Page 1

INSIDE: DON’T ASK? DO TELL PAGE 9 | RENE AT THE RIB ROOM PAGE 63

BEST

OF NEW ORLEANS

G A M B I T > V O L U M E 3 2 > N U M B E R 3 9 > S E P T E M B E R 2 7 > 2 011

.COM


>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>> > <<<<<<<

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

>>>>>>

contents <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>

CHECK IT OUT

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 3923 BIENVILLE ST., NEW ORLEANS, L A 70119 < < < < <(504) < < <486-5900 <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > >OPERATING > > > > > HOURS > > > >: 8:30 > > A.M. > > >TO>5>:30> P.M. > MON.-FRI. PUBLISHER

MARGO DUBOS

8131 Hampson St. • 866-9666 Open Til 8pm Thurs • Streetcar Stop #43

SHOE LUST HANDBAG ENVY

Van Eli Boots

SEPTEMBER 27, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 39

> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >ADMINISTRATIVE > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Fall > > >Arts > > >&>Entertainment > > > > > > > > > Guide > > > > > > > > > > > 15 > > > > > >EDITOR > > > > KEVIN > > > >ALLMAN >>>

Commentary

5

Blake Pontchartrain

6

News

9

Bouquets & Brickbats

9

MANAGING EDITOR KANDACE POWER GRAVES POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON STAFF WRITERS ALEX WOODWARD, CHARLES MALDONADO EDITORIAL ASSISTANT LAUREN LABORDE listingsedit@gambitweekly.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEREMY ALFORD, D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, MEG FARRIS, BRENDA MAITLAND, IAN McNULTY, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS, DALT WONK CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER CHERYL GERBER

C’est What?

9

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

What’s hot and who’s coming to town

“Save Our Sons”

The New Orleans know-it-all

New Orleans servicemembers react to the dismantling of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”

This week’s heroes and zeroes

15

Gambit’s Web poll

Scuttlebutt

From their lips to your ears

Clancy DuBos / Politics

14

Green Matters

35

A not-so-new face on the City Council UPTOWN 4119 MAGAZINE ST. 899-6800

Incubating green businesses at the Building Block; a solar-powered church; and more

FRENCH QUARTER 526 ROYAL ST. 569-0005

FEETFIRSTSTORES.COM

A&E News

41

Gambit Picks

41

The Drowsy Chaperone kicks off a season of musicals Best bets for your busy week

Cuisine

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

41

Ian McNulty on the Rib Room 5 in Five: Five places to dine near City Park Wine of the Week Scuttlebites

The Puzzle Page

YES!

KE A CA

PREVIEW: tUnE-yArDs

FILM

276-9095

78

MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

REVIEW: Moneyball REVIEW: Tucker & Dale vs. Evil REVIEW: Michele Basta

51 53

REVIEW: God of Carnage

55 55

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SHERRY SNYDER 483-3122 ········sherrys@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CARRIE MICKEY 483-3121 ·········carriem@gambitweekly.com SALES CONSULTANT MARY LOU NOONAN 985-809-9933 ··········maryloun@bellsouth.net

STAGE

63

42

44

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com STACY GAUTREAU 483-3143 ········stacyg@gambitweekly.com INTERN JOSHUA DAVIS MARKETING DIRECTOR

ART

www.flourpowernola.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR GEORGIA DODGE

46 46 48

EVENTS

Market Place

70

Weekly Tails

71

Mind / Body / Spirit

71

Employment

72

Automotive

79

Real Estate / Rentals

JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

CLASSIFIEDS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> 483-3100 FAX: 483-3153 | classadv@gambitweekly.com

BUSINESS >>>>> billing inquiries: (504) 483-3135

CLASSIFIEDS

COVER DESIGN BY BRITT BENOIT

04

63 63 63 64

GAMBITGUIDE MUSIC

DORA SISON

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÉ

DISPLAY ADVERTISING >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3159 | displayadv@gambitweekly.com

ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

Mon-Sat 10-6 | Thurs 10-7 | Sun 12:30-5

IT’S

9

PRODUCTION >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

73

CONTROLLER GARY DIGIOVANNI ASSISTANT CONTROLLER MAUREEN TREGRE CREDIT OFFICER MJ AVILES OPERATIONS & EVENTS >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> OPERATIONS & EVENTS DIRECTOR LAURA CARROLL OPERATIONS & EVENTS ASSISTANT RACHEL BARRIOS

Gambit Communications, Inc.

CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2011 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


commentAry

thinking out loud

this narrow edge of time

A

These mediators know and can reach the young people who are likely to settle a beef with a gun. Among the other programs that will be launched or expanded are Circle of Courage, which teaches conflict resolution in public schools; and increased (and ongoing) investment in the New Orleans Recreation Department and Job One, the program that connects teens with jobs. Community support is equally if not more important, and Landrieu had five immediate, concrete suggestions for New Orleanians: join or start a Neighborhood Watch group, serve as a mentor, support local nonprofit groups, hire a young male and volunteer. Already there has been a predictable chorus of cynicism, skepticism and pure naysay-

organic cotton & bamboo compression support moisture wicking 4 way stretch odor resistant breathable and comfortable

clothes + accessories

Since 1994, more than 4,000 New Orleanians have been lost to homicide. ing: We’ve tried similar things before. It’s too much of a feel-good approach. We’re broke; where is the money coming from? To all of those, we say: We haven’t tried this particular approach. On the contrary, we’ve tried jailing our way out of this problem, and it’s gotten us nothing but an enormous (and dysfunctional) prison without affecting the crime rate. Meanwhile, to sustain this effort, the city is applying for a $2.5 million grant from the National Institute of Justice. Granted, Save Our Sons may not work. But if it does, it won’t just be Landrieu’s legacy; it will be the legacy of all New Orleanians standing on this narrow edge of time. In the 1990s, then-Police Chief Richard Pennington slashed New Orleans’ homicide rate in half. Many doubted Pennington, but he proved it could be done. It can be done again, which is why this initiative deserves our support.

7732 maple 865 . mon - sat 10-6

9625

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

t the debut of his Save Our Sons crime summit on Sept. 17, Mayor Mitch Landrieu told the 2,000 people gathered at UNO Lakefront Arena, “We are standing on the narrow edge of time. And we have to make a decision about whether or not we are going to fall off of it, or whether we are going to pull back from the abyss and lay a foundation for the future, for our sons and our daughters.” The mayor was speaking, of course, of New Orleans’ horrendous homicide rate, which remains 10 times higher than the national average. The FBI’s Unified Crime Report, which came out two days after Landrieu’s speech, was filled with disquieting but hardly surprising statistics. New Orleans saw 50 homicides per 100,000 residents in 2010; the statewide average, which was still high, was 12 per 100,000. Per capita statistics are one thing, but here’s another: Since 1994, more than 4,000 New Orleanians have been lost to homicide. In July, New Orleans Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas announced a commitment to cut the city’s homicide rate by 5 percent. At the time, we said it was too modest a goal (and it is), but it’s better than where we are now, which is actually worse than 2010, when Serpas came into office. He inherited a dysfunctional force and a deeply troubled city, but the fact remains we’re heading in the wrong direction. Landrieu’s Save Our Sons initiative will, he says, be modeled after “Operation Ceasefire,” which began in Boston in the 1990s. In the 10 years leading up to 1994, Boston saw a tripling of homicide rates for young black men and a 418 percent increase in juvenile handgun homicides. Operation Ceasefire focused on the worst offenders. The results were immediate, according to a U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) report; the initiatives in Operation Ceasefire, the DOJ found, led to a 63 percent decrease in the monthly number of youth homicides in Boston. That’s the good news. The bad news is that homicides have been on the uptick again in Boston — and Operation Ceasefire and similar programs have not shown the same success in other cities where they’ve been tried, such as Cincinnati. Still, other mayors place hope in Ceasefire. Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker oversaw a crimefighting strategy that led to his city’s first murder-free month in decades. But Newark has had a bloody summer in 2011, and Booker is embarking on an adaptation of Operation Ceasefire right now, just as Landrieu is. The city is putting up $250,000 in seed money and applying for supplemental grants to get “messengers” on the streets.

tasc or thriv whichever way you know us performance wear

05


blake

Antiques & Interiors

PONTCHARTRAIN™

wholesale to the public.

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

over 12,000 square feet of european antiques.

HEY BLAKE, WHAT’S GOING ON WITH THE LOUISIANA ARTWORKS BUILDING ON LEE CIRCLE? I PASS BY IT ALL THE TIME AND AM SAD TO SEE IT SITTING SHUTTERED.

& decorators alike

A.J. ALLEGRA

300 Jefferson Highway(A cr oss fr om Lowe’s) New Orleans 504.231.3397 www.dopantiques.com

BACK TO SCHOOL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

$98.00

“WHERE THE UNUSUAL IS COMMONPLACE.” RUNNING THROUGH OCTOBER 3540 Toulouse Tickets: 488-1460 or www.midcitytheatre.com

CATERING! FOR YOUR BLACK & GOLD & LSU PARTIES

6215 WILSON ST.

06

HARAHAN • 737-3933

515 HARRISON AVE.

LAKEVIEW • 484-0841

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

5101 W. ESPLANADE AVE. METAIRIE, LA 70006 504-885-4956 • 800-222-4956

This Fall... Enjoy Sushi!

4920 Prytania St. • 891-3644 closed on sundays

• kyotonola.com

DEAR A.J., When the doors to the Louisiana ArtWorks building were locked in January, no one was certain whether it would open again. The future looked bleak for the project because insurance on the $25 million building had lapsed, and the organization was more than $16 million in debt. Louisiana ArtWorks, which hoped to provide display and studio space to artists, seemed like a great idea in 1997 when Arts Council of New Orleans President Shirley Trusty Corey, former Mayor Marc Morial and other officials announced plans for the arts complex to open in 2000. The date was pushed back repeatedly because of a variety of difficulties, including a dispute with preservationists over the fate of the Bradford Furniture Company building, which ArtWorks organizers had planned to tear down. Local preservationists opposed demolishing the Bradford building, which was constructed in 1915, and eventually won that battle. The state money budgeted for Louisiana ArtWorks was put on hold, and the Arts Council went back to the drawing board to come up with revised plans, which delayed the project and increased the cost. Construction finally began in 2003, with a projected opening date of 2004. It didn’t happen. While it’s not unusual for major construction projects to experience delays and cost overruns, Louisiana ArtWorks had more than its share of troubles. Construction ceased by the end of 2004 while the Arts Council tried to raise enough money to put the contractor back to work. Good news came in July 2005 when the Louisiana Legislature allocated $3.5 million for Louisiana ArtWorks, which had sat dormant for eight months. The next month, Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans and the levees failed, further delaying the project. Louisiana ArtWorks finally opened in 2008, although parts of the building were still unfinished. The five-story,

93,000-square-foot complex housed artist studios, education rooms, a gallery, retail space and workshops for glass, metal and print media. The project was intended to be a tourist attraction as well as an art-making center. Visitors would be able to walk around most of the studios, observing and talking to artists as they worked, and buy their artworks. It had a lot of potential, but the complex cost a fortune to operate. The entire board of directors resigned last May, and Louisiana ArtWorks officially has ceased operations. The Arts Council is considering transferring the title of the building to a new owner.

Louisiana ArtWorks’ studios, galleries and retail area closed in January and could remain closed for good. PHOTO BY KANDACE POWER GRAVES

HEY BLAKE, WHAT CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT THE MILLIKEN CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL THAT USED TO BE LOCATED ON TULANE AVENUE? DR. BOB

DEAR DR. BOB, Deborah Milliken provided funds to build The Richard Milliken Memorial Hospital, which was constructed in 1898, in memory of her husband, who died two years earlier. Deborah, known as the “good angel of suffering children,” visited the hospital often, taking gifts to the children who were patients. For years it was considered an outstanding charitable hospital for children in New Orleans. Deborah Milliken died in 1915 at age 84, and the hospital was torn down in the early 1930s to make room for the LSU Medical School.


O

M

N AT 10A PE

R FO

BLA GOLCK & HOM D E GA MES

AL FRESCO DINING ON FULTON ST.

