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Interested in the Health Care field as a career?

Volunteer in our hands on program open to good caring people, to assist in caring for our patients. This is designed to bring extra hands to the bedside. Work along side our exp. Certified Nursing Assistants. Volunteer time could be a very important asset on your resume & helps in applying for schools.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

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NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE Gentilly Terrace & Gardens - Sat. April 2nd, 8am - 1pm. Residences between Elysian Fields Ave, Gentilly Blvd, Filmore Ave & Peoples Ave. Starting point: 3141 Gentilly Blvd.

DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430

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for PUBLISHER MARGO DUBOS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > KENTUCKY DERBY< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >19 > > > > > >EDITORIAL >FAX: > > 483-3116 > > > > |>response@gambitweekly.com >>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Orleans Parish jury duty: one man’s story, EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > with > > > a> survival > > > > >guide > > > >and > >even > > >dining > > > >tips > > > > > > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES

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The State of the State / Jeremy Alford

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Politics / Clancy DuBos

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New Orleans know-it-all

Endorsements in the Jefferson Parish elections A longtime alternative bookstore and bike shop are shuttered in the Marigny amid controversy over permits ... and gentrification This week’s heroes and zeroes

33

Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

Rep. Robert Kostelka: running the redistricting meetings ... and running his mouth

The ill winds of redistricting

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NOLA at SxSW

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

The 2011 nominees

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

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OUT

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STAGE

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REVIEW: Work by Dawn Dedeaux and Troy Dugas

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REVIEW: Interstate Fringe Festival

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PREVIEW: Harry Fest

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EVENTS

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CLASSIFIEDS

FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs 10-7 | Sun 12:30-5

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Ian McNulty on Cowbell 5 in Five: Five places for takeout picnic food Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT The Women of Calypso at the Contemporary Arts Center

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Market Place Employment Mind / Body / Spirit Real Estate for Sale & Rent Automotive COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

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2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 watkinsfootcenter.com

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BIG RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS CARRIE MARKS, MARGUERITE LUCAS, MARTA JEWSON

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CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


44-211 Latino American Forum Ad Gambit:Layout 1 3/3/11 2:37 PM Page 1

Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies presents

LATINO – AMERICA A FORUM ON HOW LATINOS INFLUENCE CONTEMPORARY U.S. POLITICS Wednesday, March 30, 2011 7 p.m. Nunemaker Auditorium Monroe Hall Free and open to the public. Three political scientists will discuss the role of Latinos in contemporary U.S. politics, including issues of immigration, political representation, and the future political landscape. For more information, contact Uriel Quesada at 865-2886 or e-mail uquesada@loyno.edu

www.loyno.edu/clacs

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ADOPTION EVENT HOSTED BY: Louisiana SPCA • CLEARVIEW MALL • 4436 Veterans Blvd. Metairie, LA • Saturday, April 2nd, 11am – 3pm 504.368.5191 • www.la-spca.org JOIN THE FUN: Many other animal rescue groups and discounts by Mall vendors Presenting Sponsor:

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Friday • April 1 Monty Banks - 6pm Alex Peters Quartet - 9:15pm

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

The world’s largest cooperative mobile pet adoption event stops here. ADOPT TODAY!

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blake

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Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

CONSULTATION DESIGN COMPLETE MAINTENANCE COMPREHENSIVE CONSTRUCTION

HEY BLAKE, CAN YOU GIVE US A BRIEF HISTORY OF SOME OF THESE FAMILIAR BAKERIES: LEIDENHEIMER, GENDUSA (JOHN AND ANGELO), BINDER AND REISING’S? GEORGE CRAVEN Acworth, Ga.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

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THURSDAY

Steak & Seafood Platter Special Live Music 7PM- till

3449 River Road (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938

Gendusa family emigrated from Sicily in 1896. Emanuel Gendusa became proprietor of the City Park Bakery, and two of his sons, Angelo and John, worked with him in the early days. In 1934, Angelo opened his own bakery, called Gendusa’s. Seventy years later, in 2004, Leidenheimer’s purchased this company as well. During its heyday, Gendusa’s bakery on Rampart Street supplied some of the best-known restaurants in the city, including Antoine’s and Arnaud’s, as well as about 70 others. Gendusa and his brother John were partners in the bakery for a while, but they separated and John opened his own bread-making business. Today, John Gendusa’s bakery is still in business at 2009 Mirabeau Ave. and has a particular claim to distinction. Back in 1929, New

DEAR GEORGE, At one time, New Orleans boasted 200 French bread bakers. Today, the number has dwindled to three, and none was founded by a Frenchman. The oldest of those companies still in existence was created by George H. Leidenheimer, a German immigrant who came to New Orleans in the mid-19th century. About 1885, he went into business with the Reuter Baking Company, but after a few years, Reu-ter went on his own to form the Sunrise Bakery. Leidenheimer started his own company in 1896. The breads he originally produced were the heavy, dense, brown breads of his native Germany, but he found fame when he turned out the bread we know today for its crisp crust and light center. Initially his bakery was located on Dryades Street, but in 1904 it moved to Simon Bolivar Avenue, Orleans restaurateurs/brothwhere Leidenheimer’s ers Bennie and Clovis Martin descendants still oper- In 1929, John Gendusa changed the shape created the beloved po-boy ate the business. sandwich during a streetcar Another baker, Geo- of the 40-inch French strike. The brothers pledged rge Reising, came to bread loaf his bakery supplied to the Martin to feed striking men at their town about the same Brothers’ restaurant to sandwich and coffee stand. time as Leidenheimer, better accommodate Whenever they saw one of the and in 1885, Reising fillings for the po-boys formed his own bak- they made to feed strik- fellows coming along, they would say, “Here comes anothery and later bought ing streetcar workers. er poor boy.” out the Sunrise Bakery. At the time, John Gendusa was supplyThese competitors — Leidenheimer and Reising — came to an agreement. Reising ing the bread for the Martin Brothers’ reswould sell his loaves below Canal Street taurant, and at their request he changed in the French Quarter, and Leidenheimer the shape of the loaf. To accommodate would sell his bread above Canal Street. the filling for the po-boy sandwiches, he Both companies were very successful, but made the loaf wider and without pointed the Reising Bakery eventually was sold tips. Traditional French bread had narrow to Harold Salmon in 1982. Leidenheimer ends, which meant much of the bread was wasted. Gendusa created a 40-inch loaf purchased it two years later. The second-oldest French bread bakery that stayed rectangular from end to end. This is a city in love with po-boy sandis that of Alois J. Binder. Opened in 1916, it is located at 940 Frenchmen St. at the wiches, and almost everyone will tell you edge of the French Quarter. The bakery’s “it’s the bread” that makes them so good. slogan is “The Happy Baker with the Light On the side of Leidenheimer trucks, Bunny Brings You Hot French Bread,” and it ful- Matthews’ iconic cartoon characters Vic and Nat’ly tell us to “Sink ya teeth into a fills that promise 365 days a year. Another well-known baking family piece of New Orleans cultcha.” Yum! was the Gendusas. Like many others, the


commEntaRy

thinking out loud

Election Recommendations oters in Jefferson Parish will go to the polls Saturday, April 2, in special elections for assessor and at-large council member. In addition, voters in Kenner will decide the fate of six property tax proposals. All of these elections are important, and we urge our readers in Jefferson to take time out this Saturday to cast their ballots. Historically, Gambit does not endorse assessor candidates. We have long advocated a system of appointed rather than elected assessors, and therefore we do not put our name behind any candidate for assessor in any parish. Elsewhere on the ballot, we make the following recommendations:

V

Roberts for Council-at-Large Jefferson voters will choose a new atlarge council member in a special election to succeed John Young, whom voters elected parish president last year. Of the two candidates on the ballot, we recommend District 1 Councilman Chris Roberts. In recent years, Jefferson Parish has been rocked by scandal. An ongoing federal investigation has only begun to scratch the surface, and voters are rightly disillusioned by what appears to be a pattern of insider deals. At the same time, parish government needs qualified, experienced leaders who know how to get things done to move Jefferson forward. We believe Roberts offers voters the best chance for that kind of leadership. Although he and Young have disagreed in the past, both men know that voters demand higher standards going forward, and both men in recent months have worked toward restoring voters’ trust in parish government. Roberts helped find a permanent source of financing for Young’s proposed inspector general’s office. We believe his thorough understanding of parish finances will serve citizens well.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

Kenner Propositions — FOR Kenner Mayor Mike Yenni inherited a troubling fiscal situation in Louisiana’s seventh-largest city when he took office less than a year ago. In recent years, Kenner’s tax base has both shrunk and fluctuated wildly based on sales taxes, oil prices and other unstable factors. At the same time, overall property taxes in Kenner are significantly lower than those in unincorporated Metairie — even though property owners in Kenner get two tax bills every year. The total millage in Kenner is less than 83 mills; the total millage in Metairie is almost 103 mills. In Gretna, another municipality in Jefferson Parish, the total millage is more than 106 mills. At a minimum, Kenner residents are not over-taxed. At the same time, Kenner faces growing costs for maintaining and improving police and fire protection, upgrading its substandard sewerage system (which is under a federal administrative order after years of Clean Water Act violations), and continuing adequate garbage collection services. Since taking office last summer, Yenni has cut the city budget by more than $5 million by eliminating positions, freezing pay and reducing waste at all levels. To address current and future needs, Mayor Yenni and Police Chief Steve Caraway are asking voters to approve six propositions that would increase Kenner’s allowable millage by 18 mills for the next 10 years. Here’s a closer look at each proposition: • Proposition 1 is a new 8-mill tax to underwrite police operations with dedicated funds for fuel, personnel, utilities, jail maintenance and the police station. Kenner currently has no dedicated millage for police protection.

• Proposition 2 is a new 4-mill tax for police buildings and equipment, including patrol cars, protective vests, guns and ammunition, uniforms, rain gear and other items. • Proposition 3 would renew an existing 1.14-mill tax for sewerage operations and maintenance, including debt service on current and anticipated bonds for needed improvements. • Proposition 4 would renew 2.4 mills for garbage collection and disposal. • Proposition 5 would renew 11.4 mills for fire department operations. Kenner’s fire rating has fallen significantly in recent years and is threatened with yet another downgrade — which drives home insurance costs much higher. By approving this proposition, Kenner residents could actually lower their homeowner insurance bills. • Proposition 6 would levy 2 new mills for fire department buildings and equipment. The department currently operates with trucks that are up to 30 years old and not up to the task of protecting a modern city. Even if all six propositions are approved — and we urge Kenner voters to approve all six of them — Kenner’s total millage would still be lower than that of Metairie.

07


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >MORE > SCUTTLEBUTT JEREMY ALFORD CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Detroit’s New Orleans-like loss of population received no telethons or FEMA assistance. America doesn’t care about Detroit people.” — Ray Wert, editor of the automotive website Jalopnik.com, apparently overlooking the $49.5 billion government bailout of General Motors in summer 2009. According to The Wall Street Journal, the U.S. Treasury had recouped roughly $23 billion of that by January 2011.

RIVER BIRCH GOES ON OFFENSE

Pleading the 5th Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

UNDER FIRE FROM THE PUBLIC, THE NEW ORLEANS POLICE DEPARTMENT’S 5TH DISTRICT SQUARES OFF AGAINST THE IRON RAIL BOOK COLLECTIVE AND PLAN B, THE NEW ORLEANS COMMUNITY BIKE PROJECT.

08

BY ALE X WOODWARD

n the heels of the closure of an annual Mardi Gras costume market inside the Blue Nile music club, a violent clash with the Krewe of Eris, and the closure of two nonprofits — all of which were within a few blocks of one another in the Faubourg Marigny — the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) was the subject of two reports: a largely positive public opinion poll and a devastating

O

The three-story warehouse at 511 Marigny St. was home to the Iron Rail Book Collective and Plan B, the New Orleans Community Bike Project, before New Orleans Police Department officers, citing inactive permits, warned its members to leave the building earlier this month.

Michael Carloss

PAGE 13

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

report from the U.S. Department of Justice. One NOPD district is at the center of much of the controversy: the 5th, which covers the Bywater, Marigny, Gentilly, St. Roch and 9th Ward neighborhoods. On March 9 (Ash Wednesday), NOPD 5th District officers visited the Iron Rail Book Collective at 511 Marigny St., asked to purchase a book, then asked to see a business permit. Volunteers at Iron Rail couldn’t produce one, so the officers suggested the library close until they could — and the same went for the other tenants of the building, often referred to as The A.R.K., after the arts collective that once rented PAGE 11

BoUQuets

River Birch landfill and its owners, including Fred Heebe, apparently are tired of taking a beating in the press. Sources at the company tell Gambit that the firm, which operates one of the largest and most successful landfills in the region, has hired a Texas PR outfit to help tell River Birch’s side of the story in response to an ongoing federal criminal investigation and claims by some in Jefferson Parish government that the firm’s contract with Jefferson was not a good deal for the parish. That contract, which never took effect, remains on hold. River Birch’s efforts appear to be paying off. Last week, The Times-Picayune ran a front-page story tracking the company’s claim that an initial draft of a parish-sponsored audit of the controversial contract actually showed that the contract was a good deal for the parish. The final, official audit reached the opposite conclusion — after a December 2010 meeting between the auditors and some parish officials led to “finessing the numbers” by altering the audit’s underlying assumptions. A preliminary draft of the audit report, which was presented at the December meeting, concluded that the par-

c'est what? DOES THE NUCLEAR DISASTER IN JAPAN MAKE YOU CONCERNED FOR THE SAFETY OF LOUISIANA’S NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS?

35% definitely

26% sort of

39% not at all

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

If the NFL lockout continues into the preseason, who do you think will be to blame?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

was honored by the Louisiana Wildlife Federation (LWF) with the group’s 2010 Conservation Achievement Award at the LWF’s annual convention in Alexandria March 19. Carloss, a biologist director with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, directed the agency’s wildlife rescue response to the BP oil disaster, coordinating rescues and rescue protocol for bird habitats along the Louisiana coast.

The NOLA Japan Quake Fund

has been established as a way for New Orleanians to contribute aid to the ongoing disaster there. The fund is a project of the Japan Club of New Orleans, the Japan Society, JetaaNOLA, the Japanese Garden Foundation and the Honorary Consul General of Japan. Japan provided much aid after Hurricane Katrina and the floods of 2005; to repay the favor, go to the Greater New Orleans Foundation website (www.gnof.org).

Rita Benson LeBlanc

was named to Sports Business Journal’s annual “Forty Under 40” list. LeBlanc, the co-owner and executive vice president of the New Orleans Saints, was lauded not only for her executive decisionmaking, but also for her community outreach. “New Orleans is a unique experience,” she told the Journal. “You can’t go through it and not have it change your life. It is my personal calling and it fulfills me.”

Michael Anderson

pleaded no contest last week to five charges of manslaughter in connection with the slayings of five local teenagers in 2006 as the city struggled to return after Hurricane Katrina. Anderson also cut a deal with federal prosecutors on charges of conspiracy and planning the murder of Ronnie Meade. Anderson, a leader in the Central City Josephine Dog Pound gang, will serve a life sentence for his crimes.


