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G A M B I T > V O L U M E 31 > N U M B E R 2 3 > J U N E 8 > 2 010

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WELLNESS

THE LAST OYSTERS?

9

CHRIS ROSE: BEACHED

13

ROCK DOWN TO AVENUE Q

27

EXPO {P UL L OU T}


BULLETIN BOARD CLASSIFIEDS BELLY DANCING CLASSES FUN, FANTASTIC & ALWAYS SASSY 8 wk sessions start 6/9. Beg: 6-7pm, Int/Adv 7:10-8:10pm. Instructor Betty Karam, jdkaram@tulane.edu 897-0432 or meryl@nojcc.org 897-0143.

EXQUISITE FRENCH QUARTER SHOWPLACE WITH PARKING! 730 ST. PHILIP ST.

A CITY WITH A SOUL

Buying MIGNOT FAGET Jewelry Rolex & Diamond Engagement Rings, CHRIS’ Fine Jewelry 3304 W. Esplanade Ave, Met. Call 504-833-2556 CONCRETE DRIVEWAYS/SIDEWALKS/PATIOS/SLABS/STAIRS/ WALKWAYS, Etc. BLOCK & BRICK WORK also. Call 504-717-5671 DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Eugene Redmann, 504-834-6430 4901 Canal St. NOLA 70119

L. BRYAN FRANCHER

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2228 St. Charles Ave. - Garden District...........................$2,992,500 340 S. Diamond St - Warehouse District........................$1,375,000 634 Esplanade - French Quarter............................................$995,000 863 Camp St - Arts District....................................................$674,000 35100 Garden Drt - Bayou Liberty estate...........................$349,000 232 Decatur 2A - Furnished French Quarter, Parking.....$325,000 1055 Brockenbraugh Ct - Metairie.......................................$249,000 1521 Pauger A - Marigny..........................................................$289,000 1204 Charters - French Quarter, Balcony...........................$199,000 1454 St. Mary No.1.....................................................................$119,000 620-22 S. Cortez............................................................................$95,000 225 N. Peters - French Quarter lease................................$1,950/mo 735 Valence - Fully Furnished..........................................$1,950/mo

www.FrancherPerrin.com

Salire Charity Boot Camp Susan G. Komen, LSPCA and Desire Street Ministry

A GREAT PLACE TO DO YOGA WILD LOTUS YOGA - Named “Best Place to Take a Yoga Class” 7 yrs in a row by Gambit Readers”. www.wildlotusyoga.com 899-0047 CLAY CLASSES Children’s, teen and adult clay classes. Adult evening classes available. Call 897-0675 for info.

Lose the Most Inches –

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

HOSPICE

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There is a wealth of opportunities here. Working with the patient and their families. Assisting bereavement dept with grieving families. Working with our nursing staff in assisting with some of their services.

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“COOKING WITH A COUGAR” Empowerment from Rosemary Donnelly’s Kitchen Cookbook www.cougarinstincts.com

MAT & EQUIPMENT PILATES PERSONAL TRAINING • LIFE COACHING

GET A POWERFUL RESUME! Evening & weekend appointments. GRANT COOPER, Certified Resume Writer CareerPro N.O. 861-0400 • Metairie 861-8882 NEW KARATE KIDS CLASS Starting June at 8132 Willow St., Uptown. Summer fun & fitness. Call 504-866-2241 to register. www.kinglamtaichi-karate.com

THERAPEUTIC THAI MASSAGE Sessions & Classes, Hammond & New Orleans. Lic #4661. www.ayurvedatouch. com or 985-507-2969 YOGA 108 NEW ORLEANS LLC Introductory Offer: $29/month WWW.YOGA-108.NET 1-866-YOGA-108

see BULLETIN BOARD TOO on the inside back cover.


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A>.M. > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI. PUBLISHER

MARGO DUBOS

WAREHOUSE

FURNITURE

PRICES

JUNE 08, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 23

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL >FAX: > > 483-3116 > > > > |>response@gambitweekly.com >>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > John > > > >Waters: > > > > >The > > Gambit > > > > >Interview > > > > > > > > > > >19 > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES The director and author of the new book Role Models talks Tennessee (Williams), Hollywood South, “Schmegmann’s” — and go-go boys

Blake Pontchartrain

8

News

9

Bouquets & Brickbats

9

C’est What?

9

Scuttlebutt

9

A fifth-generation family of oystermen faces the loss of its jobs ... and its way of life

19

599

7

New Orleans know-it-all

TO THE PUBLIC

$

Commentary

A time to help our coastal neighbors

This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

Shop Talk

3-PIECE sectional

Maximo’s

WITH OTTOMAN

25

VIEWS

comes in five different colors

Jeremy Alford / The State of the State

13

Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

15

Clancy DuBos / Politics

17

The “BP Session” in Baton Rouge

504.305.4247

www.gswwarehouse.com

Talking sand, surf and oil companies Jindal: Out of his comfort zone

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

27

A&E News

27

Gambit Picks

27

Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

28

Cuisine

47

Avenue Q ’s naughty puppets come to town Best bets for your busy week

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 08 > 2010

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

04

Your friendly neighborhood Pharmacy

Poetic License Heels UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZINE ST. 899-6800

Ian McNulty on Restaurante Telemar 5 in Five: 5 places for whole-loaf po-boys Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005

The Puzzle Page

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs 10-7 | Sun 12:30-5

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GAMBITGUIDE MUSIC

FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

FILM ART PULL-

62 OUT

STAGE

EVENTS

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Mind / Body / Spirit

Weekly Tails

Real Estate / Rentals Market Place

COVER PHOTO BY GREG GORMAN COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> PRODUCTION DIRECTOR DORA SISON SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÉ DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR AMY WENDEL 483-3138 ········amyw@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ROBIN LAMARQUE 483-3144········robinl@gambitweekly.com JESSIE HORNBACK 483-3143 ········jessieh@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com NORTHSHORE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CRISTY NEWTON ········ cristyn@gambitweekly.com INTERNS ARNAZ BHUJWALLA, CAROLYN BAKER CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MARY LOU NOONAN 483-3122 ········maryloun@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE MELINDA JOHNSON 483-3124 ········melindaj@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MARKETING DIRECTOR

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135

CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES

OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CAROL STEADMAN

CLASSIFIEDS Employment

POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITER ALEX WOODWARD EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, KYLA BOUTTE, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, CHRIS ROSE, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER INTERNS MARY CROSS, SARAH EDDINGTON, LEAHANISE HOGAN, JENNIFER KILBOURNE

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WEBSITE >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> WEB SITE MANAGER

MARIA BOUÉ

Gambit Communications, Inc. CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in The Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

2010 LEGACY 2.5i

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With hotels at the Convention Center and French Quarter, you’ll love the convenience of staying at a Hilton Garden Inn® in NOLA. And you’ll be jazzed with all the amenities – like a pool, casual restaurant & bar; and rooms with every comfort including HDTV and self-adjusting, pressure-free beds. Plus all kinds of things you won’t be charged for like property-wide WiFi, 24-hour

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

t

au

06

ve

Res

Back

business center and fitness center.

R a n t s gi

On Thursday, June 17 these local restaurants will give 20% of their dinner proceeds to the Louisiana SPCA. So grab your friends and family & dine out for our animals! Bistro daisy Café amelie Martinique Bistro Meauxbar Bistro Café degas santa Fe Tomatillo’s La Petite Grocery eat new Orleans semolina-Clearview Mall

Zoe restaurant at W new Orleans Kyoto Japanese restaurant Pinkberry Café rani Gott Gourmet Café Mona Lisa restaurant Broussard’s restaurant Vega Tapas Café & Catering La Peniche restaurant

F O r M O r e i N F O r M At i O N v i s i t :

La-sPCa.OrG 504.368.5191 | 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd, New Orleans, LA 70114

New Orleans Convention Center 1001 S. Peters St. • 504-525-0044 • neworleansconventioncenter.hgi.com New Orleans French Quarter/C.B.D. 821 Gravier St. • 504-324-6000 • neworleansfrenchquartercbd.hgi.com ©2010 Hilton Worldwide

Gambit Weekly 1/4 Page B&W (4.729 x 5.33”) Insertion Dates: April 20 & 22, June 8, August 31, Oct 12, Dec 21, 2010 NoCoop_TABD.indd Job #38413 4.12.10


CommentarY

thinking out loud

You Can Help

D

will be at the Louisiana Seafood Festival June 11-13 at the French Market. • Support the New Orleans service industry. Louisiana is about to begin a $15 million campaign to tell tourists we’re open. Spread that message to out-of-state friends by word of mouth, email and social networking. Ask them to pass it on: If you want to help, visit south Louisiana. • Businesses, consider new ways to extend a hand. In the months after Katrina, Louisiana residents made a point of patronizing local businesses. It’s time to give back. (This summer, Gambit will run ads in other alternative weeklies across the country with information about how to donate to charities serving coastal residents. The paper also will offer discount ad rates to local restaurants.)

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This isn’t a “Louisiana problem” any more than the destruction of the Grand Canyon would be an “Arizona problem.” • Donate time, food or money to Second Harvest Food Bank, which has begun targeting relief efforts to coastal families. • Demand action from elected officials at the state and national levels. Remind them this isn’t a “Louisiana problem” any more than the destruction of the Grand Canyon would be an “Arizona problem.” On May 30, an estimated 1,000 people gathered at Washington Artillery Park to demonstrate against BP and to advocate for Gulf residents. Those images went around the world and intensified media coverage of the calamity. By joining future protests, you can keep the heat on Washington — and BP. Nothing can take away the pain we feel when we see an oil-fouled marsh, a dead pelican or our neighbors’ agony, and our righteous fury will not easily subside. But remember this: What got us through Katrina, more than anything else, was our service to one another here in Louisiana. It’s time to help each other again.

9625

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

uring Memorial Day weekend, Louisiana coastal communities got a grim look at their future. The annual Plaquemines Parish Seafood Festival went on as usual, but the group’s website pleaded with potential visitors, emphasizing the local bounty was safe to eat. Uncertain of what’s to come this summer, organizers of July’s Grand Isle Tarpon Rodeo canceled the event (an “Island Aid” benefit concert will be held that weekend instead). And, for foodies, the unthinkable has occurred: Drago’s is now forced to serve imported mussels rather than locally harvested oysters. “It’s heartbreaking,” says owner Tommy Cvitanovich. “But we’ve got to do what it takes to survive.” Consider this: Hurricane Katrina closed Louisiana waters to fishermen for days. With BP and the federal government now agreeing that the oil gusher on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico may not be stanched until August, our coastal neighbors have been thrust into unimaginable economic chaos just as summer begins — the time they should be prospering. Jim King, who rents kayaks and camp space on Grand Isle during the tourist-heavy summer months, told the New York Daily News he has not rented anything for 40 days. Mary Tutwiler’s story (p. 9) of a family of struggling oyster farmers is a not uncommon one. The repercussions aren’t limited to coastal parishes. Metro New Orleans restaurants, virtually all of which depend on fresh local seafood, also will be affected, as will Gulf Coast tourism in general. Louisianans are rightly furious at this situation, and many have expressed our feelings of powerlessness against the destructive muck fouling our marshes, tarring our beaches and killing wildlife. We can’t stop the oil gusher, but there are some things we can — and must — do to mitigate the disaster: • As part of this year’s hurricane plan, schedule a summer vacation in the coastal parishes. Get to know the people. Stay in their cabins, eat at their restaurants, drink at their bars. Hear their stories and share them with friends and relatives back home. Provide monetary and moral support to the victims of this catastrophe. Some on the coast feel the nation doesn’t care about their plight. Let them know you do. • Eat local seafood. As of the first week of June, 70 percent of the state’s fisheries were still open and perfectly safe. Thirty percent of America’s domestic catch comes from Louisiana, says Ewell Smith of the Louisiana Seafood and Marketing Board, which is keeping close tabs on seafood safety. The fishermen and shrimpers represented by the board ask you to have confidence in them and their product. A great way to show solidarity with them

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

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pontcHartrain™

new orleans know-it-All

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

Hey Blake, Is there a websIte for Gustave blache where I can vIew all or a selectIon of hIs art? Grisly

Dear Grisly,     I  know  of  one  website  where  you  can  see several of this talented artist’s works:  www.coleprattgallery.com,  the  website  for Cole Pratt Gallery on Magazine Street.  You can also find information there about  Gustave Blache III’s education and exhibits of his work.     Blache  is  a  native  of  New  Orleans.  He  completed his bachelor of fine arts at the  School  of  Visual  Arts  in  Savannah,  Ga.,  and his master of fine arts at the School  of Visual Arts in New York City.     Art  critic  D.  Eric  Bookhardt  reviewed  Blache’s  work  in  Gambit  in  December  2006, writing “Gustave Blache is a youthful  New  Orleanian  now  making  a  name  for himself in New York. Reflecting a rather Francophile style reminiscent of Degas  with  overtones  of  Courbet,  his  paintings  have  appeared  in  old-master  exhibitions  in  which  he  was  the  only  living  artist.  Despite  ties  to  19th  century  France  and  21st century New York, he regularly returns  home,  and  if  the  paintings  in  this  Mop Makers show suggest prosaic scenes that  Degas might have painted in New Orleans  over  a  century  ago,  they  actually  depict  workers  at  an  employment  program  at  our present-day Lighthouse for the Blind.  A  product  of  NOCCA  and  the  youth  art  projects presided over by Richard Thomas,  Blache  tempers  the  immediacy  of  the  present with a deeper perspective rooted  firmly in the past.” Hey Blake, what was the name of the lIbrary on royal street across from washInGton square that was torn down? when was It torn down?

Fan us on

must pr esent coupon. offer ends fr iday, june

blake

FOLLOW US ON

A reAder

Dear reaDer,     Once  upon  a  time,  we  had  many  more  library  branches  than  we  do  now. Hurricanes seem to wreak havoc  on them.     In 1902, the city received $250,000 from  Andrew  Carnegie  to  build  a  new  main  library  and  three  new  branch  libraries.  One of these branches was located in the  Faubourg Marigny at the corner of Royal  and Frenchmen streets. By 1908, the new  main  library  was  open  at  Lee  Circle,  and  two  other  branches  opened  on  Pelican  Avenue  in  Algiers  and  Napoleon  Avenue  in Uptown.     The  Royal  Street  Branch  of  the  New  Orleans  Public  Library  —  it  never  had  another name — was a fine old building, 

but  it  could  not  take  the  wind,  rain  and  falling  debris  of  Hurricane  Betsy  in  1965.  Not  long  afterward,  the  library  and  the  Holy  Redeemer  Church,  which  was  on  the same block, were demolished. In their  place you will find the Christopher Inn.

The Mop Makers (Spinning the Mop Thread) by Gustave Blache III reflects a style reminiscent of Edgar Degas’.

Photo courtesy of cole Pratt Gallery

Hey Blake, my aunt used to tell me about the lane cotton mIll somewhere around tchoupItoulas street on the mIssIssIppI rIver. she saId she was a nurse there for many years untIl It closed. years later, my father-In-law saId he used to fIll the vendInG machInes there when he was younG. both are Gone now, but I never was told why the mIll closed. any Info on who owned the mIll and why It closed? w. J. McdonAld

Dear W.J.,     The  cotton  mill,  located  at  434  Cadiz  St., opened in 1864 and was the first successful  venture  in  manufacturing  cotton  cloth. The founder was N.L. Lane.     Over the years the mill grew and prospered.  It  changed  owners  several  times,  but always kept the name of its founder.  By the time it closed, about 1,400 workers  took  raw  cotton  and  spun,  dyed,  wove  and finished it.     When  the  mill  closed  in  1957,  it  was  owned  by  M.  Lowenstein  &  Sons  Inc.  of  New York. Competition came in the form  of plastics and synthetic materials.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >JEREMY > > > > ALFORD CHRIS ROSE CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < knowledge < < < < < < < < < < <is < <power < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <13 15 17 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QuoTeS of THe Week

“It would be ridiculous to resign at this point.” — BP CEO Tony Hayward on June 2, the same day he apologized to Gulf Coast residents for saying “I want my life back.”

The Last Harvest

“There ought to be a run on these once we get out of this session.” — State Sen. Joe McPherson, D-Woodworth, after his Senate Transportation Committee gave swift passage to House Bill 96, which would create a special license plate for retired state employees. In light of the state’s ongoing budget crunch, many are looking to cut costs by reducing the state’s workforce.

ThaT oysTer you aTe probably came from caminada bay. We hope you enjoyed iT. iT may be your lasT for a long, long Time.

AdviSe ANd diSSeNT

Should the Louisiana Senate get to accept or reject university appointees to the board that will build and oversee the new $1.2 billion LSU teaching hospital in New Orleans? So far, a majority of the Senate and a unanimous House committee think so — but the governor and LSU are fighting Senate Bill 18 by Sen. Ed Murray, DNew Orleans, which would require Senate confirmation and financial disclosure by university appointees to the public hospital board. The measure is expected to generate a major floor fight when it comes up for final passage in the House this week. The governing board of the new hospital has been the subject of much controversy. Last year, House Speaker Jim Tucker pushed a bill that forced LSU and Tulane to work out their differences over appointments to the board. Under a compromise approved by Gov. Bobby Jindal, the governor gets to appoint four members to the 11-member board — all of whom must be confirmed by the Senate under existing law. LSU also gets to appoint four members, along with one by Tulane, one by Xavier, and one rotating between Dillard, SUNO and Delgado. Murray’s bill would extend the Senate confirmation requirement to the university appointees and subject them to minimum levels of financial disclosure. “This is going to be the most expensive asset that the state has,” Murray says of the teaching hospital in New Orleans. “Other state management boards — for the Superdome, LSU and many others

by mary tutwiler

U

paGe 12

place to grow up. It Jaden Collins is only 7 but hasn’t sunk in yet, to already is an old hand at see all this ruined. I shucking oysters. can’t even think it. But photo by isabelle tutwiler it doesn’t look good. I heard the guys from Alaska talk about the Exxon Valdez. Twenty-one years later, there’s still oil. It doesn’t look good for the fishing industry. And Jaden, he already knows he wants to oyster. What’s he going to do?” Three weeks ago, heavy oil hit the beaches of Grand Isle, the barrier island that protects Caminada Bay, and oil sheen began to seep beyond the island and into the

c'est what? how would you characterize the obama administration’s response to the Gulf oil disaster?

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was named ABC News’ “Person of the Week” for his work sounding the alarm on the Gulf oil disaster. The president of Plaquemines Parish has been a quotable, down-to-earth spokesman for Louisiana on the national news and has put a human face to the suffering of coastal residents. He also has used his Facebook page to put a thorn in the side of BP, posting an executive’s email and urging Americans to demand more action from the oil giant.

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locations throughout Louisiana raised more than $30,000 for Haitian earthquake relief with the restaurant group’s “Dining for a Mission” program. Each Tuesday in April, the restaurants donated part of their dinner proceeds to Catholic Charities Haiti Relief, making the point that though the headlines from Haiti may have receded, the need for humanitarian aid has not.

Mac McClelland,

human rights reporter for Mother Jones, blew the whistle on BP’s attempt to keep media away from seeing the environmental catastrophe at the Elmer’s Island Wildlife Refuge. Her photos — and descriptions of BP’s seeming authority over Grand Isle and Jefferson Parish authorities regarding access to public land — focused international attention on BP’s crackdown on the media and put the oil giant on the defensive.

Tony Hayward

continued to insult and outrage Gulf Coast residents last week nearly every time he opened his mouth. The BP CEO speculated that hospitalized oil cleanup workers who suffered from respiratory ailments might instead have “food poisoning” and told an interviewer, “I would like my life back.” So would the 11 men who perished on the Deepwater Horizon. Heckuva job, Tony. Have you met Michael Brown?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

p until four weeks ago, when the Louisiana departments of Wildlife and Fisheries and Health and Hospitals closed the bays and estuaries north of Grand Isle for fishing, Nick Collins was harvesting his select oysters from reefs his great grandfather seeded. Collins, along with his father, Wilbert, and his son, Jaden, was dredging up 65 sacks a day on the family’s 2,000 acres of leases, and three times a week, those oysters traveled to Acadiana. For more than 40 years, the late “Black” Bourque bought his oysters from Wilbert Collins for his restaurant, Black’s in Abbeville. When the restaurant closed several years ago, son Brian Bourque continued the relationship with the Collins family, supplying oysters to other restaurants in the area. That supply has run out for the indefinite future. Today, Nick and Wilbert are keeping busy working on one of their boats, the Broud Tracy, in dry dock while Jaden plays with his dog, Scrappy. Jaden is only 7. But he is well aware that he represents the fifth generation of the Collins family in the oyster business, a tradition that is so endangered by the oil spill in the Gulf that, in bad moments, Nick says he’s thinking of moving to Canada. The Beausoleil oysters of the Acadian Peninsula, in New Brunswick, are small, briny and delicious. But they are not Caminada Bay oysters. That’s when Nick, who is rational, calm and articulate about the situation, begins to choke. “When I was a kid, I used to swim with the dolphins right here; I’d feed them silver eel from the nets. It was an awesome

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bays. Further to the east, in Plaquemines Parish, heavy oil has invaded marshes. “We’re not seeing it yet here,” Nick says of his oyster leases, “but we know it’s coming. There’s too much oil.”