WE’RE MAKING HAPPY HOUR GRAND

4-6pm Monday - Friday · 2 for 1 Wells & Drafts at the Bar 575 Convention Center Blvd. | Fulton St. at Lafayette | Open 11am-til 504.520.8530 | grandislerestaurant.com | $3 Validated Parking in Harrah’s Self Parking Garage

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

New Orleans

08

AUTHENTIC CUISINE PASSED DOWN FOR GENER ATIONS

CSNO Live to Eat gambit ad_2003 U.S. News ad 2nd set 9/22/11 9:46 AM Page 1

NOLALoyola 2011

FREE ORDER OF FRIED PICKLES WITH PURCHASE OF A BUCKET OF BEER

HAPPY

HOUR MON - FRI • 4-7PM

New Orleans on a Plate: A Conversation about Legendary Fare with OPEN FOR

breakfast, lunch & dinner MON-T HUR S & SUN 8A M-10PM F R I & SAT 8A M-11PM

135 DECATUR STREET • FRENCH QUARTER 504.529.8600 • WWW.HUCKFINNSCAFE.COM

Ti Martin of Commander’s Palace Leah Chase of Dooky Chase and JoAnn Clevenger of Upperline

Friday, September 30, 2011, 7:30 pm Nunemaker Auditorium, Monroe Hall

FREE

The Center for the Study of New Orleans • www.loyno.edu/csno


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > MORE SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 14 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“Rep. Jeff Landry has no regrets for comparing the nation’s lead offshore oil and gas regulatory agency to the Gestapo and will not apologize. ‘Absolutely not, not one,’” Landry (R-La.) said Tuesday evening when asked whether he had any regrets. “I mean, I didn’t name-call them. I used it as an adjective or an adverb in saying it was like, it was similar.” — Politico, Sept. 21, 2011, reporting on the dust-up between Landry and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE). Landry had gone to BOEMRE’s New Orleans office without an appointment, seeking a meeting, but was rebuffed after a 20-minute wait. BOEMRE director Michael Bromwich responded, “Your comparison of the minor inconvenience you experienced to the tactics and methods of the Nazi secret police is simply unacceptable from anyone, but especially from a public official.”

Do Tell AMID A CELEBRATION OF LAST WEEK’S REPEAL OF DON’T ASK DON’T TELL, GAY AND LESBIAN SERVICE MEMBERS AND FORMER SERVICE MEMBERS STILL SEE CHALLENGES AHEAD. BY CHARLES MALDONADO

jubilant crowd started filling the French Quarter bar Boondock Saint around 5 p.m. on Sept. 20. By that time, nearly 18 hours had passed since the “prohibition of homosexual conduct … continue(d) to be necessary to the unique circumstances of military service,” per U.S. Code Title 10, Section 654, commonly referred to as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” which was officially repealed as of 12:01 a.m. “I never pretended, but I didn’t break the policy per se,” said Chris Savage, who was there with his longtime partner Duane Talley for the bar’s Repeal Day Party. Savage, a marine science technician with the rank of E6 petty officer first class in the U.S. Coast Guard, told Gambit he has served for more than 17 years. “Last week was my first honest conversation,” he said. “I was talking to a lieutenant and I just referred to my partner. … So often it was just such a dark cloud. It was scary. You couldn’t have the shades open in the house.”

A

Chris Savage, a marine science technician with the U.S. Coast Guard, and his partner Duane Talley celebrate the repeal of the military’s Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell policy. said she also underwent an investigation. “A girl had come into my room,” she said. “Someone saw her.” St. Pe’s superiors did not consider the witness who reported the incident to be credible, however, and the investigation was quickly dropped. Talley, Savage’s partner, as well as Nicole Barbe, who organized the Repeal Day Party, were less fortunate. Talley said he was discharged from the Air Force in the mid-’80s, before Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell was on the books, and when merely being gay — rather than openly gay — was banned. Barbe was discharged from the Navy in 1999. She told her chief petty officer she was gay because other sailors — suspicious about her sexuality — were harassing her. “The Navy did accuse me of lying,” Barbe said. She sought legal counsel from the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network (SLDN), a nonprofit organization dedicated to providing legal services to LGBT service members and, until recently, putting an end to Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell. The group was able to get Barbe an honor-

The Concerned Classified City Employees Group raised objections to proposed civil service rule changes for city employees during a Sept. 19 New Orleans Civil Service Commission meeting. Two days later, the group filed a formal complaint to the city’s Civil Service Department against commission vice chairwoman Dana Douglas for what it calls Douglas’ disregard of the group at the meeting. During the meeting, Douglas stopped the group’s attorney, Arthur Smith, from completing his full presentation. Smith had planned to read interview material from state employees whose departments had undergone similar changes as those proposed by Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s administration. Smith said the state’s new layoff procedures and other changes under consideration by the city had eroded both worker PAGE 13

c'est what? WHEN DO YOU THINK THE NBA DISPUTE WILL BE SETTLED AND BASKETBALL WILL RESUME?

35%

BEFORE NEW YEAR'S

KIDsmART,

45%

NO HOOPS THIS SEASON

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

20%

AFTER NEW YEAR'S

With the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” gay servicemembers can now serve openly in the military. What kind of an adjustment will it make to the armed services?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

the local nonprofit dedicated to arts education in New Orleans public schools, was chosen by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts to pilot a professional development seminar on arts coaching. The seminar, which was held Sept. 15-16, will help local teachers this year as they work in residencies in 10 public schools utilizing arts instruction across the school curricula.

Irvin Mayfield

raised more than $70,000 for local charities with his “Love Sessions,” an 11-night “battle” between himself and jazz musicians Kermit Ruffins and Roy Hargrove. More than 1,500 jazz fans attended the shows, which were held at Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse in the Royal Sonesta Hotel and his newly opened I Club in the JW Marriott. Twelve local nonprofits will split the money raised.

Sugar Bowl officials

made illegal campaign contributions in 2004 and 2006 to then-Gov. Kathleen Blanco, according to a Sept. 20 report by Bernard Goldberg on HBO’s Real Sports. The Sugar Bowl, a tax-exempt charity, bought three $1,000 tickets to Blanco fundraisers in violation of the rules governing 501(c)(3) charities. The bowl’s executive director, Paul Hoolahan, characterized it as an “embarrassment.”

Congressman John Fleming,

R-Minden, appeared on MSNBC Sept. 19 to criticize President Barack Obama’s plan to raise taxes on the 0.3 percent of wealthiest Americans. Fleming, who represents Louisiana’s 4th Congressional District and who cleared more than $6 million in 2010 from his Subway and UPS Store franchises, called the plan “class warfare” and complained, “By the time I feed my family, I have maybe $400,000 left over.” His family eats that much? That’s a lot of foot-longs.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

But Savage was relatively lucky when the policy was active. He said he was investigated once in 2007, based on a false tip. Someone told his superior officer that he saw Savage and Talley kissing while on duty on Coast Guard property. When Savage was summoned to make a statement to his executive officer, he demanded to see proof of the incident — which according to the witness’ allegations took place right next to a security camera. When security tapes cleared Savage, the investigation was dropped. Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Marissa St. Pe — a former active-duty soldier who served in the Afghan War in 2005 — told Gambit she came out to her fellow soldiers Sept. 20. But while she was stationed in Germany, St. Pe

COMPLAINT DEPARTMENT

09


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

10

r i c e m i l l l o f t s

01-03 bedrooms 750-2100 s q f t $1600-$4000 522 montegut @ chartres

n o w

o p e n

A b u i l d i n g of br e at ht ak i ng o r i gi nal i t y . C a pt iva ti n g rive r v i ews. I n sp i re d s t r e e t a r t . Subl i m e o p e n s pa c e. Arc h i tec tur a l a rt ifa c ts. H osp i ta l i t y s er vi c es. A j o y ful t r i but e t o c rea t i v i ty a n d bea u ty . 504.300.1 130 | r i c e m i l l l o f ts.c o m

in the bywater


news

views

page 9

able discharge. SLDN’s website says the organization has advocated on behalf of 10,000 members of the military since 1993. “This [repeal] wouldn’t have happened for another decade without the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network,” Barbe said, standing on top of a barstool at the party and leading a toast. “Although we’ve gotten this far, there’s still a whole lot farther to go.” St. Pe and others at the Boondock Saint shared the sentiment. “I feel like this is a victory, but I also feel like we have a lot more to do,” St. Pe said.

811 Conti Street

504-523-8619

Mon-Sun 10am-6am www.erinrosebar.com One Main Financial 200 Saturday, Oct. 1 - 2:30pm AAA 400 Sunday, Oct. 2 - 1pm

2520 HARVARD AVE., SUITE 2B METAIRIE, LA 70001 • 504-454-3004 watkinsfootcenter.com

SERVICE INDUSTRY HI-LIFE SPECIALS Monday-Thursday • Midnight-4am

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

First on the list, both St. Pe and Barbe said, is making sure same-sex partners — and husbands or wives in states that allow same-sex marriage — receive the same benefits traditionally given military spouses. The military provides health and life insurance, housing, pensions and, under the new G.I. Bill, college tuition to spouses of service members. But so far the Pentagon has balked at providing any benefits to samesex partners, even when the couple is married. The military cites the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, a federal law that defines marriage as being only between one man and one woman. Since it is a federal employer, the Pentagon argues, it defers to federal rather than state law. The following is from a Defense Department statement released in April, five months after Congress approved a repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell: “The Defense of Marriage Act prohibits extension of many military benefits — such as medical care, travel and housing allowances and other benefits — to same-sex couples. Service members will continue to have various benefits for which they can designate beneficiaries; the services will reemphasize these opportunities.” SLDN has pledged to lobby for samesex benefits and will continue to provide legal representation for LGBT service members who have been subject to ridicule or harassment by peers or superiors in a military culture sometimes accused of accepting, even condoning, anti-gay sentiment. The question is whether the SLDN will continue to receive enough individual contributions, now that its marquee issue has disappeared, to continue its mission. Individual contributions account for more than half of SLDN’s $2.2 million 2010 cash revenue (as opposed to in-kind revenue — typically gifts of resources like use of property), according to its most recent tax filing. “When I was there, we used to say we were there to put ourselves out of business,” said Charlotte D’Ooge, a former fundraiser for SLDN. “But, no, I don’t think they’re going to give up now.”

Weekend Appointments & House Calls Available

11


The

scuttlebutt

New OrleaNs

another location, probably on St. Claude Avenue,” though Mutter said he doesn’t rule out bringing Plan B back into the building. “But they can’t really be displaced for an entire year,” he added. “I don’t know what’s going to be in the commercial space. I do think the corner itself will be something like a cafebookstore, but something certainly (like) a neighborhood business. It might be a restaurant. I don’t know. I haven’t gotten that far.” — Alex Woodward

FRom dime sToRe To LuxuRy

The City Council on Sept. 22 voted 5-2 in favor of a multi-use high-rise development at the corner of North Rampart and Canal streets, the site of the long-vacant Woolworth building. Councilmembers Stacy Head and Cynthia Hedge-Morrell were the dissenting votes. The vote itself, which lasted 10 seconds, was nevertheless preceded by nearly two-and-a-half hours of debate, and here’s how that time was spent: First, there were 15 minutes of comments from people who were opposed to the project. Bill Borah of Smart Growth for Louisiana went first and objected to what he called “undemocratic” time limits on public commentary. (District C Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer, who sponsored the bill, later showed a lengthy list of public meetings held over the course of negotiations on the project.) Others cited the project’s seeming inconsistency with plans for the city’s new Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance (CZO), which would limit Canal Street buildings to 120 feet, a number preservationists didn’t oppose. “I hope you’re going to tell us today that the new rules, the new CZO, is not just going to be a jumping-off point for variances,” said Nathan Chapman,

founder of the Marketing Center for Social Security Law Practices and a vocal preservationist. Some accused councilmembers of “kissing the ring” of politically powerful, big-money developers, even when they weren’t playing by the rules. “This is not kissing the ring,” Council President Jackie Clarkson said. Supporters then had their 15 minutes, which included a PowerPoint presentation. Many in this group were people actively involved in the project, including development team leader Praveen Kailas, Kailas’ lawyer Chris Kane and Hank Smith of Harry Baker Smith Architects, which designed the building. Smith called the 120-foot limit in this case “arbitrary,” saying the average height of buildings on Canal Street is 173 feet. Head signaled her opposition when she went after the developers for requesting and getting a $2.4 million 2008 assessment ($1.2 million less than the $3.6 million they spent on the property in 2007), saying the city lost $75,000 to $100,000 in tax revenue as a result of the reassessment. An amendment from Head that would have limited the development’s height to 154 feet on its Canal front and 70 feet on its Iberville front failed without a vote when no one else would second it. Finally, it was on to final statements from councilmembers — that part where, just prior to the actual vote, each member takes 15 minutes to tell the audience what their votes are going to be. Councilman Jon Johnson said he thought tourists are disappointed to find out that the French Quarter doesn’t offer easy access to glitzy retail chains. “Why should a person who flies into New Orleans, comes into the CBD, have to go out to Metairie for high-end retail?” Johnson said. — Maldonado

Gala Thursday October 6th • 6:30pm

Galvez solarium 914 N. Peters st French Quarter

One ticket $75; two tickets $135. 942-8542 or noafest@neworleansaafrikanfilmfest.org

Highlighs of the 2011 Mississippi River 9th Ward Film & Arts Festival Schedule Thur