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

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JCC 2011 SUMMER DAY CAMPS page 8

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neighborhood,” says Plan B director Victor Pizarro. “But it does feel like defeat.” FOUNDeD IN 2003, THe IRON RAIL housed a lending library and nonprofit bookstore with thousands of titles (some “radical” or anarchist, others not) as well as records and ’zines not typically found in other independent bookstores and libraries in the city. It also was the first library to reopen after Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures. Julian Mutter (of the Mutter family, which owns Doerr Furniture) purchased 511 Marigny St. in 1995 and says the Iron Rail, unlike its building-mate Plan B, was never popular with the neighborhood. Though Mutter says he supports bookstores and groups like Iron Rail, he met with its members and all parties agreed Iron Rail would voluntarily leave the building. “We just thought it was mutually beneficial,” Mutter says, adding the agreement was to facilitate the possibility of Plan B reopening. “The Iron Rail really was never accepted by the neighborhood. … They attract folks that hang around that are different — ‘crusties,’ travelers. … They’ve got their own baggage, and they realize that. They figured it was better to go to another home.” Iron Rail and Plan B members — as well as business owners like Benny Naghi, who owns the Mardi Gras Zone market on Royal Street — feel the FMIA doesn’t represent that neighborhood’s diversity, and that FMIA was complicit in the NOPD’s suggestion for the 511 Marigny St. tenants to leave. In an email to Gambit, FMIA president Chris Costello says FMIA was “surprised to learn the businesses did not have proper permits to operate” but he “encourages the leaders of both groups” to obtain those permits. “I’m utterly disgusted a small group of people can shut down a social service, a really badly needed social service in New Orleans, that doesn’t cost anyone on the federal, state or local level a penny,” says Pizarro, a New Orleans native who also works with the state’s Regional Planning Commission on bicycle advocacy issues. “We do this because we care about it and believe in it. … Who we service is a cross-spread demographic of New Orleans. It’s not just white punk traveling kids. That’s a broad spectrum — black people, white people, elderly, young. It’s all over the place.” A TeLePHONe SURVeY CONDUCTeD IN February by the NOPD and the New Orleans Crime Coalition found residents across New Orleans are increasingly satisfied with the NOPD’s performance — in every district but the 5th. Most districts showed a significant increase in citizen satisfaction from 2010 to page 13

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the property. The building, a three-story brick warehouse overlooking Marigny and Decatur Streets, also housed Plan B, the New Orleans Community Bike Project. Gambit’s calls and emails to NOPD 5th District Cpt. Bernadine Kelley and Qualityof-Life Officer Matthew Alsina were not answered, but a March 10 press release (the NOPD’s only public statement on the eviction) said the 5th District received a citizen’s complaint from “the office of a City Council member” that the building “was operating without proper permits.” In the release, NOPD said Romy Samuel, the city’s collector of revenue, said the building didn’t have “active permits.” (The release also incorrectly called the Iron Rail the “Iron Rail Book Collection.”) NOPD and the mayor’s office both say those missing permits are occupational licenses, or business permits. But the city’s occupational license tax code makes an exemption for nonprofits: “Any organization which has been organized for bona fide nonprofit purposes (including political subdivisions of the State of Louisiana) shall be deemed to be exempt from the occupational license tax imposed by chapter 150, article VII of the Code of the City of New Orleans.” Hundreds of residents showed up at a Faubourg Marigny Improvement Association (FMIA) meeting at St. Paul Lutheran School March 21 to hear concerns about anonymous complaints against neighborhood businesses, the most recent (and controversial) being the closure of 511 Marigny St. A YouTube video of the meeting shows two NOPD officers telling Iron Rail members, “It’s not the 5th District’s decision. You have to go through the city, find out just as any business or 501c3, what licenses or permits you need to open.” Iron Rail spokesperson Sean Walsh says, “We have our permits. We always did. The process has been gone through. We just came to say we’re leaving the building. We want community support.” A quick search on the Louisiana Secretary of State’s website shows both the Iron Rail (charter number 35567229 N) and Plan B (charter number 35038926 N) are listed as nonprofits in good standing. American Civil Liberties Union attorneys working with Plan B say Louisiana law does not explicitly state that nonprofits must operate in a building with an occupancy license. Last week, Iron Rail announced on its website that the bookstore is looking for a new home (“We’re regrouping, and will open our library elsewhere in New Orleans.”), while Plan B, which offers free bike repair workspace and assistance and low-cost parts, is performing “mobile” bike workshops on the St. Roch Street neutral ground. “We are considering moving out of the

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2011. The 1st and 3rd jumped nearly 20 percentage points to 63 and 78 percent, respectively. But in the 5th, satisfaction fell from 55 percent to 47 percent. The survey, however, was conducted Feb. 21-22, before the recent conflicts in that district: the Blue Nile costume market closure Feb. 27, the Krewe of Eris clash March 6, and the eviction of the A.R.K. tenants March 9. And the survey results were released just a day before a scathing report from a U.S. Department of Justice probe of NOPD operations. So why the approval drop? Tulane University criminologist Peter Scharf says there are two factors: a change in demographics (more “dissatisfied” people, for one) and a shift in leadership and “the quality of service.” Others questioned the results of the survey itself. Attorney and community activist Jacques Morial sent a follow-up email to NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas pointing out what he called “fatal flaws in the methodology of the survey”: an equal number of respondents from each district despite population differences, and the number of respondents with college degrees (56 percent) compared to the city average (28 percent). Nevertheless, Serpas says the poll is good

news for New Orleans. “This survey … shows that the old, tarnished reputation of NOPD is on its way out,” Serpas said in a statement. “We know we still have work to do.” DISTRICT C COUNCILWOMAN KRISTIN Gisleson Palmer, whose district includes the Marigny, says she wants to see Plan B return, and soon. Like Mutter and the tenants at 511 Marigny St., Palmer also isn’t clear what permits Plan B needs to “get legal,” despite the group’s established nonprofit status and tax exemption. “We’re trying to get clarity for them,” she says. “I just want to help them as much as I can and get them up and running because they really do provide a valuable service to the community.” But Palmer, who chairs the council’s transportation committee and often supports the city’s biking initiatives, says she’s not familiar with Iron Rail or “who they are or what they do,” and doesn’t know enough about the bookstore to work with it to ensure its legality and future. “I’m willing to work with anybody, if their intent is to be legal and do it the right way,” she says. Some residents and members of Iron Rail and Plan B say the chronology of

events suggests the building’s closure was retaliation following the violent clash between the Krewe of Eris and the NOPD less than 72 hours before the officers visited the building. Mutter, who has lived in the Marigny for 32 years, doesn’t make the connection. “I think some unrulies ruined it for some people,” he says. “(It was) a really good example of how a few people have ruined it for everyone else.” Palmer says the citizen complaint wasn’t sent to her office, which represents District C and includes the Marigny. “We track what calls come in and forward them to the appropriate departments, and I’m sure the council office did the same thing for this one,” she says. “It’s not an issue of targeting; it’s just an issue of you receive a complaint from a constituent and you forward it to the appropriate department.” The Iron Rail held its weekly meeting March 23 to plan its future but was not able to provide a statement to Gambit before the paper went to press. Pizarro says last week Scott Hutcheson, Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s liaison to the cultural community, offered to help Plan B navigate the city’s permitting process. They plan to meet this week.

scuttlebutt page 8

name, but the clear implication is that Heebe is “co-conspirator A.” Whether part of a PR offensive or not, the notion that Mouton was routinely on retainer to one of Heebe’s companies long before his appointment to the commission goes to the heart of what will surely be Heebe’s defense if the feds go after the business owner. — Clancy DuBos

Tribal TreaTy

One day after the U.S. Department of Justice released its report limning the New Orleans Police Department’s (NOPD) constitutional abuses of citizens in scathing detail, NOPD had its first big test of the department’s relations with the public. March 19 was St. Joseph’s Night, the traditional evening each year when Mardi Gras Indians take to the streets in their elaborate plumage. NOPD and the Indians have clashed in the past, most notably in 2005, when a skirmish between the two groups led to a City Council hearing at which Big Chief Allison “Tootie” Montana of the Yellow Pocahontas tribe was stricken with a heart attack while at the podium and died in the Council Chamber. This year, though, relations between

Indians and cops Uptown were quite cordial, according to Alison McCrary, an attorney who has worked with the tribes as a legal observer for the past six years. “It was an unprecedented weekend, and we had really been worried,” McCrary says, referring to pre-St. Joseph Night flare-ups between the cops and the Indians. Right before the event, members of Mardi Gras Indian tribes had met with NOPD Chief Ronal Serpas, Deputy Chief Marlon Defillo, 6th District Commander Capt. Robert Bardy and others, including representatives from Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s and Police Monitor Susan Hutson’s offices. “Officers had a notable presence, but they were helping to facilitate the event,” McCrary says. The result? A problem-free St. Joseph’s Night — and the following day’s “Super Sunday” daytime celebration came off without a hitch as well. The following week, the Indians sent a sheet cake to the Uptown police station. On top, inscribed in icing, was the message “Thank You, 6th District, For a Wonderful Weekend.” — Kevin Allman Read more Scuttlebutt at www.bestofneworleans.com

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ish would save roughly $1.6 million over the contract’s 25-year term. The final report, which was released in January by the Baton Rouge accounting firm of Postlethwaite & Netterville, said the parish would save at least $9 million if it continued to use its own dump and not River Birch’s. Parish attorney Deborah Foshee told the T-P that the meeting was not about the numbers at all, but rather an attempt to make sure the assumptions were accurate and valid. The contract appears to play a key role in what many suspect is a wide-ranging federal investigation into Jefferson Parish politics. Meanwhile, a source at River Birch tells Gambit one of Heebe’s other companies, Shadow Lake Management, had former state Wildlife and Fisheries Commissioner Henry Mouton on retainer for years before he joined the commission in 2003. Mouton was indicted on bribery and other charges Feb. 25. The indictment alleges Mouton was bribed while on the commission to lobby against competing landfills after Hurricane Katrina, which struck in August 2005. The indictment doesn’t mention Heebe or any of his other companies by

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The Halls Have Ears WHILE A SENATE COMMITTEE CAME UNRAVELED LAST WEEK, THE REAL ACTION WAS IN THE CORRIDORS — AS USUAL.

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hallway outside of Kostelka’s committee room, Boustany and Richmond huddled with a staffer. “I wouldn’t mind going downriver into St. James, because I’m going to become a big port person,” Richmond told the staffer. A few days earlier, Richmond was keeping his distance, but now he was keeping in tight spaces with Boustany. At one point, Richmond passed along a remark about former U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Boustany shook his head and interjected, “Right. You told me about that at the Chinese restaurant.” Ah, the Chinese restaurant. In mid-January, without Landry present, delegation members met privately at a Chinese restaurant in Washington, D.C. and agreed to a set of “guiding principles” for redistricting. The principles included two north Louisiana congressional districts that would protect Alexander and Fleming. Maps showing as much were distributed at the meeting by Kostelka. The same map pitted Boustany against Landry but favored Boustany by dividing Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes. That proposed division remained a major point of contention last week. Back in the hallway on Day Five, Richmond and Boustany had the attention of Kostelka. They spoke in hushed tones. It was another tense day, and Kostelka’s congressional plan was on the agenda this time. “OK. Fine,” Kostelka said to the pair. “We’ll just make the changes later.” Word traveled quickly that Kostelka’s congressional plan was in danger because of his heavy-handedness earlier in the week. Another similar plan was substituted as the ruling class’ choice. Meanwhile, on the House side, negotiations began to advance a measure that would keep Terrebonne and Lafourche together. By April 13, there will be a move to mesh the two plans in a compromise, but who can say what the final plan will look like? Alexander, the dean of the congressional delegation and the man who led the pivotal meeting in D.C. in mid-January, winked and nodded at folks passing in the hallway. He seemed pleased with the way things were going. That had to make some folks, particularly Landry, nervous. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ jeremyalford.com.

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ongressman Charles Boustany, a Lafayette Republican, didn’t want to waste time last week doing constituent work when state lawmakers were deciding which one of Louisiana’s seven congressional districts to eliminate. Time was when a U.S. congressman would never be seen pleading for his political life with state lawmakers. Typically, it’s the locals who plead with members of Congress for federal dollars. Yet, there was Boustany, on Day Three of the Legislature’s special redistricting session, standing inside a Senate committee room with fellow GOP Congressmen Rodney Alexander of Quitman, Bill Cassidy of Baton Rouge, John Fleming of Shreveport and a staffer representing Steve Scalise of Metairie. Even New Orleans Congressman Cedric Richmond, the only Democrat and sole African-American in the delegation, made an appearance. He kept his distance on this day, openly opposing everything the Republicans supported during debate. The committee meeting was heated. Chairman Bob Kostelka, R-Monroe, lost control more than once. A former judge, Kostelka called Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, “little lady” — as if to put her in her place. It prompted one veteran lawmaker to lament, “I don’t know if the judge is going to last through this.” The meeting made one thing clear: Freshman Congressman Jeff Landry, a New Iberia Republican, is the odd man out. Landry cooked for a group of leges the night before the session convened, but no amount of gumbo or sauce piquante could overcome his lack of seniority. “I think it’s important that we have a say in this process, but we don’t need to dictate to [state lawmakers] what we think is in our best interest,” Landry said during a brief phone interview last week. Landry likely will face Boustany in 2012, which makes the redistricting process a turf battle between the two Republicans. Landry wasn’t there on this day when Kostelka — without properly posting it on the committee’s agenda — decided to take up his own congressional redistricting plan, which favors Boustany. Democrats raised hell, but the Judge argued it was just coincidence. “Because the congressmen were present, I wanted to give them an opportunity to speak,” Kostelka said. And that was just Day Three. Things got wackier on Day Five. In the

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POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Ill Winds lot of folks in north Louisiana probably thought they weren’t affected that much by Hurricane Katrina — until now. In what may be the last blast of Katrina’s ill winds, state lawmakers are wrestling with the difficult, messy issues of redistricting in a special session that already has exposed a lot of raw nerves. There are some interesting — and scary — parallels between the chaos that marked the immediate aftermath of Katrina in New Orleans and the pitched battles unfolding now in Baton Rouge. In just the first three days of the session, before the first redistricting plan was voted on, tempers flared. To those who saw years of festering wounds exposed by Katrina, it was a familiar sight. It’s likely to get worse by the time the session ends on April 13. Just as Katrina pushed some people over the edge, the pressure of drawing new districts for themselves and others in the wake of massive population

A

shifts (most of which were caused or exacerbated by the storm) has triggered an apocalyptic, every-man-forhimself drama in the halls of power. It’s an ugly tale of confusion, fear, anger and opportunism. No one is safe. Familiar protocols no longer function, and old allegiances are crumbling as lawmakers grab hold of anything that looks like self-preservation. In some ways, it’s a perfect political storm. Louisiana has seen extremely small growth over the last four decades. Some parishes in north Louisiana have fewer people today than in 1980. More recently, Katrina upended the more populous southern parishes. Even more recently, Republicans gained control over both houses of the Legislature, and they are anxious to solidify those gains. At the same time, blacks now comprise almost a third of the state’s residents — and they rightly want more access to political power here and in Washington.

Now add one more element: term limits. Because of term limits, relatively few lawmakers have been through this process before. That means few of them know what to expect — or even how to act. And when one of the “newbies” winds up chairing one of the committees charged with drawing the new districts, you get a scene like the one that played out last week in the Senate. Sen. Bob Kostelka, a white Republican from Monroe, arrived in the Senate in 2003. He now chairs the Senate and Governmental Affairs Committee and has authored a congressional remap plan that (surprise!) protects two north Louisiana GOP incumbents while dividing the more populated parishes of south Louisiana. Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, a black Democrat from New Orleans who first arrived in the House in 2000, supports a rival plan that creates a single north Louisiana district with a sizeable (42 percent) black minority. When she and state Sen. Lydia Jackson, a black

Democrat from Shreveport, tried to get the rival plan heard in Kostelka’s committee, the normally respectful tone of the Senate gave way to open hostility. At one point, the obviously irritated chairman dismissively asked them, “How many congressmen have you talked to?” and “What about the governor? Have you heard what he said about my plan?” (Jindal, who initially promised to stay out of redistricting fights, now supports Kostelka’s plan.) At one point, Kostelka snapped at Peterson, addressing her as “little lady” and reminding her that this was not her committee. Clearly, it was not. But Kostelka and other Republicans may soon be reminded that this process doesn’t really end on April 13. All Louisiana redistricting plans must be approved by the U.S. Justice Department, which is run by Democrats appointed by President Barack Obama. The ill winds are a long way from over.

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In the Pool CALLED TO JURY DUTY IN ORLEANS PARISH?

ONE MAN’S SURVIVAL GUIDE. B Y I A N M C N U LT Y | P H O T O S B Y C H E R Y L G E R B E R

I

THE BASIC JURY DUTY PROCESS AT CRIMINAL Court begins when residents receive that summons ordering them to appear at the courthouse on a specified day. This is a quick visit. Jury commissioners simply register jurors and assign schedules for actual service to begin the following month.

My schedule called for eight days of service on each Tuesday and Thursday in February. Other jurors would report each Monday and Wednesday, though it’s simple to change your own scheduled days during the month. When I asked a jury administrator for one such change, it was accomplished with a quick swipe of her pen. Friends who had served on juries told me the chances of getting picked for an actual trial were slim. Some said they had simply reported as scheduled, read books in the jury pool lounge all morning and were released each day around lunchtime. That sounded easy enough. But that was then. During eight days of jury service, I was called for six different trials to participate in voir dire, which is when the judge and attorneys question prospective jurors on their abilities to be impartial and ultimately select a jury panel to hear a case. By the end of the month I’d been picked for two trials. Robert Kazik, the court’s judicial administrator, confirms this is an increasingly typical experience, and he says more jurors are being called to voir dire for multiple trials on the same day. Your scheduled days, however, by no means dictate the days you may actually need to serve. Someone who turns up for his first Monday of service could be picked for a trial to begin Tuesday and which could wrap up in a single PAGE 20

PAGE 22

10 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT JURY DUTY PAGE 24

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

t starts one afternoon when you receive the letter, perhaps tucked between the coupon circular and the phone bill. It’s a summons to report for jury duty at Orleans Parish Criminal District Court, and it’s the first indication that soon — and for a period lasting about a month — your life will be quite different. I completed a round of jury service in February. It was my first time serving and I approached the experience with curiosity and anxiety. I hoped it would be interesting and that I could meaningfully fulfill my civic duty at a time when criminal justice issues in the city are critical. But I received scant information about what was to come. I didn’t know how to prepare, how I should manage my personal and professional affairs during the month of service ahead or just how my time would be put to use by the state. What follows is a personal look at completing that service — and a survival guide of sorts. File it away for the day you find that summons between the coupons and the phone bill.

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2. Jurors can use the court’s South Broad Street entrance, which is much faster and less crowded than the main entrance. 3. Bring a snack or pack a lunch. There’s a fridge in the jury pool lounge to store it. 4. You may bring a laptop to get work done in the jury pool lounge, and jurors are among those allowed to bring cellphones into the courthouse. 5. Speak up. Mumbling is endemic in the courtroom. Repeated questions and unclear answers make a lengthy process even longer.