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I headed doWN To GraNd Isle WITh Nick and Jaden to see some of the family’s prime oyster reefs in the middle of Caminada Bay. driving over the new toll bridge between leeville and Grand Isle, you can see for miles into the wetlands and the bays. The waters of the Gulf are striped with orange booms. Two days before the Memorial day weekend, Grand Isle should be packed with fishermen and tourists here for the Grand Isle redfish rodeo. The only boats on the water are Jefferson Parish sheriff’s office cruisers taking journalists out to see the oil containment effort. small knots of National Guardsmen stand around with nothing much to do. We board the Capt. Nick, which needs a hosing down after idling for over a week. as we leave the dock, the water is spattered with black droplets so small that it looks like a school of squiggling tadpoles has surrounded the lugger. oil has begun arriving in the bay. Farther out, the water itself is seaglass green, beautiful salty water from the Gulf. It’s high tide. Nick drops the dredge for a test, to see what his oysters look like after two weeks of neglect. The Collins family arrived in louisiana before the turn of the 20th century. Frederick Collins traveled from scotland to France, where with the aid of a man remembered only as “a Jewish man named levy,” Frederick took a ship to america. he stepped off the boat at ellis Island, N.Y. Why he was drawn to louisiana, Wilbert Collins, 72, currently the patriarch of the Collins family, never found out, but he does know his Frenchspeaking great-grandfather was a judge in Thibodaux sometime in the 1890s. Frederick Collins named his son levy, in honor of his benefactor. levy Collins took to lafourche Parish like a poule d’eau to water, moving to a community then called Chenier, just west of Grand Isle. he had an innate sense of how to nurture louisiana’s wild oysters. “My great-grandpa made these reefs in Caminada Bay,” says Nick, dredging seeming to trigger the storytelling gene that runs strong in the Collins family. “he tonged up oysters in Thunder Bayou; he felt they were a great oyster, but they had paper shells. he’d row a boat out into the bay and put the oysters on the sand, in the best spots. The bay thickened them up, made a better shell. he started these reefs we’re still using now.” levy Collins sold his oysters from a shed in Chenier until two major hurricanes early

in the 20th century pushed the family back from its prime beds. First they went to leeville, and then to Golden Meadow, about 45 minutes up Bayou lafourche. “he’d bring them up to leeville,” Nick says of his ancestor, “in what looked like an old watermelon truck, and sell them by the side of the road; there was no refrigeration in those days. he used the beds, his son (levy Collins Jr.) did, then my daddy (Wilbert Collins) and now me. It’s incredible how well and how long these reefs have sustained us.” Nick throws the winch into reverse, and a dripping net filled with heavy oysters spills onto a steel table built into the boat. Jaden has been impatiently playing with a small tool that is part ax, part pick. When the oysters hit the table, Jaden grabs a cluster and knocks three oysters accreted into “singles.” Nick borrows the tool from his son and pries open an oyster. It’s creamy with a hint of seawater green on its frills, the pearl-colored eye firm and round. “Now I’m not going to eat it,” Nick says, “but I want you to see how beautiful this is.” CaMINada BaY oYsTers, NICk saYs, are the creme de la creme of louisiana’s oyster crop. They’re flavorful into the summer, when oysters for the most part become thin and milky. May is spawning season. oysters are broadcast spawners, the males and females releasing sperm and eggs into the water. The fertilized eggs become larvae. In the larval stage, an oyster floats in the water column feeding and growing for about two weeks. The larvae then sink onto the reefs, attaching themselves to the hard surface bottom or to other oysters. In this small hard-shelled stage, the oysters are called sprats. oysters feed by opening and closing their shells, filtering plankton and algae from the waters that wash over the reef. It takes two to three years for a sprat to reach market size, a minimum of 3 inches across the shell. spawning is a highly vulnerable time for oysters; they are naturally under considerable stress, and the oil spill presents a menace they cannot avoid like other more mobile marine life can. once a sprat attaches itself to a reef, it will spend the rest of its life in one spot. right now, louisiana’s oyster reefs face a triple threat from the spill. If heavy oil washes in and sinks on the reefs, it can smother the oysters, or taint them for an unknown length of time. The chemicals in Corexit, the dispersant used by BP, can potentially kill larvae. oil and Corexit combined, floating beneath the surface in the water column, also pose an unknown element. and then there is the annual problem of fresh water. louisiana’s oysters need a salinity level of at least six parts per thousand for lar-


OYSTeR BedS ACROSS THe STATe HAve been closed, opened and closed again rapidly over the weeks since the BP disaster, as health and wildlife officials react to reports of oil coming into the state’s waters. At a meeting of the Louisiana Oyster Task Force, the state’s health officer dr. Jimmy Guidry explained that the most rapid way to detect if oysters have been contaminated by oil is as low tech as it gets: smell the oyster. “Your nose is highly sensitive; smell and taste are the first line

of detection,” he said. “If an oys- (Left to right): Jaden, ter smells bad Nick and Wilbert Collins in front of or tastes bad, their boat. then we’ll send by it to the lab.” I Photo Isabelle tutwIler decided to try out dr. Guidry’s approach to testing Nick’s oysters. They smelled of the fresh salty air surrounding us. So I went with my instinct and slurped up a fat oyster right off the shell. That’s when I really understood Nick’s pride and fear for his oyster beds. The night before, I had eaten a dozen raw oysters in New Orleans that came from beds east of the Mississippi River, which last week were still open to fishing. While they were firm and plump, they had very little taste, as if the fresh water flowing over them had washed out the natural flavor of the oyster as well as the salty brine. Nick’s Caminada Bay oyster was sweet, with a meaty marine flavor and unique mineral notes. And May, as Nick adds, is not high oyster season. “You should try my oysters in November, when they’re at their prime.” His pride in my delight lit up his face for a moment. And then, like a wave, I could see the recollection of the present situation wash over his features. “I’m so proud I’m part of this company and the Caminada Bay oysters,” he says of his family business. “BP can’t put a price on this.”

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vae to be able to feed and grow. Weeks ago, when the oil spill was still at sea, the state opened up all of its freshwater diversion spillways, sending water from the Mississippi River out across the marshes on both the east and west banks of the river to try to use the strength of the Mississippi’s current to keep the spill offshore. The steady flow of freshwater may be even more devastating to the oyster reefs than the oil. Last week, three areas in lower Lafourche Parish were reading salinity levels ranging from 5.8 to 1.1 parts per thousand. Little Lake, another location of the Collins family leases, was at the low end of the reading. “If the oysters don’t get 3.4, and a boost to 8, they get weak, barely opening and closing,” says Nick. He’s bitter about the quick decision to open the spillways without consulting the oyster fishers. “You’re not going to push the oil out,” he complains. “It’s going to be the biggest oyster kill in the history of the state.” Should entire oyster beds die, the bestcase scenario for rebuilding reefs is three years, the amount of time it takes for a sprat to grow to market size. Reseeding can happen immediately for beds killed by fresh water, as long as the salinity level rises. But should the oysters become contaminated by oil, it’s an open question as to how long it takes for oysters to filter out the oil residue, or if the reefs die, how long before they are clean enough for lease holders to begin again. As for the families who historically have built Louisiana’s oyster industry, how long can they hold out without a paycheck? With the loss of each business the state also loses the collective knowledge passed down from father to son, as well as a unique culture that has been preserved for more than 200 years.

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— all require Senate confirmation. For some reason they don’t want it for this board, but we need to make sure that we have competent people on this board as well as other boards.” Murray’s measure passed the Senate on May 18 by a vote of 23-12 after much debate. Opponents (chiefly the Jindal administration) have argued that requiring Senate confirmation would delay building the hospital and could interfere with the sale of bonds needed to finance the project. Murray disputes both contentions, saying the governor often appoints people to boards between legislative sessions, and those appointees serve pending confirmation. As for the bonds, state Treasurer John Kennedy has said that requiring Senate confirmation would not transform the hospital’s debt into state debt — a fear voiced by the bill’s opponents. “There are several other state boards whose debt is not considered state debt and whose members must be confirmed by the Senate,” Murray says. As of late last week, Murray was lobbying several leading House members from New Orleans to handle the bill on the House floor. — Clancy DuBos

Leges Tip Off fOr ChariTy

The annual House vs. Senate basketball game is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Monday, June 7, at LSU’s Pete Maravich Assembly Center, and once again the New Orleans Hornets organization has signed on as the official host. While past legislative basketball games have been nothing more than a full-court exhibition of semi-skill, this year’s event will include a charity fundraiser. Admission to the basketball game is free, but the “HoopLA Out of Bounds Bash” charity event will coincide with the game for an admission price of $100 a couple. Proceeds of the fundraiser go to the Legislators’ Charity Fund, which for the past two years raised money for Children’s Hospital in New Orleans at Christmas time. This week’s event will feature gourmet food, cocktails and a silent auction; proceeds will be used to refurbish a basketball court in a participating legislator’s district. In order to qualify for the basketball court project, however, lawmakers must buy a ticket to the event, and the winning district will be selected by a drawing. In addition, one lucky contestant (not a legislator) can shoot from half-court for a new Chevrolet Camaro. “I could not be more pleased with the success of this event in just two years,” says state Rep. John Schroder, R-Covington, chairperson for the event. “We have a great committee that is fortunate to have the Hornets as a partner. During this tough economy we are able to bring some needed financial assistance to a lucky public body and provide needed recreation for our youth.” Tickets and information are available from Schroder at js@johnschroder.com. — Alford

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A major fight is expected this week during House debate over New Orleans Sen. Ed Murray’s bill to require Senate confirmation and financial disclosure of people local universities appoint to the board that will build and oversee the LSU teaching hospital in New Orleans. words from local lawmakers recently. House Bill 1205 by Rep. Joe Harrison, R-Napoleonville, would have forced local and state governments to confirm the citizenship status of people applying for certain public benefits. Local lawmakers complained that Harrison’s legislation would have led to racial profiling, additional costs and other controversies. The state of Arizona recently passed sweeping immigration laws that continue to stir a raging national debate. Opponents of Harrison’s bill say Louisiana would be criticizing the feds after all the hurricane aid it sent and all the oil spill recovery dollars that are likely to come — and the many immigrants who helped rebuild southeast Louisiana. “I just don’t like it when we start injecting what I see as sort of meaningless language into our laws and pointing the finger at the federal government and then asking them to give us money,” says Rep. Walt Leger, D-New Orleans. Harrison explained why he titled his bill the “Louisiana Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2010” and exactly who he believes it would benefit. “This is not the federal government’s money,” Harrison says. “It is taxpayers’ money, regardless of where or what political entity holds those funds.” Among other things, the bill, which is dead for the session, would have forced the attorney general’s office to create a new investigative unit to look into illegal immigration practices. It also would have certified citizenship through an electronic database operated on the federal level. Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-New Orleans, said the government doesn’t need to get into the business of tracking human beings, no matter their origin. “This really scares the daylights out of me,” he said. — Jeremy Alford


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t’s hard to believe, but back in late in any real way — and in hindsight, the have paved the way for such ideas. In some ways, the movement started March, when state lawmakers first House and Senate may have waited too convened, some predicted this long to become agitated. “The Legislature when this new, younger Legislature was would be an “education session.” It was isn’t doing anything about BP,” says Sen. seated in 2008. Sen. Nick Gautreaux, practically a mantra, especially among Rob Marionneaux, D-Livonia. “We don’t D-Abbeville, has Senate Bill 183 to let the state lease land for renewable energy the higher ed crowd, the target of hefty even want to talk about it.” Freshman Sen. Norby Chabert, such as wind, solar, hydrokinetic and budget cuts. What a difference a day makes. In this D-Houma, held forth on the floor for geothermal. He also has Senate Bill case, the day was April 20, the date of the two consecutive weeks. “We’ve stood idle 103 for local governments to establish long enough,” he shouted to his fellow special funds to purchase vehicles that BP Deepwater Horizon blowout. Make no mistake: The BP oil disaster senators. “In some cases, it may be too run on alternative fuels. Rep. Franklin will define the entire year. A story on late. But we cannot wait another min- Foil, R-Baton Rouge, has House Bill 751, Bloomberg.com recently predicted the ute, as an unprecedented environmental which makes it easier for homeowners to meet the requirements for installing gusher could continue until Christmas, Armageddon is upon us.” While lawmakers may have to wait for solar panels, and House Bill 793, which based on the current hurricane season. If that happens, Harry Roberts, a pro- a special session to get more involved reorganizes the framework for Sustainable Energy Financing Districts fessor of Coastal Studies at so homeowners could direct Louisiana State University, their property taxes toward told Bloomberg 4 million making residential energy barrels of oil will have been improvements. spilled into the Gulf of Mexico While Treasurer John Kennedy by Christmas morning. has proved himself adept at With this kind of data floathijacking attention during leging around and BP’s failed islative sessions with his fisattempts to contain the freecally hawkish ways, this year’s flowing oil, lawmakers last man of the hour is Attorney week began whispering about General Buddy Caldwell, who the need for a special session. estimates Louisiana eventually If BP doesn’t come up with a will need up to $65 million to solution to the gusher and for fight all of the parties responthe spending needs of local sible for the BP disaster. He government, those whispers has asked lawmakers to pony will soon become something up the cash now. (Kennedy is much louder. still around; he says Louisiana “The parishes being already has enough money in affected, we’re going to have various budgetary pots and to come together and help that the Legislature needs only them,” says Rep. Gordon Gov. Bobby Jindal and local officials last week toured the oilto pull dollars together from Dove, R-Houma, chairman of saturated Pass a Loutre at the mouth of the Mississippi River. those sources — and then pray the House Natural Resources photo couRtesy of the goveRnoR’s office that the feds and/or BP will Committee. “Some parishes will get hit harder than other parishes. with the spill and its repercussions, a foot the bill down the line.) As for Gov. Bobby Jindal, his fate And of course, we’re going to have to number of issues in the ongoing session address the shrimpers. And if this (fed- are taking on a new shine because of the remains as elusive as ever. He’s getting eral) moratorium (on deepwater drilling) environmental tragedy. A bill filed to per- hit by Democrats, including former Gov. isn’t lifted, we’re also going to have to mit the attorney general to hire lawyers Kathleen Blanco, for not spending money on a contingency-fee basis is now being sooner and cheered by Republicans and address all of the people affected by it.” Rep. Patrick Connick, R-Marrero, whose framed as a bill to help the AG battle BP. columnists for pushing his own plan to home parish of Jefferson is feeling the A proposed constitutional amendment build up temporary barrier islands to keep impact, says he hopes the state can save that was introduced to create an oil and out the oil. Even some who support his a bit of money and handle the crisis with- gas processing tax is now sold as a tool to idea, however, wonder what’s taking him so long to act on it. out a special session. And if that does level the playing field. Bloggers and columnists nationwide What hasn’t changed since the April 20 happen, he says the next two weeks will be among the busiest closing days the are beginning to dissect the legislation explosion is the state’s unprecedented, Legislature has ever seen. “(The attor- coming out of the State Capitol in search two-year, $3 billion budget shortfall. The ney general) needs money to prosecute. of any connection to the Gulf disaster. budget crunch begins at midnight at the The sheriffs’ offices in the parishes need Of particular interest are some alterna- end of this month — and no amount of money,” Connick says. “It’s a sad thing. tive and renewable energy bills creeping political boom can curtail the impact of We’re going to be going from a fishing through the process. Some of those on that fiscal implosion, which lawmakers industry to a cleanup industry and our the outside looking in have labeled the will have to address one day soon — with green bills as a knee-jerk reaction to the or without BP. way of life is going to be lost.” With less than two weeks to go until BP incident, but in actuality the measures adjournment, lawmakers barely have were advancing well before the drilling Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ enough time to get involved in the issue platform exploded, and previous sessions jeremyalford.com.

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could stand chest high in it and still see your feet. But there was always that nagging question: Where is it? Where’s the oil? There was none to be seen, thank God. Just beach balls, no tar balls. The currents have spared Flora-Bama so far. Still, the crowds were down, way down, especially for Memorial Day weekend. And looking out over that vast, beautiful Gulf at night after the kids had gone to bed, I got to thinking that, for now at least, Louisiana may be a lost cause but at least there’s this, the Panhandle, the beloved “Redneck Riviera,” so very calming and beautiful, still America’s bestkept-secret vacation destination.

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“Sandig rumpa” — the sum total of my knowledge of the Swedish language — means “I’ve got sand in the crack of my butt.” There were no booms littering the beaches and no fleets of salvage boats skimming the surfaces, like there are just miles to the west, where folks in Mississippi and Louisiana are once again taking it on the chin for their fellow countrymen’s insatiable thirst for petroleum products. We had so much fun that, by the middle of last week, the kids and I were already talking about going back as soon as possible to do it all again. Then I opened up a week’s worth of back issues of the newspaper I had missed while out of town and read: Scientists and prognosticators said the Gulf’s currents had shifted. The monster was snaking across Mobile Sound. And now I find I’ve got a lot more than just sand in my ass. I’ve got murder in my heart. And I’m just about ready to take these jokers from BP and all the other bastards and run my kid’s fishing pole and that 2-foot shark and anything else I can find right up their arrogant, big, fat sorry rumpas.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

y kids had already been at the beach for a few days when I arrived in Gulf Shores late last week. They’d already been tubing and playing sand soccer and lots of Marco Polo. And my son — my 9-year-old — had reeled in a 2-foot shark out of the shallow water with a borrowed fishing pole. That there is what you call a summer memory. They were out by the pool when I drove up, jumped out of my car and ran past them, straight to the water, yelling: “Sandig rumpa!” My boys, they cracked up, yelling back: “Sandig rumpa!” a greeting that only one with a passing knowledge of Swedish would understand. And maybe not even then. I charged past them toward the water, running, kicking, splashing and finally wiping out in the waves, heels over head, a 50-year-old body performing a maneuver more befitting a 15-year-old — but always the best way to start a day at the beach. I was in shorts, not a bathing suit, so when I came out of the water, I had pockets full of water, shells and sand. I went running back to my kids. They were waiting for what happens next. We’ve done this a million times before: I shivered, shook my body with a beach chill. And then I yelled: “Sandig rumpa!” And me and the kids, we lost it, man. Busted 40 guts. Then we all yelled it together: Sandig rumpa! And we lost it again, just loving life, just gone, gone, gone. OK, maybe you had to be there. The “sandig rumpa” thing is a private joke me and my kids have had since they were in diapers, fittingly, because “sandig rumpa” — the sum total of my knowledge of the Swedish language — means “I’ve got sand in the crack of my butt.” Don’t ask how I know this. It’s got something to do with the 1984 World Cup, a Swedish zydeco band and a whole lot of thick brown liquor called Glug. Long story. Anyway, it’s a term that conjures up for my little gangsters of love some of the best of our family times. It conjures the beach and what we do. There is nothing in the world to me better than watching my kids run wild and free and barefoot; sunburned, windblown, nettle-stung and sand-stuffed in every crack, crevice and orifice of their bodies. That sandig rumpa thing, for true. This recent trip, of course, was marked by a bitter-not-so-sweet tinge, of course. Yes, the sand was virgin white, as always, and the water was so green that you

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politics Politicking with Clancy only on blogofneworleans.com. Email your political questions to clancy@gambitweekly.com

out of His Comfort Zone ou know the Gulf oil disaster has turned the nation’s politics upside down when Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser consistently outshines President Barack Obama and Gov. Bobby Jindal on the evening news. The reason is simple: Nungesser is closer to the problem and knows what he’s talking about. He’s also unafraid to step out of his comfort zone to make a point or get something done. That’s the basic problem for both Obama and Jindal: A disaster of this magnitude requires that they step out of their respective comfort zones. So far, neither man has shown much willingness to do so. Obama, for example, refuses to budge on his knee-jerk six-month moratorium on offshore drilling — an overreaction that clearly was intended to placate his supporters in the environmental community after he had authorized an expansion of drilling in federal waters in the Gulf. The president thus seems more concerned with the politics of the situation than the resolution, despite his rhetoric. For his part, Jindal has declined to support legislation that would allow the state

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honed their skills for a fight such as this. BP has already retained local defense lawyers, and it likewise is hiring local and national experts to fortify itself in court. Jindal must respond in kind, even though it might mean sacrificing some of his precious ideological purity. If the governor genuinely wants to hold BP accountable for all costs associated with this disaster, he must support giving Caldwell the authority he needs to hire the best environmental plaintiff attorneys available to take on the oil giant. He must step out of his comfort zone. It’s what leaders do.

Jindal needs to do much more, and it will require him stepping out of his comfort zone.

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CLARIFICATION: In a recent column about transparency, I wrote that not enough legislators from either political party were helping folks like Rep. Wayne Waddell and Sen. Robert Adley (both Republicans) resist Gov. Bobby Jindal’s efforts to preserve official secrecy in the governor’s office. In response, state Rep. John Bel Edwards of Amite, chair of the House Democratic Caucus, challenged my criticism of Democrats on that issue. He correctly noted that Rep. Neil Abramson had authored several transparency bills that Jindal vetoed or killed in recent years. “Neil is just one stalwart for open government in our caucus,” Edwards wrote to me. “Ethics reform and transparency are not partisan issues.” Edwards makes a good point, particularly about Abramson’s bills, which this newspaper has consistently supported. I certainly did not intend to slight the efforts of Abramson and others on this issue, but my point remains that not enough legislators in either party have taken up the cause. We hope more will going forward.

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our years ago, filmmaker John Waters was asked to write an appreciation of Tennessee Williams as a foreword to a new book about the playwright. That essay grew into Waters’ latest project, a book titled Role Models — about the people who

have shaped the director’s life, from Johnny Mathis and Little Richard to the strippers and bar owners of his native Baltimore. “Tennessee Williams saved my life,” Waters writes ... and then goes on to describe how, as a 12-year-old in the 1950s, he stole a collection of Williams short stories out of the “adult” section of his local public library.

WATERS : THE GAMBIT INTERVIEW BY KEVIN ALLMAN PHOTO © GREG GORMAN

BEHAVI R GAMBIT: Kids steal books, but you have to be the only boy in history who stole a Tennessee Williams book.

G: Tennessee was on the downswing when he died in 1983. Do you think he would have had a renaissance? JW: I don’t know. Would he have had a renaissance? Would he have had a facelift? There’s a lot of horrible stuff that could’ve happened. Edward Albee certainly, later in life, had a complete turnaround. You don’t know what would’ve happened. Could Tennessee Williams be successful if he was sober forever? That’s a harrowing question. G: You attended the Tennessee Williams festival in New Orleans a few years back. Did you get to meet Dakin Williams (Tennessee’s brother)? JW: I didn’t. But it was amazing to see all these Tennessee Williams lookalikes walkin’ around (laughs). I had a good time, but it was bizarre! G: Did you get to meet any other Tennessee Williams obsessives?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

JOHN WATERS: From the library! But if they let me read it I wouldn’t have stolen it. When I come to New Orleans, one of the first places I go is a bookshop on Pirate’s Alley (Faulkner House) that’s a shrine to Tennessee Williams. He was the first person I ever read that let me believe I didn’t have to be like they were telling me I had to be, and there were people who didn’t fit in — and didn’t want to fit in! That was more important. He gave me that freedom as a child early to realize that.

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COVER STORY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

DOESN’T EVEN PARTICIPATE IN THE UNITED STATES. IT’S REALLY IT’S ABOUT MUSIC, AND DRINKING, AND NOW THERE’S GOOD ART THERE, TOO.

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JW: I met a lot of ’em! Are you kidding? It was like a cult gathering — the People’s Temple of Tennessee Williams addicts!

G: You once said you were interested in directing the film version, but that project seems kinda snakebit.

G: Was Tennessee the reason you moved to New Orleans in the early 1970s?

JW: It’ll never happen. How can a movie ever live up to that book? So many people have tried to do it — when I tried to do it, it was when Divine was alive, and we wanted him to play the main part (Ignatius Reilly). Some of the top directors in the world have tried to make that movie, and I don’t know if it’ll ever happen. Maybe it shouldn’t.

JW: Certainly I thought about it. I wrote in my new book about how much more fun it is to ride on the bus named Desire. It was my Christmas card one year. My friend was at the next stop and got a picture of me getting off. It’s still amazing to me when I see the bus named Desire. But when I was there, the streetcar was still there. I lived on Rampart Street right across from that Schmegmann’s [sic] market, and it still looks exactly the same. I would hear 24 hours, all night long, “Mrs. So-and-So, your groceries are ready on Aisle 3,” and it was like a nightmare. I lived there with Mary Vivian Pearce and Danny Mills — he played Crackers in Pink Flamingos and she was a topless go-go girl, and we stole drinks from people in bars. I don’t know why we didn’t get mononucleosis, ’cause we would go from bar to bar lifting people’s drinks when they weren’t looking. When I was living in New Orleans, I was the poorest I ever was in my entire life. I went to Buster Holmes every night and had beans and rice for 30 cents and I remember how absolutely delicious they were. I had made Pink Flamingos; I had shown it in Baltimore and gotten a distributor, New Line Cinema, but they held it for almost a year and a half. So I didn’t have a penny. Finally I heard it was opening in New York, so I jumped in my car and drove to New York. And my life changed. G: If you lived at Rampart and Elysian Fields, you lived about half a block from (A Confederacy of Dunces author) John Kennedy Toole’s mother (Thelma Ducoing). Did you know that? JW: No! I didn’t know that! Oh, my God! And of course I love that book — it’s still the first book I send to anyone I know who gets sentenced to prison. ’Cause it’ll make you laugh, and nobody feels much like laughing when you just started serving a prison sentence. It’s a tradition.

G: New Orleans, like Baltimore, is a port city with distinct neighborhoods and a lot of characters. Do the two remind you of each other? JW: No, I think they’re very different, because New Orleans doesn’t even participate in the United States. It’s really outside of all culture. It’s about music, and drinking, and now there’s good art there, too. I have a great time there, but it doesn’t remind me of any other city, and I don’t think it would be flattered to be compared to anybody else. My favorite neighborhood is — what’s it called? It’s that little island with so many trailers on stilts — it’s where all the hustlers live (laughs). It’s kind of isolated, but it was really flooded. It’s the first place I ever saw trailer parks on stilts. That was fascinating to me. But (New Orleans) is like no other place in the world; it’s so eccentric it’s like it’s turned on itself and become a parody turned back into reality, which is good — an exaggeration of oneself. G: You were in a movie shot down here: Blood Feast 2, which was filmed in Abita Springs. Did the people there know what kind of movie was being filmed? JW: I was just there for three days, so I was never in the real community there. The most outrageous thing that happened to me — there was a film where someone pretended to be me that was shooting in New Orleans. ... Someone came to New Orleans, said they were making another movie about teen dancers, said they were me, and nobody questioned it. Even the film board at the time dealt with them! I finally blew the whistle. People were mortified. The papers had covered it. And the guy went to jail, and wrote me a letter which I never answered. It was astounding to me. I’m pretty identifiable.

