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Low Expectations

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dropped to 179; in 2009, with a slightly larger population, New Orleans’ murder rate fell again, slightly, to 174. During the last three calendar years of Riley’s watch, with the city’s population growing, New Orleans’ murder rate went down almost 15 percent. It held steady in 2010, with 175 murders. When Gambit interviewed Serpas on June 6 of this year, the number remained flat: 90 murders by that date in 2011 compared to 90 murders during the same time frame in 2010. One factor in Pennington’s success, Serpas told us, was “a very robust expansion of NORD (New Orleans Recreation Department) in giving young people quality afternoon experiences that might help them learn how to deal with conflict.” NORD suffered terribly under former Mayor Ray

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Nagin. Landrieu, by contrast, has doubled NORD’s budget and opened more swimming pools and summer camps. The city also has expanded a summer job-training program for teenagers. Bottom line: Serpas now has that tool in his belt, and citizens therefore should expect better results in the crime figures. Clearly, New Orleans has societal and systemic problems that long predate Serpas’ arrival as chief. Still, a goal of reducing the city’s murder rate by 5 percent isn’t going to cut it among a population weary of bullets and bodies. Serpas has broadcast his expectations when it comes to officers’ conduct. He should be equally vociferous when it comes to curbing violent crime. If we’re going to eliminate the “soft bigotry of low expectations” that stifle too many of our city’s youth, it’s time to raise the expectations of our police force as well.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

he soft bigotry of low expectations.” That famous phrase was coined by White House speechwriter Michael Gerson for thenPresident George W. Bush, who was defending his No Child Left Behind education agenda. Regardless of how one feels about No Child Left Behind, Bush’s underlying point was a sound one: If you set high goals and provide appropriate support, people usually meet your expectations, and then some. That’s why it was so disheartening to learn last week that New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas had set one of NOPD’s most important goals so low. In a March report to Mayor Mitch Landrieu, Serpas wrote that he aimed to reduce the city’s murder rate by 5 percent. Five percent? In 1996, then-chief Richard Pennington, Serpas’ mentor and close friend, went before the New Orleans City Council and boldly pledged to reduce the city’s recordlevel murder rate by 50 percent in three years — if the council would devote more resources to NOPD, including a long-overdue pay raise for officers. Pennington got the resources, and he kept his promise. Last month, in a one-on-one interview, Gambit asked Serpas if he could make the same promise. He said he couldn’t, due to a variety of factors. “Things were completely different in 1996,” he said. “In 1996 our department did not do a very good job at several things: We were not coordinated across the department between detectives and officers. … We also had very little effort at all in investigating less-than-lethal events. In fact, most of them just ended up in a file cabinet. And nobody ever did any follow-up. … Now, 15 years later, we’re still doing a much better job of a decentralized investigative strategy, so we can’t really advance that much compared to what we did 15 years ago.” Fair enough, but a mere 5 percent reduction is not acceptable. Cutting the murder rate by 5 percent in 2011 would save less than one life a month. In a city that’s still known worldwide as a murder capitol, now led by a mayor and police chief who came in as reformers, cutting the murder rate by nine people this year is just not good enough — particularly in a city with a population substantially smaller than the one Pennington policed. When Warren Riley was police chief (September 2005 to May 2010), the murder numbers bounced up and down. From 2006 to 2007, for example, New Orleans saw murders spike from 160 to 210. In fairness to Riley and NOPD, the city’s post-Katrina population also rose significantly during those two years. In 2008, as the city continued to repopulate, the rate

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DEAR JOHN, Yes. Maps show Bayou St. John extended into areas much closer to the French Quarter, but we have to go way back to explain. Shortly after the last ice age ended, glaciers began to melt and the seas began to rise again. About 4,000 B.C. the shoreline stabilized along the Gulf much as it is today, except for Louisiana. Its shoreline is believed to have been about where the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain is today. The Mississippi River continued to build deltas in the area, creating a bay about 2,000 years ago that we now know as Lake Pontchartrain. The lower Mississippi had changed course several times — and still continues to try. Until we built levees, the river overflowed its banks annually, and this water seeking the Gulf carved out bayou tributaries. It is believed this process created Bayous Metairie and Gentilly flowing between the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain. Bayou St. John, once known as Bayou Choupic by the Acolapissa Indians, originally formed about 500 years ago as a tributary of Bayous Metairie and Gentilly. Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville and his brother Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville explored the lower Mississippi River in 1699. During this trip, they were shown the river terminus of a portage (the way to go from one body of water to another) that led to Bayou Choupic (St. John). It was on March 9 that Iberville wrote, “The Indian who accompanied me revealed a terminus of the portage from the southern shore of the bay where the Indian boats land in order to descend this river. They drag their boats along a fine path …” This portage eventually led to the decision to develop a city at the site of present-day New Orleans, and the “fine path” later became Bayou Road, the oldest road in New Orleans. HEY BLAKE, WHEN I WAS A LITTLE BOY, I REMEMBER TRAVELING ALL THE WAY TO THE END OF DAVID DRIVE TO VETERANS HIGHWAY. THERE WAS LITTLE THERE EXCEPT FOR THE CHECKERBOARD WATER TANK, BUT THERE WAS A BIG NEW STORE THAT ONLY GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES COULD ACCESS. I REMEMBER IT AS GEX, AS IN GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEE EXCHANGE.

Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville decided to found New Orleans in its present location largely because what is now Bayou Road provided a way to move boats and goods from the Mississippi River to Bayou St. John.

WHAT’S THE HISTORY OF THIS STORE, AND WHAT’S THERE NOW? GEORGE GILLESPIE

DEAR GEORGE, You must have been a little boy in 1963 because that’s when the GEX came to Jefferson Parish. Located at 7000 Veterans Highway, it was a membership department store, an early version of Sam’s Club or Costco. You had to fill out an application form, provide proof of eligibility and pay a $2 membership fee. But you were eligible if you were an active or retired member of one of many different groups: federal government; state government; city government; parish government; a school, college or university; school board; armed forces or National Guard or an employee of a company having all or a substantial portion of its production under contract with city, parish, state or federal government. As you can see, this covers a lot of folks. Your $2 got you a lifetime membership card and an extra one for your spouse. Then you could take advantage of all the benefits. The store carried more than 90,000 brand-name items ranging from groceries to gasoline and fashion to furniture. Other services included an auto service center, an optical service, shoe repair, a cafeteria, dry cleaning and more. The store closed in 1976, but now that you’re a big boy you can drive to the Barlon Plaza Shopping Center, where all the shops will let you in without a membership card.


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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“We already make sure criminals know their rights. Before police arrest someone they inform them of all their rights under the law, so it’s only common sense that we would do the same for women before they get an abortion. Women deserve to know their legal rights and the protections already afforded to them under the law, and we are confident that the more they know, the more they will choose life.” — Gov. Bobby Jindal on July 6, as he signed into law HB 636. Among its provisions: clinics that perform abortions will need new signage throughout outlining “pregnancy resources”; women seeking appointments will be directed first to the state Department of Health & Hospitals “abortions alternative” website; and any outpatient abortion facility that has a nonphysician performing abortions can have its license revoked by the state.

The Social (Non-Smoking) Network THE FATE OF SMOKING AT FINN MCCOOL’S IRISH PUB IS IN CUSTOMERS’ HANDS. BY ALE X WOODWARD

T

“The other candidates think they can take the check and do the right thing, and they can’t. I need one out of 100 Americans to give me $100, and in the age of the Internet, it’s very possible. That’s where I am.” — Former governor Buddy Roemer, who has acknowledged he is running for president, telling the National Journal his plans for campaign fundraising.

casinos and other smoking Pauline and Stevenues are workplaces like phen Patterson, any other where smoking is owners of Finn typically prohibited. McCool’s Irish Pub, With legislation on the devised a ‘social experiment’ in table earlier this year, other nonsmoking for bars were bracing for the their customers. worst — having to force their smoking patrons out the door. Others adapted preemptively. In 2010 and 2011, Let’s Be Totally Clear has collected a growing list of smoke-free bars, with large and popular joints like d.b.a., Maison and Tipitina’s going nonsmoking. The campaign continues to sponsor nights of music and music festivals (like Foburg in the Faubourg Marigny), with venues pledging to go smoke-free for those events. Those that made the smoke-free switch did not necessar-

“Today, the state with the lowest adult obesity rate would have had the highest rate in 1995.” — Jeff Levi, executive director of the Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), which last week released its annual report about obesity in America. With an obesity rate of 31.6 percent, Louisiana ranked as the fifth most obese state in the nation — below only Mississippi, Alabama, West Virginia and Tennessee. Fifteen years ago, TFAH said, only 17 percent of Louisianans were clinically obese. PAGE 11

c'est what? WHEN DO YOU THINK THE NFL LOCKOUT WILL BE OVER?

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Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

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Does the continuing expansion of social media like Facebook and Google+ make you worried about your privacy?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

the legendary jazz trumpeter who began his career as a “society jazz” player in the 1920s, will celebrate his 100th birthday July 17. Generally acknowledged as the world’s oldest working jazz musician, Ferbos is still a fixture at the Palm Court Jazz Cafe each Saturday night. The club will host a sold-out party for him on his birthday, but at press time tickets were still available for his regular Saturday gig July 16.

Mike McKenzie,

former cornerback for the New Orleans Saints, spent part of his Fourth of July weekend helping New Orleans Area Habitat for Humanity (NOAHH) build a house in the Carrollton neighborhood. The effort represented a partnership with McKenzie’s nonprofit 34 Ways Foundation, which provides guidance and support for impoverished children. Current Saints Danny Clark and Mark Ingram lent NOAHH and McKenzie a hand.

American Standard Brands,

the New Jersey-based manufacturer of kitchen and bath plumbing products, is donating more than 1,500 fixtures and accessories to the St. Bernard Project (SBP), the group that has served as a rebuilding model in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. The donation includes toilets, faucets, showerheads and accessories. To date, SBP has built 352 homes in the area and has another 47 projects in progress.

Judge Reginald T. Badeaux III,

a state district court judge in St. Tammany Parish, was publicly censured by the Louisiana Supreme Court for not recusing himself in a divorce case in which the divorcing couple were friends of his. The court found he continued to socialize with the husband and “engaged in ex parte communications with him regarding child custody.” The court noted that Badeaux did not gain any “personal advantage” as a result of the improper conduct, but it assessed him more than $1,400 in court costs.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

o go smoke free or not?” That simple question, posted June 27 on Finn McCool’s Irish Pub’s Facebook wall, sparked a debate whether the popular Mid-City neighborhood bar should hang the no smoking sign permanently. The bar did go smoke-free — but only for one day, in what the owners call a “social experiment.” The bar has scheduled another “experiment,” this time during its typically super-crowded trivia night July 11. (One of the bar’s Facebook respondents wrote, “Pub Quiz Night alone is enough to give me Second Hand emphysema.”) “That’s been one of the biggest complaints over the years — that it’s smoky — but it’s never really hurt business,” says Finn’s owner Stephen Patterson. “We’re not really looking at it from a business perspective but from our customers’ concerns, from the general dialogue between everybody.” This year, legislators in Baton Rouge once again introduced a potential ban on smoking in bars and casinos in Louisiana, an almost-annual legislative ritual that just as often is butted out. This year the Louisiana Senate knocked down the measure with a 15-22 vote, despite the Senate Health & Welfare Committee’s approval and all signs pointing to a “yes” vote. Sen. Rob Marionneaux, D-Grosse Tete, wrote the bill and pushed a similar bill last year, saying, “How many more studies do we need before we do the right thing and make bars and casinos in Louisiana smoke-free?” The Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco Free Living’s Let’s Be Totally Clear initiative has pursued an aggressive ad campaign, calling for bar and casino employees’ rights to clean air and pointing to health studies showing the ill effects of barroom smoke. It argued that bars,

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ily throw their support behind legislation — Robert LeBlanc of Republic New Orleans, Capdeville, LePhare and loa, for example, says bar and club owners should have the right to decide the rules of their business, though LeBlanc prohibits smoking in all his venues. The bill was defeated in June. Now, bars are deciding their smoking policies, free of interference from lawmakers.

sMOKeRs JaNe MOLiNaRY aNd RYaN Platner, sitting at the bar at finn’s for a New York Yankees game, say they wouldn’t mind a smoke-free bar, but both see there’s room for a compromise — splitting the bar into halves: smoke-free and smokefriendly. Others wouldn’t mind the new rules — a group of smokers around a pub table wouldn’t mind walking outside for a change. finn’s customers at the bar and on facebook argue there’s more to the MidCity destination than smoking. Of the bar’s eight employees, two are smokers. The “social experiment” had neither a positive nor a negative effect on their tip buckets, but the bartenders — employees the Let’s Be Totally Clear

campaign aims to protect — are split: They say a smoke-free bar would be nice, even for smokers, but what about their customers, especially the late-night clientele, forced to sit outside on Banks street, or the chain-smoking video poker players who would have to walk outside repeatedly — which could become a safety issue late at night. These are the questions many bars considering a smokefree space will have to ponder as long as bar-smoke legislation continues to fail in the state. “i guess we’re trying it bit by bit,” Patterson says. “Our next step might be to do a regular day every week — every sunday in august, or something like that. if that’s what people want that’s what we’ll provide for them.” while finn’s continues its “social experiments,” the social network smoking debate continues. Compare one facebook page, “New Orleans smoking ban supporters should be deported to utah” (with only 18 “likes”) to “New Orleans Needs More Non-smoking Live Music Venues!,” with 241. One finn’s commenter wrote, “if y’all go smoke-free, i’ll do your advertisements for free for a year.” The Pattersons largely stayed out of the “To go smoke free or not?” thread, preferring to see what customers told them, but Pauline chimed in with the bar’s take: “i’m a nonsmoker but i don’t believe i have a right to tell people not to smoke. “ … i don’t think smoking should be legislated ... it is a personal right. i have never and will never vote for it to be banned. … The decision we make will obviously piss off half of you ... as the camp is divided. i wish we could all just get along. … whatever decision we make, we will take on board what you’ve all said and try to accommodate everyone as best we can.”