7. Bring your juror ID badge to court each day. Keep it by your keys so you won’t forget. 8. You’re paid nothing for sitting in the jury pool or in voir dire. You’re paid $10 per day of service when picked for a case requiring a verdict.



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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 29 > 2011

BACK IN NEW ORLEANS, MY JURY duty days quickly assumed a familiar rhythm, which began by checking in with jury administrators at 8:30 a.m. in the windowless but comfortable jury pool lounge in the courthouse basement. Here I’d sit with a randomly selected cross-section of New Orleans humanity, all of us waiting for each of the 12 judges working on the floors above to make their requests for that day’s first juries. Then in the courtrooms, voir dire would begin and we would each wait to be selected for a jury, sent back to the lounge to await another call from a judge or to be released for the day. My peers in the pool came from all walks of life. There was the young woman who wore nursing scrubs, the woman in a business suit and the man in the Rouse’s supermarket uniform, all dressed as if they hoped to make it to work at some point that day. Some people wore New Orleans Saints jerseys or warm-up suits, others arrived in preppy casuals and one man sported a jacket glimmering with Carnival krewe medals. The musician Chaz “Washboard Chaz” Leary was in my pool, as was drummer Jason Marsalis. The majority were black, most of the rest were white and there was a small sampling of Latino and Asian people. Some college-aged people lugged

textbooks; others were clearly retired. Some worked furiously on laptops and cellphones at any chance; others read books, knit and watched daytime TV. Court officials frequently remind jurors that their experience with the judicial system will likely seem far less gripping than courtroom dramas on TV and film. They’re not kidding. Even while I sat through an afternoon of voir dire for a murder case, with the defendant seated just a few yards away, the inherent tension of the proceedings was smothered by the mundane and repetitive process of interviewing juror after juror. Only a portion of all the jurors called to the courtroom are interviewed at once, and while everyone else is supposed to pay attention, many turn to books and crossword puzzles, some fidget with muted cellphones and others simply doze off as the hours tick past. I memorized the appearance of people sitting in the rows before me, like the woman with dyed yellow curls and a Bluetooth device attached to her ear, or I traded whispered commentary with my neighbors along the bench about which jurors being interviewed would make the cut. Even by the second day, it was clear my fellow jurors had picked up a few tricks for handling the court’s routine. Some brought along breakfast to eat in the jury lounge; others were now toting lunch sacks. There was less of a scramble to get into the building on time, too. More people had learned that by using their juror ID badges they could access the building’s side entrance facing South Broad Street, which proves much

25


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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > MARCH 29 > 2011

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faster than queueing up at the main entrance with the day’s defendants, witnesses and other visitors. The courthouse has many rules, and it’s worth decoding which may be disregarded or don’t apply to you. For instance, signs indicating that cellphones are prohibited in the building nearly sent me back to my car to ditch mine on my first visit. But jurors are free to bring phones and even laptops to use in the jury pool lounge, just not in court. This proved to be my lifeline. Each morning I took a seat in the jury’s “quiet room” — a space apart from the main lounge and free of TV noise and cellphone conversations — and there I tried to complete as much work as possible on my laptop before the calls for juries began, typically an hour to 90 minutes into the morning. Then there’s food. Signs outside one courtroom promised a 24-hour jail sentence for anyone eating or drinking inside, yet when I entered I noticed court employees drinking coffee. Later, sheriff’s deputies would bring the judge coffee at the bench. When another juror discreetly passed around candy, I wondered when anyone was last sent to jail for snacking in court. Food, in fact, is a preoccupation. When you’re picked for a jury, a courtprovided meal is usually part of the deal. Judges make frequent reference to these meals from the bench, promising takeout from specific restaurants for those selected for juries.

Court employees are forever wheeling around cases of soda or sandwich platters on the same carts others use to haul evidence into the courtrooms. Jurors waiting in the jury pool or sitting through voir dire are given periodic updates on predicted upcoming lunch breaks, which during my stay lasted anywhere from more than an hour to less than 20 minutes (see “Order from the Court,” page 22, for dining options near the courthouse). IT’S EASY TO FEEL LIKE A NUMBER IN jury duty, and indeed that’s essentially how jurors are managed. Names are selected at random for each group of jurors sent up to a courtroom for voir dire, and jurors are lined up and seated in the court by a number assigned to each of us. Such regimented control — with the need to request bathroom breaks, to raise hands for attention, to stand and deliver when called upon by judges and attorneys — was reminiscent of school days. Perhaps that explains the popular urge to rebel against it. When my friends first learned I was headed for jury duty, some volunteered advice for getting out of it. “When they ask you questions, just act crazy, say you don’t believe in laws or something,” one said. “Just wear a Che Guevara T-shirt,” came another suggestion. “They’ll cut you for sure.” But no such hijinks would get you excused from jury duty outright. When you’re not serving on a jury, you’re back in the jury pool, waiting


sHTo P aLK

BY CARRIE MARKS

SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON

Key Pieces hen Traci Landry opened Lola Boutique (622 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-9410) last November with Tiffany Treadaway, she knew their combined business acumen would put the shop in good stead. The longtime friends and business partners already operated two successful stores — Bella Lucca in Slidell and Mode in Covington — but they sought a third collaborator to elevate the store’s aesthetic. Florida transplant Jess Leigh fit the bill and became the store’s buyer. “We knew we wanted her on board,” Landry says. “She’s the one to push the envelope.” A proclivity toward more avant-garde pieces sets Lola Boutique apart, and Landry finds New Orleans shoppers more receptive to quirky fashions than her Northshore customers. The boutique’s Riverbend location is a plus for Leigh, who enjoys being removed from the hustle of more concentrated shopping districts. “We’re close to our Uptown clients and university women,” she says. “People will see us changing the mannequins while they’re in the neighborhood having lunch, and wander through (the store).” In addition to clothes, the store carries a selection of gifts like fragrant candles and the tobacco-, gin- and rosewater-scented Tokyo Milk perfumes, but Leigh says jewelry and accessories are the shop’s best-sellers. To keep merchandise current, Leigh approaches each season’s market shows armed with information from women’s style magazines, which she pores for “overarching colors, shapes and influences” rather than specific trends. For summer, she’s noticed a strong presence of menswear-inspired clothing, an ongoing emphasis on the gladiator sandal and what she terms “anything-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

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goes fashion: pulling off wearing what you like by wearing it with confidence.” Her instincts are often right on point. Rifling through a clothing rack, she points to a top featured in pop star Avril Lavigne’s most recent music video and notes the vintage-inspired T-shirts Leigh ordered for Fashion Week New Orleans have almost sold out. Landry appreciGarments, accesates Leigh’s edgy outlook because it sories and gifts allows Lola Boutique to cater to a wider are available at spectrum of tastes. “It’s a generational Lola Boutique’s difference,” Landry says. “We’ll carry a Riverbend location. dress that we’ll both wear — but it’s a question of how and with what we’d wear it. We bring more than one perspective.” Leigh cites one customer as the best exemplification of the boutique’s diverse appeal: “She comes by almost every day to shop, and she’s always talking about how her daughters are stealing her new stuff.”

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AMERICAN PHOTO SAFARI (298-8876; www.americanphotosafari.-com), a locally owned business that provides French Quarter sightseeing tours/photography workshops taught by professional photographers, offers Gambit readers a special discount effective through April 30. Make reservations on the website and use promo code GAMBIT20 to receive a 20 percent discount on the four-hour tour ($79) or two-hour tour ($59). BLUE DOT DONUTS (4301 Canal St.) celebrates its grand opening Friday, April 1, by offering its selection of hot, handmade donuts at half price. The sale begins at 7 a.m. and continues until the donuts run out. Regular business hours for the store will be 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. Tickets for the SEVENTH ANNUAL ST. JUDE DREAM HOME GIVEAWAY (www.dreamhome.org) are now available. The $100 raffle ticket buys a chance to win a home appraised at $625,000. Proceeds benefit ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL. The drawing will be held Sunday, June 12, and tickets can be purchased at IBERIA BANK locations (citywide; www.iberiabank.com) in the greater New Orleans area, on the website or by calling (800) 327-2559.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011


MUSIC: BIG EASY AWARD NOMINEES PAGE 35 STAGE: INTERSTATE FRINGE REVIEWED PAGE 48 CUISINE: COWBELL’S CHARM PAGE 53

BOY HOME PAGE 33

HARRY CONNICK JR. COMES TO THE MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

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Caribbean Muses

Kizzie Ruiz is one of Trinidad and Tobago’s top calypso singers.

A TRIO OF TOP FEMALE CALYPSO STARS PERFORM IN NEW ORLEANS. BY WILL COVIELLO

T

lar women singers. He met the three women in this show, and eventually got funding to do a workshop with them in Knoxville, Tenn., in 2009. In April 2010, he returned to Trinidad and they completed the show, which debuted in Miami in January and then moved to Denver (“Coldarado” as Caesar dubbed it). The women returned to Trinidad for Carnival, much of which revolves around calypso tents, or massive tent parties featuring the nation’s best known calypso singers. Performers follow a circuit of events set up in major cities, with five different tents in the capital, Port-au-Spain. On Dimanche Gras, the Sunday prior to Fat Tuesday, there’s a final competition, and a top calypso artist is crowned the winner, or Monarch. In 1978, Calypso Rose was the first woman to win the competition. Singing Sandra has won twice (1999, 2003). Calypso has its roots in slavery on the islands, developing as a combined storytelling/singing form by African griots, praise singers who maintained an oral history tradition. The modern musical genre emerged in the early 1900s, and the first record was produced in New York in 1914. As a live musical form, it’s marked by satire and social commentary. “It’s the poor man’s newspaper,” Ackamoor says. “Songs are all about topical events and politics.” Caesar has written songs about topics ranging from love to HIV and physical abuse. “The best part is realizing people understand the point you are trying to make,” she says. “It’s nice when people say you touched their heart.”

50

CUISINE

53

THE SQUARE

The Radiators headline the first Wednesday at the Square concert. The series continues through June 15, and headliners include Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Galactic, Tab Benoit, Kermit Ruffins and others. There also is an art market and food and drink vending supports the free concert series. 5 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Wednesday. Lafayette Square, 600 block of St. Charles Ave., 585-1500; www.wednesdayatthesquare.com

APRIL

1 3

IL TROVATORE

The New Orleans Opera Association concludes its season with Verdi’s intricate tale of love and vengence, Il Trovatore. The production stars Mark Rucker and Mary Elizabeth Williams (pictured), who also appeared in last season’s production of Tosca. Tickets $20-$126. 8 p.m. Friday; 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 529-3000; www.neworleansopera.org

APRIL

02

MEN WITH ROMY AND BIG FREEDIA

JD Samson painted her own stripes as a town crier for the LGBT rock community with New York City’s establishmentcrashing electroclash trio Le Tigre. Conceived in 2007 as a singles-remixing side-project, MEN’s bumping February debut Talk About Body (Iamsound) lays out its frank agenda in the most egalitarian arena possible: the dance floor. Romy and Big Freedia open. Tickets $12 in advance, $15 at the door. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

APRIL

04

HARRY CONNICK JR. AND ORCHESTRA

Harry Connick Jr. recently made a splash on Broadway lending New Orleans accents to a showcase of big band and jazz standards. All net proceeds from this show benefit the Ellis Marsalis Center in Habitat for Humanity’s Musicians Village. Tickets $61.05-$164.80 (including fees). 7:30 p.m. Monday. Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 287-0351; www.mahaliajacksontheater.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

he calypso music of Trinidad and Tobago is often associated with legendary male singers such as Mighty Sparrow (Slinger Francisco) and Lord Kitchener (Aldwyn Roberts). Americans may also think of Harry Belafonte, whose “Banana Boat Song” (or “Day O”), was a hit from his 1956 album Calypso, which brought a commercialized version of the genre to listeners around the globe. But in roughly the same period that Caribbean music came to be dominated by reggae and other sounds, women have joined the ranks of top calypso singers in the Caribbean nation. “There was a time when women were only in the chorus or sat on the back bench,” says singer Shereen Caesar (aka Queen Fayola), daughter of a calypso singer known as Puppet Master. “Calypso was always seen as a boys’ club. The earlier songs were often about escapades and topics weren’t always things you’d sing about with women around.” Caesar and two other stars of Trinidadian calypso, Kizzie Ruiz and Singing Sandra, complete a four-city tour at the Contemporary Arts Center this week, and there is a seminar on the genre’s history. The series was created by Idris Ackamoor and Rhodessa Jones, founders of San Francisco’s music and theater project Cultural Odyssey, and it was funded by New Orleansbased National Performance Network. Ackamoor, who plays alto saxophone in the women’s backing band, got the idea for the project when he visited the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago in 2006. A longtime fan of Sparrow’s music, he was surprised to learn that there were many popu-

EVENTS

33


noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

Deafening Buzz A WACKY WEEK AT SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST. uried among the hundreds and hundreds of hopefuls (and Duran Duran) on this year’s South By Southwest roster, one name stood out: “Tapes ’n Tapes, Minneapolis, Minn.” Who? Precisely. Every March, the Austin, Texas, music, film and technology monstrosity crowns a few kings-for-a-week, and in 2006 — my last trip there before last week — TnT was royalty. The quintet had just released its Pixiesdusted proper debut, The Loon, and it played to packed rooms every day, sometimes thrice a day, rocking the Austin City Limits television studio in the afternoon and closing dive bars on Sixth Street after midnight. After one substandard follow-up, 2008’s Walk It Off (they couldn’t), the band was an afterthought. Five years later, it’s a cautionary tale. The SXSW program is both soothsayer and graveyard, a pocket-crumpled testament to the rickety state of the recording industry and the fickle nature of music fans. Revisit the thick brochures of years past and the red-circled names you obsessed over — or the ones you didn’t — become more glaring with age. Dr. Dog parlayed 2005’s Fader coronation into two record deals and a legion of adoring fans. Its partner-in-hype that year, Bloc Party, went on hiatus in 2010. Louisiana representatives seem to operate on a different plane at SXSW, old hats at this kind of temporary invasion. The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, as always, were legacy ambassadors, performing a Thursday night ACL Live set at the Moody Theater and appearing Saturday in Danny Clinch’s film Live at Preservation Hall: Louisiana Fairytale, which captured the band’s French Quarter confab with My Morning Jacket in April 2010. (Hirsute buds Ben Jaffe and Jim James chatted in the crowd before a Wednesday night rooftop set by Empress Hotel at Light Bar.) Park the Van showcased new signees Empress Hotel among a six-pack of rockers on Friday at Mi Casa Cantina, including a punchy, revamped Generationals lineup that was ubiquitous (its 1 a.m. headlining gig was the band’s seventh in four days). Ponderosa Stomp founder Ira “Dr. Ike” Padnos dissected bluesman Bobby Rush in a Saturday interview, and bounce icon Big Freedia broke it down at a Thursday lecture (“The Importance of Bounce Movement”) and

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

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bowed to breakout star Vockah Redu on Saturday at Kiss & Fly. In a shrewd scheduling move, Quintron and Miss Pussycat closed the week with a cop-killing puppet show and smoke-shrouded outdoor set at Mohawk in the wee hours Sunday.

Danny Clinch’s documentary about the Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s collaboration with My Morning Jacket screened at South by Southwest. PHOTO COURTESY OF DANNY CLINCH

Elsewhere, there were the obligatory surprise appearances by stage-crashers Erykah Badu, Billy Gibbons and Jack White; J Mascis taking time out of a solo set to cover folkie Edie Brickell (she’s coming to Republic in May); and a panhandler offering “haircuts from the future” (despite everyone looking like some variation on Daria or Russell Brand). The single best gig may have been Pitchfork’s stunning Thursday showcase inside the Central Presbyterian Church featuring TuneYards (imagine an aboriginal Theresa Andersson), Glasser (Bjork as a possessed marionette) and Louisiana native Julianna Barwick, whose Asthmatic Kitty debut The Magic Place, a self-looped choir of pearly gates entrance music, started and summarized the evening. Then there was Kanye West — whose Saturday night concert inside the Seaholm Power Plant was the week’s worst-kept secret — getting served by New Orleans country sweethearts Hurray For the Riff Raff in the pages of The Wall Street Journal. Alynda Lee on Kanye cutting into her audience: “If Lucinda Williams was playing at the same time, we’d be screwed.” The faux beef encapsulated the wacky world of South By Southwest, where even unsigned bands get to upstage the world’s biggest stars now and again. Don’t lose hope, Duran Duran, Birmingham, U.K. There’s always March 2012.


BIG EASY MUSIC NOMINATIONS

HIT THE HIGH NOTES

MUSIC

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

The New Orleans Bingo! Show is nominated for Best Mixed Bag.

36

Meschiya Lake is nominated for Best Female Performer and Best Traditional Jazz with her band the Little Big Horns.

Dee-1 is nominated for Best Rap/Hip-Hop.

BEST FEMALE PERFORMER Helen Gillet Meschiya Lake Sasha Masakowski Theresa Andersson

BEST ALBUM OF 2010 Anders Osborne, American Patchwork Dr. John and the Lower 911, Tribal Galactic, Ya-Ka-May Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Backatown

Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns Preservation Hall Jazz Band

BEST CONTEMPORARY JAZZ

Los Po-Boy-Citos is nominated for Best Latin.