G: We’re becoming “Hollywood South” down here, with these huge tax credits — JW: You’re stealing everything! That’s why I can’t get a movie made, because of you! G: Any advice for people who find their neighborhood has become a backlot? JW: They do get grumpy. I don’t have any advice, because when someone wants to film in your house, it is the worst possible thing they could possibly ask you. Just know your state is making no one else be able to film movies anywhere else in the country. You and Michigan. Because of your state, I can’t get a movie made now. And there’s only one thing I hate about your city: the weather. I hate hot weather. So I would die if I lived there. G: You write (in Role Models) that it’s tough to go out in Baltimore because a lot of your favorite bars are gone. Do you think irony and hipster culture have taken a toll on America? JW: There’s still bars in Baltimore, I can promise you. But hipsters don’t go to those bars. They’d get beat up! Well, it depends: if you come with me you won’t get beat up. But what happens is when hipsters — or liberals, which is even worse — come in and smirk at people. Or think they’re better. Or make fun of the people, or look down to them; I never look down to them, I look up to them. So the worst thing you could do if I ever took you barhopping is to look and laugh in any kind of way, because I don’t go there to laugh — I go there to marvel. G: My favorite chapter in Role Models was the one about “real people”: Zorro the stripper and Miss Esther the bar owner. JW: Playboy is printing that chapter. Just think about it. A gay man writing a tribute to a bald lesbian mother in a heterosexual magazine. I think it’s fair. And Zorro would be thrilled to be in Playboy. Finally! G: You got more than you expected with Little Richard. JW: That was in the ’80s — that was a long time ago! But I don’t know he’s changed, from what I read. He’s in two worlds: show business and rock and roll and the religious world. Sometimes that is problematic. G: You haven’t run into him since?

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COVER STORY JW: No! Where would I run into Little Richard? I don’t think Little Richard participates in real life. G: Are there any role models whom you haven’t met, or who won’t meet with you? JW: Most are dead. But I’ve certainly met a lot of them, and I talk about many of them in the book. ... They’re usually effete homosexuals (laughs). Let’s see; I’ve met (porn star) Jeff Stryker. There aren’t any new porn stars I want to meet. I’m friends with Jeff. And my favorite go-go boy in the entire world is in New Orleans, named Chris, at the Corner Pocket. He’s also known as Bulldog. And he’s the best one in the whole world, so I always like to see him. G: One of the phrases from your movies — “teabagging” — has entered the political lexicon. I hear it on CNN, and I just read today that in the new biography of Barack Obama he actually uses that word.

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JW: Did you know Rachel Maddow on MSNBC showed the entire scene from Pecker, and said “Republicans: This is teabagging” — and it even showed Martha Plimpton saying “No balls on foreheads!” And they cut back to the set and you could hear the entire crew laughing in the background. She showed it in prime time! G: Are you proud of that? JW: Yes! Certainly! It crossed over! But now the Republicans don’t say that word any more. They changed it, because they know now. G: What do you think of the Tea Party movement? JW: Well, the day after the health care bill passed and Republicans were rioting and breaking windows, I thought, “That’s what we should’ve been doing.” I have to give them credit that they would get that mad because a poor person can now afford an operation! That’s startling to me. Yet at the same time, they hate Obama exactly the same way we hated Bush.

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G: Is America largely unshockable now? JW: I’m shocked every day — shocked by the terrible movies, and the stupidity and the racism, but I haven’t tried to shock anybody since the end of Pink Flamingos. If anybody tries to shock today, it’s old hat, or people try too hard. I’m trying to surprise you with wit, and that’s hard to do, but if I even do that once in a while then my goal has been done. What is shocking any more? I don’t know. You can go online to these websites and see the most hideous people naked ... and it could be your aunt

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G: Yes, except when Bush was elected, we said, “Well, we’ve got to accept this” —

and uncle. It’s hard to imagine Lenny Bruce once went to jail for saying f— when I was a teenager, and now you could look on Craigslist and see your next-door neighbor f—ing — for free! Pink Flamingos plays on television! On Sundance (Channel). Uncut!

JW: I never said that! I was the one who wanted to be out there settin’ fires! I’m older, but I still like a riot! I used to go to riots like kids go to raves.

G: For our younger readers: can you suggest some role models for the youth of today? Who should they be reading or studying?

G: Last I read, you were trying to get a movie called Fruitcake off the ground, to no success. JW: Yeah, and I don’t think anyone I know in the film business can get a midpriced Hollywood movie off the ground any more. They either want you to make a movie for $500,000 or make a movie for $100 million that’s going to have 12 sequels. I’m not whining — independent filmmaking goes through a lot of cycles — but right now, I think, is the worst cycle for independent films since I started. They liked Fruitcake; they paid me to write it, and I had a development deal. But New Line’s gone, and there’s about three companies now you can pitch to instead of 15 or 20. G: Has the movie industry ruined itself in some ways? I don’t really want to go to a mall and watch a really loud movie where people are texting and talking.

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movies on their iPhone. It’s never gonna go back. So I don’t whine about it — it’s not better or worse — but it is changing so rapidly nobody can figure out how to make money with the new media, except the people who think up the technology. I’ve said what I want to invest in: Avatar-quality 3-D for home porn. That person will be rich.

JW: It isn’t to me, but I promise you, it is to most people. Go to an art theater — have you ever seen anybody under 50 in there? (laughs) Kids would rather watch

JW: Oh, boy. If you really want to start a trend, you should horrify the people who are three years older than you. Not your parents. The people who are 21 when you’re 15. That’s the ones you should work to unglue their values. The music industry is where kids first do rebel — and I rebelled — but I just have youth spies to tell me about them. I give ’em poppers to pay ’em (laughs). G: Coming full circle: Today, would you be flattered or pissed if a kid lifted a copy of Role Models from the library? JW: Well, I hate to say it, because when someone shoplifts your book, you still get the money; the store doesn’t. But it’s true that if your book is one of the top shoplifted ones, they won’t reorder it. It’s not worth it. Shoplift the Bible. That’s still the biggest shoplifted book, you know. So keep stealing the Bible, not mine — I worked for four years on it!


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KALENCOM, a New Orleans-based lifestyle company best known for its Hadaki line of bags and totes, will donate 10 percent of all June proceeds to the Audubon Nature Institute. The funds will support efforts to rehabilitate sea turtle populations affected by the Gulf oil disaster. Purchase Hadaki products at RAPP’S LUGGAGE & GIFTS (604 Canal St., 568-1953; 3250 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-6536) or www.hadakishop.com.

estled in the lower French Quarter, Maximo’s Italian Grill (1117 Decatur St., 5868883; www.maximosgrill.com) is a hidden gem. Since reopening in 2008, the restaurant has delighted in-the-know locals and fortunate tourists, maintaining its tradition of tasty cuisine in a vibrant atmosphere. “We’ve got a very happy relationship with the crew [and] with our customer base, we’re just trying to get that back to where it was,” executive chef Thomas Woods says, referring to the restaurant’s closure after Hurricane Katrina. “We’re trying to get that family feeling back again.” Woods was sous chef at Maximo’s before Katrina and took over the executive chef role shortly after reopening. Along the way he perfected the restaurant’s offerings of northern Italian favorites, including veal gnocchi, duck pappardelle, and what he calls the “champion” of the menu, osso buco. Last month, Woods competed in the Louisiana Seafood Cook-Off, where his Thai mango chili-glazed shrimp with Thai basil sticks and Asian-style cucumber salad were well received. Some people have raised concerns about the safety of Louisiana seafood following the Gulf oil disaster, but general manager Kristen Carimi says the staff is keeping a close eye on the situation. “We have been in constant contact with our seafood distributors, and they do not seem concerned at this time,” she says. “The main thing being affected is oysters, and we don’t have oysters on the menu.” Maximo’s general manager Kristen Diners can sample from an ever-shifting menu of nightly specials, which includes Carimi loves the restaurant’s family vibe. country-braised pheasant paired with risotto. Several seats available in front of the open kitchen allow customers to watch Woods and his staff work their magic. “I’m a ham back there; I give a show,” Woods says. “I’ll answer questions, teach people techniques.” Regulars at the restaurant get to rub elbows with tattooed hipsters and out-of-towners, because nightly promotions draw in different crowds. Wednesday’s half-off bar night is a favorite with the young professional set, Carimi says, and a live music night is in the works. The restaurant’s snug quarters and its convivial mood make for an electric dining experience for patrons and employees alike. “I love this restaurant,” Carimi says. “I love how everyone here has so much heart. It’s definitely a French Quarter thing.”

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Shop at KATY BEH CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY (3708 Magazine St., 896-9600; www.katybeh.com) during June, and 10 percent of your Anne Sportun jewelry purchase will be donated to Voice of the Wetlands (www.voiceofthewetlands. org), a nonprofit organization started by musician Tab Benoit to raise awareness of and develop educational outlets for wetland conservation and restoration.

this Summer!

swimming pool hours

DAILY 8AM-6PM BY APPOINTMENT

4920 TCHOUPITOULAS ST. NOLA 504-218-4098 WWW.CANINECONNECTIONNOLA.COM

Sum Sale r Sal mer e Summe 50%-75% OFF SELECTED ITEMS PET INSPIRED T-SHIRTS AS LOW AS $5 FREE LOGO ITEMS W/ PURCHASE OF PURCHASE OF $30 NATURA PRODUCTS MIN. WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 08 > 2010

50% State 30% Federal 12 months same as cash

ELLA BUGZ, a new line of trendy children’s clothing designed by St. Bernard Parish native Jennifer Andrews, launches Friday, June 11. Visit www.ellabugzboutique.com to order or find out how you can host a trunk show.

25


Wednesdays 5-7:30pm

Many thanks to our sponsors and all the fans that came out to the concerts this year! Don’t miss our last concert of the year on Wednesday, June 9 with

GALACTIC and the Soul Rebels. Your Friends at the Young Leadership Council

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

presents

26

JAZZ’N the VINES

Friday, June 11

Saturday, June 12

The Right Reverend Soul Review

Johnny Angel & the Swingin’ Demons

9:30 pm

BIG DADDY “O” REVIEW

9:30 9:3 pm

Unpretentious Blues/Folk sounds of South Louisiana

outdoor music concert

SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 2010

Best Martini in Town

6:30PM - 9PM • GATES OPEN@ 5:30PM ADMISSION: $10/person

81250 Hwy. 1082, 6.5 miles from juncture w/Hwy. 21, just north of Covington, LA.

www.pontchartrainvineyards.com or call 985-892-9742

Dinner Served Nightly • 7 Days A Week


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << Music filM art >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> what to know before you go << <<<<<<<<<< << 28 34 36 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < J U N Miike Snow >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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9 p.m. Wednesday Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com

09

What would Britney Spears’ “Toxic” be with Peter Gabriel on the mic? Miike Snow’s answer: better than it sounds. The Swedish trio teams the dance-floor-lording production talents of Bloodshy & Avant (ghostwriters for Spears, Madonna and many others) with American singer Andrew Wyatt’s remixed “Solsbury Hill” vocal melodies. Canon Blue opens. Tickets $15 advance purchase, $18 at the door.

AVENUE Q 8 p.m. tue.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sat.-SuN., 7:30 p.m. SuN. mahaLia JackSoN theater for the performiNg artS, 801 N. rampart St. ticketS: $25 aND up. ViSit www. mahaLiaJackSoNtheater.com or caLL (800) 745-3000.

Q ... and A PUPPET SEX, 20-SOMETHING ANGST AND THE LATE GARy COLEMAN ARE INTERTWINED IN AVENUE Q, ARRIVING THIS WEEK AT THE MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER. by LaureN LaborDe

I

With founding member Buzz Osborne (pictured) well over 40, Melvins continues its more than 20-year, down-tuned and down-tempo warpath with the June release of the band’s 20th album The Bride Screamed Murder (on Mike Patton’s Ipecac Recordings label) — a wrecking ball of grinding fuzz and tongue-in-cheek thundergod riffs. Totimoshi opens. Admission $20.

world naked Bike ride Noon, Saturday 12 Washington Square Park, 700 Elysian Fields Ave.; www.worldnakedbikeride.org JUN

PHOTO BY JEREMY BLUM

In 2009, 300 nude (or partially so) cyclists pedaled through the French Quarter. Looking to up the ante as part of a global network of nude biketivists, New Orleans’ second annual “freedom” ride protests oil dependency and raises awareness of cyclists’ vulnerability, made all the more clear when participants ride without their rags. Free admission.

MoonShine MadneSS p.m. Monday 14 7:30 Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 522-6545; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com JUN

Southern Rep at Le Chat Noir presents a one-night-only cabaret collage — from burlesque to Broadway (and booze) — featuring a lineup with Tony Award-winner Michael Cerveris, 2010 Big Easy Awards Theater Person of the Year Bob Edes Jr., Ricky Graham and Leslie Castay, among others. The revue races from the racy to ridiculous, with music and moonshine, courtesy of Piedmont Distillers. Tickets $45 general admission, $125 VIP seating.

The 1970s morning-radio DJ known as “Scoot” returns to By KEVIN ALLMAN town this week with a publicaccess TV special. The native New Orleanian and “Rod Stewart lookalike” (so says his press kit) will return to the airwaves June 11 at midnight on Cox channel 4 and Charter channel 12 with “a lively look at topical discussions” and special guests the Topcats.

Scootin'

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 08 > 2010

n a musical featuring a song called “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist” and an act of fully nude onstage puppet sex, it seems Avenue Q’s creators weren’t worried about taking jokes too far. Although characters sing the praises of “Schadenfreude” in one scene, some real worry occurs when a main target of the show’s ridicule dies in real life. “We have no idea (what’s going to happen) yet!” touring cast member Brent Michael DiRoma said, laughing nervously, about 20 minutes after actor Gary Coleman was pronounced dead of a brain hemorrhage at Utah Valley Regional Medical Center. “Anyone who is his family or people who are supporting him might not agree with this show. Either that, or the guy who plays our Gary Coleman is going to be really famous.” In the play, which stops in New Orleans June 8-13 on its Broadway Across America tour, Coleman — played by a woman in the original cast, but portrayed by Nigel Jamaal Clark on tour — is a building superintendent who sells his possessions on eBay and is introduced in a song called “It Sucks to Be Me.” He makes the show’s puppet and human characters, underemployed twenty- and thirtysomethings floundering in outer-outer-borough New York, seem successful in comparison. “I made a lot of money / That got stolen by my folks,” he sings. “Now I’m broke and the butt of everyone’s jokes.”

Jeff Whitty, the book writer for Avenue Q, which won the Tony Award for Best Musical in 2004, kept the character in the show after a few edits in a May 29 production at the home for its current off-Broadway run. Jacqueline Grabois, who plays Kate Monster and Lucy the Slut in the touring cast, thinks Coleman can tastefully maintain his residence on Avenue Q. “That’s what theater’s all about. Gary Coleman still exists now, but just in Avenue Q,” she says. “I think it’s kind of a cool thing that he gets to live on now through this Tony Award-winning show.” Before Coleman’s death, the cast was not unfamiliar with making audiences — especially those in more conservative locales — uncomfortable. “I mean, there are a few definite red states, that take (the show) a different way and take it to heart,” says DiRoma, who plays the roles of puppets Princeton and Rod in the show. “I think … it’s just not for them. There’s a lot of season ticket holders, you know, that might not look ahead and just go to see a show and they’re kinda shocked to see naked puppets on stage doing it.” The show, which promises “full puppet nudity” in its promotional materials, is like Sesame Street for adults (although DiRoma is quick to clarify that Avenue Q is not affiliated with the children’s television show). Its lessons include the joys of ethnic jokes, the benefits of the Internet (for porn) and some hard-won lessons about growing up. “Aside from its potty humor and vulgarity, it’s got a big heart,” DiRoma says. “The audience can really walk away … feeling changed a little bit. They might have a different outlook on things in a positive way.” But when it comes to New Orleans, the cast doesn’t anticipate many audience walkouts. “Oh, my God, I’m so excited, you have no idea,” Grabois says about performing in the city. “I’m really looking forward to it.”

MelvinS p.m. Wednesday 09 10 One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net JUN

27


noah

bonaparte pais

on the record

seattle's best the pharmaCy’S Weekend ew Orleans is suddenly overrun by quality rock bands. Is the Pharmacy one of them? It’s a more complicated question than it sounds. Weekend, the trio’s third album, is for certain a Crescent City product, written and recorded in a Mid-City rental house during the first eight months of 2009 and issued as a split release in March by local imprint Park the Van and Seattle’s Don’t Stop Believin’ Records. Captured using only a four-track, an old microphone and some cheap effects pedals, the LP plays out like a lost artifact from 1965 London, with a low-lying cloud of reverb obscuring singer/guitarist Scott Yoder’s jagged Jagger twang, Brendhan Bowers’ skipping drum patterns and Stefan Rubicz’s mood-swinging, Zombies-inspired keyboard bass lines and solos. “It was definitely something, I think, that we all had to do, in a natural kind of way,” Yoder says of the backward-looking platter. “We all gravitated toward older ’60s stuff. New Orleans was definitely the catalyst for being able to bring that out of us.” The group itself, however, is harder to pin down. Born on Seattle’s neighboring Vashon Island, the Pharmacy has become something of a timeshare band, one that now must be considered at least half ours: It’s putting an international tour on pause this week to lay down leftover tracks for another album here. “I definitely miss New Orleans a lot,” Yoder says. “I think about it more than I think about Seattle when I’m on tour.” Which is to say he’s been thinking about it a lot. Since leaving town in August, the band has spent as many nights on the road as at home, taking Weekend’s tunes everywhere from a May booze cruise in Manhattan (“this trashy, smelly, weird little boat that went around the Statue of Liberty”) to the Funk Hostel in Zagreb, Croatia — a high point, Yoder says, of a spring swing through Europe. “The more east we go, the more fun things seem to be. … It’s definitely a different vibe from America. People are a lot more cerebral about their enjoyment of music. There’s all these people there just kind of standing and staring at you. You’re not really sure what to make of it. You learn to go through the set expecting no interaction

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

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JUN

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with the audience, really. Then you’ll finish a set and talk to a few people and realize that they really enjoyed it. “They’re very specific though,” he laughs, adding with an unspecific Eastern Bloc accent, “‘Song 1 was very good. Song 2, no.’”

Even persnickety listeners will have a hard time faulting Weekend. The band’s formerly kaleidoscopic psych/pop suddenly finds laser-guided precision, both musically and lyrically, on the eerily Stones-like zenith “On With the Show” (whose cascading, painted-black hook takes turns on piano and violin) and “Children on TV” (“Remember we were just children on TV / And the whole world was just what our eyes could see?”). Weekend’s companion album, the bulk of which will be recorded this week in the 9th Ward, continues the retro-rock mining while playing up the grungier garage aspects, Yoder hints: “It’s more ’90s, in a way. I don’t think I will ever not think of Nirvana.” After its first trip to Mexico, a cooldown summer in Seattle and an annual fall jaunt, the bicoastal band plans to return to New Orleans in the winter. For Yoder, it seems, home is where the guitar is. “I think it’s safest to say that we’re a band that started on Vashon Island,” he says, resigned. “I don’t know if we’re a New Orleans band, or a Seattle band, or a Zagreb band.”

the pharmacy with native america 10 p.m. Saturday CirCle Bar, 1032 St. CharleS ave., 588-2616


Listings

stick this in your ear

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 8 ArnAud’s JAzz BisTro — Gumbo Trio, 6:30

BAcchAnAl — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BAnks sTreeT BAr — Barisal Guns, 10 BMc — Frans Schuman, 7; Sweet Jones, 9:30

cAfe negril — Glen David Andrews, 9:30

chickie WAh WAh — Anders Osborne, John Fohl & Johnny Sansone, 8 circle BAr — The Tom Paines, 6; Shellshag, Bipolaroid, Bellys, 10 coluMns hoTel — John Rankin, 8 d.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

dos Jefes upToWn cigAr BAr — Tom Hook, 9:30 The fAMous door — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

funky pirATe — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 gennAro’s — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

one eyed JAcks — Harold Battiste & Friends, 9

preservATion hAll — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

rioMAr resTAurAnT — Javier Tobar, 7

rock ’n’ BoWl — Willie Lockett & the All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 snug hArBor JAzz BisTro — Betty Shirley & Chuck Chaplin Trio, 8 & 10 spoTTed cAT — Brett

old poinT BAr — Mike Burkart, 6:30

Windsor courT hoTel (polo cluB lounge) — Zaza, 7

one eyed JAcks — Melvins, Totimoshi, 9

yo MAMA’s BAr & grill — Beth Patterson, 8

pAlM courT JAzz cAfe — Topsy Chapman, Lars Edegran, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

yuki izAkAyA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Wednesday 9

repuBlic neW orleAns — Miike Snow, Canon Blue, 8

61 Blues highWAy — Chris Polacek & the Blues Highway Band, 8

rock ’n’ BoWl — Joe Krown, 8:30

ArnAud’s JAzz BisTro — Gumbo Trio, 6:30

rosie’s TAvern — Oliviers, 8

BAcchAnAl — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

snug hArBor JAzz BisTro — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

rusTy nAil — Jenn Howard, 8

BAnks sTreeT BAr — Bionica, 10 BAyou pArk BAr — Lynn Drury & Friends, 10 BeAch house — Candy RiedlLowe, 7 Big Al’s sAloon — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7 Blue nile — Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 BMc — Domenic, 7; Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30 Box office BAr — Dan Wallace Quartet, 6 cAfe negril — World Jazz Project, 9:30

chickie WAh WAh — Iguanas

old poinT BAr — West Bank Mike, 6:30

old fireMen’s hAll — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

TropicAl isle originAl — Plan B, 5; Radio Active, 9

lAfiTTe’s BlAcksMiTh shop — Mike Hood, 9

MAple leAf BAr — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MoJo sTATion — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

TropicAl isle BourBon — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9

cAndlelighT lounge — Treme Brass Band, 9

MAison 508 — Slick Idiot, Mona Mur, 8

liTTle TropicAl isle — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAple leAf BAr — Little Freddie King, 10

TropicAl isle BAyou cluB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9

hoWlin’ Wolf (The den) — The Big Busk: A Night of Street Performers, Dirty Bourbon River Show, 9

liTTle TropicAl isle — Lacy Blackledge, 5; Joe Bennett, 9

preview

TAvern on ciTrus — Harvey & the Chest Nuts, 8:30

lA peTiTe grocery — Estelle Campagne, 6

cArousel piAno BAr & lounge — John Autin, 9

circle BAr — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Mike Brun, Kelly Carlyle, Natalie Palms, 10 coluMns hoTel — Ricardo Crespo, 8 d.B.A. — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

deckBAr & grille — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8; Dr. Porkchop Blues Band, 10 dos Jefes upToWn cigAr BAr — Bob Andrews, 9:30 The fAMous door — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

funky pirATe — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 gennAro’s — Funagles, 8 irvin MAyfield’s JAzz plAyhouse — Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