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“i would work for $100 a day in Louisiana rather than $150 a day here. in Louisiana, the word there is that the governor is still grateful for the work we did.” — Miguel Ramirez, an undocumented worker who moved from New Orleans to Tuscaloosa, Ala. in search of tornadorelated construction jobs. On June 9, Ala. Gov. Robert Bentley signed a stiff illegalimmigration bill which will take effect in September. Among its provisions: all businesses must verify citizenship of their employees with the federal government;

it will become a crime to give an illegal immigrant a ride; and law enforcement officers will have power to check papers in cases they determine “reasonable suspicion exists.”

Primary ConCerns

Louisiana’s presidential preference primaries were never a very big deal, but state Republican officials are happy that state lawmakers pushed back the date of both party primaries from late february to late March 2012. had legislators not mandated

the later date, the state’s delegation to the GOP convention in Tampa, fla., next august could have been cut in half. The new primary dates were set by lawmakers in house Bill 509 by state Rep. Nita Hutter, R-Chalmette, which Gov. Bobby Jindal signed into law as act 293 of the 2011 Regular session. The law mandates that presidential preference primaries (along with certain other local and municipal elections) be held on the “third saturday after the first Tuesday in March” starting in 2012. That puts Louisiana’s page 13

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

PaTTeRsON aNd his wife PauLiNe, The owners of finn McCool’s, came up with the idea: their “social experiment” asked customers to keep smoking outside while the bar went smoke-free from its opening hours to close, for just one day. The crowd that afternoon on June 26 was thin — kickball players trickled in, regulars surrounded the bar and the Boo Koo BBQ kitchen was open. But gone was the smoke, save the lingering smell from the night before. The Pattersons, both nonsmokers, say sales were normal and the bar’s facebook wall filled with messages of thanks. The Pattersons’ inbox, however, was filled with less positive messages. Many customers, including regulars and nonsmokers, boycotted the day (though the Pattersons said the cash register saw no difference than a typical day at the bar). Responses to the “smoke-free or not?” question, they say, were split down the middle. But they also say many of their smoking customers liked the idea of a ban. “Ninety percent of people are in the middle — you get 5 percent extremes on one end that want to ban smoking and think all smokers should be drawn, strung and quartered,” Patterson says. “Then you get the people on the other end who say, ‘if you do this, it’s like an anti-human rights thing.’ The overwhelming majority is in the middle and saying whatever will be will be. smoking is legal — they expect there’s going to be smoking in a pub.”

The Pattersons say business at irish pubs took a significant hit in places like New York, where smoking was banned in 2003, and in ireland, where smoking was banned in 2004. “we’re listening to our customers that come here all the time,” Patterson says. “we’re not looking to get a new set of customers, and we’re not looking to change the customers we already have. it’s just something that’s come up.” Cassandra Contreras, coordinator for the Louisiana Campaign for Tobacco-free Living, says the experiment is a “great idea.” “They’re being proactive, but they’re being cautious,” she says. “They have concerns, but they’re taking the steps to at least try it out.” Other neighborhoods, she says, are trying similar experiments — in uptown, Grit’s Bar goes smoke-free from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. sundays, and Phillip’s Restaurant and Bar hosts a smoke-free friday the first week of every month. “Neighborhoods are reaching out to the campaign, and talking to their bars,” she says. finn’s neighbors — like 12 Mile Limit, Pal’s Lounge, Mid-City Yacht Club and The Bulldog — remain smoke-friendly, for now.

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scuttlebutt page 11

A Bike-Friendly City

Dan Jatres, pedestrian and bicycle program manager for the Regional Planning Commission (RPC), last week called on the New Orleans City Council to support the city’s application to the League of American Bicyclists’ Bicycle Friendly Community program. The program’s list of 180 bike-friendly cities has three rankings: bronze, silver and gold. New Orleans earned only “honorable mention” rankings the last three years it applied for the designation. Jatres says he hopes to see New Orleans receive at least a bronze designation this year, based on how the city has “shifted its philosophy to a multimodal transportation approach,” which accounts for bikes and pedestrians as well as motor vehicles. In his presentation to the council, Jatres highlighted the city’s bike improvements, including the 30 miles of bike paths added within the last year (bringing the citywide total to 42 miles, with another 30 in development). He noted the RPC’s workshops with engineers, city planners and law enforcement and its public outreach campaigns for bicycle awareness and safety. District C Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer introduced a resolution in support of Jatres’ request, adding that the city is in the “top six in the country for bike riding.” The resolution includes a measure to establish goals to get New Orleans a gold designation by 2018 — an ambitious goal, Jatres told Gambit, but he said the city has to “ramp up its efforts” and commitment to bike projects to meet the pace of “gold” cities like San Francisco and Minneapolis, and the “platinum” rank of Portland, Ore. Louisiana currently ranks 24th among the states in the Bicycle Friendly America 2010 rankings, with “F” grades in bicycle infrastructure, policies and programs, evaluation and planning. For a Bicycle Friendly Community designation, the league judges cities on “engineering, education, encouragement, enforcement and evaluation and planning.” A national advisory group selects the winners. Selected cities receive no direct financial benefit, but the designation serves as leverage for potential funding. The 2008 honorable mention made the city eligible for a Bikes Belong grant. — Alex Woodward

SAenger ConStruCtion BACk on trACk

Faced with construction hammers going silent at the Saenger Theater and other historic rehabilitation projects across the state, Gov. Bobby Jindal and state legislators ushered through a four-

year extension of a historic preservation tax credit that would have expired at year’s end. The governor signed the extension bill July 8 at a ceremony at the Saenger, where construction stopped for a period in March after investors, acting on concerns the tax credit might not be renewed, asked that all financial transactions for the project be put on hold. In order to resume work until the tax credit issue could be resolved, the city fronted more than $1.1 million to the $45.8 million restoration project, showing confidence in the legislature to deliver the extension, H.B. 63 by Sen. Ed Murray, D-New Orleans. The measure also was backed by preservationists and developers who warned that projects were in jeopardy, and by state lawmakers like Rep. Walt Leger III, D-New Orleans, who warned of lost jobs and lost revenue from unrealized taxes on income, sales and property. “The extension of the commercial historic tax credit, at the end of the day, was truly a no-brainer,” Leger said. With financing back on track, the curtain is scheduled to rise again in late 2012 at the 84-year-old theater. House Bill 63, also signed by Jindal, extends a similar tax credit for residential properties until 2016. The Louisiana Legislature unanimously passed both bills. Public money and state and federal tax credits will fund a large portion of the Saenger’s resurrection. In addition to more than $6 million in state commercial historic preservation credits, there is about $9 million in federal historic preservation and new market tax credits and $13 million in Community Development Block Grant money. Commercial preservation projects like the Saenger and the Bywater Art Lofts generate a state tax credit amount equal to 25 percent of the cost of restoration; the tax credits are then purchased by investors to lower their state income tax liability. Investors also sell them to companies and wealthy individuals. The state has provided $135 million in tax credits to 124 projects since the program began in 2002. The projects have produced more than $650 million in investment, 11,000 construction jobs and 5,700 permanent jobs, Jindal said. Had the tax credit not been extended, alternative plans for a lower level of funding would have been used, said Gary Elkins, an attorney for the Saenger Theater Partnership. It would have meant a smaller stage, which in turn would mean larger productions, such as the Broadway musical Wicked, which played on the Mahalia Jackson Theater’s larger stage in 2010, would not be able to be staged at the Saenger. — Michael Joe

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 12 > 2011

next primaries on March 24, 2012. In 2010, both national political parties took steps to impose order on their respective primary calendars. Those steps came in response to attempts by many states — including Louisiana — to one-up each other by scheduling their primaries earlier and earlier in the election year, hoping to garner more attention from candidates and the media. Traditionally, the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary kick off the presidential campaign season, followed closely by the Nevada caucuses and the South Carolina primary. In an attempt to maintain those states’ traditional edge — and head off the trend of frontloaded primaries and caucuses — both parties’ national committees agreed to start the primary season in February, reserving the earliest dates for the four traditional leadoff states. Under the new rules, all other states must wait until March 6, 2012 or later to hold delegate selection caucuses or primaries. The GOP put some teeth into the new rule by threatening to downsize convention delegations from states that don’t comply. (The Democrats have the same rule, but many felt it would not be followed in 2012 because President Barack Obama is the presumptive nominee anyway.) Louisiana had previously set its presidential primaries for late February, putting the state GOP afoul of the new rule. Hutter introduced the measure at the request of GOP officials who wanted to avoid losing half the state’s delegation next year. The measure sailed through the House but had a bumpy ride in the Senate. It was initially sidetracked in the Senate and Governmental Affairs Committee when Democratic senators, joined by two of their GOP colleagues, voted to “defer” the bill. After an outcry from GOP officials (and some sharply worded emails to the GOP senators who voted initially to kill the bill), the Senate committee reconsidered the measure at a special meeting two days later. In a 5-4 vote along party lines, the bill was reported out of committee. It then passed the Senate by a vote of 27-9 — with three Republican senators voting against it and most Senate Democrats voting for it. The House unanimously concurred in several Senate amendments, and Jindal signed the bill into law on June 28. “Both national parties had agreed to this new process,” said state GOP Chairman Roger Villere Jr. of Metairie. “The new law is the right thing to do because it agrees with our national party’s position.” — Clancy DuBos

13


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Down-Ballot Fireworks ith Gov. Bobby Jindalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity still well above 50 percent among Louisiana voters and the state Democratic Party still without a lead horse to run against him, the Oct. 22 gubernatorial primary is shaping up as a hohum affair. Several down-ballot contests, however, could provide some fireworks. The likeliest statewide contests to create some sparks are those for lieutenant governor and secretary of state, and possibly attorney general. Republicans currently hold all statewide offices up for grabs this fall. Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser has announced his candidacy against fellow Republican Jay Dardenne in the lieutenant governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race, and there is talk other GOP challengers may emerge. Nungesser, a businessman, will have the financial resources needed to make this race competitive. So far, the lieutenant governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race is shaping up as an all-GOP affair but, considering Jindalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national ambitions, that race could become the marquee contest this year. If Jindal doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t finish his anticipated second term, the race for lieutenant governor effectively becomes a race to succeed Jindal as governor. Democratic

W

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Party Chair Buddy Leach has declared his partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intention to compete for all statewide offices, and the race for lieutenant governor would be a good place to start fielding top-shelf candidates. Qualifying for all offices is Sept. 6-8. The Secretary of Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race has drawn at least one major Democratic challenger to Republican incumbent Tom Schedler â&#x20AC;&#x201D; attorney Caroline Fayard. Fayard ran a respectable race for lieutenant governor last year but stumbled earlier this year when she uttered her now infamous â&#x20AC;&#x153;I hate Republicansâ&#x20AC;? remarks in Washington Parish. In addition to being quotable, she will be well-financed. Also challenging Schedler is state Rep. Walker Hines of New Orleans. Hines, who was elected to the House as a Democrat in 2007, switched parties last year. Other candidates for secretary of state appear likely, including House Speaker Jim Tucker, R-Algiers, who is term limited. Attorney General Buddy Caldwell, who also switched parties after the GOP sweep in 2010, has no announced major opponents, but state Senate President Joel Chaisson II, D-Destrehan, is said to be giving serious

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consideration to challenging Caldwell. If he runs, Chaisson will pose a significant threat to Caldwell. In addition to the statewide down-ballot races, local contests will give voters plenty to chew on. Jefferson Parish voters will get their first chance to consider the political fates of all parish officials since the scandals of the Aaron Broussard administration first rocked

In addition to the statewide down-ballot races, local contests will give voters plenty to chew on.

the Gretna courthouse 18 months ago. Broussard and several top aides have since resigned, triggering a mild reshuffling of the political deck in Jefferson. But voters have not yet had an opportunity to vet all parish officials â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from parish president to assessor, from clerk of court to council members â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all at once. That will happen in October. In New Orleans, at least four judgeships will be on the ballot, and each is a citywide contest. Two judgeships at Civil District Court and one at Criminal Court are on the ballot after recent resignations. Civil Court Judges Madeleine Landrieu and Rose Ledet won seats on the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeal last year, and they will take those offices on Jan. 1, 2012. Landrieu and Ledet formally submitted their resignation letters last week, triggering special elections in October. Criminal Court Judge Terry Alarconâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recently announced retirement and the death of Traffic Court Judge Dennis Dannel in January likewise have triggered races for those seats in the fall. All four judicial contests are expected to draw multiple candidates, making the downballot races the ones to watch in October.