Soul Rebels Stooges

BEST GOSPEL CHOIR

Donald Harrison Sasha Masakowski Terence Blanchard

First Emmanuel Baptist Church Shades of Praise Tyrone Foster and the Arc Singers

BEST TRADITIONAL BRASS BAND

BEST GOSPEL GROUP/ INDIVIDUAL

Pinstripe Brass Band Storyville Stompers Treme Brass Band

Aaron Neville Leo Jackson and the Melody Clouds Minister Jai Reed

BEST TRADITIONAL JAZZ

BEST CONTEMPORARY BRASS BAND

Kermit Ruffins

Hot 8 Brass Band

Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk is nominated for Best Funk.

Galactic Ivan Neville and Dumpstaphunk

BEST R&B

Kermit Ruffins is the Honorary Music Awards Chairperson. Little Freddie King Tab Benoit

BEST HARD ROCK/ HEAVY METAL

Dr. John Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews Walter “Wolfman” Washington

Arson Anthem Goatwhore Haarp

BEST RAP/HIP HOP

Anders Osborne The Radiators Rotary Downs

Big Freedia Curren$y Dee-1

BEST FUNK BAND

BEST BLUES

Big Sam’s Funky Nation

Guitar Lightnin’ Lee

BEST ROCK

BEST ROOTS ROCK Honey Island Swamp Band Lil’ Band O’ Gold Paul Sanchez


CoMe PLaY WiTH US!

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March 29

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WEDNESDAY March 30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S NOJO JAM

JaMes BlaCK at 8PM

presents the music of

CHarlIe ParKer at 8PM

BRaSS BaND JaM

2011

MAR.

EVERY SATURDAY AT MIDNIGHT

PLaY HOUR

EVERY WEDS. THURS. FRI. 5-8pm

Monday 28

BOB FreNCH aNd tHe

OrIGINal tUXedO Jazz BaNd

thursday 31

Burlesque Ballroom

sHaMarr alleN

starring

TRiXiE MiNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

aPrIl 2011

sunday april 3

Friday april 1

tYler’s reVIsIted FeatUrING

leON “KId CHOCOlate” BrOwN saturday april 2

dON VaPPIe

GerMaINe Bazzle Monday april 4

BOB FreNCH aNd tHe

OrIGINal tUXedO Jazz BaNd

JOIN US FOR FRENCH QUARTER FEST APRIL 7-10 irvinmayfield.com For more information: IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

Lakeview • 504-288-3080

37


HIT THE HIGH NOTES

BEST COUNTRY/FOLK

BEST WORLD/REGGAE

Hurray for the Riff Raff J. the Savage Spencer Bohren

Casa Samba Ensemble Fatien Panorama Jazz Band

BEST ZYDECO

BEST MIXED BAG

Cedric Watson et Bijou Creole Chubby Carrier and the Bayou Swamp Band Lil’ Nathan and the Zydeco Big Timers

Matt Perrine and Sunflower City The New Orleans Bingo! Show Tin Men

BIG EASY MUSIC NOMINATIONS

MUSIC

BEST EMERGING

BEST CAJUN Feufollet Lost Bayou Ramblers Pine Leaf Boys

3 Pc. Spicy Brian Coogan Band Revivalists

BEST LATIN

BEST DJ/ELECTRONICA

Los Po-Boy-Citos Otra Vivaz

Gypsyphonic Disko DJ Soul Sister DJ T-Roy

Top left: The Preservation Hall Jazz Band is nominated for Best Traditional Jazz. Right: Aaron Neville is nominated for Best Gospel. PHOTO BY SARAH FRIEDMAN

Bottom left: Galactic is nominated for Best Funk.

NOBA Presents

cupcake displays

for your next celebration

TheeaST Village oPera comPany ParSonS dancewiTh

A DAnce/Rock opeRA event!

april 16, 8 p.m. | mahalia Jackson Theater

3 locations:

819 W. Esplanade Ave, Kenner 6233 S. Claiborne Ave, Uptown 800 Metairie Rd, Metairie

www.thekupcakefactory.com (504)464-8884

The phenomenal Parsons Dance returns with the full-evening dance/rock opera Remember Me, a collaboration with the Grammy-nominated East Village Opera Company. With brilliant digital effects and a hip soundtrack of classic arias performed by EVOC, the always innovative David Parsons transforms a tragic tale of star-crossed love into a “wholly new and visually arresting” (Broadwayworld.com) evening of high-voltage dance. The program includes his unforgettable signature masterpiece, Caught!

“ParSonS enTerS The realm of PoP SPecTacle wiTh a Vengeance!” official hotel

official airline

See clips at nobadance.com

TickeTS Selling faST. Secure your SeaT Today.

Tickets $20-$80

discounts available for students, seniors and groups.

To order, call

800.745.3000

TickeTmaSTer.com

or

–villAge voice

504.522.0996 nobadance.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

custom

39


LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 29 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Sam Doores & the Tumbleweeeds, Phillip Roebuck & Morgan Okane, 10

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER — Michaela Harrison, 6 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 10 BMC — Dana Abbott Band, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Notes & Quotes Songwriters Open Mic, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Nervous Duane, 7; Gas Light Street CD release, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — New Orleans Nightcrawlers, 8 D.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Marc Stone, 4:30; Jay B Elston, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Salvadore Liberto, 8

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3 OAK — Reed Alleman, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Jimmy Carpenter, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars Feat. Shannon Powell, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Johnny J & the Hitmen feat. Derek Huston, 8:30

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Thelonious Monk Institute Ensemble, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Two Fools on Stools, 1; Butch Fields Band, 5; Mojo Trio, 9

12 BAR — Brass-a-holics, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Abi Aaronson, 8; Buddy Mann, 9; Biff Rose, 10

preview

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Seguenon Kone & friends, Kossa Diomande, Dr. Michael White, Martin D. Zagbo, Boubacar Cissoko, 9

OAK — Honey Island Swamp Trio, 8

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; My Graveyard Jaw, 9

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Gashcat, Elephant Apple, Engine, 10

ONE EYED JACKS — Black Angels, Suuns, 8

BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Tim Laughlin & Duke Heitger feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — FICUS, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 BMC — Jameson Family Band, 6; Maryflynn & Prohibition Blues, 8:30; Blues4Sale, 11

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Coleman Jernigan Project, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5; Tom McDermott & Meschiya Lake, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6

D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — Buskers Ballroom, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Big Krit, Freddie Gibbs, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Lovey Dovies, Dead People, Adults, Opposable Thumbs, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Ashley Beach, 9; Randy Mack, 10 OAK — Billy Iuso, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Joint Chiefs of Jazz feat. Frank Oxley, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Beth Patterson, 9

PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8

Big Queasy

A demo-turned-label debut, Suuns’ October 2010 LP Zeroes QC (Secretly Canadian) doesn’t feel comfortable in either category. It doesn’t feel comfortable anywhere. The Quebecan rock band’s current single, “Pie IX,” is uneasy to the point of queasiness: sung in a distorted, indecipherable serial killer’s whisper (best guess: “Would you like to kick it with me/ Would you like to kick it?”) with its spare handclaps, stray guitars and flitting shakers on distraction duty while a dying fluorescent-bulb bass hum slowly snuffs out the lights. Suuns (pronounced “soons”) is comprised of deliberate sound sculptors, drawing attention more for the precise moods brought on by their sounds — itchy “Marauder,” seething “Arena,” teeth bared on affronted opener “Armed For Peace” — than their songs. But there’s a madness to their method. Headlining is Austin, Texas’ Black Angels, whose November visit to Tipitina’s with Black Mountain was a relentless double set of droning night visions. Tickets $15. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

MAR

31

Suuns with Black Angels 8 p.m. Thursday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

SIBERIA — Junk Culture, Microshards, DJ Urine, Mikronaut, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 WEDNESDAY AT THE SQUARE —

601 S. Maestri Place, 585-1500 — The Radiators, 5 Windsor Court Hotel (Polo Club Lounge) — Zaza, 6 ZADDIE’S TAVERN — Cindy Chen & Mike Sklar, 8

Thursday 31 12 BAR — Sick Like Sinatra, 10

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Sour Soul, 10

BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9 THE BEACH — Chicken on the

Bone, 7

BLUE NILE — Gravity A, 10

BMC — Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Eudora & Deep Soul, 8:30; Low-Stress Quintet, 10

BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Brandon Foret, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Mark Carson & Friends, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; New Fun, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Tuba Skinny & Erika Lewis, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Sam and Boone, 6 D.B.A. — Andrew Duhon, 7; Chris Thomas King, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Darrian Douglas Project, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Chuck Chaplin Trio, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES — Deekline, Digital, Noogs & Steeza, Kaizor, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — WayGoners, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

PRIME EXAMPLE — Ed Perkins, 8 & 10 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Chris Ardoin, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9 SIBERIA — Hooten Hollers, Don Nails & the Brokeass Band, Loren Murrell, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Aaron Goldberg Trio, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStara, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 1 12 BAR — Felice IMA, 10

BABYLON LOUNGE — Control Room, Acadias and others, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — New Fun, Rotten Cores, 10 BIG AL’S SALOON — Brandon Foret Band, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — High in One Eye, Torgo, Dongles, 9

INTERFERENCE SPORTS BAR — Kyle Turley Band, 8

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Mike Ryan & Friends, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Nelson Lunding, 7; Dana Abbott Band, 11 THE MAISON — Some Like it Hot!, 7; Coyotes, Mississippi Rail Company, 27 Lights, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Radiators, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alex Bosworth, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

OLD POINT BAR — Mission Three, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Mixed Nuts, 9:30

SHAMROCK BAR — High Voltage, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9 THREE MUSES — Mumbles, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

TIPITINA’S — Hot 8 Brass Band, Stooges Brass Band, 10

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Foret Tradition, 9

Saturday 2

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Alex Peters & Quartet, 9:30

CARROLLTON STATION — Iguanas, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Pressure Johns, 7; Motherload, 11 CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Happy Talk Band, R. Scully’s Rough 7, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Royal Players Brass Band, 10 FUHRMANN AUDITORIUM — Danny O’Flaherty & Noel Nash, 7:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Sparrowhawk, Heatrash, DJ 69000, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Senses Fail, Ghost Inside, Man Overboard, Transit, Dodging Cathrine, 5:30 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Reckless Kelly, 9:30

HOWLIN’ WOLF — DMC Nola, 9

YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Lagniappe Brass Band, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — One Year Anniversary Bash feat. Toxic Rott, A Hanging, Dummy Dumpster and others, 3 BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Tin Men, 11:45

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Shamarr Allen, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Philip Manuel Quartet, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Burgundy, 9

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CARROLLTON STATION — Pontchartrain Wrecks, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Mission Three, 7; Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 11 PAGE 42

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Matthew Mayfield, 9

Wednesday 30

MUSIC

41


MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 41 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

CLEVER WINE BAR — Scott Sanders Quartet feat. Olivier Bou, 8 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Eric Lindell, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DRAGON’S DEN — Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers, Truth Universal’s Grassroots, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Happy Talk Band, Steve Eck, Felix, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Honeyboy Carencro CD release feat. Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

KERRY IRISH PUB — Denise Marie, 5; Wilson & Moore, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 11 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Michael Liuzza, 2; Honeyboy Carencro, 3; New Orleans Moonshiners, 4 THE MAISON — Kelcy Mae, 5; Kristina Morales, 7; Yojimbo, 10 & midnight

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 5; Charley & the Soulbillyswampboogie, 8; Blues4sale, 11 OLD POINT BAR — Ian Cunningham, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Alexis Marceaux CD release, Sun Hotel, Butter & Jelly, 9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

42

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Swing Kings feat. William Smith, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — MEN, ROMY, Big Freedia, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9:30 SIBERIA — Suplecs, Let the Night Roar, Wildfires, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Astral Project, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Kyle Turley Band, 8

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10

On the Air is a rollicking

rendition of a live radio broadcast from 1945! The cast of five and a live band brings the era to life with a timeless musical score, comedy and more!

THREE MUSES — Mission Three, 7; Andy J. Forest & the NO Town Band, 10

Friday & Saturday Evenings Dinner seating 6pm, Show 8pm Show only

Sunday Brunch Matinee

Brunch seating 11am, Show 1pm

$60 $30 $60

SponSored in part by the LouiSiana economic deveLopment’S office of entertainment deveLopment and the inStitute of muSeum & Library ServiceS.

ReseRvations Recommended! call 504-528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org WW2-14271_OnTheAir_Gambit_newphoto.indd 2

3/15/11 2:28 PM

TIPITINA’S — To Be Continued Brass Band, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10

Sunday 3 BANKS STREET BAR — Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes Open Mic, 9

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Gal Holiday, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 7

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7 CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara Trio, 3

HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Seneca, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Sunday Brass, 9 THE MAISON — Benny Grunch & the Bunch, 4; Rhythm Jesters, 7; Margie Perez, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 5; Javier Olondo, 8 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingster feat. Mark Braud, 8

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Boogie Men, Wise Guys, 5 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — John Mahoney Big Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10

THREE MUSES — Debbie Davis, 7 TIPITINA’S — Sunday Music Workshop feat. Paula Rangell, Johnny Vidacovich, 1; Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

Monday 4 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat.

Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DRAGON’S DEN — Mars, Most Heinous, Nola Fam, Domenic, 10 FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB — Steve Keith, 8

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — Harry Connick Jr. & Orchestra, 7:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30

PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. William Smith, 8 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7 THREE MUSES — Kristin Diable’s Songwriters Revue, 7

classical/ concerts MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD —

675 Lafitte St., Mandeville, (985) 624-3147; www.mandevilletrailhead.com — Fri: Mandeville Live! presents Anais St. John, 6:30

PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS —

81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old Military Road), Bush, (985) 892-9742; www.pontchartrainvineyards.com — Sat: Jazz ’n the Vines presents Jon Cleary, 6:30

TULANE UNIVERSITY DIXON HALL — 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5000 — Sat: Classic Guitar Series presents Florian Larousse, 8; Mon: New Orleans Friends of Music presents Simone Dinnerstein, 7 URSULINE CHAPEL — 2701 State St. — Sun: Musica da Camera, 4

XAVIER UNIVERSITY — Musical

Building Recital Hall, 1 Drexel Drive, 486-7411; www. xula.edu — Wed: Daniel Washington & Wilfred Delphin, 7

XAVIER UNIVERSITY CENTER BALLROOM — 1 Drexel Drive, 520-7568 — Wed: Dr. Michael White presents “The African Roots of New Orleans Jazz”, 7 For more listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Vigilante Justice

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) — A politician poised

to win a Senate seat falls for a beautiful ballet dancer. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14 BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) — After Earth is attacked by

unknown forces, Los Angeles becomes the last stand for mankind. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

BEASTLY (PG-13) — The mod-

ern-day Beauty and the Beast follows a teen transformed into a monster to find true love. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) — FBI agent

Malcolm Turner who disguises himself as an old woman. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9

Director Glen Pitre’s 1986 film Belizaire the Cajun gave Acadiana its first heroic Cajun figure since the early talkie Evangeline (1929). In the raucous adventure set in 1859, a Cajun herbalist healer named Belizaire (Armand Assante) tries to revive an old relationship with Alida Thibodaux, who’s married to Matthew, one of a group of vigilantes who want to rid the region of Cajuns. Belizaire’s cousin Hypolite Leger is one of the targets for expulsion by lynchmob, and when Matthew turns up dead, both men are accused of murdering him. The corrupt sheriff discovers that manipulating justice can be a double edged sword, and the plot twists continue all the way to the gallows. The film is being re-released on its 25th anniversary. It was filmed in Louisiana with the assistance of Robert Redford and Robert Duvall, who makes a cameo appearance. — Will Coviello

Belizaire the Cajun A PRIL 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. Friday-Thursday Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 304-9992; www.chalmettemovies.com

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID 2: RODERICK RULES (PG) —

Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward relinquishes the throne. AMC Palace 20, Prytania

Chineses woman will do whatever it takes to snag the apartment of her dreams. Chalmette Movies

GNOMEO & JULIET (G) — The

animated film is a spin on the Shakespeare tale with feuding gardeners and their lawn gnomes and flamingos. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 HALL PASS (R) — Two women

grant their husbands one week of freedom. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen who hides a secret

identity and extraordinary abilities must elude an enemy who seeks to destroy him. AMC Palace 20, Grand

JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) —

Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston star in the romantic comedy about a plastic

SATURDAY APRIL 2

ONE YEAR

ANNIVERSARY BASH! ALL DAY EVENT LIVE MUSIC STARTING AT 4PM

The UNNATURALS RON HOTSTREAM TERRANOVA The ROTTEN CORES F The LOLLIES SH REE EE FR OW OW The BILLS H S DUMMY DUMPSTER INDIAN GIVERS DONKEYPUNCHER A HANGING SCARECROW SONIC BOOMBOX FAT CAMP TOXIC ROTT

THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin

LIMITLESS (PG-13) — A loser

tries a designer pharmaceutical that makes him extremely focused and confident. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) — A

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) —

Amanda Seyfried stars in the reboot of the fairy tale. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) —

slick Los Angeles attorney who operates out of the back of his Lincoln lands a case that isn’t what it appears to be. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Zack Snyder’s vivid actionadventure follows a girl who escapes to a fantasy world. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MARS NEEDS MOMS (PG) — In

(Liam Niason) awakens after a car accident and discovers another man has assumed his identity. AMC Palace 16

UNKNOWN (PG-13) — A man

the animated film, a 9-yearold finds out just how much he needs his mom when she’s abducted by Martians. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY

PAUL (R) — An alien (voiced by Seth Rogen) and some English sci-fi nerds have a close encounter while journeying to

tally hits the teenaged son of the Easter Bunny with his car, and then takes him in.