Music Man

When Harold Battiste walks into One Eyed Jacks on Tuesday, it will be his first time. “I don’t even know where it is,” Battiste says, his speaking voice following a natural beat. “I’ve never played there. I hear it’s on Toulouse Street, but I’ve never been there.” The incongruous pairing marks the release of Battiste’s memoir Unfinished Blues: Memories of a New Orleans Music Man, published in June by the Historic New Orleans Collection (HNOC). It will benefit his All For One Foundation and the HNOC’s Louisiana Musicians Biography Series, which launches with Battiste’s book. It’s also evidence that at 79, the storied music educator, saxophonist and producer — maestro for Sam Cooke and Sonny & Cher, gris-gris behind Dr. John’s night-tripping heyday and founder of the first black-owned independent record label, AFO, in 1961 — is still opening new doors. The patron party and club concert feature respective salutes from friend and UNO Jazz Studies colleague Ellis Marsalis and proteges Jesse McBride & the Next Generation, among others. “You don’t know how special it makes me feel,” Battiste says. “When that man brought me [the book] to proofread, it brought tears to my eyes. That’s the first time I saw my life spread out like that before me. It made me see myself in a whole different light.” Everyone else, too. Party tickets $150 (includes concert and autographed book); concert tickets $10 advance purchase, $15 day of show. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

Jun

08

An EvEning with hAroLd BAttistE And FriEnds 6 p.m. Tuesday Historic New Orleans Collection, Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres St., 598-7171; www.hnoc.org 9 p.m. Tuesday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneyedjacks.net

spoTTed cAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen St. Jug Band, 10 TropicAl isle BAyou cluB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9 TropicAl isle BourBon — Damien Louvier; Jason Bishop & the Garlic Truck Band, 9 TropicAl isle originAl — Plan B, 5; Late As Usual, 9 voilà — Cherry Pop, Bomshell Boogie, 9

6; Kill Ida Belle, Sunshine Factory, I, Octopus, 10 clever Wine BAr — Johnny Sansone’s Mid-City Fill-In & Harmonica Orchestra, 6 coluMns hoTel — Fredy Omar, 8 dAvenporT lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 7; Sweet Spot, 10 dos Jefes upToWn cigAr BAr — Chuck Chaplin Trio, 9:30 french QuArTer pizzeriA — Big Joe Kennedy, 9 funky pirATe — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 hi-ho lounge — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 house of Blues — Tommy Emmanuel feat. Chase Foster, 8 house of Blues (pArish) — Sons of Bill, 9 hoWlin’ Wolf norThshore — Black Magnolia, 10 irvin MAyfield’s JAzz plAyhouse — Johnaye Kendrick, 8 JiMMy BuffeTT’s MArgAriTAville cAfe — Eddie Parrino, 7 lAfiTTe’s BlAcksMiTh shop — Mike Hood, 9 le Bon TeMps roule — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 10 liTTle TropicAl isle — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAple leAf BAr — The Trio, 10 MArigny BrAsserie — Courtyard Kings, 8

Windsor courT hoTel (polo cluB lounge) — Zaza, 7

old poinT BAr — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 9

yuki izAkAyA — By and By, 8

pAlM courT JAzz cAfe — Crescent City Joymakers, 8

Thursday 10

preservATion hAll — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8

ArnAud’s JAzz BisTro — Gumbo Trio, 6:30

BAcchAnAl — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BAnks sTreeT BAr — Rabbit, 10 BAyou pArk BAr — Ron Hotstream

rock ’n’ BoWl — Geno Delafose, 8:30 sing sing cluB — Big Soul Band, 9 snug hArBor JAzz BisTro — Henry Butler Steaming Syncopators, 8 & 10

Big Al’s sAloon — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam Session, 8

spoTTed cAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners

Box office BAr — Billy Iuso & the Restless Natives, 7

TropicAl isle BAyou cluB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9

BMc — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 10

Tello’s BisTro — Jerry Nuccio, 5

cArousel piAno BAr & lounge — John Autin, 9

TropicAl isle BourBon — Mark Barrett, 4; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

check poinT chArlie — Pallbearers, Massgrave, Die Rotzz, Necro Hippies, 9

chickie WAh WAh — Country Fried, 8

circle BAr — Sam and Boone,

TropicAl isle originAl — Plan B, 5; Late As Usual, 9 vAughAn’s — Kermit Ruffins & Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

hosTel neW orleAns — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8

Richardson, 4; Jerry Jumonville, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns

Music

Windsor courT hoTel (polo

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r e m m u S

Entertainment Series

music

Listings

Club lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7

Yuki izakaYa — Wazozo, 8

Friday 11 61 blues HigHwaY — Jack Yoder & Li’l’ “G”, 8 andrea’s Capri blu lounge — Philip Melancon, 7

Wednesday Night Comedy

Caroline “The Cajun Queen” Picard June 9 • 7:30pm & 9:30pm Coming soon: Brian Scolaro (6/16)

arnaud’s Jazz bistro — Gumbo Trio, 6:30

austin’s restaurant — Scott Kyser, 6:30

banks street bar — Kevin O’Day & James Andrews, 10 baYou park bar — War Office & the Parishioners, 10

beaCH House — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9

Thursdays - Karaoke, Live Band & Ladies Night Budweiser specials throughout the night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials.

Karaoke • 8:30pm-9:30pm The Topcats • June 10 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: No Idea (6/17)

bMC — Sasha Masakowski, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; We Are 1 Brass Band, 1 a.m. boMbaY Club — Right Reverend Soul Revue, 9:30

box oFFiCe bar — Rites of Swing, 9 CaFe negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

Carousel piano bar & lounge — John Autin, 9 Carrollton station — J the Savage, 9:30

CHiCkie waH waH — Paul Sanchez & Friends, 8; Pony Space feat. Caleb Guillotte, 10:30

Local Favorite Fridays

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

Al “Lil Fats” Jackson

30

June 11 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: Junior & Sumtin Sneaky (6/18)

CirCle bar — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6; Other Planets, Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, 10 Clever wine bar — Courtyard Kings, 8

ColuMns Hotel — Alex Bachari, 5 davenport lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9

d.b.a. — Meschiya Lake and the Little Big Horns, 6; Brian Coogan Band, 10 dos JeFes uptown Cigar bar — Eric Traub Trio, 10

Louisiana Saturday Nights Rockin’ Dopsie, Jr. and the Zydeco Twisters June 12 • 9:30pm Coming soon: Deacon John & the Jump Blues Orchestra (6/19)

eMeril’s delMoniCo — Bob Andrews, 7

FrenCH Quarter pizzeria — Big Joe Kennedy, 9 FunkY pirate — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

green rooM — Consortium of Genius, 10 HerMes bar — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road • Harvey

boomtownneworleans.com/boomers-nightclub Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? c A L L 8 7 7. 7 7 0 . S T O P

Hi-Ho lounge — Blue Ribbon Healers, Sweet Street Symphony, 10 House oF blues — Bag of Donuts, 9

House oF blues (parisH) — Angry Banana feat. Stereohype, Joystick, Reagabomb, 6:30 Howlin’ wolF — Cocytus Festival feat. The Unwilling Commencement, This is The Enemy, Jane Doe’s Dead and oth-

ers, 6:30 Howlin’ wolF (tHe den) — Vox & the Hound, 9 irvin MaYField’s Jazz plaYHouse — Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8 JiMMY buFFett’s Margaritaville CaFe — Eddie Parrino, 7 le bon teMps roule — Tom Worrell, 7; Gravity A, 10 le pavillon Hotel — Philip Melancon, 7 little tropiCal isle — Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 Maple leaF bar — 101 Runners, Daryl Hance, 10 Market CaFe — Andy K. and Bobby Love, 4:30 old point bar — Li’l Red & Big Bad, 9:30 olive branCH CaFe — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6 one eYed JaCks — Supagroup, Missing Monuments, War Amps, 9 palM Court Jazz CaFe — Duke Heitger & Palm Court Jazz Band, Gerald Adams, 8 preservation Hall — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8 republiC new orleans — G-Eazy, 10 roCk ’n’ bowl — Bucktown Allstars, 9:30 seasons steak and spirits — Dr. Jazz & Friends, Jeanne Louise, Joe & the Italian Pony, 7 snug Harbor Jazz bistro — Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10 spotted Cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10 st. roCH tavern — The Way, 9 tipitina’s — Soul Rebels Brass Band, DJ Soul Sister, 10

toMMY’s wine bar — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10 tropiCal isle baYou Club — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 1 & 5; Danny T & the Blue Crawfish Band, 9 tropiCal isle bourbon — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 tropiCal isle original — Butch Fields Band, 1; Radio Active, 5; Late As Usual, 9 utopia — Big Soul Band, 4

voilà — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 windsor Court Hotel (polo Club lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7; Anais St. John, Harry Mayronne Trio, 9

saturday 12 300 n. broad ave. — Debauche, 11 a.m. apple barrel — Peter Orr, 7

arnaud’s Jazz bistro — Gumbo Trio, 6:30

austin’s restaurant — Scott Kyser, 6:30

baCCHanal — Gypsy Swing Club, 8 banks street bar — Wild Magnolias, 10

blue nile — Andy J. Forest Trio, 7

bMC — One Mind Brass Band, 12:30; New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Kristin Diable, 9:30

boMbaY Club — Johnny Angel & the Swinging Demons, 9:30 box oFFiCe bar — Louisiana Hellbenders, 9

CaFe atCHaFalaYa — Atchafalaya All Stars, 11 a.m. CaFe negril — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7

CaFe rose niCaud — Troy Sawyer, 8 Carousel piano bar & lounge — John Autin, 9 Carrollton station — City Park Skateboard Park Benefit feat. Tangle, Dresden and others, 9:30 CirCle bar — Jazzholes, 6; Pharmacy, Native America, 10 davenport lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9

d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; Cedric Burnside & Lightnin’ Malcolm, 11 deCkbar & grille — Miche & MixMavens, 8

9:30 one eYed JaCks — Dax Riggs, Unnaturals, 9 palM Court Jazz CaFe — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 preservation Hall — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. William Smith, 8 ritz-Carlton — Catherine Anderson, 1 roCk ’n’ bowl — Kermit Ruffins, 9:30 rustY nail — Jenn Howard & Crazy McGee, 10 saturn bar — Shearing Pinx, Nu Sensae, Kindest Lines, Skate Night!, 9 snug Harbor Jazz bistro — Tospy Chapman & Solid Harmony, 8 & 10 spotted Cat — Luke Winslow-King, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 tipitina’s — Bonerama, 10

toMMY’s wine bar — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10 tropiCal isle baYou Club — Creole Zydeco Farmers, 1; Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Danny T & the Blue Crawfish Band, 9 tropiCal isle bourbon — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett; Debbie & the Deacons, 9

dos JeFes uptown Cigar bar — Sunpie & The Louisiana Sunspots, 10

tropiCal isle original — Butch Fields Band, 1; Radio Active, 5; Late As Usual, 9

FrenCH Quarter pizzeria — Big Joe Kennedy, 9

utopia — Big Soul Band, 4

HerMes bar — I.Q. feat. members of Iguanas, 9:30 & 11

sunday 13

eMeril’s delMoniCo — Bob Andrews, 7

twist oF liMe — Dirtys, Crotchbreaker, 10

FunkY pirate — Mark Penton, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

windsor Court Hotel (polo Club lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7; Anais St. John & the Harry Mayronne Trio, 9

Howlin’ wolF — Cocytus Festival feat. Falls From Grace, Nothing Sacred, Zynk and others, 6:30 Howlin’ wolF nortHsHore — Demuredin, 9 JasMine’s FrenCH restaurant — Darren and Diana, 9 JiMMY buFFett’s Margaritaville CaFe — Irving Bannister’s AllStars, 4 laFitte’s blaCksMitH sHop — Mike Hood, 9

le bon teMps roule — Funkifry’d, 10 little tropiCal isle — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

Maple leaF bar — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10

Market CaFe — Andy K. and Bobby Love, 4:30 Mike’s on tHe avenue — Suzanne & Company, 9 Mulate’s CaJun restaurant — Bayou DeVille, 7 MY bar — Big Pearl, 9

old point bar — Dana Abbott,

arnaud’s Jazz bistro — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m & 6:30 asHé Cultural arts Center — Bamboula 2000 CD release, 5 banks street bar — Mid-City Jam, 9 baYou park bar — SoulSect, 7

bMC — Ras Chemash Lamed, 6; Gal Holiday, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight buFFa’s lounge — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. CaFe atCHaFalaYa — Sam and Boone, 11 a.m. CaFe negril — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CaFe rani — Courtyard Kings, 11 a.m. CirCle bar — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Davis & the Travelling MacAlarys, 10 ColuMns Hotel — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. Court oF two sisters — Mary Flynn, 9:30 a.m. d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers,


Howlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wolF (tHe Den) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 irvin MayFielDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz PlayHouse â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Masonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s VIP Revisited feat. Germaine Bazzle & guests, 7 JiMMy BuFFettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MarGaritaville CaFe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Irving Bannisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s All-Stars, 4 little troPiCal isle â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MaDiGanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anderson/ Easley Project, 9 MaPle leaF Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington, 10 Market CaFe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Andy K. and Bobby Love, 4:30 Mulateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CaJun restaurant â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bayou DeVille, 7 olD Point Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wilson & Moore, 3:30

PalM Court Jazz CaFe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Fischer & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8 tHe PreCinCt â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funk Express, 7:30 Preservation Hall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

roosevelt Hotel (Blue rooM) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. sinG sinG CluB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Soul Band, 9 snuG HarBor Jazz Bistro â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brian Quezergue CD release, 8 & 10 sPotteD Cat â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rights of Swing, 3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10 st. CHarles tavern â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m. tiPitinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 troPiCal isle Bayou CluB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Creole Zydeco Farmers, 1; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9 troPiCal isle BourBon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Barrett; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 troPiCal isle oriGinal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Butch Fields Band, 1; Rain, 5; Late As Usual, 9 voilĂ  â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mario Abney Quartet, 9 a.m.

aPPle Barrel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam Cammarata, 8 arnauDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz Bistro â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gumbo Trio, 6:30 BaCCHanal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

Banks street Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Awlins Johnnys, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Barret, 7; Smoky Greenwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mondays Blues Jam, 9:30

CaFe atCHaFalaya â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Burke Ingraffia, Dr. Danny Acosta, 7

CHiCkie waH waH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spencer Bohren, 7 CirCle Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maddie Ruthless, 10

ColuMns Hotel â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Doucet, 8

D.B.a. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Glen David Andrews, 9 Donnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar & Grill â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

Dos JeFes uPtown CiGar Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Fohl, 9:30 tHe FaMous Door â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

Four Points By sHeraton (M!x ultralounGe) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

Funky Pirate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Penton, 4; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8 Green rooM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alexis Marceaux, 10; Generation Way, 10

Hi-Ho lounGe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blue Grass Pickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Party, 8

House oF Blues â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dropkick Murphys, 8 irvin MayFielDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jazz PlayHouse â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

little troPiCal isle â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9 MaPle leaF Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Papa Grows Funk, 10

Mat & naDDieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s restaurant â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7 My Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Pearl, 10

olD Point Bar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brent Walsh Trio, 8 Preservation Hall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8 snuG HarBor Jazz Bistro â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 sPotteD Cat â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Worldly Wine/ Martinis

troPiCal isle BourBon â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Bennett, 5; Butch Fields Band, 9

HOOKAH

troPiCal isle oriGinal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Damien Louvier, 5; Rain, 9

230 DECATUR

11AM-4AM DAILY

winDsor Court Hotel (Polo CluB lounGe) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 7 zeitGeist Multi-DisCiPlinary arts Center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wood Spider, Stefan Fink, 8

classical/ concerts laFayette square â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 601

South Maestri Place, 5811039 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wed: Wednesdays in the Square presents Galactic, Soul Rebels, 5

louis J. roussel PerForManCe Hall â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www. montage.loyno.edu â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fri: Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestras Summer Concert, 5:30

MCkeownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Books anD DiFFiCult MusiC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 4737

www.attikineworleans.com 587-3756

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor

A True Mid-City

Neighborhood

MusiC bAr

7Ă&#x160;",  -½Ă&#x160;*,  ,Ă&#x160;<<Ă&#x160; 1

07 TUE 08 WED 09 THU 10 FRI 11 SAT 12 SUN 13 MON

MUSIC LINE-UP CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND BETTY SHIRLEY w/ Chuck Chaplin Trio DELFEAYO MARSALIS & Uptown Jazz Orchestra HENRY BUTLER Steaming Syncopators ELLIS MARSALIS TRIO TOPSY CHAPMAN & Solid Harmony BRIAN QUEZERGUE CD Release Party

-"7/ -\ nĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;*

  Ă&#x160;,"Ă&#x160;x*

â&#x20AC;˘4â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

JUN

JUN

JUN JUN JUN JUN

PERFORMERS WELCOME OPEN MIC ALL

9PM

08

LYNN DRURY

9PM

CLASSIC COUNTRY THURSDAYS

THE WAR OFFICE

10PM

THE GREEN MANTLES NEW ORLEANS FUNK BAND SOULSECT

10PM

07

09 10 11

12

W/

WITH

RON HOTSTREAM

W/ THE PARISHIONERS

ZEUSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

N. Peters Street, 589-4841; www.nps.gov/jazz/index. htm â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tue: The Influence of the Blues in Jazz feat. Matt Hampsey & Bruce Barnes, 3; Wed: Lawrence Cotton, noon

oGDen MuseuM oF soutHern art â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 925 Camp

PontCHartrain vineyarDs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old

Military Road), Bush, (985) 892-9742; www.pontchartrainvineyards.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sat: Jazzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;n the Vines presents Big Daddy O Review, 6:30

st. annaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ePisCoPal CHurCH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1313 Esplanade Ave., 9472121 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wed: Mission to Musicians Concert Series feat. Panorama Jazz Band, 7:30 trinity ePisCoPal CHurCH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thu: Trinity Artist Series presents Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: New Orleans Civic Orchestra, 6; Mon: Taize, 6

6PM

Pet boarding, doggy dayCare & grooming

new orleans Jazz national HistoriCal Park â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 916

Pavilion oF tHe two sisters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thu: Twilight Garden Concert Series presents Wilson & Moore, 6

9PM

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

Tchoupitoulas St., 8951954 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thu: An Evening of Difficult Music presents Cornelius F. Van Stafrin III & Tarr, 8

St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thu: Ogden After Hours presents Jimmy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duckâ&#x20AC;? Holmes, 6

& FRIENDS EVERY WED.

WebCamS available

For monitoring 24/7

Family SuiteS in-HouSe groomer Sunday PiCk-uPS available

1st Pet Full Price - 2nd Pet Half Off!

3 full bars â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. â&#x20AC;˘ 523-5530 VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

Your Petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Away From Home! 4601 Freret St. (corner of Freret & Cadiz) 504.304.4718

www.zeusplace.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

ritz-Carlton â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2

Monday 14

Every Fri & Sat Night

MON

House oF Blues â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Gospel Brunch feat. Zion Harmonizers, 10 a.m.

yuki izakaya â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Luke Winslow King, 7

BELLY DANCER

troPiCal isle Bayou CluB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 9

WED

Funky Pirate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Penton, 4; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8

winDsor Court Hotel (Polo CluB lounGe) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 7

experience the mediterranean

tiPitinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cowboy Junkies, 9

THU

FinneGanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Laissez Faire, 2

bar & grill

Grillo & the Frenchman St. Allstars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

FRI

Donnaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar & Grill â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band

wHiskey Dix â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Jam feat. Gypsy Blue, Royal Blue Band and others, 7

SAT

6; Coot, 10

Attiki

music

SUN

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

31


VIEUX-TO-DO Three feSTIvALS

ONe weeKeNd

JUNe 11—13, 2010

T H E f R E N C H M a R K E T ’ S 2 4 T H a N N Ua L

creole tomato fESTIVaL

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS By LOCAL CHEFS

A CELEBRATION OF LOUISIANA PRODUCE AND THE RENOVATED FARMERS MARKET

live HOMEGROWN MUSIC NEW ORLEaNS MUSIC! MAIN MUSIC STAge

AT THE

OuTBACK STAGE FRIDAy & SuNDAy

KIdS STAge at dutch alley perFormance pavillion

OCEaNa rESTauraNT

Music, workshops, facepainting & more

Chef Keith Theard

at Governor nicholls at the Farmers market

SaT SaT

jUNE 12

11:00 a.m. >> Storyville Stompers arrive after

jUNE 11

VIEUX TO DO

OpeNINg dAy pArAde @ 10:30A.M. & preSS CONfereNCe @ 11:15 A.M. featuring Treme Brass Band, tomato “throws” and tomato tastings at Farmers Market

32

CREOLE TOMaTO feSTIvAL throughout the

SUN

jUNE 13

11:00 a.m. >> New Wave Brass Band arrives after

secondlining from Washington Artillery Park 12:00 NOON-1:00 p.m. >> Preservation Hall Stars 2:15-3:00 p.m. >> Margie Perez 3:00-3:45 p.m. >> Thelonious Monk Institute/ 5:00-6:30 p.m.

NOCCA Quintet >> Louis Prima Tribute Band

COOKINg deMOS local cheFs Feature creole tomato recipes + Free samples

SaT

jUNE 12

11:15-11:45 a.m. >> Molly Kimball, Nutritionist, RD, CSSD

& Times Picayune nutrition columnist discusses tomato health with Chef Nino, Rouses Markets. 1:00-1:45 p.m. >> Chris Monterro, Bacco’s prepares Creole Crabmeat Caprese 4:00-4:45 p.m. >> April Neujean, Chef Teacher and Food and Nutrition Coordinator, Edible Schoolyard New Orleans, prepares kid-friendly garden food recipies SPONSORS

SUN

ArTS MArKeT at dutch alley & dumaine sponsored By dutch alley artists co-op

jUNE 13

11:15 a.m. -12 NOON >> Chef Erin Talbot, presents Creole Tomato recipies with Mrs. Talbot’s Tasty Foods 1:30-2:30 p.m. >> Chef Matthew Fultz, Seven on Fulton 3:00-4:00 p.m. >> Chef Gus Martin, Muriel’s Jackson Square

11:00-1:30 p.m. >> KidSmart circus arts workshops 1:45-2:45 p.m. >> Papa Frog’s African

Drumming workshop 3:00-4:00 p.m. >> Johnette Downing 4:00-5:00 p.m. >> Swing music w/ Miss Sophie Lee PLUS Lindy Hop dance lessons!

SUN

jUNE 13

11:00-1:30 p.m. >> KidSmart circus arts workshops at Pavilion (music on boom box) 1:45-2:45 p.m. >> Bo Dollis, Jr. and Wild Magnolias performance & workshop 3:00-4:00 p.m. >> Johnette Downing 4:00-5:00 p.m. >> Swing music w/ Miss Sophie Lee PLUS Lindy Hop dance lessons

Chef Troy Waugh

CELEbRaTE THE fISHERMaN, THE CHEfS & THE CULTURE Of LOUISIaNa

HELP SPREaD THE WORD ask for Fresh louisiana seafood. PROUDLy SPONSORED by

FRENCH MARKET FRESH, FRENCH MARKET FIT!

produce stands featuring fresh local produce: French market produce, Hollygrove Farms, & mother Nature’s Cupboard Eateries serving fabulous fresh food: meals from the Heart, alberto’s Gourmet pLuS FREE TOMATO Cheese, Organic Banana, SAMPLES aNd TOmaTO FEST N’awlins Café & Spice SOuvENirS FOr SaLE! Emporium

SO New SeASON! MONDAYS 9PM

Winner will face-off with the winner of the Australian Prawn Peeling Challenge at The Great American Cook-Off on Aug. 7th in New Orleans.

and the Zydeco Big Tymers

BArrACKS STreeT STAge

SaLTWaTEr GriLL

Chef William McIntyre

STOP bY: PerfOrMANCeS | free GiveAwAYS | CAlOrie-burNiNG DANCe leSSONS

SUNdAy@ OUTBACK STAge

10:45 am - 12:45 pm >> Curley Taylor & Zydeco Trouble 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm >> Li’l Nathan

Chef Brian Katz

Get down with Season 2 of Oxygen’s weight-loss competition series, Dance Your A** Off. The official Dance Your A** Off Tour, presented by Yoplait, is hitting New Orleans at the Louisiana Seafood Festival on Saturday, June 12th from 11am to 7pm !

