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CLANCY DuBOS: WINNAS & LOOZAS

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GREEN MATTERS

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ESSENCE FEST BEST

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

ATING CELEBROF MUSIC S 40 YE AR

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JUNE 29, 2010 · VOLUME 31 · NUMBER 26

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Let the music play

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Clancy DuBosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; annual look at da winnas and da loozas in the just-concluded legislative session This weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heroes and zeroes

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Dividing the fiscal pie in Baton Rouge

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Gambit Communications, Inc. chAirmAnâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;CLANCYâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;DUBOS President & ceoâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;â&#x20AC;&#x201A;MARGOâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in The Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

05


r e m m Su Entertainment Series

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Thursdays - Karaoke, Live Band & Ladies Night Budweiser specials throughout the night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials. Karaoke • 8:30pm-9:30pm The Chee Weez • July 1 • 9:30pm-1:30am (No Ladies Night) Coming soon: Foret Tradition (7/8)

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

Junior & Sumtin Sneaky July 9 • 9:30pm-1:30am

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Let the Music Play

N

out almost immediately. A Facebook page set up in support of the street musicians had 12,000 members in less than a week, many of whom were out-of-towners outraged that New Orleans, with its myriad crime problems, sees cracking down on musicians as a priority. This is not the message we need to send to America. Meanwhile, the brass band musicians raise good questions. Why crack down on live bands for noise, they ask, when clubs up and down Bourbon Street are blaring canned music into the streets? Why not crack down on cars with sound systems so loud they rattle the walls of the old buildings of the Vieux Carre? Perhaps the best question was articulated by Joseph Maize, the trombone player of the TBC Brass Band, who said, “I’m from the St.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

ew Orleans is justly proud of its generations of brass band musicians, from Louis Armstrong to Kermit Ruffins to 24-year-old Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews (who just last week taped appearances on Late Show with David Letterman and Austin City Limits). These men honed their craft on the streets of Treme and the French Quarter. So, two weeks ago, when the New Orleans Police Department began enforcing an ordinance that prohibits live performances on the streets after 8 p.m., the reaction was swift — from musicians, locals and tourists alike. With all the crime in New Orleans, why was the NOPD taking aim at the very people who keep our indigenous music alive? According to NOPD 8th District Commander Edwin Hosli, French Quarter residents and business owners have urged police to enforce noise ordinances in the Vieux Carre, and new Chief Ronal Serpas has made it clear he intends to address quality-of-life issues aggressively. Neither of those are bad ideas, but suppressing New Orleans’ live music tradition isn’t the answer. While French Quarter property owners and residents have a right to peace and quiet, the corner of Bourbon and Canal streets is the gateway to the city’s live entertainment district. Part of the problem is the broad nature of the decades-old ordinance, which doesn’t recognize the difference between a busy corner like Bourbon and Canal streets, where the To Be Continued (TBC) Brass Band has played for almost a decade, and the quieter streets of the lower French Quarter, which are lined with houses and apartments. To everyone’s credit, all parties involved have kept cool heads when this could have become a flashpoint. This week, representatives of the brass bands, the NOPD and Vieux Carre homeowners are set to sit down with District C Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer to seek common ground and find solutions. City Council President Arnie Fielkow has proffered a few suggestions that make sense, including extending hours for street performance, establishing separate laws for noise in business and residential areas of the French Quarter, and staking out different curfew hours for different times of the year. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has issued a general statement of support, but we urge him — as the state’s former leader of cultural tourism — to add his voice more forcefully to the discussion. The issue could not have arisen at a more inopportune time for tourism leaders. With the Gulf oil disaster and a reeling seafood industry, the last thing the city needs is another controversy. Word got

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Dear OlD Fan, The company you are asking about is Stewart Enterprises Inc. It was founded in 1910 and is the second-largest provider of products and services in the funerary industry in the United States. Right now, the company owns and operates 230 funeral homes and 144 cemeteries in 26 states and Puerto Rico. Stewart Enterprises began on April 26, 1910, when Albert Stewart acquired three St. Vincent de Paul Cemeteries and the St. Vincent de Paul Marble Shop. At the time, he was president of the Acme Realty Company, and a client deeded him the properties in lieu of payment. After Stewart tried unsuccessfully to dispose of the properties, he decided to make the businesses profitable. In 1931, his sons Frank Sr. and Charles incorporated the properties as the Acme Marble & Granite Company. The company expanded in 1949 by building Lake Lawn Park Cemetery and developing a large perpetual-care mausoleum. Twenty years later, in 1969, Frank Jr. purchased the adjoining Metairie Cemetery from the Weiblen Family. He established the Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home in 1979. Metairie Cemetery was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1991. Metairie Cemetery, established in 1872, should be on everyone’s list of places to visit because it documents the social, political, cultural and military history of New Orleans. It also has the distinction of being the only cemetery in America that once was a race course.

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Dear alex, Residents of New Orleans began as early as 1726 to build artificial levees ranging from 4 to 6 feet to protect their city from flooding. By 1812, when Louisiana became a state, levees guarded 155 miles of land north of the city on the east bank and 180 miles on the west bank of the Mississippi

River. By the mid-19th century, levee building was still the main form of flood control, and over a thousand miles of levees stretched along both sides of the river. In 1879, Congress established the Mississippi River Commission, which was dominated by the Army Corps of Engineers, to set policy regarding the waterway. By 1926, the commission had constructed levees stretching from Cairo, Ill., to New Orleans and declared the levee system along the Mississippi River would prevent floods. A year later, the group was

proved wrong when levees Metairie Cemetery broke, creating contains many very the Great Flood old, elaborate and unusual tombs such of 1927. as the Brunswig After this disas- family mausoleum ter, Congress in the shape of a passed numer- pyramid. ous Flood Control photo BY KANDACE Acts, but the one poWER GRAVES most important to us was when lawmakers first authorized the Lake Pontchartrain and Vicinity, Louisiana Hurricane Protection Project in the Flood Control Act of 1965. The project was to construct a series of control structures, concrete floodwalls and levees to provide hurricane protection to areas around Lake Pontchartrain. It originally was expected to take about 13 years to complete and cost about $85 million. It was a joint federal, state and local effort. When Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans in 2005, the project — including about 125 miles of levees — was estimated to be 60 percent to 90 percent complete in different areas, and the estimated completion date for the whole project was 2015.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >jeremy > > > > alford chris rose more scuttles < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < knowledge < < < < < < < < < < <is < <power < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <12 15 13 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

Quote of the Week

“Until we close the well off, I think there’s a period here where it’s going to be very difficult to restore BP’s reputation.” — BP spokesman Bob Dudley June 24, who added fixing up disasters “is not a core competency with us.”

Da Winnas & Da Loozas

ChehArdy: ‘enough … tiMe to Move on’

thanks to the Bp deBacle and the Budget crunch, this year’s legislative session was even uglier than usual.

Politicos all over Jefferson Parish were speculating last week as to the real reason why veteran Assessor lawrence  chehardy decided to resign midway through his current term. Chehardy, 57, will have served 35 years in the post when his resignation becomes effective at the end of the year. He succeeded his father, who held the post for 10 years, and he had a virtual lock on the job since his first election in 1975. “I’ve been in this office 35 years, and that’s a very long time to be in the public limelight and to be as active as I have been, both in terms of the office and politically,” Chehardy told Gambit. “You reach a point where, after 35 years, you say to yourself, ‘This is long enough. It’s time to move on.’” Chehardy’s decision comes less than six months after aaron  Broussard resigned as parish president and tim  Whitmer stepped down as Broussard’s right-hand man in parish government. Broussard and Whitmer’s resignations came in the midst of a federal investigation into parish government and the awarding of contracts to firms doing business with Whitmer’s insurance agency. Chehardy’s name has not been linked to that scandal. A champion of the homestead exemption, Chehardy has been a statewide as well as parish political force for decades, although in recent years he assumed a lower profile in par-

By clancy duBos

hey say money can’t buy love or happiness, but in politics this much is clear: Lack of money will buy you a whole lotta heartache and misery. Add to that the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history and you’ve got some real ugliness. That pretty much sums up the 2010 Louisiana legislative session. Gov. Bobby Jindal, who typically stays above the legislative fray, was even more detached than usual because of his daily trips to the oil-threatened coast. In his absence, House and Senate leaders, building on past tensions, nearly came to blows in the final hours. And with so little money to spread around, the inevitable cuts to education, health care and the arts/culture portend even more agony next year, when state revenues are expected to take an even more precipitous nosedive — just in time for redistricting and the next round of statewide elections. Beatings will continue until morale improves. So, without further ado, here’s my assessment of the annual sausage factory, starting with …

T

    1. Gov. BoBBy Jindal — Jindal got most of what he wanted, but he went in with a modest agenda — his big push was for tougher laws against sexual predators. On another level, he came back from the coast at the eleventh hour and brokered an uneasy House-Senate compromise on the budget — thereby proving he has learned how to be governor. His conservative supporters in the House were disappointed he sided with the more spendthrift Senate in the budget fight, but doing so lets him put off difficult decisions until next

year. He also helped pass the GRAD Act, which will give some relief to state colleges and universities in the form of tuition increases that won’t require legislative approval.   2. Mayor Mitch landrieu— The new mayor didn’t have much time to gain traction as he took office five weeks into the session, but his past legislative experience paid off for the city. Lawmakers passed a bill to annualize the state’s reimbursement to the city for expenses related to Harrah’s Casino (about $3.6 million), and they likewise approved a set of bills to fight

c'est what? do you support the noise ordinance to shut down street musicians in the French Quarter at 8 p.m.?

Mat Murphy,

No

YeS

vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com this week’s QUeSTIoN

page 11

BoUQuets

84%

16%

Have you experienced significant depression from hearing about the Gulf oil disaster?

this week’s heroes and zeroes

executive chef at the Ritz-Carlton New Orleans, organized “Chefs for Fishermen and Families,” an event where 20 New Orleans chefs caravaned to Grand Isle to feed the community. The June 19 event was co-sponsored by the Louisiana Restaurant Association and Signature Events, which also organized live music, a sno-ball stand and soccer lessons from the New Orleans Jesters — and sent families home with coolers full of food and hearts full of love from the Crescent City.

Larry King Live

dedicated its June 21 broadcast to Gulf Coast relief, with celebrities working the phones and correspondents in Grand Isle letting Louisiana fishing families tell their stories. While the international music community has been slow to respond to the tragedy, now in its third month, it was good to see media efforts ramping up. The event raised more than $1.8 million in two hours for the United Way, National Wildlife Federation and The Nature Conservancy.

Spirit Airlines

unveiled a new ad campaign last week featuring glistening bikini babes with the slogan “Check out the oil on our beaches.” When people complained, Spirit issued a non-apology, saying, “It is unfortunate that some have misunderstood our intention with today’s beach promotion,” and claiming the ads were designed to highlight the fact that many beaches did not have oil on them at all. The airline is known for ads featuring juvenile sex humor, but capitalizing on tragedy and grief is too much.

Michael Savage,

whose syndicated Savage Nation radio show is heard locally on WGSO-AM, took aim this week at coastal fishermen whose livelihoods have been ruined by the oil disaster. “Do you think the deadbeats on welfare want to get their hands dirty when they can stay at home?” he said to his radio audience. “They haven’t worked most of their lives down there. They think they’re entitled to a government check after Katrina.” Savage wouldn’t last an hour actually working on an oyster boat.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

DA WINNAS

page 13

Gov. Bobby Jindal, who typically stays above the legislative fray, was even more detached than usual because of his daily trips to the oilthreatened coast. But he returned just in time to broker an uneasy House-Senate compromise on the budget.

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blight and expedite recovery efforts. The city also picked up nearly $18 million in capital outlay projects and killed an effort to move LSU’s medical school to Baton Rouge.     3. Charter  SChoolS — Education reformers won key concessions that will help charter schools grow statewide and beat back attempts to rein in charters’ independence. Meanwhile, they passed two bills to establish a uniform application and review process and a timeline for potential operators.     4.  Big  toBaCCo — The Marlboro Man and his posse once again quashed attempts to extend the statewide smoking ban to bars and casinos.   5. home  SChoolerS — Lawmakers passed a bill giving home-schooled athletes the right to ask high school principals for permission to play on schoolsponsored teams. Principals can say no, but what do you think will happen when the next Tim Tebow shows up? Home schoolers also will get “regular” high school diplomas from now on, thanks to a separate measure enacted this year. 6.  gun  loverS — Praise the Lord, and lock and load. Leges passed a bill to allow concealed weapons to be carried inside churches, if pastors agree. They also passed a measure exempting concealedcarry permit holders from a statewide ban against carrying guns within 1,000 feet of schools. Which brings us to …

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

Martiny’s bill to ban chemical companies and big business from forcing onerous “hold harmless” agreements on their subcontractors and truckers. Over Big Oil & Chemical’s objections, Jindal signed Martiny’s bill last week. 3. Trial lawyerS — The state’s plaintiff bar has steadily increased its legislative clout in recent years, and this year trial lawyers nearly got their Holy Grail: a bill authorizing the state attorney general to hire lawyers on a contingency-fee basis. The original bill was narrowed to apply only to the BP debacle, which won over Jindal, but it still ran out of time on the House floor in the final minutes of the session.   4. teaCher  unionS — Public school teachers lost on a number of issues, including the proliferation of charter schools, annual-versus-triennial teacher evaluations, and tying 50 percent of evaluation scores to evidence of student progress. The unions also fought a bill that will let school districts waive various rules and regulations for low-performing schools in exchange for meeting performance goals. 5. SChool  BoardS — Local school boards this year lost the micromanagement fight, which means board members will have to start acting like real board members and not feudal lords — and they’ll (supposedly) have to let superintendents actually run the schools. We’ll see how that goes.     6. higher ed — College and university leaders heaved a sigh of relief that they DA LOOZAS weren’t cut further, but in the past 18 1. Gov. BoBBy Jindal — Yes, he’s a months they’ve been cut more than $250 loser as well as a winner. It’s been that million. They got authority to raise tuition, kind of year. He killed four bills aimed but it will take a lot more than a 10 perat making his office more transparent, cent tuition hike to offset the cuts they’ve but state Rep. Neil Abramson, D-New endured already — and what’s coming Orleans, convinced House members to next year. Higher ed supporters also failed amend a Senate bill to tack on a transpar- to cap the cost of scholarships available ency provision dealing with the BP oil from the popular (but expensive) TOPS disaster. Now, less than 18 months before program. On other higher ed fronts, a bill he seeks re-election, Jindal will have to to consolidate governing boards failed veto another transparency bill or admit once again, and Commissioner of Higher defeat on this front. No matter what he Education Sally Clausen’s retire-rehire does, this represents a chink in his armor. maneuver made all of higher ed a target. Also, his administration lost the fight to     7. tranSparenCy advoCateS — Once sustain the $15 drivers license fee hike it again, Bobby Jindal kept a lid on what imposed earlier this year. Other losses: people get to see from his office. Jindal-backed bills to make it easier to tap   8. texterS — OMG! Lawmakers passed into the state’s protected funds, a bill to a bill that makes texting while driving a abolish the lieutenant governor’s office primary offense, which means cops can and a separate measure to strip that office stop anyone they observe texting at the of its responsibilities over museums, state wheel. This is actually a major step toward parks and tourism. greater highway safety. 2. Big  oil  and  the  ChemiCal    9. StonerS — Dude, a handful of “antiaSSoCiation — For decades, these Mojo” bills passed overwhelmingly, makguys have had their way with lawmak- ing Louisiana among the first states to ers, but this year they failed to recog- outlaw the boutique weed substitute. nize that BP changed everything. They Considering how much worse things are seriously over-reached on a bill to gut going to be next year, lawmakers may the Tulane Environmental Law Clinic, and regret taking such a hard line against they got their butts kicked on Sen. Danny mind-altering drugs. Bummer, man.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

SUCH AS

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he day the Louisiana House of Representatives sent the state’s $26 billion operating budget to the Senate, the folks over at Hubig’s sent over a large tray of their pies to lawmakers on the floor. In response, legislators starting calling out for their faves. “Toss me an apple!” “They brought any peach?” One sergeant-at-arms jockeyed for a lemon pie. A few even recused themselves from enjoying the Faubourg Marigny’s most famous delicacy. The scene wasn’t unlike what happens every year over the state’s financial resources, except the budget represents one enormous pie and practically everyone wants a slice. At no other time during the recent legislative session was that more evident than on its final day, June 21. That’s when House leaders, most notably Appropriations Chairman Jim Fannin, D-Jonesboro, agreed to send the state’s annual spending plan in House Bill 1 to Gov. Bobby Jindal without forcing the measure into a compromise committee. In exchange, Senate President Joel Chaisson, D-Destrehan, agreed to attach $30 million in lawmakers’ pet projects to the state’s ancillary budget in House Bill 76, the same barrel of pork Senate members patted themselves on the back for stripping from HB 1 when the bill came over from the House. “I think they serve a valuable service,” Chaisson said of the pet projects during the session’s final hours. As in previous years, pie slices were doled out based on rank and favor. For the most part, the Legislature’s chairmen were granted six-figure marks, sometimes more, while individual members of budget committees got smaller allocations. Sometimes, portions can be traded to lower-ranking lawmakers for votes or other courtesies. To hear Fannin explain it is to hear the voice of political logic: Nothing gets done around the Capitol for nothing. “It’s just a process down here where members who work on and sit on committees are able to have a little for doing that,” he said before the House adjourned sine die (without setting a date for meeting again). Rep. Juan LaFonta, D-New Orleans, chastised his colleagues for not only taking part in the “process,” but also endorsing it through a series of yea votes. “If you’re going home with

T

your little project and you’re happy, then you’re not looking at this with a clear vision for the state,” LaFonta said. “This here stinks. And it stinks because everybody in this room got elected by their constituency to come down here and be responsible.” It’s not as if the state has money to spare. The fiscal year that ends this week saw a $600 million shortfall; the new budget that takes hold July 1 contained a pesky $1 billion gap, and lawmakers were forced to begin preparing — it’s debatable as to whether that actually occurred — for another $2 billion deficit forecast for the 20112012 fiscal year. That latter figure is likely to balloon, LaFonta railed, thanks in part to Jindal’s decision, for which he had legislative support, to use one-time money to float the new budget rather than cutting in preparation for the following year — ominously dubbed “the cliff year” for the state’s anticipated long fall from its recent fiscal high ground. The BP catastrophe in the Gulf will undoubtedly deliver another fiscal body blow to the state, just in time for Budget Crisis 2.0 next year. Noting the ironic juxtaposition between Jindal and LaFonta’s budgetary positions, Rep. Ernest Wooton, R-Belle Chasse, floated a dead-on assessment. “This day will live in infamy,” he said. “Little Bobby turns liberal and Rep. LaFonta turns conservative.” Infamy? Or just a case of everybody wanting — but not everybody getting — a piece of the pie. Freshman Rep. Ledricka Johnson Thierry, D-Monroe, having just completed her very first session, thanked House members for a “great experience,” which caused House Speaker Jim Tucker, R-Algiers, to walk up to the podium and check her forehead for a fever. But Thierry wasn’t feverish at all. Instead, she offered her colleagues some sweet potato pies that she brought from her district. One veteran House member was quick to explain to her how things work. “Do we get the whole sweet potato pie,” asked Rep. Jeff Arnold, D-New Orleans, “or do we have to give half to the Senate?” Visit www.bestofneworleans.com for a list of New Orleans earmarks in the budget bill. Contact Jeremy Alford at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.


more scuttlebutt

page 9

Darnell in District 2 state senate race

Attorney Mike Darnell, who served for several months on the New Orleans City Council in 2007 after At-Large Councilman Oliver Thomas resigned in a bribery scandal, confirmed to Gambit last week that he will run for the District 2 state Senate seat being vacated by two-term state Sen. Ann Duplessis. Darnell, whose law partner is state Sen. Ed Murray, was appointed interim council member in August 2007 after Thomas abruptly resigned. He served until At-Large Councilwoman Jackie Clarkson won a special election three months later. Before his brief stint on the council, Darnell served several years as a deputy city attorney and, in 2004, as an interim judge at Juvenile Court. Duplessis is resigning her state Senate seat to become an aide to Mayor Mitch

Landrieu. Qualifying for the special election to succeed Duplessis is July 7-9, and the primary is Oct. 2. A runoff, if needed, will be Nov. 2. Others known to be looking at the race include former District E Councilwoman Cynthia Willard-Lewis, whose political career started in the state House of Representatives in 1993, and Orleans School Board member Ira Thomas, who won a school board seat less than two years ago. — DuBos

Mayor, Bp HolD oil spill ‘open House’

Mayor Mitch Landrieu got more than he bargained for when he co-hosted an “oil spill response open house” with representatives from the U.S. Coast Guard and BP on June 23 in the Botanical Gardens at City Park. Eighteen agencies showed up to answer citizens’ questions on subjects that included wildlife, safety, fisheries and making claims, but Hizzoner’s opening remarks quickly devolved into a series of rapid-fire exchanges with citizens from an activist group called The Emergency Committee to Stop the Gulf Oil Catastrophe. “You’re saying this is about information, but you’re shutting people down,” said Larry Everest, interrupting Landrieu. “I’ve been to these where there’s a lot of B.S.” Everest said he didn’t like the open expo format and wanted citizens to have the opportunity to ask questions of Landrieu, BP and the Coast Guard in a press conference format where everyone in the crowd could hear. “If everybody will conduct themselves with civility and ask a question, then allow somebody to respond, then I’m sure they’ll be happy to do that,” Landrieu said. Another citizen asked what the mayor thought of a recent pledge by Sen. Mary Landrieu, his sister, that offshore drilling is safe. “I can’t answer questions for Senator Landrieu, she’s not here. My name is Mitch Landrieu. She’s the United States senator,” the mayor responded, to some applause from the crowd. “Well, obviously, the BP drill rig was not safe. That’s fair enough? We agree on that?” The back-and-forth continued for about 10 minutes and became increasingly chaotic — as TV cameras rolled — before Landrieu’s staff escorted the mayor to the door, stopping several times to answer more questions from citizens and a bevy of journalists. — Matt Davis

lawMakers want More

On the last day of the legislative session (June 21), at least two coastal lawmakers were itching for a special legislative session later this year, albeit for very different reasons. The first call came from Senate President Joel Chaisson, D-Destrehan, who knocked heads with House Speaker