HOP (PG) — A slacker acciden-

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 3/29

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 3/30

Khris Royal & Dark Matter

THU 3/31

The Trio

FRI 4/1

The Radiators

SAT 4/2

The Radiators

SUN SUN 4/3 3/13

feat. Johnny V., George Porter Jr. + Special Guests

Joe KrownTrio Trio Joe Krown

w/Walter “Wolfman” feat. Russell Batiste &Washington Walter & RussellWashington Batiste Wolfman

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FILM

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LISTINGS INSIDIOUS (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A family

begins to experience inexplicable phenomena after their son falls into a coma.

DELFEAYO MARSALIS & UPTOWN JAZZ ORCHESTRA

ELLIS MARSALIS QUARTET ASTRAL PROJECT

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BERGA: SOLDIERS OF ANOTHER WAR (NR)â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The film tells the

story of captured American soldiers sent to concentration camps instead of POW camps. Call 528-1944 ext. 229 for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. Tuesday, Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944

THE EXILES (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The 1961

documentary follows a group of Native Americans who live in Los Angeles. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday, The Porch 7th Ward Neighborhood Center, 1943 Pauger St.

GIANT (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The 1956 film starring Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson and James Dean depicts the life of a Texas cattle rancher and his family. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday. Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com PELADA (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The film docu-

ments the culture of pick-up soccer games in 25 countries. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Monday, then April 5-7, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Curry stars

in the rock movie-musical. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

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Gable, Jeanette MacDonald and Spencer Tracy star in the 1936 film about a singer and a priest who try to reform a saloon owner in the days before the 1906 earthquake. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and April 6, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

SECOND EUROCHANNEL SHORT FILMS TOUR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The center

hosts thematic programs of award-winning short films that pay tribute to a changing Europe. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, free for members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

FILM FESTIVALS 5707 Magazine St. ¡ 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

PELICAN Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OR FILM FESTIVAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The theater hosts Nunez

Community Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual

Lion cubs are undeniably cute. Unfortunately, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of denial that goes into the decision to adopt an animal that will grow into a 550-pound adult, which will instinctively seek to dominate his own pride. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what lead to Lambert (pictured) escaping his Ohio ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pen and running wild on a local highway. He was returned to a horse trailer, where he and female Lacy produced four cubs. The Elephant in the Living Room is about the spike in ownership of exotic animals in the United States. It presents an amazing list of animals people try to keep as pets, including all sorts of big cats, highly poisonous snakes (African puff adders), armadillos, hyenas, chimpanzees and even an elephant (eventually taken from its owner because he could not adequately feed it). The film is full of news stories of exotic animal ownership gone awry, leaving stunned neighbors describing mountain lions running through their suburban neighborhoods and a 16-foot boa constrictor escaped into the walls of a home occupied by a woman confined to a wheelchair. The odd truth is that most states donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t regulate ownership of exotic animals, and no-one knows how many tigers and other large animals are kept as pets. The main figure in the film is Tim Harrison, a public safety officer in Ohio who created Outreach for Animals, an organization dedicated to finding appropriate places for exotic animals abandoned, lost or rescued from abusive owners. He makes a very strong case that many people who own exotic animals are not capable of caring for them. The cameras follow him across the country to a Las Vegas animal auction and Florida, where he interviews police who have a python problem similar to Louisianaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nutria problem: abandoned pet pythons were released into an environment where they have no natural predators and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve reproduced so prolifically they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be eradicated. The film also spends a lot of time with Terry Brumfield, Lambertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owner, who was able to overcome chronic depression and health problems partially because of his love for the lion. He clearly loves the animal, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t justify Lambertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treatment. The film wades into the conflict between individuals who assert a right to own animals and communities concerned about risks posed by large predators, but it is most concerned with the well-being of the animals caught in the middle. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Will Coviello

APRIL

1-7

The Elephant in the Living Room 9:30 p.m. Friday-Thursday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

film festival, which features short films and â&#x20AC;&#x153;short shortâ&#x20AC;? films in nonfiction/ documentary, animation/puppet and

music video categories. 7 p.m. Thursday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Works

by Tony Benjamin and R. Tucker Fitz-Hugh Jr., through May 12. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — “The Art of Dr.

Seuss: Rare Editions Collections,” prints and sculpture by Dr. Seuss, through May. Opening reception 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. “

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Taft

McWhorter, jewelry by Belle Bijoux and glass photography by Drake, through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. ASYLUM. 608 Julia St., 525-4633 — “Horses,” works by Joshua

Walsh through May. Opening Saturday.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Shoot for the Wall,”

photographs by Zack Smith, through May. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “Time Line,” work on canvas by Karen Jacobs, through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

Buzz,” oil on canvas by Carolyn Evans; “Walk About,” monotypes by Barbara Brainard; both through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — “Introspection,” mixed

media on canvas by Sean Self, through May 5. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Ghost Fleet,” sculpture and works on paper by Raine Bedsole, through May 22. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Koosh,” works

by Paul Campbell, through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Today’s Specials,” works by

Will Smith Jr., through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“The Theatre of Cultural Strata: A Visual Journey of Urban Archeology and Cultural Veneer,” a multimedia exhibition by Krista Jurisich, through May 2; “Halcyon Days,” paintings by Justin Forbes, through May 8; opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Moments Behind

the Eyes,” works by Nathan Durfee, through April 23. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “Deep

Blues Outsider Menagerie,” a group exhibition of musicinspired works, through May 28. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. THE OLD IRONWORKS. 612 Piety St., 908-4741 — “Automata,” an exhibition of kinetic, robotic and mechanical sculpture, through April 9. On view 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. daily, or by appointment. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Grandeur,” acrylic paintings by Michael Marlowe, through April. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. YA/YA. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306; www.yayainc. com — “The Artist’s Relationship to Womanhood,” works by YA/YA female artists. Exhibit is on view 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERIES 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Paintings by

Tim Trapolin, through April 18.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — “Mwwwaha-

hahhhaaa!” mixed media by Ryan Ballard, through Wednesday. Closing reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

811 GALLERY. 811 Howard Ave., 524-3872; www.francoalessandrini.net — Photographs by Ric-

cardo Lorenzi, through April 10.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photo-

graphs by Michael Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado, through April 30.

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “Order

of Effects/Accomodating the Mess,” a group exhibition, through Sunday. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Works by Elsie

Semmes, Abe Geasland, Kiki Huston and Phillip Spence, through Thursday.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St.

Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Read My Lips,” paintings by Terrence Sanders, through Monday. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Byrdie’s Landing,”

carved wood sculpture installation by Swamp Deville, through April 6.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — “An

Artist’s Rage: Crimes Against Humanity,” paintings and installations by Gustavo Duque, through April 20. D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Surroundings,” mixed-

media sculpture by Allen Wynn, through Thursday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Emit,” works

by William DePauw, Sean Friloux and Cory Knott, through Sunday. FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “Perma-

nence,” paintings by Timothy Cavnar, through Sunday.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Works

by Lee Deigaard, Alex Podesta, Tippy Tippens and Dave Greber, through Sunday.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “The River,” a group

invitational exhibit featuring local and regional artists, through April 30.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

HIGHWATER GALLERY. 7800 Oak St., 309-5535 — “The Shamrock

Shimmy,” prints, paintings, handmade jewelry and oil paintings by Serene Bacigalupi, Forrest Bacigalupi, Luiny Ripera and Brian Poirier, through April 15.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works

by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JAZZ & HERITAGE GALLERY. 1205 N. Rampart St., 558-6100; www. jazzandheritage.org — “Femme

Fest,” an exhibition of female artists curated by the Women’s Caucus for Art of Louisiana, through April 15.

review Strange Alchemy The objects on view are all too familiar, though not necessarily reassuring. Wrecking balls, ladders and water, lots of water, offer no end of troubling associations — and not just for local associations. Those same images also resonate in the wake of the recent horrific flooding in Japan, but in Dawn Dedeaux’s Unseen expo, they attain an eerie quality of detachment. A wrecking ball hanging from a huge chain evokes an oracular omen of sorts, while ghostly ladders crafted from clear Lucite suggest platonic or even semi-celestial forms. The severed links of anchor chains lying on, or rising from, the floor also are tipped with clear Lucite in an intimation of dense matter suddenly transformed into something more like light. This near-metaphysical mixing of metaphors is especially evident in some glass cylinders with photographic portraits — headshots — seemingly fused into the glass. Filled with water, which functions like a distortion lens, they have a strange undulating quality, yet their slightly bewildered expressions dispel the more obvious associations of drowning in favor of something more otherworldly. Like the other works, they intimate mortality while touching on mystery, as if beyond the turmoil of the unspeakable there lies the possibility of wonder, or perhaps even grace. In the art world, logos and labels are ordinarily the realm of pop art, which at its best provides wry social commentary while making banality seem like fun. In the hands of Acadiana artist Troy Dugas, however, they morph into strange tapestries and marvelous mandalas that come across as ethereal if not mystical. Flame #1 is reminiscent of the sacred pyres of the Zoroastrians, and only up close does it become clear that it was cobbled together from shredded whiskey labels. Others recall the intricate sacred arabesques of the Sufis, Hindus, and even the symbolism of the Kabala, in a graphical iteration of the medieval alchemists’ attempts to transform lead into gold — only here banality is transmuted into beauty and beyond. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU APR

16

Unseen: Sculpture and photography by Dawn Dedeaux Recent Work: Mixed-media collages by Troy Dugas

Arthur Roger Gallery, 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “A Toast to Louisiana

Seafood,” a group exhibition of oil and acrylic works, through Thursday.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Sublimi-

nal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “Wrapped,” sculpture by

Sidonie Villere, through April 9. “The Theatre of Cultural Strata: A Visual Journey of Urban Ar-

cheology and Cultural Veneer,” a multimedia exhibition by Krista Jusrisich, through May 2. JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki, paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through Thursday. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries. com — “Confluence,” works

by Kathryn Hunter, through April 16.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Altered States,” works by Herman Mhire, through April 23. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “The Saints Go Green,” works by Chad Ridgeway, Teri Walker, Carol Rivers, Tish Douzart and Pamela Conway Caruso, through Wednesday. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Cuba on my Mind,” photographs by Katie Wainwright and Denise Tullier-Holly, through April 30. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Spring

ART

45


ART

LISTINGS

ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

MARCH 30 - JUNE 15, 2011 MARCH 30 APRIL 6 APRIL 13 APRIL 20 APRIL 27 MAY 4 MAY 11 MAY 18 MAY 25 JUNE 1 JUNE 08 JUNE 15

The Radiators Trombone Shorty & Orleans Ave + Soul Rebels Brass Band Kermit Ruffins + Coot Anders Osborne + Honey Island Swamp Band Irvin Mayfield & the Jazz Playhouse Revue Marcia Ball + Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue George Porter, Jr. + The Lee Boys The Iguanas + Los Po-Boy-Citos Tab Benoit + Navy Band New Orleans Full Steam Brass Band

Eric Lindell + The Revivalists Galactic + Marc Stone Cyril Neville & Monk Boudreaux

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — “Water,”

oil on canvas, watercolor on paper and graphite on paper by Jan Aronson, through April 14. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www. rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen

Grumich, Vitrice McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing. RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 5259988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by

Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George

+ Gravy

Rodrigue, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www. rosetreeglass.com — Hand-

Concession sales keep it free. No outside food or drink please!

blown glass work, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

WWW.WEDNESDAYATTHESQUARE.COM

46

Wednesdays 5-7:30 pm @ Lafayette Square

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by

®

Sheila Phipps, ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Ms.

Informed: An Homage to Women Who Have Changed History,” ceramic work by Susan O’Brien, through Wednesday.

Preferred Partner

AUDITIONS for

ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www. sttammanyart.org — Photo-

graphs by Robert Dutruch, through April 9.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing

APRIL 25th, 2011

NEW YORK CITY THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

For complete details: www.StompOnline.com/auditions

My Religion, Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through Thursday.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www. stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

through April 12.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

The museum features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill Binnings,

Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Dual Tense,” works by Robyn Denny; “Functional for your Purpose,” works by Jason Derouin; both through Sunday. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — Works by

Sarah Stiehl, through May 15.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www. vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 2999455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — “Ana-

log Frontiers,” a collection of steampunk art curated by Theodora Eliezer, through Thursday.

MUSEUMS CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Then & Now,” works by 14 artists who have exhibited at the center, curated by Dan Cameron, through June 12. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Drawn to

Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,” drawings by Hirschfeld, through Saturday. “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,” through April 20.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — “All That Glitters,” an

exhibition of Carnival jewelry,

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www. louisianafilmmuseum.org —

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For:

American Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24.

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Photography as a

Healing Art,” photographs by Jim Belfon, through Saturday. “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection, through May 28. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “The Sound of One

Hand: Painting and Calligraphy by Zen Monk Hakuin,” through April 17. “Lofty Ideals: Selections of Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,” through April 24. “Different Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through May 15, and more. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-cen-

tury pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Big-Hearted Pots,”

ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; “North Carolina Craft Now,” an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through April 10. “A Life in Glass,” glass vessels by Richard Ritter; “Selections from ‘Partial to Home,’” photographs by Birney Imes, through April 15. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit, and more; ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through Nov. 30. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


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THEATER 13 LESSONS. Xavier University, Administration Building Auditorium, 520-7525; www. xula.edu — The performance explores the theme of adult literacy in New Orleans. Call 520-5423 for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. Thursday. DEBAUCHERY. Le Chat Noir, 715

St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Mark Routhier directs Pat Bourgeois’ soap opera featuring Kyle Daigrepont, Sean Glazebrook, Matthew Mickal and others. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX.

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

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Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre. com — Theatre UNO presents the play in conjunction with the Tennessee Williams/ New Orleans Literary Festival. Tickets $8 seniors and UNO students, faculty and staff, $12 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

GYPSY. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — The musical based on the memoirs of burlesque dancer Gypsy Rose Lee focuses on her and her sister’s childhood with their overbearing stage mother. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday through April 9.

HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH.

Backyard Ballroom, 3519 St. Claude Ave., 945-9936; www. frontmanshow.com — The musical tells the story of an East German rock ’n’ roll star who was the victim of a botched sex-change operation. Email skinhorsetheater@ gmail.com or visit www.skinhorsetheater.org for details. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. ThursdayFriday, midnight Saturday through April 9. MAMA DRAMA. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — The show is a collection of vignettes about

New Orleans Fringe Festival organizers selected two popular local shows from its November 2010 event for a double bill with two Houston Fringe shows dubbed Interstate Fringe, which was presented in both cities. Goat in the Road Productions’ brilliant comedy Our Man lead off the New Orleans showcase. In it, creators William Bowling and Christopher Kaminstein star as 1950s-era radio show hosts who get carried away broadcasting letters from soldiers serving abroad. The entire show takes place in a five-by-five foot Plexiglas box, which accentuates the distorted reality they fabricate for listeners as they repeat and revise a letter from Ronald Reagan to his first wife. Reagan never served overseas, but that doesn’t restrain their enthusiasm and soon Reagan’s exploits involve fighting the Germans behind enemy lines alongside Knute Rockne (who died in 1931). Eventually, they realize they have created not just a hero but a monster. The duo will reprise the show in April at Trouser House Gallery. Also from New Orleans, Chard Gonzalez Dance Theatre reprised The Divine Feminine, which offered its own unique brand of slapstick humor. In both costumes and solo dances, the five women in the piece invoked and mocked gender images, especially in relation to dance, for example a suffering ballerina. Interspersed between the solos, Chard Gonzalez and Christopher Forsyth, wearing spandex, reincarnated over-the-top scenes from the movie Flashdance, which featured an aspiring ballerina doing energetic dance routines, stretching the thin premise that the pure titillation of the film was some form of artistic expression for Jennifer Beals’ character. Gonzalez pushed the madness further by doing one dance while spinning furiously on roller skates. Houston’s Rogue Improv solicited the word “unicorn” from the audience and ran with it. The half-hour performance started with a trio of unicorn hunters, conjured other monsters and often focused on awkward moments between friends. At one point, Omar Adam and Antoine Culbreath jumped into side-byside chairs and each embarked on his own idea, one miming driving and one pretending to type at a computer. Neither abandoned his premise and the idea of bridging them was pushed to impossible extremes before they found an absurdly satisfying conclusion. The comedians were quick on their feet, knew when to end a joke and when to revisit a developed theme. The one-woman show Yes, Cassandra was disappointing. Brandy Holmes starred as Cassandra recounting the wreckage of the Trojan War. She stalked the stage, and spasmodic stops and jerks seemed to highlight her outrage at the slaughter, which she had forseen. The monologue, however, was presented like a fragmented modernist performance poem. It dwelt on a disjointed list of war atrocities and didn’t do enough to animate Cassandra as a fully realized character. — Will Coviello

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bestofneworleans.com STAGE the joys, trials and tribulations of being a mother. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. MARRIAGE CAN BE MURDER. Le Cafe De Bon Temps, 40261 Hwy. 190 East, Slidell — The comedic murder-mystery takes place at a wedding and reception, which turns sour after someone kills a mother-in-law. Reservations are required. Tickets $50 (includes dinner). 6 p.m. Sunday. ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen at The

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the stage musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www. stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday through June 26.