OcT

06

Fri

OcT

07

saT

OcT

08

suN

OcT

09

• Gala at the Galvez • Prelude by the River (kora, sax, drums) | 6pm • Molto, led by Jean Montes | 7pm • Meal & Tributes • Jesse McBride Presents the Next Generation 9:30 pm • Screening: Draw Yourself! | 10 am • Children’s Workshop • Lower 9th Ward Village Charmaine Neville 7pm • Screening: Shirley Adams: Portrait of a Mother (So Africa) 8pm • Screening: Africa United (UK) 10am • New Orleans African American Museum Screening: Murder on a Sunday Morning (France/USA) 1pm • Fredy Omar con su banda | 7pm • Screening: Central Station (Brazil) | 8pm • Caesar Bros Funk Box 6:30 pm • Screening: Black Venus (France/Tunisia) 7:30 pm Festival pass: $20; $5 each screening. info/purchase: www.neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org or noafest@neworleansafrikanfilmfest.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

In May, Julian Mutter announced plans to renovate his property at 511 Marigny St. (known as The A.R.K.) into an apartment building with retail space on its bottom floor. Artists currently rent the top floor for studio space. Mutter’s plans appear to be moving forward; several artists recently told the Faubourg Marigny Improvement Association (FMIA) that they received notices to vacate the studio by Nov. 11. Plans for the $15 million project include 48 one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments, and 4,000 square feet of commercial space at the corner of Decatur and Marigny streets, with off-street parking for all units. “We’re looking to break ground on it by the end of the year,” says Mutter, whose family also owns Doerr Furniture Store. “We anticipate approximately between 11 months and 13 months of construction time. Our goal is to have the building in service by December 2012.” In April, Mutter requested a zoning change for the property from commercial use to residential and commercial mixed uses. Mutter told Gambit the city’s approval of the zoning and ordinance changes arrived last week. As for the artists in the building: “They’ve been displaced,” Mutter said. The New Orleans Community Bike Project (Plan B), which operates inside The A.R.K.’s first floor, also will have to move — at least temporarily. “I want to keep them in my sphere,” said Mutter, an avid bicyclist and board member of the Metro Bike Coalition. “I’m looking to work with them to find them

We want to hear about the coolest achievers you know — nominate them for Gambit’s annual 40 Under 40 awards, which spotlights New Orleanians under the age of 40 for their accomplishments. The deadline for nominations is Oct. 4 at 5 p.m. (elected officials are not eligible). Winners will be featured in Gambit Nov. 1. To be eligible, nominees must be 39 or younger, live in the New Orleans metropolitan area and be worthy of distinction for their achievements, ideas put into practice or their contributions to the community. Send your nomination to Gambit managing editor Kandace Graves: • email (preferred): kandaceg@gambitweekly.com (put “40 Under 40” in the subject line) • fax: 504-483-3116 • mail: Gambit, attn: Kandace Graves, 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. Please include the nominee’s name, where he or she works, birth date and cellphone number, as well as a few paragraphs about what makes him or her a good candidate for the honor. Only winners will be notified. All nominations must be received in the Gambit office by 5 p.m. Oct. 4.

invites you to celebrate Harold Battiste Jr. Recipient of The Second Toni Cade Bambara Award for Cultural Leadership

McKennA MuSeuM oF AFRicAn AMeRicAn ARt

The A.R.K. And The CovenAnTs

40 under 40 nominations

afrikan Film & arts FesTival Project

pRytAniA tHeAtRe

morale and confidence in the State Civil Service Commission. Douglas told Smith that since he already had put that testimony into a written letter, it was sufficient for the commission and there would be no need for him to present it aloud. In its complaint, a copy of which was provided to Gambit, the group claims that Douglas, in denying Smith the opportunity to read the interviews aloud, demonstrated a “blatant disregard” for the group’s response to Landrieu’s proposed changes to Civil Service Rule XII, which governs layoff procedures. Other changes under consideration by the administration would ease managerial restrictions on hiring and firing city employees. “Attorney Smith should have been allowed to present his information without interruption on this very important matter. The jobs of hundreds of Classified City Employees are at stake,” the complaint says. The group has requested to be placed on the agenda for the commission’s next meeting Oct. 17. — Charles Maldonado

AFRicAn AMeRicAn MuSeuM

page 9

13


clancy DUBOS

POLITICS

An Easy Choice wo week s ago, when Eric Granderson contemplated his prospects for winning the interim appointment to succeed his boss, Arnie Fielkow, on the New Orleans City Council, he said, “I’m not going to lose one moment of sleep over whether I get this job. But, if I do get it, I’ll probably lose a lot of sleep in the next few months.” The statement was vintage Granderson, who long ago established himself as one of the most effective, insightful and influential staffers at City Hall. He began his career there nearly 30 years ago as an aide to then-District D Councilman Lambert Boissiere Jr. He later served as a top aide to Mayor Sidney Barthelemy, then moved to the Downtown Development District, where he served as capital projects manager. He returned to City Hall as a top advisor to District C Councilman Troy Carter, then signed on as Fielkow’s chief of staff in 2006. Along the way, Granderson came to know the ins and outs of city government as well as anyone. He knew the people as well as the sometimes-arcane processes. His advice was sought not only by politi-

T

cians, but also by citizens, business folks and civic leaders who needed help navigating City Hall’s bureaucracy. With his college degree in political science from Columbia University, the New Orleans-born Granderson had all the formal qualifications when he started out, but it was his years in the trenches of city government that made him an invaluable counselor to several council members and a mayor — and an easy choice to succeed Fielkow temporarily, until his successor is elected in the spring. I have known Granderson since his first days at City Hall. His hallmarks are his level head, low profile and calm demeanor. He beat out 15 other applicants for the interim appointment, which the council approved unanimously and without debate. Some citizens in the audience last Thursday expressed anger at Granderson’s appointment, but fellow applicant Tommy Milliner, who worked in the city attorney’s office during some of the years that Granderson worked as a council and mayoral aide, praised the selection. “He’s an excellent choice,” Milliner said.

The appointment of Granderson, who is African-American, gives the seven-member council its third black member and begins to restore some of the racial parity that existed before Hurricane Katrina. Back then, the council had five African-American members; the city is more than 60 percent black.

While Granderson has keen political instincts and knows well the complex currents that swirl beneath the city’s political landscape, those who know him say universally he is absolutely colorblind in his dealings with people. And while he moves easily around City Hall, he will not be a pushover as a council member. Look for him to ask some penetrating questions at budget time. By law, Granderson cannot run in the March 24 special election to succeed Fielkow. Qualifying for the special election is Dec. 7-9, and several of Granderson’s new colleagues could be running against one another in that race. That will test the council’s — and Granderson’s — diplomatic skills. In accepting his appointment, Granderson told his new colleagues, “I’m going to be counting on you for advice.” No doubt, but his fellow council members would be well-served to continue heeding Granderson’s counsel as well.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

nola beans caters for game day

14

catering available

pastries & Hot breakfast

yummy desserts and coffee

www.noalbeans.com • join us on facebook

Hours: Mon-Sat 7am-6pm • Sun 7am-3pm


GA MBIT ’S GU IDE TO FA LL ENTERTA INME NT COMPILED BY WILL COVIELLO AND LAUREN LABORDE

I

FILM...............................................................15 THEATER........................................................17 DANCE............................................................24 OPERA............................................................24 COMEDY..........................................................24 FAMILY............................................................24 CONCERTS......................................................25 CLASSICAL CONCERTS....................................26 FESTIVALS & EVENTS......................................26 SPORTS...........................................................28 GALAS & FUNDRAISERS...................................30 KEVIN ALLMAN ON MUSICAL COMEDY......................................18 D. ERIC BOOKHARDT ON PROSPECT.2...............22 ALEX WOODWARD ON COMEDY.........................25 WILL COVIELLO ON THE VOODOO MUSIC EXPERIENCE...............28

GAMBIT PICKS ARE NOTED WITH A

FILM 50/50

The dramedy follows a 25-year-old (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) as he deals with a cancer diagnosis. Sept. 30

Footloose

The 1980s classic is re-imagined in a modern setting with eye-catching choreography. Oct. 14

The Thing

Courageous

An experiment on a research site in Antarctica frees a dangerous alien that had been trapped under ice, putting the team of scientists in danger. Oct. 14

Dream House

Elizabeth Olsen stars in the Sundance hit about a young woman struggling to readjust to normal life after fleeing a cult. Oct. 21

From the creators of the Christian drama Fireproof, the movie centers on police officers in various stages of fatherhood and their struggles with faith. Sept. 30 A family — which includes Daniel Craig and Rachel Weisz — moves into a new house without knowing it was the scene of some grisly murders. Sept. 30

What’s Your Number?

A woman (Anna Faris) decides to try to find the man of her dreams among her 20 ex-boyfriends to avoid increasing her “sex number.” Sept. 30

The Ides of March

In the political thriller based on an acclaimed play by Beau Willimon, Ryan Gosling plays a staffer who is introduced to the dark side of politics while working on a presidential campaign. Oct. 7

Real Steel

In the near future, where giant robots have replaced humans in the sport of boxing, a washed-up former fighter (Hugh Jackman) teams up with his estranged son to build and train their own high-tech fighter. Oct. 7

The Big Year

Three men (Jack Black, Steve Martin and Owen Wilson) face off in a bird-watching competition in 1998, when El Nino brought an influx of species to North America. Oct. 14

Martha Marcy May Marlene

Paranormal Activity 3

The latest installment of the night vision-horror franchise takes place before the other two films, when the main protagonists were children dealing with supernatural occurrences. Oct. 21

Snowmen

A 10-year-old and his misfit friends attempt to set a world record in the family comedy. Oct. 21

The Three Musketeers

Alexandre Dumas’ classic swashbuckling tale gets a bigscreen reboot. Oct. 21

Take Shelter

An ordinary family man is haunted by apocalyptic visions, compelling him to obsessively work on building a storm shelter in his backyard — which heightens the suspicion of everyone around him. Oct. 21

13

Alexander Skarsgard, Mickey Rourke, Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson and others star in the French film remake, where a young man steals a dead person’s identity and becomes embroiled in an underground crime world. Oct. 28 PAGE 16

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

n fall, football season kicks off, theaters open new shows, Hollywood rolls out Oscar hopefuls, and festivals and galas fill the calendar. There’s everything from classical music to arena rockers, comedy to modern dance, blockbusters to bowl games vying for room on your social calendar. Gambit’s fall entertainment guide previews the city’s most anticipated events, so mark your schedule and enjoy the best of the season’s offerings.

15


FALL entertainment GUIDE Founded in 1995, the Jefferson Ballet Theatre has produced critically recognized, quality performances for audiences in the Greater New Orleans area.

The Jefferson Ballet Theatre thanks and honors Myra Mier, its director of 16 years, as she entrusts her vision to the company’s new directors, Kimberly and Kenneth Beck. Classes and private instruction available at all levels.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Individual auditions now being held for company membership and performance casting.

Look for the Jefferson Ballet Theatre’s upcoming production of the Hans Christian Anderson classic tale, The Snow Queen, to be performed on Friday, January 6, 2012. For more information contact Kimberly at (504) 468-1231 or kimmballet@yahoo.com. 3621 Florida Blvd., Kenner www.jeffersonballettheatre.com

Anonymous explores intrigues in Elizabethan England and the question of whether Edward de Vere wrote the plays attributed to William Shakespeare. © C o l u m b i a P i C t u r e s 2 0 11 Page 15

Anonymous

The film explores the theory that Edward de Vere was the true author of the works credited to William Shakespeare, set amid a time of scandal in Elizabethan England. Oct. 28

In Time

Justin Timberlake stars in the sci-fi thriller about a world where everyone is programmed to die at age 25 — unless they can pay to live longer (aka Rick Perry’s America). Oct. 28

Johnny English Reborn

British comedian Rowan Atkinson returns as the inept British Intelligence agent in the James Bond spoof. Oct. 28

Like Crazy

College lovers deal with a long-distance relationship and a love triangle in the romantic indie-drama. Oct. 28

The Rum Diary

Johnny Depp stars in the adaptation of the Hunter S. Thompson novel, an unhinged account of a journalist’s stint at a Puerto Rican newspaper. Oct. 28

A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas

The stoner romp is back with more hijinx and Neil Patrick Harris cameos. Nov. 4

My Week With Marilyn

A portrait of Marilyn Monroe (Michelle Williams) at the peak of her fame is framed through the account of a 23-year-old’s weeklong romance with the star. Nov. 4

Puss in Boots

The popular character from the Shrek series gets his own big-screen adventure. Nov. 4

Tower Heist

When staff members from a Manhattan high-

16

rise become victims of a Ponzi scheme, the group plots to pull off a heist to get their money back. Nov. 4

J. Edgar

Clint Eastwood directs Leonardo DiCaprio in a candid look at life of the FBI director, who harbored many of his own secrets. Nov. 11

A Dangerous Method

David Cronenberg’s historical film is about psychiatrist Carl Jung, his mentor Sigmund Freud and the beautiful woman who catches both men’s attention. Nov. 23

Arthur Christmas

11.11.11

The 3-D computer animated film follows Santa Claus’ son Arthur, who must deliver an important present before Christmas morning. Nov. 23

Jack and Jill

Martin Scorsese’s family-friendly film is a fantasy/adventure about an orphan who lives inside the walls of a magical train station in 1930s Paris. Nov. 23

The horror-thriller is set on Nov. 11, 2011, the day the film says Heaven’s 11th gate is predicted to open and unleash a deadly entity from another world. Nov. 11 A man’s twin sister visits him and refuses to leave in the comedy starring Adam Sandler, who plays both twins. Nov. 11

Melancholia

In the Lars von Trier drama, Kirsten Dunst is a depressed bride whose wedding becomes a fiasco; at the same time, a newly discovered planet is hurtling toward Earth. Nov. 11

The Descendants

In Alexander Payne’s (Sideways) movie, a recently widowed father (George Clooney) tries to reconnect with his daughters while in Hawaii. Nov. 18

Happy Feet Two

The dancing CGI penguins are back for a sequel. Nov. 18

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn, Part 1

The mythical creature romance series nears its end with the first part of the conclusion. Nov. 18

The Artist

The black-and-white, silent French romance depicts Hollywood during the time when silent cinema was being replaced by talkies. Nov. 23

Hugo

The Muppets

Some fans (Amy Adams and Jason Segel) team up with the Muppets to save their old theater from a greedy oil tycoon (Chris Cooper). Nov. 23

Piranha 3DD

The sequel to the schlocky horror-comedy finds those pihanhas making their way into a new waterpark. Nov. 23

We Need to Talk About Kevin

In the adaptation of Lionel Shriver’s gripping novel about a fictional Columbine-esque school shooting, Tilda Swinton and John C. Reilly play the parents of a teenager responsible for a high school killing spree. Dec. 2

New Year’s Eve

The romantic comedy’s star-stuffed cast includes Michelle Pfeiffer, Sarah Jessica Parker, Hilary Swank, Ashton Kutcher, Lea Michele and many others. Dec. 9

The Sitter

Jonah Hill is a reluctant babysitter who doesn’t know what he’s getting into when he takes on


three challenging charges. Dec. 9

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Gary Oldman stars in the adaptation of John le Carre’s British spy novel. Dec. 9

W.E.