Jim Tucker, R-Algiers, over a bill to allow the state attorney general to hire lawyers on a contingency-fee basis to fight BP. In many respects, that feud has been simmering for years; this year it boiled over. The sessions of 2008 and 2009 also ended with showdowns between those two men, who differ in style and ideology. Tucker claims Chaisson waited too long to negotiate the bill’s details; Chaisson contends that’s “absolutely untrue” and counters that Tucker and his key lieutenants ran every compromise by business and industry lobbyists, who wanted the bill torpedoed. The end result is blood on the water. Chaisson was so enraged on the final day that he stormed the dais in the House as the session’s deadline neared, shouting and pointing his finger at Tucker. Before senators returned to their districts, Chaisson promised to take his beef to the top. “I’m going to ask the governor to call a special session,” he said. On another front, House Natural Resources Chairman Gordon Dove, R-Houma and a close ally of Gov. Bobby Jindal, has been calling for a special session since the BP Deepwater Horizon rig exploded on April 20. “I still firmly believe that when all the dust settles, maybe in a couple of months, we’re going to be back here in a special session,” he said last week. “I’m glad we got to assign some money for the oil spill and took some positive steps on the budget, but there’s nothing we could do about the federal drilling moratorium. That’s going to have a trickle-down effect.” — Jeremy Alford

resolution rounDup

In the legislative session’s final days, three New Orleans lawmakers advanced three very local resolutions. Resolutions do not have the force of law but do have some political force because they are formal expressions of legislative sentiment. Rep. Jared Brossett passed a resolution urging the New Orleans Civil Service Commission to televise the nonjudicial portions of its meetings held in the City Council Chamber. With a touch more political flair, Sen. David Heitmeier moved another resolution that requests the state Department of Transportation and Development to “convene a work group to review and analyze the policies, procedures and practices” of the Crescent City Connection Police Department. Finally, Rep. Walker Hines authored a resolution that proves politics can never get too local. The resolution asks DOTD to install a traffic light at the intersection of Airline Drive and Eagle Street and to establish a new school zone near Bethune Elementary School — proving, as the late Speaker of the U.S. House Tip O’Neill famously noted, that all politics is local. — Alford

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

ish elections. Still, he proved many times that his endorsement and the Chehardy name held a lot of magic when he chose to make his presence felt. Chehardy says he had hoped his resignation would trigger an October special election, but it came about a week too late. Now the race to succeed him will likely be April 2, 2011. That could still affect the political war many expect in Jefferson over the Oct. 2 special election for parish president. At-Large Councilmen Tom Capella and John Young are the leading candidates in that race, and if both men qualify next week (qualifying is July 7-9), it promises to be an expensive, bruising contest. “My decision and the timing of my announcement had nothing to do with the parish president’s race,” Chehardy says. “If the parish president’s race were a factor, I would have researched the law to make absolutely sure that the election could have been called in October. The truth is, I’ve been talking this over with my wife for some time, and we finally reached a final decision over the weekend, so I announced it.” The assessor’s job is not as high profile as that of parish president, but the assessor doesn’t have to contend with term limits — and he or she can still practice law on the side. Both Capella and Young are lawyers. The vacancy in the assessor’s office presents an opportunity for an uneasy truce, but that would mean the two councilmen — and the political factions behind each — would have to trust each other for a period of months. Given the personalities involved and recent political history in Jefferson, that would be a highwire act unlike anything seen in the parish for quite a while. Sources say politicos on both sides of the Young-Capella race have been strategizing since Chehardy announced his retirement. — Clancy DuBos

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dition of young players — to take it to the street. But someone’s been complaining, and the cops have been breaking up the scene and — as seems so often the case — the vibrant street culture of New Orleans is being assailed, rather than encouraged, by the authorities. It’s almost too good to be true, what the TBC Brass Band does: presents and promotes New Orleans culture and tradition — at no cost to the city! I was in Nashville, Tenn., recently and, in moving from one concourse to another, I passed two different lounges where country and Western bands were playing. It wasn’t even noon yet! All I could think was: That’s the way it should be done! You visit Nashville, you expect country music everywhere. That’s the way to imprint the visitors, seduce them, lure them back. For a while, somebody was paying

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Lord knows we could all use a bounce in our step around here. bands to play at our airport, but the project was short-lived. And too bad, because it’s a very small price to pay — a couple hundred bucks — to make a really big impression on folks coming to and leaving town. It says this place is serious about its music and culture. But yet again, New Orleans can’t seem to find a way to let street traditions grow and spread. We shouldn’t be running bands off the street; we should be inviting more into the street. It’s not just for visitors. Just like the free concerts in Lafayette Square in the springtime, I love to stop and listen to the guys at the corner of Bourbon and Canal. It’s impossible to walk away from the scene without a bounce in your step — and Lord knows we could all use a bounce in our step around here. So c’mon, New Orleans. Let the band play on! Give the people what they want! And now, remind me to tell you about the time I went to the Netherlands and walked into a bar and found two guys dressed in lederhosen and wooden shoes playing pool. For true.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

was 13 years old when I took a train to Inverness, Scotland with my parents. I was wide-eyed with wonder. Scotland! What did I know of it? Well, nothing — other than that the streets would be filled with men in plaid kilts playing bagpipes, of course. That much, I knew. And so it was that, as we walked around town that first morning, there were men in kilts everywhere, playing bagpipes. In the public squares. On street corners. Down every alley. Everywhere, bagpipers abounded! It was nothing short of breathlessly magical. It was also not what it appeared to be. Turns out that my childish imagining of Scotland was, of course, just that: the stuff of fairy tales and children’s books. What my family happened to have wandered into was an event called the Northern Meeting, an annual festival to celebrate the traditions — and music — of the Scottish Highlands. The festival includes the national bagpipe competition, and what we were witnessing was the contestants tuning up. The range and pitch of the instrument is such that the men needed to get far away from each other to tune and practice, and so it was that they were scattered all over town, rendering a magical soundtrack over the landscape. Thrilled as I was to witness this fantastic phenomenon, I was, of course, very disappointed to realize that the streets, meadows and hills of Scotland were not actually filled with men playing bagpipes. Because that’s what any visitor would expect, and certainly want, to see, of course — based on a lifetime of reading, storytelling and Disney movies. And this leads us to New Orleans, where, when visitors come, they expect to find streets filled with men blowing horns. Hot jazz on every street corner, music falling from the sky like rain, filling the ears with the city’s unique soundtrack. On one corner, that’s exactly what visitors can find. At the corner of Bourbon and Canal streets, young men deliver the straight-out-of-your-imagination New Orleans street scene: A band playing, people dancing, a tableau that gives tourists and locals alike a fantasy version of what we all dream New Orleans is like. But the scene at the corner of Bourbon and Canal has been tamped down. The city’s law books say you can’t play in the streets after 8 p.m. After that time, you’ve got to take it inside. Never mind that the To Be Continued Brass Band has been playing on that corner until deep into the night for years and years and years. Everyone has benignly ignored a law that suppresses the great urge and tra-

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010


an h t . er i r r e g t as an s s i i d lle oi l i f v l r gu Ca e s h e Jam about t ev er

ys. a s s. e r e h ’ n , r so a i r W p e at ing no r a ‘We e’s tak h a nd

I

By Mat t Da v is

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

n the world of TV news punditry, it seems to be OK to scream, point your finger and call your fellow pundits names — as long as you don’t really mean it. The problem with James Carville these days? He really means it. “You want to know who to get mad at? Get mad at all these idiots that came in and said these companies could selfregulate themselves,” he snarled on The Colbert Report earlier this month. “If the oil was Lehman Brothers, it would’ve just gone away by now,” answered Stephen Colbert, trying to lighten the interview. Carville would have none of it. “They would’ve bailed that out!” Carville shot back, adding, “I think this is a war. I think we’re being invaded out there.” Carville raised the temperature on CNN, the network that pays his bills, when he literally went off — live, on the air, from Grand Isle — on fellow CNN pundit Fareed Zakaria, who said President Barack Obama was letting the oil disaster distract him from other major concerns. “This is a very smart man,” Carville said of Zakaria, teeing it up for his hallmark swing. “And I don’t think that he

unders t a n d s exactly what is going on down here. I don’t think he understands that an entire culture is at risk … and he is whining about the fact that the president had to cancel a trip to Indonesia to do something about what’s going on in Louisiana?” As for Obama, Carville’s message was even more direct: “Tell BP: ‘I’m your daddy. I’m in charge. You’re going to do what we say.’” James Carville is going rogue — why are we not surprised? CArVILLe’S STOCK IN TrAde IS NOT holding back, but typically he does it on behalf of democrats, many of whom have been his clients. With the BP debacle, it’s different. This time it’s personal. No one is spared. “I’ll never forget,” Carville says in a phone call from a New York hotel, where his wife, GOP political consultant Mary PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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Losing his temper at the Obama administration:

    “It  was  built  up  over  the  whole  coastline  issue,  over  the  levees. And it was a sense of neglect that I felt that Louisiana  had been on the receiving end of for a long time. And … early  one morning it just all came up.”

Obama’s drilling moratorium:

    “I think that one of the things that we need to do, and some  people are doing this, is to go to him with sort of a plan. … The  mayor  was  telling  me  one  of  the  ideas  was  to  let  them  drill  but not penetrate the reservoir until we know more, but they  could  get  that  up  and  running  again.  There  are  any  number  of ideas. I think we’ve got to be constructive, but if we don’t  get this back and running, it will really wreck the economy in  south Louisiana.”

Bobby Jindal’s performance since April 20:

    “I think the governor has brought a lot of attention to this  thing.  People  sense  that  he’s  there.  And  I  think  he’s  done  a  good job.”

Billy Nungesser:

    “His heart’s in the right place. He’s trying a lot of things. I  think people wanted to take action, and I think [he] wanted to  do what [he] could to protect things.”

Adm. Thad Allen:

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

    “He’s  got  a  really,  really  big  job.  And,  you  know,  it’s  in  no  sense an attack — I think he’s doing the best he can under a  really difficult situation here.”

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Matalin, is launching a new radio show  with Arianna Huffington. “My wife and  I  were  having  dinner  with  our  children,  and my oldest daughter, who’s just going  to be 15, just busted out crying. And she  said, ‘Can we just talk about me for one  time and stop obsessing about this?’”     Carville’s  obsession  with  what  he  calls the “catastrophe” in the Gulf stems  from growing up 65 miles upriver from  New Orleans.      “I  went  to  high  school  in  Donaldsonville,  and  back  then  the  teams  in  our  district  were  the  Catholic  schools  in  Thibodaux,  Raceland,  Larose,  Lockport,  Golden  Meadow,  Houma,”  he  says.  “Literally  these  places  are  in  real  jeopardy of — the further south you go — in  real  jeopardy  of  not  existing.  And  it’s  hard to think of that happening.”     His  passion  for  New  Orleans  likewise  is rooted in an appreciation of the city’s  unique  culture.  He  has  a  rant  about  it  that he can call up on cue.     “It’s  more  than  a  city,”  he  says.  “It’s  more than a place. It’s an entire culture.  It has its own identifiable cuisine, its own  identifiable  music,  its  own  identifiable  funerals, its own identifiable social structure, its own identifiable architecture, its  own identifiable body of literature. …      “If this were a city of 700,000 people  20  years  from  now  and  it  was  prosperous but had lost its culture, it would not 

On the nation’s long-term commitment:

    “If we clean this coast and don’t���rebuild it, it’s all going to  be for naught.”

New Orleans’ future:

    “This  is  not  some  paranoid  rantings  of  an  old  man.  Somebody  is  going  to  say  that  it’s  just  too  expensive,  the  state needs to move north of the I-10/I-12 corridor — I guarantee you. That’s why I always, always point out that what’s  happened  to  us  is  nothing  natural.  There’s  been  two  colossal  engineering  failures.  One  is  a  result  of  failure,  and  one  is  a  result  of  negligence,  but  it’s  shoddy  engineering  that’s  caused our problems. It’s not anything else. And believe you  me, there are people that want that story line that this kind  of place is too vulnerable, too expensive, etc., etc. No way can  that story line gain any traction.”

His political training in Louisiana:

    “I  learned  a  lot  from  [veteran  consultants]  Gus  Weill  and  Raymond  Strother.  I  give  them  a  lot  of  credit.  Cooking  and  political  consulting  are  pretty  good  in  Louisiana.  I  would  say  that  most  of  the  things  I  learned,  I  learned  before  I  left  Louisiana. … It was a good testing ground.”

Modern political discourse:

    “I just was in Nevada where you have the Senate candidate  talking  about  Second  Amendment  remedies.  Now,  if  that’s  not across the line, then I don’t know what is.”

Making BP pay:

    “They’re  the  biggest  tortfeasor  in  the  history  of  the  United  States, and there may very well be criminal negligence here.”

be as good as a city of 400,000 people  that  had  maintained  its  culture.  If  we  lose the culture, we lose what makes us  New  Orleans.  We  become  just  another  place. … I think it’s important for people  to  realize  how  special  our  culture  is  —  and that it’s not something that we can  take  for  granted.  We  have  to  want  to  preserve it.”     On cable news, the line between pundit  and  insider  is  so  porous  that  two  CNN contributors, Alex Castellanos and  Hilary  Rosen,  have  side  gigs  as  lobbyists  and  PR  professionals  for  BP.  (The  network has said neither pundit will be  allowed to opine on the oil disaster.) So  the White House was none too pleased  when Carville took aim at Obama.     “It  just  looks  like  he’s  not  involved  in  this!”  Carville  told  ABC  host  and  fellow  former  Bill  Clinton  campaign  advisor George Stephanopoulos last month.  “Man,  you  have  got  to  get  down  here  and take control of this! Put somebody  in charge of this and get this thing moving! We’re about to die down here!”     The  outburst  prompted  David  Axelrod, a senior White House adviser to  President Obama, to tell The Washington Post  two  days  later  that  Carville  “has  always been a very passionate person,”  but that “what I haven’t heard is exactly  what  he  thinks  we  should  do  that  we 

aren’t doing.”     Twelve days later, NBC aired an interview with Obama, who said he was consulting  with  experts  “so  I  know  whose  ass to kick.”      Carville would be glad if his outspoken  criticism  of  the  White  House  led  to  a  tougher  approach,  but  he  understands  Axelrod’s  reaction.  “If  I  was  in  the  White  House,  I  would  have  been  mad at me, too,” he says. “But they’ve  got  a  job,  and  that’s  to  protect  the  president.  And  I  have  a  job,  and  that’s  to protect south Louisiana.     “Nobody in the White House is happy  with me,” he continues. “They still don’t  like  to  be  criticized,  and  I  understand  that. But I thought it was justifiable and  I did it.”     The  situation  in  the  Gulf  has  even  brought Carville and his Republican consultant wife together politically. Matalin  ran President George H.W. Bush’s unsuccessful  re-election  campaign  against  Carville’s  campaign  for  Clinton  in  1992.  They married in New Orleans the following year.      “I think we’re both sort of focused on  getting  the  thing  cleaned  up  and  making  sure  that  people  are  held  accountable,” Carville says. “And I think we both  understand how sensitive this is, to get 


different, but the flow is the same as if “Al-Qaeda would have blown up a supertanker at the LOOP (Louisiana Offshore Oil Port),” Carville says. “It is in essence an invasion. So I’m not interested in the constraints of the 1990 Act. Just change it.” CArvILLE’S STrATEGy fOr BILL CLINton defeated President George H.W. Bush in 1992 using the mantra: “It’s the economy, stupid.” Is Carville concerned today that Obama might be vulnerable to the same criticism when he runs for re-election in 2012? “If the commitments are made and he follows through on this, it may be a plus for him,” Carville says. “We’re very early in this game … when they get this thing capped and stopped gushing, we’re in for the long haul. And we’re still going to be dealing with this in 2012. He might point to this as one of his great accomplishments. I hope he can.” While Obama may be able to emerge positively from the BP catastrophe, Carville doesn’t see that possibility for BP. “BP is going to have a rough go here,” he says. “And they deserve to.” In the years before the Clinton campaign, Carville learned the importance of fighting negative press in compressed news cycles. The next story in the BP catastrophe, he is sure, is that “somebody is going to say it’s just too expensive, and the state needs to move north of the I-10/I-12 corridor.” And that touches a nerve with Carville, one that triggers a familiar, passionate rant. “If you visit slipshod, crappy engineering on anybody, then you’re going to have bad results,” he says. “The country, you know, extracts minerals from us, they extract the seafood, the commerce, the wealth

of the state and have used it constantly, have not reimbursed us, have destroyed our land … “And frankly, we’re not going anywhere. We ain’t moving one inch. And not only are we not moving, we’re going to be very aggressive about advancing our way of life, and we’re going to be very aggressive about protecting our culture. … “There can’t be any quarter given. There can’t be one inch given. I’m not moving anywhere, and neither should anybody else.” Mary Matalin’s radio show, Both Sides Now, airs every Sunday on 77WABC New York. Find out more at www.bothsidesradio.com.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

this done, and what’s at risk here. “We don’t have a lot of disagreements about Louisiana things, to tell you the truth. Our differences accentuate, become more pronounced, the farther we get from south Louisiana.” Carville and Matalin both seemed disappointed during an appearance on CNN after Obama’s Oval Office speech on June 15, but the next day, the president and BP announced a $20 billion claim fund. Carville called it a victory for the people of Louisiana. “I would rather have had that speech and $20 billion the next day than to have Lincoln’s Second Inaugural (Address) and $10 billion the next day,” he says. “I think the fund is a serious thing, and I think it’s going to help some people.” On the six-month moratorium on deepwater drilling, Carville dons his strategist’s hat and offers a way for Obama to reverse course without losing face: The big political issue to address before lifting the moratorium is public frustration with the apparent lack of corporate responsibility. “If you had the CEO personally attest that the rig was safe and that safety was going to be the No. 1 priority — and that the CEO and senior officials of that company and the board all signed off on this — and you got somebody like Bob Bea, who people justifiably trust in south Louisiana, to go out and inspect those rigs and inspect the procedures, and he said that they were safe to operate, I would let my children sleep on that rig.” Carville has been so critical of the federal response to the catastrophe that he’s drawn praise from the unlikeliest of natural enemies — former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who wrote on her Twitter feed, “President may put down the golf clubs & fundraiser fork 40 days into Gulf gusher to finally grasp this tragedy? Carville’s right on this.” Agreeing with Sarah Palin? When it comes to the unfolding disaster in the Gulf, James Carville — a diehard Democrat from Iberville Parish — has gone beyond rogue. He’s in new territory. His rhetoric evokes George W. Bush after 9/11. “I agree with the president’s use of ‘we’re being invaded.’ And to me, this is just like a war. And so, when you talk to people, they say, well, under the Oil [Pollution] Act of 1990, we have to do it like this, or under the Stafford Act, we have to do it like this, or under the regulations, we have to do it like this. My answer is ‘Change it.’ It’s just a stupid act of Congress. Call them in. … Have the president ask for extraordinary powers.” The Oil Pollution Act of 1990 imposes a $75 million cap on company liability for losses related to an oil spill. Today, the origin of the oil may be

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Phoenix Recycling bins line the halls of Orleans Parish Civil District Court. District C councilwoman Susan G. Guidry plans to get the court’s neighbors in city council on board with a similar program.

Hall Mark City Hall is taking its first steps to reCyCle — in wHat Could be tHe first pusH for a Citywide program. Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

by alex woodward

20

ays after taking office, District A Councilwoman Susan G. Guidry signed up her office for recycling pickup. It was her first attempt to jump-start a City Hall-wide movement for an overhaul of the city’s defunct recycling program. Guidry keeps a blue bin in her office, thanks to the service provided by Phoenix Recycling. “I pay for that myself,” she says. Guidry has long supported recycling. She promoted Phoenix Recycling as president of the Parkview Neighborhood Association and as a customer, and she publicly announced her candidacy for the District A seat at a November 2009 meeting for NOLA Recycles, a campaign urging city officials to resume municipal recycling pickup, which disappeared from city services following Hurricane Katrina. In January, both Guidry and then-mayoral candidate Mitch Landrieu endorsed NOLA Recycles’ six-point plan: Reintroduce citywide recycling, prevent illegal dumping, accommodate safe disposal of hazardous waste, recycle construc-

D

tion and demolition waste from city projects, put the Department of Sanitation in charge of promoting and overseeing recycling projects — and begin a recycling program at City Hall. Guidry and Landrieu wrote to Sierra Club environmental justice organizer and NOLA Recycles campaign coordinator Darryl MalekWiley to show their support. Guidry wrote: “I wholeheartedly will support the next mayor in implementing the return to curbside recycling, taking action against illegal dumping, and the rest of the NOLA Recycles Six Point Plan.” Landrieu wrote that he is “eager to restore a curbside recycling program. Our citizens want it, and city government is the only way to make it happen. To that end, upon taking office, I will scrutinize the city budget and work to eliminate waste and inefficiency. Securing funding for this program is our biggest hurdle. … I will also work to make sure City Hall offices recycle their waste and use recycled products.” The rest of the council members

now support Guidry’s efforts to institute a council-wide recycling program. “We’ve put in an informal bid quote, where we’ve asked a number of companies we understand do some level of recycling, to provide a quote to recycle for all of City Council — the seven council members and their central staff,” she says. Guidry met with Landrieu as he entered office and discussed a citywide recycling plan. “I strongly recommended we start recycling at City Hall, that it would be a message to our citizens as well as the rest of the country that we’re moving on to the 21st century,” she says. “He was very supportive of it.” “She’s definitely taking a leadership role on the recycling effort at City Hall,” Malek-Wiley says. “We applaud that and other efforts to get recycling back in the neighborhoods of New Orleans. FORMER MAyOR RAy NAGIN’S sanitation director Veronica White dodged recycling during that administration, citing budget constraints. Guidry acknowledges it will be hard to transform the status quo, or “what has been done by the previous administration that is going to be so difficult for us to try to dig ourselves out of it,” she says. Meanwhile, the councilwoman looks to Baton Rouge. Recycling projects there have reduced landfill page 23

The Lafitte Greenway Project this month purchased the final parcel of land it needs to create a 3.1-mile linear park connecting neighborhoods from the French Quarter to Lakeview. The 16.5-acre parcel along the Lafitte Corridor in Mid-City was the site of the defunct Louisiana Institute of Film Technology (LIFT) Studio; the $3.8 million cost of the land was funded by a Community Development Block Grant. “Bringing this land back into public hands serves as a maximal realization of this project,” Bart Everson, president of Friends of the Lafitte Corridor, said of acquiring the parcel of land. The Greenway Project, which began in 2006, seeks to create a corridor of continuous parks, bike trails, recreational facilities and open public spaces to provide pedestrians and nonmotorized vehicles a safe passage in the area and to increase outdoor activities. Everson says the acquisition of the former LIFT Studio site makes the project even better. “This land will be the widest part of the corridor, and it has the most potential for creative stuff to happen,” he says. “It could be the most interesting part of the greenway.” After numerous setbacks, Everson says he’s happy to see the project gaining momentum again. “It’s very heartening to see (Mayor) Mitch Landrieu’s support on this,” he says. “We are hoping the administration will proceed expeditiously.” The next steps are selecting design and construction teams, says Everson, who hopes to schedule a groundbreaking ceremony within a year. —Sarah Eddington

new roots

Nola Green Roots has given the phrase “naturally New Orleans” a whole new meaning. On May 29, the organization, which converts abandoned plots of land into thriving community gardens, opened its second location: Wise Words Community Garden. Area residents can pay a monthly membership fee of $20 and receive weekly shipments of the garden’s produce straight to their homes. In return, they are expected to perform gardening duties once a week. Stakeholders can pay $30 a month for produce privileges without the required labor. Designed for both food and art, the garden features weekly cooking demonstrations using fresh ingredients, page 25

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This month’s 24th annual French Market Creole Tomato Festival was bittersweet. As it ushered in the state’s signature summer crop, it also served as a toast to the seafood industry, stopping just short of saying farewell. The Gulf oil disaster’s impact is far-reaching, but Louisiana farmers and their crops are resilient, especially the green corona-topped vegetable, a versatile summertime favorite — perfect on a sandwich, in a salad or on its own. Emeril’s chef David Slater partnered with the Crescent City Farmers Market this month for his June “Farm to Fork” menu, featuring a barbecue sauce made with, of course, Creole tomatoes.