SHRIMP PEELING Challenge

eSpLANAde STreeT STAge

& the Zydeco Hellraisers

as we attempt to Dance Off A Million calories to benefit the American Heart Association.

OUTBACK'S LOUISIANA

jUNE 12

5:30p.m. - 7:00 pm >> Buckwheat Zydeco

BIGGEST DANCE PARTY EVER

@ faRMERS MaRKET

SaT

rEd FiSH GriLL

JOIN OXygeN@S

HEaLTH faIR

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm >> Bruce Daigrepont 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm >> Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots

3:15 pm - 5:15 pm >> Dwayne Dopsie

Chef David Scheuermann

Fried Green tomatoes, creole tomato crepes, and more!

BArrACKS STreeT STAge

Chef Steve young

THE vadaLia GriLL BY HurriCaNE FENCE COmpaNY

fOOd BOOThS IN dUTCh ALLey

health booths, screenings and info about eating right while enjoying local food!

rOYaL HOuSE OYSTEr Bar

jUNE 11

12:15 pm - 2:15 pm >> Goldman Thibodeaux

& the Lawtell Playboys 2:45 pm - 4:45 pm >> Les Freres Michot 5:15 pm - 7:15 pm >> Lost Bayou Ramblers

SUN

jUNE 13

eSpLANAde STreeT STAge

10:45 am - 12:45 pm >> Dikki Du & the Zydeco Krewe 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm >> Li’l Malcolm & the House Rockers 3:15 pm - 5:15 pm >> Corey Ledet & His Zydeco Band 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm >> Terrance Simien

& the Zydeco Experience BArrACKS STreeT STAge

12:15 pm - 2:15 pm >> Feaufollet 2:45 pm - 4:45 pm >> Cedric Watson et Bijou Creole 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm >> Steve Riley & the Mamou Playboys

www.cajunzydecofest.com The Louisiana Cajun-Zydeco Festival is produced and presented by the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, in collaboration with the Louisiana Seafood Festival and the French market’s Creole Tomato Festival. SPONSORS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

jUNE 12-13

secondlining from Washington Artillery Park 12 NOON-12:45 p.m. >> Sharon Martin & First Take 2:00-3:30 p.m. >> Gypsy Swing Trio 5:00-6:30 p.m. >> Freddie Omar Con Su Banda

iNTErCONTiNENTaL NEW OrLEaNS

jUNE 12

fRI

33


anniversarY ParTY SATURDAY JUNE 19TH

coMe celeBraTe THe liFe oF

coacH nicK revon

filM

25

TH

liStiNgS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A Room wiTH A ViEw

review

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

PARTY STARTS @9PM drink specials free food w/drink purchase

check out www.myspace.com/coachscornermetairie for future events and band info

Enjoy a FREE MARTINI

drive

888.6685

w/the purchase of a lunch entrée. Tues-Fri.

Classic Italian Dishes Local Specialties Fresh Seafood Private Parties - Best Italian Restaurant 2009

7839 St. Charles Ave • New Orleans • 866-9313 4411 Chastant St • Metairie • 885-2984 vincentsitaliancuisine.com | available for catering & private parties

Now ShowiNg BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

CITY ISLAND (PG-13) — A prison guard takes his long-lost son home to his family, which is already filled with secrets. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place DATE NIGHT (PG-13) — Tina Fey and Steve Carell star as a couple whose rare night out turns into a case of mistaken identity. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14, Grand DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX DINOSAURS ALIVE! (NR) —

David Clark helms a CGI jaunt in a Jurassic park. Entergy IMAX, Kenner MegaDome GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) — An ambitious record

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

company intern (Jonah Hill) is on a mission to get an oversexed British rock star (Russell Brand) to L.A.’s Greek Theatre. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

34

THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) — The Swedish

film based on the first book in Stieg Larsson’s Millenium trilogy follows a computer hacker drawn into a murder mystery by an embattled journalist. Canal Place

GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

Bring The Indoors

OUTSIDE Create Your Custom Outdoor Living Environment

HURRICANE ON THE BAYOU (NR) — Greg MacGillivray

directs a film about Louisiana’s eroding wetlands and the natural protection they provide against hurricanes. Includes performances by Tab Benoit, Amanda Shaw, Allen Toussaint, Chubby Carrier and Marva Wright. Narrated by Meryl Streep. Entergy IMAX

WWW.MULLINLANDSCAPE.COM

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) — Robert Downey Jr. stars as the Marvel Comics character in the sequel to the 2008 blockbuster. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

CA LL FO R A CO N S U LTATI ON

JUST WRIGHT (PG) — A physi-

5 0 4. 2 7 5. 6 61 7

Photo by Will Serber

2221 TransconTinenTal

LIVE MUSIC BY

BLACK MAGNOLIA

Mother Unlode Many of America’s working poor live paycheck to paycheck, but even payday is an elusive prospect for the Cheng family. In Tze Chun’s Children of Invention Elaine (Cindy Cheung), a single mother of two living on the outskirts of Boston, debunks the notion that the American Dream is attained by an ironclad work ethic alone. Elaine tries to stay afloat by working as a real estate agent and participating in pyramid schemes that work under the guise of peddling skin care products or vitamins. Her ex-husband has moved to Hong Kong and is remiss in sending child support payments. Her young children, Raymond (Michael Chen) and Tina (Crystal Chiu), are often left in the car or alone in their temporary living arrangement, living secretly in the model unit of an incomplete condominium building, where they subsist on ramen dinners. A new business venture is particularly attractive to Elaine after the scheme’s ringleader offers to cover her $2,500 “membership fee” to widen the company’s Asian-American reach — or, what Elaine fails to realize, dupe more immigrants. She remains active in the scheme even after quickly realizing that instead of selling products, her role is to recruit more people with the lure of big paychecks that she’s yet to receive herself. After becoming increasingly embroiled in the scheme, Elaine mysteriously disappears and leaves the children to fend for themselves. Here is where the child actors shine, delivering sympathetic but never saccharine performances as they devise means to get by without their mother. The children’s plan to peddle Raymond’s creations — spaghetti-spinning forks and neckties with builtin penholders — and buy their old house back shows how necessity can indeed be the mother of invention. Chun’s real-life experiences with his immigrant mother lend realism to the low-budget film, which was an official selection at 2009’s Sundance Film Festival. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members, children 14-under free with paid adult. — Lauren LaBorde

THRU JUN

30

ChildreN of iNveNtioN 7:30 p.m. nightly June 11-June 20, except for June 14. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net


film

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

“SENSATIONAL!” Shawn Edwards, FOX-TV

cal therapist (Queen Latifah) falls for her NBA client. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand KILLERS (PG-13) — A woman

(Katherine Heigl) meets the man of her dreams (Ashton Kutcher), only to find out he’s an international assassin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) — An

American in Verona responds to a letter to Juliet Capulet seeking advice about love, leading her and the letter’s author on a journey through Italy. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

MARMADUKE (PG) — The

WILD SAFARI: A SOUTH AFRICAN ADVENTURE (NR) —

Ben Stassen takes viewers on a journey to find Africa’s “Big Five” animals. Kenner Megadome

opening friday THE A-TEAM (PG-13) — Liam

Neeson stars in the bigscreen adaptation of the 1980s action TV show.

THE KARATE KID (PG)— A 12

year old who moves to China with his family seeks the mentorship of a kung fu master after becoming the target of bullying.

special screenings

giant dog from the one-panel comic strip gets a movie. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

BRIT WIT — The Big Top

A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) — The 1980s horror fran-

CHILDREN OF INVENTION (NR) — Two young children are

chise that created Freddy Krueger gets a modern reboot. AMC Palace 16

PRINCE OF PERSIA: SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) — Based on the

video game, a Persian prince must form unlikely alliances to protect a magical dagger. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) — The winner of the 2009

Best Foreign Film Oscar follows a retired police detective who decides to write a novel, but then becomes the central character of a dangerous drama. Canal Place

SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) —

Carrie, Charlotte, Miranda and Samantha leave the Big Apple for an Abu Dhabi adventure. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Grand

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) —

The titular ogre makes a deal with Rumplestiltskin to get his old life back. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

SPLICE (R) — The human

hybrid creation of a pair of rogue genetic engineers quickly becomes their worst nightmare. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

left to fend for themselves when their mother becomes embroiled in a pyramid scheme. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. FridaySunday, then June 15-20, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

DIAL M FOR MURDER (PG) — In Alfred Hitchcock’s film, a former tennis pro carries out a plot to murder his wife (Grace Kelly). Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com GUYS AND DOLLS (NR) — The movie-musical stars Marlon Brando and Frank Sinatra as professional gamblers in the late 1940s. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and June 16, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com THE LOSS OF A TEARDROP DIAMOND (PG-13) — In the

Tennessee Williams screenplay, a headstrong heiress in the Roaring 20s rebels against society by asking the impoverished son of her father’s caretaker to escort her to social events. Tickets $10, $8 New Orleans Film Society members. 3 p.m. SaturdaySunday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

THE MISFORTUNATES (NR) — A 13 year old living with his drunk, lazy father and three uncles in his grandmother’s house wants to escape. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Sunday, then June 15-18 and June 20. 4 p.m. Saturday and June 19, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary

NEW MUSLIM COOL (NR) — A

drug dealer-turned-devout Muslim confronts realities of the post-9/11 world after the FBI raids his mosque. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students, $5 members. 6 p.m. Friday-Sunday, then June 15-20, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

SEDUCED AND ABANDONED (NR) — Pietro Germi directs

the follow-up to 1961’s Divorce, Italian Style. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria. com

SEX IN THE CENTRAL CITY —

The center screens a series of films exploring the boundaries of human sexuality. Film screenings include Secret Museums, Graphic Sexual Horror, Bi the Way, Tarnation, Prodigal Sons, Stonewall Uprising and The Lost Films of Charles Lundlam. Visit the website for screening times. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students, $5 members. Nightly through Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

LOCAL LISTINGS FOR STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 11 CHECK THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

4.729" X 5.333" (1/4 PG SQ) TUE 6/8 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

SHAUN OF THE DEAD (R) — A

man attempts to find focus in his life while dealing with his girlfriend, mother, stepfather and an apocalyptic zombie uprising. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING OF

TOY STORY 3 in 3D TUESDAY JUNE 15TH

VIEUX CARRE MATINEES —

AMC Palace 20 Elmwood

The Historic New Orleans Collection screens short films on Louisiana history and culture. Visit www.hnoc.org for details. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre. com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

7:30 pm Pick up your complimentary pass

FRIDAY JUNE 11TH 11AM - 4PM at

4920 Tchoupitoulas St.

Text TOYS to DISNEY (347639) Disney.com/ToyStory

While supplies last. Passes are available on a first come, first served basis. No purchase necessary. Limit one (admit-two) pass per person. Rated G.

Bring a new, unwrapped toy to be donated to local kids and teens and receive a movie prize! Participation not required. Offer valid while supplies last.

IN THEATRES FRIDAY, JUNE 18TH

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) — The film uncovers the origins of the hero-outlaw, from his stint as an archer to his exile in Sherwood Forest. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

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arT

lisTings

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Opening ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “Junkfish

Caviar,” a multi-media installation by Susan Gisleson, through July 5. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com — “Hur-

ricanes, Hand Grenades and Other Delightful Things,” oil on canvas by Scott Guion, through July 17. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — “For a Canvas of Skin,”

tattoo sketches on paper by local tattoo artists, through July 6. Opening reception 6 p.m. Saturday.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink,” a

printmaking invitational featuring 31 regional and national printmakers, through July 17. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “The Col-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

ors of Summer,” a group show of gallery and invited artists featuring mixed-media paintings, drawings and photographs, through July. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday.

36

galleries 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot.com — “James Booker: An

Intimate Portrait,” photographs by Jim Scheurich, through June. 2001 MAGAZINE STREET GALLERY. 2001 Magazine St., 522-3341 — Works by Eugenia Cameron

Foster, Les Lyden, Stephen Richardson, Will Crocker and Stewart Harvey, ongoing.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com —“B-Movie

Double Feature,” video and photographs by Heather Weathers, through June 26.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Rock

and Roll,” photographs by Lynn Goldsmith, through July 5.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

WHaT YoU see is WHaT YoU geT Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

both through Saturday. More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

gallery showcases emerging and established contemporary artists.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “Transfer,” prints by Teresa Cole, through July 22.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 2858 Magazine St., 891-9080; www.antonart.com — Works

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “30-

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Treasures of the Gulf,” a

AMMO. 938 Royal St., 220-9077; www.ammoarts.com — The

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others.

AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue and North Miro Street; www.aortaprojects.blogspot.com — “Blue

Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem, through December.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition of

gallery artists, through July.

ART BY CHRISTY. 733 Royal St., 586-3886; www.artbychristy.com — Large-scale oil paintings and

other works by Christy WorksBoutte, ongoing.

ART GALLERY 811. 811 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Recent

sculptures by James Surls, through June 27.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BECA ICAD. 527 St. Joseph St., 566-8999; www.becaicad.org —

“Sublime Affliction,” works by Jenn Parnell, through June 25.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Second Line: Lift-

Year Anniversary Exhibition,” works by David Goodman, John Oles, Christina Goodman and Jere Allen, through July.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “About

Face,” paintings by Andrew Bucci from 1950 to 1962, through June 27.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paintings

from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — Annual group exhibition featuring sculptures, paintings and mixed-media works by gallery artists, through Aug. 3. DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

ing Our Souls Up Into Heaven,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

GALERIE DALRAY. 713 Royal St., 681-0880; www.galeriedalray. com — Works by Tim Jaeger,

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings

Brian Tull, Carlos Cadavid and others, ongoing.

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com — “Brothers in Arts,”

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Images from the

End of the Earth,” photographs of Grand Isle by Zack Smith.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

contemporary oils on canvas by Quincy Verdun and Leon Verdun, through June.

group exhibition featuring more than 12 artists, through July.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GRIS GRIS LAB. 2245 Brainard St., 872-0577; www.grisgrislab. com — “L’Espirit d’Haiti,”

photographs by Christopher L. Mitchell, through July 9.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — “Field Record-

ings,” videos by Courtney Egan, through July 5.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

“Let’s Go to the Park,” a group exhibition featuring paintings in oil and acrylic by local artists, through June. JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“reconsidered,” new paintings by Stephen Hoskins, through July 28.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

JUPITER ARTPROJECTS. 1901 Royal St., 281-4230; www.jupiterartprojects.com — “Girls,” photo-

graphs by Libbie Allen, through Saturday.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing.

JUSTIN ROBINSON SMITH GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 528-2588 — Works by Justin Robinson

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — “Clouds,” paintings by Phil Thompson; “Coastal Vistas,” paintings by Nancy Lowentritt;

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — New paintings by Don Picou

Smith; photography by Sidney Smith; both ongoing.

review Bounce House As an exploration of New Orleans bounce and hip-hop, the Ogden Museum’s Where They At? is a striking presentation of photography and text that works on several levels. Beyond its value as cultural anthropology, it also offers insights into the intricacies of local music culture (see “Representing Bounce,” Events Feature, April 19), but how does it stack up as visual art? Some of the Ogden’s more conservative visitors were overheard muttering that they didn’t think it belonged in a museum. In fact, documentary and street photography have long inspired such responses. Not everyone can see beyond the raucous facade, but Aubrey Edwards’ photographs hark to the unvarnished candor of Danny Lyon’s stark biker portraits or Larry Clark’s studies of the domestic life of middle American junkies in Tulsa, Okla. In like manner, Edwards and Fensterstock take us to the remote backstreets and clubs where colorful characters like Mia X, DJ Jimi and Big Freedia can be observed on their home turf. Mia X, Mother of Southern Hip-Hop is an iconic image of the sassy, jazzy godmother of the idiom coyly glancing out from the billowing contours of a composition that is a blend of darkly luminous Caravaggio lighting and streetwise insouciance. Many others are more candid but no less artful, at least as far as the women and the “sissies” are concerned. “Sissy bounce” drag queen performers are a local specialty, and an image like Big Freedia, depicting the beatifically beaming singer in a cloud of lavender, pearl and metallic mauve fabric, conveys the sheer Dionysian otherworldliness of the genre. Some male performers, ranging from Juvenile to Partners-N-Crime, can be too self-conscious, or wooden, but the somnambulistic DJ Jimi somehow manages to employ narcolepsy as a dramatic device. All that and more appears in this remarkably detailed exploration of the unique parallel universe that is the New Orleans bounce scene. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU J U LY

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Where They aT?: new Orleans Bounce and Hip—Hop in Words and pictures by aubrey edwards and allison Fensterstock

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org

and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing. KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by a select group of artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists, ongoing.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 —

New paintings by Holly Sarré, ongoing. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Growing Pains,”

a group exhibition curated by Christy Wood, through July 24.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Festival Play-

ers,” photographs by Randy Sanders; “Loteria Mosaico,” Venetian glass mosaics by Randy Sanders; “Makin’ Music,” giclee prints by Sarah Stiehl; all through June. LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — page 38


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

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“The Unconventional Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paint-

ings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www. michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111; www.noafa.com —

Student art exhibition, through July 24. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 — “Random Order,” works by James Henderson; “Deep Horizon,” new works by Pat Macaluso; both through June. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by

Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

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RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Works by Teri Walker,

Chad Ridgeway, Tamra Carboni, Caren Nowak and others, ongoing RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries.net — Multimedia works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown

glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart.com — Works by Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing. SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.

sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila Phipps, ongoing. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Long Story Short,” mixed-media works on canvas and paper by Karen Laborde, through June. SOUTHERN LIGHTS STUDIO. 901 Carondelet St., 524-0200; www.southernlights.com — “2

Dreams: The Secret of Life,” photography by Jackson Hill, ongoing.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “The Talented

Tenth: African American Artists and Musicians of the Harlem Renaissance, the W.P.A and Beyond,” through July. STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary

sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO 525. 525 E. Boston St., Covington; www.studio525covington.com — Rare rock ’n’ roll

photographs by Sidney Smith; tribal painting and mixed media by Justin Smith; works by Sarah Freeman Carey, Christopher Morrison Slave and Richard Lee; all through June. STUDIO 527. 527 Julia St., 2184807 — “Design Within Breach:

A Case Study for How Crisis Influences Design,” drawings, photographs and models of post-Katrina projects by Frank Gehry, Robert Tannen, Tina Freeman, Futureproof, Abe Geasland, Chrestia, Staub & Pierce and others, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., third floor, 529-3306 — Works by

YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Ves-

sels,” paintings by Gary Komarin; “Small Works,” paintings by John Randall Nelson; both through June 28.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Works by

Will Smith, ongoing.

Spare SpaceS BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111 — “Coming Home:

2005-2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing. BELLA NOLA. 4236 Magazine

St., 897-9499; www.bellanola. net — Paintings by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

THE COUNTRY CLUB. 634 Louisa St., 945-0742; www.thecountryclubneworleans.com — Works

by Mike Pajon and Mark Bercier, through June.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 8918500; www.dosjefescigarbar. com — Works by Mario Ortiz,

ongoing.

DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

FUEL. 4807 Magazine St., 8955757; www.fuelcoffeehouse. net — Paintings by local artists

nola.com — Works by Tanner, ongoing. NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 8913381; www.neutralground.org —

Work by local artists, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St, 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

SOUND CAFÉ. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. VEGA TAPAS CAFE. 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-2007; www. vegatapascafe.com — Paintings

by Mari De Pedro, ongoing.

Corey Sanders and Mario Ortiz; New Orleans-inspired acrylics by Kristin Littwin; paintings by Natalie Gaidry; all ongoing.

YELLOW MOON BAR. 800 France St., 944-0441; www.yellowmoonbar.com — Mural by Mike Frolich, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com —

call for artiStS

Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446 — Works by

Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

ITALY DIRECT. 709 Tchoupitoulas St., 566-4933; www.fashionsofitaly.com — “Abstract Reflec-

tism,” paintings by Robere Lord, through June.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., No. 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by

Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco —

Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobia-

MIDDLE EAST FILM FESTIVAL. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net — The festival seeks film

submissions, as well as Arab, Persian or Middle Eastern musicians, multi-media installations and performance pieces, for the November event. Visit www. nolamideastfilmfest.blogspot. com for details. Submission deadline is September 30.

MY NEW ORLEANS: PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF A CITY IN TRANSITION. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts. com — Artists of any medium

are invited to submit works expanding on impressions of New Orleans life, culture, food, art and music for the November exhibition. Email rhinocrafts@ yahoo.com for details. Submission deadline is July 15.

muSeumS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. Tilton Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5535 — “Cre-

ative Circles: Exploring Community Within African Art,” an exhibition of manuscripts and artwork in conjunction with NOMA’s “Beyond the Blues,” through June.

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave., 522-4806; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits

of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Prints,” paintings by Joan Mitchell, through June. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Katrina +

5: Documenting Disaster,” an oral history and photography project with historical maps, documents and a multimedia presentation, through Sept. 12.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Unti-

tled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through December. “Serigraphs from the Toussaint L’Ouverture Series, 1986-1997,” by Jacob Lawrence, through July 15. LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’

Neighborhood: A Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills; “Team Turtle Training Camp,” handson exhibit designed to teach kids how to make healthy choices; all ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America:

Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM CABILDO. 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Unsung Heroes: The

Secret History of Louisiana Rock & Roll,” through May. “The Cabildo: 200 Years of Louisiana History,” ongoing.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hurricanes:

Katrina and Beyond,” ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The

Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Snapshots of D-Day,” more

than 70 photographs of the Normandy invasion, through June 27.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Summer Daydreams,” floral watercolors by Carol Greel, through June. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — Oil paintings by Joan

Mitchell, through June 27. “Patti Smith: A Donation to NOMA,” photographs by the musician, through July 3. “SWEET Suite Louisiana,” color intaglio prints by Warrington Colescott; “The Therapist,” photographs by Donald Woodman; “Beyond the Blues: Reflections on African America from the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center,” a selection of works from African-American artists; Photographs by William Greiner; all through July 11. “Swamp Tours,” a group exhibition featuring contemporary Louisiana artists, through Aug. 29, and more. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Brooching the Subject:

One-of-a-Kind,” jewelry by 22 artists, through July 15. “Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues,” photographs by William Ferris; William Ferris Folk Art Collection; both through July 25. “Where They At: New Orleans Bounce and Hip-Hop in Words and Pictures,” by Aubrey Edwards and Alison Fensterstock, through Aug. 1, and more. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “The Birth of Coffee,”

black-and-white photographs documenting worldwide coffee works, ongoing. “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans, and more.


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ENJOY SUMMER CUISINE at the Green Goddess!

AVENUE Q. Mahalia Jackson Theater of the Performing Arts, 1201 St. Peters St., 525-1052; www.acetheatregroup. com — In the risque Tony-winner for Best Musical, puppets portray outer, outer-burough New Yorkers trying to make it in the city. Tickets start at $25. 8 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, 7:30 p.m. Sunday. DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS. NOCCA|Riverfront Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca. com — The stage musical adapta-

tion of the 1988 film centers on two swindlers living in the French Riviera. Tickets $30. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday. 2 p.m. Sunday through June 20. Mystic Krewe of Satyricon performance 8 p.m. Thursday. THE EVERLASTING BONFIRE. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5105 ext. 2 — Part of the New Orleans

Shakespeare Festival at Tulane, the play follows a playwright penning a gothic horror production about Edwin Forrest. Tickets $30. 8:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday through June 20.

THE GIN GAME. Luke’s Brisket and Broadway Dinner Theatre, 1540 Lindberg Drive, Slidell, (985) 781-6565; www.brisketandbroadway.com — Two nursing home residents

engage in a series of gin rummy games that inspire increasingly difficult conversations. Tickets $40 (includes dinner). 7 p.m. FridaySaturday through June 26.

