONSTANCE

1112 Dauphine

2/1 2ndflr,goodstorage,lotsofnaturallight $1350

1/2 double, living room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, a/c unit. $675/mo. Call 895-6394 or 289-9977.

1125 Rampart #3

1/1 Exclocation,lotsnatlight,fresh/tidy $750

4917 S MIRO ST

318 Royal #2

1/1 lrg pvt gallery,huge dbl parlor

$2500

931 Bienville

parking remote entry, well lit

$175

2 BR, 1 BA, pool, cen a/h. $885 mo, water incl. Furn kit, w/d. Safe neighborhood. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

3219A PRYTANIA

$950

1908 Dauphine

2/1 cute marigny apartment, great loc! $950

633 St Peter

1/2 fullyfurn,balc,completelyremodeled $1175

Perfect for prof’, Renov Vict hse, 2br/,1 full + 1/2 ba, LR, DR, kit, wd flrs, w/i balc., appls, ca&h, security, pool privileges. $1500/mo. 813-8186 274-8075.

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

CONDOS FOR SALE 3141 Ponce de Leon #7 1/1 shotgun style, wd flrs, fab loc $149,500 812 Esplanade #2

1/1 grnd flr w/ pool! 481sqft

$170,000

1233 Decatur #8

1/1 3rd fl, tons of charm 608 sqft $199,000

1809 Burgundy

1/1 spectacular, needs facelift

$238,000

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

1750 ST CHARLES #424

French Quarter Realty

studio 3rd Flr. Cent AC, Hi Ceil Wd Flr Balc

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

835 St Louis “F”

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

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PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN JEFFERSON & OCTAVIA

GREAT INVESTMENT NEW LISTING

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 06 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 64

70

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

5419 LASALLE

1208/1210 S. GENOIS

ELEGANT UPTOWN HOME. Nestled between Jefferson & Octavia on a quiet block, this newly renovated home features a spacious living area with high ceilings & lots of natural light. Expansive eat-in kitchen overlooks deck & gorgeous courtyrd surrounded by garden. Living rm opens to large porch. Master bdrm suite opens onto large balcony has closet & storage space galore! Attached sitting/dressing room has additional closets. 3BR/3BA, 3,050 sq. ft. APPRAISED FOR $595,000 IN JUNE 2011. Must see!! $525,000

IMMEDIATE CASH FLOW. Property is currently getting $1800 rent, potentially more. Gutted after Katrina, renovations completed in 2006 include new roof, dry wall, and wiring, 2 new central heaters installed since 2006. Long term tenants, excellent return on investment. Close to the Blue Plate Mayonnaise Building. $125,000

(504) 895-4663



Gambit New Orleans: September 6, 2011