My Corona


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010


reen matters

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District C Councilwoman Susan G. Guidry and NOLA Recycles hope to see a City Hall-wide recycling program.

points, and you can use those points and redeem them with local and national partners. We always, always have locals (where you can redeem points) — a lot of mom and pop shops in our program in every city we’re in.” With programs in 300 communities in 26 states and the U.K., Recycle Bank partners with the city’s hauler and updates its equipment with Recycle Bank hardware. But Recycle Bank operates only as an incentive program, and New Orleans has no municipal recycling service or recycling hauler. Guidry says, however, she can see the program working for New Orleans once the rest of City Hall gets onboard — a decision that ultimately rests with the mayor’s office. “I can’t go further than that right now and get the mayor involved and all,” she says. “We’re getting the information we need to assist them on that.” As for Recycle Bank’s benefits to New Orleans, Guidry says “the municipality ends up saving more because it has less garbage, less cost in pickup and landfill fees and disposal fees. The citizens get coupons, depending on how much they recycle, for a grocery store, that type of thing. They’re incentivized to recycle. It sounds like a wonderful program. We’re just going to do the research and hand it over to the mayor and see if we can make it work.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

waste by 25 percent. In 2006, the capital city adopted a single-stream curbside recycling service (meaning different recyclable materials can be mixed in the same bin), which provides 64-gallon bins to residents and makes weekly pickups. Baton Rouge also contracted with Natural Resources Recovery, which collects and composts yard waste at two facilities, then sells its compost under the label Nature’s Best Organics. New Orleans had a recycling program before Katrina, but it needs the incentive to reinstitute it, Guidry says. She looks to national models and companies for ideas so her efforts won’t end with just the City Council recycling. Guidry says she and her staff have researched Recycle Bank, which company spokesperson Melody Serafino explains is a “recycling rewards program.” The company partners with cities and waste haulers to provide residents with recycling bins equipped with GPS or ID-reading technology so each bin is matched to a household. Trucks equipped with Recycle Bank’s technology perform single-stream pickups and measure how much each household recycles. That data is converted into points. “It’s like a frequent flyer program,” Serafino says. “The points go into your Recycle Bank account, which you can access online or you can call us up and we’ll give your

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Up In The AIr Monitoring air quality during the gulf oil disaster B y a l e x W o o d Wa r d

he Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set up air quality monitoring stations along the Gulf Coast and has determined what we breathe to be safe: “EPA’s air monitoring to date has found that air quality levels for ozone and particulates are normal on the Gulf coastline for this time of year and odorcausing pollutants associated with petroleum products are being found at low levels,” the EPA reports on its website. But what about that oily “gas station” smell? Bhaskar Kura, a professor and director of the Maritime Environmental Resources and Information Center at the University of New Orleans (UNO), instituted an air quality assessment program, and later this year he plans to organize a conference (“Environmental Impacts of Oil Spills: Challenges and Potential Solutions”) at UNO. Kura helps explain the science of the smell. What the EPA is looking for: a number of air pollutants, like fine particles (PM2.5, or particles smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter) and coarse particles (PM10, or particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter); hydrogen sulfide and hydrocarbons known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from crude oil, like benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene. But Kura says the EPA’s determination that the air is safe is premature. “We do not have complete understanding of the air quality in all locations for all time periods,” he says. “Air monitoring is being performed at only select locations and there is a possibility of missing hot spots depending on the wind direction and other meteorological conditions.” There are nine air-monitoring locations in Louisiana in Lafourche, Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

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The disTincT “oil scenT” has frequenTly appeared in The ciTy, miles away from The oil. is iT Toxic? “Odors can come from most hydrocarbons or VOCs, and these are considered ‘air toxics,’ with each compound having different levels of health impact,” Kura says. “If the odors were truly from the evaporating hydrocarbons or VOCs, they are of concern.” The EPA says, “Some of these chemicals may cause short-lived effects like headache, eye, nose and throat irritation or nausea. Some people may be able to smell several of these chemicals at levels well below those that would cause short-term health problems.” can These polluTanTs sicken people? Crude oil contains pollutants with potential short- and long-term health impacts.

The Environmental Protection Agency has set up air sampling equipment in Lafourche, Plaquemines and St. Bernard parishes. Benzene is a carcinogen — exposure to benzene can increase the probability of cancer. Other chemicals in crude also have the potential to impact health, and the elderly, young and sick may respond differently than healthier individuals. Kura says if people experience health problems, “they should make note of their symptoms and visit their health care professionals promptly.” “Toxicological knowledge indicates that it is possible that the exposed public may experience certain health risks from inhalation of air contaminated with certain chemicals found in crude and natural gas,” he says. “Whether people in our region can get sick depends on a number of factors such as sensitivity of individuals, concentration of various toxic compounds in the air (which again depends on the location, wind direction and meteorological conditions), duration of exposures and frequency of exposures.” To whaT degree are These airborne polluTanTs harmful To The environmenT? any long-Term effecTs? Depending on toxicity, concentration and duration of pollutants in the air, Kura says airborne pollutants can cause damage to water, soil, property, crops and the food chain. View air-monitoring information at www.epa.gov/bpspill/air.html.


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displays local artwork and encourages hands-on involvement with local produce and agriculture. Crops currently growing in the garden includes tomatoes, cucumbers, okra and fresh herbs such as dill, basil and parsley. Fresh eggs can be gathered from a chicken coop on the site. Members also can access local produce through the Nola Green Roots website (www.nolagreenroots. com), which lists prices and availability. Nola Green Roots’ first project was the Mid-City Community Garden at 516 S. Salcedo St. The gardens have received support from organizations including New Orleans Food and Farm Network, HandsOn New Orleans and AmeriCorps. Joseph Brock, Nola Green Roots executive director, says the Gulf oil disaster has magnified the importance of utilizing local produce. “Even though the Gulf has taken a turn to rid us of our natural resources, we are trying to show people that not all of them are gone,” he says. — Eddington

Second Solar School

reeniverse

Page Turnover

Beginning this fall, students at Loyola University New Orleans, Dillard University and Nunez Community College can save as much as half off the cost of regular college textbooks by using recycled books. Loyola’s bookstore, run by the Follett Higher Education Group, will launch its Rent-A-Text program, which allows students to rent books for their courses instead of purchasing them new. Students are allowed to highlight and mark in the books, and they also have the option of buying them at the end of the term. Students can order their books online or purchase them in the bookstore. The Follet groups says Rent-A-Text’s pilot program saved students at seven universities nearly $2 million on their books in one semester. The program is expected to reach more than 500 campuses nationwide for the 2010 academic year. — Eddington

Solar SailorS

Sailing the Milneburg Joy, a team of University of New Orleans (UNO) engineering students won the 2010 World Championship of Intercollegiate Solar Boating, a series of regatta races featuring solarpowered or solar- and electric-powered vessels. Twelve teams competed June 9-13 in Fayetteville, Ark., and UNO took home the Collegiate World Champion title. Boats also were judged on design, appearance and workmanship. Team members included students from UNO’s School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering and the Department of Electrical Engineering. — Woodward

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green gianT? arget is one bookend on the row of big-box retailers and their sprawling parking lots that line Metairie’s Veterans Memorial Boulevard. It’s the kind of place where shoppers might load up their sport utility vehicles with plastic bags carrying everything from groceries to new shoes. It’s also the only place in the greater New Orleans area that recycles glass. Private companies like SDT Waste & Debris and Phoenix Recycling have slowly reinstated recycling services post-Hurricane Katrina, but none accept glass. Target stores around the country, including the Metairie location (4500 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-2184; www.target. com), however, accept and recycle shoppers’ used glass bottles as well as cans, plastic bags and bottles, MP3 players, ink cartridges and cell phones. The in-store recycling program is part of Target’s larg-

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er waste-reducing initiative, which also includes streamlining product packaging, selling reusable bags, minimizing and recycling operational trash and donating unsold merchandise to community organizations. The store also reuses garment hangers, sells organic foods and other products and uses energy-efficient light fixtures and faucets in the store. Yet, searching “plastic” on Target’s website yields 2,667 items, and employees at the store’s cash register rarely, if ever, offer reusable bags; they might even use a plastic shopping bag to hold a single tube of mascara or package of breath mints. Perhaps the corporation’s pro-green values haven’t trickled down to all its employees, but since Target is among the most comprehensive recycling services in the city, it might be time to think inside the (big) box. — Lauren LaBorde

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

Joseph A. Craig Elementary unveiled its solar energy system last month, making it the second school investing in the switch to solar under the New Orleans Solar School Initiative (NOSSI). The Treme school, which reopened in 2008 following a $15.5 million renovation necessitated by Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures, is now partially powered by a $250,000, 25.6-kilowatt solar array, providing 36 megawatt hours of electricity a year. NOSSI is a partnership among Nike, Entergy New Orleans, Winrock International, the U.S. Green Building Council and the City of New Orleans. Entergy invested $1.5 million in NOSSI projects last year, and last fall NOSSI named its first solar school —Warren Easton High School. That school now features a 6,634-square-foot rooftop-

mounted solar panel system that provides 37 megawatt hours of power a year. — Alex Woodward

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << Music filM art stage >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> what to know Before you go << <<<<<<<<<< << 29 35 37 39 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < J U n E The NoN wiTh wATiV >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 10 p.m. Wednesday

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Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616

PHOTO By EvAN JAMES FRENCH

“Post-rock” long ago gave way to other pre-silly musical proclamations (see: “chillwave”), but the hallmarks of the mid-’90s instrumental genre live on with Tadaima, the self-released sophomore offering from Oklahoma City’s the Non: elastic song structures, shimmering textures, angular crescendos and hoppedup rhythmic adventures. If Chicago forbearer Tortoise is the tortoise, this band is the hare. New Orleans free-jazzmen WATIv open. Free admission.

ZomBie TowN : A DoCumeNTAry plAy 01 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday, through July 18 Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com J U ly

Southern Rep at Le Chat Noir makes its debut with this mockumentary about a San Francisco theater troupe that gets stuck in a small Texas town that just happens to be the site of a zombie apocalypse — this is their “true” story. It’s directed by Southern Rep associate artistic director Mark Routhier and written by Tim Bauer. Tickets $20.

Sweet 16

Gladys Knight’s Essence presence includes a musical performance as well as a debut of her new jewelry line.

The essence Music FesTival reTurns For iTs 16Th year wiTh a deep lineup oF shows and seMinars. By Noah BoNaparte pais

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Gladys KniGht

Fans of classic rock are fond of pitting the Beatles against the Rolling Stones, but soul cronies face a potentially bloodier showdown: Diana Ross or Gladys Knight? Deep down, everyone falls on one side or the other, preferring Ross’ finger-wagging sass

or Knight’s wounded, fiery defiance. That Knight’s family band the Pips began its seven-year Motown run as the opening act for Ross’ Supremes only further scalds the argument — as did Knight’s allegation, in her 1997 autobiography Between Each Line of Pain and Glory: My Life Story, that Ross once had her removed from a tour because audience response to Knight was too strong. True or false, it isn’t hard to swallow. Though the Pips failed to supplant the Supremes, the Temptations or Marvin Gaye on Berry Gordy’s A-list — the band’s biggest success, including defining torch song “Midnight Train to Georgia,” came after leaving Motown for Buddha Records in 1973 — one listen to Knight’s pyrotechnic take on “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” is all the evidence needed to support her claim. (The divas themselves seem to have buried the hatchet, appearing together for a heart-health benefit in 2008.) Knight, whose solo career during the past two decades brought her back to her gospel roots, returns to New Orleans for the first time since headlining a November 2008 tribute concert for Xavier University president Dr. Norman C. Francis. Her Twitter account (@MsGladysKnight) contains no digs at Ross; instead, it’s currently ablaze page 28

PHOTO By JENNy BAGERT

On July 1, venues nationwide host Gulf aid concerts with proceeds benefiting the Gulf Restoration Network. At Tip’s, headliners include Ivan Neville, Coco Robicheaux, Rotary Downs (pictured), the Joe Krown Trio, John Gros, and the We Are One and young Fellaz brass bands. Call club for ticket information.

Go 4Th oN The riVer Music 4 p.m., fireworks 9 p.m. 04 New Orleans Riverfront; www.go4thontheriver.com. J U ly

ESSEncE MuSic FESTival

July 2-4 louisiaNa superdome (Night CoNCerts) erNest N. morial CoNveNtioN CeNter (semiNars)

The Navy Band New Orleans performs in venues including the Riverwalk, French Market and Old U.S. Mint leading up to the Dueling Barges, one of the American Pyrotechnics Association’s “Top 5 Must-See Fireworks Displays in the U.S.” The event is sponsored by the Riverfront Marketing Group. Admission is free.

www.esseNCemusiCfestival.Com www.hoB.Com When Rock ’N’ Bowl moved to By lauren laBorde its current location on Earhart Boulevard and South Carrollton Avenue, some of the murals covering the former location’s walls moved with it. One mural depicts Pete Fountain leading his band, which makes Rock ’N’ Bowl (3016 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-1700; www.rockandbowl.com) a fitting spot for the clarinetist’s 80th birthday celebration Saturday, July 3, at 3 p.m. Fountain, along with Tim Laughlin and Connie Jones, performs at the event. Admission $10.

Fountain Fest

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

very Independence Day since 1995, New Orleanians have had their choice of two sets of downtown fireworks: over the Mississippi River or inside the Louisiana Superdome. The Essence Music Festival’s Sweet 16 — a celebration of 40 years for its parent publication — features a gift-wrapped weekend with a little something for everyone, from soul and R&B royalty to funk and hip-hop ringleaders, both native and visiting, classic and contemporary. Rivaling the main stage and Super Lounge performances by the likes of Gladys Knight, Mary J. Blige, De La Soul and Earth, Wind & Fire are a growing slate of seminars with scores of academics, politicians and celebrities, including Bill Cosby, Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Ca., and the Rev. Al Sharpton. Essence has become more than just an explosive music festival — it’s a cultural market and meeting place.

TipiTiNA’s Gulf CoAsT 01 BeNefiT 10 p.m. Thursday Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.gulfcoastbenefit.com J U ly

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with information about a new jewelry line, debuting at Essence, that benefits the Ghanaian Kumasi Women’s Cooperative, whose beads grace her bracelets and necklaces.

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What have we learned from De La Soul? Thanks to the legendary Long Island, N.Y., hip-hop trio, we know the magic number (it’s three, of course); we know jazz, rap and abstract pop can coexist without sounding like bloated elevator music (apologies, Arrested Development); and we know of dozens of then-radical East Coast groups like A Tribe Called Quest, Brand Nubian and Queen Latifah’s Native Tongues posse, whose cues from De La Soul’s 1989 debut 3 Feet High and Rising migrated west with California’s Hieroglyphics crew and continue to influence mainstream artists like Black Eyed Peas, Mos Def and Common today. Perhaps Prince Paul should get the most credit. The New York rapper and DJ discovered De La Soul’s three MCs when they were still teenagers, and it was his

’60s-sampling, variety-show production — paired with their offthe-cuff humor and tag-teaming flow — that turned 3 Feet High into a critical and commercial landmark. The LP reached No. 24 on the Billboard 200 chart and topped year-end lists from transatlantic publications The Village Voice and NME, who respectively called it “the Sgt. Pepper of hip-hop” and “one of the greatest albums ever made.” A more incisive comment came from Playboy writer Robert Christgau, who dubbed De La Soul the New Wave to Public Enemy’s punk. Indeed, it was the paisley group’s stark contrast to the burgeoning gangsta-rap movement that made it so revolutionary. Tommy Boy follow-ups De La Soul is Dead (1991), Buhloone Mindstate (1993) and Stakes is High (1996) were surpassed by Tribe’s jazzy leanings and harderedged scene leaders like Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Tupac Shakur and the Wu-Tang Clan, lending 3 Feet High the feel of a fading snapshot from a distinct moment in hiphop history. Read a preview about Alicia Keys at www.bestofneworleans.com.

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Ushered into contemporary R&B by the then-Sean “Puffy” Combs, Mary J. Blige’s intense, soulful vocals dominated ’90s R&B charts, from 1992’s What’s the 411? hit “Real Love,” to 1995’s “I’ll Be There for You/ You’re All I Need to Get By,” a duet with Method Man that propelled both the WuTang Clan alum and Blige to Grammy-winning status. Eight platinum albums, eight Grammys and a performance at Barack Obama’s inauguration later, Blige leans a little less on hip-hop and sample-heavy, rhymeready beats of her formative years with her latest album, 2009’s Stronger With Each Tear — this time, Blige gets her Led out. Her take on Led Zeppelin’s sweat-dripping “Whole Lotta Love” is pure disco-spinning pop, and “Stairway to Heaven” showcases Blige’s otherworldly pipes. In the studio for that cut? Blink 182’s Travis Barker and Steve Vai, the over-the-top guitar mad man. Is Blige jumping off the R&B bandwagon? Is she a hesher at heart? Earlier this year she told Spinner.com “You got to get lost in the rock ’n’ roll moment of it all, and once you get lost in the rock ’n’ roll moment of it, all you can do is scream to the top of your lungs or go as low as you need to go. It’s not a head thing — it’s a spirit thing.” Blige may have sold her soul to rock ’n’ roll, but the “queen of hip-hop soul” isn’t straying from her empire. On the club-ready, decidedly non-rock ’n’ roll “The One,” Blige sings “I ain’t saying that I am the best, but I’m the best.” — Alex Woodward

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Mary J. Blige 9:40 p.m., Sunday, July 4 Essence Music Festival, Main Stage


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ART AND ART SUPPLIES MOSS STREET GALLERY 331 Eliza St., 319-3730; www. mossstreetgallery.com Buy any print (unframed or framed) and receive a second unframed print free during the summer sale. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com In honor of its 30th anniversary, the gallery offers 30 percent off any custom mat until July 17. CASELL GALLERY 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www. casellartgallery.com In honor of 40 years in business, the gallery offers 40 percent off all Joachim Casell original pastels and 10 percent off everything else in the store. FORSTALL ART SUPPLY 3137 Calhoun St., 866-4278; www.forstallart.com Buy one Winsor & Newton canvas and get two free, plus paints and brushes are up to 50 percent off until Sept. 6. GALERIE SEVERN 3501 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8885361; www.galeriesevern.com Now through July 31, get 10 percent to 30 percent off selected in-stock original and giclee art and peruse a wide selection of canvas and paper. NATIONAL ART & HOBBY 5835 Magazine St., 899-4491 Save on canvas from July 1 through Aug. 31: Buy one canvas and get 30 percent off; buy two and get 40 percent off; buy three or more and get 50 percent off. Brushes are discounted 25 percent, and students and teachers receive a 15 percent discount on regularly priced items (valid ID required).

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org Books, postcards, T-shirts and art posters are on sale in the Ogden Museum’s store through July 31. POET’S CUSTOM FRAMING 3113 Magazine St., 899-4100 Mention this listing and receive 15 percent off custom framing through July 31.

BEAUTY/HEALTH/ WELLNESS: CURVES Citywide; www.curves.com Receive 50 percent off the signup fee through Labor Day. ESTHETIQUE FACIAL SPA 5702 Magazine St., 896-1006; www.efacialspa.com Treat your skin to a $35 microdermabrasion treatment from July 17 through Aug. 14. MANHATTAN ATHLETIC CLUB 4162 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey, 362-2200; www.manhattanathletic.com Get fit with a three-month membership for $149, or sign up for a two-year membership and receive the summer free. The offer is valid through Aug. 11. PIXIE COSMETICS AND SKINCARE 5715 Magazine St., 895-5571 Enjoy 50 percent off makeup lessons through Sept. 1, and find additional savings throughout the store. ST. CHARLES VISION Citywide; www.stcharlesvision.com St. Charles Vision offers free vision screenings at Whole Foods Market (Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119; www.wholefoodsmarket. com) from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Monday of each month (July 12, Aug. 9, Sept. 13, etc.).