JACKSON SQUARE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The play is

a dark comedy about three women and the deep secrets they share. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday. LET FREEDOM SWING! National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The retrospective musical highlights wartime music. Visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 1 p.m. Sunday.

LOVE’S LABOR’S LOST. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5105 ext. 2 — The New Orleans Shakespeare

Anniversary Celebration Help us celebrate our first anniversary. Over 50 bottles of wine to choose from and our globetrotting cuisine. Lazy alfresco lunching 6 days a week in scenic Exchange Alley. Join us! Lunch & Brunch 11am-3:30pm; Dinner Thur-Sun 6pm-11pm. 307 Exchange Alley, in the Quarter.

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Festival at Tulane, in collaboration with the NOLA Project, present the comedy. Tickets $30. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Sunday.

MOONSHINE MADNESS. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Moon-

shine cocktails are served while local theater stars perform duets, burlesque and Broadway standards in the event presented with Southern Rep. Tickets $45 general admission, $125 VIP seating. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MURDER AT THE HOWARD JOHN-

Get in on the Act mediums that are between 30 and 60 minutes long for its November festival. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. Application deadline is July 1.

preview French Frauds There’s only room for one con man on the French Riviera. That’s the rule in the musical Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and the 1988 film of the same name. In Frank Oz’s film, Michael Caine and Steve Martin are two confidence men who stop at nothing to out-con or outwit each other for the same mark, an alleged wealthy heiress. The musical follows the same battle of wits — Lawrence Jamieson (Bob Pavlovich), the handsome ladies’ man, and Freddy Benson (Gary Rucker, who also directs), the conniving swindler, agree to target Janet Colgate (Kayla Herrington), and the one who walks away with her $50,000 is the last man standing in the Riviera. But the jackpot soon becomes Colgate’s heart as the men start to fall for their victim. Musical director James Kelley and choreographer Tara Brewer lead the musical adaptation, which premiered on Broadway in 2005. Tickets $30. The Mystic Krewe of Satyricon presents a performance at 8 p.m. Thursday. — Alex Woodward

thRU JUne

20

Dirty Rotten scoundrels NOCCA Riverfront, Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun.

SON’S. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — The suspenseful

comedy follows a love triangle in a Howard Johnson Motor Inn. Tickets $18. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and June 18-19.

OUR TOWN. Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — Bean’s spin on the Thorton Wilder classic takes place in a racially diverse Grover’s Corners, N.H. in the mid-20th century. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors, $60 benefit performance. 8 p.m. FSaturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through June 27. Benefit performance 8 p.m. Friday. THE PIANO TEACHER. Southern Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — In the

off-Broadway hit, a lonely, cookieloving piano teacher becomes the subject of a chilling mystery. Tickets $20-35. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

THE REALLY DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES OF STEPFORD PARISH. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Something

is amiss among the housewives of Stepford parish in the Running With Scissors farce. Tickets $26 FridaySaturday, $21 Sunday (both include $5 drink credit); 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through June 27.

WINE LOVERS. Muriel’s Cabaret Theatre at Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com — Audi-

ence members can taste six wines during this play about budding romance in a wine class. Tickets $59 (includes six glasses of wine). 8:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 5 p.m. Sunday.

auDiTions BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday. CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The chorus holds

NEW ORLEANS FRINGE THEATER FESTIVAL INFORMATIONAL MEETING. Community Book Center, 2523 Bayou Road, 948-7323; www.communitybookcenter.com — Those interested

in performing or volunteering in the New Orleans Fringe Festival are invited to attend. Visit info@ nofringe.org for details. 5:30 p.m. Monday.

Dance THE DON EFFECT. Candle Factory, 4537 N. Robertson St — Through dance,

theater, film, music and food, the show explores the human desire to recreate what cannot be recreated. Tickets $10 (includes food). 9 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. OLIVE DANCE THEATRE’S SWIFT SOLOS. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — The series of vignettes is based

on the career of choreographer and break dancing innovator Ken Swift. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 members and students. 8 p.m. Saturday.

SOLEDAD BARRIO & NOCHE FLAMENCA. Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com — The

acclaimed flamenco troupe consists of three dancers, two guitarists and two singers. Tickets start at $35. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

comeDy BLUE MONDAY STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — The weekly open

mic is hosted by Tony Frederick. 9 p.m. Monday.

BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday. COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 400-6145 — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday. COMEDY CLUB. Seasons Steak and Spirits, 1398 Front St., Slidell, (985) 649-7558 — Seasons hosts a weekly

comedy night. 9 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY LIVES. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Comedy teams Dr. Awkward and Men Not Mars perform weekly improvisational comedy. Admission $10. 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday.

weekly auditions for women ages 16 and older for its original show “A Streetcar Named Who Dat” to be performed in October. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday.

NEW ORLEANS FRINGE. New Orleans Fringe seeks works in a variety of

COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St.,


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com sTage

DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 5711863; www.rubyfruit-jungle. com — Kristen Becker hosts a comedy show with live music, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday.

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GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a

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comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

on vacation until Wed. June 9th

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. Maison 508, 508 Frenchmen St., 3097137 — The show features local

stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m. Show is 8 p.m.

JEFF DUNHAM. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The comedian takes his

Odentity Crisis tour to New Orleans. Tickets $39.50. 8 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Tarantula Arms, 209 Decatur St., 525-5525 — Simple Play presents a

weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Shadowbox Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre. com — The troupe performs interactive improv comedy. Tickets $10, $8 in advance. 7 p.m. Saturday.

prov group features a comedy show with a dinner option. Tickets $10 for show only. 8 p.m. Friday.

STAND UP NOLA. Boomtown Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans. com — The casino hosts free,

TERRY STOKES. Gut-Buster Comedy Room, Holiday Inn, 501 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (800) 465-4329; www.holidayinn.com — The hypnotist performs a

comedic show involving audience volunteers. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Saturday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly

open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

T H R U The Piano Teacher J U N 8 p.m., Thu.-Sat.; 3 p.m. Sun. Southern Repertory Theater The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St.,  third floor, 522-6545  www.southernrep.com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY DINNER SHOW. Memeworks Integrated Creative Arts, 527 Julia St., 523-SHOW — The im-

    Mrs. K is a piano teacher “in a suburb among suburbs” — the most innocuous of ladies in the most  innocuous of settings — and the central character  in Julia Cho’s The Piano Teacher, currently on the  boards at Southern Rep. When we first meet Mrs. K  (Peggy Walton-Walker), she’s lounging in her rather  bare parlor, which is furnished with two armchairs  and dominated by an old upright piano, the instrument she used to bring neighborhood children in  touch with their musical heritage.     Everything is gentle and genteel — except,  perhaps, for that Kafka-esque last name. “My  husband saw war and revolution first hand,” she  says, explaining that she fell in love with him partly  out of pity. We never learn his real name, only the  shortened alphabetical form. He’s been dead for decades. “We had 36 happy years together,” says Mrs.  K. “I thought of him as a refugee and he was.” She  seems content, if lonely, in her humdrum existence:  watching Dancing with the Stars, nibbling cookies.       Much (perhaps too much) of the play comes in  the form of monologues. But Walton-Walker gives  a focused, compelling performance. Things pick  up when she rummages through the piano bench,  takes out an address book and decides to see if she  can track down any of her now-grown students.  That old address book is the bottle from which she  sets free an evil genie — for there was an unknown  dark side to her marriage.     Mrs. K manages to locate two of her former  students, Mary (Veronica Russell) and Michael  (Michael Aaron Santos). As Mrs. K chats with  them, she learns some disturbing truths about her  late husband.     While waiting her turn at the piano, Mary would  do crossword puzzles with Mr. K in the kitchen.  It turns out both Mary and Michael hated those  sessions in the kitchen with Mr. K — but not for the  reasons that might first leap to mind. “He never  touched me,” Michael admits. All of this took place  out of sight and long ago, and the play shows us the  consequences coming home to roost.     Under Mark Routhier’s direction, the excellent  cast bring this troubling, if somewhat stilted drama  to life. Michael Duran’s set, Joan Long’s lighting and  Eric Shimelonis’ sound are effective. — Dalt Wonk

a ke all of our signature recipes daily.

weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

m

IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515 — The Rusty Nail hosts a

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages comedy competition. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

Exterior Designs

BEVERLY KATZ | Landscape Designer

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

healthy alternatives for bet ter living

42

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listings

Be there do that

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

family Tuesday 8 KINDER GARDEN: CREEP, CRAWL AND FLY. Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Admission $12, $10 members, $5 for each additional adult. Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@ longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Wednesday 9 LONGUE VUE VISITS THE LIBRARY: LIFE AROUND OUR POND. Jane O’Brien Chatelain

West Bank Regional Library, 2751 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey — Longue Vue House and Gardens present discussions and activities focused on pond life in libraries around the city. Call 488-5488 ext. 320 or email jgick@longuevue.com. 11 a.m.

ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 12 THE FROG PRINCE . Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — The Shoestring Players present this classic story featuring Dorabella the Fairy Guardian. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

brass band for an hour-long performance. 11 a.m. SNOBALLS AND SPACEWALKS.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — The event features a variety of children’s activities including lawn games, crafts and a visit from the Audubon Bugmobile. Call 488-5488 ext. 320 or email jgick@longuevue. com for details. Admission $8, $6 members, free for children ages 2 and under.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 1222 N. Dorgenois, 821-0529; www.stlukesnola.org — The annual event features raffles, Caribbean-American food and a wide selection of books for sale. 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The hospital hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 4565000 for information. 6 p.m.

DIVORCE AND BEYOND.

Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker helps group participants going through the process of divorce. Call 835-5007 for details. ELEVATING YOUR HISTORIC HOME . Preservation Resource

Center, 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — The homebuyers’ workshop on house raising also provides information about historic properties for sale. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

MOVEMENT MEDITATION CLASS. Louisiana Himalaya

Alley, Near French Market, on North Peters Street — The children’s musician and author performs. 3 p.m. MUSIC FOR ALL AGES. New

NOMA’S BEYOND THE BLUES.

Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters Street, 589-4841; www.nps. gov/jazz/index.htm — Children bring their own instruments and play with a professional

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

CANCER EDUCATION CLASS.

DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Grace Wilson of the New Orleans Museum of Art discusses the museum’s current exhibit. Call

Angels Convent, 3500 St. Claude Ave. — Guests can eat dinner and learn about the community-owned grocery store opening next year. Call 324-6849 or e-mail info@nolafoodcoop.org for details. 6 p.m.

Wednesday 9

Tuesday 8

Market, 200 Broadway St., 8615898; www.marketumbrella. org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

TREE TROOPERS TRAINING .

YOUNG SURVIVOR COALITION . ACS Volunteer Center, 2605 River Road, Jefferson, 8334024 — The group is for breast cancer survivors ages 40 and younger. 6 p.m.

events

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

appearance-related side effects of treatment and regain selfconfidence. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Parkway Partners Greenhouse, 1137 Baronne St., 620-2228; www.parkwaypartnersnola.org — The training places emphasis on selecting the right tree for the right location, caring for a healthy tree and current green laws. Call 620-2224 or visit www.parkwaypartnersnola.org for details. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

ST. LUKE’S FAMILY FUN DAY.

Association Community Center, 621 N. Rendon St. — The class leads participants in meditation through movement. Call (907) 957-0852 for details. 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.

JOHNETTE DOWNING . Dutch

preview

Call 488-5488 ext. 333 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. Admission $30, $25 members. 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

telling the Blues Mississippi is the epicenter of the blues and a fertile crescent to both the river’s delta and the myth and soul behind the music. In Delta Blues (Tyrus Books), edited by Mississippi author and 2010 Harper Lee Award recipient Carolyn Haines, contributors bury crime fiction in the Deep South, weaving stories from the crossroads where iconic bluesman Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil. Writers — including James Lee Burke, John Grisham, Charlaine Harris and David Sheffield — translate the blues storytelling tradition and mystery into 19 fully realized fictional narratives. Other contributors include Ace Atkins, Lynne Barrett, Suzann Ellingsworth, Beth Ann Fennelly, Bill Fitzhugh, Tom Franklin, Dean James, Toni L.P. Kelner, Nathan Singer, Michael Lister, Daniel Martine, Mary Saums and Les Standiford. Getting closer to the book’s impetus, the writers formed a band, dubbed Blues Muse, for the project and performed at actor (and foreword writer) Morgan Freeman’s Ground Zero blues club in Clarksdale, Miss. One dollar from each purchase of the book benefits Freeman’s Rock River Foundation, which promotes literacy efforts. Delta Blues contributing writers Suzanne Hudson and Alice Jackson, a veteran journalist and longtime Mississippi resident, sign at the event. — Alex Woodward

JUN

12

Delta Blues Book sign— ing with suzanne huD— son anD alice Jackson Maple Street Books (7529 Maple St., 8612105; www.maplestreetbookshop.com)

838-1100 or email mdeane@jefferson.lib.la.us for details. 7 p.m. ROAD HOME ASSISTANCE . Community Center of St. Bernard, 1107 LeBeau St., Arabi, 281-2512 — Representatives are available at the center to assist homeowners with questions and concerns. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

TEA ON TUESDAY: GREEN INTERIORS WITH CHET POURCIAU. Longue Vue House

and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Chet Porciau explores interior design trends with an emphasis on eco-friendly decorating. A traditional tea follows. Pre-registration is required.

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost & Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter.org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

NEW ORLEANS FOOD CO-OP POTLUCK & MEETING . Holy

ROUND TABLE LUNCHEON . Begue’s Restaurant at the Royal Sonesta, 300 Bourbon St., 533-2278; www.beguesrestaurant.com — The monthly luncheon features a number of speakers. Call 553-2220 or email nscallan@royalsonestano.com for details. Admission is $38. Noon. SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., No. 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

YAPPY HOUR . Ruby’s

Roadhouse, 840 Lamarque St., Mandeville, (985) 626-9748; www.rubysroadhouse.com — The benefit for Pelican Bark Park, the Northshore’s first dog park, features drink specials, a pet fashion show, a Humane Society pet adoption tent and more. Pets welcome. Admission $5. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

Thursday 10

LAKEVIEW MARKETPLACE .

610 STOMPERS BALL CRAWL .

LOOK GOOD, FEEL BETTER SUPPORT PROGRAM . Tulane

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www.harrisonavenuemarketplace.org — The Lakeview Neighborhood Association presents an outdoor event with live music, food, drinks, handmade crafts and activities for kids. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Cancer Center Library, 1415 Tulane Ave. — The program helps women undergoing cancer treatment cope with the

Squeal Bar-B-Q, 8400 Oak St., 302-7370 — The dance troupe leads a parade through the Riverbend neighborhood that stops at bars and restaurants in the area. Visit www.610stompers.com for details. Pre-registration party 5 p.m. Thursday, Ball Crawl 2 p.m. Saturday.

Magazine St., 891-8682; www. heycafe.biz — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

Thursday 10

events

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EvEnts

Listings

outside one’s body to effect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. FORM AND FUNCTION IN DESIGN LECTURE AND WINE RECEPTION . Design Within

Reach, 3138 Magazine St., 891-6520; www.dwr.com — Longue Vue presents Ruthie Wilson’s lecture on the roles of imagination and contrasts in New Orleans interiors and gardens. Pre-registration is recommended. Call 488-5488 ext. 320 or email jgick@longuevue.com for details. Admission $10. 6 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522

St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

HERB SOCIETY OF AMERICA MEETING .

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Tony Fernandez speaks about cypress reforestation. Pre-registration required. Call 866-7795 or email driscoll@driscollantiques.com for details. Admission $5, free for members. 6:30 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511

Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail. com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

KNIT AND SIP. Castine Center, Pelican Park,

63350 Pelican Drive, Mandeville, (985) 6267997 — Knitters of all levels meet to knit, talk and drink coffee. Call (985) 626-7997 for details. 10 a.m. to noon.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM SECOND THURSDAYS. Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 523-

3939; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — The program discusses the World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition of 1884. Call 568-8526 or email bmulla@crt.state.la.us for details. 6 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

NOLA YOUNG PROFESSIONALS FOR RAVI SANGISETTY. Republic New Orleans, 828

44

S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola. com — The congressional candidate hosts an event for young professionals. Call (985) 413-1233 or email kmcdonald@raviforcongress.com for details. Admission $50. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

PROJECT LAZARUS GUARDIAN ANGEL DINNER . Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, 500

Canal St., 595-5511; www.sheratonneworleans.com — Charmaine Neville performs at this dinner honoring volunteers. Preregistration is required. Call 949-3609 ext. 505 or email srivera@projectlazarus.net for details. Admission $150. 6:30 p.m.

ST. CHARLES VISION AND SALT TRUNK SHOW. Loa Bar, International House Hotel,

221 Camp St., 553-9550 — The annual event includes eyewear fittings, a look at SALT’s summer collection, 20 percent off eyewear purchased at the event and specialty cocktails. Email rsvp@lrgnola.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

“An Ngon... Eat Well!”

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING WORKDAY. St. Charles Avenue Presbyterian

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Church, 1545 State St. — Participants prepare materials needed for the next school year, and also learn more about STAIR and exchange ideas about tutoring. Call 8990820 for details. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

WTC UNDER 40 MENTORING AND NETWORKING EVENT. Plimsoll Club, World

Trade Center, 2 Canal St., No. 2900, 529-1601; www.wtcno.org — Arnie Fielkow speaks at the launch of the World Trade Center’s Mentors Program, which features light fare and a cash bar. Pre-registration is recommended. Call 529-1601 ext. 220 or visit wtcno.org for details. Admission $20. 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.


events

Friday 11 10TH ANNUAL LADIES IN RED GALA . Generations Hall, 310

Andrew Higgins Drive, 5814367; www.generationshall.net — The Preservation Resource Center fundraiser features live jazz and food. Reservations required. Visit www.prcno.org for details. Admission $75, $150 for gala and patron party. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION . ACS

Volunteer Center, 2605 River Road, Jefferson, 833-4024 — Those interested in volunteering for the organization are invited to attend. Call 833-4024 or email tiffany.scott@cancer. org for details. 10 a.m. to noon. BEANS + RICE: A CULINARY AND CULTURAL ODYSSEY. Williams

Research Center, Historic New Orleans Collection, 410 Chartres St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — The two-day event celebrates red beans and rice with a reception and panel discussion. Call 523-4662 or visit www.hnoc.org for details. Pre-registration is required. Admission $35, $25 students and teachers. Reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, forum 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

LOUISIANA CAJUN-ZYDECO FESTIVAL . Old U.S. Mint, 400

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

LIPSTICK MIX FUNDRAISER SOIREE . K-Joe’s Cajun & Creole

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 677-3668 — The program discusses one of Louisiana’s most well known residents: the American alligator. 11 a.m.

BROAD FLEA COMMUNITY MARKET. 300 N. Broad Ave.,

corner of Bienville Street — The market includes an eclectic mix of handmade crafts, gifts, rare books, vinyl, and more. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Tammany Parish Hospital, 1202 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 898-4000; www.stph.org — Participants can attend three, 45-minute breakout sessions discussing issues of concern to cancer patients and their caregivers. Pre-registration is recommended. Call (985) 898-4581 or email ccorizzo@stph.org for details. 8:45 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

oil—free from the sea Photo courtesy of the Louisiana seafood Promotion and marketing Board

As one-third of the Vieux to Do (which also includes the 24th annual Creole Tomato Festival and the Cajun Zydeco Festival), this year’s Louisiana Seafood Festival is a moment to celebrate the fishermen, chefs and culture relying on the state’s bounty now endangered by the BP oil disaster. While oil-soaked shores and wetlands threaten its future, the raison d’etre is honored (and fried, boiled, barbecued or on the half shell) within this five-block domain, and its definition extends to anything in the water — from alligators to oysters, crabs, shrimp, fish and crawfish. The festival features more than 50 vendors of food, drink and arts and crafts, as well as live music on stages hosted by the Cajun Zydeco Festival. On Friday and Saturday, chefs from Oceana, the Hotel InterContinental, Royal House Oyster Bar, Red Fish Grill, Saltwater Grill and others host cooking demonstrations. Free admission. — Alex Woodward

JUN

11 13

louisiana seafood festival Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

SECOND SATURDAY PROGRAM .

Parkway Partners Greenhouse, 1137 Baronne St., 620-2228; www.parkwaypartnersnola. org — Landscape architect Keith Bleichner lectures on favorite New Orleans plants. 9 a.m. to noon

ST. CLAUDE SANKOFA MARKETPLACE. Sankofa

Marketplace, St. Claude and Caffin avenues — The monthly market features health screenings, children’s activities, a farmers market, art, live music and more. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. TRESTLEFEST ARTMART. Dixie

Art Supplies, 5005 Bloomfield St., 733-6503; www.dixieart.

com — The monthly indoor art market features art vendors, demonstrations, prizes, refreshments and more. Noon to 5 p.m. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. URBAN MINISTRIES COMMUNITY OUTREACH . Columbus

Children’s Center, 2503 Columbus St., 428-1790 — The

event features food, resources for community members, heath screenings, children’s activities and more. Email lee@ godskingdombuilders.net for details. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. WORLD NAKED BIKE RIDE NEW ORLEANS. Washington Square

Park, 700 Elysian Fields Ave. — Cyclists ride as bare as they dare to protest non-renewable energy and consumerism. Visit www.worldnakedbikeride.org for more information. Noon.

Sunday 13 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE .

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The

JULEPS IN JUNE . Private Residence, call for details — The Faulkner Society fundraiser features food, drinks and live music in a historic home. Preregistration is required. Visit julepsinjune2010.eventbrite. com for details. Tickets $175. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. LAMBETH HOUSE HOME TOUR .

Lambeth House, 150 Broadway St., 865-1960; www.lambethhouse.com — Guests can tour five homes displaying antiques and artwork, and Sucre provides refreshments. Call 865-1960, ext. 114 for details. Admission $25, $20 in advance. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LATINO HEALTH FAIR . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121 — The fair features free health screenings, food and live music from Freddy Omar con su Banda. Visit www. saintannas.blogspot.com for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. LOUISIANA BOOKS 2 PRISONERS WORKNIGHT. Nowe Miasto,

223 Jane Place; www.myspace. com/nowemiasto — The group sends books and letters to prisoners. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SIERRA CLUB PROGRAM .

Audubon Zoo, Dominion Auditorium, 6500 Magazine St. — Speakers from the Gulf Restoration Network and Lake Ponchartrain Basin Foundation speak about the BP oil disaster. Call 780-8889 for details. 7 p.m.

ZOE PRESENTS ROCK ’N’ BOWL . Rock ‘N’ Bowl, 3016

S. Carrollton Ave., 861-1700; www.rocknbowl.com — Life Center Full Gospel Cathedral’s youth group presents a night of music, bowling and food for teens ages 14 and up. Call 915-

8594 for details. Admission $25. 8 p.m. to midnight.

Monday 14 BEGINNING AND INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN LANGUAGE CLASSES.

American-Italian Museum & Research Library, 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — The museum offers a series of Italian classes. Times and days vary. Call 522-7294 or email americanitalianmuseum@gmail.com for details. CBT GROUP. Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 8355007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details. TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (excepting holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 2518600 or visit www.notoast234. freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Nonprofit Central, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofit-central.org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Call for appliCations CENTER FOR CULTURAL INTERCHANGE . The center

seeks families to host foreign exchange students during the upcoming school year. Email ayp@cci-exchange.com or visit www.cci-exchange.com/host. htm for details. Application deadline is Aug. 31.

FLO WOODARD MEMORIAL BARTENDING SCHOLARSHIP.

The New Orleans Culinary and Cultural Preservation Society and Crescent City School of Bartending select a professional bartender to attend a training course valued at $3,000. Email flowoodardbarscholarship@crescentschools.com for details.