Madonna directs a biopic of Wallis Simpson — the American socialite whom King Edward VIII abdicated the throne to marry — intercut with a modern-day story. Dec. 9

Young Adult

Diablo Cody and Jason Reitman — the duo behind Juno — return for the comedy starring Charlize Theron as a divorced fiction writer who hopes to rekindle a romance with a married ex. Dec. 16

Alvin & the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked The trio finds itself marooned in a tropical paradise. Dec. 16

Pariah

A 17-year-old African-American girl begins to quietly accept her identity as a lesbian while living with her parents in Brooklyn. Dec. 25

War Horse

Steven Spielberg adapts the Tony Awardwinning stage play that follows a boy looking for his pet horse during World War I. Dec. 28

Unscheduled: The Skin I Live In

Pedro Almodovar directs Antonio Banderas in the drama about a plastic surgeon who uses a human guinea pig to perfect his invention — synthetic skin that can withstand all damage.

theater The Future is a Fancyland Place

Carnage

The bizarre behavior of cows and eerie messages coming through radio static drive the residents of a small community to seek spiritual enlightenment. AllWAYS lOUNGE Through Oct. 2

The Iron Lady

Parents get drawn into a fight between their sons and the conflict escalates. SOUTHERN REP Through Oct. 9

Roman Polanski directs the adaptation of the Tony-winning Yasmina Reza play about parents who enter an immature conflict over an altercation between their sons. Dec. 16 Meryl Streep portrays Margaret Thatcher in the intimate biopic of the first and only female United Kingdom Prime Minister. Dec. 16

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

Robert Downey Jr. reprises the title role in the sequel, where the detective must try and stop a cunning criminal mastermind. Dec. 16

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo

Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

Tom Cruise returns — and stars alongside Jeremy Renner — in the latest installment of the thriller series, in which the IMF is implicated in the bombing of the Kremlin. Dec. 21

The Adventures of Tintin

Steven Spielberg’s adaptation of the classic comic book series is a vivid animated adventure. Dec. 23

In the Land of Blood and Honey

Angelina Jolie makes her directorial debut with a love story set amid the Bosnian War. Dec. 23

We Bought a Zoo

Cameron Crowe directs Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson in the true story of a family that purchases and moves into a dilapidated zoo and works to get it reopened. Dec. 23

The Darkest Hour

A group of young people in Russia fights to survive an invasion of invisible electric aliens. Dec. 25

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock star in the screen adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer’s quirky novel, in which a precocious boy whose father died during 9/11 embarks on an ambitious journey that takes him through New York. Dec. 25

The Drowsy Chaperone

A man reminiscing about old-time musicals conjures a show-within-a-show starring an outrageous cast of characters. JPAS, WESTWEGO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Sept. 30-Oct. 16

The Amazing Acro-Cats

Samantha Martin returns with her troupe of performing felines. SHADOWBOx THEATRE, 2400 ST. ClAUDE AVE. Oct. 5-17

Ricky Graham and Friends

Ricky Graham is joined by Jefferson Turner, Mandy Zirkenbach and Matthew Mickal for an evening of cabaret. MID-CITY ARTS THEATER, 3450 TOUlOUSE ST. Oct. 6

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

The NOlA Project reprises its fun and rambunctious spring production of the comedy, set in the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sulpture Garden at the New Orleans Museum of Art. NOMA, SYDNEY AND WAlDA BESTHOFF SCUlPTURE GARDEN Oct. 6-16

Devil Boys From Beyond

A New York reporter tracks down gorgeous alien men who have landed in Florida and are pursing retired women in this campy satire of tabloid news. ACTORS THEATRE OF NEW ORlEANS Oct. 13-29

Rumours of War

ArtSpot Productions reprises its multimedia theatrical piece about a slave revolt on a louisiana Plantation. NEW ORlEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM, 1418 GOV. NICHOllS ST.; WWW.ARTSPOTPRODUCTIONS.ORG Oct. 14-30

All Weather Ballads: A Love Story

Vermont-based Sandglass Theater’s puppet show about environmental issues. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER, 900 CAMP ST.; WWW.CACNO.ORG Oct. 14-15 page 18

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

David Fincher (The Social Network) directs the English-language adaptation of the wildly successful film and book series about a troubled computer hacker. Dec. 21

God of Carnage

17


Opportunity starts today

FALL entertainment GUIDE page 17

Golden Girls

Running With Scissors stages a drag version of the popular TV series. SouTheRn Rep Oct. 20-23

PINTS & POBOYS

Choose a 3-inch Poboy & a Pint of Beer • $8

plus tax

The capacity for hurt is more than eclipsed by the ability to reach for health and happiness.

—Nathan Fischer,

BA, MA, Marriage & Family Counseling

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Our Lady of Holy Cross College graduates are highly regarded in the workplace for their exceptional knowledge, skills and compassion.

18

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES MAJORING IN: • A.S. and B.S. in Addictions Counseling • B.S. in Applied Behavioral Science • A.S. in Juvenile Counseling • B.S. in Psychology • B.S. in Social Counseling MASTER’S DEGREES WITH SPECIALIZATIONS IN: • Clinical Mental Health Counseling • Marriage and Family Counseling • School Counseling Nationally accredited by CACREP

TO LEARN MORE: Contact: Dr. Carolyn White E-mail: cwhite@olhcc.edu Office: 504.398.2149

Visit us at WWW.OLHCC.EDU or find us on:

Every Night • 7-10pm Choices include: Fried Green Tomato & Remoulade, Overstuffed Shrimp, Root Beer & Glazed Ham & Cheese, Pattons Hot Sausage, Certified Angus Roast Beef, or French Fry, Roast Beef & Cheddar Poboy

The Good Negro

A preacher deals with personal issues that could compromise his position as a Civil Rights leader. AnThony BeAn CommuniTy TheATeR Oct. 21-Nov. 6

The Hallelujah Girls

A group of Southern women share their lives and romantic and family dilemmas with one another. JpAS, WeSTWego peRfoRming ARTS CenTeR Oct. 21-Nov. 6

AllWays Halloween Fun House

The AllWays Lounge hosts a showcase of short pieces by several theater companies including Cripple Creek Theatre and Tally ho Daredevils. ALLWAyS Lounge Oct. 21-31

Fiddler on the Roof

A poor man in a small village shares Jewish traditions with his five daughters. JpAS, VARiouS VenueS Oct. 22-30, Nov. 6 & 20, Dec. 2

From a Long Way Off

A new orleans family battles the Catholic Archdiocese over the closing of a church in postKatrina new orleans. JpAS, WeSTWego peRfoRming ARTS CenTeR Oct. 28-Nov. 13

Rock of Ages

Two young rockers move to Los Angeles in 1987 and shoot for fame in the era of big hair, glam and searing guitar solos in this touring Broadway musical. mAhALiA JACKSon TheATeR Nov. 1-6

Red

John Logan’s Tony Award-winning play dramatizes the ambition and pressure on renowned painter mark Rothko when he page 20

Come Try Our Weekly Throwback Cocktail! EXTENDED HOURS!

Mon-Sat 11am-10pm

3454 Magazine St. NOLA 504-899-3374

A LittLe Song, A LittLe DAnce

F

ans of traditional musicals: get out your calendars now, because the upcoming stage season brings a large number of song-and-dance shows — and many of them are New York hits making their New Orleans debut, starting this week with the Jefferson Performing Arts Society (JPAS) production of The Drowsy Chaperone (Sept. 30-Oct. 16), starring several local favorites (Ricky Graham, Janet Shea, Brian Peterson). Also on JPAS’s schedule: Fiddler on the Roof (Oct. 22-30); the latest Nunsense variant, the gruesomely-titled Nunset Boulevard (Jan. 6-22, 2012); the 1960s-set good-time shows Hairspray (Jan. 28-Feb. 5, 2012) and The Bikinis (Feb. 24-Mar. 11, 2012); the Tony Award-winning The Light in the Piazza (Mar. 16-18, 2012) and the roller-boogietastic Xanadu (May 11-27, 2012). For kids, JPAS is offering adaptations of the Disney films The Jungle Book (Dec. 2-11) and Cinderalla (Mar. 23-Apr. 1, 2012). Many of these shows will also travel to the Northshore and to Mississippi performing arts centers in addition

to these dates. For locations and exact times of all shows, check the JPAS website at www.jpas.org. While the Saenger Theater renovation continues (target date for opening is now late 2012), the Mahalia Jackson Theater once again hosts the Broadway Across America series. The Addams Family has come and gone (snap, snap), but next up is Rock of Ages (pictured), the latest jukebox musical featuring mainstream 1980s rock (Whitesnake! Foreigner! Twisted Sister! RAAHR!) spun into a simulacrum of a plot (Nov. 1-6). The season also brings a revival of South Pacific (Nov. 29-Dec. 4); the norelation-to-Cirque-du-Soleil Cirque Dreams: Holidaze (Dec. 20-24); Blue Man Group (Jan. 31-Feb. 5, 2012) — and, at long last, New Orleans’ first look at The Lion King, which arrives for a month-long engagement (Mar. 14-Apr. 15, 2012). Those hoping for The Book of Mormon or (shudder) SpiderMan: Turn Off the Dark — well, there’s always JetBlue’s nonstop flights to the Big Apple, or you can hold out hope for next year. — Kevin Allman


FALL entertainment GUIDE

The touring Broadway production of South Pacific comes to the Mahalia Jackson Theater in November. page 18

accepts a landmark commission. Southern rep Nov. 2-20

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

The Woman in Black

A lawyer must sort through the papers of a deceased woman in a remote British town and discovers a mysterious figure haunts the townspeople. plAymAkerS Nov. 4-20

Pchile Goyin 1419 BASIN STREET NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA

WWW.MAHALIAJACKSONTHEATER.COM

YOGABBAGABBALIVE.COM PRESENTED BY

Yo Gabba Gabba! TM & © 2011 GabbaCaDabra LLC

Nov. 4-20

A Night of Opera & Broadway

Broadway star Brad little and opera star Juan carlos Valls headline an evening of Broadway and opera hits. JpAS, tulAne uniVerSity’S Dixon hAll AnD northShore hArBor center, SliDell Nov. 9 & 13

Crimes of the Heart

three sisters each juggling her own tribulations gather to deal with their father’s crisis in this comedy. ActorS theAtre of new orleAnS Nov. 10-26

Torch Song Trilogy

bring a SAINT to your next party sandwichES & cheese PLATTERS

CLOTHING

714 ADAMS ST. (504) 872-9230 (behind Starbucks at Maple)

20

KIA MOTORS

mondo Bizarro and new noise present a largescale puppet theater piece about a women who is swallowed by a lake and emerges in a strange world. locAtion tBA

apparel shoes jewelry

facebook.com/ryeclothing

from St. James Cheese Company 5004 prytania st • 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

Andrew cruise directs the chronicle of a drag queen’s life in new york. AllwAyS lounge Nov. 25-Dec. 4

Rumors

rich socialites try to shield themselves from public view after they arrive at a party and find that the host has shot himself in this neil Simon play. riVertown repertory theAtre Nov. 18-Dec. 4