SALON DU BEAU MONDE 612 Julia St., 568-0050; www. salonbeaumonde.com Book an appointment for a full head of highlights with Deshea or Mandi and receive a complimentary haircut from June 29 through Aug. 1. Use the code name “beach blonde” when making your appointment. SERENITY DAY SPA AND GIFTS 110 Metairie Heights Ave., Metairie, 281-4905; www. serenitydayspaandgifts.com Receive complimentary Eye Revive and Lip Buff treatments with every Serenity Power Peel Facial through Labor Day. SIMPLY FIT 701 Metairie Road, Metairie, 831-3009; www.simplyfitgym.com New members have access to special deals through Sept. 1. The six-month special offers a single membership for $225 (including initiation and card fees). The price applies to membership to the Metairie, Uptown or River Ridge locations. SINGER-BRINT CUSTOM VISION 4720 S. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-3155

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This handmade beaded cuff is on sale for $49 (originally $89) at LADY SOHO. Improve your vision with LASIK correction surgery at a reduced summer rate of $799 per eye. WOMEN & MEN’S NUTRITION & WEIGHT CONTROL 4436 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-6776; www.womensnutrition.net Get in shape with an 18-week membership for the price of 16 weeks or a 12-week membership for the price of 10 weeks, available through Aug. 31.

BEVOLO GAS AND ELECTRIC LIGHTS 318 Royal St., 522-9485; 521 Conti St., 522-9485; 68467 Hwy. 59, Mandeville, (985) 249-6040; www.bevolo.com Bevolo design consultants provide a complimentary lighting analysis of your home. Visit the Royal Street location for additional instore savings through July 31. NORDIC KITCHENS & BATHS INC. 4437 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-2300; www. nordickitchens.com Take advantage of Nordic’s luxury Energy Star packages. Specials such as volume discounts and instant rebates ranging from $1,000 to $2,500 are in effect all summer on Sub-Zero Wolf, Viking, Thermador, Miele and Bosch products. THE GREEN PROJECT 2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org Go green and get all your lumber for 20 percent off during July.

13 MONAGHAN 517 Frenchmen St., 942-1345; www.13monaghan.com Get pints of Guinness and Harp for $3.50 and frozen Irish coffee for $4.50. ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com Buy a special three-course lunch for $20.10 and get featured martinis for 25 cents Monday through Friday. ATTIKI BAR AND GRILL 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com Cool down with happy hour specials through August: two-for-one martinis on Mondays, two-for-one mojitos on Tuesdays and two-for-one margaritas on Wednesdays. Tuesdays and Thursday are service industry nights, featuring $2 domestic beers, $3 imports and $2 well drinks. BACCO 310 Chartres St., 522-2426; www.bacco.com Take advantage of the “Ciao Down at Sundown” menu and get three courses (including lobster ravioli, shrimp or chicken) for $25 when you dine between 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. any night through Aug. 31. BELLA BREW 2701 Airline Drive, Metairie, 846-9930 To celebrate its three-year anniversary, Bella Brew’s customers can get a free latte with the purchase of a latte of equal or greater value throughout July. CAFE DEGAS 3127 Esplanade Ave., 945-5635; www.cafedegas.com Clip the coupon in this section of Gambit and buy one entree or appetizer and get one of

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Best Buys & Bargains > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

BUILDING SUPPLIES/HOME SERVICES

DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

equal or lesser value free through July. CAFE PRYTANIA 3445 Prytania St., 891-5773 Drinks (excluding Grey Goose vodka) are $2 during happy hour from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday through Friday. COLUMBIA STREET TAP ROOM & GRILL 434 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8980899; www.columbiastreettaproom.com Pitchers of domestic beer are $5 through Labor Day. Enjoy Sampler Beer Night every Tuesday, 50-cent wings on Wednesdays and live music on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. CORNER OYSTER HOUSE 500 St. Peter St., 522-2999; www.corneroysterhouse.com Receive a free appetizer when you purchase two or more entrees from June 29 to Sept. 6 (excluding holidays). ELEVEN 79 RESTAURANT 1179 Annunciation St., 2991179; www.eleven79.com Catch the $20 lunch special Thursday through Friday, or drop in for the $30 dinner special Monday through Thursday. THE FIT GOURMET OF NEW ORLEANS 621-6788; www.fitgourmetneworleans.com Buy one meal and get 50 percent off a second meal July 5 through 8. HUCK FINN’S CAFE 135 Decatur St., 529-8600; www.huckfinnscafe.com Receive a free appetizer with the purchase of two entrees (dine-in only) from June 29 through Labor Day. KUPCAKE FACTORY 517 St. Louis St., 324-3325; 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave. Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com Get $3 off a dozen regular cupcakes when you bring in the coupon in this section of Gambit. LA PENICHE RESTAURANT 1940 Dauphine St., 943-1460 Brunch, dinner and latenight specials are offered daily with prices ranging from $7 to $13. MARTINIQUE BISTRO 5908 Magazine St., 8918495; www.martinique-

3


designer

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Best Buys & Bargains > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

7716 MAPLE STREET 504.304.6025 swapboutique.com

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4

bistro.com Order three appetizers and a glass of wine for $28 on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. NONNA MIA 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717; www.nonnamia.net Get pitchers of premium draft beers (Peroni and Abita) for $5 or 50 percent off any bottle of wine on Mondays and Tuesdays. PERE ANTOINE RESTAURANT 741 Royal St., 581-4478; www.pereantoine.com Receive a free appetizer with the purchase of two or more entrees from June 29 through Sept. 6 (except for holidays). RALPH’S ON THE PARK 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com Enjoy three appetizers and one glass of wine for $28 all night, every night through Aug. 31. RARE CUTS 1600 W. Causeway Approach, Mandeville, (985) 778-0800; 5860 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 309-8391; www.rarecuts.com Get 20 percent off your first purchase of restaurant-quality meat (limit one discount per household). RED FISH GRILL 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com Through Aug. 31, take advantage of the summer “Grilling and Chilling” menu, which offers a three-course dinner for $35. SAL’S SNO-BALL STAND 1823 Metairie Road, Metairie, 666-1823 Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Sal’s Sno-balls by purchasing one of 250 limited-edition etchings created by local artist Phillip Sage. The etchings are priced at $100 each. TANDOORI CHICKEN RESTAURANT 2916 Cleary Ave., Metairie, 889-7880

Visit SWAP BOUTIQUE and receive 20 percent to 70 percent off selected summer items, including this $35.99 floral blouse that converts to a skirt or dress.


Best BUYS & BARGAINS Buy one lunch or dinner buffet and get one for half price when you use a coupon, which you can get at the restaurant. THAT’S AMORE PIZZERIA 421 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie; 454-5885; www.thatsamorepizzeriaonline.com Enjoy a free order of fries with the purchase of a footlong po-boy. TWO TONY’S RESTAURANT 105 Hammond Hwy., Metairie, 831-0999; www.two-tonys.com From June 29 through Labor Day, savor a complimentary glass of house wine with each entree you purchase (dine-in only, limit four free glasses per table) from June 29 through Labor Day.

FASHION/ CLOTHING:

Summer SAVINGS

{

Get 10 percent off any HADAKI item, including this $120 mango-print duffel bag, when you order from the website (www.hadakishop.com) and enter the code “Summer Fun.” and sport coats. The slim suit is now $395, and shirts, shoes, ties and sportswear are 25 percent off SWAP BOUTIQUE 7716 Mark St., 304-6025; www.swapboutique.com Clothes, handbags, shoes, sunglasses and other selected items are 20 percent to 70 percent off. Clip the coupon in this section of Gambit and receive $10 off your next purchase through July. THREADS 360 3135 Metairie Road, 309-5487 Get 10 percent off your purchase of $60 or more when you mention this listing now through July 31. THRIFT CITY USA 601 Terry Pkwy., Gretna, 363-0006 Feeling thrifty? Head to the sale July 15, when all clothes and shoes will be half price. TRASHY DIVA 829 Chartres St., 581-4555; 2048 Magazine St., 299-8777; www.trashydiva.com Selected collections, shoes and boots are 50 percent off through August. TRUCK STOP 2209 Magazine St., 302-1895 To celebrate the store’s grand opening, Truck Stop has great deals on vintage and new Western wear, street wear, boots, kids’ and ladies’ wear. Most garments cost $12 to $20. YVONNE LAFLEUR 8141 Hampson St., 866-9666; www.yvonnelafleur.com Linen merchandise is 30 percent off, and cocktail, work and formal dresses are $99. Plus, peruse the $19 rack, $29 rack and $59 rack for discounted separates.

hot deals that cool off

your wallet

}

SUMMER SALE 50%-75% off selected items pet inspired t-shirts as low as $10

JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES BOWEN JEWELERS 2309 David Drive, Metairie, 835-1665; www.bowenjewelers.com Take 50 percent off in-stock floor clocks and receive free delivery and set up. During an open house trunk sale Aug. 7, guests can register to win a free grandfather clock. KATY BEH CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY 3708 Magazine St., 896-9600; www.katybeh.com During Katy Beh’s annual Thank You sale July 1-31, take 25 percent off in-stock jewelry. MIGNON FAGET Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 835-2244; 3801 Magazine St., 891-2005; The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 524-2973; www.mignonfaget.com From July 9-17, receive 50 percent off cleaning and repairs of Mignon Faget jewelry. SYMMETRY JEWELRY & DESIGNERS 8138 Hampson St., 861-9925; www.symmetryjewelers.com Selected pieces by gallery artists are on sale, including designs by in-house artist Tom Mathis. THE WATCH & CLOCK SHOP 824 Gravier St., 525-3961; www.worldoftime.com Seiko watches are 10 percent to 20 percent off.

SHOES BARRY’S CHILDREN’S SHOES 3300 Severn Ave., Metairie; 885-8882 Get 10 percent off regularly priced items during the School

Buy one entree or appetizer & get one of equal or lesser value FREE (Up to $15.00 Value) NOT GOOD WITH ANY OTHER OFFER / EXP. JULY 31,2010

15% off your purchase with this coupon.

1 per customer only. Excludes sale items. Not to be used with any other promotion or discount. Valid dates July 1st-July 31st.

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10 OFF

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Best Buys & Bargains > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

BASICS UNDERNEATH FINE LINGERIE 12 St. Ann Drive, Mandeville, (985) 727-9521; 5513 Magazine St., 894-1000 During the Fourth of July weekend sale, selected merchandise (including bras, pajamas, activewear and swimwear) will be 50 percent to 75 percent off. BELLA NOLA 4236 Magazine St., 897-9499; www.bellanola.net Help save the coast with some fashionable support: “Save Our Gulf” T-shirts are $20, and a portion of the proceeds benefits the St. Bernard Project and the National Wildlife Federation. BRANCH OUT: VINTAGE & SUSTAINABLE GOODS 2022 Magazine St., 371-5913; www.branchoutshop.com Selected men’s and women’s apparel is discounted up to 50 percent during the summer sale, which lasts until Aug. 1. BUFFALO EXCHANGE 3312 Magazine St., 891-7443; www.buffaloexchange.com Donate three cans of food and receive a $5 coupon to apply toward your next $20 purchase of used and vintage garments. Second Harvest Food Bank will distribute the food to families affected by the Gulf oil disaster. BUSTLES & BOWS BRIDAL BOUTIQUE 3230 Severn Ave., Metairie, 7807090; www.bustlesandbowsbridal.com Receive 30 percent to 80 percent off bridal attire during the summer Sample Sale Aug. 20-21. FAIRY 5715 Magazine St., 269-2033; www.fairynola.com Catch a fairy — or a deal on

summer merchandise — with sales of 20 percent to 50 percent off. FROCK CANDY 3112 Magazine St., 301-9864; www.frockcandy.com Selected clothing is up to 50 percent off. HICKORY CHICKS 1915 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 324-2454 Enjoy a glass of wine and 10 percent off your purchase g during happy hour shopping every Friday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Clip the coupon in this section of Gambit and receive 15 percent of your purchase of regularly priced items during July. HOUSE OF LOUNGE 2044 Magazine St., 616-6948; www.houseoflounge.com Throughout August, intimates are 25 percent to 50 percent off. ITALY DIRECT 709 Tchoupitoulas St., 566-4933 Receive up to 50 percent off designs from Versace, Armani, Canali and more. PIED NU 5521 Magazine St., 899-4118; www.piednuneworleans.com The summer sale beginning July 7 features 60 percent to 90 percent off. PERLIS CLOTHING 1281 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville, 674-1711; 6070 Magazine St., 895-8661; www.perlis.com Catch the summer sale through July 31 to receive 50 percent off summer clothing for men, women and boys, as well as lifetime alterations. PORTER STEVENS Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 834-3771; www.porterstevens.com A special selection of men’s tailored suits is on sale for $199 each, which includes free lifetime alterations. PRIMA DONNA’S CLOSET 927 Royal St., 875-4437; 1206 St. Charles Ave., 522-3327; 3213 17th St., Metairie, 835-1120; www.primadonnascloset.com Through Labor Day, receive 50 percent to 75 percent off select summer merchandise. RYE 714 Adams St., 572-9230 Receive 10 percent to 30 percent off selected items (including shoes and jewelry) through July 3. RUBENSTEINS 102 St. Charles Ave., 581-6666; www.rubensteinsneworleans.com During the Back to the Basics sale, enjoy savings of 25 percent to 40 percent on suits

5


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Best Buys & Bargains > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

Attiki

Volume discounts and hefty instant rebates (ranging from $1,000 to $2,500) at NORDIC KITCHENS AND BATHS, INC. make dream appliances a practical luxury. Uniform Shoe Special, which is available through Sept. 30. IMELDA’S FINE SHOES 501 Metairie Road, Metairie, 849-9089 Selected shoes, clothing and accessories are 25 percent off. PERFECT FIT SHOES 5012 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie; 456-5993 All items in the store will be 25 percent to 50 percent off during the semiannual sale from July 15 through Aug. 31. SHOE-NAMI 3102 Magazine St., 8951717; 3319 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-0805; 15 Westbank Expressway, Gretna, 366-0177 The Magazine Street and Severn Avenue stores feature selected shoes for up to 50 percent off. At the outlet store in Gretna, all merchandise is $19.99 or less. SNEAKER SHOP INC. 904 Harrison Ave., 488-9919 Get 20 percent off any pair of shoes in the store through Sept. 29.

GIFTS & HOME FURNISHINGS/ ACCESSORIES ABC TILE DISTRIBUTORS INC. 3105 18th St., Metairie, 833-

5543; www.abctile.com Get a free project and design implementation, as well as a free product knowledge consultation all summer long. ACCESSORIES IN BRASS 4537 Magazine St., 8996237; www.accessoriesinbrass.com Bring in this listing and receive a 10 percent discount on anything except pipe. BARTO APPLIANCE 1400 Airline Drive, Metairie, 831-2734; www.bartoappliances.com Get discounts of $100 to $880 on Frederick air conditioners. All Samsung French door refrigerators also are on sale, starting at $899 and up. BOKAEI RUG GALLERY 2727 N. Causeway Blvd., Metairie, 846-8098; www.bokaeirugs.com Receive up to 50 percent off items during the anniversary sale through July 31 and 20 percent off professional rug cleaning and repairs. BRITISH ANTIQUES 5415 Magazine St., 895-3716 Receive 50 percent off everything in the store (excluding picture frames) through Labor Day. BUSH ANTIQUES 2109 Magazine St., 5813518; www.bushantiques.com

Everything on the second floor is on sale, with discounts up to 75 percent, beginning July 1. CAMERON JONES FOR YOUR HOME 2127 Magazine St., 524-3119 Take advantage of one-ofa kind specials and savings on selected furnishings. DECORATING DEN INTERIORS 3905 Wanda Lynn Drive, Metairie, 324-6499; www. decoratingden.com Get 25 percent off all silk and faux silk panels through July 31. ELITE HOME PRODUCTS 5630 Salmen St., Harahan, 495-2125; www.elitehomeproducts.com Receive $100 off a $500 purchase through July 20. ESTELLA’S HOME 601 Frisco Ave., Metairie, 833-8979 Receive up to 50 percent off selected items, including lamps, crystal serving items, linens, candles and clocks July 19 through 24. GENTRY 6047 Magazine St., 899-4223 Receive 15 percent off all shoes during July. HADAKI BY KALENCOM (800) 344-6699; www. hadakishop.com Take 10 percent off your entire online order through Labor Day when you enter the coupon code “Summer Fun.” HANS LUETKEMEIER & SON INC. 3246 Severn Ave., Metairie, 454-1170; www.hlas.com The Spectacular Storewide


HELPING NEW ORLEANS ONE STEP AT A TIME!

during July. WILKERSON ROW CYPRESS WORKS 3023 Chartres St., 208-7998 During the summer clearance sale through July 3, score up to 60 percent off retail prices on tables, armoires, bookcases, beds and more.

PETS CANINE CULTURE 4920 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-4143; www.canineculturenola.com Clip the coupon in this section of Gambit and receive 50 percent to 75 percent off selected items. Pet-inspired T-shirts are as low as $10. DOSKEY MOBILE VETERINARY CARE 812-5986; www.doskeymobilevetcare.com After the first exam at regular price, customers receive $10 off each additional exam during the same visit through Sept. 1.

SERVICES & MORE AKS GEM SHOW 4532 Kawanee Ave., Metairie, 455-6101; www.aksshow.com Get $1 off admission into the Gem, Jewelry and Bead Show at the Pontchartrain Center July 16-18. BIG EASY SCOOTERS 3926 Magazine St., 2696465; www.bigeasyscooters.com Take 10 percent off selected 50-cc to 150-cc scooters through Sept. 4. Get 20 percent off scooter rentals when you mention the coupon code “Gambit.” FEDERICO’S FAMILY FLORIST 815 Focis St., Metairie, 837-6400 For that special someone, pick up a dozen roses for only $6.50. The offer is only valid for cash and carry orders.

HOTEL MONTELEONE 214 Royal Street, (800) 535-9595; www.hotelmonteleone.com Stay at the luxurious Hotel Monteleone for $99 weekdays and $109 weekends (based on availability) from June 29 through Sept. 2. LIBERTO’S CLEANERS 4814 Prytania St., 897-2161 Through July 31, bring in two or more suits to be cleaned and pressed and receive $3 off each suit.

MIKE THE BIKE GUY 4411 Magazine St., 899-1344 Receive $10 off when you mention this listing during the summer tune-up special through July 31.

NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball.com Take advantage of the Family Four Pack this season and receive four tickets, four programs, four hot dogs and four soft drinks for only $44 .

RENT-A-NERD INC. 103 Focis St., Metairie, 4546373; www.454nerd.com New customers receive 20 percent off the labor charge for their first service call when they mention this promotion.

STUDIO504 PHOTOGRAPHY 127 Jefferson Heights Ave., Metairie, 382-8128; www.studio504photo.com The Beat the Summer Heat Studio Portrait Session includes an in-studio portrait session and 11-by-14 print for $75. Mention this listing to receive the offer for studio sessions through July 31.

At GENTRY, these sandals by comfort brand Naot will set you back only $104.55 (originally $123) after a 15 percent discount applicable to every shoe in the store through July.

GARDEN DISTRICT PODIATRY

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Cafe DiBlasi Week Night WINE Down

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Best Buys & Bargains > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

Sale features 20 percent off the entire stock of antiques, estate jewelry, sterling silver, silver gifts, pewter and jewelry through Sept. 1. HAZELNUT 5515 Magazine St., 8912424; www.hazelnutneworleans.com Receive 30 percent off custom bedding, shower curtains and fabric in Hazelnut’s exclusive Pontchartrain Beach pattern through Labor Day. Working with Second Harvest Food Bank, a portion of proceeds will benefit families whose livelihoods have been affected by the Gulf oil disaster. INTERIORS & EXTRAS 324 Metairie Road, Metairie, 835-9902 Get 20 percent to 50 percent off selected art through July 1. From July 1-15, selected rugs are discounted 20 percent to 50 percent. THE JUNQUE SHOP 421 Frenchmen St., 453-2199 Receive 50 percent off everything, excluding consignment deals. KATHY SLATER INTERIORS AND ANTIQUES 3954 Magazine St., 400-9032; www.kathyslater.com Receive 15 percent off selected custom coffee tables through August. MIRE ANTIQUES 2050 Magazine St., 568-4944; www.mireantiques.com The store is closing and everything must go. Drastic price reductions for furniture, lamps and oil paintings are in effect until July 24 . NEW ORLEANS FINE RUGSS 6117 Magazine St., 8991595; www.neworleansfinerugs.com Get 10 percent off every rug, plus a free customcut pad. OOPS DECOR 6; 1119 Josephine St., 528-2216; www.oopsdecor.com Clip the coupon in this section of Gambit and receive 20 percent off anyy one item in the designer home consignment store through Aug. 31. PARADISE CAFE 3717 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-4141 All garden flags and poles are 20 percent off

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7


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Friday, July 2

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9:30 pm

9:30 pm

Special Summer

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Thursday Night

Lobster Night $25 Fresh Maine Lobster w/Salad & Side

Best Martini in Town Dinner Served Nightly • 7 Days A Week


noah

BONAPARTE PAIS

ON THE RECORD

CD Reviews ROUGH SEVEN Give Up Your Dreams (Self-released)

n-again, off-again Dumpster juicers Morning 40 Federation, like many New Orleans musical acts, aren’t just better when experienced live; to be fully appreciated, the Bywater brownbaggers almost have to be witnessed, missing something essential (or a couple of things, likely sweat and alcohol) when reduced to record. Former co-frontman Ryan Scully does not suffer this fate. “A lot of bands have made some pretty candy-ass records here that don’t sound anything like they do live,” the singer/guitarist once told OffBeat, but capturing the feeling of a performance on wax only works when the songs cooperate. His Rough Seven has gigged since 2008, sharpening its show by incorporating some of the best players in the city: guitarist Rob Cambre, keyboardist Ratty Scurvics, singers Meschiya Lake and Erika Lewis. Debut Give Up Your Dreams holds up not because it sounds like a Rough Seven concert, exactly — Scully’s compositions are just more fully realized now, standing out less on shtick than on craft. They also fit this band like a koozie, Scurvics’ barroom piano making the balladic “St. Anthony” into an ideal sunrise drinking song and Cambre’s Hendrixian axe cutting through the blues of “Had a Home” like so much split firewood. In the end, it’s Lake and Lewis who add the most to the platter, countering Scully’s gruff Westerberg grunts with sky-high gospel cries that continually recall Merry Clayton’s vocal work on the Rolling Stones’ “Gimme Shelter.” That kind of interplay is a subtle touch, but it’s enough to turn fun tunes into fine tracks.