PARALLEL LIVES. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400

St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — C. Patrick Gendusa and Kevin Smith star in the gender-bending comedy that is a lighthearted take on the battle of the sexes. Visit www.noctc.org for details. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, then Thursday-Saturday through April 16.

SECONDARY CAUSE OF DEATH. Rivertown Repertory Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — The play is Peter Gordon’s sequel to the comedic murder-mystery Murdered to Death, a satirical whodunit set in England. Tickets $30 general admission, $28 seniors and students, $15 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. THE SOUND OF MUSIC. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — A nun leaves the convent to serve as governess for the children of a strict widower in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical. Tickets $15-$35. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. THREE ONE-ACT PLAYS BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS. Southern Rep Theater, The Shops

YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU. Playmakers

Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www. playmakersinc.com — George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play follows two star-crossed lovers during the Depression. Tickets $15 general admission, $10 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin Mayfield’s

Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

BUSTOUT BURLESQUE. House of Blues, 225

Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com — The burlesque troupe performs. Tickets $29.40 (includes fees). 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Saturday.

RICK GRAHAM’S 2011 RENEW REVUE. Le Chat

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — The annual cabaret show celebrating life in New Orleans features Yvette Hargis, Amanda Zirkenbach, Matthew Mickal and Jefferson Turner. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday.

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at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — The theater hosts world premiers of Tennessee Williams’ one-acts The Pretty Trap, The Magic Tower and Every Twenty Minutes. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

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EVENTS

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Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Saturday 2 CHILDREN’S PARTY & EASTER EGG HUNT. New Orleans

Opera Association’s Women Guild Home, 2504 Prytania St., 899-1945 — The Junior Committee of the Women’s Guild of the New Orleans Opera Association’s annual event includes a visit from the Easter Bunny and egg hunt, a performance by Opera a la Carte, a light lunch with drinks and more. Call 529-2278 ext. 227 or gklein@neworleansopera. org for details. Tickets $5 children, $10 general admission. 10 a.m. to noon. EASTER EGG HUNT. Longue

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Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — The event features crafts, facepainting, an egg hunt and more. Admission $6 members, $8 nonmembers. 9:30 a.m to 10:30 a.m. members, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. general admission.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

MASTER GARDENERS.

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Hollygrove Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www. hollygrovemarket.com — Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans teaches young gardeners to plant, paint, identify good and bad bugs and feed the chickens. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Sunday 3 MOUNT CARMEL EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA. Mount

New Autohaus. Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans has moved in to their new contemporary Autohaus showroom. This new facility is unlike any other Mercedes-Benz dealership in our State. Over 20 Mercedes-Benz vehicles are displayed on our new showroom alone, which has more than tripled in size. We invite you to stop by and see what makes Mercedes-Benz of New Orleans the leader in the luxury vehicle market and how we are changing the future of luxury automotive sales and service in New Orleans.

Tom Benson Owner

Jamie Moll V.P. / Gen. Manager

Carmel Academy, 7027 Milne Blvd., 288-7630; www.mtcarmelcubs.org — The event begins with a Mass and then includes breakfast, a visit from the Easter Bunny, games, cookie decorating and an egg hunt. Call 288-7626 ext. 217 for details. Admission $15 per adult and child in advance, $15 day of event. 9 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 29 EUCLID RECORDS TRIVIA NIGHT.

mbofno.com 3727 Veterans Boulevard Metairie, LA • 504-456-3727 Service open on Saturdays

Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The game tests knowledge of New Orleans and non-New Orleans music trivia, and prizes include bar tabs, record store gift certificates and more. 8 p.m. Tuesdays.

BE THERE DO THAT

MIXOLOGY MADNESS. Victory,

339 Baronne St., 522-8664; www.victorycocktails.com — At the W Girls New Orleans event, bartenders compete to make the best signature drink to raise money for the New Orleans Women’s Shelter. Visit www.wgirls.org for details. 7 p.m.

REQUIESCAT IN PACE: LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT JUSTICES AT REST. Law Library

of Louisiana, Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., Suite 1190, 310-2550; www. lasc.org — Law library director Georgia Chadwick and Ann Masson, Tulane Preservation Studies Program assistant director, discuss Chief Justices and Associate Justices who served on the Louisiana Supreme Court. Call 525-3377 for details. Free admission. 6 p.m.

Wednesday 30 ART IN BLOOM. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The

five-day event features more than 100 exhibitors showcasing floral designs, sculptures and sceneries. A patron and preview party featuring food and drinks, auctions and music by Anais St. John kicks off the event 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday. Visit www.noma.org/ AIBtickets for details. Wednesday-Saturday. ARTS COUNCIL OF NEW ORLEANS GRANT WORKSHOP. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The workshop, which is recommended to anyone seeking grants from the council, covers the grants offered, program priorities, eligibility requirements, application process and tips on how to submit a competitive application. Call 595-8461, 5958471 or visit www.artscouncilofneworleans.org for details. 5:30 p.m. KIDS RETHINK NEW ORLEANS SCHOOLS FUNDRAISER. AIA

MODEL GREEN HOUSE. Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott. com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. A WOMAN’S SPIRITUAL JOURNEY SERIES. St. Francis

Xavier Parish Center, 444 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8340340; www.stfrancisxavier. com — Catholic Women in Action hosts the four-part Lenten series that includes Mass followed by panel discussions. Call 310-6981 or email awaldron@arch-no.org for details. 8 a.m.

Thursday 31 THE BOAT SHOW. Ernest N.

Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — The event features many types of water crafts on exhibit, as well as an appearance by Twiggy, the water-skiing squirrel. Call 376-3679 or visit www. theboatshow.net for details. Admission $8, free for children under 12. 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday-Friday, noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. HAPPY HOUR SALON.

New Orleans Center for Design, 1000 St. Charles Ave., 525-8320; www.aianeworleans.org — The event supports the Rethinker’s Architectural Program, a program for children ages 8 to 15, in their goal to fund a research trip. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — The event celebrates local art and writing endeavors with drinks, presentations and discussions. This week’s event features Brad and Jim Richard. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

LIVING WELL WITH DIABETES.

INCREDIBOWL BOWLING EXPERIENCE. All Star Lanes,

East Jefferson General Hospital, Conference Center Domino Pavilion, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The fair for individuals with diabetes and their caretakers features presentations about eye disease, exercise, how to cook diabeticfriendly meals and more. Call 456-5000 for details. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

3640 Williams Blvd., Kenner — The event features the entire New Orleans Hornets team bowling to benefit Ochsner’s Change the Kids, Change the Future program to help fight childhood obesity. Call 593-4981 or visit www. hornets.com for details. Tickets start at $500. 7 p.m.


bestofneworleans.com EVENTS PRESS CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS GRIDIRON.

Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — The event looks back at the year’s headlines with a satirical spin by members of the New Orleans journalism community and excerpts from Ricky Graham’s Renew Revue. The event, which benefits the Press Club’s scholarship fund, also features hors d’oeuvres and a raffle. Visit www.pressclubneworleans.org for details. Admission $60 (includes $10 drink credit). 6 p.m. TASTINGS AT THE TRACK: OLD WORLD VERSUS NEW WORLD. Fair Grounds Race

Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., 943-1415; www.fairgroundsracecourse.com — The wine-tasting event features more than 30 choices from a variety of producers, as well as a selection of gourmet cheeses. Admission $25. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. WINE PAIRING & TASTING . Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — The tasting featuring Bordeaux wines, served with a complementary menu, benefits the Whole Planet Foundation. Pre-registration is required. Admission $20. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Friday 1 AL COPELAND FOUNDATION APRIL FOOL’S DAY GOLF CLASSIC. Stonebridge Golf Club

of New Orleans, 1500 Stonebridge Drive, Gretna, 394-1300; www.stonebridgegolfofno.com — The golf tournament benefiting cancer research features food from local restaurants, appearances by special guests and a $5,000 “hole in one” prize. Call 620-3727, email jdesselles@alcopeland. com or visit www.alcopelandfoundation. org for details. Admission starts at $175. 10:30 a.m. COVINGTON BREWHOUSE BEER STROLL . Covington Trailhead, 419 N. Hampshire St., Covington — Guests can sample beers from local breweries in the “stroll” of area businesses. Email gottaluvcov@covla.com for details. Admission $10. 5:30 p.m. FISH FRYDAYS. Our Lady of the Rosary

THE O-MAZING RACE. The Bourbon Pub and Parade Club, 801 Bourbon St., 5243788; www.bourbonpub.com — Teams of four to six people pursue clues through the French Quarter in the Ogden Museum’s interactive art and culture scavenger hunt. An after party follows the hunt. Call 5399616, email cconnor@ogdenmuseum.org or visit www.ogdenmuseum.org/race for details. Admission $35 race and after-party, $10 after-party only. 7 p.m. race, 9:30 p.m. after-party. PUTTS FOR PETS. Bayou Barriere Golf Course, 7427 Hwy. 23, 394-9500; www. bayoubarriere.com — The golf tournament benefits the LA/SPCA. Call 3399080 or visit www.la-spca.org for details. Admission $135 per person, $500 per group of four. Noon. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 2 ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park, 333

Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.

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Church, 1322 Moss St., 488-2659 — The church hosts weekly fish fry events during Lent. Visit http://fsjna.org for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

51


EVENTS

LISTINGS

slidellartleague.info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. BUILD NOW’S 9TH WARD CRAWFISH BOIL BLOCK PARTY.

Lower 9th Ward, Corner of Tricou Street at N. Prieur Street — The crawfish boil celebrates Build Now’s 40th house and its continued revitalization of the 9th Ward. Call 373-6962 or visit www.buildnownola.com for details. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. C.G. JUNG SOCIETY OF NEW ORLEANS PROGRAM. Parker

Memorial United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., 895-1222 — David Schoen presents a workshop called “The Psychodynamics of Addiction.” Visit www.jungneworleans. com for details. Admission $35 members, $45 non-members. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. CRESCENTS ON THE RIVER GALA .

Port of New Orleans, 1350 Port of New Orleans Place, 522-2551; www.portno.com — The Crescent River Pilots’ Foundation presents the event. Patron party 7 p.m., 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. gala.

CRIMESTOPPERS TEEN PEACE SUMMIT. UNO Lakefront Arena,

6801 Franklin Ave., 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — Musicians Bobby V., Mystikal, Kourtney Hart, Mannie Fresh, Lupe Fiasco and others appear at the event promoting antiviolence through lectures about crime prevention and conflict resolution. Call 8378477 or visit www.crimestoppersgno.org/teensummit.php for details. Admission $10-$25. Noon to 5 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

DRINK FOR JAPAN . Avenue

52

Pub, 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243; www.avenuepub. com — The local chapter of the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program Alumni Association hosts the event benefiting the NOLA Japan Quake Fund. The event features Japanese beers, refreshments, a raffle and more. Visit www.jetaanola.com for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 6 p.m.

E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF.

Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ECOLE BILINGUE FETE FRANCAISE . Ecole Bilingue

De La Nouvelle Orleans, 821 General Pershing St., 8964500; www.ebnola.com — The school’s annual event features live music by Charmaine Neville, Panorama Jazz Band and others, as well as food from local restaurants. Free admission. 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

FRERET STREET FESTIVAL . Freret

Street, 4400-5000 blocks; www.thenewfreret.com — The festival features a children’s area, more than 200 local food, crafts and collectibles vendors

BE THERE DO THAT and four stages of music, with performances from 101 Runners, Tin Men, Big Sam’s Funky Nation and others. Visit www.freretstreetfestival.com for details. Noon to 5 p.m. LEUKEMIA CUP REGATTA POST-RACE PARTY. Southern

Yacht Club, 105 N. Roadway St., 288-4200; www.southernyachtclub.org — The Mississippi/Louisiana chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s party features live music by Band of Brothers and Sunpie Barnes and the Louisiana Sunspots, food and drinks from local restaurants and a silent auction. Visit http://msla.lcr.llsevent.org for details. Admission $50 per person, $75 per couple. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.

LSU AGCENTER SPRING GARDEN SHOW. Botanical Garden, City

Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9386; garden.neworleanscitypark.org — The event features garden product exhibits, a plant sale and a children’s area. Call 4839471 for details. Tickets $3 children, $6 general admission. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. NEW ORLEANS REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY HOME AUCTION .

Xavier University, University Center Auditorium, 1 Drexel Drive, 486-7411; www.xula. edu — NORA will auction more than 94 Road Home and REALM properties at the event. Visit www.gilmoreauction.com for details. 10 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS SPRING FIESTA . New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association, 826 St. Ann St., 581-1367; www.springfiesta. com — The New Orleans Spring Fiesta Association’s event features home and walking tours, a presentation of the Spring Fiesta queen and her court, a brunch at Commander’s Palace and other activities. Home tour admission $22 in advance, $25 day of event; walking tour admission $12 in advance, $15 day of event. Call 581-1367 or visit www.springfiesta.com for the schedule and other details. Through Sunday. OLD ALGIERS RIVERFEST. Mardi

Gras World, 233 Newton St., Algiers, 361-7821 — The festival features live music by the Irvin Mayfield Quartet, Dr. Michael White’s Liberty Jazz Band, Rebirth Brass Band, Leah Chase and others, plus food from local restaurants and an arts fair. Visit www.oldalgiersriverfest. com for details. Noon SaturdaySunday. ST. BERNARD PROJECT’S FOUNDATION FOR HOMES & HOPE. House of Blues

(Foundation Room), 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com — Chefs from local restaurants prepare a fivecourse gourmet dinner to benefit the St. Bernard Project’s rebuilding program. Email rsvp@stbernardproject.org or visit www.stbernardproject. org for details. Admission $100

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF LOUISIANA REFRIGERATOR ART AUCTION . The Foundry, 333 St.

preview Harry Fest

A block party celebrating the life and legacy of the late Rev. Harry Tompson, Gambit’s 2001 New Orleanian of the Year, will be held on Sunday, April 3, in the 200 block of Baronne Street. Dubbed “Harry Fest,” the celebration marks the 10th anniversary of Tompson’s death at the age of 64 — and kicks off the 160th anniversary of the Church of the Immaculate Conception, known to generations as “the Jesuit Church,” which Tompson pastored in the final years of his life. Tompson is remembered for many reasons — among them his service as president of Jesuit High School and as director of the Manresa Jesuit Retreat House in Convent, La. — but his lasting legacy is the four missions he launched from the downtown parish he revitalized before his death. Tompson parlayed his many friendships among the city’s elite to begin renovating his church and to launch initiatives connecting his friends and the church to underserved youth and homeless people in Central City. Among his ongoing success stories are Cafe Reconcile, the Good Shepherd Nativity Mission School, Boys Hope Girls Hope and the Harry Tompson Center for the homeless. “Father Harry started a renovation at the church, and we are trying to finish the job — especially the stained glass,” says Immaculate Conception parishioner Cathy Espenan. “We’re also amazed at how successful all of his outreach programs are. Each one is changing lives, every day. One man, even 10 years after his death, has made a difference in the lives of many people.” The church’s current pastor, Rev. Stephen Sauer, noted the “significant advances in racial harmony that we have experienced” as a result of Tompson’s work. “Harry took a mostly white, non-urban flock — which had gathered more for love of him than anything else — and he committed them to the work of outreach and reconciliation.” Harry Fest will begin at 11 a.m. with Mass at the church, followed by a street party featuring music by Michael “Soulman” Baptiste, The Good Shepherd School Choir, New Orleans Mystics Motown Review and Bag of Donuts. The festival also will feature food, family fun, arts, crafts, and more. — Clancy DuBos

APR

3

HARRY FEST 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday 200 block Baronne Street, 529-1477; www.jesuitchurch.net

(includes dinner and cocktail pairing). 7 p.m. cocktail hour, 8 p.m. dinner. ST. LOUIS CEMETERY NO. 2 TOUR. St. Louis Cemetery No.

2, Claiborne Avenue between St. Louis and Iberville streets; www.saveourcemeteries.org — Save Our Cemeteries hosts a guided walking tour of the cemetery. Pre-registration is required. Call 525-3377, email membership@saveourcemeteries.org or visit membership@ saveourcemeteries.org for

details. Admission $15 members, $18 non-members. 10 a.m.

Sunday 3 BYWATER NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION HOME TOUR .

The tour features homes in a variety of styles and sizes in the area between Mazant and Pauline Streets. Call 494-3705 or email robynrealt@aol.com for details. Tickets $12 BNA members, $15 general admission. Noon to 4 p.m.