South Pacific

the touring Broadway version of the rodgers and hammerstein classic is about love and acceptance between a nurse and french expatriot during world war ii. mAhAliA JAckSon theAter Nov. 29-Dec. 4

Grenadine McGunkle’s Double-Wide Christmas

running with Scissors’ serial holiday show returns. one eyeD JAckS Dec. 2-24

The Blood

Anthony Bean wrote and directs a gospel youth musical about Jesus christ and faith. Anthony BeAn community theAter Dec. 3-18

A Christmas Carol — The Whole Story

Actor’s theatre presents rene J.f. piazza’s comic revision of charles Dickens’ classic mashed up with guests from popular fairy tales and other interlopers. Actor’S theAter of new orleAnS Dec. 8-23

Romeo & Juliet

the nolA project presents Shakespeare’s tale of young lovers. nomA Dec. 8-18

A Christmas Story

playmakers presents Doris Baizley’s adaptation of charles Dickens’ holiday classic. playmakers Dec. 9-11

Celebrate the Holidays

Actor’s theatre presents a musical celebration of the holidays. Actor’S theAtre of new orleAnS

Dec. 9-23

Celtic Christmas

Danny o’flaherty leads an evening of celtic page 24


FALL entertainment GUIDE

Canvassing the City Battle Royal by Alexis Rockman

P

rospect.2, the long anticipated successor to the critically acclaimed Prospect.1 international contemporary art biennial, opens Oct. 22 and runs through Jan. 29, 2012. While a tad more modest in scope than Prospect.1, Prospect.2 offers up a similar mix of established and cutting-edge international art stars, and it will introduce visitors to this city’s unique culture and dynamic arts community. The roster of 27 national and international luminaries includes artists such as Sophie Calle, Nick Cave, Jonas Dahlberg, William Eggleston, Nicole Eisenman, Ragnar Kjartansson, An-My Le, Alexis Rockman and Francesco Vezzoli, coming from nine countries including France,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Paint with the original

22

Italy, Sweden, Poland, Japan, Chile and Vietnam. Several local artists also are included. Beyond its intriguing mix of new and traditional media, this year’s biennial also features a variety of sitespecific projects conceived specifically for the city New Orleans. New York-based composer and new-media artist R. Luke DuBois opens Prospect.2 with a performance piece, The Marigny Parade, featuring nearly 350 musicians from such local institutions as the St. Augustine High School Marching 100 band. Like its predecessor, Prospect.2 uses numerous scattered exhibition sites that encourage visitors to explore host neighborhoods such as Treme, St. Claude, Uptown,

City Park and the Warehouse District. There also is a satellite venue in Lafayette featuring Milan-based video artist Grazia Toderi. Despite the challenges of assembling such a largescale endeavor in a climate of global economic constraint, Prospect founding director Dan Cameron remains undaunted. “We look forward to once again drawing the art world’s creative energy to the Gulf region, and continuing to support the flourishing visual arts community of New Orleans,” Cameron says. For more information, visit www.prospectneworleans.org. — D. Eric Bookhardt

A little bit of paint, a little bit of wine and a whole lot of fun!

4524 Magazine St. New Orleans

Ask about

504-891-3209

“Corks On the Go"

119 Focis St., Metairie

504-832-5536

our mobile party unit.

2689 Florida St., Mandeville

985-626-6272

Corks N Canvas is on Facebook

www.corksncanvas.com

Support local businesses that help their local community. We’re committed to giving back... one painting at a time.

• Step by step instruction • Paint & canvas provided • Leave with completed work


#10 - GAMBIT - 09-13-2011

TOTES AND TEES For Breast Cancer Awareness.

AND THE WITNESSES Featuring

Sarah Spiegel

Get a Breast Cancer Awareness Tote Bag or T-shirt when you earn 25 base Reward Credits®. For each guest that picks up a tote or tee, Harrah’s New Orleans will donate $1 to a Breast Cancer Awareness organization. Monday, October 10, 12pm – 8pm Winners Cove Totes and Tees limited to the first 2,000 guests.

TICKETS $10 EACH

Limited Seating

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4 • 7:30 PM Fuhrmann Auditorium Doors Open 6:45 pm • Ceremony 7:15 pm

GRE

A

ER C E NT

Harrah’s reserves the right to change, cancel or amend these events at any time. Must be 21 or older to enter casino and to gamble. Know When To Stop Before You Start.® ©2011, Caesars License Company, LLC.

TER OVINGTON 317 873 N . J EF 92-1 FERSON AVENUE ‡ 8

C

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

F LOUIS PRIMA, JR.

23 V1_60253.10_4.729x10.833_4c_Ad.indd 1

9/23/11 9:19 AM


FaLL entertainment GUIde page 20

Christmas music and folk dance. JPAS, WeStWego Performing ArtS Center Dec. 17-18

dance

opera

Chard Gonzalez Dance Theatre

the troupe is joined by special guests for a presentation of improvised dance. ShAdoWbox theAtre, 2400 St. ClAude Ave. Oct. 21-22

Mark Morris Dance Group

Choreographer mark morris’ modern dance company presents a trio of short pieces. mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Oct. 22

Jacoby & Pronk

drew Jacoby and rubinald Pronk lead their namesake modern dance troupe. mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Nov. 11-12

The Nutcracker

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Rubinald Pronk and Drew Jacoby are the principal dancers in Jacoby & Pronk.

24

GR OPEILL LAT N E!

Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

LIVE MUSIC

Friday & Saturday Nights!

NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

BREAKFAST • LUNCH CATERING (CALL US!) You asked for it – we heard you.

Now SERvING ICEd CoFFEE!

Bagels made-from-scratch daily on premises in the traditional style.

3138 MAGAzINE ST (Enter on 9th Street) • 504.309.7557 TUESdAy-FRIdAy 7AM-3pM • SAT & SUN 8AM-3pM

See full menu at: artzbagelz.com

Turandot

the new orleans opera Association (nooA) presents Puccini’s tale about an unyielding princess. erneSt n. moriAl Convention Center Oct. 15

A Masked Ball

nooA presents verdi’s opera of mistaken jealousy with a local twist: the climactic scene is set at a mardi gras ball. mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Nov. 18 & 20

comedy Louis C.K.

mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Oct. 6

new orleans ballet theatre presents the holiday classic featuring professional principal dancers and a supporting cast of more than 60 young local dancers. loyolA univerSity, rouSSel hAll Nov. 26-27

Ron White

The Nutcracker

Sinbad

delta festival ballet presents its production of the holiday classic. tulAne univerSity, dixon hAll Dec. 22-23

The Great Russian Nutcracker

mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Oct. 7 mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Oct. 14

Loni Love

hArrAh’S neW orleAnS CASino Nov. 18

Salon

Diversions M A K E - U P

LUNCH SPECIALS

the moscow ballet performs one of its signature pieces. mAhAliA JACkSon theAter Dec. 29

H A I R

AVEDA CONCEPT SALON Specializing in Hair Extensions · complimentary consultations

Feather Extensions 838 ROYAL ST · 299–0040 HOURS: TUES -SAT 11–7

WE DO TAKE OUT, DELIVERY & CATERING SERVING HEALTHY, LOW CALORIE,NO MSG & MICROBIOTIC COOKING

BUBBLE TEA & SLUSH WITH REAL FRUITS NOW AVAILABLE

FOOTBALL SPECIALS

CHICKEN WITH PECANS

AWARDED #1 BY NEW ORLEANS MAG. AND HIGHLY RECOMMENDED BY GAMBIT

3009 Magazine St. Uptown • 891.8280 SUN - THURS 11 AM - 10 PM • FRI & SAT - 11 AM - 11 PM

WWW.JUNGSGOLDENDRAGON2.COM


tHeAtRe Dec. 2-11

family Petite Rouge

JPAS presents Mike Artell’s Cajun version of the Little Red Riding Hood tale, set to zydeco music. JPAS, St. JoSePH Abbey, Covington Sept. 30-Oct. 1-2

Sesame Street Live: Elmo’s Super Heroes

Super grover loses his mojo and elmo and friends try to restore him to his former stature. new oRLeAnS ARenA Oct. 20-22

Harry Potter Halloween Concert

Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra benJAMin FRAnkLin HigH SCHooL www.LPoMuSiC.oRg Oct. 30

Yo Gabba Gabba Live!

brobee, Muno, Plex, toodee, Foofa and friends dance live. MAHALiA JACkSon tHeAteR Nov. 6

The Pecan Cracker

Ricky graham reworks The Nutcracker into a Creole Christmas show for the whole family. SoutHeRn ReP Dec. 1-24

The Jungle Book Kids

Children perform in this production of the Disney classic. JPAS, weStwego PeRFoRMing ARtS

Disney’s Phineas and Ferb

Phineas and Ferb set out to make exciting new inventions on their summer vacation. uno LAkeFRont ARenA Dec. 16

concerts Blondie

MAHALiA JACkSon tHeAteR Sept. 28

Skrillex with Foreign Beggars

SugAR MiLL, 1100 Convention CenteR bLvD. Sept. 30

Comedy ComeBaCk

Ghostland Observatory

efore a live audience in Chicago in 2007, the ultra-wry comedian Michael Ian Black remembered his 2006 appearance at the Parish at House of Blues: “I know they’ve been through a tragedy in New Orleans. I’m aware of that. But even victims can be f—ing assholes.” Maybe New Orleans hadn’t yet acquired live comedy etiquette, instead greeting the rare touring comic with a typically smoky, noisy, chit-chatty club (same goes for touring rock bands). Perhaps we’ve learned our manners — last year, comic Paul F. Tompkins brought his tour to New Orleans, and Kevin Hart and Kyle Kinane stopped here last spring. Louis C.K. (pictured), fresh from the second season finale of his brilliant FX series Louie, per-

B

SugAR MiLL Oct. 1

Scream Tour with Mindless Behavior, Diggy, New Boyz, Jacob Latimore, Hamilton Park and OMG Girlz uno LAkeFRont ARenA Oct. 2

George Jones

MAHALiA JACkSon tHeAteR Oct. 2

The Script with Hot Chelle Rae

MAHALiA JACkSon tHeAteR Oct. 4

page 26

forms at the Mahalia Jackson Theater on Oct. 6. As a writer, C.K. has worked for Dana Carvey, David Letterman, Conan O’Brien and Chris Rock on their respective shows, and his standup credits — relying on his dark, often gross, weird and brilliant storytelling — include the Emmy-nominated Chewed Up and Sundance Film Festival standout Hilarious. He’s a revered “comic’s comic,” topping dozens of “best comics ever” lists, more so in the past year than during his career’s previous 20 years combined — fueled by the two seasons of the critically acclaimed Louie, which earned him a 2011 Emmy nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. Other incoming acts include the Scotchthroated, cigar-smoking Ron White — the Blue Collar Comedy Tour veteran seemingly in on the joke — who performs the following night on Oct. 7 at the Mahalia. Breakout comedy star Loni Love stops at Harrah’s Casino on Nov. 18. Baltimore electronic musician Dan Deacon brings his experimental sketch- and video-based Wham City Comedy Tour to the Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center on Nov. 3, a week before New Orleans Comedy Week (Nov. 9-12), hosted by Austin, Texas-based improv group The New Movement. The group, founded by comedians Chris Trew and Tami Nelson, has a second home in New Orleans where it performs regularly and offers improv classes. — Alex Woodward

WALK IN 7 DAYS A WEEK • NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

It’s Flu Season. We are HappyTo Announce the

FLU SHOTS $25

REOPENING OF OUR 2ND (& ORIGINAL) LOCATION

8108 EARHART BLVD

We also offer on-site vaccinations for groups/businesses.

(Across from Popeyes) 504-866-6000 CORPORATE-FREE TRADITIONAL TATTOOING DONE DAILY! All of our artists are certified and licensed by the State of Louisiana. With over 1,000 years of combined experience, our artists can make most of your tattoo dreams a tattoo reality!

Mon-Fri: 8AM-8PM Sat & Sun: 8AM-5PM www.DoctorsExpressMetairie.com

3348 W. Esplanade Ave., Suite A, Metairie, LA 70002

504-315-7788

610 Frenchmen St. • NOLA • 504-947-8286 www.electricladyland.net • Call for more information

FREE DELIVERY

BEERS ON THE

BALCONY. PITCHERS ON THE

A U T H E N T I C J A PA N E S E C U I S I N E

Now Serving FRESH

H I Su n

-Th u

33

TORO

and SEA URCHIN

11:0 01 S. 1 Carro 0a m -10:3 llton • 488-188m-11:00pm 0pm · p 0 Fri 11:00am 0 : -11:00pm · Sat 4

SUSHI BAR

www . M IKIMOTOS U S

PORCH.

DRINKS ON THE

DECK.

HOWEVER YOU SAY IT...

WE’VE GOT AMAZING OUTDOOR DINING!!! 632 S. CARROLLTON

8859 VETERANS BLVD.

IN RIVERBEND

866-9741

NEAR DAVID DR. WWW.OHENRYS.COM

461-9840

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Are you prepared?