O

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THE HAPPY TALK BAND Starve a Fever (PFAM)

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

uke Allen kicks off the Happy Talk Band’s latest album with a minimalist Spoon groove, a slinking, contracting and expanding three-chord organ figure accompanied only by syncopated handclaps and Allen’s tangled, storytelling croon. For those who have become accustomed to the Happy Talk’s brand of well-honed country rock, which typically switches between two gears, buzz saw and tear-in-your-beer, it may take a few more bars before the band comes into focus. The A-side of Starve a Fever is laden with such surprises, some of which work better than others. On the nursery-rhyming “Muggers Waltz,” a humorous and humanizing ode to criminals set to orchestral strings (“Muggers need money too / There’s bills to be paid and their babies need shoes”), Allen sounds like Tom Petty covering Andrew Bird. But preceding cut “Not Accidental” misses its mark both musically and lyrically — the conventionally arranged, midtempo spooker delving into Zachary Bowen’s gruesome 2006 murder of girlfriend Addie Hall via uncomfortably bland lines like “Up above the voodoo shop / He’s made you something in a pot.” The album hits its stride on the back half, where the band settles into a more familiar, inspired rhythm. The toe-tapping intimacy of “All Played Out” makes like M. Ward jamming at the Circle Bar, and spare piano piece “Dr. Ike’s Lament” unfurls in slow motion, paying poetic homage to Ponderosa Stomp founder Ira Padnos’ other job (“The anesthesiologist, he seldom smiles, he barely blinks / He’s counting pills, he’s counting sheep / He counts on gravity to let him sleep”). They’re a buildup to “Answer Me,” an ivory-tinkling, ironically affecting death row F-off stuffed with delicious details. “Hey warden, could you cook me my last meal,” Allen sings, “in a bloody apron and a pair of stiletto heels?” That meal? “Two eggs over easy, a steak and a loaf of bread / Just Bunny Bread.”

29


ARE YOU A

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CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND

TUE

MICHAEL PELLERA QUART. w/ Jeremy Marx DELFEAYO MARSALIS & Uptown Jazz Orchestra PHIL DEGRUY & CLOUD SHARP NINE ELLIS MARSALIS TRIO DONALD HARRISON QUARTET SKYCHILD w/ Jamelle Williams & Allan Dejan

-"7/ -\ nĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;*

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â&#x20AC;˘4â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

hot + sake = DATE! SUSHI

4920 prytania st â&#x20AC;˘ 891-3644 www.kyotonola.com â&#x20AC;˘ closed sundays

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 29 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Izzy & the Kesstronics, 9 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeff Albert Quartet, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Barret, 6:30; Mumbles, 9:30 CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Glen David Andrews, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anders Osborne, John Fohl & Johnny Sansone, 8 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Paines, 6; Au Ras Au Ras, Pepi Ginsberg, 10 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Hook, 9:30 GENNAROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dirty Bourbon River Show, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Marsalis, 8 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Truman Holland, 5; Joe Bennett, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Three Piece Spicy; Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny T, 8 OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; West Bank Mike, 6:30 OZ NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Freedia, Katey Red, DJ Rusty Lazer, 11 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brother Tyrone & the Mindbenders, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michael Pellera Quartet feat. Jeremy Marx, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jerry Jumonville, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Canaille, 7 & 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Plan B, 5; Cruz Missiles, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Wednesday 30 61 BLUES HIGHWAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Blues Highway Jam feat. Lefty Keith, 8 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bionica, 10; John Lisi & the Delta Funk, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury & Friends, 10 BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

Pretty Dirty PHOTO BY RYAN COLLERD

During the past decade, Tess Brunet has kept time for Houma blues-rocker Dax Riggs (as Deadboy and the Elephantmen) and New Orleans pop breakouts Generationals, with whom she currently plays. For Au Ras Au Ras, a newborn group that debuted June 18 at the Saturn Bar, the diminutive drummer is stepping out from behind the kit to a less familiar position: manning a synthesizer and singing lead vocals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve only been playing keyboard for a month,â&#x20AC;? she admits, deadpanning with a self-deprecating laugh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really simplistic.â&#x20AC;? Fans of Brunetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other bands have been treated to the equivalent of a live musical birth, as this third Au Ras gig â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the second in as many weeks at the Circle Bar, both with Park the Van labelmate and gal pal Pepi Ginsberg (pictured), visiting from Brooklyn â&#x20AC;&#x201D; doubles as the trioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10th practice. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come expecting the swampy howls of Deadboy or the sugarcane hooks of Generationals, she warns. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pop songs, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dirty pop songs. Dirty and pretty at the same time.â&#x20AC;? Free admission. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noah Bonaparte Pais

JUN

29

AU RAS AU RAS WITH PEPI GINSBERG 10 p.m. Tuesday Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10; Gravity A, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 7; Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30 CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; World Jazz Project, 9:30 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme Brass Band, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Iguanas, 8 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Non, WATIV, I, Octopus, 10 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Paines, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DECKBAR & GRILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7:30; John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8; Dr. Porkchop Blues Band, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Royen, 9:30 GENNAROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funagles, 8 HERMES BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Rankin Trio, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ratty Scurvics, 7 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Booty Trove Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Irvin MayďŹ eldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NOJO Jam, 8 KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chip Wilson, 9 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Little Freddie King, 10 MOJO STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 OLD FIREMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lars

Edegran, Topsy Chapman, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jenn Howard, 8 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Damien Louvier; Jason Bishop & the Garlic Truck Band, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Plan B, 5; Late As Usual, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; By and By, 8

Thursday 1 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Jordanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Neighborhood Improvement Association, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron Hotstream, 9 BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Beach House AllStars, 8 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Jam, 8 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Low-Stress Quintet, 7; Big Pearl, 10 CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Autin, 9 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam and Boone, 6; Natalie Palms, Jamesons, Hannah Kreiger-Benson, 10 DAVENPORT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeremy Davenport, 5:30

HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vivian Green, 9 HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF NORTHSHORE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Black Magnolia, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Roman Skakun, 5; Johnaye Kendrick, 8 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 MAISON 508 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Red Dog CD release (penthouse), 8; Abney Effect, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Trio, 10 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Laughlin, Crescent City Joymakers, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Geno Delafose, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Phil Degruy & Cloud Sharp Nine, 8 & 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hardly Play Boys, 7 & 9 VAUGHANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kermit RufďŹ ns & Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wazozo, 8

Friday 2 61 BLUES HIGHWAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jack Yoder & Liâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;l G Delta Blues, 8 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Earphunk, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crystal Rivers, 10 BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 7; Mark Pentone & Smoky Greenwell Trio, 9; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; Medianoche International, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lee Greenwood, 9:30 CARROLLTON STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tanglers Bluegrass Band, 9:30 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lovehog, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Festival Weekend Takeover feat. DJ Kid Capri, Lance Gross, Chrisette Michele and others, 10 LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Worrell, 7; J. Monqueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d Blues Band, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dwight Breland, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 LOUISIANA SUPERDOME â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Essence Music Festival, 7 MAISON 508 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Some Like it Hot!, 7:30; Salva MC Epcot, Eprom Nasty Nasty (penthouse), 10; Izzy & the Kesstronics, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ensemble Fatien feat. Seguenon Kone, 11 NOWE MIASTO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Moloch, Thou OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marc Stone Band, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clive Wilson & Gerald Adams, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bucktown AllStars, 9:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ellis Marsalis Trio, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson; Jumbo Shrimp, 6; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9:30 ST. ROCH TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Way, 9 TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

31


N UE VE ZZ

JA NEW

O RLE AN S

PR

EM

IE

R

Celebrate 4th of JULY

at the

PLayHOUSE

TOP 10 BARS

FRiDaY Leon

“Kid Chocolate”

Brown

SaTURDaY Shannon Powell

JULY 2010

Saturday 3, 17, 24

JOHNAYE KENDRICK

Sunday 4

Thursday 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 Friday 2, 9, 16, 23, 30

LEON “KID CHOCOLATE” BROWN Saturday 3, 17

SHANNON POWELL Saturday 10

GLEN DAVID ANDREWS Saturday 24, 31

SHAMARR ALLEN

SHANNON POWELL GLEN DAVID ANDREWS Sunday 11

ED “SWEETBREAD” PETERSEN Sunday 18

DEREK DOUGET Sunday 25

DON VAPPIE

SUNDaY Glen David Andrews Monday 5, 12, 19, 26 BOB FRENCH and the

ORIGINAL TUXEDO JAZZ BAND Tuesday 6

DON VAPPIE

READERS’ CHOICE AWARDS Go to bestofneworleans.com to vote for your favorite New Orleans bar & see how your pick stacks up against our editors.

Tuesday 13

AARON FLETCHER

Winners will be revealed in Gambit's 2010

Tuesday 20

JASON MARSALIS Tuesday 27 ED “SWEETBREAD” PETERSEN

irvinmayfield.com IMJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

Top 50 Bars of New Orleans

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

JULY 6TH ISSUE

32

presented by

ABSOLUT VODKA To advertise in the Top 50 Bars Issue, call

Sandy at (504) 483-3150 DEADLINE: JUNE 25


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10 TOOLOULAS — V-Street, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; Danny T & the Blue Crawfish Band, 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Captain Leo, 1; Mark Barrett, 5; Debbie & the Deacons, 9 VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5

Saturday 3

Sunday 4 61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Blues Highway Jam, 5 BANKS STREET BAR — Hat Talk, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — SoulSect, 7 BMC — New Orleans Music Series, 1; Richard Crespo, 5:30; Gal Holiday, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Lost Grips, 10 FINNEGAN’S EASY — Laissez Faire, 2 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Mason’s VIP Revisited feat. Germaine Bazzle & guests, 7 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Lacy Blackledge, 9 LOUISIANA SUPERDOME — Essence Music Festival, 7 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9 MAISON 508 — St. Claude Serenaders, 4; Larry Scala & the Rhythm Jesters, 7 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Adam Crochet Trio, 3; Michael Liuzza, 10 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30 ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Skychild feat. Jamelle Williams & Allan Dejan, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m. TIPITINA’S — Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 WHISKEY DIX — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 7

Monday 5 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR —

FunkTime, 10 BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9 GREEN ROOM — Alexis Marceaux, 10; Generation Way, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9 MAISON 508 — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; Musicians Open Jam feat. Soul Project, 10 OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Rooney, Young Veins, Black Gold, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — T’Canaille, 5 & 9 TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Joe Bennett, 5; Butch Fields Band, 9 TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Damien Louvier, 1; Big Feets, 5; Rhythm & Rain, 9

classical/ concerts 3 NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — 945 Magazine

St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Sun: Music at the Museum presents Jefferson Symphony Chorus, noon; Sun: Sunday Swing feat. Joe Krown, 3

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — 916 N.

Peters St., 589-4841; www. nps.gov/jazz/index.htm — Wed: Lawrence Cotton, noon

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Thu: Twilight Garden Concert Series presents Albinas Prizgintas & the Yellow Dog Prophet Choir, 6 ST. ANNA’S EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1313 Esplanade Ave., 9472121 — Wed: Doc Otis & the Junker Jazz All-Stars, 7:30 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Wed: Victory Belles, 1 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Albinas Prizgintas, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

61 BLUES HIGHWAY — Soul Blues Players, 8 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7 BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 8 BANKS STREET BAR — Dirty Bourbon River Show CD release feat. Debauche, 10 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Rites of Passage, 8 BAYOU PARK BAR — Marc Stone, 10 BLUE NILE — St. Louis Slim Trio, 7; Dappa (upstairs), 9; Legally Blind, 11 BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Vivid, 9:30; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 9:30 CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 CARROLLTON STATION — Jimmy Robinson & Cranston Clements, 9:30 CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6; Spickle, Hostile Apostle, 10 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wilson & Moore, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Truth Universal presents Grassroots (downstairs), 10:30 HERMES BAR — Glen David Andrews, 9:30 & 11 HI-HO LOUNGE — Sluts, Die Rotzz, OLD, Superdestroyers, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES — Celebrity Day feat. Idris Elba, Ryan Cameron, DJ Biz Markie, 1 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Shannon Powell, 8 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — LC Smoove, 11 LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Jason Bishop, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9 LOUISIANA SUPERDOME — Essence Music Festival, 7 MAISON 508 — Loose Marbles, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — John Lisi & the Delta Funk, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Pete Fountain’s 80th Birthday Party feat. Tim Laughlin & Connie Jones, 3; Anders Osborne, 9:30 RUSTY NAIL — Country Fried, 10

THE SAINT — DJ Musa’s July 4th Welcome Back Bonanza, 11 SATURN BAR — Music Hates You, A Hanging, Omean, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Donald Harrison Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Palmetto Bug Stompers, 10 TIPITINA’S — Shamarr Allen’s B-day Bash feat. Irvin Mayfield, Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER — Seated, Kamana, 7:30

MUSIC

33


“THE BEST ‘TWILIGHT’ MOVIE SO FAR!” –– ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY WEEKLY

“ THE PERFECT SUMMER

MOVIE ! ” Bill Zwecker, FOX-TV

“�����. EXHILARATING!” –– Shawn Shawn Edwards, Edwards, FOX-TV FOX-TV

“ONE OF THE SUMMER’S BEST FILMS.” –– Jake Jake Hamilton, Hamilton, FOX-TV FOX-TV

“EPIC! MORE ACTION, MORE ROMANCE, MORE SUSPENSE.” –– Maria Maria Salas, Salas, TERRA TERRA TV TV

WRITTEN BY

ADAM SANDLER & FRED WOLF DIRECTEDBY DENNIS DUGAN

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

4.729" X 5.333" (1/4 PG SQ) TUE 7/29 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY

34

SUMMITENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS “THETWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE” A TEMPLEHILL PRODUCTION INASSOCIATIONWITH MAVERICK/IMPRINT AND SUNSWEPTENTERTAINMENT MUSIC KRISTENSTEWART ROBERTPATTINSON TAYLORLAUTNER BRYCEDALLASHOWARD BILLYBURKE AND DAKOTAFANNING BY HOWARDSHORE PRODUCED BASED ON EXECUTIVE BY WYCKGODFREY KARENROSENFELT THE NOVEL “ECLIPSE” BY STEPHENIEMEYER PRODUCERS MARTYBOWEN GREGMOORADIAN MARKMORGAN GUYOSEARY SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY DAVIDSLADE BY MELISSAROSENBERG www.eclipsethemovie.com

IN THEATERS AND MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes, Text Message ECLIPSE and Your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)

STARTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT TICKETS ACCEPTED

COME VISIT US OR CHECK OUT OUR MENU AT

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4024 CANAL ST. 302-1133

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filM

liSTiNgS

A room with A ViEw

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Air nations.

review if She only had a heart

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Now ShowiNg THE A-TEAM (PG-13) — Liam Neeson

stars in an adaption of the 1980s TV show. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

CITY ISLAND (PG-13) — A prison guard takes his long-lost son home to his family. Canal Place GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) — A

record company intern (Jonah Hill) must get an oversexed British rock star (Russell Brand) to L.A.’s Greek Theatre. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R) — The film follows a computer

hacker drawn into a murder mystery by an embattled journalist. Canal Place

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) — Robert

Downey Jr. stars as the Marvel Comics character in the sequel to the 2008 blockbuster. Grand, Hollywood 9 JONAH HEX (PG-13) — The life of a haunted bounty hunter changes when the U.S. military makes him an offer he can’t refuse. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE KARATE KID (PG) — A 12 year old

KILLERS (PG-13) — A woman

(Katherine Heigl) meets the man of her dreams (Ashton Kutcher), only to find out he’s an international assassin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) — See

plot of Killers. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MOTHER AND CHILD (R) — Three woman who have never met are profoundly affected by adoption. AMC Palace 20 PLEASE GIVE (R) — A woman feels

guilty for buying furniture at estate sales and marking them up at her store. Canal Place

ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) — The film uncovers the origins of the herooutlaw, from his stint as an archer to his exile in Sherwood Forest. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) — The

winner of the 2009 Best Foreign Film Oscar follows a retired police detective who decides to write a novel, but then becomes the central character of a dangerous drama. Canal Place

Fritz Lang’s landmark film Metropolis (1927) became an art house classic, either because or in spite of its cryptic futurism and melodramatic treatment of class struggle. The most expensive silent film ever made at the time of its release, it was a two-and-a-half hour extravaganza. After its debut in Berlin, it was cut by as much as an hour and screened in a couple of shorter versions. A close-to-original restoration recently was made possible by footage recovered in Argentina. The full story in Metropolis is easy to follow and more operatic than science fictional, combining social consciousness, religious redemption, love, lust and mistaken identity. Metropolis is a grand city in which a class of owners and managers lives above ground amid architectural grandeur, and laboring classes live and toil below. Joh Fredersen is its industrialist mastermind. His son Freder enjoys great privilege, but he spies Maria, a woman from below, and follows her, witnessing the crushing working conditions there. It turns out Maria counsels the workers at secret meetings, telling them a mediator figure (“heart”) will appear and reconcile the “head” (owners of the city) and the “hands” (workers). Freder falls for her, but his father believes she is instigating rebellion. Fredersen turns to a crazed inventor, Rotwang, who is building a “machine-man.” He wants the bizarre genius to make the robot look like Maria and then use the machine to destroy the uprising. Personal rivalries and ulterior motives emerge when Rotwang tests his evil mechanical Maria in the decadent red-light district Yoshiwara, where she seduces the sons of the wealthy before he sends her below to ignite the workers’ rage. The story becomes a straightforward thriller (with the occasional comic earnestness of silent film acting) as robotic Maria incites the workers to destructive fury. Soon, both Marias are running through the city streets, and neither the angry mobs nor the bourgeois revelers know which one they are chasing. Metropolis’ future depends on whose passions will prevail. The story does everything from echoing Frankenstein to presaging Blade Runner. Not surprisingly, Lang eventually moved to Hollywood and contributed to the development of film noir. Tickets $8 general admission, $7 students/seniors, $6 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

JUL

5-7

MeTropoliS 7 :30 p.m. Mon.-Wednesday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

ANIMAL CRACKERS (NR) — Mayhem

ensues when a valuable painting goes missing during a party in this Marx brothers film. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

ART OF THE STEAL (NR) — The documentary chronicles the struggle for control of a private art collection. Tickets $8 general admission, $6 New Orleans Film Society and CAC members. 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org THE COMPLETE METROPOLIS (NR) —

The newest version of the silent film contains recently discovered and restoredfootage. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Monday and July 6-7, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

GLOBAL LENS COMMUNITY FILM INITIATIVE — The school screens

international films. 5 p.m. & 7 p.m. nightly through June 30, NOCCA|Riverfront Lupin Hall, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com

THE LOST FILMS OF CHARLES LUDLAM (NR) — The center screens The

Sorrows of Dolores and Museum of Wax. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 members. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD: REANIMATED (NR) — Artists of vari-

ous mediums pay tribute to scenes of the cult classic. . Tickets $5, free with admission to Zombie Town. 10 p.m. Saturday, Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

STONEWALL UPRISING (NR) — The

film depicts the events and social climate surrounding the 1969 police raid of the Greenwich Village gay bar. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

VIEUX CARRE MATINEES — The SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) — Carrie,

Charlotte, Miranda and Samantha leave the Big Apple for an Abu Dhabi adventure. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) — The

titular ogre makes a deal with Rumplestiltskin to get his old life back. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SPLICE (R) — The human hybrid

creation of a pair of rogue genetic engineers quickly becomes their worst nightmare. AMC Palace 20

TOY STORY 3 (G) — Woody, Buzz et

al return to the big screen when

Andy prepares to go to college. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

opeNiNg wedNeSday THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG13) — Bella continues to be torn

between choosing the vampire or the werewolf.

opeNiNg ThUrSday THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) — In M.

Night Shyamalan’s film, the Fire nation launches a centuries-long war against the Earth, Water and

Historic N. O. Collection screens short films on Louisiana. Free admission. 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. TuesdaySaturday, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 4299090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 4687231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

who moves to China with his family seeks the mentorship of a kung fu master after becoming the target of bullying. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Special ScreeNiNgS

35


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

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listings

WHaT yoU see is WHaT yoU geT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

Opening NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Glisten

With Glass, Print and Metal,” works by Michelle Knox, David Lindsley, Melissa Clark and Carrie Quandt, through July. Opening Saturday.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Works on Paper,”

works by Stephanie Hierholzer and Amanda Sibley, through July. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday.

galleries 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery.blogspot. com — “James Booker: An Intimate Portrait,” photographs by Jim Scheurich, through Wednesday. A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www. agallery.com — “Rock and Roll,” photographs by Lynn Goldsmith, through Monday. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery. org — “Junkfish Caviar,” a multi-me-

dia installation by Susan Gisleson, through Monday.

AORTA PROJECTS. Poland Avenue and North Miro Street; www.aortaprojects.blogspot.com — “Blue Fence,” installation by Jennifer Odem, through December. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition of gal-

lery artists, through July.