LOUISIANA YEAR OF THE SONG 2010 SONG CONTEST. The con-

test winner wins a two-day writing session with songwriter Jim McCormick. Visit www. nosongfest.com/song+contest for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15. NEW ORLEANS TRADITIONAL JAZZ CAMP. The summer music

camp for adults accepts applications for professional and amateur musicians and vocalists. Visit www.neworleanstradjazzcamp.com for details. PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

ALLIGATOR LIFE . Fontainebleau

Festival Association, 200 S. Galvez St. — Atendees can taste several wines and cheeses and register for the 2010 Oktoberfest Parade. Call 4856454 for details. Admission $20. 2:30 p.m.

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

LIVING THROUGH AND AFTER A CANCER DIAGNOSIS. St.

Feed, Pet & Garden Center, 4421 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson — LA/SPCA volunteers are on hand to facilitate pet adoptions. Visit www.la-spca.org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

GERMAN HERITAGE FESTIVAL ASSOCIATION WINE & CHEESE SOCIAL . German Heritage

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

SUMMER RUM . Amusement

PET ADOPTIONS. Jefferson

DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 299-9455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

Restaurant, 720 St. Louis Street, (504)495-8383 — Drag queen Hedda Lettuce performs at this benefit for the Greater New Orleans AA Roundup. Call 4958383 for details. Tickets $20 for the show only, $50 for dinner and the show. 7 p.m.

Saturday 12

preview

EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm. crt.state.la.us/site/mintex.htm — Buckwheat Zydeco headlines this three-day celebration of zydeco music. Call 558-6100 or visit www.cajunzydecofestival.com for details. 10:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday. Park, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 259-1509; www.neworleanscitypark.com — The piratethemed Friends of City Park fundraiser features food, drink, costume contests and more. Call 483-9376 or visit www. friendsofcitypark.com for details. Admission $40, $35 Friends of City Park members. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

faith-based nonprofit seeks

45


eVents

Listings

homes still damaged (50 percent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 942-0444 ext. 244 for details.

Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 8328111 for details.

CaLL for VoLunteers

IRON RAIL. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www. ironrail.org — The bookstore and community space seeks volunteers. Weekly meetings are 8 p.m. Wednesday.

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient-service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480 or anotherlifefoundation@hotmail. com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org.

BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION. Bayou Rebirth seeks

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 309-7304 or (877) 500-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors to area children. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

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nization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans. org for details. Fr

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

best rates! color ads!

volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

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nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER. The

center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing. org for information.

HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

group holds orientations to connect locals with available volunteer opportunities in New Orleans. Call 483-7041 ext. 107 or email cho@ handsonneworleans.org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony

Hospice, 519 Metairie Road,

46

JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum seeks

volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 8370175 or email daveharrell@yahoo. com for details.

JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL.

The charter school that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 18 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Ginger Morvant at ginger@la-spca. org for details. LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower Ninth Ward. Visit www.lowernine. org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS.

Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION. The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and up for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum is accepting applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 233 or email janet. mauer@nationalww2museum.org for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS.

Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area innercity youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS. New

Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and

expertise as part of the ARMSOutreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@ nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information. SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks senior volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING.

The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students in reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION. The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details. TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro

Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www.touro.com/content/ careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, Patient Information Desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call Volunteer Services at 897-8107 for information.

words 17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES. Gold

Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon. net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT. Fair

Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spoken word readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

LATTER LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — Friends of New Orleans Public Library holds its regular book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes &

Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MID-CITY WRITERS GROUP. Prose

writers meet to read and critique original work. Email midcity.writers@gmail.com for details. Tuesday.

OCTAVIA BOOKS SCIENCE FICTION BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513

Octav ia St., 899-7323 — The group discusses Geoff Ryman’s Air: Or, Have Not Have. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800 France St., 944-0441; www.yellowmoonbar. com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La Divina

Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria. com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

ALICE JACKSON & SUZANNE HUDSON . Maple Street Book Shop,

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The authors sign Delta Blues. 1 p.m. Saturday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch Cook Books Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DAVID HERLIHY. Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs and reads from The Lost Cyclist. 6 p.m. Saturday.

DENISE DANNA & SANDRA CORDRAY. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The authors discuss Nursing in the Storm: Voices from Hurricane Katrina. 7 p.m. Thursday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at the

Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a weekly free poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Decatur St., 571-1863; www.rubyfruit-jungle.com — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St., 343-2406 — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject. com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >SPICER LIFE < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <June is a busy month for chef Susan Spicer, who is slated to > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >open her new Lakeview restaurant Mondo (900 Harrison Ave., < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <224-2633; www.mondoneworleans.com) this week and then celebrate the 20th anniversary of her flagship Bayona (430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com) next week. Spicer has described Mondo as a neighborhood restaurant serving an eclectic menu that could range from fish tacos to pizza to Thai noodles. Bayona events include a culinary symposium with lunch on June 14 ($265 per person) and a gala dinner on June 15 ($260 per person), both featuring guest winemakers and sous chefs from Bayona’s past, including John Harris and Donald Link.

am

B

THE FESTS MUST GO ON

The annual Louisiana Seafood Festival (www.louisianaseafoodfestival.com) returns this weekend to the Old U.S. Mint, part of a three-festival lineup known collectively as the Vieux To Do. The Louisiana Cajun-Zydeco Festival (www.jazzandheritage. org/cajun-zydeco) provides the tunes with a lineup of bands from south Louisiana while the adjacent French Market holds its popular Creole Tomato Festival (www.frenchmarket.org).

five 5 IN

FIVE PLACES FOR WHOLE-LOAF PO-BOYS

Stand Up and Get Crunch A HONDURAN RESTAURANT WITH CENTRAL AMERICAN SOUL

KOZ’S Elisabeth Olviedo and her daughter Daisy serve Latin comfort food at Telamar. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

T

Everything from the house-special barbecue ham to hot dogs can be had whole

TAG’S MEAT MARKET & DELI

1207 E. JUDGE PEREZ DRIVE, CHALMETTE, 277-6594

like slices of fried plantains. It’s all soaked down with aderezo, a mild, savory, creamy sauce, and topped with a generous salad of fresh cabbage and carrots, tomatoes and pickled onions stained the color of beets. The chicken tastes of garlic and everything piled over it, while the cabbage crunches, the tart onion crunches and the plantain outside the swath of sauce crunches, too. Honduran cooking from the Olviedo kitchen proves a very crunchy cuisine. Another audible example is Honduran tacos. Served six to an order, these fried, tightly-rolled tortillas are stuffed with chopped chicken and look like flautas covered with crumbled white farmer cheese, lots of cabbage slaw and that aderezo again. I would recommend the chicharrones only to those seeking a true jaw workout. When the enormous, rock-hard wonks of fried pork skins arrived, I could not saw through them even with the serrated knife provided and had to resort to inelegantly gnawing the edges. I also would not mess again with the stewed pig feet — a gravy of bones, fat and cartilage with occasional moments of meat — but I’d order the very tender, unmistakably-textured tongue in red sauce anytime. Telamar doubles as a bar, a holdover from its daiquiri shop days, and it can draw a randy crowd at night. The scene is pretty mellow at lunch, though, and it’s quite something to watch guys with hands stained black from work delicately pulling mussels from huge bowls of caldo mariscos and glugging down the milky broth between pulls of beer. Even if the menu lacks much description, it’s clear Telamar serves comfort cooking incarnate for its target audience.

Grilled sausage from the adjoining butcher shop is stacked like bricks between bread

KATIE’S RESTAURANT

3701 BIENVILLE ST., 484-0580; WWW.KATIESRESTAURANTANDBAR.COM

Recently reopened and serving “the barge,” with a choice of mixed fried seafood

CHAD’S BISTRO

3216 W. ESPLANADE AVE., METAIRIE, 838-9935

An old-fashioned “boat,” with seafood filling a hollowed loaf WHAT

LOUISIANA SUPER SAVER

WHERE

Rough around the edges, big on value, whole roast beef loaves priced under $11

Restaurante Telamar 7908 Earhart Blvd., 866-9711 WHEN

Breakfast, lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

Chicken with plantains, breakfast baleadas, seafood soup, stewed tongue WHAT DOESN'T

A formidable language barrier

CHECK PLEASE

A former daiquiri shop serving hearty, inexpensive Latin comfort food

1641 LOUISIANA AVE., 891-6670

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 HB Picpoul de Pinet

COTEAUX DU LANGUEDOC, FRANCE/$9-$10 Retail

Made from native white Picpoul grapes grown on hillsides overlooking the Mediterranean, this medium-bodied wine offers aromas of grapefruit, honeysuckle and pear with lime zest and tropical nuances. On the palate, a tart acidity mingles with crisp green apple, lemon, a hint of white peach and a pleasant minerality on the finish. Drink it now and serve well chilled. Enjoy as an apertif or with oysters, seafood, other shellfish, goat cheese and fresh beet salad. Where to buy it: Bacchanal, some Rouses locations and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Where to drink it: Emeril’s, Bouche Wine Bar and Bistro, Lilette, Catch, Delachaise, Stein’s Market and Deli and La Provence. (Listings current at press time.) — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

he stencil on the glass door at Restaurante Telamar reads “Soul Food Kitchen,” and though that’s a remnant of a short-lived past tenant for this unusual property, it still seems apt for the food offered today. Now though, instead of the red beans and gumbo of the former restaurant, it’s plantains, puffy tortillas, thick crema and crisp cabbage slaw that exude the soul of Honduran country cooking here. This is a rough-and-tumble cafe, a tiny, cluttered place where smiles come easy but a language barrier awaits customers unschooled in Spanish. Without much menu description, ordering can be a crapshoot, though the result was more often elation than regret on my visits. Telamar is run by Elisabeth Olviedo and her daughter Daisy, both natives of Honduras. They moved from Texas to New Orleans early in the Katrina recovery and rented an Uptown house where they prepared boxed lunches for crews of laborers and served hot food direct from their stove. This was during the period when food service options in New Orleans were slim, and this sort of bootstrap entrepreneurism was common. But as the situation in New Orleans began to normalize and the city reasserted some of its rules, officials shut down the Olviedo home business. By 2007, however, they were back in action with a sanctioned restaurant in Broadmoor, and last fall they moved to their current location on Earhart Boulevard, which had a long run as a daiquiri shop before its soul food stint and current Honduran flavor. Telamar’s don’t-miss dish is pollo con tajadas, or fried chicken with long, ribbon-

6215 WILSON ST., HARAHAN, 737-3933; 515 HARRISON AVE., 484-0841; WWW.KOZCOOKS.COM

47


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

You are what You eat >>>>>>>>>

>>>> hearts of palm and avocado. No < < < < < < <reservations. < Breakfast, lunch and > > > > > > > >dinner > Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $ <<< VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — >> The cafe serves cheese boards <and < charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <menu < of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > reservations. >> Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinDollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 ner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 4833116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

CHINESE

AMERICAN CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638; www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

48

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL —

4617 Sanford St., Metairie, 883-5905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. Or try the blackened chicken Caesar wrap. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps from the regular menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501

Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Fresh Louisiana boudin made with pork, rice and seasonings is a specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. Also try pulled pork with sides like baked beans and potato salad. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Beers change seasonally. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601

Gallier St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade des-

serts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields Ave., 284-7878; www.lafittescafe. com — Lafitte’s serves wraps with a wide selection of fillings, burgers and patty melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139 N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www.therubyslippercafe.net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. Lunch options include burgers, sandwiches, salads and changing specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese. com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

287-0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp,

CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; wwww.chinaorchidneworleans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Empress chow mein, mango shrimp or chicken, and triple dragon with shrimp, chicken and beef are specialties. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W.

Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams Blvd.,

Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-0301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 7389678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served all day long. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S NORTHERN ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chefowner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties of the house include Trota Bayou la Fourche — speckled trout served with lump crabmeat in a lemoncream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd., Gretna, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi. com — For casual Italian dining, head to Cafe DiBlasi for pan-fried


L/S:4.5”

Original Ruth’s Chris Steak House, New Orleans, 1965

L/S:4.625”

WHO put the sizzle in Ruth’s Chris Steak House? Ruth Fertel. The woman who mortgaged her home on a hunch and bought a neighborhood steak house, which eventually grew into a family of local steak houses. Using an 1800° broiler and 500° plates, steaks are still cooked and presented just the way Ruth would insist: sizzling.

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi

200 Varick St. New York, NY 10014 : Phone 212-805-7500

RCS_COR_P08422_B14_14D_14F_20A

Client: Ruth’s Chris Steak House

WO: 45th Anniversary Print - Gambit Weekly

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

SPECS L/S: None DOC SIZE: 4.5” x 4.625” B: None G: None

49

Regula Regula Regula Bold


MI

OR

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

Stop by for a beverage $5.00 Mojitos & $5.00 Margaritas Stay for a Bite Cuban Platters BBQ | Seafood Mexican

DAILY SPECIALS

I DELIVER!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM FRI & SAT ‘TIL 9:30 PM

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

OUT2EAT veal topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce or a traditional veal shank osso buco served with rich brown sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266

— This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915

Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010; www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cheese sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644

— Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave.,

488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAK-

HOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253;

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 06/20/10

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT • DR. MITCHELL PIERCE DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Jessie Moore / Chip Wilson

Jazz, Folk, Country and R&B JUNE 10 @ the Pavilion of Two Sisters NEW ORLEANS BOTANICAL GARDEN CITY PARK Gates Open 5PM-8PM · Performance 6PM Adults = $8 / Children 5-12 = $4 Children 4 & Under = FREE

For more information call

(504) 483-9488

50

www.neworleanscitypark.com

www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LATIN AMERICAN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 862-5252 — Enjoy

Latin home cooking in a quaint and festive cafe. Try the namesake Salvadoran pupusas, stuffed cornmeal disks, or Mexican favorites. Latin-style brunch is served on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT — 901

Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www. cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 5860972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made

Diners share a carafe of margaritas at Sante Fe (3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077). PHOTO BY susan snee

martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www. milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

jita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickorysmoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www.juansflyingburrito. com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-ahalf-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

las St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitou-

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200 Magazine St.,

595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fa-

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 9480077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. Chicken Maximilian is a baked chicken breast roulade with Anaheim peppers, chorizo and Asiago cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade Ave., 9459997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice and beans. There are many margarita options. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 5258899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daqui-

ris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffetstyle gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine

St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe. com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepperhoney-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR — 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www.liuzzas. com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash


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8 k In 1986 k SCHWEGMANN’S , was voted , best supermarket

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

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Gambit’s Best of New Orleans® Reader’s Poll

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Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

only. $$ MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910

W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 4633030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

— Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Maga-

zine St., 708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria.com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger features ground beef, applewood-smoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. The Beaurantula is a Philly cheese steak loaded with vegetables and ranch dressing. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE RESTAURANT — 1513 St.

Charles Ave., 525-7437 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial

Blvd., Metairie, 835-0916; www. sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SEAFOOD

Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE — 3633

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tobasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Executive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie

CATERING

COMBO SPECIAL

Sandwich Platter House Salad + Assorted Dessert Platter $11.85 per person

PLACE ST. CHARLES 201 ST. CHARLES AVE.

Mon-Fri 7am-2pm • Free Delivery 522-8198 • www.steves-diner.com

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Peters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanishaccented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.Sat. Credit cards. $$



VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY FOR

PO’BOYS! LOVE OUR BRUNCH?

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

(504)

482-3047

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transconti-

nental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113

Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Check out our dinners Hookin’ Seafood Specials

601 Gallier & Chartres St. · 944-9272 www.elizabeths-restaurant.com

Week Night WINE Down

2 for 1

FR

IED

EN B ICK a! CHAmeric in T ES

2401 St. Ann Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 Monday-Saturday 11am-3pm 504-822-9503 NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

WINE BY THE GLASS on select wines • tues-thurs

1801

Stumpf Blvd. TERRYTOWN 70056

504.361.3106

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

www.cafediblasi.com

53


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

For Rent &

Employment Special Rates

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

BUY

FREE Applies to line ad only.

EMPLOYMENT $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

AGENTS & SALES gae-tana’s

Seeking Energetic Sales Assoc for Women’s Clothing Store. Must have customer service exp. Fax resume 504-865-1272

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS BOOTH RENTAL W/FOLLOWING

Available for NO Salon East. Also Sew in Special $175 + save 5% on hair. 504-909-4753

GLENN MICHAEL SALON & BEAUTY ACADEMY No Hiring All Positions: • Front Desk, Customer Service & Retail Manager • Teacher & School Administrators • Stylists (Exp. & AppREnTiCES) • nail Techs Salary, benefits, bonuses, discounts & more. A Great Place to Work, Learn & Grow! E-mail resume with contact name & phone # to: glennmichaelsalonacademy@yahoo.com or call now 504-250-3969 to leave name, ph # & desired position.

Your Future Starts NOW!

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS

Regional & Long Haul Runs! Great Pay, Bonuses & Benefits incl. Free Health Ins. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker End. TWIC Card & 1 yr. TT Exp. Required. 985-479-7002

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

SEEKING NEW ORLEANS FINEST SERVICE PROFESSIONALS

NOW HIRING:

• Housekeeping • Food & Beverage • Gift Shop Retail Manager • Floor Supervisor • Bartender • Houseperson • Server’s Assistant • Room Attendant • Sazerac Server • Guest Request Runner • Barista Supervisor • Uniform Room Attendant • Host/Hostess • Room Service Server Professionals must apply online: www.hiltonfamily.jobs

classadv@gambitweekly.com

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market PLACE Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

COCKTAIL SERVERS

54

The Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50 CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in The

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email. Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thursday @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wednesday @ 5 p.m. NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

Bar & Pizza Kitchen Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

EOE/AA Drug Free Workplace

Mon.-Wed. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Thurs. 8:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. /Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

WIT’S INN

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave. POSITIONS WANTED RELIABLE SENIOR FEMALE

Newcombe Tulane Grad, Airline stewardess, teaching, marketing bkgrnd wants telephone or computer work at home. 897-0207

EMPLOYMENT

Real Estate

NEED HELP? Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds Call

483-3100 Fax

483-3153

We offer competitive wages and benefits. Apply in person at 700 Conti Street Mon - Fri 9am to 4pm Email: employment@royalsonestano.com Fax: 553.2337 EOE/Drug Free Workplace

CK E H C E S PLEA ! D A R U O Y

rt to very effo e e k a m We nts. ertiseme v d a in r o t avoid err d the firs a r u o y k ec not Please ch e we can c in s , s r pea ds day it ap correct a in r fo le sib n. be respon publicatio f o y a d t firs call after the an error, d in f u o If y rtment ied Depa if s s la C the tely at immedia be & it will 0 0 1 .3 3 8 . (504)4 s possible a n o o s s a corrected


CLASSIFIEDS AUTOMOTIVE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer.

DOMESTIC AUTOS HONDA ACCORD 2 DR SPT COUPE 2000 Fully loaded, sun roof, low miles (75k). Exc cond. $200 down, take over notes of $145/mo with warranty. Call 667-7810, 24 hours.

ADOPTIONS IMPORTED AUTOS 2004 Audi A-4 convertable. Fully loaded, leather seats. Exc cond. 64K mi. $14,000. Call Tim, 985-507-1230.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

ABOUT MASSAGE

Tired of just a rub down? Get beyond that w/ a massage exp. by Matteo, Lic #0022. Met area. 504-832-0945

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

Alicia Whittington

Welcome Back All Clients! 1 HOUR 60/90/12 min avail Swedish & Deep Tissue

$50

Appts 8a-9p M-Th 8a-5p Fr

MERCHANDISE BICYCLES Diamond Back Mountain Bike $99 504-427-0493

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $295 Brand New Iron Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 $95 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $115 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122 Queen Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $129. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 Used black leather living room set; recliner sofa & recliner loveseat, 2 glass end tables & coffee table. All for $900. Call Jennifer @ 504-931-8020 or leave msg.

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS Small GE Microwave. Very Clean. $20. 780-2200

LA Lic# 520

601.303.7979

Right Massage Touch Private Spa-like Studio surrounded by tropical garden in Fauborg Marigny/ French Quarter. Flexible day/night & wknd schedule. Male massage therapist.

Call Chris 504-458-5996 www.righttouchnola.com to view location, pics & specials. #4553

PETS

PET ADOPTIONS ANGEL - Beautiful sweet Calico,if you want love ,shes the one.Spayed, shots 504 462-1968 BOURBON- Siamese malevery sweet, handsome and personable,neutered,shots 504 462-1968 Bubbles and Bacardi- 2 precious 8 wk old grey and white kittens ,504 462-1968. ELIJAH-Gorgeous med long hair solid white angora cat,super sweet and smart,neutered ,shots 504 462-1968 LEILA- Beautiful solid white F kitty Very talkative and loving ,perfect companion. spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Will give a child a life of security and endless love. A great family, education, and wonderful home awaits. Expenses paid.

Please call Ria at 1-888-851-4935 LEGAL NOTICES ESTATE OF STEPHEN J. DUBRAVA

SUPPLEMENTAL PROBATE CITATION File No. 2009-679. Surrogate’s Court Broome County Supplemental Citation THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: William Treseck, John Tresek, Bertha Pecen, Valerie Stasko, Ann Fitch, and children of Ludmilla Dubrava, Paternal First Cousins of the decedent, Stephen J. Dubrava, if living, whose whereabouts after due diligence demonstrated are unknown; and if William Treseck, John Tresek, Bertha Pecen, Valerie Stasko, Ann Fitch, and children of Ludmilla Dubrava, survived the decedent, Stephen J. Dubrava, but died subsequently, then to their fiduciaries, beneficiaries, assigns and successors in interest of the property of Stephen J. Dubrava, all of whose names and whereabouts after due diligence demonstrated are unknown. A petition having been duly filed by Henry J. Pochily and MaryAnn Pochily, who is domiciled at 2809 Smith Drive Endwell, New York. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Broome County, at Binghamton, New York, on June 21, 2010, at 10:00 o’clock in the forenoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Stephen J. Dubrava lately domiciled at 246 Oak Street, Binghamton, New York admitting to probate a Will dated June 27, 2005 (a Codicil dated N/A), a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Stephen J. Dubrava deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that letters testamentary issue to: Henry J. Pochily and Maryann Pochily. Dated, Attested and Sealed April 21, 2010 Hon. Eugene E. Peckham (Surrogate) Tracy A. Allen Deputy Chief Clerk Richard N. Aswad, Esq, 722-3495 Attorney for Petitioner Aswad & Ingraham, 46 Front Street, Binghamton, New York 13905 (NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. Youare not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you). LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT I, Stephen J. Dubrava, currently residing at 246 Oak Street, City of Binghamton, County of Broome and

Weekly tails Lisa is a 2-month-old,

lisa

Kennel #A10431693

nugget

Kennel #A10368427

spayed, DSH with Tortie markings. She loves to play with her toys, is gentle and enjoys being petted. To meet Lisa or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Nugget is a 1-year-old, neutered, Terrier mix. He has unusual markings and whiskers to match, knows how to sit (especially for treats) and enjoys playing ball. To meet Nugget or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/ SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

SERVICES BUSINESS SERVICES Property Managment

Are you looking for a professional Property Managment Company? Look no more Kajun Konnication is here to serve you. Please feel free to contact us @ 504-722-9944

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

readers need

A NEW PET

You can help them find one.

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Pet” Section call 504.483.3100.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

call

Adopting your newborn would be my life’s greatest joy.