25


FALL entertainment GUIDE page 25

Harry Shearer and Judith Owen’s Holiday Sing-a-Long

Contemporary arts Center, 900 Camp st.; www.CaCno.org Dec. 18

Better Than Ezra

HarraH’s new orleans Dec. 30

cLAssIcAL concErts

For tiCkets and details, ContaCt tHe louisiana pHilHarmoniC orCHestra: 523-6530; www.lpomusiC.org

Mahler Symphony No. 1

First Baptist CHurCH, Covington Sept. 30 maHalia JaCkson tHeater Oct. 1

Sunset Symphony: Mandeville Park Concert mandeville lakeFront Oct. 9

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 5 maHalia JaCkson tHeater Oct. 29

Shostakovich Symphony No. 5

First Baptist CHurCH, Covington Nov. 5

Yuletide Celebration

pontCHartrain Center Dec. 1

Baroque Christmas

First Baptist CHurCH, new orleans Dec. 15 First Baptist CHurCH, Covington Dec. 16

FEstIvALs + EvEnts Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Art for Art’s Sake

26

receptions at art galleries citywide celebrate the beginning of the fall art season. www.cacno.org Oct. 1

Kanye West joins Jay-Z on a tour stop at the New Orleans Arena. Taylor Swift

new orleans arena Oct. 5

Cake

maHalia JaCkson tHeater Oct. 15

Chris Brown with T-Pain, Kelly Rowland and Tyga new orleans arena Oct. 15

Allen Toussaint

HarraH’s new orleans Oct. 21

Paul Simon

uno lakeFront arena NOv. 4

Mark Chestnutt & Mark Wills

Boomtown Casino, 4132 peters road, Harvey; www.Boomtownneworleans. Com Nov. 19

Kanye West and Jay-Z

new orleans arena Dec. 3

WWE Hell in a Cell

professional wrestlers mix it up in the arena. new orleans arena Oct. 2

Mississippi River 9th Ward Film and Arts Festival

the festival features films from south africa (Shirley Adams: Portrait of a Mother), France (Black Venus) and Britain (Africa United), panel discussions, music and more. neworleansaFrikanFilmFest.org Oct. 6-9

Gretna Heritage Festival

grand Funk railroad, lynyrd skynyrd, sara evans, sonny landreth, the kyle turley Band, george porter Jr. and the runnin’ pardners, galactic, louis prima Jr., vince vance and the valiants and the Honey island swamp Band perform at the festival. downtown gretna www.gretnaFest.Com Oct. 7-9

Voice of the Wetlands Festival

tab Benoit, anders osborne, amanda shaw, waylon thibodeaux, Chubby Carrier and the Bayou swamp Band and others perform at the festival calling attention to the problem of coastal erosion. Houma; www.voiCeoFtHewetlands.Com Oct. 7-9

Crescent City Blues & BBQ Festival

tab Benoit, kenny wayne shepherd, marcia Ball,

the Carolina Chocolate drops, little Freddie king and others play the free festival. laFayette square www.JazzandHeritage.org Oct. 14-16

New Orleans Film Festival

Headlining films include The Artist, Brawler, The Big Fix and The Man in the Glass: The Dale Brown Story. the festival also features documentaries, animation and short and experimental films, plus parties and panel discussions. www.neworleansFilmsoCiety.org Oct. 14-20

Madisonville Wooden Boat Festival

the quick & dirty Boat Building Contest is the highlight of the two-day festival. other entertainment includes live music, a children’s village, food and craft vendors and more. lake pontCHartrain Basin maritime museum, water street, madisonville www.woodenBoatFest.org Oct. 15-16

Carnaval Latino

the festival includes headliners la makina, sonora dinamita, esther lanuza, la sonora santanera, la Chanchona, rumba Buena and others. Blaine kern’s mardi gras world, 1380 port oF new orleans plaCe www.Carnavallatinonola.Com OCT. 15-16

Prospect.2

Curator dan Cameron’s international art biennial prospect.2 opens at galleries, museums and other venues across the city. www.prospeCtneworleans.org Oct. 22-Jan. 29

Voodoo Music Experience

soundgarden, snoop dogg, tv on the radio, the raconteurs, Blink 182, mastodon, girl talk and a host of other musicians and performers fill three days of entertainment. City park; www.tHevoodooexperienCe.Com Oct. 28-30

Mirliton Festival

the Bywater event features live music, food and craft vendors in markey park. www.mirlitonFestival.Com Nov. 5

New Orleans Bookfair

the alternative media showcase features new and used books, small press publications, self-published work, comics and other diy media. 500-600 BloCks oF FrenCHmen street www.nolaBookFair.Com Nov. 5

Swamp Fest

dance to Cajun and zydeco music and enjoy Cajun cuisine at the annual event. auduBon zoo, 6500 magazine st. www.auduBoninstitute.org Nov. 5-6

Words and Music Festival

nilo Cruz (Anna in the Tropics), Junot diaz (The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao) and armando valladares (Against All Hope) headline the literary event with readings, discussions, dramatic performances, parties and more. www.wordsandmusiC.org Nov. 9-13

Covington Three Rivers Art Festival

artists and craft vendors fill downtown Covington for a two-day festival with live music, a children’s area, food, a fun run and awards for participating professional and student artists. columbia Street in downtown covington www.threeriverSartfeStival.com Nov. 12-13 page 28


fall entertainment guide page 26

New Orleans Fringe Festival

The Fringe presents a wide array of alternative theater, comedy, dance and performance art productions at various venues around the city. www.noFringe.org Nov. 16-20

New Orleans Po-Boy Preservation Festival

The sandwich celebration fills oak Street with live music and all sorts of po-boys from area restaurants. oak STreeT aT SouTh CarrollTon avenue

www.poboyFeST.Com Nov. 20

New Orleans Middle East Film Festival

Zeitgeist screens a very large selection of features and documentaries from across the middle east on a range of political and cultural subjects. ZeiTgeiST mulTi-DiSCiplinary arTS CenTer, 1618 oreTha CaSTle haley blvD., 827-5858 www.ZeiTgeiSTinC.neT Dec. 8-18

sports NEw OrlEaNs saiNts

all gameS aT The louiSiana SuperDome TiCkeTS: 731-1700 • 7:20 p.m. Sun., oct. 23, indianapolis Colts • noon Sun., nov. 6, tampa Bay Buccaneers • 7:30 p.m. mon., nov. 28, New York Giants • noon Sun., Dec 4, Detroit lions • 7:30 p.m. mon., Dec. 26, atlanta Falcons • noon Sun., Jan. 1, Carolina Panthers

tulaNE FOOtBall

all gameS aT The louiSiana SuperDome TiCkeTS: 861-9283 • 7 p.m. Sat., oct. 8, syracuse • 2:30 p.m. Sat., oct. 15, utEP • 2:30 p.m. Sat., oct. 22, Memphis • 7 p.m. Thu., nov. 10, Houston

lsu FOOtBall

all gameS aT Tiger STaDium, baTon rouge TiCkeTS: (800) 960-8587 • 11:20 a.m. Sat., oct. 1, Kentucky • Tba, Sat., oct. 8, Florida • Tba, Sat., oct. 22, auburn • Tba, Sat., nov. 12, western Kentucky • 1:30 p.m. Fri., nov. 25, arkansas

NEw OrlEaNs HOrNEts

regular season nba games are not expected to begin on schedule due to unresolved league issues.

BaYOu ClassiC

louiSiana SuperDome Time Tk Nov. 25

NEw OrlEaNs BOwl Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

louiSiana SuperDome 8 p.m. Sat., Dec. 17

28

Vooduets t

he Voodoo Music Experience (Oct. 28-30; www.thevoodooexperience.com) has an impressive lineup of headlining veterans, including Soundgarden (pictured), Snoop Dogg, Blink-182 and My Chemical Romance, relatively newer bands like The Raconteurs and Band of Horses, DJs and electronic performers including Girl Talk, and an array of New Orleans and Louisiana roots music acts. There will be one large mainstage instead of the dueling facing stages of recent events, and some major acts will play more intimate shows on other stages. One of the more prominent scheduling motifs is collaboration. Not all of the special pairings are hugely surprising — the Violent Femmes’ Gordan Gano has been working with the Lost Bayou Ramblers, and they’ll perform together at Voodoo. Alt-folk queen Ani DiFranco will mix it up with Ivan Neville and drummer Herlin Riley. Cajun stalwarts BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet will be joined by clarinetist Dr. Michael White. Members of Morphine will back Jeremy Lyons, and former Radiators guitarist Dave Malone will throw down with Bonerama. There’s even a special performance for modern dance fans. The Trey McIntyre Project debuted a live collaboration with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band in February. A performance of Ma Maison will be presented at the Preservation Hall Tent at Voodoo. The Preservation Hall band also will perform with the Del McCoury Band — Preservation Hall issued their collaboration American Legacies in April. In a separate performance, the McCoury band will back Keller Williams. Voodoo tinkers with its offerings every year, and some of the new attractions include a Ferris wheel and carnival amusement rides. Due to positive response to the DJ and dance Le Plur tent last year, Voodoo will expand its offerings. And a Deja Voodoo series of after-parties at local clubs (midnightto-6 a.m.) will be previewed by DJ sets (as yet unannounced) on the grounds at City Park. — Will Coviello

suGar BOwl

louiSiana SuperDome TBA Tue., Jan. 3, 2012

BCs NatiONal CHaMPiONsHiP louiSiana SuperDome TBA Mon., Jan. 9., 2012

galas + fundraisers New Orleans Film society Gala

John goodman will be honored at the film society’s annual gala. eiFFel SoCieTy, 2040 ST. CharleS ave. Sept. 29

i’m Every woman

The event benefits the new orleans women’s Shelter, which assists homeless women and children. The howlin’ wolF, 907 S. peTerS ST. www.nolawomenShelTer.Com Oct. 6

Magic in the Moonlight

The al fresco dinner benefits new orleans botanical garden. new orleaanS boTaniCal garDen, CiTy park; www.neworleanSCiTypark.Com Oct. 14

O what a Night

george Dureau will be honored at the ogden museum’s annual fundraising gala. Ogden MuseuM Of sOuthern Art page 30


SHU RIDE T TTLE HE F BUS REE ES!

Art Openings, Refreshments, Live Music & More!

Brought to you by the Magazine Street Merchants Association Find out more at www.magazinestreet.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Saturday, October 1 5 p.m. - 9 p.m.

29


Menu Tailgateeekend

every w our new Come try u items & 11am-9pm daily men list! Tue-Fri Sat-Sun 8am-5pm e in w w e n Weekend Breakfast Sat-Sun

3100 Magazine St. • 504-373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com

d e dressings, sauces and meats to

m ake all o f our signature recipes dail y.

G ott Gour met Cafe uses the fre s h

m es t ingredients available for our home a

FALL entertainment GUIDE

Saints quarterback Drew Brees looks for a receiver. Photo by Jon ath a n bachm a n Page 30

Cocktails for Kid smART

Jazzin’ in the Moonshine

The gala benefits crimestoppers, which offers rewards to citizens who provide tips to solve crimes. gAllieR HAll, 545 sT. cHARles Ave. www.cRimesToPPeRsno.oRg Nov. 4

Justice for All Ball

Jon cleary and the Philthy Phew entertain at the annual benefit for the Pro Bono Project. AuduBon TeA Room www.PRoBono-no.oRg Nov. 4

Louisiana Museum Foundation

The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Rebirth Brass Band and Roots of music perform at the gala benefitting the louisana museum Foundation. www.THelmF.oRg Nov. 4

Signature Chef Auction

The new orleans marriott hosts the fine dining soiree benefiting the march of dimes. new oRleAns mARRioTT, 555 cAnAl sT. www.mARcHoFdimes.com/louisiAnA Nov. 4

Howling Success

The gala to support the lA/sPcA features a motown theme. HyATT Regency new oRleAns www.lA-sPcA.oRg/Howlingsucceess Nov. 5

Pasta & Puccini

opera performances highlight this fundraiser for Jefferson Performing Arts society.

HoTel inTeRconTinenTAl, 444 sT. cHARles Ave., www.JPAs.oRg Nov. 11

The Odyssey Ball

deacon John entertains at a gala beneftting the new orleans museum of Art. nomA; www.nomA.oRg Nov. 12

Swingin’ on a Star

The Jewish community center holds its Rat Pack-themed fundraiser at the Arbor Room at Popp Fountain in new orleans city Park. www.swinginonAsTAR.oRg Nov. 12

Dr. Norman C. Francis Endowed Scholarship Benefit Concert

Al Jarreau and John Boutte perform at the annual scholarship fundraiser. eRnesT n. moRiAl convenTion cenTeR TicKeTs 520-4252.; www.xulA.edu Nov. 18

All Saints Soiree

The event supports save our cemeteries. FnBc Building, 210 BARonne sT. www.sAveouRcemeTeRies.oRg Nov. 19

Golf Ball

The Fore Kids Foundation raises funds for area service organizations. Roosevelt New oRleaNs www.foRekidsfouNdatioN.com Nov. 19

delicious house specialties free delivery* 5pm–9:30pm *($15

minimum)

catering available

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15

Home for the Holidays

John Boutte, Kermit Ruffins and many others perform at the fundraiser to support scholarships at the new orleans center for the creative Arts. House oF Blues www.dAnielPRicememoRiAl.oRg Dec. 23

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

Come Have Lunch With Me!