Joseph St., 586-1309 — The school’s annual fundraising event features an art auction, food, an open bar and live music by Ingrid Lucia and DJ Soul Sister. Call 274-4580 or visit www.isl-edu.org for details. Tickets $60 in advance, $100 at the door, $125 patron party. 5 p.m. patron party, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. gala.

IRISH, ITALIAN AND ISLENOS PARADE . The parade rolls down

Judge Perez Drive in Chalmette. Call 442-1006 for details. 11 a.m.

NEW ORLEANS BRUNCH EXPERIMENT. Howlin’ Wolf, 907

S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Home chefs cook brunch dishes to compete for a cash prize and the chance to advance for a national title in Brooklyn, New York. The competition is open to anyone. Email thefoodexperiments@gmail.com for details. Admission $20 in advance, $25 day of event. Noon to 4:30 p.m. NICOLE MURPHY MEMORIAL TIGER RUN . Audubon Park,

Shelter 10, 6500 Magazine St. — The 5K run/walk memorializes the LSU medical school student who was killed at the World Cup last year, and proceeds benefit LSUHSC student-organized community projects. Visit www.medschool. lsuhsc.edu/tigerrun for details. Admission $15 before March 27, $20 day of race. 7 a.m. registration, 8:30 a.m. race.

Monday 4 SAVE OUR LAKE & COAST GOLF CLASSIC . Chateau Golf and

Country Club, 3600 Chateau Blvd., Kenner, 467-1351; www.chateaugc.com — The

Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation’s golf tournament also includes lunch, dinner, an awards party, door prizes and more. Call 836-2205 for details. Admission $125. 11:30 a.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS ARTS COUNCIL OF NEW ORLEANS GRANTS. The council awards

grants to support arts activities in Orleans, Jefferson and Plaquemines Parishes. Visit www.artscouncilofneworleans. org for details. Application deadline is April 27. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST. The museum seeks

essays on the topic “Why should we remember Pearl Harbor?” for the contest that awards a cash prize. The entry divisions are middle school (grades 5-8) and high school (grades 9-12). Essays are accepted online only. Visit www.nationalww2museum.org/essaycontests for details. Submission deadline is Thursday.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS FRENCH QUARTER FESTIVAL.

Volunteers are sought for the festival (April 7-10). Visit www. fqfi.org for details. FRIENDS OF LAFITTE CORRIDOR.

The group seeks ambassadors for its annual Hike the Lafitte Corridor event April 16. There is a training session Saturday. Visit www.folc-nola.org or email lafittegreenway@gmail. com with the subject line “ambassador” for details.

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL. Volunteers are need-

ed for the festival’s production team. Visit www.nojazzfest. com/volunteer for details.

WORDS CHRISTEE ATWOOD. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The author discusses In Celebration of Elastic Waistbands: Episodes of Imperfection, Insanity and Occasional Enlightenment. 7 p.m. Tuesday. C.S. HARRIS. Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses Where Shadows Dance. 1 p.m. Saturday.

DEBRA SHRIVER . New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The author signs Stealing Magnolias: Tales From a New Orleans Courtyard. 5 p.m. Friday. ED HASLAM . Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author signs and discusses Dr. Mary’s Monkey. 5:30 p.m. Thursday.

JOHN WADE II . East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The editor discusses How to Achieve a Heaven on Earth. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

TABATHA COFFEY. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The star of the Bravo show Tabatha’s Salon Takeover signs and discusses It’s Not Really About the Hair. 6 p.m.

TROY GILBERT. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The author signs Dinner With Tennessee Williams. 7 p.m. Friday.

TROY GILBERT, GREG PICOLO & KENNETH HOLDITCH . Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author and chefs present a signing and tasting around Gilbert and Picolo’s Dinner with Tennessee Williams. 6 p.m. Tuesday. YVONNE SPEAR PERRET. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and discusses Yat Wit: Chicken Gumbo for the New Orleans Soul. 2 p.m. Saturday.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <TAPPING INTO RELIEF EFFORTS > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The Avenue Pub (1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243; www.< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <theavenuepub.com) hosts a beer-based benefit for Japan Saturday, April 2, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $20, which includes two beers and light food. Proceeds benefit the local NOLA Japan Quake Fund (see www.jetaanola.com). In an WHAT ongoing benefit, Meson 923 (923 S. Peters St., 523-9200; www. Cowbell meson923.com) has pledged all proceeds from sales of special sake cocktails and a new dish, a Japanese-inspired ramen soup WHERE with Berkshire pork and crawfish, to the Japanese Red Cross. 8801 Oak St., 2988689; www.cowbellVINTAGE PAIRINGS nola.com The annual French Quarter Wine Festival is underway at Le Meritage (1001 Toulouse St., 586-8000; www.lemeritageresWHEN taurant.com) in the Maison Dupuy Hotel. The festival is a Lunch and dinner series of wine dinners and seminars. Dinners continue each Tue.-Sat. Tuesday and Wednesday through May 4, and there’s a closing reception on May 13. Tickets range from $95 to $145 per event. RESERVATIONS For details visit www.frenchquarterwinefestival.com. Not accepted

am

B

HOW MUCH

Moderate

WHAT WORKS

Pasture-raised meats, many house-made touches WHAT DOESN'T

A loud dining room short on seating options

CHECK, PLEASE

A burger boutique with gourmet comfort food

More Cowbell AN ORGANIC BURGER BOUTIQUE OPENS ON OAK STREET.

Krista and Brack May opened Cowbell. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

W

ity plays out on the menu, too. Grilled chicken — sourced from pasture-raised birds — is served with tortillas, beans and avocados, and grilled fish tacos are topped with mirliton slaw. A first-rate clam chowder makes an unexpected appearance, but the menu sticks close to the comfort food script. The macaroni and cheese is inevitable but also excellent, bound with a rich, smoky, layered cheese sauce. Fries are middleweights, falling somewhere between frites and steak fries. They’re good dipped in sweet, thin, house-made ketchup and irresistible when squirted with Cowbell’s “agogo” sauce, a spiked-up mayo that tastes like a honeyed aioli. Beware that the frequently changing “adult” grilled cheese is sometimes too complex and persistently undersized. Even escorted by a mug of soup on the side, it makes an unsatisfying lunch. Meanwhile, the vegetarian burger is thoughtfully crafted with beans, sweet potato, peppers, squash and broccoli all ground together and griddled up. Like the beef burgers, this goes on a potato roll that’s buttery and soft yet burly enough to keep its form. Cowbell remains BYOB, though May hopes to have a bar in place by Jazz Fest. The kitchen has a few steaks from organically raised cattle, though they aren’t necessarily grassfed. For some diners, none of this matters. Some may dismiss the organic and grass-fed items as the trend du jour, but Cowbell caters to people who care about the difference. For those who are merely curious about it, this restaurant provides a very accessible entry point. After all, it’s just a burger.

IN

FIVE PLACES FOR INSTANT PICNIC TAKE-OUT FOOD BETWEEN THE BREAD

625 ST. CHARLES AVE., 324-5304 www.betweenthebreadnola.com

Enjoy its smoked salmon sandwiches in nearby Lafayette Square.

JOHNNY’S PO-BOYS

511 ST. LOUIS ST., 524-8129 www.johnnyspoboy.com

Haul your favorite po-boy to Woldenberg Park on the riverfront.

KJEAN’S SEAFOOD

236 N. CARROLLTON AVE., 488-7503

Break open a bag of boiled crawfish under City Park’s oaks.

TARTINE

7217 PERRIER ST., 866-4860 www.tartineneworleans.com

Get a pate sandwich and eclair and head to Audubon Park.

VINE & DINE

141 DELARONDE ST., 361-1402 www.vine-dine.com

Take a brisket hoagie to the Algiers levee for a view of the city.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Mazzoni Toscana Rosso

MONTALCINO, ITALY / $15-$19 RETAIL

An extraordinary Super Tuscan at an affordable price, Mazzoni is a blend of 28 percent Merlot and 72 percent Sangiovese. After fermentation, the wine spent six months in large French oak barrels and six months in oneyear-old French barriques, followed by two months bottle aging. In the glass, aromas of ripe red berries, plums, spices and earthy notes yield to a palate of bright red cherry and blackberry fruit with fine tannins, good acidity and a lingering finish. Drink it with veal, pizza, pasta and dishes with marinara sauce. Buy it at: Cork and Bottle and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Orleans Grapevine Wine Bar and Bistro, Harrah’s New Orleans and Ristorante del Porto. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

e still call it comfort food, but the realm of burgers and fries, mac and cheese and apple pie can be pretty rigorous these days. As more fine-dining chefs cast themselves as comfort-food champions, the stakes — and prices — for these durable standbys have risen. But just what makes one guy’s burger worth more than a ten-spot? The answer at Cowbell is pretty clear, and the approach overall at this new Uptown eatery is refreshingly straightforward. Burgers anchor Cowbell’s brief menu, and they’re made from grass-fed and organically raised cattle. This meat costs more, and so do Cowbell’s filling though hardly belly-busting burgers, which begin at $11. Fortunately, the difference registers on the palate as well as the pocketbook. You can taste it in the meat’s texture and acidity, in the dense crumble and firmness of this lean yet distinctively flavorful beef. Onion compote is the most upmarket condiment here, but this isn’t a burger you want to dress up too much. Cowbell was opened in December by Brack May, one-time chef at the CBD’s now-defunct Cobalt, executive chef at the nonprofit teaching cafe Liberty’s Kitchen and brother to Olympic volleyball champion Misty May-Treanor. His wife Krista PendergraftMay is co-owner and manager, and she’s responsible for much of the found-object sculpture and contemporary art decorating the place. The building has the feel of a border town roadhouse down at the end of Oak Street, very close to the parish line. This hip, Southwestern sensibil-

five 5

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>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) < < < < < < <345-6789; < www.tryyuen.com — specialties include fried > > > > > > > >House > soft-shell crab topped with Tong <<< Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style >> stir-fried alligator and mushrooms <in<oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > >COFFEE/DESSERT > Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128

Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

54

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings,

baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www.

budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled

shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N.

ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso

fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer

Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 5615171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No

reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAU-


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OUT2EAT RANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, panfried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to

Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Chef Michelle Matlock offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/

MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iber-

ville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of poboys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

57


OUT2EAT tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platter, plus daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING

— 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Gourmet pizzas made with homemade dough are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

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WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

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4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or choose from a host of salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

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SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — You can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

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R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

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REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Hours: Mon-Sat 7am-6pm • Sun 7am-3pm

Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef, hot sausage or fried seafood poboys and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 5208530; www.grandislerestaurant. com — Seafood options include raw oysters and lobster St. Malo, which combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson

Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — The six-piece includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at

the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY —

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie

Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


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• Group • Private • Basic • Board & Train • Advanced • Consultations • Competition

Exp 4/1/2011

464-1267

Residential & Commercial

JCM’s Dog Training

5 YEAR WARRANTY

GULF STATES AIR

including

After Construction Cleaning

Beautiful & spacious BRAND NEW KENNELS with Courtyards & Acreage to run, play & enjoy the freedom of the being outside!

$

49

cleaning needs

A unique and upscale facility with the dog’s best interest at heart.

condenser & installed

Service Calls $ 50

CLEANING SERVICE

SPORTS & FAMILY CHIROPRACTOR Dr. JohnWaguespack

Harry's Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown• 504-896-1500 Metairie • 504-896-1550

WITH SECOND LOOK, WE FIND IF ANYTHING GOT LEFT BEHIND.

504-289-4344

RELIEVING PAIN caused by accident, injury, fatigue, or stress • METAIRIE

722 Phosphor Ave

• COVINGTON

203 West 21st Ave

H&R BLOCK® 3501 Severn Ave. • Metairie, LA 70002 Phone: 504-455-3095 • Mon-Fri 9:00 am to 8:00 pm Sat and Sun 9 am - 5 pm Error rates are for tax season 2010. Fees apply for Second Look reviews or if you have prepare a corrected or amended return. 2If H&R Block makes an error on your return, we’ll pay resulting penalties and interest. If you are audited, we’ll explain your audit notice and the documentation you should provide to the auditor. 2011 HRB Tax Group, Inc.

1

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

3 TON A/C

CRISTINA’S

Let me help you with your

“A LITTLE BIT OF OLD NEW ORLEANS ON THE NORTHSHORE!”

OFFICES

Susana Palma

AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING

Family Owned & Operated

504-899-0005

GARDEN CENTER 10367 Airline Hwy • Open 10-3 M-F

For more info, schedule and helpful blogs go to: www.TransformNOLA.com

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician

11am to 7pm daily

Call us today for your free consultation

8422 Oak St. NOLA 985-640-2648

- Chip/Spot Repair - Colors available - Clawfoot tubs & hardware FOR SALE

2101 MAGAZINE STREET

10367 Airline Hwy . St. Rose

504-466-8813 AT

Strength, balance and flexibility!

Residential • Commercial

Come Visit Us At Our New Location!

FREE

LANDSCAPE

Yoga & Personal Training

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE • SERVICES • EVENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS • AND MORE

59


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS

GUIDES/TOURS

Salon Front Desk Coordinator

LA’S TOP TOUR ATTRACTION

Part time. Evening hours & Sat. to start. More flexibility after training. Personable & fashion forward a must. Please apply in peraon at: 4033 Veterans Blvd., #C (2nd Floor), Metairie,

seeks articulate, personable guide. Bilingual a plus. PT/FT. Call 9-5, Laura Plantation 225-265-7690.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

in the Warehouse District

Instructional Coordinator: Computer Cluster

Computer Cluster. Develop instructional material for computer teachers at 2 charter school campuses. Must have Master’s in Education or any IT or Computer related major plus 36 mo. experience. In lieu of Master’s degree, will accept Bachelor’s degree plus 5 yrs progressive resp. exp. Mail resume to Pelican Educational Foundation, 5552 Read Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70127, Attn: Mr. Eski. Ref. Ref. to Ad#ID

LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

in search of talented HAIRSTYLIST COLORIST APPRENTICE Please Call

568.0050

for interview FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Coleman Young Farms, Muleshoe, TX, has 2 positions for hay & grain. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.65hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/3/11 - 12/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8134386.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

CSS Potato Farms, Dalhart, TX, has 3 positions for grain & potatoes. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/10/11 - 11/30/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX3081108.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Grace Ag Partnership, Greenville, MS, has 2 positions for grain & oilseed crops. 3 mths experience required w/ references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.10hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/9/11 11/1/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 29653..

Seeks Exp Pantry/Line Cook. Call 504-299-1179 & provide resume for interview.

café b Ralph’s BRennan’s newest property at 2700 Metairie Road Opening Soon

Jeffrey Roper Farms, Plains, TX, has 2 positions for grain & oilseed. 3 mths experience required w/references; valid and clean DL; tools & equipment provided; housing and daily trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 4/11/11 - 12/15/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6150525.

HEALTH/FITNESS

Metairie Restaurant seeks Experienced GRILL/FRY COOK Call Lynn 456-7470 for interview

RETAIL

VOLUNTEER

is looking to fill 2 positions: Sales, a Prep/Serve/Clean helper, Must be able to work weekends. Call Crescent City Cooks!, Riverwalk 529-1600.

FT or PT Tailor is needed for ladies clothing store. Experience preferred.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

Wednesday, March 30th 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm 111 Veterans Blvd (Heritage Plaza), Suite 150

Hiring Experienced Servers, Experienced Cooks, & Valets Bring resume for on-site interviews

Immediately Hiring

Certified TRX Trainer

Send resume to: info@salirefitness.com 504-821-4896

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

COOKING SCHOOL/STORE

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

SALES/BRIDAL

Excellent opportunity for long term employment. Retail sales preferred. Salary+commision. We will train.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

504-523-7027

• JOB FAIR •

MISCELLANEOUS Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

THE BEACH HOUSE

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

For more information call Julie 504-539-5525

60

ELEVEN 79 Restaurant

TEACHERS/INSTRUCTORS GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

Coaches needed for Gymnastic & Tumbling classes. PT schedule is avail & flexible. For more info: 884-0907


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe METAIRIE

GENTILLY

WAGGAMAN

Great 1 Bdrm Condo for Rent in Metairie! Gated Community, ground floor unit, reserved parking outside your door! Fitness Ctr & Pool! Granite & SS appliances. Washer/Dryer. Conv. to Hosp, I10, Shopping! $950/mo. Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates O: 504-838-7649 or C: 504-669-4677

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

55 Richelle Street 3BD/2BA Additional Large Lot $135,000 Prudential Gardner Kathy Hunter 985-688-5873

FRENCH QUARTER

RIVER RIDGE

SLIDELL

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine

9012 Rosecrest Lane 1,420 sqft, lot 62x120 Newly renov 2 bdrm, 2 bth, original hw floors, appl. inclu. Covered carport and additional shed in bkyd. Great River Ridge nbrhd. $189K.

Elegant Contemp., 2 MSTR STES, 4 Bd, 3.5 Bth, 2 Wood Burn Fpl, 4k Sq. Ft. Rear Yard. Wide Gate Street Access. Park Like Setting. $299,500.