State of New York, do hereby make, publish, and declare this to be my Last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all wills and codicils heretofore made by me. FIRST: I direct that all of my just debts and funeral expenses be paid as soon as practical after my death. SECOND: I direct that my Executor pay all estate,inheritance and like taxes imposed by the government of the United States, or any state thereof, in respect to all property required to be included in my state thereof, in respect to all property required to be included in my gross estate for estate or like tax purposes by any of such governments, whether the property passes under this Will or otherwise,without contribution by any recipient of any such property. THIRD: I give, devise and bequeath all the rest, residue and remainder of my Estate and property of every kind and wherever located, both real, personal and mixed, tangible and intangible, to the Trustee in office at the time of my death under the Stephen J. Dubrava Living Trust, to be held, administered and disposed of by the Trustee in accordance with the provisions of my living trust, as it may be amended from time to time. FOURTH: I appoint Henry J. and MaryAnn Pochily the Co-Executors of this my Last Will and Testament. I hereby direct that said Co-Executors of this my Last Will and Testament. I hereby direct that said Co-Executors are to act jointly. In the event that one of the Executors shall predecease me, then, in the alternative, I appoint the remaining Executor, to be alternate Executor of this my Last Will and Testament. We, whose names are hereto subscribed, DO CERTIFY, that on the 27th day of June, 2005, the above-named subscribed his name to this instrument in our presence and in the presence of each of us, and at the same time, in our presence and hearing, declared the same to be his Last Will and Testament and requested us, and each of us, to sign our names thereto as witnesses to the execution thereof, which we hereby do in the presence of the Testator and of each other on the day of the date of the said will, and write opposite our names our respective places of residence. Angelina Cutrona, residing at 1216 Echo Rd, Vestal, NY 13850 Richard N. Aswad, residing at 201 Deyo Hill Rd, Johnson City, NY 13790 In no event shall a bond or other security be required of the Executed or alternate Executor for the faithful discharge of their duties. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto subscribed my name this 27th day of June, 2005. Stephen J. Dubrava

55


and

Apartment Condo Guide and

FURNISHED CORPORATE UPSCALE SPACIOUS 2 & 3 BEDROOM CONDOS. SECURED PARKING, GYM, POOL, INTERNET. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. New Orleans-Algiers Point river front! Convenient to everything. The longer the stay, the better the deal. Multiple rental discounts. Minimum term is one month. W/D, alarm syst, high ceils, exp. brick, balcs & priv rooftop decks.

Large storage closets, Direct tv. Wide screen tv! King size master bed bedroom, 2.5 bathrooms. Extra queen sofa bed in living room. All you need is your bag! Completely corporate furnished! Friendly active neighborhood. 3 minute walk to free Algiers Point ferry which takes 8 scenic minutes landing at Canal St. At Harrah's casino/ French Quarter and Central Business District.

FROM $2500/MO! A DEAL FOR 1700 SQ. FT!

Call owner 504-366-7374 or 781-608-6115 cell for best deal! 323 Morgan St., New Orleans, LA 70114

1727 BORDEAUX

APARTMENT & CONDO GUIDE!

(coming out in the July 13 issue!)

515-517 St Louis St • NOLA 70130 Prime location on premier blk in the heart of the French Quarter. Upscale 1BR condos newly renov. Old character mixed w/ modern luxury. Nr rest., shopping & attractions. 2 blks to Jackson Square. Starting at $139K.

Brandi amedee

owner/agent

504-481-1028 Bramedee@yahoo.com Shelnutt real eState enterpriSeS office: 504-524-1111

CONDOS! TOTAL MONTHLY: $380-$700 NO DOWN PAYMENT! Free Credit Restoration! UP TO $7,990 CASH BACK! Ask about the $24 million park!

888-207-1711

504-896-9991 MOV

E IN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

BOOK NOW FOR THE NEXT

$39,900 - $79,900

Luxury uptown 1 BR apt, sec gat, offst prkg, well maintained pool, 2 blks to St Charles, 4 blks to the Prytania shopping center’s grocery, pharmacy & popular restaurants. $875/mo.

56

Delpit House ConDominiums

TOD AY


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe LAKEVIEW

MID-CITY

MISSISSIPPI

DOWNTOWN

701 N. Salcedo Street, $111,000 Renovated 2BR/2BA Granite counters, custom cabinets Offstreet parking Todd Neal Fletcher Ranger Realty 504.329.4343

904 Wood Street, Waveland, MS Hideaway on 3+ acres with pool and 3 unique cottages to restore your way. Would make a wonderful compound or subdivide. Just reduced to $175,000. MLS#100897. Call Helene at 228-493-4275 Latter & Blum Coastal Living

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. • RIVER VIEW 34K sq. ft. of land. 20K sq. ft. of building. Prkg on St. James. Bounded by Celeste, St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters Streets. Asking Price:$1,200,000 Call Cassandra Sharpe/Broker Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-568-1252 • c: 460-7829

GENTILLY

MID-CITY

WESTBANK

RIVERBEND

2904 St Peter Street, $100,000 Renovated 2BR/2BA, wood floors Large kitchen, Granite counters, Ceramic floors Todd Neal Fletcher Ranger Realty 504.329.4343

2429 Bristol Place, New Orleans Cute starter home for $120,000 2BR/1.5BA, Carport, Open living, dining, den, Refreshed kitchen and bath Todd Neal Fletcher Ranger Realty 504.329.4343

FANTASTIC LOCATION Riverbend Victorian Camelback 1028 Joliet, close to river & Oak St., 3br, 2 ba, many original architectural details, off st parking, new roof, wood floors, high ceilings. $269,000 STO Louis Lederman • Prudential Gardner 504-874-3195

NEW ORLEANS

For Sale By Owner: Reduced Lake Vista 4 BR 3 BA tri-level, 2985 sq ft., $385k Call 504.723.2840

931-35 Dauphine $935K 1850’S Creole cottage. Updated kit & ba, patio, ctyd w/pond. Back unit has 4 studio apts-7 apts total. $6500/mo rent income.

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multifamily. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location!

4526 St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. postKatrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

5542 CHARLOTTE DR $99,500

SLAB RANCH 3 BR, 2 BA PARTIALLY RENOVATED + GUEST COTTAGE

504-568-1359

Gambit Weekly 4.67x5.333”

REAL ESTATE AUCTION S p e r r y Va n N e s s G i l m o r e Au c t i o n

3900 NORTH HULLEN • METAIRIE, LA 70002 WWW.3900NHULLEN.COM

48+ Properties p

June e2 23-26 Located Throughout SE SE, LA and MS By Order Of Local Banks & Others Homes Hom Ho m • Waterfront Townhomes & Lots • Canal Street Office Bldg. • Duplexes • Acreage • Residential Lots • Development Land

Thurs., June 24th - 12 Noon Bank Ordered 3030 Canal St. New Orleans 17,795 sf. Office Bldg. To be auctioned from the Hilton Riverside, N.O., LA

Thurs., June 24th - 3:00 p.m. Executive Home on Bayou St. John 5668 Bancroft, New Orleans 7 BD, 7 BA, 2 - 1/2 BA, 7,994 sf.

Fri., June 25th – 1:00 p.m. Bank Ordered

Fri., June 25th – 7:00 p.m. Bank Ordered 13 Chateau Palmer, Kenner Custom Home on Golf Course 6 BD, 5 BA, 6,254 sf.

3907 Civic, Metairie 3 BD, 2 ½ BA, 2,08 sf.

Metairie-Kenner-New Orleans-Slidell-Covington-Lafitte/Barataria St. Bernard, Springfield, Maurepas, LA & Bogue Chitto, MS

Sperry Van Ness

504 468-6800

A C C E L E R AT E D M A R K E T I N G

®

AUCTION & REALTY CO.

www.gilmoreauction.com

Term: 10% Down Auction Day, 10% Buyer’s Premium, “As is, Where is”, Close in 30 Days 3316 Florida Ave., Suite 201, Kenner, LA 70065 • David E. Gilmore, CCIM, CAI, AARE • LA #447 • Francis J. Braud, Broker

Three story, beautiful 6-bedroom. 5.5 baths Chateau-like home, 5,214 sq.ft. The best of everything. Main 1st floor Kitchen, all professional lines Sub-Zero/Viking/, granite counter tops. Second floor kitchen/designer appliances, second floor great den. Master bedroom on first floor w/Jacuzzi tub. Salt water pool with outside Jacuzzi, outside bathrooms. Just minutes from the Causeway and Lakeside Shopping Center.

Offered At: $695,000 Priced under current appraisal Polly Eagan gri, crs - Agent broker licensed in state of la

504-862-0100 • pollyeagan@aol.com KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY New Orleans

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

Selected Sele ectt Properties Sold Absolute, No Minimum, No Reserve

8601 Leake Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118-USA

Each OfficE indEpEndEntly OwnEd and OpEratEd

57


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

1234-36 Andry St. Renovated and Priced at $83,500.

Southern Spirit REALTY, L.L.C.

Keisha Washington

Broker

Office: (504) 319-2693 • keisha.washington@hotmail.com www . southernspiritrealty . com

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804 103 Egret

3/2 "Lake Vista Sanctuary"

$1500

1214 Peniston 2/1 "Touro Bouligny"

$1200

1406 Magazine

$1100

2/1 Magazine Gallery Apt.

1207 Jackson 1/1 "Aquatic Garden Apartment" $700 7522 Benjamin 1/1

Cool Pool Condo

$650

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

BYWATER ELEGANCE IN THE BYWATER

Stunning juxtiposition of architectural integrity & soignee panache. 2000’ 2- 3 bdrms, 2 ba, garden room, steps to river. Offers staring at $299,000. 626 Pauline St. 504-914-5606.

CORPORATE RENTALS CORPORATE RENTAL

3 story, 4br/3ba/garage. 2800’. Fully furn w/all amenities inc. (TV, internet & satellite). Blks fr UNO & min to Fr. Qtr. $3800 Ridgelake Realty Inc., 504-8363830, 452-9602 .

COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES RIVER VIEW - DOWNTOWN

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. 34K sq.ft of land, 20K sq.ft of bldg. Pkng on St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters. Asking $1,200,000. Call Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-5681252, cell 460-7829. See our ad in todays RE showcase!

605 9th St, New Orleans Ofc/Warehouse space. 18500sf total/3,000sf ofc. 20 ft ceils, elec Roll-up drs. Entire prop gated. 1 blk off Tchoupitoulas. Great price! $529K. Nolan Peters, 504-427-8889

GENERAL REAL ESTATE ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

readers need

525-9763 COMMERCIAL RENTALS

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $500

Call 899-RENT

UPTOWN Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

1023 PIETY ST

2 BR, 1 BA townhouse, furn kit, w/d hkps, patio, O/A, $700/mo. Call 650-8778 Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/cer flrs, recess lighting, srnd snd, sec sys, grt bkyd. Never flooded. Zone X, roof 4 yrs. $1600/ mo or $194,900 For Sale. Call Sylvia 415-6501 Newly renov 4 plx. 2 br, 1 & 1/2 ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd. No pets. Quiet area suits retired person. $725/mo, refs & dep. 504737-2089.

SINGLE BRICK HOME

3BR/1BA, , New floors, new paint, open flr plan, Carport, yard 1,100 sq. ft. $900. 504-508-2377.

KENNER REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

$750 Call

BYWATER 1 BR - 3415 DAUPHINE ST

RIVER RIDGE NR LEVEE

INCLUDING UTILITIES

58

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 1324 HICKORY

NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

Private rm w/bath & kit. Utilities paid, $500/mo. & 3 brm/1 bath house, $900. 504-737-2068

METAIRIE A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $660 & 1 br + study fr $785. Furn corp avail. 780-1706 or 388-9972. www.orrislaneapts.com

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1150/ mo - 914-882-1212

OLD METAIRIE SECRET $300 OFF 1ST MONTH’S RENT

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, Windows Galore, 12’ x 24’ liv rm., sep Din, King Master, cable & internet ready. Laun on Prem. No Pets - $699 & $799 • 504-236-5777

QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD

Totally Renovated. LR, Furn Kitchen, Cen A/C, w/d hkps, 3BR/1BA $900/ mo. 504-782-3133.

Furn kit + w/d, wd flrs, wtr pd, ac, on bus line, sm bkyd. $650+dep+yr lse. Pet neg. Call Joe @ 944-6013. Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. 888-239-6566 or mrsmell@ comcast.net

3009 ROYAL ST

Newly renov’d, 2br/1ba, LR, kit w/ appls, washer/dryer, $975/mo + $975 dep. 504-945-7829 or 817-681-0194.

BYWATER EFFICIENCY

Great for One Person - Seeking Nice Tenant w/ Positive Energy. Available June 1 - no utility dep.Furn (incl linens, pots pans dishes), all utils pd, wi-fi & digital cable w/ all premium movie channels, laundry on site $840 inclusive w/ $420 dep. Short term rentals $900/mo or $300/wk. Must be compatible w/ owner, upper apt, off lush patio shared w/ two dogs & cats. Bicycle to Fr Qtr, bus at Royal St, walk on the levee. Nice place, nice people, seeking nice tenant. 483-3130

CARROLLTON 7818 NELSON

Remodeled 2 BR, w/cherry wd flrs & deck, LR, DR, Lndry on site, off st prkng, $1000/mo. 251-2188 or 813-7782

8026 COHN STREET

1 br upper w/deck, 1 house off S Carrollton, w/d, gas & wtr pd. $575/mo. Avail 7/1. 504-861-7553

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4704 - A ST. PETER St.

Nr Delgado, all new 1 BR, kit, lr, backrm, w/d/fridge, o/s pkng. $875/ mo includes wtr & elec. pd. 504-3829477, Mark.

DBL ON HARDING

3br/1.5ba, CA&H, wtr pd, w/d hkps, cov’d off st prkg, no smokers. 1 blk to bayou/park. Nice n’hood. $1200 485-0133

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

516 David St, 3BR, 2BA, 12” ceils, ca/h, 1467 sf, new appls incl w/d, granite. 1 blk to bus/st car, walk to City Pk. $1500-$1800. 504-669-7049

To Advertise in

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

899-RENT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

REAL ESTATE Call 483-3100

Sterling Financial ServiceS, llc Mortgage Rates are still LOW!!!

5/1 ARM

3.5%

3.653% APR

Interest rate quoted assumes a minimum loan amount of $200,000.

a new home to RENT

You can help them find one.

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

No Upfront Fees Pre-Approval in Minutes

Call Michael Schenck

504-889-0737

www.sterlingrates.com Rates as of 5/12/2010 and subject to change without notice.


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1 BDRM - NEAR TULANE

514 MADISON ST/ $1000

1st flr off Decatur. Two 1 br, 1 ba, liv, din area, kit, wd flrs, coin w/d. Eddie 861-4561. Grady Harper Inc

941 ROYAL ST

Fully furn, 1 br, 1 ba, shared pool & balc, w/d on site. $1200/mo/dep. No Pets. 504-236-5757. FQRental.com

FRENCH QUARTER CHARM

1226 Chartres. Newly renov 1 br apt, $1000/mo. Carpet, pool, laundry rm, sec gate. No pets. Mike, 919-4583.

504.949.5400

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@ fqr.com

www. frenchquarterrealty.com

French Quarter realty’S 2007 toP ProDucer

RENTALS 1418 Chartres studio $650 210 Chartres 3d 1/1 $850

French Quarter Realty

1233 esplanade #4 2/1 $900

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

1908 dauphine #2 2/1 $925

504-949-5400

1022 st peter #203 1/1 $995

1/1 2/2 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 2/1 2/1.5 1/1 2/1 1/1 1/1 1/1 2/1.5

Single house/ all new/ w/d $650 Hi Ceils, hdwd flrs, lge kit, $1290 furnished w/wifi, tile floors $1050 Lots of windows,new carpet,crtyrd $1150 tile floors,courtyard,525 sqft $850 Upperrearunit,newcarpet,600sqft$1100 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950 CBD Furnished Utils included $950 carriage house w/ crtyrd $1025 Util included, furn., great loc! $1000 priv crtyd&balcy,town house $1000 Commerical, 750 sqft $2000 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $1100 new kitch&bath,great location $1500 Fully furnished apt.w/d on site $1500 condoindesirableblock,HUGEcrtyrd!$1700 renov apt w/high end touches. $1100 2 level apt,ss appls,pool&prkng $1000 nicelayout,greatloc,waterpaid $1000 wd flrs,central air,water paid $1000 d/w, great loc, water paid $1000 street balc,prkng,prime loc $1800

210 Chartres #3e 2/1 $1500

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 6029 BELLAIRE - $1100

Renov, cute 3 br, 2 ba, liv, eat-in kit,w/ gas appls & granite, alarm, drive. Grady Harper Inc, 861-4551.

1 BDRM CLOSE TO UNIV

Near Nashvl & Freret. Renov Lg upper, 1 br, dr or 2nd br, lr, furn kit, cen a/h, wd flrs, ceil fans, w/d hkps. $900/mo. Avail now. 895-0016.

1 BEDROOM APT

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

1/2 BLOCK ST CHARLES

1629 2nd. Upper rear bright 1 br apt, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, pvt balc, w/d facil. $800/mo, lse, refs. 895-4726 or 261-7908.

1036 MARENGO

Single cottage. 3 br, 2 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, w/d hkps. Avail 7/1. $1800/mo. 899-7657.

1042 SONIAT ST

3 bedrooms, 1.5 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, w/d, 1500 sf, 12’ ceils, $1400/mo. 504-952-5102

1106 BOURDEAUX ST

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $975/mo. 504/495-6044

TREME 1300 GOV NICHOLS

2 blocks to French Quarter, 1 Bedroom, Parking. $700/month + deposit. Call 504-525-6520 & 504390-4362

NICE 1 BEDROOM UNIT

1315 ST PHILIP ST, lr, kitchen w/appls & bath, hdwd flrs, near Fr Qtr, park, wtr pd, $575 • 504-909-5150

construction

2BR, 2011 GEN PERSHING

8226 WILLOW

3216 PRYTANIA - Upper

A UNIVERSITY AREA

3943 LA AVE PKWY

AUDUBON ST

4106 STATE ST DR•$1000

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

4308 CONSTANCE ST

NEAR SACRED HEART

4610 CARONDELET

RENOV’D - GRT LOCATIONS!

Best apt you’ll see! $1200/mo. Near the univs, beaut nb’hood, 1500 sq ft living space, 1 BA, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, No pets. Avail Jun 1. Paula 952-3131 1000 sf, 1 BR, liv rm, lrg furn kitchen, cen a/h, hkps, balc, off st prkng, no pets, $950/mo • 504-838-0065 Upper 3 br, 2 ba, furn kit, carpet, fans, a/c, w/d hkps, off st pkg. No pets. Call Joe at 400-7273. 2 br, 1 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, c-a/h, w/d, c-fans, wd flr, drv, stor shed. Grady Harper, Inc. Eddie 861-4551. Renov apts, 1/2 blk from Napoleon, 2 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, vaulted ceils, mstr suite, sun porch, 2nd br loft, w/d, sec sys, deck, yard & shed. $1500/mo. 804-304-9864

Corner Maple. 2 or 3 br in hist, renov bldg, cen a/h, all appls, w/d, 12’ ceil. $1450-$1850/mo. 723-0001. Walk to rests or bike to Univ, 2bdrms, Kit w/brfkst area. appl Hi ceils, wd flrs, fncd patio area, $1200 + $1200 sec dep. 225-620-5302 4539 S Roman, 2000sf, 1/2 dbl, 2BR, 2BA, f-kit, w/d, c-a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd, $1100. 504-467-7052, 259-0043 Lux 1brm/1ba CA&H, W&D, wd flrs. No undergrads. No pets & no smoking. $1000/mo+ dep. 861-7480. One person studio. Near TU Univ. $590/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837 Fantastic neighborhood, 3 br, 2.5 baths, fenced in yard. Lovely details and amenities. Ready 6/15/10. $1,800/mo. 4620 Carondelet St. 7234472 or 872-9365

Spac 2 BR, 1 BA, frplc, cen a/h, porch, $1000/month w/ sec dep. 4 blks off St Charles. 504-891-7584 lv msg

1 blk St Charles. Renov upr 1700 sf, 2 br, solarium, cov’d prch, cen a/h, Italian tile kit & ba, hdwd flrs, frplcs. $1500/mo. 723-0001.

1205 ST CHARLES AVE

4917 S MIRO ST

2 bedrooms, washer/dryer, cen a/h, pool, closet space, water included. $885/mo. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

#1 LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT 1BR- Gated, lrg pool, laund, patio, $625/mo. 1 BR - Gated, lrg pool, laund, patio, $800/mo. #2 NAPOLEON AVE 1BR - Mod kit, pool, pkng, laund. $600-$700/mo 891-2420

143 CHEROKEE

5300 FRERET

VICTORIAN SHOTGUN

Furn lux 1 br condo in conv location. Fully equip kit, gated pkg, fitness ctr. Call Mike for price, 281-798-5318. Lux 1 br, 1 ba, hi ceilings, ceil fans, wd flrs, exp brick fplc, cedar lined closets. $800/mo. Call Steve w/Latter & Blum, 650-6770.

1508 CARONDELET, 2 Avail

1 BR, $800 & Studio, $750. Totally remodeled, cen a/h, hi ceils, hdwd flrs. 510-677-5855 or 1-888-239-6566

1702 DANTE ST

LAKEFRONT

802 FERN ST

Lg Garden Dist camelback. Liv, din, furn kit, study, den, 2 br, 2 ba. Charm! Grady Harper, Inc, 861-4551.

2 BR, liv, kit, bath. CH&A, Stove & fridge included. Access to pool & utility room. $800 per mo. Call 504-427-3284

2 BR, 1 BA - $1200/mo

Napoleon nr St Charles, one of the best apts you will see! 1,500 sq ft iving space, c-a/h, hdwd flrs, no pets, near universities. 2011 Gen Pershing, Avail 6/1, water paid. Paula 952-3131

2023 BROADWAY

By Jefferson. Raised cottage, upper. Deluxe 2br, lux bath/jacuzzi. Furn, W&D, hrdwd flrs, 1400sf, $1300/mo includes gas. 899-3668.

5419 STORY ST

3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/ all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd, off st pkg. Safe n’hood, sec sys all units. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

6319 S. PRIEUR

2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kitchen, tile bath. No pets. Off Calhoun. $850/mo, Call Gary 861-4958

7323 COHN - UNIV AREA

2 bedroom, 1 bath apt. Furn kit, cen a/h, tile & carpet, w/d, water/trash/ sewer paid. $750/mo. 430-8313.

Cls to univ/hosp/Lusher, beaut lrg 3 independent BR w/ cntr hall, lr, dr, furn kit, d/w, w/d, 1BA, wd flrs, scrnd prch. $1350 • 504-895-2683

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

2105 FERN ST

7535 JEANNETTE ST

2 br, 1 ba, cen a/h, w/d, d/w, wd flrs, hi ceil, sec sys, patio. No dogs. Great n’hood. $900. 504-236-7575

215 MILLaudon

Close to Tulane, 1 br, equip’d kit, fenced in yard. Section 8 welcome. $625 Call Chuck, 504-236-3609.

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $650/mo w/ wtr pd. No pets. 453-8996. 1BR, bath, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lutcher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422

7614 COHN STREET

1BR/1BA, half a double, nice backyard, university area. $625/mo. 504-782-4848

502 Washington, 2BR, 1BA, w/d, c-fans, wd flrs, c-a/h, sec, drvwy, pool, FREE Direct TV, $1150. 813-5822

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

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59


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2010 PC LLC

60

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Online Classifieds

now on bestofneworleans.com upgrade your ad to print in front of

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PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

(504) 895-4663

62

MICHAEL ZAROU

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cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


BULLETIN BOARD TOO CLASSIFIEDS ALL HOME IMPROVEMENTS Carpentry, Tile Work, Sheetwork, Painting, Fencing, Roofing, Cement Work, Bobcat Services, etc. FREE Est. 504-717-5671 CORPORATE BUSINESSES Are you in need of computer network services? Call The Eli Henry Group, support you can count on - 800-801-8375 BRICK BLOCK & CEMENT Driveways, Sidewalks, Walkways, Porches, Patios, Slabs, etc. Best brick, block or cement jobs in town! 504-717-5671

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 08 > 2010

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE

63



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