865-1428 · 704 s. carrollton mon–sat 11am–10pm · sun noon–10pm www.chinaorchidneworleans.com

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 27 > 2011

The event benefits Kid smART’s arts education programs. PRivATe Residence www.KidsmART.oRg Nov. 3

33


reen matters

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ + + +bringing +++++++++++++ ++++++++++++ home + + + + + + + +sustainability ++++++++ ++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

micro greens

36

greeniverse

37

greenlight

micro

reens

Block By Block

+++++++++++ +++++++++++ +++++++++++ +++++++++++ +++++++++++

by alex WoodWard

Plugged-In camPus

With 20 businesses under its roofs, green business incubator the building block opens another location inside the neW orleans healing center With plans to expand to tWo more locations by 2012. by alex WoodWard

g

ing several desks is open, save for  one space. “We’re already filling up,”  Bradley-Wright says before walking  to the Building Block’s additional office space inside the center overlooking St. Claude Avenue and sitting  above Fatoush, an organic cafe on  the center’s first floor.     Tenants at the Building Block  include green-job training program  Louisiana Green Corps, sustainable  living magazine Louisiana Green Scene, design consultants Clean  Energy Solutions and more than a  dozen others. They use the shared  services of an office — phone, Internet, fax, copier, conference room  — and they also share a client base,  aiming to be a “one-stop shop” for  green resources.     “The businesses in this market  segment are obviously motivated  by the same thing that motivates  every other business: be successful,  earn money, grow the company —  but they’re obviously motivated by  more than that,” Bradley-Wright  says. “It’s especially valuable and  important to other small companies  isolated in small offices or operating  informally out of their home, to be  able to look across the room or hall  and be surrounded by people doing  like-minded work. Someone doing  green-minded policies, someone  using recycled materials to create  clothing — it just feels like you’re in  the right place.”

Forrest Bradley-Wright, co-founder of the Building Block, says the organization’s new location in The New Orleans Healing Center is almost full of green businessess looking to share space and resources. Photo by Cheryl gerber

Center has 30 start-ups with  hundreds of employees working  inside the building, and an incubator in South Carolina is testing  a similar tech-based start-up program with neighboring Clemson  University. Locally, the IP Building  (as in “Intellectual Property”) fosters several “forward-thinking”  companies and organizations  including the Idea Village, Launch  Pad and 504ward.     The Building Block sticks mostly  with green-based businesses  — though a few of its tenants  are not strictly in the business  of sustainability. By being in  the same building and sharing  the same space, businesses can  learn from and use the services  of the “greener” companies, and  incorporate them into their own.  (“Part of the growth of green  development is awareness of one  another,” Bradley-Wright says.)     The Building Block works like  this: “We create a pipeline,” BradBusiness incubators and commuley-Wright says. The office sets  nities have sprung up across the  a business up with a functional  country. Some use different models  office space (with address and  and offer different services, whether  phone number), helps put out  its assisting start-ups with tax incen- services to the green marketplace,  tives, creating jobs, or simply offering  and then helps grow the company  a desk at low rent. Tennessee’s Ham- sales-wise and with additional  ilton County Business Development  locations (via the Building Block’s  page 36

    Loyola University is the first college in Louisiana to  install electric vehicle charging stations on its campus.  The first plug-in kiosk for electric vehicles, installed this  summer, offers two plugs and stands in the “horseshoe” of the university’s St. Charles Avenue-facing  campus. Another station was installed in the parking  lot of its Broadway Street campus. Both are available to  Loyola staff, faculty, students and campus visitors.     Charlie Marshall, Loyola’s director of facilities systems,  says the idea to install charging stations developed  following renovations to make Thomas Hall more  sustainable. “It was one idea that came up we decided  would be to start off a symbolic gesture” of increased  campus sustainability initiatives, he says. “There’s  definitely going to be an increase on campus and off (in  electric vehicles). The technology increase is going to  gain traction.”   The university also uses WeCar, a car-sharing program  offered by Enterprise Rent-A-Car, though its fleet is gaspowered. Marshall says the university is on the waiting  list for electric vehicles, which will be parked at the  charging stations.     “There will be a need for (charging) stations,” Marshall says. “There’s the idea you charge from home, but  just as people stop to put gas in their car, they’ll need a  place to plug in.”

movIng on uPPer

    The weekly Sankofa Farmers Market has moved to  the Holy Angels Complex (3500 St. Claude Ave.) from  its former Lower 9th Ward outpost. From 10 a.m. to 2  p.m. Saturday, the market offers produce, baked goods,  plants, dairy and seafood from vendors based in the  New Orleans area and along the Gulf Coast.     At its new location, which opened Sept. 10, the  market features more vendors and is located in another  neighborhood without access to fresh local goods. Market executive director Rashida Ferdinand says Sankofa’s  move is an opportunity for the market to grow and  provide more customers access to fresh food — and  support local farmers and fishers.     But the market hasn’t fully left the Lower 9; it is the  flagship project of the Sankofa Community Development Corporation (CDC), which also runs a school  garden at the KIPP Renaissance High School/Frederick  Douglass High School. This spring, the market hopes  to offer students space to sell the school’s produce.  (Students from Langston Hughes Academy previously  sold produce from that school’s garden at Sankofa.) The  CDC, working with the New Orleans Redevelopment  authority, also is developing an urban garden at 27 St.  Claude Court, and produce from that garden will be  available in the coming months.     The market accepts credit, debit and Louisiana Purchase cards. Visit www.sankofafarmersmarket.org for  more information.

HeInz awards announced

    Nancy Rabalais, executive director of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, was one of 10  recipients of a $100,000 2011 Heinz Foundation grant  for her research mapping the “dead zone” growing in  the Gulf of Mexico. The Chauvin, La.-based consortium  was founded in 1979 and studies Louisiana’s marine 

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

reen and sustainable  businesses make environmental sense, but their  selling point is savings in dollars,  not watts. Green business incubators across the country have taken  in sustainability-minded startups  and entrepreneurs in pursuit of  the green economy. Businesses cut  costs by sharing office space and  using a cooperative outlay (though  more suit-and-tie and less on-thefarm) inside offices resembling IP  Building-esque concepts, fostering  “ideas” and “projects” — but the  small businesses inside have an environmentally focused edge: energy  policy , green building, recycling,  water management, transportation and community development  organizations. Others are more  traditional, but lean on their office  neighbors for “green” support. The  idea is a functioning hub of green  business activity, both inside and  outside the office.     New Orleans has The Building  Block, housed in two locations (at  the newly opened New Orleans  Healing Center and at Mid-City’s  The Icehouse), with 20 businesses  sharing space at both locations. Alliance for Affordable Energy program  director Forrest Bradley-Wright and  FutureProof director Prisca Weems  co-founded the Building Block, and  the organizations share offices.  (The Alliance moved from its former  home at the ArtEgg Studio building  in Mid-City into the Healing Center.)  The Building Block plans to expand  by 2012 with two more locations, including one reserved for retail space.     “New Orleans is on this acceleration curve for green industries,”  Bradley-Wright said inside the  Building Block’s newest location on  the third floor of the Healing Center,  days before the high-profile building made its debut. The Building  Block is, unlike other tenants in the  center, almost full. One room hous-

36 more

page 36

35


page 35

two offices and two planned offices). The Building Block’s office inside the Healing Center serves as its flagship, but the organization soon may expand to another location — a more green techoriented space inside NASA’S former Michoud facility in eastern New Orleans. The Building Block also may add another office in the heart of the “green light” district on Magazine Street, a stretch of the Lower Garden District with sustainable retailers selling items made from recycled goods and environmentally

more

micro

reens

friendly clothing, furnishings and jewelry. Office rental at the Building Block begins at $550, with “virtual office” arrangements beginning at $250. “Prisca and I, in founding this, are big vision people,” Bradley-Wright says. “We see the direction we need to go and frankly are going, and we feel there are steps to move it along, to really be a flywheel, to make sure we’re maximizing what we have and we’re getting there as strong a way as possible as soon as we can.”

+++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

page 35

36

environments and coastal life. Rabalais’ research has found that significant depletion of oxygen levels in the Gulf began as early as 1950, when nitrogen fertilizers used on farms were part of runoff into the Mississippi River and the Gulf. As of 2010, the dead zone had increased to 7,700 square miles, making it the largest dead zone in the U.S. and second largest in the world. Rabalais currently is studying the impact of the BP oil disaster on oxygen levels. Other Heinz award recipients include Sandra Steingraber, who studies “cancer clusters” (when U.S. cancer registries show high concentrations of cancer reports in one particular area) in relation to the Toxic Release Inventory — her findings (in her book Living Downstream) draw a relationship between reports of cancer and proximity to industrial sites. Steingraber pledged to use her award to fight against hydraulic fracking (pumping pressurized fluid into rock layers to release petroleum and gas).

reeniverse

Garden Party

From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 15-16, New Orleans City Park hosts the Botanical Garden Fall Festival, featuring landscape design artists, plant sales, arts and crafts and more. The event is $8 general admission, $4 children (ages 5-12), and free to Friends of City Park members. Visit www.neworleanscitypark.com for more information.

truck Farm

Each week the Hollygrove Market & Farm hosts Food Truck Tuesdays, the most reliable stopping point for the New Orleans area’s food truck consortium. Every Tuesday from noon to 2 p.m., food trucks pull up to the farm and offer a sampling of their goods — from Covington’s Lola Deux (Sept. 27), serving mobile dishes from the Northshore restaurant Lola, to Woody Ruiz’s local seafood-centric Woody’s Fish Tacos (Oct. 4). Past trucks include Taceaux Loceaux, Geaux Plates and Empanada Intifada. Hollygrove’s general manager Paul Baricos says the weekly event will continue indefinitely.

++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++

meet the neiGhbors More “green” inside the new orleans healing Center

Vine &Vino Create your very own beautiful flower basket or living wreath! NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!

D EMOLITION D ECONSTRUCTION S ERVICES A VAILABLE &

2801 Marais St., NOLA 70117 504.947.0038 • www.rtno.org Monday-Saturday, 9 to 4:30

Register today! (504) 265-0725 Tuesday • Wednesday • Thursday Friday on Request

FALL BEDDING PLANTS & ANNUALS ARE HERE!

Lakeview Florist NURSERY & GIFTS

5590 CANAL BLVD | 504-265-0725

he Building Block isn’t the only green-focused office inside the New Orleans Healing Center (NOHC), which held its grand opening last month. In addition to the 20 small businesses working from the Building Block’s office, the NOHC also houses several small businesses focused on sustainability and environmentally friendly services. The EarthLab gardens and nurseries serve as a research playground for soil health and water management, composting and indigenous plant life. Fatoush is a coffeehouse and cafe run by Suleyman and Fatma Aydin, who opened several restaurants throughout the New Orleans area and now focus on excluding refined sugars and flours, hydrogenated oils and sweeteners from their menus. Next door is the New Orleans Food Co-op, which was in the works even before Hurricane Katrina. The co-op first set up a mobile market

t

for its members, then expanded to a small space inside the NOHC, the former Universal Furniture. The co-op offered some local produce supplemented with health foods from larger vendors. Now the 5,500-square-foot community-owned grocery plans a grand opening Oct. 1. The center’s newest tenant is Build Now, a nonprofit organization that helps rebuild energy-efficient, Energy Star-rated homes in flooded neighborhoods, primarily Gentilly, Lakeview and the 9th Ward. “We want to be part of the rebuilding on this corridor,” Build Now’s David Fields says of the move to St. Claude Avenue. Founded in 2008, Build Now assists property owners through the rebuilding process at a low cost and supplies “everything from the ground up,” Fields says. It has built almost 50 homes since 2008. — Alex Woodward


reen light

+++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++ +++++++++++++++++++++++

Lobster Night $28

**

Every Thursday Night in September

Fresh Maine 1.5 lb. Lobster w/Salad & Side Lobsters are limited, reservations recommended Due to rising transportation costs, the price has changed

Sun WorShip A LAkeview church’s post-kAtrinA renovAtions incLude A soLAr-powered overhAuL. By ALLison Good

C

After more discussion about installation details and engineering processes, Solar Alternatives finally got “boots on the ground” in late July. “All the panels are up,” Mielke says. “We’re just waiting for Entergy to put in the required meter.” Now, he added, church members are

Fri • Sept 30

Sat • Oct 1

Matt Lemmler Trio 6 & 9:30 PM

Matt Lemmler Trio 6 PM

DINNER AND ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY

830 conti st. (in the prince conti hotel) 504.586.0972 • 800.699.7711

www.thebombayclub.com dinner & music nightly

validated parking (at Iberville & Dauphine)