Completed Before the BP Oil Spill,” a group exhibition of gallery artists, through July 17.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery. com — “Hurricanes, Hand Gren-

ades and Other Delightful Things,” oil on canvas by Scott Guion, through July 17.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “For

a Canvas of Skin,” tattoo sketches on paper by local tattoo artists, through July 6.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective. com — “Images from the End of the

Earth,” photographs of Grand Isle by Zack Smith.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “30

Year Anniversary Exhibition,” works by David Goodman, John Oles, Christina Goodman and Jere Allen, through July.

tion featuring more than 12 artists, through July.

review past perfected Sometimes they don’t come back. Some folks moved to middle America after Katrina, fit right in, and stayed there. But what about the hard-core New Orleanians who somehow ended up in extended exile? Folks like post-K Nashville resident Scott Guion, whose striking new paintings are so NOLA-centric they feature vintage local icons like Mr. Bingle and Morgus the Magnificent, relics of a memory bank littered with lost Carnival throws and Lucky Dog wagons. Heck Freezes Over alludes to the recent Saints Super Bowl win, but it’s rendered in ’70s-style imagery, including the Superdome as a boiling kettle of crawfish and Buddy D as an angel in a dress. The Temptation of St. Ant’ny depicts 1950s-1960s stripper Blaze Starr pounding a bongo in her leopard-skin print bikini atop a giant, levitating plate of beignets, all rendered in the lurid tones of expired Kodachrome. Winged Jax and Falstaff beer cans, and a streetcar topped by the Hubig’s pie man, swarm like termites in the sky, all of which poses a frightening warning to the locals: Stay away too long and the fates will relentlessly torment your brain with no end of insidious local kitsch. Beware! More vintage beer and flashbacks appear in Junkfish Caviar, Susan Gisleson’s poetic evocation of her pre-adolescent sexual awakening in the 1970s, an event provoked by her brother’s Playboy magazines and beery reveries. All that, plus the experiences of her five sisters and the pop icons of the period, inspired her symbolic mannequin sculptures, archetypal figures in garments made from found objects, thorns, mirror shards, oyster shells and the like. The walls are covered with cutouts of curvy, busty babes incised from ’70s-style interior paneling, reflecting the stereotypes women have to work with and around. In Gisleson’s world, the value of experiences, like found objects, depends on what you’re able to do with them. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU JUL

17 THRU JUL

04

Hurricanes, Handgrenades and OtHer deligHts: new paintings by scOtt guiOn Barrister’s Gallery, 2331 St. Claude Ave, 710-2506; www.barristersgallery.com JunKFisH caViar: a piece OF wOrK by susan gislesOn Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St, 250-7975; www.press-street.com

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — “About Face,” paintings by

Andrew Bucci from 1950 to 1962, through Wednesday.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Dew

Point,” a group show featuring 12 artists, through July 24.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 —

Annual group exhibition featuring sculptures, paintings and mixedmedia works by gallery artists, through Aug. 3. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink,” a print-

making invitational featuring 31 regional and national printmakers, through July 17.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “The Achilles

Cycle,” works by Clay Blancett in response to the film God’s Architects; works by Wendy Babcox and April Childers; both through Saturday.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com — “Brothers in Arts,” contem-

porary oils on canvas by Quincy Verdun and Leon Verdun, through Wednesday.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Transfer,” prints by Teresa Cole, through July 22. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “Trea-

sures of the Gulf,” a group exhibi-

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Gorgamon,” works by The Joanna, an ongoing collaborative project, through Saturday. GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,”

works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GRIS GRIS LAB. 2245 Brainard St., 872-0577; www.grisgrislab.com —

“L’Espirit d’Haiti,” photographs by Christopher L. Mitchell, through July 9. HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Field Recordings,” videos by Courtney Egan, through Monday. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “Let’s Go to the

Park,” a group exhibition featuring paintings in oil and acrylic by local artists, through Wednesday.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “reconsidered,”

new paintings by Stephen Hoskins, through July 28.

JUPITER ARTPROJECTS. 1901 Royal St., 281-4230; www.jupiterartprojects. com — “Can’t Knock Tha Hustle,” works in response to Nigerian scam artists by Terrence Sanders, through July 15. LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 5225988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com —

“Growing Pains,” a group exhibition curated by Christy Wood; “Our Gulf Coast,” a group exhibition featuring works inspired by the Gulf Coast; both through July 24.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “Festival Players,”

photographs by Randy Sanders; “Loteria Mosaico,” Venetian glass mosaics by Randy Sanders; “Makin’ Music,” giclee prints by Sarah Stiehl; all through Wednesday. NEW ORLEANS ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111; www.noafa.com — Student art

exhibition, through July 24.

OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 —

“Random Order,” mixed media by James Henderson; “Deep Horizon,” new works with acrylic and latex house paint by Pat Macaluso; both through Wednesday.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “The Colors of Summer,” a group show of gallery and invited artists featuring mixedmedia paintings, drawings and photographs, through July. SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out

of the Blue,” a group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3. SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery.com — “Long Story Short,” mixed-media works on canvas and paper by Karen Laborde, through Wednesday. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132,

catering combo Special Sandwich Platter, House Salad + Assorted Dessert Platter — $11.85 per person —

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M-F 7am-2pm • Free Delivery 522-8198 • www.steves-diner.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “The Gulf: Works

art

37


Alliance Française de La Nouvelle-Orléans Learn French with the French! Individual & Group classes from beginner to expert!

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SUMMER SESSION: JUNE 28 - AUGUST 14 Celebrate Bastille Day the French way! Potluck Summer Evening Party on July 9, 6 pm to 8:30 pm Bastille Day Dinner on July 12, 7 pm to 10 pm at Café Degas

(504) 568-0770 1519 Jackson Avenue afno@af-neworleans.org

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art

listings l

568-9050 — “The Talented Tenth: African American Artists and Musicians of the Harlem Renaissance, the W.P.A. and Beyond,” through July.

toalliance.org for details. Submission deadline is Thursday.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Perma-

STUDIO 525. 525 E. Boston St., Covington; www.studio525covington.com — Rare rock ’n’ roll

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg. com — “Peel Sessions: First

Exploring Community Within African Art,” an exhibition of manuscripts and artwork in conjunction with NOMA’s “Beyond the Blues,” through Wednesday.

photographs by Sidney Smith; tribal painting and mixed media by Justin Smith; works by Sarah Freeman Carey, Christopher Morrison Slave and Richard Lee; all through Wednesday.

Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www.thomasmann.com —

“Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 9437446; www.venusiangardens. com — “Luminous Sculpture,”

works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

Works by Will Smith, ongoing.

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass

works by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 29 > 2010

38

TUESDAY JULY 6TH AMC Palace 12 Clearview 6:00 pm

Pick up your complimentary pass

FRIDAY JULY 2ND 11AM - 4PM at

4920 Tchoupitoulas St. Passes are available on a first-come, first-served basis - while supplies last. Each pass admits one. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Employees of all promotional partners and their agencies are not eligible.

IN THEATERS JULY 9

museums

nent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com —

INVITE YOU AND A GUEST TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING

What you see is What you get

Call for artists MIDDLE EAST FILM FESTIVAL. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The festival

seeks film submissions, as well as Arab, Persian or Middle Eastern musicians, multi-media installations and performance pieces, for the November event. Visit www. nolamideastfilmfest.blogspot. com for details. Submission deadline is Sept. 30. MY NEW ORLEANS: PERSONAL IMPRESSIONS OF A CITY IN TRANSITION. Rhino Contemporary Crafts Company, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Artists of any

medium are invited to submit works expanding on impressions of New Orleans life, culture, food, art and music for the November exhibition. Email rhinocrafts@yahoo. com for details. Submission deadline is July 15.

NEW ORLEANS PHOTO ALLIANCE. The alliance seeks

submissions for “GULF,” a visual exploration of the Gulf of Mexico to open in August. Visit www.neworleanspho-

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. Tilton Hall, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Ave., 865-5535 — “Creative Circles:

ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave., 5224806; www.backstreetmuseum. org — Permanent exhibits

of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Prints,” paintings by Joan Mitchell, through Wednesday. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Katrina +

5: Documenting Disaster,” an oral history and photography project with historical maps, documents and a multimedia presentation, through Sept. 12.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

“Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through December. “Serigraphs from the Toussaint L’Ouverture Series, 1986-1997,” by Jacob Lawrence, through July 15. LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’

Neighborhood: A Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills, and more.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The muse-

um features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM. Old U.S. Mint, 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6968 — “Target America:

Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause,” an interactive exhibit exploring the damaging effects of illegal drugs, through Nov. 24. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM CABILDO. 701 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Unsung Heroes: The Secret

History of Louisiana Rock & Roll,” through May. “The Cabildo: 200 Years of Louisiana History,” ongoing.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Snapshots

of D-Day,” more than 70 photographs of the Normandy invasion, through Sunday.

NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Sumpt’n

to See, Native Son Comes Home,” paintings by Ted Ellis; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” a collection of artifacts by Derrick Joshua Beard; both through November.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Summer Daydreams,” floral watercolors by Carol Greel, through Wednesday. NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FOUNDATION. 1205 N. Rampart St., 522-4786; www. jazzandheritage.org — “The

Passing Parade: New Orleans’ Brass Band Tradition,” a multimedia and interactive exhibit, through Wednesday.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “Patti Smith: A Dona-

tion to NOMA,” photographs by the musician, through Saturday. “SWEET Suite Louisiana,” color intaglio prints by Warrington Colescott, and more. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-cen-

tury pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Brooching the Subject:

One-of-a-Kind,” jewelry by 22 artists, through July 15. “Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues,” photographs by William Ferris; William Ferris Folk Art Collection; both through July 25, and more. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “The Birth of Coffee,”

black-and-white photographs documenting worldwide coffee works, and more.

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.


LisTings

Get in on the Act

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

TheaTeR BLANK CANVAS. First Unitarian Universalist Church of New Orleans, 2903 Jefferson Ave., 866-9010; www.firstuuno.org — In the oneact play, a painter’s works come to life and make people re-experience the most intense version of love they have ever known. Email blankcanvasproject@yahoo.com for details. Tickets $5. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through July 10. MACBETH. Lupin Theatre, Tulane

University, 865-5105 ext. 2 — The play, part of New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane, is told through the eyes of the St. Charles Theater in late 1830s. Tickets $30. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Sunday through July 11.

MATT & BEN. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Two women portray actors Matt Damon and Ben Affleck in Mindy Kaling and Brenda Withers’ play. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Monday and July 12.

ZOMBIE TOWN. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — The mockumentary follows a San Francisco theater troupe that travels to the site of a zombie attack to interview survivors. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday through July 18.

CabaReT Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta. com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

CORDELIA WAS THE FOOL. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre. org — The cabaret revue features a rotating slate of women performing poetry, comedy, dance, music and storytelling. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

GEORGE M. COHAN TONIGHT! Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — The one-man show stars David Herzog as the American entertainer known for songs “Over There”, “Give My Regards to Broadway” and “The Yankee Doodle Boy.” Tickets start at $20. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday, 1 p.m. Sunday. THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark. com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

www.nolacomedy.com — Comedy teams Dr. Awkward and Men Not Mars perform weekly improvisational comedy. Admission $10. 9 p.m. Thursday.

review Wilder at heart Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prizewinning Our Town defies many conventional theatrical boundaries. The “Stage Manager” (Charles Bosworth) is a free-roaming narrator who addresses the audience, describing the idyllic town of Grover’s Corners, N.H. At times he interacts with characters, and he summons a historian to field (planted) questions from the audience about the town. During a recent run at the Anthony Bean Community Theater, the Stage Manager even described what was available at the concession stand (spinach-artichoke-crawfish dip). Wilder’s play focuses on the neighboring Webb and Gibbs families, whose respective children, Emily (Greta Zehner) and George (Michael Alexander), grow up, fall in love and get married. Wilder fills the play with the rituals of daily life, like the delivery of milk every morning and chatter about the weather, sunrise and sunset. Director Anthony Bean updated the setting from the early 20th century to the 1950s, and included an explicit racial element. In his version, the people of Grover’s Corner live free of prejudice, although the rest of the country does not. It isn’t until George and Emily are about to wed that the issue of an interracial relationship is broached, and it’s revealed George’s grandfather was killed for traveling with his white wife in Louisiana. The story lacks conflict save George and Emily’s jitters about marrying young. For such a long play— that employs so much professorial-style narration — it’s surprisingly compelling. Confident performances by Zehner and Alexander grounded the more immediate scenes. In one instance, they ably fabricated an emotionally critical turning point in their young relationship after the narrator parachuted them into the scene. Wilder’s play is concerned with whether people let their lives slip by in daily installments with insufficient contemplation or enjoyment. He underscores his point with a funeral in the final act, which works here, and has nothing to do with race. There probably is a good reason for these characters to explore the world outside Grover’s Corners. But recast as a bastion separate from the segregated United States of the 1950s, one might wonder why they would leave its safe and peaceful environs. It’s pleasant to visit Grover’s Corners as imagined by Bean, but compared to Wilder’s version, it’s hard to leave it without a much clearer sense of the cost of an unexamined life. It’s an interesting twist on a remarkable play. — Will Coviello

audiTions BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY.

NEW ORLEANS FRINGE. New Orleans

Fringe seeks works in a variety of mediums between 30 and 60 minutes long for its November festival. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. Application deadline is Thursday.

Christ the King Lutheran Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday.

Comedy

CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The chorus holds weekly auditions for women ages 16 and older for its original show A Streetcar Named Who Dat to be performed in October. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love

Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 400-6145 — The bar hosts a free stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY LIVES. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300;

COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-allages comedy competition between two teams. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. rubyfruit-jungle.com — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. Maison 508, 508 Frenchmen St., 309-7137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m. Show is 8 p.m. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Tarantula Arms, 209 Decatur St., 525-5525 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Shad-

owbox Theatre, 2400 St Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — The troupe performs interactive improv comedy. Tickets $5. 7 p.m. Saturday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY DINNER SHOW. Memeworks Integrated

Creative Arts, 527 Julia St., 523-SHOW — The improv group features a comedy show with a dinner option. Tickets $10 for show only. 8 p.m. Friday.

O, VENGEANCE! La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Actors improvise Shakespeare based on audience suggestions. Tickets $8. 10 p.m. Saturday. STAND UP IS DEAD. Zeitgeist Multi-

Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — The tour of the raw stand-up comedy show makes its stop in New Orleans. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. 9 p.m. Friday.

STAND UP NOLA. Boomtown Casino,

Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The casino hosts free, weekly stand-up performances with a changing lineup of comedians. 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday.

STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674

Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. STUPID TIME MACHINE. Avenue Pub, 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243 — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

Sun-ThurS 11am-9pm, Fri-SaT 11am-11pm

Reservations at 504-528-1940 www.american-sector.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

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39


Summer Swat theings

events

listings

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

George M. Cohan Tonight! July 2-3-4 Award-winning NY performer’s renditions of Yankee Doodle Dandy, Give My Regards to Broadway, and more!

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

The Victory Belles & The Victory Six! July 9-10-11

Take a nostalgic trip through the 1940s with classics like Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy and I’ll Be Seeing You, plus a rousing patriotic finale!

The High Ground Drifters July 16-17-18

family Tuesday 29 TODDLER TIME . Louisiana Children’s

Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Enjoy an eclectic mix of Bluegrass, old-time Country, Swing and more!

Thursday 1

Friday and Saturday evenings John Besh’s All-American Buffet @ 6pm; Show @ 7:30pm: $45 Show only: $30 Sunday Brunch Matinée @ 11am; Show @ 1pm: $55

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Saturday 3 Magazine St. at Poeyfarre ★ 504.528.1943 ★ stagedoorcanteen.org

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SPECIALS

MASTER GARDENERS. Hollygrove

Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 4837037; www.hollygrovemarket.com — Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans teaches young gardeners to plant, paint, identify good and bad bugs and feed the chickens. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

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Tuesday 29

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

events

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CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street Market, 200 Broadway St., 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. GREEN IT YOURSELF SERIES: COOL IT DOWN . Good Work Network

Business Resource Center, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 3092073; www.goodworknetwork.org — The program provides tips on energy-efficient and cost-effective HVAC systems. Email vfedeli@ globalgreen.org for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

HOLOCAUST TEACHER WORKSHOP. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum hosts “Echoes and Reflections,” a multi-media teacher workshop focusing on the Holocaust. Pre-registration is required. Call 528-1944 ext 225 for details. 9 a.m. to noon.

Wednesday 30 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N.

Be there do that Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to effect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www. frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Pravda, 1113 Decatur St. — The progressive drinking club allows members to share ideas while enjoying libations. 7 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE . St.

Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola. org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence. org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409 Andry

St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group conducts tours

of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING WORKDAY. Woodland Presbyterian

Church, 5824 Berkley Drive — Participants prepare materials needed for the next school year, and also learn more about STAIR and exchange ideas about tutoring. Call 899-0820 for details. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., No. 4, 5256500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

DRINKING LIBERALLY NEW ORLEANS.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store,

1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron

Rail, 511 Marigny St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail. com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. MAGNOLIA PHYSICAL THERAPY PATIENT APPRECIATION DAY.

Magnolia Physical Therapy, 5606 Jefferson Hwy., 733-0254; www. magnoliatherapyla.com — Magnolia celebrates its five-year anniversary and new Harahan location with food, drinks, free screenings and prizes. 8 a.m to 5 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. TUNA SEITHER UNVEILING EVENT. Davenport Lounge, Ritz-Carlton, 921 Canal St., 524-1331; www.ritzcarlton.com — The artist unveils his piece “Coastal Paradise” and sells autographed prints to benefit the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation’s Save Our Coast program. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. WARGAMES. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum hosts WWII board and miniatures gaming on the first Thursday of every month. Pre-registration required. 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday 2

and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

EASTSIDE ART MARKET. Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. The sale is open to the public. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

Thursday 1

Saturday 3

THE A-TEAM . East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The A-Team, a group comprised of World War II veterans, presents a program about optimism, teamwork and courage. 7 p.m.

ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park,

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala Ave., Sala Avenue

Magazine St., 891-8682; www.heycafe.biz — The weekly meetings

333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague.info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 8999119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau State

Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 6773668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J.

Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

FONTAINEBLEAU HISTORY TOUR . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 677-3668 — The walk down the alley of oaks discusses the life of Bernard de Marigny and his influence on Louisiana’s history. 11 a.m. FRERET MARKET. Freret Market, cor-

ner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 638-2589; www.freretmarket.org — The market offers food, arts, live music and goods from local exhibitors on the first Saturday of each month. Noon to 5 p.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation, 13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET. Gretna

Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

JUST GRILL IT. Whole Foods Market,

3420 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-8225 — The event provides culinary inspiration for Fourth of July celebrations. Noon to 2 p.m. The event also occurs at Whole Foods Market Arabella Station (5600 Magazine St., 8999119).

NATIVE NOW: INVASIVE SPECIES. Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — The program discusses the pros and cons of non-native and near-native invasive plant species. Call 488-5488 ext. 401 or email hschackai@longuevue. com for details. 8 a.m., 9 a.m., 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

PARTY WITH A PURPOSE . Voilà,

300 Decatur St., 581-2524; www. voilanola.com — The event benefiting the conversion of a Central City church into a state-of-the-art media center features live music, food and drink specials. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.


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Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EvEnts

1 p.m. to 5 p.m. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 4 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 299-9455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. FEED THE MULTITUDES. Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The annual event features free food, children’s games, live entertainment, free health care screenings and free haircuts. Visit www.feedthemultitudes.com for details. 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. GO FOURTH ON THE RIVER .

LOUISIANA BOOKS 2 PRISONERS WORKNIGHT.

Nowe Miasto, 223 Jane Place; www.myspace.com/nowemiasto — The group sends books and letters to prisoners. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PLAQUEMINE MAIN STREET FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION.

Plaquemine Lock State Historic Site, Plaquemine, 57730 Main St. — The celebration includes games, food, family activities and free admission to the Bayou Water Front Park, Plaquemine Lock S.H.S. and Iberville Museum. 4 p.m.

SUNDAY SWING WITH JOE KROWN . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Professional swing dancers are on hand to provide coaching for dancers of all levels while musicians play World War II-era hits. Lessons 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., live music 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Monday 5 CBT GROUP. Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details. TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (excepting holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Nonprofit Central, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofitcentral.org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Call for appliCations CENTER FOR CULTURAL INTERCHANGE . The center

seeks families to host foreign exchange students during the upcoming school year. Email ayp@cci-exchange.com or visit www.cci-exchange. com/host.htm for details. Application deadline is Aug. 31.

FINS AND GRINS PHOTO CONTEST. The Aquarium of

the Americas holds a contest to find the best pictures of aquarium exhibits and visitors. Visit www.audubonInstitute. org for details. Submissions deadline is July 31.

FLO WOODARD MEMORIAL BARTENDING SCHOLARSHIP.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The New Orleans Culinary and Cultural Preservation Society and Crescent City School of Bartending select a professional bartender to attend a training course valued at $3,000. Email flowoodardbarscholarship@crescentschools.com for details.

ST. BERNARD PARISH FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION. Sidney

LOUISIANA COMPOSERS FORUM . Composers can

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

owned by

submit original compositions for possible inclusion in a Sept. 29 performance by a 20-piece orchestra. Call 831-7145 or email LouisianaComposersForum@ gmail.com for details. Deadline is Saturday.

loCals for loCals

WoMenS, MenS & teen Clothing shoes • purses • belts • and more!

REBIRTH

LOUISIANA YEAR OF THE SONG 2010 SONG CONTEST.

clothing exchange

The contest winner wins a two-day writing session with songwriter Jim McCormick. Visit www.nosongfest.com/ song+contest for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15.

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Mon-Fri 11-7 | Sat 11-6 | Sun 12-5

NEW ORLEANS TRADITIONAL JAZZ CAMP. The summer

music camp for adults accepts applications for professional and amateur musicians and vocalists. Visit www.neworleanstradjazzcamp.com for details. PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes still damaged (50 percent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 9420444 ext. 244 for details.

YOUTH ESSAY CONTEST. The

New Orleans Public Library system accepts essays answering the questions, “How do I feel about New Orleans in 2010? Where are we now and where are are we going?” Winners will travel to Vero Beach, Fla. with City Council President Arnie Fielkow for an educational and recreational trip. Applications available at New Orleans public libraries. Submission deadline is July 16.

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Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — The event includes an open mic portion, a reading by a featured poet and a poetry slam competition with cash prizes. Signup 7:30 p.m., event 8 p.m. Tuesday.