ONLY 4 UNITS LEFT. STARTING AT 93,500

Jennifer Shelnutt French Quarter Realty 388-9383

Call (504) 915-3220

CLASSIFIEDS MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN! REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

OLD METAIRIE VACANT LOT - METAIRIE HEIGHTS

50 x 120. Ready to build $120,000 (504) 451-8118

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 Lshaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

COVINGTON 227 S. ORCHARD LANE

Garden Home, gated, 3br, 2 ba wd flrs, 10’ ceil, granite. 1634 sq ft liv, 2250 total. $249K. 985-892-5533

227 CODIFER BLVD

CORPORATE RENTALS 1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

3 SMALL OFFICES - CBD

From 135 - 220 sq ft. Can be subdivided. $500 each. Parking available. Call 561-1216 for info.

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750-$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

605 VALLETTE ST

3br 2ba house. Updated kit & ba, wd fls, high ceil, cent a/h, w/d hkup, walk to ferry, parks, $1500. 713-204-5342

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

WEEKLY RENTAL

Musicians, Buskers, and Artists only. No Deposit, No Lease. $50/week. 504-943-9149

CARROLLTON 8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

KENNER 3BR/2.5BA TOWNHOUSE

O/S prkng, wtr paid, all kit appls, priv yard, conv. location, cable ready, Pets ok. $1000/mo. 504-913-4803.

METAIRIE LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" 248 Cherokee 2br/2ba "University Area Condo" 7522 Benjamin 1br/1ba "Cool Pool Condo" 912 Harding Dr. 1br/1ba "Bayou Efficiency"

$1000 $1200 $700 $600

4328 BANCROFT DRIVE $625,000

Properties For Lease and For Sale

Full Service Property Management Over 30 years of selling properties & filling vacancies!

504-736-0544

www . mauriceguillot . com

A LARGE WATERFRONT HOME ON PRESTIGIOUS STREET. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist

Old Met 2 br lower duplex. Lg fenced yd, off st pkg, small pet OK. Walk to everything! $1100. 504-908-6751

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

Call Property New Orleans Susan 504 231-2445 or Greg 985 781-4504

REAL ESTATE OLD METAIRIE

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

BAYOU LIBERTY AREA

61


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS 8131 PLUM ST

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

Annunciation St. @ Napoleon

Join us for the next MfC Meeting

Multifamily Report by Schedler & Associates with Madderra & Cazalot Thursday, April 7, 2011 • 12 noon

4320-C Annunciation St. $650/Month + One Month Deposit. No Smokers. Available April 15th Furnished Kitchen. Washer / Dryer provided. (no quarters needed!!!) Water Paid. On 3 Bus Lines! On Parade Route! NEAR EVERYTHING!!! Walk to Tipitina’s, Grocery, Eateries, Shops along Magazine. Rear 1st-floor apartment No dogs. Cats are OK. Please don’t call after 9 pm. 504-288-3264

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

Vincent’s Restaurant 4411 Chastant St., Metairie $30 members • $35 non-members

FRENCH QTR LOFT

1220 Chartres. 2 bdrm apt. w/balc. Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. $1500/mo. Mike, 9194583.

FRENCH QUARTER

1 bedroom, 1 bath, balcony with view of Mississippi & Fr Qtr. $1000/mo w/ dep. Call 504-909-2104.

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEFRONT LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504756-7347

MID CITY 217 N. SCOTT ST.

2340 Dauphine Street

BeechGroVe & cLaiBorne hoMes tammy schindler 504- 373-5581 804 sherry lane westwego, lA 70094 managed by nDC real estate management

Downtown Development Group

& metro wiDe ApArtments 304-hoUse (4687) www.Brunoinc.com PartnershiP in Protection Commercial services Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

137 Canvasback Drive, st. rose, lA 70087

62

(504) 486-5846

5403 PoweLL street

new orleans, La 70123-2306 (504) 731-8777 www.fd-cf.com

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 936 ESPLANADE-1 bd/ 1 ba $750 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

837 ROYAL - 2 bd/ 1.5 ba

$3200

539 DUMAINE 1 BD/ 1BA $1500 921 CHARTRES 1 BD/ 1BA $1050

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

800 sq/ft., wd flrs, 2 firepl mantels, ceil fans, LR, DR, kit, bath w/clawfoot, hall closet, BR w/closet. Cent a/h, DW, fridge w/ice & wtr, Stackable W&D, small front yd, EZ on st pkg. Walk to Rouses, bars & restaurants. Pets OK w/fee. Avail April 1. $780/lse. (504) 908-5210 for appt.

COMPLETELY REMODELED

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

TREME 1137 TREME

2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 Blk to St. Charles

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

1014 WASHINGTON AVE

Completely renov 2 br, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood flrs, w/d hkps, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail May 1

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-2396566 or mballier@yahoo.com

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

2011 GEN PERSHING 2 APARTMENTS

3 BR, $1800; 1BR, $1100. Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apts you’ll see. Beautifuln’ghborhd. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smoke no pets. Paula 504-952-3131

2368 CHIPPEWA

1BR/1BA, tile flr, side entrance, pets negotiable. $600/mo + deposit. Owner on premises. Avail April 1. 228-8687

4322 LAUREL STREET

AT Napoleon 1 br half dbl, furn kit, w/d, porch, large yard. Great location on parade rt! $650/mo. 905-4372.

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

APARTMENTS with

interested in Joining the CounCil? ContaCt: Kathy d. BartheleMy, CounCil direCtor (504) 837-2700 or Kathy@hoMe-Builders.org www.MfCno.CoM Affiliated with

H O M E B U I L D E R S A S S O C I AT I O N O F G R E AT E R N E W O R L E A N S 2424 N Arnoult Rd • Metairie, LA 70001

Washers and Dryers • Gated • Home Office Spaces Pet Friendly • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance 24/7 Online Resident Services Features vary by community.


CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE 7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

Suites at Exchange Centre

935 Gravier Street, Suite 600 • New Orleans, LA 70112

Where Innovation and Opportunity Connect Executive suites at an incredible value with a unique array of services and a unique approach to pricing – offering one very reasonable price that includes everything! Exterior and interior offices available ranging from $425-$900.

1, 2 & 3

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400 2/1.5 prkng, 2nd flr, new carpets &paint $895

Parkview St.John #405 2/2 Great Views,2 prkng spaces,pool $1350 1137 Burgundy

2/2 Pvt Ctyd, hi ceils, hrdwd flrs, Exc Loc $1500

1824 Dauphine

3/2.5 lrg bdrms,3 blacs,lg kit,2 mini bars! $2650

829 Ursulines #7

2/2 renov,blac,prvt patio&prvt pool $2800

829 Ursulines #5

1/1 lovely apt in the lower FQ.

1108 Dauphine #5

1/1 Renov apt with courtyard $850

718 Barracks #5

1/1 3rdflrapt,commoncrtyd,beautiful! $800

1463 Pauger #1

1/1 recentlyupdated,grndflr,commoncrtyd$950

1119 Dauphine #9

1/1 2nd flr apt. basic cable & wtr paid. $950

1418 Chartres “C”

studio gated,furn,Common crtyd,no kitch $700

$995

renov,greatloc,patiow/hottub $219,000 updated,modern, 533 sqft $242,000 fab condo w/balc! 1040 sqft $369,900 grnd flr w/pool! 481sqft $189,000 3rdflw/tonsofcharm 608sqft $199,000 spacious,fabloc!Crtyrd,1188sqft$399,000

REAL ESTATE AUCTION

S p e r r y Va n N e s s G i l m o r e Au c t i o n By Order of Local Banks & Others

April 11th - 14th

Kenner - 3648 W. LA State Dr. (Home) 3713 E. LA State Dr. (Home) 431 Holy Cross (Home) 506 John Hopkins (Home) 629 Chablis (Home) Metairie - 1617 S. Arnoult (Residential Lot) Luling - Lot 71 Lac Verrette (Residential Lot) New Orleans - 2010 - 12 Second St. (4-Plex) 2520 - 22 Derbigny St. (Duplex) 7740 Allison (Home) Gretna - Lots 29E & 29F Fried St. (R-2 Lots) Algiers - 11 Sugarberry Pl. (Residential Lot)

5 PROPERTIES SELL ABSOLUTE A C C E L E R AT E D M A R K E T I N G

Only $3995 Call 504-365-1655

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘02 AUDI TT ROADSTER Low miles $11,995 504-368-5640

64K miles, $11,995 504-368-5640

®

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

5400 block of STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys all units. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

Adorable gated condo. 1 bdrm/1bath. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $1100. Call (504) 432-1034.

GRT LOCATIONS!

MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/ mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

‘06 ACURA TL $16,995 504-368-5640

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, scrn porch. $1050 + deposit. Owner/ Agent, 442-2813.

S. FRONT - NR. CHILDREN’S HOSP

Newly renov cottage. 1BR, lr, kit, w/d hkups. $750 + dep. No sec 8, no pets. New Owner Special: $100 off 1st mo. rent. 504-891-1889, 473-0821

RENTALS TO SHARE HOUSEMATE

Renovated, , 1900 sq ft half double. Medium size BR. Wireless internet & Direct TV in den and util incl. $500. No pets, no smokers. 377-8768

GARAGE SALES/FLEA MARKETS SAMPLE SALE Sat April 2nd

‘06 INFINITY G35 COUPE

ONE DAY ONLY! 8am - ??? Toys • Books • Gifts & much more! 2618 St Charles Ave between 3rd & 4th Streets.

‘08 HONDA ACCORD LXP

PETS

$16,995 504-368-5640

33K Miles, $14,995 504-368-5640

‘09 ACCORD COUPE EXL V6, LOW LOW MILES $21,900 504-368-5640

‘09 HONDA CIVIC DX, 4 door $11,995 504-368-5640

PET ADOPTIONS Elijah

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

IF YA COUGHING AND YA SNEEZING YOUR DUCTS COULD BE THE REASON

Improving the Health Of your Indoor Air! Locally owned, lic, ins. Free Est. Residential, Comm’l, Marine HEALTHY AIR DUCT CLEANING www.healthyairductcleaning.org 376-2444

AIR COND/HEATING SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE BOOK NOW TO SPRAY YOUR OAK TREES

For Buckmoth Caterpillars & Termites Natural, non-chemical pesticide ADRIAN’S TREE SERVICE Call Jean, 504-367-1160

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru April Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

TRUCKS ‘08 NISSAN TITAN

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

Xtra Cab $13,995 504-368-5640

‘09 DODGE JOURNEY XXT Low miles $14,995 504-368-5640

MERCHANDISE

NEAR UNIV•GARDEN DIST

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

PORTRAITS

By Artist Alexander Samuel Schwartz Private & Public collections. Appt. only, 775-354-4464

ADOPTIONS ADOPT

Adoring couple longs to adopt newborn. secure, endless love awaits. Christine & Paul, 1-800-774-0854. Expenses paid.

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

BLDG. MATERIALS MISC. BUILDING MATERIALS

& remodeling materials & some new appliances, wall tiles, roofing shingles, moulding, wooden floor planks, etc. (504) 578-648.

BOOKS BOOKS

Readers Digest condensed. 25 - 30 books. Exc codition. Call (504) 578-6486.

SERVICES HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

FLOORS/CARPET/TILE GROUT WORKS, LLC

Tile Grout Cleaning, Color Sealing, Grout repair, Shower Restoration, Natural Stone Care, Tile Replacement, Recaulking. Commercial & Residential. Free Estimates. Jay Broadwell, 504-309-2509. www.grout-works.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

MISC. HOME SERVICES CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL

Self Contained & Stationary Compactors. Rentals, Sales, Service. Roll Off Containers (15, 20, 30, 40 Cu. Yds.) Fully Insured. Construction, Commercial, Industrial, Residential, Maritime. Free Quotes, Same Day Service, No Delivery Fee. RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO. INC. 835-1696

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

CONDOS FOR SALE

Sperry Van Ness

DOMESTIC AUTOS 05 FORD TAURUS

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

Louis Vergona 504.799.3122

504 468-6800

AUTOMOTIVE

‘03 MERCEDES BENZ E320

Melissa.pittman@transwestern.net

2/2 1/1 2/1.5 1/1 1/1 2/1.5

Close to univer. 2/1 furn kit w/stove, mw, fridge w/ice, dw & w&d. Hdwd flrs, ceil fans, CA & H. Water paid by owner. Nice shared backyd. $975/ mo. + same dep. (504) 282-1346 or 628-0557 1 BR unfurnished apt, 3 blocks to universities, $700/mo, utilities incl. No pets. 504-865-8437 for appt.

Melissa Pittman 985.630.7769

733 Montegut 511 Gov Nicholls D 1119 Dauphine 812 Esplanade 1233 Decatur #8 921 Chartres #9

7722 HICKORY ST.

815 PINE ST

ALL INCLUSIVE HIGHLIGHTS • Fully furnished and equipped suites available at affordable, all inclusive rate • Unique amenities including fitness room, media centre, and training room all included in pricing.

222 London #224

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $675/mo w/wtr pd. No pets. (504) 858-2162.

AUCTION & REALTY CO.

w w w. g i l m o r e a u c t i o n . c o m David E. Gilmore, CCIM, CAI, AARE • LA #447

63


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS warehouse dist. BaCK oN MarKet

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Wonderful renov $2,700,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 63

66

330 s. diaMoNd st.

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

HISTORIC BUILDING IN WAREHOUSE DISTRICT PRE-1850. Stand alone building on street with beautiful neutral ground. Artist studio since 1997, open floor plan-loft style. Can be developed into exquisite residence or commercial space. Enclosed patio. Zoned CBD-8. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. $425,000

(504) 895-4663

Great iNVestMeNt sale PeNdiNG

4206-08 s. GalVez LARGE INVESTMENT DUPLEX Centrally located in Broadmoor near Napoleon. First floor gutted. Excellent potential for rental income or resale. $60,000


a utomotive

Be Kind to Your Car A few easy ways to keep your automobile in great shape.

W

hether you drive a new car or a well-traveled vehicle, regular maintenance can add years to the life of your automobile, save you money on fuel and repairs — and make your commuting experience more trouble-free and enjoyable. You should use the owner’s manual as a guide for what you should have checked, replaced and renewed and at what intervals. Following your car manufacturer’s recommendation for changing the oil is one of the most important habits to establish. Depending on your car model, recommendations for changing the oil range from every 3,000 miles to 7,500 miles or more. Just check the levels regularly in between. Keeping your oil clean extends the life of your engine by keeping the moving parts properly lubricated and the pistons firing on cue. This makes your ride smoother, plus helps your vehicle optimize its horsepower. Low oil levels or grit in the lubricant can cause the moving parts to grind against each other, putting stress on your engine and sometimes leading to costly parts failures. You should get the oil filter changed along with the oil, and it generally is recommended that you change your air filter every other oil change. Driving with a dirty air filter can adversely affect your gas mileage. You can check your oil, brake, power-steering and engine fluid levels yourself using the dipsticks under your hood. You want to keep them within the “full” range, but make sure you don’t overfill the reservoirs. You don’t need a mechanic to tell you when to change your windshield wipers; just observe when they are squealing, streaking or aren’t clearing water from your windshield. You may want some guidance on installing new ones, however, to make sure you get the right size and type for your vehicle and put them on right-side up. Correct tire pressure also is important for a comfortable and safe ride. Proper inflation levels for your automobile can be found in the owner’s manual or the inside driver’s door of your car. The pressure level printed on the side of the tire indicates maximum safe inflation — not what is recommended for specific vehicles. Keep a tire

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1845 WESTBANK EXPWY | HARVEY, LA 504-368-5640 • www.SuperiorHonda.net * See dealer for details. 36 mo. lease 12k/yr. No money down! WAC through AHFC. Ends 3/31/11. MPG based on 2011 EPA milage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > marcH 29 > 2011

REALLY

gauge in your car and check your tires often because uneven pressure, over-inflation or low tire pressure can lead to a lack of maneuverability, drag down your gas mileage and cause uneven wear on your tires, which affects your car’s performance and the comfort of your ride. Another tip is to have your tires rotated every 6,000-8,000 miles to ensure the tread wears evenly so you can get the maximum life out of them. It’s a good idea to have a mechanic give your car a checkup every 30,000 miles or so (again, check your owner’s manual) to determine the health of your water and fuel pumps, radiator, belts, hoses and brakes. Make the appointment earlier if you hear whining, knocking or other abnormal noises. Taking care of these problems when they first start can save you money on repairs since the cost usually escalates as parts become more damaged. Unusual squealing, whining or grinding when you brake is a real indication that you need to clean or change your brake pads or have other maintenance performed before you damage your brake drums (an expensive mistake).

67


WE I ZE L A I C E SP P IN GROUS EVENT

Regular classes:

Every Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday in April from 7-9 p.m.

Mom's Day Out, Kids Paint Free: Saturday, April 9th & April 23rd from 2-4 p.m.

PRE-SKETCHED CANVASES NO DRAWING REQUIRED! Each person in your group can choose a different painting from our painting Gallery, we custom sketch your choice!

5200 VETERANS BLVD METAIRIE, LA â&#x20AC;˘ 70006 (NEAR TRANSCONTINENTAL)

CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS: (504) 455-4413

www.rembrandtusa.com


Gambit New Orleans- March 29, 2011