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Lot of Aryan Brotherhood? You got a lot of diehard AB’ers out there, but you also got a lot of oldschool Southern rockers that just want a ZZ Top tattoo. What’s the meaning behind teardrops? Depends on the state you’re in. Some people wear them to count time under their left eye. Under the right, it signifies a dead homeboy. For some it’s the number of people they’ve killed. In Louisiana, it doesn’t mean as much — they just wear teardrops to be having them. In Texas, a lot of tattoos are gang related. Did doing tattoos help you pass the time in prison?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

Yes. When they find out you can do tattoos, it’s a never-ending process. There is always somebody next on the list who wants to get tattooed. When you don’t have money or support on the

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outside that becomes your hustle and trade. It’s like having a job on the street. Regardless, I’ve always really enjoyed doing it. Who is the best tattoo artist you’ve encountered in prison? Uncle Pete at Angola. Been there 30-something years. Everybody knows him. He charges a lot, but he’s well worth it. You’re a smart and well-spoken guy. How did you get started in the criminal life? I got married at 17. Had a son at 18. Went to work for a petrochemical company making $27 an hour in 1981. Bought a new double-wide, a pickup, put my wife in a Trans-Am. I had a bass boat, a four-wheeler, a catfish pond, four acres of land, a dog, a cat and a horse. Even a horse trailer. But every day I did the same thing: get up, go to work, come home, watch TV and listen to the wife gripe. It got old. I got tired

of it. Felt like I was missing something. You can have everything and it’s still not enough. So I started riding with a motorcycle club in Texas. Got into the methamphetamine trade in the ’80s. Transporting from El Paso to Beaumont. But I didn’t get into real trouble till I started doing it. Drugs and girls. I lost my head. Went downhill from there. Sold to an undercover narc and got a slew of dope charges. Bang. Straight to prison. Did the outlaw lifestyle suit you at the time? I ain’t going to lie; I loved it, but it ain’t an easy life. I’m having a hell of a time getting a job now because of it. When I apply for a job, they see me. That’s strike one. Next is the background check, then it’s over. People can tell these are prison tattoos — no color in them. They automatically deem that I’m a bad person. That makes it hard. What’s the moral to the story? Don’t do the crime unless you can do the time … because you have to live with the consequences. You can be rebellious without going to prison. My advice to young guys: just do right and stay away from it. I’m here to tell you it ain’t where you want to be. I lived it over 20 years. Now I’m back out here, trying to find a job. There ain’t nothing fun about prison. It’s not glamorous. When the lights go out, you’re there by yourself. Ain’t nobody can help you but you. And it ain’t going to get no better. And it can always get worse … at any moment. What’s next for Victor Sandifer? Where’s the road lead? I’m getting old. I’m 47. Feel like I’m running out of time. If I catch another felony, it’s three strikes and I’m over with. I ain’t been perfect, I’ve made mistakes, but I’m a good person. I don’t like violence, but I won’t let anybody run over me — that’s a man thing; you take care of your business. Eventually, you have to make a change. But at a certain age, nobody wants to hire you for anything. It’s hard just to get somebody to give you a chance … hard, hard. I just want a little job where I can work and enjoy what I’m doing. Pay the bills. Not make a fortune — just get by. Just do my little thing and be happy. I just need somebody to give me a chance. Just a break, that’s all. Just a shot. — Dege Legg, aka Brother Dege, is a writer and musician living in Lafayette. His name is pronounced “deej leg.” His website is www.degelegg.com.


®

For one week, the best bartenders don’t work in bars. One time a year the international cocktail community converges on New Orleans for Tales of the Cocktail®. That time is finally here again. See the world’s best bartenders in action at the United States Bartender’s Guild Piña Colada Competition, Spirited Dinner® Series and countless other events during Tales of the Cocktail® 2011.

Tickets are still available to several spirited events.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 12 > 2011

To get your tickets visit www.TalesoftheCocktail.com.

22


ART: HAITI PHOTOS AT THE OGDEN PAGE 41 EVENTS: THE AIR SEX CHAMPIONSHIPS PAGE 45 CUISINE: MAYAS ON MAGAZINE PAGE 49

LOUISIANA

MADE

BRITNEY SPEARS DOES IT AGAIN AT THE NEW ORLEANS ARENA PAGE 27


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 29 36 39 42 45 49 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > JUL << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Into the Woods revisits a host of fairy tale characters all trying to fulfill particular dreams, though with more modern ideas and means. Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Rapunzel, a rapping witch and others cross paths as their wishes collide. Tickets $28-$37. 8 Retrospective p.m. Thu.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. 8 P.M. SATURDAY; 3 Tulane University, Dixon P.M. SUNDAY Hall, 865-5269; www.summerlyric.tulane.edu LOYOLA UNIVERSITY,

Into the Woods

ROUSSEL HALL, 6363 ST. CHARLES AVE.; WWW.LEDTNEWORLEANS.COM TICKETS $20

Reunion Dance LULA ELZY DANCE THEATRE CELEBRATES ITS 20TH ANNIVERSARY BY WILL COVIELLO

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Booker T. Washington High School suggested she apply to NOCCA for her senior year of high school. Though she had not previously studied dance, Elzy decided to try it. “I was always in the library,” she says. “I found some books about dance, and I just brought the pictures to life.” As a dancer and choreographer, Elzy focuses on modern dance, based on the Horton technique, developed by Lester Horton and based on his ideas about a whole body approach emphasizing flexibility, strength and freedom of movement. Elzy attended SUNO, but she finished her degree at the Alvin Ailey American Dance Center, which offered credits for dance study. She lives and works part time in Dayton, Ohio, where she is a choreographer for The Muse Machine, a high school arts program. Her list of accomplishments and credits include a Kennedy Center fellowship in Washington D.C., and a choreography credit for a classical ballet adaptation of Porgy and Bess in the former Soviet Union. But Lula Elzy Dance Theatre was created because of a break with classical ballet. “I wanted to do a holiday show that wasn’t the same old thing for Christmas,” she says. “(Clarinetist) Victor Goines is a friend of mine. He told me there was a Duke Ellington arrangement for Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker. (Ellington’s) Nutcracker Suite became the basis for our first show.”

A pet project of Black Key Patrick Carney (whose indie imprint Audio Eagle issued its 2008 debut, We Breed Champions), Knoxville, Tenn., rock trio Royal Bangs joined Lafayette’s GIVERS as the newest Glassnote signees with its third LP, Flux Outside, an adventurous romp released in March. Colourmusic opens. Tickets $8. 8 p.m. Thursday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

Britney Spears with Nicki Minaj

JUL

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JUL

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Does Nicki Minaj have her own green room at the New Orleans Arena? The pink-wigged, scene-stealing MC opened for Lil Wayne there in April; this time, she’s the lead-in to “Toxic” avenger Britney Spears, whose pop star is back on the rise (March’s Femme Fatale debuted at No. 1 in seven countries). Nervo & Jessie and the Toy Boys open. Tickets $37.35$368.15 (includes fees). 7 p.m. Friday. New Orleans Arena, 1501 Girod St., 587-3822; www.neworleansarena.com

Davell Crawford Pianist Davell Crawford checks into Snug Harbor for an all-too-rare local performance. He juggles genres and ensembles ranging from his jazz trio and gospel singers up to a 22-piece orchestra, which he’ll work with in August to reprise his tribute to Ray Charles. He performs solo and with special guests. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Saturday. Snug Harbor, 626 Frenchmen St. 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com

JUL

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

ula Elzy Dance Theatre perfomances have usually featured collaborations with musicians and artists. The approach has helped draw new audiences. “I sometimes hear people coming out say, ‘And there was dance, too,’” she says with a laugh. The company celebrates its 20th anniversary with Retrospective, a collection of works from past shows. Some pieces feature live music by Ellis Marsalis, Jason Marsalis and Jason Stewart and many are set to music by local composers, including Harold Battiste, Moses Hogan and a King Oliver piece arranged by Dr. Michael White. Other dances incorporate the music of Duke Ellington and Stevie Wonder. Many of Elzy’s collaborations with local musicians are born out of her longtime relationship with NOCCA. Elzy taught dance at the high school for 17 years, and that was where she first met Ellis Marsalis and other music faculty. All of the female dancers in Retrospective are former NOCCA students Elzy taught, and some also have taught at the school. Some of Elzy’s students have gone on to dance professionally, including one principal dancer with Alvin Ailey’s American Dance Theater. Colette Williams, who was a finalist on the third season of So You Think You Can Dance and is pursuing a career in film. Elzy also is a graduate of NOCCA and discovered her interest in dance at her audition. An English teacher at

Retrospective features current and former Lula Elzy Dance Theatre dancers and choreographers and some of Elzy’s former students.

Royal Bangs

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LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 12 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BAYOU PARK BAR — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 9 BISTREAUX — Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BLUE NILE — Dr Jimbo Walsh & the Bubbles, 10

BMC — Andre Bouvier’s Royal Bohemians, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Notes & Quotes Songwriters Open Mic feat. Jimmy Sidewall, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Grayson Capps, 8

D.B.A. — New Orleans Suspects, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Todd Duke, 9:30

DRAGON’S DEN — RMonic, Kaizor, Unicorn Fukr, Mr. Cool Bad Guy, 9 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson, 8:30

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Don Vappie, 8 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Willie Bonham, 4; Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues Band, 6; Moonshine & Caroline, 9:30 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Sean Stair, 8; Ukulele Jake, 9; Sazerac the Clown’s Cabinet of Wonders, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8 SIBERIA — Mr. Clit & the Pink Cigarettes, Room 101, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Darrian Douglas & the Session, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

TROPICAL ISLE BOURBON — Frank Fairbanks, 5; Damien Louviere Duo, 9

TROPICAL ISLE ORIGINAL — Two Fools on Stools, 1; Jay B Elston Band, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA — Sombras Brilhantes, 8

Wednesday 13 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 8:30

ALGIERS FERRY DOCK — Wednesdays on the Point feat. The Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indians, Pinettes Brass Band, 6 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

BAYOU PARK BAR — U.S. Neros, 9

BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Jason Songe Presents (upstairs), 10; Gravity A, 11 BMC — David Mahoney Quartet, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHICKIE WAH WAH — NOLA County, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8 D.B.A. — The Mirlitones, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Midnight Snax, DJ Beesknees, 10

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hope Toun, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Frank Fairbanks, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; The Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — New Orleans Suspects, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL —

Willie Bonham, 4; Andrea Gomez, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30

MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Yesterday is Waiting, 7; Shay, 9 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Richard Scott, noon OAK — Amanda Walker, 7

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Open Mic Night feat. Kim Cantwell, 6:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Steve Byrne, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Joe Krown, 8:30

SIBERIA — Colossus, Phantom Glue, Solid Giant, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 THREE MUSES — Frenchmen Street String Quartet, 7

VICTORY — Sombras Brilhantes, 7:30

Thursday 14 12 BAR — Green Demons, Trevelyan, Ponykillers, 9

BACCHANAL — The Courtyard Kings Quartet, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

BANKS STREET BAR — Creepy Fest feat. The Unnaturals, Nick Name & the Valmonts, Black Kat, Rotten Cores, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 9 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BMC — The Ramblin’ Letters, 6; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — BRW, 8 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Amasa Miller & Holley Bendtsen, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Songwriter Night feat. Kristin Taffaro, Charles Lumar, Michael Mantese & Micah Mckee, 9

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — John Lisi, 7

preview 19th Nerves Breakdown They formed a band in San Francisco in 1974, moved to Los Angeles, cut one self-titled, four-song EP in 1976 and disbanded in 1978. If the brief bio of the triple-threat Nerves — singer/guitarist Jack Lee, singer/bassist Peter Case and singer/ drummer Paul Collins — sounds less like that of a pop/rock classic and more like your pop’s rock-flashback cataracts, then consider the short-lived trio’s family tree: a pouch of punchy, before-their-time tunes (including the Blondie-covered “Hanging on the Telephone”), assembled and released on 2008’s wiretaut One Way Ticket; an equally great, equally fated spinoff, the shorter-lived Breakaways, whose lone recording went unheard until the 2009 reincarnation Walking Out on Love: The Lost Sessions; and two more spinoffs of that spinoff, Case’s Plimsouls (1978-1983) and Paul Collins’ Beat, the latter of which, against the odds (several splits, the popular extinction and excavation of its genre), survived them all. The Beat’s eponymous 1979 debut, anchored by a rerecorded version of the Collins original “Working Too Hard,” is regarded by many as the LP the Nerves never got to make, and 2010’s rejuvenated King of Power Pop! (Alive) is the one Collins has been trying to make ever since — anchored by the seemingly self-aggrandizing “Kings of Power Pop,” one particular rock flashback whose eye-roll embellishments (“We could not tune our guitars/ No one thought we’d go very far”) ring true. King Louie’s Missing Monuments, The Coathangers and Bipolaroid open. Call for ticket information. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

J U LY

14

Paul Collins' Beat 10 p.m. Thursday Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & the All Purpose Blues Band, 4; Big Al Carson, 8:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Shamarr Allen, 8

KERRY IRISH PUB — Dave James & Tim Robertson, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — BrassA-Holics, 11

D.B.A. — Marc Stone Acoustic Trio feat. Patrick William & Mike Burkart, 7; Funkifry’d, 10

LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE — Al Hebert, 4:30; Frank Fairbanks Duo, 9:30

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

DEUTSCHES HAUS — The Sauerkrauts, 2 & 7

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; The Abney Effect, 10

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren

MISS MAE’S/ THE CLUB — Rotten Cores, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Willie Bonham, 4; Andre Bouvier’s Royal Bohemians, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Vespertine Circus, 8; Buddy Mann, 9 OAK — Brian Coogan, 8

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — Ogden After Hours feat. Dehlia Low, 6 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Major Bacon, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — Royal Bangs, Colourmusic, 7 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Crescent City Joymakers, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Paulin Brothers Brass Band, 8

PRIME EXAMPLE — Red Morgan, 8 & 10 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Geno Delafose, 8:30

THE SAINT — Hold Tight, This Is Your Life, Adults, 9

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 10

SIBERIA — Paul Collins Beat, King Louie’s Missing Monuments, Coathangers, Bipolaroid, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Jonathan Frielich, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10

STUDIO A AT THE STEAK KNIFE — Dining Out for Life feat. Anais St. John, 8 THREE MUSES — Eilaina & Company, 7:30

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 15 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — DJ Rincon, Madillz, Myverse, ATM, Caliobzvr and others, 9 BABYLON LOUNGE — Invoke the Nightmare, Shove!, 10 BAYOU PARK BAR — The Urban Achievers, 10 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Gravy, 10

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BOMBAY CLUB — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues Band, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Groovy 7, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Jack Fine Band, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — The Outside Lights, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Creepy Fest feat. The Pallbearers, Before I Hang, Toxic Rott, Crotchbreaker, Donkeypuncher, Concrete Shoes, 9 CHICKIE WAH WAH — The Honey Pots, 5:30; Paul Sanchez, 8

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Kenny Brown, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Fitzpatrick, 10 DOWNTOWN COVINGTON — Sunset at the Landing feat. Jeff Albert Quintet, The Mutineerz, 6

DRAGON’S DEN — Creepy Fest feat. Sci-Fi Zeros, Fat Stupid Ugly People, The Lollies, The Vapo-Rats, The Riffs, 9 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — Nod, First Fracture, 10

HI-HO LOUNGE — Debauche, 10

THE HOOKAH — Jermaine Quiz’s Mash-Up NOLA, 9

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

HOUSE OF BLUES — Jack’s Mannequin, Steel Train, Lady Danville, River James, 5:30

TROPICAL ISLE BAYOU CLUB — Can’t Hardly Play Boys, 5; T’Canaille, 9

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HOUSE OF BLUES — New Orleans Beatles Festival feat. The Topcats, Chuck Credo, Thaddeus Richard and others, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — The Tanglers, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

KERRY IRISH PUB — Buddy Francioni & Home Grown, 5; Foot & Friends, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Tom Worrell, 7; Dave Jordan Band, 11

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NEW ORLEANS ARENA — Britney Spears, Nicki Minaj, Jessie & the Toy Boys, Nervo, 7

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART — Bamboula 2000, 5:30; New Orleans Jazz Orchestra, 9 OAK — Kristin Perez, 6; Jayna Morgan, 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

30

OLD POINT BAR — J the Savage, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — No Fuego, Stereohype, For Karma, Mission vs. Madness, 10

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THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. William Smith, 8 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Royal Teeth CD release feat. Mobley, 10 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — The Refugeze, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Creole String Beans, Los Po-Boy-Citos, 9

SIBERIA — Wildfires, Suplecs, Venemous Maximus, Ancient VVisdom, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; New Orleans Moonshiners, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Big

Band-16, 6 and July 17, 11 a.m.