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District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs The Last Banana. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

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Stop, 7056 Read Blvd., 2432436 — The authors sign their books. The event also features food, drinks and live music. 3 p.m. Saturday.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

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Various locations along the riverfront — The annual event includes its signature dueling barges fireworks show, as well as live music and family activities. 4 p.m.

D. Torres Memorial Park, Jean Lafitte Parkway, Chalmette — The event includes food, fireworks and music by Harvey Jesus and Fire. Call 278-1032 or 278-4295 for details. 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

41


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504.267.3032 1432 St. Charles Ave Shanghai grilled Shrimp or ChiCken Salad — Grilled shrimp or chicken with romaine lettuce, cucumber, tomato, edamame and honey roasted pecans in chef’s sesame vinaigrette dressing. Served with sesame wheat noodles.............with ChiCken $8.95 · with Shrimp $9.95 Beef Chow fen noodle — Marinated beef with fen noodle and Chinese vegetables................................................................................................................................ $9.95 aSparaguS Sautéed with ChiCken — In brown or garlic sauce...... $9.95 fried Bean Curd in teriyaki SauCe — Teriyaki sauce with black mushrooms, peas and carrots.............................................................................................................$8.95 Stuffed ChineSe eggplant — Chinese eggplant stuffed with pork and shrimp with chef’s special sauce....................................................................................................... $9.95

BOOK YOUR PARTIES IN OUR PRIVATE BANQUET ROOM WITH TWIN BALCONIES!

1910 MAGAZINE ST. • 504-JACKSON (522-5766)

42

Latin Dancing

Summer Special

MON - SAT 11AM - 10PM • SUNDAY BRUNCH 10AM - 3PM • WWW.JACKSONNOLA.NET

3605 South Carrollton ave · reServationS / take-out 482-3935 · www.fivehappineSS.Com mon-thurS 11am-10pm · fri & Sat 11am-11pm · Sun 11am-10pm


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Slurping on Carrollton > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Ramen soup may be associated with bargain noodle packs from the grocery store, but more refined renditions are a major < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < puttINg < < < < < < < <everythINg < < < < < < < < < <oN < < <the < < < table < < < < < < < < < < < < < <craze in Japan. Ramen also is a focus at a new Japanese restaurant, little tokyo small plates & noodle Bar (1368 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-6088), part of the local Little Tokyo mini-chain. Tailor your ramen with a choice of meats, bamboo shoots and bok choy and level of spicy heat. The menu includes soba and udon dishes, sushi and tapas-style versions of Japanese appetizers.

am

B

WHAT

Cafe Hope WHERE

1101 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 756-4673; www.cafehope.org WHEN

Lunch MondayFriday, private events by reservation HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

CHECK, PLEASE

Operated by a nonprofit that offers apprenticeships to young people 17 to 21 years old

Dining DealS

ralph’s on the park (900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com) has resumed its annual summer dining special, which includes three appetizers and a glass of wine for $28. Gw Fins (808 Bienville St., 581-3467; www.gwfins.com) now offers a three-course “Fins Feast” menu for $35, with $5 of each dinner donated to the Gulf oil disaster volunteer program LA Gulf Response. The menu changes daily.

five 5 IN

FiVe unusuAl eGG rolls And sprinG rolls

squeAl BAr-B-q

8400 oak St., 302-7370 www.squeal-nola.com

Black-eyed peas, bacon and chunks of andouille sausage fill a fried roll.

new orleAns Food & spirits

210 old Hammond Hwy., metairie, 828-2220; 2330 lapalCo Blvd., Harvey, 362-0800

Fried “Voo-Doo” rolls feature crawfish stuffing.

Hope Du Jour A CAfe Where meNtorINg Is the mAIN Course. b y I A N m C N u lt y

C

pHoto BY CHERYL GERBER

apprenticeships are complete. “It’s a great model because food is personal and you get immediate feedback on it,” Boyd says. “You serve someone a great meal and they tell you if they liked it. They might compliment you on the service you provided, on the restaurant you’re representing, and that’s a great affirmation for young people trying to do something new and get themselves on a career track.” Cafe Hope is inside the Hope Haven Center, a campus of ornate Spanish mission-style buildings first opened in the 1930s as an orphanage and later run by the Archdiocese of New Orleans as a treatment center for troubled youth. Early programs — long-since discontinued — stressed self-support, so enterprises like an on-campus dairy and carpentry shop produced income for the center and taught its young residents potential job skills. In a way, that spirit has been rekindled at Cafe Hope, too. Funding from Catholic Charities and a state grant marshaled by West Bank legislators were instrumental in completing the new restaurant, but the money Cafe Hope pays to its apprentices comes largely from people who eat there. The cooking is fresh and loaded with interesting twists. A creamy sweet potato soup with smoky ribbons of andouille started a recent lunch that continued with chicken stuffed with crawfish dressing and smothered with spicy tomato sauce. Nothing on the menu costs more than $10. A vegetable garden visible outside the cafe’s windows supplies some of the produce used in the kitchen, including okra that is pickled and often offered as a lagniappe appetizer. It makes a tart beginning for what proves to be a very sweet dining experience.

Mr. B’s Bistro

201 royal St., 523-2078 www.mrbsbistro.com

Fresh rolls are filled with duck confit, shiitake mushrooms, spinach and goat cheese.

Besh steAk

HarraH’S 4 Canal St., 533-6111 www.harrahs.com

A plum glaze lacquers the pork belly spring rolls.

ArnAud’s restAurAnt 813 Bienville St., 523-5433 www.arnauds.com

Crawfish, rice noodles and lettuce in rice paper is a snack at the French 75 bar.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2008 Neil Ellis Sauvignon Blanc

Groenekloof, South AfricA / $16

This Sauvignon Blanc is made with grapes sourced from South Africa’s west coast. A 2003 Wine Spectator Top 100 wine, the current vintage shows aromas of lemon and grapefruit and an intriguing flintiness. Flavors of guava, white peach, lime, lemongrass, an engaging minerality and pleasant herbaceous character are rounded out with perfect acidity and a long finish. Drink now and over the next couple of years. Enjoy with oysters, calamari, crabmeat, fish, scallops, smoked seafood, chicken, pork, salads with vinaigrette, chevre and brie cheeses. where to buy it: Martin Wine Cellar (Uptown and Metairie). where to drink it: Martinique (Listings current at press time.) — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

ourtney Theard’s first day as a cook at a Gretna country club turned into an unanticipated trial by fire. The 19-year-old New Orleans native reported for duty that first day last month ready to learn the ropes, and he even brought along a pad to take notes. But when the club’s chef went home ill, Theard suddenly found himself responsible for turning out a luau-style dinner for a big party in the dining room. “I wasn’t expecting it, but I felt very confident once I realized what I had to do,” Theard says. “As soon as I got into it, I just remembered what I’d learned, remembered my kitchen skills, and I got it done.” For those skills and at least some of that confidence, he credits Cafe Hope, a new nonprofit restaurant program in Marrero where he is an apprentice. Cafe Hope uses the tried-and-true format of a fullservice restaurant, open to the public, to deliver life skills training and career preparation to young adults who want to make a new start. It’s a model similar to Cafe Reconcile, the Central City-based nonprofit restaurant that pioneered the idea in New Orleans 10 years ago and indirectly spawned Cafe Hope, which opened last month. The nonprofit’s founder and executive director is Don Boyd, a Belle Chasse native and veteran of corporate hotel kitchens who was Cafe Reconcile’s chef early in the last decade. The program he designed for Cafe Hope is intended for people ages 17 to 21 who often are referred by youth advocates, juvenile services, churches and family members. It combines a 12-week curriculum of hands-on training in the kitchen and dining room with guidance from industry professionals and volunteer mentors and help with job placement once

Culinary director Fred Miner (with beard) helps apprentices learn the ropes in the kitchen at Cafe Hope.

43


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

You are what You eat >>>>>>>>>

>>>> VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., < < < < < < <361-1402; < www.vine-dine.com — > > > > > > > >The > cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate <<< and cured meats. There also is a >> menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, salads and dips. No <bruschettas, < reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>> Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CON— TEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

44

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501

Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Fresh Louisiana boudin made with pork, rice and seasonings is a specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. Also try pulled pork with sides like baked beans and potato salad. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL —

4617 Sanford St., Metairie, 883-5905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. Or try the blackened chicken Caesar wrap. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memo-

rial Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps from the regular menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Beers change seasonally. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601

Gallier St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch

Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields

Ave., 284-7878; www.lafittescafe. com — Lafitte’s serves wraps with a wide selection of fillings, burgers and patty melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

CHINESE

CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; wwww.chinaorchidneworleans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Empress chow mein, mango shrimp or chicken, and triple dragon with shrimp, chicken and beef are specialties. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139 N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www.therubyslippercafe.net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. Lunch options include burgers, sandwiches, salads and changing specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese. com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes housemade pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Prytania

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. The Terrazu salad is topped with boiled shrimp, hearts of palm and avocado. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SAL’S SNO-BALL STAND — 1823 Metairie Road, Metairie, 6661823 — Enjoy something cold and sweet from this 50-year-old business, which offers an assortment of flavored sno-balls, soft-serve ice cream, malts, banana splits or ice cream cones dipped in chocolate. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W.

Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss,

tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams Blvd.,

Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-0301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 7389678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. Breakfast, lunch and dinner are served all day long. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S NORTHERN ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chefowner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties


Come enjoy our new delightful Vietnamese items such as Spring rolls, Pho, Bun, Chicken Salad, Sweet & Spicy Fish along with all of your favorite CHINESE and VEGETARIAN dishes.

LUNCH SPECIALS starting at $5.45 CRISPY LEMON GRASS SHRIMP $13.95

Daily soup or Salad with your lunch for only $1.95 WE DELIVER • DINE IN • TAKE OUT • CATERING

3635 Prytania St.

(at Amelia)

New Orleans, LA. 70115

(504)899-5129 VIETNAMESE FRESH SPRING ROLLS $6.95

For full Menu please visit our web site: www.moonnola.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

45


OUT2EAT of the house include Trota Bayou la Fourche — speckled trout served with lump crabmeat in a lemoncream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

stuffed cornmeal disks, or Mexican favorites. Latin-style brunch is served on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Chef Chris Montero artfully prepares homemade pastas and fresh seafood, including lobster and shrimp ravioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

LOUISIANA CON— TEMPORARY

BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-2426;

CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd.,

Gretna, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi. com — For casual Italian dining, head to Cafe DiBlasi for pan-fried veal topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce or a traditional veal shank osso buco served with rich brown sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

46

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi. com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LATIN AMERICAN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 862-

5252 — Enjoy Latin home cooking in a quaint and festive cafe. Try the namesake Salvadoran pupusas,

ATCHAFALAYA

RESTAURANT

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking. Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRA— NEAN/MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200

Magazine St., 595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. There also are Latin American dishes, paella and fried ice cream for dessert. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. Chicken Maximilian is a baked chicken breast roulade with Anaheim peppers, chorizo and Asiago cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade

Ave., 945-9997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice and beans. There are many margarita options. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St.,

310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www.got-

tgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honeybaked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $ LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR — 3636

Bienville St., 482-9120; www.liuzzas. com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$ MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W.

Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 8380022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Magazine St., 708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria. com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger pizza features ground beef, applewood-smoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. The Beaurantula is a Philly cheese steak loaded with vegetables and ranch dressing. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 4880133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $ SLICE RESTAURANT — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than

two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef poboys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd.,

Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

tive Chef Gregg Collier dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE —

2401 St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. There are also changing daily specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Sat. Cash only. $$

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE — 3633

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Pe-

ters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanish-accented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601

Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tobasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640

Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by Execu-

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


Best retaiL WeBsite 1. Sucré www.shopsucre.com 2. Puglia’s Sporting Goods www.puglias-sporting-goods.com 3. Hadaki www.hadakishop.com

WINNERS Best Bar WeBsite 1. Lucy’s Retired Surfers Bar and Restaurant www.lucysretiredsurfers.com 2. Cure www.curenola.com 3. Bar Uncommon www.baruncommon.com

Best restaurant WeBsite 1. La Petit Grocery www.lapetitegrocery.com 2. Jerk’s Island Grill www.jerksislandgrill.com 3. Stanley Restaurant www.stanleyrestaurant.com

Best HOteL WeBsite 1. The Roosevelt New Orleans www.therooseveltneworleans.com 2. Hotel Monteleone www.hotelmonteleone.com 3. Windsor Court Hotel www.windsorcourthotel.com

Best nOn-PrOfit WeBsite 1. Stay Local! New Orleans www.staylocal.org 2. Where They At www.wheretheyatnola.com 3. St. Bernard Project www.stbernardproject.org

Best scHOOL WeBsite 1. Ursuline Academy www.ursulineneworleans.org 2. New Orleans Center for Creative Arts www.nocca.com 3. Langston Hughes Academy www.langstonhughes.nola180.org

Best service PrOvider WeBsite 1. Lakeside Camera Photoworks www.lakesidecamera.com 2. WorkNOLA www.worknola.com 3. Policy Pitch www.policypitch.com

Best LOcaL Musician WeBsite 1. Preservation Hall Jazz Band www.preservationhall.com 2. Jeremy Davenport www.jeremydavenport.com 3. Arajay www.arajay.com

Best LOcaL BLOg 1. We Live to Eat Nola www.welivetoeatnola.com 2. Invade Nola www.invadenola.com 3. New Orleans Tech www.neworleanstech.net

Best e-neWsLetter 1. Nolalicious www.nolalicious.com 2. 504ward www.504ward.com 3. City Business Daily Update www.neworleanscitybusiness.com

Best OnLine ad caMPaign 1. Ochsner Health Systems 2. Tobacco Free Living 3. Dirty Coast

Best LOcaL MOBiLe aPP

2. WWOZ Mobile App by Jacobs Media 3. Offbeat Magazine by Susco Solutions

Best tv neWs WeBsite 1. WWL TV www.wwltv.com 2. Fox 8 www.fox8live.com 3. ABC 26 www.abc26.com

Best radiO WeBsite 1. WWOZ www.wwoz.org 2. WWL www.wwl.com 3. WNOE www.wnoe.com

Best sOciaL netWOrker 1. NolaEats www.nola-eats.com 2. VisitNewOrleans www.neworleansonline.com 3. Net2NO www.netsquared.org

Presented by:

1. Arthur Hardy’s Mardi Gras Guide by Calliope Digital Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

47


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com

AGENTS & SALES

Blaine Kern Jr’s

MARDI GRAS

PRODUCTIONS SALES & OFFICE ASSISTANT

This is a full time position with

sales & general administrative duties supporting normal office functions. Experience with direct client interaction is preferred & ability to do website work desired but not necessary. The right candidate will be an energetic self-starter with a desire to be a team player-ability to multitask and follow through with assignments is a must.

SEEKING NEW ORLEANS FINEST SERVICE PROFESSIONALS

NOW HIRING:

• Housekeeping • Food & Beverage • Gift Shop Retail Manager • Floor Supervisor • Bartender • Houseperson • Server’s Assistant • Room Attendant • Sazerac Server • Guest Request Runner • Barista Supervisor • Uniform Room Attendant • Host/Hostess • Room Service Server Professionals must apply online: www.hiltonfamily.jobs EOE/AA Drug Free Workplace

mgp1201@hotmail.com.

Please include required salary and date available.

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS Available for NO Salon East. Also Sew in Special $175 + save 5% on hair. 504-909-4753

ENTERTAINMENT MOVIE EXTRAS. Earn up to $150 Per Day. To stand in backgrounds of major films. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-664-4621

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

Experienced Central Order Processing Customer Service Clerk w/outstanding communication & data entry skills. Must be methodical w/superior attention to details & organization. FT w/ benefits. Fax resume 504-895-4162 ATTN: HR Deadline to apply 7/2/10 AA/EOE

MARINE TANKERMAN

Ingram Barge Company has an opening in their Harahan, La location. Candidates must possess a current Tankerman’s license a vaid TWIC card. Also must possess a valid Driver’s license and a High School diploma/ GED. This position will be responsible for loading and discharging of diesel fuel and other liquids. Work schedule will be on a rotating schedule (i.e. 14/7). Generous daily wage and excellent benefit package. Interested candidates must apply online at www. ingrambarge.com. EOE, M/F/V

email resume to employment@avisgroupinc.com or employmentatavis@gmail.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE

Sophia

MERCHANDISE ELECTRONICS DIRECT TV FREE Standard Installation! FREE SHOWTIME+STARZ (3mo)! FREE HD/DVR upgrade! Ends 7/14/10. New Customers Only, Qual. Pkgs. From $29.99/mo. DirectStarTV 1-877885-8764

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $295 Brand New Iron Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 $95 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $115 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122 Queen Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $129. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

MEDICAL HUGO 4.0 DELUXE WALKER Wheels with breaks, under-seat stroage, padded back rest. Gently used, excellent condition. $50. 504-919-0560

PETS A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

CANON

Avis group seeks Administrative Assistant/Customer Service Representative in an executive business setting. Flexible hours with potential to grow. Computer skills and ability to multi task required. Duties include: filing, preparation of sales reports, data entry and telephone support. No experience necessary. Energy, career oriented Customer Service Representative who thrives in fast paced customer service. Strong customer service orientation. Team player. Results.

GEO Metro, ‘96 $295. Still runs or parts. Call 943-7699 HONDA ACCORD 2 DR SPT COUPE 2000 Fully loaded, sun roof, low miles (75k). Exc cond. $200 down, take over notes of $145/mo with warranty. Call 667-7810, 24 hours.

Rice, 19 positions; Belcan Services group, Eagle Lake, TX; 3 mths exp req w/references; clean driver’s license; tools, equipment, and housing provided free. Trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.69/hr; 3/4 work guarantee from 4/25/10 - 12/25/10. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with a copy of this ad

Pizza Maker & Bartender w/ food experience

Apply in person Mon-Fri,1-5pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

DOMESTIC AUTOS

SEASONAL

VOLUNTEER

Bar & Pizza Kitchen

AUTOMOTIVE

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

WIT’S INN

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT/ CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE

48

CUSTOMER SERVICE UPTOWN MFR SEEKS

Send resume & contact information to

BOOTH RENTAL W/FOLLOWING

CLASSIFIEDS

HOSPICE Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

NEED HELP? Advertise in

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

ABOUT MASSAGE

Tired of just a rub down? Get beyond that w/ a massage exp. by Matteo, Lic #0022. Met area. 504-832-0945

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

Alicia Whittington

Welcome Back All Clients! 1 HOUR

EMPLOYMENT Call 483-3100

$50

90/120 min avail

Swedish & Deep Tissue Appts 8:30am-9:00pm LA Lic# 520

Harrah’s New Orleans Casino and Hotel is looking for Experienced Stewards for our Buffet. Duties include preparing tableware for washing, cleaning and storing china, and sanitizing all cooking equipment. Requirements: Must have speed and accuracy in order to maintain maximum efficiency. Must be able to get along with co-workers and work as a team. Must present a well-groomed appearance. Willingness to work all shifts and days. Must be at least 21 years of age. To apply, please go to www.harrahs.com and click on our careers link. Harrah’s Entertainment is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Gambling Problem? Call 1-800-522-4700

call

601.303.7979 PSYCHICS/TAROT/ASTROLOGY

BODY, MIND & SOUL EXPERIENCE

READ YOU LIKE AN OPEN BOOK

Indulge yourself in Egyptian oils and incense from around the world. Crystal & Tarot card & Palm Readings. Answer your deepest questions and open the door to your future.

504-377-1711

NEW LOCATION ON PRYTANIA

PETS FOR SALE ACE, BASENJI/WHIPPET MIX. PUP. A love bug and Great Running Partner! VetCk/Vacs/Neut/Microchip/Rescue/ Hsbkn/Crate Trained (504-460-0136)

Free English Bulldog Puppies 2 FREE ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES PLEASE CONTACT ME ASAP morrisphillip200@gmail.com.

PET ADOPTIONS

Sophia- 1 yr old gorgeous sleek and sweet light smokey grey tabby ,spayed,shots ,tested, 504 462-1968 TIGER MIKE, PLOTT HOUND, 1 yr old, Beautiful Brindle Male. Vck, Vacs, Neut, Rescue, Micro-chip Please call (504) 451-2822 TIGER MIKEE, 1 year old, Plott Hound, Brindle Female, Vck, Vacs, Spay, Rescue, Micro-chip Call (504) 451-2822

Winky

Winky - Very beautiful and sweet Calico lap cat ,Say ed ,shots ,rescue ,504 462-1968 ANNOUNCEMENTS

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer. HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

Vendor Exhibit Opportunity

Ex Hall at Sheraton NO for Federally Emp Women “Jazz Up Your Career!” Nat Training Prog. July 12-15. Att Approx 2,100 from across US! 4 d complete Pack Fees: Fed/Corp $1600. Sm Bus/nonprof $700. Tables $150 a table, a day. Contact exhibits@few.org or (517)527-3100x125 or (812)8541471.

ADOPTIONS

Adopting your newborn would be my life’s greatest joy.

COATS & HUNTER, BORDER COLLIE MIXES, young, Vetck/ Vacs/Neut/Microchip/Rescue (504) 460-0136. EBONY, Black kitten, Vck, Vacs, Neut, Litter Train, Rescue. 504-451-2822

Will give a child a life of security and endless love. A great family, education, and wonderful home awaits. Expenses paid.