STUDIO A AT THE STEAK KNIFE — Jessie McBride & the Next Generation, 7 THREE MUSES — Ellen Smith, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10 TIPITINA’S — New Orleans Bingo! Show, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 16 12 BAR — Better by Design, Sun Hotel, 9 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — DJ Yamin, NinjaPlease, Dubla, Tony Skratchere, 10

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

BABYLON LOUNGE — Blessed be the Wretched, Pursuance, Wake Into The Nightmare, The Mothercell, 10

Blues Band, 1; Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson, 8:30

GREEN ROOM — Power Blvd., 9 HI-HO LOUNGE — Creepy Fest feat. Against Empire, The Sluts, Swinging Dicks, Die Rotzz, Early Graves, Split Lips, 8:30 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Stop the Violence Benefit Concert feat. Partners-NCrime, Kourtney Heart, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Marathon, From Hours to Ours, Self Help Tapes, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Carl LeBlanc, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 5; Rites of Passage, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — The Reklaw Collective & the Big Way, 2

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — St. Jude Community Center Benefit Concert feat. Irma Thomas, Jo “Cool” Davis, Michael Baptiste, Gina Brown and others, 7

BEACH HOUSE — Chicken on the Bone, 9:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Mali, 10

BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 7

BAYOU PARK BAR — Better by Design, Space Trumpet, 9

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 7; The Rap Pack (upstairs), 10; Dirty Bourbon River Show, EZ Company, 10 BMC — The Lushingtons, 3; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 6; Rue Fiya, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m.

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Aaron Foret, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8

CARROLLTON STATION — Craig Paddock Band, The Acadias, 9:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers & guest, 9

THE CYPRESS — Streetcar Samba CD release feat. Yellow Light Accelerators, Last Flight Home, Monday Valentines, 7

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Joe Krown Trio w/ Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Russell Batiste, 11

DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DEUTSCHES HAUS — Lorelei und Schatzi feat. Gary Trumet, 2 & 7

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Roman Street, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & the All-Purpose

THE MAISON — Kelcy Mae, 7; Pinettes Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; Geb Rault Band, 7:30; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 11 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Garret Thorton, 7; Clint Kaufmann, 8; Mr. Steve, 9; Homemade Soul, 10; Steven Burks, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Fritzgerald Barrau, 3 OAK — Brad Webb, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — The Space Heaters, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Lost Bayou Ramblers, Vagabond Swing, 10 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Ponchartrain Wrecks, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. T’Canaille, 2; Sonny Landreth, Tab Benoit, 9:30 SIBERIA — Creepyfest feat. Cider, Flyin’ Trichecos, MANGINA, Murder Suicide Pact, The Bills, Superdestroyers, Interior Decorating, 10

PAGE 35


BEST OF NEW ORLEANS

®

READER’S POLL BALLOT

Best Sweet Shop ______________________________________________

Best Bicycle Store _____________________________________________

Best New Retail Store (opened September 2010 or later) _______________

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Best Place to Have Your Pet Groomed ______________________________

Best Dermatologist ____________________________________________

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Best Cheap Gas (specify location) ________________________________

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Best Florist __________________________________________________

Best Health Club ______________________________________________

Best Garden Store _____________________________________________

Best Personal Trainer __________________________________________

Best Place to Buy Wine _________________________________________

Best Place to Take a Yoga Class ___________________________________ Best Place to Take a Pilates Class _________________________________ Best Dance Class and Where to Take It _____________________________ Best Fitness Boot Camp ________________________________________ Best Barbershop ______________________________________________ Best Manicure/Pedicure ________________________________________ Best Hair Salon ______________________________________________ Best Place to Get Hair Extensions _________________________________ Best Day Spa ________________________________________________ Best Place to Get a Massage _____________________________________ Best Place to Get a Bikini Wax ____________________________________ Best Tanning Salon ____________________________________________

Best Liquor Store _____________________________________________ Best New Orleans Neighborhood Grocery ___________________________ Best Jefferson Neighborhood Grocery ______________________________ Best Northshore Neighborhood Grocery ___________________________ Best Supermarket _____________________________________________ Best Farmers Market ___________________________________________ Best Art Market ______________________________________________ Best Bakery __________________________________________________ Best King Cake ________________________________________________ Best Wedding Cake ____________________________________________ Best Real Estate Agent _________________________________________ Best Attorney ________________________________________________

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THREE MUSES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cindy Scott, 7; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mahayla, Au Ras Au Ras, Opposable Thumbs, 10

TOMMYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WINE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Julio & Caesar, 10

TOOLOULAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Money Shot, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9 ZADDIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David & Karen Noble, 9

Sunday 17 BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Voices of New Orleans Songwriters Night & Open Mic, 7; To Be Continued Brass Band, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 1; Kipori â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby Wolfâ&#x20AC;? Woods, 7; Jack Cole & Friends, 10 BOOMTOWN CASINO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Captain â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chiggy Chiggyâ&#x20AC;? Charles, 7

BUFFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.; Traditional Jazz Jam feat. Mayumi Shara & Marla Dixon, 8

THE CYPRESS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lions Among Wolves, Awaken December, Iridescence, Bellaport, Bear, The Gentlemen, 7 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Joe Hall & the Louisiana Cane Cutters, 10 DRAGONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DEN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zoo, 9

FINNEGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EASY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Gara, 12:30

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark & the Pentones, 4; Cori Walters & the Universe Jazz Band, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Skin â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Bones Gang, 6

HOMEDALE INN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7

MADIGANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Easley Trio, 5; Margie Perez, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Julio & Caesar, 5; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 8 NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Swing feat. The Settle Down, 2

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alex Bosworth, 2

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jesse Moore, 3:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lionel Ferbos 100th Birthday, 7

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brass-A-Holics, 8 THE PRECINCT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Funk Express, 7:30 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joint Chiefs of Jazz feat. Frank Oxley, 8

RITZ-CARLTON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 THE SAINT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Creepy Fest feat. Dummy Dumpster, Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Only in it for the Honey, Slutever, Indian Givers, Terranova, DJ Pasta, 9

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Goddamn Gallows, Viva Le Vox, Dimestore Troubadours, Michael James & His Lonesome, Meschiya Lake, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Rankin, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m. STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victory Big Band, 6

THREE MUSES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Moonshiners Trio, 4:30; Zazou City, 7

TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

HOUSE OF BLUES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m; 106 & Park Closer to My Dreams Tour feat. Mindless Behavior, Lil Twist, Jawan Harris, Trevante and others, 7

Monday 18

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

BJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; King James & the Special Men, 10

HOWLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WOLF (THE DEN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny

APPLE BARREL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam Cammarata, 8 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 007, 7

BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9

COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Doucet, 8

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Sanchez, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9 DONNAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BAR & GRILL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Fohl, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

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FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cori Walters & the Universe Jazz Band, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Band, 8

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LITTLE TROPICAL ISLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marc Stone, 4:30; Jason Bishop, 9

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THE MAISON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Papa Grows Funk, 10 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danielle Thomas, 8

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FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

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OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brent Walsh Jazz Trio feat. Romy Kaye, 7

ONE EYED JACKS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Six Feet Under, Origin, Vital Remains, Abysmal Dawn, 9 PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Jordan, 7

SIBERIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Badr Vogu, Cape Of The Matador, Endall, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

DAMAGED ART WORK? Paintings â&#x20AC;˘ Prints â&#x20AC;˘ Frames â&#x20AC;˘ Mirrors Photos â&#x20AC;˘ Sculpture â&#x20AC;˘ Glass â&#x20AC;˘ Ceramic Professionally Restored

The New Orleans Conservation Guild, Inc. 13 years in New Orleans 3620 Royal St â&#x20AC;˘ In Bywater 10-4pm â&#x20AC;˘ Mon-Fri [504] 944-7900 www.art-restoration.com

ST. ROCH TAVERN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

3 full bars â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. â&#x20AC;˘ 523-5530 VISIT OUR WEBSITE

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classical/ concerts DUTCH ALLEY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Near French

Market, on North Peters Street â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sun: Summer Twilight Romance Series presents Harmoniemusik, 7

5300 TCHOUPITOULAS Suite F4

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola.com â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Tue: Trinity Wall Street Choir, 7:30; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: Matthew Hayes & Tatiana Pino, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

in the riverside market

504.895.2911

hairloftnola.com

900 FRENCHMEN 943-9433 8550 PONCHARTRAIN BLVD. 267-3263 WWW.WASABINOLA.COM

now carrying keâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;rastase

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

LE BON TEMPS ROULE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chapter: SOUL, 9

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor

MUSIC BAR

TUE

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Victory Big Band, 6

KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Monday Blues Jam, 9:30

WED

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ken Swartz Trio, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Burns, 8

NEIGHBORHOOD

THU

PAGE 30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Davell Crawford & Company, 8 & 10

A True MID-CITY

MUSIC

FRI

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

35


FILM

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 8:30PM 7/13

THE GREEN DEMONS, TREVELYAN & PONYKILLERS 9PM

THU 7/14

BROWN IMPROV COMEDY 8:30PM

FRI

DJ DIAGNOSIS 10:30PM

7/15

SAT BETTER BY DESIGN W/ SPACE

7/16

TRUMPET 9PM

COME SEE US

SAT. JULY 23

TO CELEBRATE OUR

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WITH LIVE MUSIC BY

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608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

Showcasing Local Music

36

MON 7/11

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 7/12

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 7/13

Khris Royal

THU The Trio featuring 7/14 Johnny V & Special Guests FRI 7/15

Papa Mali

SAT 7/16

Papa Mali

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 7/17 & 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

NOW SHOWING BAD TEACHER (R) — Cameron Diaz plays a foul-mouthed, gold-digging seventh-grade teacher. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

A ROOM WITH A VIEW MONTE CARLO (PG) — Selena Gomez

stars in the summertime tween comedy about a case of mistaken identity during a trip to Monte Carlo. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) — Jim Carrey plays Mr. Popper, a business man whose world is turned upside down when six penguins turn his swanky New York apartment into a snowy winter wonderland. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

BEGINNERS (R) — A new rela-

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) — In the

BRIDESMAIDS (R) — A comically

SUPER 8 (PG-13) — A group of

tionship causes Oliver (Ewan McGregor) to remember his recently deceased father (Christopher Plummer) who, after 44 years of marriage, came out of the closet. Canal Place struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friend’s maid of honor. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

BUCK (PG) — The documentary fol-

lows Buck Brannaman, who channeled his abusive childhood into a career as a wildly successful “horse whisperer.” Canal Place

CARS 2 (PG-13) — The Pixar sequel

finds its characters competing in an international race. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) — In the DC Comics adaptation that was filmed in New Orleans, a hot-shot test pilot must maintain peace in the universe using a mystical green ring. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14, Prytania THE HANGOVER PART II (R) — After the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand — but things once again go awry. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, Grand HORRIBLE BOSSES (PG-13) — A group of friends devise a convoluted plan to get rid of their intolerable bosses. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9 LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) — After

being fired from the high-level position at his job, the affable Larry Crowne (Tom Hanks) decides to go back to college. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG-13) — Michelle Williams stars in the film following travelers lost in the Oregon desert in 1845. Chalmette Movies MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG) — In the Woody Allen film, a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

latest installment of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. Entergy IMAX

friends in 1979 start to witness strange occurrences after a catastrophic train crash in J.J. Abrams’ sci-fi drama. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand

TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) — A mysterious

event from the past threatens to bring war to Earth in the third installment of Michael Bay’s giant robot franchise. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) — Terrence Malick’s film, Palme d’Or winner at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, follows a man through his innocent childhood to his disillusioned adult years. Canal Place THE WARD (R) — A woman held against her will in a mental asylum must discover the terrifying secrets of the ward in order to survive. AMC Palace 20 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) — The prequel tells the origin story of the Marvel Comics supergroup. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 ZOOKEEPER (PG-13) — Zoo animals break their silence to help their kind caretaker (Kevin James) get a girlfriend. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) — The

Harry Potter series culminates in an epic showdown with Lord Voldemort. INCENDIES (PG-13) — In the

Academy Award-nominated foreign language film, twins travel to the Middle East to piece together their mother’s life and fulfill her last wishes.

WINNIE THE POOH (G) — Pooh and

his friends Tigger, Rabbit, Piglet, Kanga, Roo-and Eeyore reuinite for an all-new story.

review

Shock and Gall

The wildly unruly, impulsive and destructive Hesher barges in on a family struggling to cope with recent tragedy, and writer/director Spencer Susser would have you believe it’s a form of extended shock therapy, which may just help snap Paul Forney out of his deep depression and offer his neglected son TJ some companionship, help and direction. It’s got a great cast, and there’s plenty of riveting suspense drawn from Hesher’s violent outbursts, crass pronouncements and strange swings between the roles of destroyer and serene mystic. It’s almost like an episode of Kung Fu with David Carradine replaced by a head-banging metal rocker who appears as if by magic in a time of crisis — only to freeload and take advantage of the chaos instead of fixing things. The notion that this wandering figure has a very different way of relating to the world is necessary, and some supsension of disbelief, or understanding that the story is at times more allegorical than literal, is necessary. But some implausible plot turns and events overburden that premise. TJ Forney (Devin Brochu) is suffering and lonely. His mother is gone, his father (Rainn Wilson) is reduced to medicated stupor, and his grandmother (Piper Laurie) is too old and sick to help. On top of that, he is being bullied at school. TJ accidently costs Hesher (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) his temporary living space, and Hesher responds by moving in with the family, who seem to think TJ has brought home a friend (which isn’t easy to believe given the gap in their ages and Hesher’s lifestyle). While Paul and TJ struggle to put up a fight in solving their own problems, Hesher lives purely in the moment, at times lashing out savagely and at times offering vulgar but candid observations. TJ develops a boyish crush on a young woman (Natalie Portman), and Hesher forces him to approach her — at the same time describing TJ’s interest in obscene terms and in a way the pre-pubescent boy doesn’t really understand. There are several similar scenes in which Hesher offers truly keen insights but laces them with incredible profanity. Susser seems to want to portray Hesher’s oblivious words and actions as some sort of clarifying intervention for the Forney family. Even if the prescription works, it’s hard to believe they could survive a second dose. The cast does a great job of creating sympathetic characters out of these lost souls, and they smooth over many if not all of the rough spots. Gordon-Levitt is probably best known for his years on Third Rock From the Sun as an adult alien disguised as a snarky human teenager. It’s hard to imagine a more starkly opposite role for him, and he’s inspired as the maniacal Hesher. Portman is extremely sweet and sensitive as an awkward and almost homely young woman who befriends TJ, but at times Susser tries to treat it like a romantic relationship, which is never believable. Hesher is a thrill-ride of a film and sometimes disturbing. At the very least, it should be labeled, “Don’t try this at home.” Tickets $7, $6 seniors/students, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

J U LY

1520

Hesher 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sun.-Thu.; 9:30 p.m. Sat. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net PAGE 38


FILM

LISTINGS PAGE 36

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AN AMERICAN IN PARIS (NR) — Gene Kelly stars as an

exuberant American expatriate in Paris in the 1951 classic. Tickets $5.50. Noon SaturdaySunday and July 13, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com

CONAN O’BRIEN CAN’T STOP (NR)— Rodman Flender‘s film

documents the comedian and TV host’s 32-city music and comedy show following his much publicized departure from NBC’s Tonight Show. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

NOLA DRIVE-IN — The group

presents an outdoor drive-in screening of Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Visit www.neworleansfilmsociety.org for details. Admission is free, but there is a $5 suggested donation. The event opens at 7 p.m., and the screening starts at 8:30 p.m. Friday, Old Schwegmann’s parking lot on the corner of St. Claude and Elysian Fields avenues.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

PATOIS FILM SCREENING AND DANCE PARTY — PATOIS: The

38

New Orleans International Human Rights Film Festival hosts an outdoor screening of the 1972 cult classic The Harder They Come that also features Jamaican barbecue, rum cocktails, a trivia competition and music by DJ Prince Pauper. Tickets $5. Doors open at 6 p.m., screening at 9 p.m. Saturday, The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 908-4741 A SHOT IN THE DARK (NR) — Peter Sellers stars in the 1964 comedy. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com TRUST (R) — David

RLAKE E B M I T N I T S U J ” TEACHER VAL TOM WOLFE D A B “ Z A I D N O R UCTION CAME L SUPERVISMIOUNSICBY MANISH RA GENE STUPNITSKY D O R P C I A S O PRESENTS A M GGINS AND JASON SEGE ASDAN LEE EISENBERG DIRECTEBDY JAKE KASDAN S E R U T C I P A COLUMBI UNCH JOHN MICHEXAECEULTIVHEI ORGIA KACANDES JAKE K DAVID HOUSEHOLTER LICUCY P ANDREWS PRODUCERS GE PRODUCEDBY JIMMY MILLER S MU M I C H A E L NBERG E S I E BY E E L & Y K S T I N WRITTEN GENE STUP BY

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Schwimmer directs the drama about a teenager who is seduced by a 41-year-old online predator. Tickets $6.50 New Orleans Film Society members, $8.50 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Monday and July 19, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

FILM FESTIVALS NEW ORLEANS FRENCH FILM FESTIVAL — The New

Orleans Film Society and The Consulate General of France in New Orleans’ festival includes screenings of Gainsbourg: A Heroic Life, L’Amour Fou, Love Crime and six other films. Visit www. neworleansfilmsociety.org for the full schedule and other details. Tuesday-Thursday,

review Severance Package

The French thriller Rapt offers a hard economic lesson: Even ransoms are subject to market valuation. While a family may consider a member priceless, other people have fixed ideas about what a life is worth. Nominated for four Cesar awards (France’s Oscars), including best picture and actor, Rapt chronicles the kidnapping of Stanislas Graff (Yvan Attal), a multimillionaire who heads a massive corporation based in Paris. The criminals are in it purely for profit, and they want 50 million euros for his return. They cut off one of his fingers to demonstrate how serious they are, and they humiliate and terrorize him for no extra charge. Negotiations get tense when Graff’s wife and the corporation can come up with only 20 million euros. The kidnappers are ruthless and efficient, but in the end, a dead body is worth nothing to them. The situation becomes more complicated as the police and government get involved. One lawyer suggests not negotiating, essentially risking paying the price of one human life to close down the industry. As the press swarms to the story, tabloids reveal Graff had multiple mistresses and lost a lot of money while gambling. This humiliates his wife and family and encourages the captors to believe anyone with alleged losses in the millions of Euros must have access to the grand sum they demand. The crass calculations also extend to the corporation, which would prefer the public and unions don’t see Graff as an overpaid playboy who barely impacted operations while collecting extravagant fees. Graff’s wife Francoise (Anne Consigny) remains committed to preserving her family, ostensibly at any cost, but she becomes increasingly aware that she barely knew her husband. The thriller runs in the French Film Festival, sponsored by the New Orleans Film Society and French Consul General. Tickets $9 general admission, $7 New Orleans Film Society members. — Will Coviello

J U LY

1314

Rapt 7:30 p.m. Wednesday; noon Thursday Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.neworleansfilmsociety.org

Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon

Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

Scan for movie times.


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — Mono-

types by Marie Bukowski and plein air paintings by Phil Sandusky, through July. Artists reception 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

GALLERY BURGUIERES. 736 Royal St.; www.galleryburguieres.com — Grand opening

party featuring works by Ally Burguieres, 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Saturday. HENRY HOOD GALLERY. 325 E. Lockwood St., Covington, (985) 789-1832 — Paintings and

ceramics by Dennis Sipiorski; assemblages by Lucille Hunter; both through Aug. 13. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

TWIST COCKTAILS. 628 St Charles Ave., 523-9600; www. twistatmikes.com — Works by Varion Laurent. Artist’s reception 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday. ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net —

“Southern Pop Surrealism,” works by Charles Bennett, Jeff Bertrand, Dustin Dirt and Brandt Hardin, through Aug. 16. Opening reception with live painting, performances and film screenings 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Saturday.

3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — “Indus-

trial Sculpture,” metal works and ceramics by Julie Korte, through July 30.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Exhibition of gallery artists

featuring Louviere + Vanessa, Sebastiao Salgado, Joshua Mann Pailet and Herman Leonard, through September.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

student exhibition, through July 23.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

gelakinggallery.com — Works by Peter Mars, through Aug. 8. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com — “What We

Can Do,” prints, drawings and installations by six artists, through July.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibi-

tion featuring Cheri Ben-Iesau, Isabelle Dupuy, Susan Landry, Ro Mayer, Myra Williamson Wirtz, Alicia Windham and Maria Etkind, through July 30. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limitededition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana!

United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Music Street

Mosaics,” an installation of mosaic works salvaged from an artist’s condemned house, through Aug. 10.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil

paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.an-

CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130;

wholesale to the public.

www.carolrobinsongallery. com — “Three of a Perfect Pair,” works by gallery artists, through July 30.

over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

& decorators alike

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

300 Jefferson Highway

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the

(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 —

“Handmade Design: Silent Auction Fundraiser for the Gulf Coast Oil Spill,” through August.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 7220876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Prospect.1.75,

Blake Boyd: The Batman Years,” mixed-media works by Blake Boyd, through July 23.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time, Again,” exhibition of work by gallery artists from the past year, through Aug. 4. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink”

printmaking invitational, through Aug. 6.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

HAPPY HOUR 5-7 DAILY!

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by artists James

Coignard, Nissan Engel, Max Papart, Petra Seipel, Theo Tobiasse, David Schneuer and Garrick Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through Friday. “Good Wood,” furniture and sculpture by Michael Robinson, through Aug. 1. “Foot-a-Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing. FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington, (985) 377-2212 — Metal sculpture by Keith Villere, through Wednesday. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Painting and sculpture

by Clark Derbes; video and collage by Kelly Boehmer and

• • • • • • •

Outdoor Dining Eclectic Wine, Beer, & Cocktail Lists Small Plates Local Artwork Open Late Open for Brunch on Saturday & Sunday Private Dining Room Available

1 6 2 2 S T C H A R L E S AV E • 3 0 1 - 9 5 7 0 MON - THURS 11AM- MIDNIGHT • FRI 11AM - 2AM SAT 10AM-2AM • SUN 10AM- MIDNIGHT

We’ve got plenty of time to have a drink. 3700 Orleans Ave. IN THE SHOPS AT THE AMERICAN CAN COMPANY

504.483.6314

www.cbwines.com Under New Ownership

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

GALLERIES

Antiques & Interiors

ART

39


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing.

review

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS MONUMENTAL. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org —

Rising from the Ruins

THRU J U LY

24

Haiti After the Earthquake: Photographs by Julie Dermansky

Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org

economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Mara/Thal-

assa/Kai: The Sea,” works by Anastasia Pelias, Rian Kerrane

and Melissa Borman, through July. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — Works by Sarah

Stiehl and Brock Swanson, through Friday.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455;

SPARE SPACES ALVAR LIBRARY. 913 Alvar St., 5962667 — “Youth,” sculpture by Betty Petri; “The Solitary Chair,” sculpture by Michael Moreau; both ongoing. BACCHANAL. 600 Poland Ave., 948-9111; www.bacchanalwine. com — “Coming Home: 2005-

2009,” photographs by Lee Celano, ongoing.

BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com — Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing. DRISCOLL ANTIQUES. 8500 Oak St., 866-7795; www.driscollantiques.com — Works by Sandra

Horstman Roberts, ongoing.

HAZELNUT NEW ORLEANS. 5515 Magazine St., 891-2424; www. hazelnutneworleans.com —

Photography by Roy Barloga, ongoing.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA youth artists, ongoing. JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

MARIGNY PHO. 2483 Burgundy St., 267-5869 — Selections from

“B Movie Double Feature,” photographs and ceramic collectors’ plates by Heather Weathers, Wednesdays-Sundays. Through July.

MCKEOWN’S BOOKS AND DIFFICULT MUSIC. 4737 Tchoupitoulas St., 895-1954 — “The Book

of Kells, Revisited,” encaustic paintings by Patricia Kaschalk, ongoing. METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “The Unconventional Por-

trait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing. NEOPHOBIA. 2855 Magazine St., 899-2444; www.neophobianola.com — Works by Tanner,

ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — Work by local artists,

ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing. PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white

photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paintings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing. SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com —

Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith, ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org —

“Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It:

Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Golden

Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic

Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.

org — “Absinthe Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org —

“Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art,” through Sunday. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Thalassa,” a 20-foottall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

Works created by child and adult students in Mahalia Jackson Early Childhood and Family Learning Center art workshops, through Sunday. “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50”; “New Orleans Craft & Design,” through July 24. “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes, through July 24.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing.

TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum.com — The museum exhibits works

that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

It is said that “history is written by the victors,” but what if there is too much history and no victors? Last year started with a bang as a huge earthquake hit Haiti and dominated the headlines until the massive Gulf oil disaster, and then storms, fires, tsunamis, tornadoes, wars, revolutions and more earthquakes happened in quick succession. Yet the earthquake in Haiti, which shares a common history with New Orleans, was staggering in scope, and this selection of images by New Orleansbased photographer Julie Dermansky captures both the overwhelming chaos and the extraordinary resilience of the Haitian people. In January 2010, Dermansky went to Haiti to try to find an old friend, an arts activist who she later learned had perished in the quake. She remained to document the plight of the Haitian people, and her images convey the apocalyptic nature of the destruction — rubble is all that remains of the monumental national cathedral (pictured), the presidential palace and other massive buildings where mangled human limbs protruded from the rubble. The photos also capture the dignity, endurance and irrepressible spirit of the Haitians themselves. In much almost-generic media disaster coverage, Haiti appears hopeless, but Dermansky’s cool, compassionate eye reveals a remarkably stoic if vivacious people whose true potential really never has been tapped. If these people have endured so much misery for so long and are still capable of hope, who are we to doubt them? On Wednesday, the Ogden Museum hosts a panel discussion moderated by WWOZ’s George Ingmire and featuring New Orleans cultural community activists who went to Haiti after the quake. The panel includes Dermansky, journalist Michael Deibert, WWOZ’s Maryse Dejean, Haitian Association for Human Development president Dr. Yvelyne Germain-McCarthy, Ogden curator/photographer Richard McCabe, Tekrema Center founder Greer Mendy and Loyola University’s Dr. Jean Montes. — D. Eric Bookhardt

Antenna seeks proposals for imaginative reinterpretations of 19th- and early 20th-century New Orleans monuments for a show in February 2012. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15, and there is a $15 entry fee. Email courtney@courtneyegan.net for details.