Elijah

Please call Ria at 1-888-851-4935

Elijah -Gorgeous solid white Angora male cat,very sweet and smart neutered,shots ,rescue ,504 462-1968 JAZZIE, Blk Dom, Short Hair, Very Sweet, Vck, Vacs, Spay, Litter Train, Rescue. Call (504) 451-2822

Kit Kit

Kit Kit, Muted Gray Tabby, Appx. 7 months old, Vet Ck/Vac/Spay/ Rescue/LitterTrained/Super Sweet (504)460-0136

Lollipop and Jellybean

5wk old male and female adorable kittens,thrown from car window and rescued.504 462-1968

Marcello and Giovanni -14 wk old male kittens

Most adorable,sociable and sweetest ever. Neutered ,shots,rescue 504 462-1968 MAXINE, Terrier Mix, 16#s, Hsbkn, Vck, vacs, spay, rescue, super sweet, Please Call (504)512-0858 NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136 NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136 RASCAL, BEAGLE, Super Sweet, Vck/ Vacs/Spay/Microchip/Rescue (504) 451-2822 SMOKEY, RUSSIAN BLUE. Vck, Vacs, Spay, Litter Trained, Rescue. 504451-2822

LEGAL NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE Those having business with Gideon Productions, LLC for the movie “The Fields” should file creditor claims postmarked by Friday, July 9, 2010 to the address 800 Richard St, New Orleans, LA 70130. After July 9, claims should be sent to RC Baral & Co, 15821 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 500, Encino, CA 91436 To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

931-35 Dauphine $935K 1850’S Creole cottage. Updated kit & ba, patio, ctyd w/pond. Back unit has 4 studio apts-7 apts total. $6500/mo rent income.

SLIDELL

922-24 Dauphine $900K 4 unit French Quarter multifamily. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location!

4526 St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. postKatrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

57345 Oak Ave • $125,000 Reduced, 2085 sq ft 3 bedroom home New Carpet, Refreshed kitchen Large rooms, Exposed wood beams Lisa B Simms-Hayles Broker MaRioN B REaL EStatE iNC www.marionb.com • 985-643-4452

LAKEVIEW

EASTOVER

I Work Hard For You. 747 MAGAZINE CONDOS FOR SALE OR LEASE Unit 5

2,515sf-$700,000 Unit 6, 4,898 on two floors-$1.3 Million Beautiful building! NAI/Latter & Blum Schaffer Mickal 504-569-9495

Let me list or manage your properties!

Colleen Mooney, agent 504-236-7765

Vallon Real Estate 504-486-5437 4533 Canal St, NOLA 70119

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

BYWATER ELEGANCE IN THE BYWATER

Stunning juxtiposition of architectural integrity & soignee panache. 2000’ 2- 3 bdrms, 2 ba, garden room, steps to river. Offers staring at $299,000. 626 Pauline St. 504-914-5606.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE Lakefront Harborview Condo

2br, 2ba w/lake view 139K 283-4706 www.datakik.com/423

For Sale By Owner: Reduced Lake Vista 4 BR 3 BA tri-level, 2985 sq ft., $385k Call 504.723.2840

GENTILLY

RIVERBEND

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

FANTASTIC LOCATION Riverbend Victorian Camelback 1028 Joliet, close to river & Oak St., 3br, 2 ba, many original architectural details, off st parking, new roof, wood floors, high ceilings. $269,000 STO Louis Lederman • Prudential Gardner 504-874-3195

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/cer flrs, recess lights, srnd snd, sec sys, grt bkyd. Never flooded. Zone X, roof 4 yrs. $1600/mo or $194,900 For Sale. Call Sylvia 415-6501

1324 HICKORY

2 BR, 1 BA townhouse, furn kit, w/d hkps, patio, O/A, $700/mo. Call 650-8778

RIVER RIDGE NR LEVEE

Newly renov 4 plx. 2 br, 1 & 1/2 ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd. No pets. Quiet area suits retired person. $725/mo, refs & dep. 504737-2089. To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

3900 NORTH HULLEN • METAIRIE, LA 70002 WWW.3900NHULLEN.COM

Priced at $205K, Huge 90x200 lot gated community, ready to renovate. Keisha Washington SOUTHERN SPIRIT REALTY, LLC (504) 319-2693

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. • RIVER VIEW 34K sq. ft. of land. 20K sq. ft. of building. Prkg on St. James. Bounded by Celeste, St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters Streets. Asking Price:$1,200,000 Call Cassandra Sharpe/Broker Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-568-1252 • c: 460-7829

170 E. Greenbrier

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS GENERAL REAL ESTATE

TCHOUPITOULAS

KENNER

METAIRIE

NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

1 BR CONDO - $675

Private rm w/bath & kit. Utilities paid, $500/mo. & 3 brm/1 bath house, $900. 504-737-2068

w/d inside condo, kit, LR, dinette, lrg ba, lrge w/in clst, pool, sm blcny, no pets. 504/885-4304, 914-1705, 473-4304

$39,900 - $79,900

CONDOS!

ALL UNITS LESS THAN $700 PER MONTH

Ask about the $24 million park!

888-207-1711 Three story, beautiful 6-bedroom. 5.5 baths Chateau-like home, 5,214 sq.ft. The best of everything. Main 1st floor Kitchen, all professional lines Sub-Zero/Viking/, granite counter tops. Second floor kitchen/designer appliances, second floor great den. Master bedroom on first floor w/Jacuzzi tub. Salt water pool with outside Jacuzzi, outside bathrooms. Just minutes from the Causeway and Lakeside Shopping Center.

Offered At: $695,000 Priced under current appraisal Polly Eagan gri, crs - Agent broker licensed in state of la

504-862-0100 • pollyeagan@aol.com KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY New Orleans 8601 Leake Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118-USA

Each OfficE indEpEndEntly OwnEd and OpEratEd

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

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49


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS BYWATER

A HIDDEN GEM

JOIN THE WHO’S WHO IN THE APARTMENT INDUSTRY! Why Become a member? We are the resource and advocate for developers, owners and managers of apartments and condominiums in Louisiana.

LIGHTING Check out ANTIQUES & our Mandeville Location FURNITURE 985-249-7145 504-522-9485

Exterior Designs

BEVERLY KATZ | LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 866-0276 www.exteriordesignsbev.com

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $660 & 1 br + study fr $785. Furn corp avail. 780-1706 or 388-9972. www.orrislaneapts.com

OLD METAIRIE $300 OFF 1ST MONTH’S RENT - OLD METAIRIE SECRET 1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ liv rm sep Din, King Master, no Pets, no Sect 8, $699 & $824 • 504-236-5777

METAIRIE TOWERS

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1150/ mo - 914-882-1212

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

BYWATER EFFICIENCY

Great for 1 Person. Avail. June 1 - no util dep. Furn, all utils pd, wi-fi & dig. cable, laundry on site $840 inclusive w/ $420 dep. Shrt trm rentals $900/mo or $300/wk. Be compatible w/ owner, upper apt, off patio shared w/ 2 dogs & cats. Seeking nice tenant. 483-3130

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 2 BLKS TO CITY PARK. 1/2 dbl. Liv rm, din rm, 2 br, kit, no frig, w/d hkps, cen a/h, drapes, closets, wd flrs. No dogs. $980/mo. 482-1733.

4704 - A ST. PETER St.

Nr Delgado, all new 1 BR, kit, lr, backrm, w/d/fridge, o/s pkng. $875/ mo includes wtr & elec. pd. 504-3829477, Mark.

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

516 David St, 3BR, 2BA, 12” ceils, ca/h, 1467 sf, new appls incl w/d, granite. 1 blk to bus/st car, walk to City Pk. $1500-$1800. 504-669-7049

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT GROUP

& METRO WIDE APARTMENTS 304-HOUSe (4687) • www.BrunoInc.com

Sustainable Property Development URBAN DEVELOPMENT • REAL ESTATE CONSULTING

504.274.1930 www.JCHDevelopment.com

103 Egret

3/2 "Lake Vista Sanctuary"

1620 Prytania 2/1 Prytania Townhouse

$1500 $1000

7801 Hampson 2/1 University Area

$900

1572 Magazine 1/1 Lower Garden District

$700

912 Harding Dr. 1/1 Bayou "Dorm Style"

$550

GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $500 INCLUDING UTILITIES

Call 899-RENT

UPTOWN WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

$750 Call

899-RENT CARROLLTON 1714 SHORT ST

Single family home - 2 br, 1 ba,furn kit, w/d, $850/mo/dep. 504-865-9848 or 504-236-5757, email FQRental.com

PARTNERSHIP IN PROTECTION Commercial Services 137 Canvasback Drive, St. Rose, LA 70087

(504) 486-5846

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

BEECHGROVE & CLAIBORNE HOMES

50

Tammy Schindler

Agnes Cardinale, Sales Executive

985-370-7213

BRENT COUTURE

MERIDIEN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 504-566-1777

504- 373-5581

804 Sherry Lane Westwego, LA 70094 Managed by NDC Real Estate Management

Jodie Luther 504-782-0746 2321 North Arnoult Rd., Metairie, La 70001 www.southlandplumbingsupply.com

GIONNE JOURDAN (856) 596-3008 GJOURDAN.MDC@COX.NET

For more Information or to apply contact: Multifamily Council Director, Kathy Barthelemy (504) 837-2700 or kathy@home-builders.org www.mfcno.com Affiliated with

1-888-521-8729


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS 3 BR SHOTGUN DBL

C-a/h, wd flrs, furn kit, hkps, shed, nr st car, fncd bkyd, no smkrs/pets. $850+dep. 504-858-5389, 491-4056

$950.00 Carrollton

Shared w/d, yard, good loc. 1 bdr, poss. 2 call 504 214-1601

French Quarter/ Faubourg Marigny 514 MADISON ST/ $1000

1st flr off Decatur. Two 1 br, 1 ba, liv, din area, kit, wd flrs, coin w/d. Eddie 861-4561. Grady Harper Inc

BEAUTIFUL 1BR APT

Cen AC/heat, w/d, enclosed courtyard, security buzzer. $800. Call 504-566-0585.

ESSENCE FEST RENTAL

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $600 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

FRENCH QUARTER APTS

Next to Rouses Grocery Store, furn/ unfurn, studio/1 BR, $650-$1200. Call 504-919-3426 or 504-581-6350.

FRENCH QUARTER CHARM

1226 Chartres. 1 bdrm apt, $900/mo. Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. Mike, 919-4583.

Lakeview/Lakeshore 6029 BELLAIRE - $1100

Renov, cute 3 br, 2 ba, liv, eat-in kit,w/ gas appls & granite, alarm, drive. Grady Harper Inc, 861-4551.

LakeFront

2023 BROADWAY

4601 S CLAIBORNE AVE

1042 SONIAT ST

2BR, 2011 GEN PERSHING

4610 CARONDELET

1629 2nd. Upper rear bright 1 br apt, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, pvt balc, w/d facil. $800/mo, lse, refs. 895-4726 or 261-7611. 3 bedrooms, 1.5 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, w/d, 1500 sf, 12’ ceils, $1400/mo. 504-952-5102

1106 BOURDEAUX ST

Spac 2 BR, 1 BA, frplc, cen a/h, porch, $1000/month w/ sec dep. 4 blks off St Charles. 504-891-7584 lv msg

1205 ST CHARLES AVE

Furn lux 1 br condo in conv location. Fully equip kit, gated pkg, fitness ctr. Call Mike for price, 281-798-5318.

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $975/mo. 504/495-6044

1205 ST. CHARLES

Hi-rise studio. Grt view, hdwd flrs, secure bldg, gated pkg, fitness center, pool. $850/mo. 504-432-6993.

1417 JOSEPH

GREAT LOCATION! Upper lg 3 br, 3 ba, furn kit, d/w, cen a/h, ceil fans, w/d on site. $1800/mo. 899-7657.

1702 DANTE ST

2 BR, liv, kit, bath. CH&A, Stove & fridge included. Access to pool & utility room. $800 per mo. Call 504-427-3284

1703 S CARROLLTON

2 br, 1 ba, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, balc, off st pkg. No pets. $1050/mo/dep. 504-865-9848 or 504-236-5757, email FQRental.com

Mid city 1 Bedroom Cottage 2-story, 1 bedroom cottage near Bayou St. John. Gas & Water paid by Owner. Hardwood floors. Wash/Dry hookup. Yard. Pets Negotiable. $760/mo. Available July 1st (504) 975-6137

121 1/2 N. CLARK ST.

1 BDRM - all appl, w/d hkps, lg clos., wtr pd. Walk to streetcar. 504-3436383 or 985-226-0340. $650 lse +dep.

1000 sf, 1 BR, liv rm, lrg furn kitchen, cen a/h, hkps, balc, off st prkng, no pets, $950/mo • 504-838-0065 2br 1ba,1/2 of a shotgun dbl. Apt incl. lvg rm, kit. demand loc. 1 blk off of Mag St. mins to Tulane/Loyola. 7 blks to St. Charles St. car. Perfect for profs or grad students! Sec Sys/Pd Mon. Hrdwd flrs W/D in unit, lge deck in bkyd Wrlss Incl. $1200/mth + sec. deposit 1 yr lse req. No pets or smokers. 310-597-9749

Spacious 3br/2ba, LR, Kit, apprx 1500sf. ca&h, c-fans, w/d, hrdwd,1blk off S. Carrollton. $1050/mo. Call 8662383 or 337-356-4497

7120 Willow Street, living room, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $700month+deposit. Call 504/283-7569

1 BDRM CLOSE TO UNIV

Clara St nr Nashvl. Renov Lg upr, 1 br, dr, lr, furn kit, uti rm w/hkps, cen a/h, wd flrs, ceil fans, w/d avl on site. $900/mo. Avl now. 895-0016.

2340 Dauphine Street

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 1201 CHARTRES #16 - 3bd/2.5ba $3000 930 ORLEANS - 2 bd/ 2 ba $2000 3935 MAGAZINE - Comm. $1500 1139 BURGUNDY - 1 bd/ 1 ba $1500 2625 ST. CHARLES - 1 bd/ 1 ba $1200 1224 BOURBON - Furn. Studio $1000 $900

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

5300 FRERET

3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/ all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd, off st pkg. Safe n’hood, sec sys all units. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

7535 JEANNETTE ST

1BR, bath, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lutcher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422

By Jefferson. Raised cottage, upper. Deluxe 2br, lux bath/jacuzzi. Furn, W&D, hrdwd flrs, 1400sf, $1300/mo includes gas. 899-3668.

7614 COHN STREET

5327 PRYTANIA ST

802 FERN ST

2BR, 1.5BA, Great loc! lux apt, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, wd flrs, 12ft ceils, fans, $1500/mo 504-444-1030

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $650/mo w/ wtr pd. No pets. 453-8996.

1BR/1BA, half a double, nice backyard, university area. $625/mo. 504-782-4848 Corner Maple. 2 or 3 br in hist, renov bldg, cen a/h, all appls, w/d, 12’ ceil. $1450-$1850/mo. 723-0001.

A UNIVERSITY AREA

4539 S Roman, 2000sf, 1/2 dbl, 2BR, 2BA, f-kit, w/d, c-a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd, $1100. 504-467-7052, 259-0043

CARROLLTON AVENUE

1 br, furn kit, a/c unit, hdwd flrs, fresh paint, sec gate. Sm pet ok w/dep. $675-$695/mo. Call 899-RENT.

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $590/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

ON HENRY CLAY AVE

Nr Aud Pk, 2 br apt, 1 ba, ac/ht, furn kit w/ w/d, hi ceils, hdwd flrs, sm patio. $1400/mo. 504/897-3816, 504/940-4831

VICTORIAN SHOTGUN

502 Washington, 2BR, 1BA, w/d, c-fans, wd flrs, c-a/h, sec, drvwy, pool, FREE Direct TV, $1095. 813-5822 trentaLs to share

CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

2 br, 1 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, c-a/h, w/d, c-fans, wd flr, drv, stor shed. Grady Harper, Inc. Eddie 861-4551.

4308 CONSTANCE ST

Renov apts, 1/2 blk from Napoleon, 2 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, vaulted ceils, mstr suite, sun porch, 2nd br loft, w/d, sec sys, deck, yard & shed. $1500/mo. 804-304-9864

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

French Quarter Realty 504-949-5400 911 N Derbigny 1/1 1204 Chartres 1/1.5 926 Port 2/1 1205 St Charles Studio 830 St Philip “G” 1/1 735 Esplanade “6” 1/1 1022 Toulouse “BC22’ 2/2 829 Ursulines #1 1/1 829 Ursulines #5 1/1 833 Ursulines #4 1/1 833 Ursulines #6 1/1 448 Julia Unit #219 1/1 718 Barracks 1/1 528 Gov Nicholls 1/1 739 ½ Gov Nicholls 1/1 3607 Magazine 1704 Napoleon 1/1 814 Orleans 1/1 210 Chartres “3E” 2/1 921 Chartres #9 2/1.5 1233 Esplanade #16 2/1 1720 Second 2/2 1028 Kelerec #1 1/1 1028 Kelerec #2 1/1 1028 Kelerec #3 1/1 1229 Royal 2/1.5

1 blk St Charles. Renov upr 1700 sf, 2 br, solarium, cov’d prch, cen a/h, Italian tile kit & ba, hdwd flrs, frplcs. $1500/mo. 723-0001.

5417 STORY ST

4106 STATE ST DR•$1000

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

1 BDRM - NEAR TULANE

Spac, lwr 3BR, 2BA, all ppls+w/d, fncd yd, off st prkg. $1650. Nr univ, hosp, cbd. Marie 504-2360644, 504-453-5047

Reduced SINGLE HOME RENOV $625 FQ,loft bd,great loc,hi ceil,ctyd $975 half double,ss app,ctyd,pets ok $1200 St. car Line, Pool, Pkng, Gym $850 Hi Ceils,Lg Balc,Prkng,Exc Loc $1995 Hdwd Flrs, Ctyd, Exc Loc $850 Pkng,Pvt Balcs,Ingnd Pool $2200 furnished w/wifi, tile floors $950 Lotsofwindows,newcarpet,crtyrd$1050 tile floors,courtyard,525 sqft $800 Upperrearunit,newcarpet,600sqft$1000 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950 Carriage house w/Priv Pool&Ctyd.$1800 carriage house w/ crtyrd $1025 Util included, furn., great loc! $1000 Commerical, 750 sqft $2000 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $800 new kitch&bath,great location $1500 Fully furnished apt.w/d on site $1450 condoindesirableblock,HUGEcrtyrd!$1700 2 level apt,ss appls,pool&prkng $1000 parking,big kitch,big back yard $1300 nice lay out,great loc,water paid $950 wd flrs, central air, water paid $950 d/w, great loc, water paid $950 street balc,prkng,prime loc $1800

FURNISHED CORPORATE UPSCALE SPACIOUS 2 & 3 BEDROOM CONDOS. SECURED PARKING, GYM, POOL, INTERNET. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. New Orleans-Algiers Point river front! Convenient to everything. The longer the stay, the better the deal. Multiple rental discounts. Minimum term is one month. W/D, alarm syst, high ceils, exp. brick, balcs & priv rooftop decks.

Large storage closets, Direct tv. Wide screen tv! King size master bed bedroom, 2.5 bathrooms. Extra queen sofa bed in living room. All you need is your bag! Completely corporate furnished! Friendly active neighborhood. 3 minute walk to free Algiers Point ferry which takes 8 scenic minutes landing at Canal St. At Harrah's casino/ French Quarter and Central Business District.

FROM $2500/MO! A DEAL FOR 1700 SQ. FT!

Call owner 504-366-7374 or 781-608-6115 cell for best deal! 323 Morgan St., New Orleans, LA 70114

MOV

E IN

TOD AY

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

uptown/garden district

Totally renov 1 br plus study, SS appls, wd flrs. 24 hr sec. $1695/mo. Call Debbie w/L & B, O/A. 952-0959.

Napoleon nr St Charles, one of the best apts you will see! 1,500 sq ft living space, c-a/h, hdwd flrs, no pets, near universities. 2011 Gen Pershing, Avail 6/1, water paid. Paula 952-3131

3216 PRYTANIA - Upper

2 bedrooms, washer/dryer, cen a/h, pool, closet space, water included. $885/mo. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

Upstairs, 1 bedroom, liv rm, din rm, kit w/ appls incld, front porch. $750/ month. Call 504-606-1845

2 BR, 1 BA - $1200/mo

Best apt you’ll see! $1200/mo. Near the univs, beaut nb’hood, 1500 sq ft living space, 1 BA, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, No pets. Avail NOW. Paula 952-3131

4917 S MIRO ST

1726 FOUCHER

1837 DUBLIN (at Cohn)

Cls to univ/hosp/Lusher, beaut lrg 3 independent BR w/ cntr hall, lr, dr, furn kit, d/w, w/d, 1BA, wd flrs, scrnd prch. $1350 • 504-895-2683

2BR/1BA CONSTANCE ST

1750 ST CHARLES #424

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

539 DUMAINE - 1 bd/ 1 ba

1/2 BLOCK ST CHARLES

51


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1 BLOCK FROM DOWNTOWN CASINO

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

looking for sexy

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

YOUR CONDO COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

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office

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office: email: mzarou@latterblum.com

Michael Zarou


BULLETIN BOARD TOO CLASSIFIEDS career opportunity COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Twenty-nine years ago, the first issue of gambit was published. Today, this locally owned multimedia company provides the Greater New Orleans area with an awardwinning newspaper and Web site (bestofneworleans.com) and sponsors many cultural events.

Advertising Account Executive Outside sales, Print, Web and event advertising

Gambit has an excellent career opportunity reserved for an ambitious and motivated self-starter. As a member of our successful advertising team you’ll sell display print, web and event advertising space to a diverse and exciting group of clients, business owners and advertising decision-makers at restaurants, boutiques, home furnishings stores, medical offices, spas, entertainment venues, etc. Account execs assess clients’ needs, are involved in the development of advertising sales campaigns, and work with our graphic designers to develop the ads. The ideal candidate will be outgoing, hard working, and personable, with a great sense of humor. A successful Account Executive understands that you get back what you put into this career. If you’d enjoy a fast-paced media environment, and thrive on relationship building, we encourage you to apply. Base pay with commission, plus bonus potential. The offer for this full-time position includes a benefits package (health insurance, 401 (k) plan, paid vacation, paid holidays, personal and sick time). Send cover letter and resume, email option: hr@gambitweekly.com. Fax option: (504) 483-3158, Mail option: Gambit Communications, attn: Human resources, 3923 bienville st., new Orleans, la 70119. No phone calls please.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUNE 29 > 2010

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T:9”

T:10.25”

Enjoy Heineken Light Responsibly. ©2010 Heineken USA Inc., White Plains, NY

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Gambit- June 29, 2010