LIZANO’S GLASS HAUS. 3400 Cleary Ave., Suite B, Metairie, 4541144 — Fused-glass works by Paulette Lizano, ongoing.

ART

41


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THEATER THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE. Cutting

Edge Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www. cuttingedgeproductions.org — The Tony Award-winning one-act musical comedy centers around a middle school spelling bee officiated by three quirky adults. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, through July 29. BROTHER. Elm Theatre, 220

Julia St., 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — In Lisa Ebersole’s play, race and class tensions arise after a stranger joins a boozy, late-night birthday celebration. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through Aug. 6.

DISNEY’S CAMP ROCK: THE MUSICAL. NORD’s Ty Tracy

RADIO WAVES. Actor’s Theatre

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LISTINGS

Theater, Gallier Hall, 545 St. Charles Ave., 598-3800; www. crescentcitylights.org — Young singers and actors from the NORDC/Crescent City Lights Youth Theater perform the pop musical. Tickets $15. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 1 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.

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STAGE

of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — A radio show staff in the 1970s struggles to put together a program while also getting along with each other in Rene J.F. Piazza’s comedy. Tickets $18 students and seniors, $20 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday through July 24.

RENT. Playmakers Theater,

19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 8931671; www.playmakersinc.com — Jonathan Larson’s hit rock musical depicts struggling young artists and musicians in New York amid the American AIDS epidemic. Tickets $15 students, $25 general admission. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday through July 24.

TELL IT TO YOUR NEXT WIFE.

Tulane University, McAlister Auditorium, 529-3000; www. tulane.edu — NFL player Marcus D. Spears presents Marcus Lee Stephenson’s comedy about a volatile marriage. Visit www.yournextwife. eventbrite.com for details and reservations. Tickets $20-$30. 7 p.m. Saturday.

THE TRICKY PART. Byrdie’s

Gallery, 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com —

Guess Who's Coming to the Party

Brother by Lisa Ebersole is a post-modern melodrama — in the sense that the pieces of the puzzle never quite fit together although they give the impression they do. Margeaux (Becca Chapman) enters a cozy living room about 4 a.m. She’s drenched from a downpour. Soon she is joined by Jamie (Rebecca Elizabeth Hollingsworth), who fusses at her about drinking and smoking. The two are opposites, both physically — Margeaux is slim and brunette, Jamie is portly and blonde— and in general attitudes. Margeaux has a tough, smart-aleck vibe and Jamie seems prim and proper. The play starts with twists and turns, and it leaves room for some that seem inexplicable. One of the first twists comes when a man (Gamal Abdel Chasten) peeks out of a door and asks for a plunger. The women lounge on the couch and chat about bathrooms, public toilets and such. Their quips, like much of the dialogue, walk a fine line between funny and distasteful. Eventually the man enters the living room and says his name is Carl. He is black, and the women say they expected a more exotic name. The soft-core racism continues when Jamie offers Carl chitlins for a snack. We learn Margeaux and Jamie are sisters and Margeaux has fallen on hard times. She’s been crashing on people’s couches and sleeping in a gym where she has a membership. Meanwhile, they all keep drinking. Jamie decides she wants to party because it’s her 26th birthday. She puts on music and starts to cut loose. While dancing provocatively with Carl, her husband Kevin (Ross Britz) comes home. Kevin is a paralegal and is perhaps the most perplexing member of this crew. That first image of his wife shimmying with Carl underlies upheaval that follows — although, the pieces of the story never quite fit together in a convincing way. Kevin has a pronounced attachment to his residence and often says “my” home — particularly when ordering other characters out it. Kevin screams at Margeaux to get out of his home, and he confronts Jamie as the conflict turns hostile. Director Sarah Zoghbi gathered a talented cast and keeps the hourlong one-act moving. Brother was produced off-Broadway in New York in 2005, and the playwright collaborated with the Elm Theatre to set the play in New Orleans. The script is uneven, but worth a look if you want to catch up on the state of contemporary theater. — Dalt Wonk

AUG

06

Brother 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat. The Elm Theatre, 220 Julia St., 2180055; www.elmtheatre.org


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com STAGE Kevin Ford stars in Martin Moran’s one-man play chronicling the writer’s relationship with an older man when he was a teenager. Email cloveproductions@gmail.com for details and reservations. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Sunday-Monday through July 25. TWELFTH NIGHT. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — Shakespeare’s comedy weaves together the stories of siblings lost at sea, a local count in love with a woman who has sworn off men, and group of buffoons out to exact revenge on an egotistical butler. The play is part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Call the box office or email box@tulane.edu for reservations. Tickets $5 minimum donation for “pay what you will” performance (Sunday), $30 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Sunday through July 23. WAITING AROUND: THE RESTAURANT MUSICAL. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Ricky Graham’s musical comedy that once had an off-Broadway run centers around the food business, from the servers’ point of view. Tickets $20 Friday-Sunday, $15 Monday. Tickets available at www.waitingaroundthemusical.com or at the theater’s box office before the performance. 8 p.m. Friday-Monday through July 25.

BURLESQUE

& CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

NEW ORLEANS DOWN THE HATCH: A CABARET IN TWO COCKTAILS. K-Joe’s Cajun &

Creole Restaurant, 720 St. Louis Street, 495-8383 — Actor Bob Edes, culinary historian Elizabeth Pearce and pianist Jim Walpole star in the story of New Orleans told through its signature cocktails. Visit www.neworleansdownthehatch.com for details and reservations. Tickets $26.60 (includes two cocktails). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and July 22-23.

AUDITIONS CAJUN BOYS GONE WILD. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Dennis Monn seeks male dancers, singers and musicians — as well as alligator wrestlers and snake handlers — for his September “Boylesque”

FOOTLIGHT FRENZY. Playmak-

ers Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www. playmakersinc.com — The theater seeks actors for the September production of the play. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

DANCE RETROSPECTIVE. Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www. montage.loyno.edu — Lula Elzy New Orleans Dance Theatre celebrates its anniversary with a performance highlighting favorite works from the company’s past 20 years. Visit www.ledtneworleans.com for details and reservations. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.

COMEDY BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Vet-

erans Blvd., 456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by select cast members of the improv comedy troupe. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy. com/BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for performers, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts

vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday. FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STANDUP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar,

2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 9484003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Com-

edy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The improv troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. THEO VON. Boomtown Casino, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 3667711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedian performs. 8 p.m. Wednesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY?. Car-

rollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

production. Auditions are by appointment only. Email dennis@theallwayslounge.com for details. Tuesday-Sunday.

43


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 12 THE PATCHWORK PLAYERS: SHORTS. Rogers Memorial

Chapel, Tulane University, 862-3214 — The performance group presents an audience participation-heavy collection of short stories, including Little Red Riding Hood and The Ugly Duckling. Call 314-2579, email patchworkplayersnola@gmail. com or visit www.patchworkplayersnola.com for reservations. Tickets $8. 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. Saturday.

TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 14 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

IRWIN ROYES. Old Metairie

Library, 2350 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-4353 — The “world’s smallest magician” puts on a magic show. 11:30 a.m.

Saturday 16 INSECT DAY. Louisiana State

Arboretum, 4213 Chicot Park Road, Ville Platte, (888) 6776100 — The Arboretum hosts a full day of insect-related activities, including presentations and demonstrations by entomologists, insect enthusiasts and organizations; hands-on insect exhibits, a film screening and more. Visit www.insectday. com for details. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

YOUTH FISHING RODEO.

Sweetwater Marina, 6205 Delacroix Hwy., Delacroix — The Knights of Columbus hosts the event, which is free for all children 15 and younger. Call 329-6405 or 377-5281 for details. 3 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

EVENTS Tuesday 12

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

preview

CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The hospital hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 456-5000 for information. 6 p.m.

LAKEVIEW MARKETPLACE .

Harrison Avenue Marketplace, 801 Harrison Ave.; www.harrisonavenuemarketplace.org — The Lakeview Neighborhood Association presents an outdoor event with live music, food, drinks, handmade crafts and activities for kids. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. HISTORIC HOUSE WORKSHOP: RECYCLING . Preservation

Resource Center, 923 Tchoupitoulas St., 581-7032; www.prcno.org — The program discusses how salvaged building materials can be reused in home construction, renovation and home decorating projects. Email sblaum@ prcno.org for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

STAGE DOOR IDOL . Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — Contestants perform World War II-era hits for a panel of celebrity judges in the singing competition. Call 528-1944 ext. 267 for details. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. YAPPY HOUR . Fetch! Mid-City,

3536 Toulouse St., 373-5417; www.fetchmidcity.com — The dog boutique hosts a happy hour event with a wine tasting (for humans), dog treats, adoptable dogs and $10 dog washes. Visit www.la-spca.org for details. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday 13 AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNERS MEETING . Columns

Hotel, 3811 St. Charles Ave., 899-9308; www.thecolumns. com — The New Orleans chapter of the group meets. Call 258-2339, email bernst@ ppg.com or visit www.asidneworleans.org for details. 5:30 p.m.

BARBECUE & WINE PAIRING .

Cork & Bottle, 3700 Orleans Ave., 483-6314; www.cbwines. com — The tasting features barbecue paired with a variety of wines. Reservations are required. Admission $25. 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

THE BUDGET BREAKDOWN: CITIZEN TRAINING SESSION ON

Hot Air

You can air-bump, air-grind or ride that air-booty any way you like when competing in the Air Sex World Championships, but save the real seduction for the bedroom. “Anyone who goes to an Air Sex show to get turned on is a super-weirdo,” says Chris Trew, host of the competition. “The point is to make the audience laugh.” Participants are encouraged to festoon themselves in sultry garb and bring their own slow jams or raunchy love anthems. Competitors have two minutes to perform, but nudity and actual orgasms are off-limits, Trew says. A New Orleanian who relocated to Austin, Texas, following Hurricane Katrina, Trew is moving home to New Orleans and rejoining the mission to build the local comedy scene via his group, the New Movement (www.nolaimprov.com). Air Sex is only the beginning, ladies and not-so-gentle men. Email chris@airsexworldchampionships.com to sign up. Tickets $5. — Emily Jensen

JUL

12

Air Sex World Championships

9 p.m. Tuesday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

THE CITY’S BUDGET PROCESS.

Grace Episcopal Church, 3700 Canal St., 482-5242 — The program helps New Orleans residents understand the city’s budget process and how to have more influence over ways tax dollars are invested. Call 940-2207 for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. ENCOURAGE SUPPORT GROUP MEETING . Center for

Restorative Breast Surgery, 1717 St. Charles Ave., (888) 8992288; www.breastcenter.com — Certified hypnotherapist Jeanne Villere discusses how medical hypnosis can provide relief for breast cancer patients. Attendees are asked to bring a pillow, yoga mat and/or towel. Pre-registration is required. Call 899-2800 or email encourage@ breastcenter.com for details. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur

and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY WOMEN BUILD KICK-OFF.

Clarion Inn & Suites, 501 N. Hwy. 190, Covington, (985) 893-3580; www.clarionhotel. com — The program inviting local women to help fund and build two homes with Habitat St. Tammany West from Sept. 30 through Oct. 29 hosts a kick-off event with a silent auction, hors d’oeuvres and live jazz music. Guests can learn more about the program and sign up as a sponsor, donor or volunteer. Email jmoskowitz@ habitatsw.org, call (985) 8933172 or visit www.habitatstw. org/wb for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux,

1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 14 48 HOUR FILM PROJECT TECHNICAL ORIENTATION & MIXER . 3 Ring Circus’ The Big

Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — The networking event for the 48 Hour Film Project provides information and answers questions about the August competition. A technical orientation for team leaders and editors is from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., followed by a recruiting mixer from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., where team leaders can interview and meet potential team members. Email 234-0116, email neworleans@48hourfilm.com or visit www.48hourfilm.com/ neworleans for details. Free admission.

CANCER EDUCATION CLASS. First Baptist Church of New Orleans, 5290 Canal Blvd., 482-5775; www.fbcno.org — The church hosts “I Can Cope,” a series of educational classes for people facing cancer. Call 957-5226 for information. 6:30 p.m. CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to

affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. DINING OUT FOR LIFE . More

than 75 restaurants donate 25 percent of the day’s proceeds to the NO/AIDS Task Force. Visit www.noaidstaskforce. org for the list of participating restaurants.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS VIDEO ACCESS CENTER PANEL & RECEPTION .

Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — The group celebrates its 39th anniversary with a panel featuring film industry experts discussing changing models of film marketing and distribution, and a reception with light refreshments and a raffle follows. Email ashley@ novacvideo.org or visit www. novacvideo.org for details. There is a $10 optional donation. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. SOUTHERN GOTHIC FESTIVAL .

Multiple venues around New Orleans host live music, DJs, vendors and parties for the gothic-industrial festival. Visit www.facebook.com/sogofest for the full schedule and other details. Tickets $10 day pass, $18 weekend pass. Through Sunday.

Friday 15 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL .

Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www. mpcds.com — Students from Country Day’s Creative Arts Program demonstrate live music, visual arts, Capoeira, sculpture, photography, painting, film, dance, poetry and theatre productions. Call 8493188 or visit www.countrydaycreativearts.com for details. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.

LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — Chan Rogers presents “Liberation of Dachau: My Experiences.” Free admission. Noon to 1 p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

Friday 15

EVENTS

45


Attiki

bar & grill experience the mediterranean

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Worldly Wine/ Martinis

HOOKAH 230 DECATUR

11AM-4AM DAILY

www.attikineworleans.com 504-587-3756

EVENTS

LISTINGS

PAGE 46

of all levels while local musicians play World War II era hits. Call 5281944 ext. 359 for details. 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. dance lessons, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. live music. Free admission. VISITING PET PROGRAM VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION . Harahan Senior

Center, 100 Elodie St., 737-3810 — The animal assisted therapy program offers an orientation for prospective volunteers. Preregistration is required. Email paws4visits@gmail.com or visit www.visitingpetprogram.org for details. There is a $10 registration fee. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS JESTERS. Pan

American Stadium, City Park, 1 Zachary Taylor Drive — The Jesters play the West Texas United Sockers. Visit www.nolajesters.com for details. 7 p.m. Friday,

536 Frenchmen St.

504-298-TRIO

www.thethreemuses.com

4:00-Till for Dinner Closed Mondays and Tuesdays for Summer

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

48

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail. com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth seeks

volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 309-7304 or (877) 500-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans. org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET.

CCFM and marketumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and

more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details. EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER . The

center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing. org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email nkennebrew@handsonneworleans.com or visit www. handsonneworleans.org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 8328111 for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum seeks

volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 8370175 or email daveharrell@yahoo. com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL .

The charter school that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 8360808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@ la-spca.org.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM .

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum needs volunteers to familiarize visitors with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 5276012 ext. 243 or email katherine. alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS.

Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area innercity youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac. org and www.operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS. New

Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 6541060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING.

The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION . The

Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

WORDS CARA HOFFMAN . St. Charles Avenue

Baptist Church, 7100 St. Charles Ave., 861-9514; www.scabc.org — The author signs and reads from So Much Pretty. 6 p.m. Thursday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine. org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details.

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at the

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Latter

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details.

Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twiceweekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

IAN MCNULTY. Old Metairie

Library, 2350 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-4353 — The author and Gambit contributor discusses and signs Louisiana Rambles.

6:30 p.m. Wednesday. LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes

& Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MARY GRIGGS. Faubourg Marigny

Art & Books, 600 Frenchmen St., 947-3700 — The author signs Unbroken Circle. 3 p.m. Saturday.

NEW ORLEANS HAIKU SOCIETY MEETING . The NOHS holds a

monthly gathering. The meeting features readings, writing and discussion. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Monday. NOMA BOOK CLUB. East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The library, in conjunction with the New Orleans Museum of Art, hosts a discussion of V.S. Naipaul’s The Masque of Africa. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. THE SCENE OF THE CRIME . St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The group meets to discuss mystery novels the third Monday of each month, through December. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. STIEG LARSSON BOOK CLUB. East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses The Girl Who Played with Fire. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www. stannanola.org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail.com for details.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <DINING FOR A DIFFERENCE > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Thursday marks the NO/AIDS Task Force’s popular Dining Out for Life fundraiser. More than 75 restaurants will donate 25 < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <percent of proceeds from the night to NO/AIDS, a nonprofit that helps people living with HIV and AIDS. Diners pay nothing extra to help. Details are online at www.diningoutforlife.com/ WHAT neworleans. In addition, Mike’s on the Avenue (628 St. Charles Mayas Restaurant Ave., 523-7600; www.mikesontheavenue.com) has been con& Bar tributing a portion of its proceeds from each Wednesday and Thursday in a benefit that wraps up this week.

am

B

WHERE

2027 Magazine St., 309-3401 WHEN

Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. HOW MUCH

Expensive

RESERVATIONS

Accepted

WHAT WORKS

A balanced blend of classics and creative cuisine WHAT DOESN'T

Too little local seafood, too many sweet sauces CHECK, PLEASE

A varied tour of Latin cuisine with bistro ambitions

Latin American Studies MAYAS TAKES A WIDE ARRAY OF FAMILIAR LATIN FLAVORS TO ANOTHER LEVEL.

Chef Edgar Irias fine-tunes an array of Latin American dishes at Mayas Restaurant & Bar. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

five 5 IN

FIVE SPOTS FOR BEEF JERKY COCHON

930 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 588-2123 www.cochonrestaurant.com

Beef jerky stars in the mint and mushroom salad.

EMMETT’S FINE MEATS & SEAFOOD 5618 JEFFERSON HWY., HARAHAN, 733-0901 www.emmettsmeats.com

Try long, thin, peppery strips from this relatively new Harahan butcher shop.

IDEAL FOOD MARKET

250 S. BROAD ST., 822-8861

A variety of jerky lines the meat counter at this Latin grocery.

ter). Served in a huge teardrop-shaped casserole dish, it’s a head-turner as the waiter bears it through the dining room with oven mitts, and its intense flavors stick with you. Other memorable dishes would be right at home at any contemporary bistro. Watermelon salad has become a summertime standard for its rejuvenating, even rehydrating qualities, and Mayas does one with salty, firm feta chunks, cilantro and a foundation of thin-sliced cucumber. The menu description of the Chilean sea bass (aka Patagonian toothfish) made the dish sound like a mixed seafood platter, but it arrived as an impressive, well-composed mosaic with a skewer of large shrimp over the grilled, herbcrusted fish and half a fried soft-shell crab resting atop a pressed cylinder of rice. Although it is fun to explore a menu like this, two significant issues arise. One is the kitchen’s penchant for overly sweet sauces that taste of soy and sugar and prove the dominant flavor in too many dishes. The other concerns price. You can find entrees for under $20, but the marquee items go much higher, with some over $30. You can eat at pretty much any restaurant in town for that money, including many that outstrip Mayas. Tropical-themed cocktails are good but also expensive, as is the weak wine list. I found the service at Mayas consistently excellent. Waiters had sound advice not only for dishes, but also for pacing an order as we tried different things. With so many different flavors at play, it’s good to have such able ambassadors running the room.

10828 HAYNE BLVD., 241-8227 www.cochondelaitpoboys.com

Come for cochon de lait po-boys, but leave with some jerky for later.

WAYNE JACOB’S SMOKEHOUSE

769 W. FIFTH ST., LAPLACE, (985) 652-9990

This artisanal Cajun smokehouse makes a mean jerky.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Fillaboa Albarino RIAS BAIXAS, SPAIN / $16-19 RETAIL

Located in Spain’s Galicia region, bordering Portugal, Rias Biaxas is home to Bodegas Fillaboa, which produces some of the finest young white wines from estate-grown Albarino fruit. A refreshing summer wine, this medium-bodied Albarino has a supple texture and is well-balanced. It has fragrances of green apple, fresh-cut lemon and melon. On the palate, taste dazzling acidity and an exciting minerality with vibrant stone and tropical fruit undertones. Drink it as an aperitif or serve it with salads, sushi, tapas, garlicky steamed mussels, grilled fish, seafood dishes, and Thai and other spicy cuisines. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle, W.I.N.O. Drink it at: W.I.N.O. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

M

Chef Susan Spicer’s casual eatery Mondo (900 Harrison Ave., 224-2633; www.mondoneworleans.com) usually doesn’t serve Sunday dinner, but on July 17 it will open for a special event for Liberty’s Kitchen (422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011; www.libertyskitchen.org), the nonprofit teaching cafe and local school food provider. The evening begins with cocktails at 6 p.m. and includes a four-course dinner with wines for $75 per person.

WALKER’S SOUTHERN STYLE BBQ

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

ayas’ menu uses the tagline “Latin fusion cuisine,” but fission would be more like it. Rather than presenting many crosscultural combinations on the plate, this Lower Garden District restaurant serves dishes from different corners of Latin America, showing how these traditions broke off from common cultural cores to develop on their own. Taking a little from Mexico (like the miraculously greaseless chiles rellenos), a little from the Caribbean (island-style curries), a little from Central America (bulging tamales and crisp tostones), and even a few notes from South America, Mayas collects a lot of familiar flavors and presents them in an uncommon upscale manner. With its long, thin dining room of dark wood and restrained, tropical decor, Mayas feels like a Latin bistro. The nice thing about Mayas is that diners can choose confidently from comfort food or more original dishes. Examples of each can be highly satisfying. In the first category, the Cuban-style ropa vieja was hearty and straightforward, with tender strands of roasted pork deeply penetrated by citrus. Some truly classic dishes aren’t so familiar, like the seafood stew called moqueca, a set piece of the casual Brazilian kitchen. Resembling a curry, it’s golden in hue, thick and creamy with coconut milk, rippling with garlic and loaded with seafood (here big shrimp and pebble-sized scallops). Diners order this moqueca either with a pile of rice or a short loaf of French bread for dunking (I recommend the lat-

LIBERTY IN LAKEVIEW

49


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > >FOR >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < <CALL <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

PARKWAY

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

PO'BOYS! IN NOLA

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482-3047 11AM TO 10PM

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

CLOSED TUESDAYS AMERICAN

Half Price Pitchers Coors Light & Abita Amber

and Bistro FRESH GREEN FRIENDLY

New Huevos Rancheros A flour tortilla covered in ham & pepper jack cheese topped w/ house madesalsa, sour cream, black beans, breakfast potatoes and two eggs cooked any way.

3903 CANAL ST

2035 METAIRIE ROAD

www.marktwainspizza.com

Join Us for LUNCH

(CORNER OF N. SCOTT)

MID-CITY, NEW ORLEANS 561.6585 | WWW.ECOCAFENO.COM

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

Specializing in

HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 12 > 2011

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE

50

G

of equal or lesser value.

G

Dine in only. Up to $5.95 Value. Expires 08/14/11

“Best New York Deli

in New Orleans”

3519 SEVERN

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 07/24/11

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban poboy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www. gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slow-braised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE — 5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810 — Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009 Magazine St., 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 5814422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601 Magazine St., 899-4260; www.pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola. com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl. com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St. Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — Signature dishes at this 19th century French Creole restaurant include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 5251486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CONTEMPORARY

CUBAN/CARIBBEAN

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638; www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www.mojitosnola.com — Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail,

CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.Sat. Cash only. $

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St., 895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and corianderspiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro. com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart. com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways,

including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 5292154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 4552266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010; www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Eggs Benedict · Huevos Rancheros Eggs Sardou · Crabcake Benedict · Omeletes Belgian Waffles · Buckwheat Pancakes Lunch Specials Daily • Breakfast Served Anytime Monday - Sunday 7am - 2pm C OR N E R OF BU R DE T T E / U P TOW N

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.



Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-nSake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

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CATERING available

COLD BE ER !

Lunc starti h Specials ng at $6.99 !

Come visit us soon, only 2 miles north of I-12 on the left

985-892-0205

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www. mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Uptown’s Favorite Neighborhood Cafe

Tues-Thurs 11-8, | Fri-Sat 11-8:30

69399 Highway 59 | Abita Springs, LA

51


OUT2EAT page 51 WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 5860972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 3019570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

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MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans. com — Attiki features a range of

Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its meal-and-a-halfsize signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 — Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or poboys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee

or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 2658855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, po-boys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this MidCity restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www. olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www. italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The

Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza. com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 4880133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza. com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $ MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $ PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of poboys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575 Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; w w w.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo which combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickorygrilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy., 737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood, raw oysters, fried seafood platters, poboys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE — Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.ruthschris. com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — Enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Chinese and Vietnamese cuisine such as spring rolls and pho soup. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$ PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.phonola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


54

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 12 > 2011


CLASSIFIEDS PET ADOPTIONS

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com

Online: When you place an ad in

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

DOMESTIC AUTOS $10,995 504-368-5640

IMPORTED AUTOS ‘09 SCION XD $12,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA i $12,995 504-368-5640

‘09 TOYOTA YARIS $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HYUNDAI ACCENT $10,995 504-368-5640

‘10 KIA SOUL $14,995 504-368-5640

‘2011 TOYOTA CAMRY LE

Power seat. Several to choose from $17,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER $9,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER AWD $18,995 Call 504-368-5640

MOPEDS/SCOOTERS

Employment

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BACK IN THE LOOP!

Advertise in

NOLA

MARKETPLACE

Thanks for your patience & well wishes. All is well and once again doing Body Work & Massage Therapy. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appointment. Metairie area. 504-832-0945. No Outcalls.

Summer Special Introductory price 1 hr

$40

90 min. avail • Swedish & Deep Tissue

5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

Alicia LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual call

504-317-4142

BASHFUL

A Touch of

Aloha

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

MERCHANDISE

DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

CHATTY CAT

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Elijah

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kirin

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

Terrier mix sweet, loveable, & friendly! gets along w/ cats & dogs. A joy to have near you. Kathy 348-2049 & 430-5036

Minnie

white & tan tabby, princess, very vocal, & likes to play. contact Traci- tbkestler@ cox.net 504-975-5971

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

Sugar

Hound mix,playful, sweet 6 m/old In obedience training ok w/ other dogs Ann Marie zmom8699@yahoo.com 858-4629

Tigger

Very sweet male 2 yr pld golden brown tabby. shots ,tested ,neutered. 504 462-1968

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

TROPIC FILMS, INC.

has completed production of NOTM “Unzip”. Creditors must contact us at (305) 395-0470

MERCY ACADEMY CLASS OF 1971 FOR INFO CONTACT: MercyReunion1971@yahoo.com

KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

APPLIANCES

Weekly Tails

18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $35. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $35. Call 943-7699

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

WALLY Kennel #A13162632

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

MUSTACHIO Kennel #A12416599

Wally is a 7-month-old, neutered, Lab mix. He’s a sweetheart of a guy and knows how to “crawl” on command. Wally will need TLC during his heartworm treatment. To meet Wally or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Mustachio is a 7-year-old, neutered, tuxedo DSH who has been at the shelter since February, due to his former family’s living situation! He LOVES to have his entire body rubbed and still has lots of sass. To meet Mustachio or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

Rentals &

Bon Bon is a 5 year old German Shorthaired Pointer looking for a special home where she is the only dog. Meet Bon Bon and other adorable Animal Helper rescues on Saturday, July 23rd from 1-3 PM at Adventure Pets, 2989 Hwy 190, Mandeville. Photo courtesy of Zoeica Images.

$12,995 504-368-5640

“Servicing Most Asian Motor Scooters” For appointment call 504-621-4013

Real Estate

Animal Helper Adoption Day

‘10 CHEVROLET HHR

Garden District Motor Scooters & Repair

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

‘09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Kookola

ALLEY CAT

55


CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

EMPLOYMENT

ADOPTIONS

EMPLOYMENT

ADOPT

Adoring couple longs to adopt your newborn. Secure life. Endless love awaits. Mary & Mike, 1-800-693-1904. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

SERVICES

Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

AUDITIONS ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS NEEDED

Business is booming, earn cash daily, will train. Full time/part time. Work locally or nationwide. Job info 678-4951417. Manager 201-443-5318

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com EARN UP $10,000/MONTH Lose weight & get paid for it! Visit http://webb2011.sbcpower.com

RETAIL Asst. Manager, Thrift Store

Join the Bridge House/Grace House team as an Assistant Manager for our Thrift Store located at 7901 Airline Drive. Three years of retail experience required. Must have experience in sales and store/employee management. References required and criminal background check will be completed. Drug-free work environment. Salary approximately $22k/year. Fax resumes to 504-525-3131 or email to thriftstore@bridgehouse.org.

VOLUNTEER

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

AIR COND/HEATING SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

ELECTRICAL

To Advertise in

DIX COMPANIES

REAL ESTATE

ELECTRICAL, Construction, Concrete, Fencing, Bobcat. Licensed & Insured. Mike Dix, 504307-7195 or Elmo Dix, 504-329-2726. mdixsr@gmail.com

Call (504) 483-3100

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

* Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru July Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

PEST CONTROL TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT

56

readers need

Call (504) 483-3100

a new JOB You can help them find one.

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Employment” Section call 504.483.3100.

Community-Owned Grocery Now Hiring! Join our team! You’ll love working for the New Orleans Food Co-op! It’s more than just a job. Join our team and serve our community by operating a new community-owned, mission-driven grocery store that will increase our community’s access to fresh, healthful, & locally produced food. We will open soon in the New Orleans Healing Center on St. Claude & Spain. 13 motivated & outgoing individuals are sought to fill the following positions:

• Full-charge Bookkeeper • Front End Manager • Cashier/Member and Guest Services Associate • Grocery Manager • Bulk Buyer

• Deli & Meat Buyer • Produce Manager • Produce Assistant Buyer • Produce Clerk • Wellness Manager

Benefits to include: competitive wages/a living wage, a 20% discount on groceries, medical insurance, a positive work environment, professional development opportunities, & more. Don’t miss out, view job descriptions today & apply online at www.nolafoodcoop.org/employment by 7/21/11 or complete an application at our Job Fair on Monday, July 18th from 3-6p at 2372 St. Claude, Suite 110. The NOFC mission is inclusive of our desire to reflect our unique and diverse community. Women, people of color, and multi-lingual speakers are encouraged to apply.

Good food, real people, meaningful work!


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GENTILLY

GENTILLY

WESTBANK

RIVER RIDGE

BILOXI, MS

FOR SALE WESTBANK EXPRESS CAR WASH 2515MANHATTAN BLVD HARVEY, LA

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities. Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

CAR WASH NEXT TO WALGREENS • 120 FOOT TUNNELS • 13 FREE VACUUM BAYS • 45,000 SQ. FT. OF LAND • 120 FOOT TUNNELS • 13 FREE VACUUM BAYS • 45,000 SQ, FT. OF LAND TRAFFIC COUNT - 50,000+ CARS PER DAY MAGNER REALTY SONNY MAGNER (504) 390-3024

9012 Rosecrest Lane Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Only Beachfront Resort in Biloxi/Gulfport - Bank Owned 3 bedroom/3 bath, 2161 sf. Amenities, covered parking Call Janine 228-313-1352 FIDELIS REALTY Please ask me about other foreclosures

Call (504) 915-3220

Reduced! Asking $169,000

FRENCH QUARTER

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $228K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. 374.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

CLASSIFIEDS FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

1020 ESPLANADE #103

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE REDUCED PRICE!

OLD METAIRIE METAIRIE TOWERS 401 Metairie Rd

1 bedroom, 1.5 bath, renovated with new appliances and AC’s. $118,000. Call 504-275-5700

1100 ROYAL STREET

Garage pkng. Great residential unit w/2 Master suites, 1750 sq. ft. Needs only a little TLC. Priced to sell at $270 sq. ft. 2nd floor rear unit, no balcony at this price. $439,000. E.J. Maysonave, (504) 544-6210

1206 BURGUNDY UNIT 5

Very bright, pristine courtyard & balcony, 1 BR. $159,000. Brigitte Fredy, Latter & Blum Inc. Realtors, Direct, 504-616-4044 or office 9483011 X110. take a virtual tour at www. brigittefredy.com

831 ST. LOUIS, UNIT H

824 BURGUNDY UNIT 2

929 Dumaine- Pied-a-terre condos:

Lg 2 level condo. 1 BR, 2 BA, covered balcony & parking, high ceil, hdwd flrs, potential to add 2nd BR. $499,000. Richard Jensen, Latter & Blum, 504-812-0010. rjensen@ latterblum.com. www.latter-blum.com/ RichardJensen

Magnificent 2 br, 2 ba. street balcony, pool. Priced to sell: $515,000. Brigitte Fredy, Latter & Blum Inc. Realtors, Direct, 504-616-4044 or office 9483011 X110. Take a virtual tour at www. brigittefredy.com

Unit 17-$91k, Unit 11-$119k, Unit 14-$109k. 727 Conti B, $139K. Fully Furn condo. Jennifer Shelnutt, Fr Qtr Realty, 504-388-9383 jennifer@fqr.com

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

RIVER VIEW TERRACE A Fr. Qtr Condomium

301 Decatur St. Rare corner location zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher REALTORS 504-3883023. www.JudyFisher.net

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

French Quarter Jewel Box

740 Esplanade, Unit4. Perfect loc betw F.Q. & Marigny. Hi Ceil, loft space, mod kit &ba. ctyd & pool. Ricky Lemann. com 504-460-6340 c 504-862-0199 o Keller Williams Realty New Orleans

JAX BREWERY French Quarter’s Finest

N * 1/1 Riverviews $495,000 J * Rare 3/3 1750 sq. ft $695,000 H * Jackson Square 2/2 $795,000 All easy access to River Terrace E.J. Masonave (504) 544-6210

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE 1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Mint 2 bdrm w/private patio in superior Fr. Mkt location across from Irene’s. Open floor plan w/slate floors, cypress beam doors, hi ceils & spacious rooms. $399,000. E.J. Maysonave, (504) 544-6210

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. Ofc 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

1325 KILDEER STREET

Solid Lakefront Home. No flooding. 4 BR, 2 BA. $299,504. Jo Ann Fitzpatrick Broussard, 504-450-1477 (cell) or Eileen Nolan, 504-495-2905 (cell) . Latter & Blum Realtors, Office 504-282-2611.

1608 FRANKFORT Lake Terrace

Renovated 3 BR, 2 BA, hdwd flrs, granite wet bar in oversized den. Extra space for fitness/office/hobby. Reduced to $329,000. Charlee Jones, Latter & Blum Realtors. Cell 504-6062447; Ofc 504-282-2611

232 LAKE MARINA AVE #8C

3 BR, 3 BA premier lakefront hi-rise condo. Extraordinary views of lake, marina & skyline. Gourmet kit, 20’ x 20’ terrace, fitness center, saltwater pool, spa. $995,000. Joan Farabaugh, Remax Affiliates, 504-723-5767

4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000 A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

1,420sq. ft, lot 62x120. Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors throughout, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/ open backyard & additional shed. 5 minutes from St. Matthews & St. Rita. REDUCED! $169,000. 504-915-3220

Former Grand Ballroom of the Italian Hall Bldg Elegant 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil, pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. $359,000. Lana Sackett, Prudential Gardner REALTORS, 443-6464 x 214 or 504-352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

511 Cov Nicholls D $229k- 1b/1b condo, 533sf, opens to ctyd. Condo fee $220. Old Vieux Carre Charm. 936 Conti #4 $539k- Renov 2b/2b, liv, new kit, gar pkg, pool, balc. Samara D. Poche’ 504-319-6226 sam@fqr.com www.frenchquarterrealty.com

REAL ESTATE

57


CLASSIFIEDS CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $650/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

3234-B Banks St.

1b/1b Upper Rr apt. Renov. Ceil fans/ new carp. all new appl. balcony, cen a/h. Util Incl. $890/m+ dep. 504908-7334

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969

4511 CANAL ST

1 efficiency $800; One 1 bdrm. $850. On red streetcar line. Both include water. Call 504-782-6564

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1200. 504-301-7239

1 BLK TO AUDUBON PARK

6230 Annunciation, 3 BR, 2 BA, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, off st prkg, $1950, lease. Call 621-7795

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

2105 FERN ST

2 br, 1 ba, cen a/h, w/d, d/w, wd flrs, hi ceil, sec sys, patio. No dogs. Great n’hood. $950. 985-246-0012.

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT 4830 1/2 CHESTNUT

1 bdrm, furn kit, cen a/h, wd flrs, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, balc. $750/ mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481.

579 S CARROLLTON

By St. Charles, Large Studio. $850/ mo utilities paid. 504-913-6999, 504259-6999

8401 WILLOW ST

1300sf, 2 or 3br, 1ba, furn kit, laun, c-a/h, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, Offst pkg. $1200 • wtr pd. 504-865-9964

FURN RIVERBEND EFFICIENCY

Eff/studio. Lg liv/sleep area Spac kit & ba, wlk-in closet. Grt n’bhd, nr st car, shops, rests, schools. 8018 Burthe St #B. $600 + dep. 1 yr min lse. 8916675 or 717-1006. Avail Aug 1st

GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter • Kaysie • Billy

504-949-5400

Adorable gated condo. 1 bd/1ba. O/S pkng, stainless appliances & granite. Garden District Patrol. $900 including utilities. Call (504) 432-1034.

511 Barracks

2/2 great location, lots of natural light! $1275

1316 Burgundy

1/1 PvtBalc/Lg deck,W/D, storage $1600

GRT LOCATIONS!

1237 Decatur

1/1 Hdwd flrs, lge kit, natlight, w/d $1400

719 Ursulines #1

1/1 Greatloc,paidcable/water/elec/Ctyd$1300

2054 Royal

1/1 shotgun style apt in fab loc. bkyd.

439 Burgundy #2

1/1 HUGE apt with tons of storage! $1000

528 St Louis #202

1/1 Second floor balcony overlooking st $1450

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 891-2420

NEAR SACRED HEART

Fantastic neighborhood, 3 br, 2.5 baths, fenced in yard. Lovely details and amenities. Ready 6/17/11 $1,800/mo. 4620 Carondelet St. 7234472 or 872-9365

RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-899-3668

AWESOME UPT DPLX UNIT

5419 STORY ST. 3 br, 2 ba duplex. Cen a/h, unfurn w/all appl inc m’wave & w/d. Close to univ & hosp. On bus line. Lg fncd bkyd. Safe n’hood, sec sys. $1350/mo. 289-5110.

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

$950

1125 Royal #3

1/1 Large open plan, DW, wd flrs

1233 Esplanade #16

2/1 renov. pool. prking for add’l $50. $1000

$1000

633 St Peter

1/2 fullyfurn,balc,completelyremodeled$1350

718 Barracks #7

1/1 newlyremodeled,pvtpool,greatLoc! $2200

CONDOS FOR SALE 929 Dumaine #14

studio cozy, skylights, common ctyd

$109,000

812 Esplanade #2

1/1 grnd flr w/pool! 481 sqft

$189,000

1233 Decatur #8

1/1 3rdflw/tonsofcharm 608sqft $199,000

921 Chartres #9

2/1.5 spacious, Crtyrd, 1188 sqft

$359,000

We have qualified tenants for your rentals. Call us!

readers need

628 Julia 1br/1ba "Arts District Apartment"

$1000

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800 1207 Jackson 1br/1ba "Aquatic Garden Apt"

$750

1514 Euterpe

$600

"Efficiency Off St. Charles"

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-236-7688 dorian.bennett@sothebysrealty.com

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 824 830 823 718

Royal - 2 bd/ 2 ba ...................... $3500 St. Philip - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $3000 Ursulines - 1 bd/ 1 ba ..................... $850 Frenchmen - 1 bd/ 1ba pkg ............. $750

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS! 2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

a new home to RENT

You can help them find one.

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

59


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN JEFFERSON & OCTAVIA

BAYOU ST. JOHN SALE PENDING

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUlY 12 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 57

62

5419 LASALLE

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

eleGant uPtoWn hoMe. Nestled between Jefferson & Octavia on a quiet block , this newly renovated home features a spacious living area with high ceilings & lots of natural light. Expansive eat-in kitchen overlooks deck & gorgeous courtyrd surrounded by garden. Living rm opens to large porch. Master bdrm suite opens onto large balcony has closet & storage space galore! Attached sitting/dressing room has additional closets. 3BR/3BA, 3,050 sq. ft. Must see!! $595,000

(504) 895-4663

1216 NORTH LOPEZ Bayou St John 4 Plex on huge lot. Well maintained. Owner’s unit has open flr plan, crown molding & whirlpool. Hdwd flrs throughout. Totally renov in 2007. Re-wired, plumbing, roof, drywall, & cen A/C throughout. Living rm opens onto patio & pool. Enjoy this tranquil setting from porch or huge balc. Pool house has storage & guest accommodations with 2 full baths. 4153 sq. ft. plus 576 Sq ft pool house. $595,000. Regular closing.



Gambit New Orleans: Julsy 12, 2011