Community Church Unitarian Universalist is the first solar-powered church in the U.S. It installed solar panels as part of its post-Katrina renovations. excited about their new relationship to their surroundings. “Everyone was really supportive, because instead of using fossil fuels to heat and cool, we’ll be using energy from the sun, which will provide 80 percent of the power for the church,” Mielke says. According to Cantin, the Energy Star certification goes beyond the solar panels. “It means they are getting energy from a clean source, and that they’re thinking in bigger terms than just solar panels,” he says. “If they are smart about energy habits, they will increase the percentage of energy that they get from solar.” The design, he says, blends in with the church’s architecture and “keeps a low profile aesthetically.” The panels are “very low-maintenance,” he says, and should last from 25 to 45 years. Meanwhile, the church has an annex building that needs a new roof, and its members are thinking solar. “We’re giving them some guidance on that right now,” Cantin says. “They’re inspired by this project to look a little further.” In Mielke’s opinion, it is just another component of a greater mission: “It’s part of an ongoing commitment to trying to make a more environmentally friendly Lakeview.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

ommunity Church Unitarian Universalist (CCUU) of Lakeview was flooded with eight feet of water when the 17th Street Canal levee broke on August 29, 2005. Six years later, the church is making a major comeback as the first Energy Star-rated, solar-powered church in the United States. “There was an enormous amount of discussion as to what to do, and the members made the commitment to rebuild in Lakeview,” says Howard Mielke, president of CCUU’s board of trustees. “Then we talked about how we could make a difference in terms of our attitude toward and respect for the city and our own church, and we started talking about energy efficiency.” Mielke says church members were inspired by Joseph Priestley, an 18th-century British chemist who discovered oxygen and carbon dioxide in the air. Priestley also was a theologian who helped found Unitarianism. “He was also all for freedom of thought, something our members really embody, so it was important to us to put all options on the table,” Mielke says. “We talked about geothermal and solar panels, but we faced the reality that as a nonprofit, we weren’t going to get any tax deductions for doing that. Then it was brought to my attention that there was a grant out there.” CCUU enlisted local firm Solar Alternatives to help create a green and sustainable architectural design, and applied for a stimulus clean energy grant established by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Though the church received no funding initially, it decided to apply a second time and was successful. “I had met some of the board members of the church personally, and we started talking about their vision for green building, and we gave them some designs and guidance,” says Jeff Cantin, founder and president of Solar Alternatives. “The second time we applied for the grant, we changed the design from geothermal to solar panels.” By that time, the church already had raised one-third of the money needed to purchase and install the panels. The grant money provided for most of the remaining costs. “Some people from around the country also donated money, and then we made our decision to go ahead with the project,” Mielke says.

37


DEBBIE DOES NOLA 41

PAG E

Blondie at the Mahalia Jackson Theater

STAGE THE DROWSY CHAPERONE PAGE 41 FILM MONEYBALL PAGE 46 CUISINE THE RIB ROOM PAGE 63


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO <<<<<<<<<< << << 42 46 51 55 56 63 >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> >> <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< << SEPT >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < The Mahalia Jackson Theater celebrates its best >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> week of 2011 by hosting both George Jones (7 p.m. Sunday) and Debbie Harry, whose Panic of Girls tour could also refer to the country legend, still shattering hearts at age 80. Blondie’s ninth LP, a wizened but no less strident emissary from the The Drowsy Chaperone 1979 Bowery, arrived on Parlophone in July. Nico SEPT. 30-OCT. 16; Vega opens. Tickets $39.507:30 P.M. FRI.-SAT.; 2 P.M. SUN. $49.50. 8 p.m. Wednesday. Mahalia Jackson Theater, WESTWEGO PER1419 Basin St., 287-0351; FORMING ARTS www.mahaliajacksonCENTER, 177 SALA theater.com AVE., WESTWEGO,

Blondie

28

885-2000; WWW.JPAS.ORG

TICKETS $30 GENERAL ADMISSION, $27 SENIORS, $20 STUDENTS, $15 CHILDREN

Getting in the Groove JEFFERSON PERFORMING ART SOCIETY OPENS ITS SEASON. BY WILL COVIELLO

S

New York production and also imagined a local cast for it, including Brian Peterson as the clumsy meddler Adolpho. “Brian can do more with his eyebrow than lots of people can do with their whole body,” Rucker says. “He’s really good at physical comedy.” Rucker has combined both the nostalgic elements and contemporary flourishes. Since the Jazz Age musical is imagined, he and the costume director embellished the flapper girl frilliness of the show and other outfits. “(With Adolpho) we went full matador,” Rucker says. “This is a hilarious musical,” he adds. “It’s one of the funnier musicals out there.” The production opens a season that includes the musicals Fiddler on the Roof, Nunset Boulevard, Hairspray, The Bikinis, The Light in the Piazza and Xanadu. The season also includes Jim Fitzmorris’ new play From a Long Way Off, the comedy The Hallelujah Girls, the audience interactive show Flanagan’s Wake and productions for young audiences. JPAS will present shows at a variety of venues. Some productions will open in Jefferson Parish and then travel to theaters on the Northshore, in Hammond, Slidell and as far away as Meridian, Miss. “It’s great to be able to take a JPAS product to other communities,” says JPAS director Dennis Assaf. “The ‘Society’ in our name doesn’t tell you what we do, but the key to success is the diversity in our programming.”

SEPT

28

The ominous post-rock peaks scaled by Explosions in the Sky could be used to accentuate just about anything, from terror propaganda (sophomore album Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Die, Those Who Tell the Truth Shall Live Forever, released the week before Sept. 11, 2001, bore in its liner notes a jetliner with the words “This plane will crash tomorrow”) to high-school football (the Texas instrumentalists wrote the score for 2004’s Friday Night Lights). Baltimore duo Wye Oak opens. Tickets $19 in advance, $21 at the door. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

Mahler’s Symphony No. 1

SEPT

30

Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero is the THRU special guest for the Louisiana Philharmonic OCT Orchestra’s 2011-2012 opening concerts in Covington and New Orleans. She’ll perform Mendelssohn’s Piano Concerto No. 1 in a program highlighted by Mahler’s Symphony No. 1. Tickets $20-$98. 7:30 p.m. Friday. First Baptist Church, 16333 Hwy. 1085, Covington; 8 p.m. Saturday, Mahalia Jackson Theater, 1419 Basin St., 523-6530; www.lpomusic.com

1

Art for Arts’ Sake

OCT

1

Art for Arts’ Sake celebrates visual arts with new shows at galleries in the Warehouse District, French Quarter, Magazine Street and elsewhere around the city. There will be food booths and cash bars set up on the 300 to 600 blocks of Julia Street. The Contemporary Arts Center marks its 35th anniversary with an after-party (9 p.m.-11 p.m.) with music by Ellis Marsalis and special guests. Free admission. Gallery openings 6 p.m. – 9 p.m. Saturday. www.cacno.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

ome theatergoers attending The Drowsy Chaperone may be introduced to unfamiliar sounds: a needle skipping on a record and all the fuzz and static of old turntable systems. “That static — I love that,” says Ricky Graham, who plays a record-collecting fan of old musicals. “It’s the sound of a time machine starting up.” The musical debuted in Toronto 1998, as Internet music sharing was about to crush record stores. Acting as a sort of narrator/impresario, a record collector conjures an imaginary Jazz Age musical with showgirls, a tycoon, mobsters and the euphemistic namesake, a serially tipsy chaperone to the showgirl. Chaperone opens the Jefferson Performing Arts Society’s (JPAS) 2011-2012 season, and it features a cast of local favorites including Graham, Brian Peterson, Janet Shea and others. Graham’s character, known as The Man in the Chair, is a devoted fan of Broadway shows of the 1920s and ’30s, and Graham could not feel more comfortable in the role. “I saw the show in New York and it was scary,” Graham says. “I knew immediately that I’ve always been the Man in the Chair. It was sort of shocking to see a character version of myself.” The imagined musical features a glamorous showgirl, Janet, who is going to leave show business to marry Robert, an oil tycoon. But the producers of her show are afraid they’ll lose money without her, so they try to sabotage the engagement by having the bumbling Adolpho seduce her. Director Gary Rucker saw the Tony Award-winning

Ricky Graham (right) stars in The Drowsy Chaperone.

Explosions in the Sky with Wye Oak

41


MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 27 BABYLON LOUNGE — Dead Superstar, 10

BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Friends, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Jim Jones & the Kool-Aid, 10 BLUE NILE — Justin Peake, 10

BMC — Spillway, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Lagniappe Brass Band, 11

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic & Matt El DeOrazio, 7; Jimmy Howell, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Charlie Wooton Project, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

THE CYPRESS — Meta the Man, Roarshark, Hobobones, 7

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 9

42

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30

HOUSE OF BLUES — Falling In Reverse, Eyes Set To Kill, For All Those Sleeping, 6:30 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Aggrolites, Brothers of Brazil, Big, Fat & Delicious, DJ Maddie Ruthless, 8 THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Carolyn Broussard, 6; ADO & Hot Lyrix, 9:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 SIBERIA — Capitalist Kids, Adults, Marathon, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

Wednesday 28 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

APPLE BARREL — The Blue Max, 10:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major

Bacon, 10

BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 10:30 BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — T-Bone Stone, 7; Sweet Jones Duo, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Dayna Kurtz & Dave Torkanowsky, 9 D.B.A. — Washboard Chaz, Paul Sanchez & Bill Malchow, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Oscar & the Blues Cats, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

HI-HO LOUNGE — Jonny Corndawg, 8; DJ Bees Knees, Sinful Friends, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — Kyuss Lives!, The Sword, Monstro, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hopetoun Collective, Gravy Flavored Kisses, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Harvest

the Music feat. Bonerama, Dave Malone, Alvin Youngblood Hart’s Muscle Theory, 5

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — Blondie, 8

4:30; Schatzy, 7

TIPITINA’S — Explosions in the Sky, Wye Oak, 9

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Andre Bouvier, 6; Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 9:30

Thursday 29

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; The Wishing Well, 9

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

12 BAR — Joe Adragna, 9

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alexey Marti Band, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30

BMC — The Rambling Letters, 6; Troy Turner Band, 9:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Up Close & Personal feat. Cornell Williams & Big D Perkins, 10

PRESERVATION HALL — Kid Simmons’ New Orleans Jazz Band, 8 RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — Marc Stone Band, 7

RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 8 SIBERIA — Leeches of Lore, Nemesis Destroyer, Face On Mars, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon THREE MUSES — Mike Hood,

BANKS STREET BAR — Kenny Triche, 8; The Neighborhood Improvement Association feat. Dave Jordan & Lynn Drury, 10

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Tom McDermott & Aurora Nealand, 8

D.B.A. — Washboard Rodeo, 7; New Orleans Nightcrawlers Brass Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Wendell Brunious, 9:30

HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, Ace Records Hip-Hop, 9:30 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Yelawolf, DJ Craze, Rittz, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Beth Patterson, 9

LAFRENIERE PARK — Live at Lafreniere feat. Amanda Shaw, 6

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Head Space, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

OAK — Kristin Diable, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — Cymbals Eat Guitars, Hooray for Earth, 7 PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. Tom Sancton & the New Orleans All-Stars, 6 PRESERVATION HALL — Smittydee’s Brass Band feat. Dimitri Smith, 8 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Top Shelf, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Li’l Nathan & the Big Tymers, 8:30 THE SALOON — Major Bacon, 5 SIBERIA — Acorn Bcorn, Indian Givers, Split Lips, DJ Benny Divine, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Richard Julian, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon

TARPON JOE’S BAR AND GRILL — Minus Linus, 9:30 PAGE 44


BAYOU

MUSIC

BEER

PAGE 42 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

GARDEN

HAPPY 2ND

BIRTHDAY

TIPITINA’S — Van Hunt, 9

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

Zagat Rated

SATURDAY OCT. 1ST CELEBRATION STARTS @ 6PM

DR. FUNK 6PM RITES OF PASSAGE 9PM DRINK SPECIALS! JELLO PUDDING SHOTS! FREE FOOD!

THANKS FOR ANOTHER

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

Friday 30 BANKS STREET BAR — Hannah KB Band, John Skvarka Band, Believers, Tintypes, 9 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — NOLA Treblemakers, 9

WED 9/28

CHIP WILSON

9PM

THUR 9/29 BETH PATTERSON

9PM

FRI 9/30

PATRICK COOPER FOOT & FRIENDS

5PM 9PM

SAT 10/1

DANNY BURNS 5PM POTCHEEN (TOURING CELTIC BAND) 9PM

SUN 10/2

IRISH SESSION BETH PATTERSON

AMAZING YEAR!

504.302.9357

LISTINGS

5PM 8PM

331 Decatur St. • 527-5954 www.kerryirishpub.com

326 N. JEFFERSON DAVIS PKWY

BAYOU PARK BAR — Revealers, 10 BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Kristin Diable, 9; Zena Moses & Rue Fiya All-Stars, 10:30 BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; The Soulbillyswampboogie Band, 1 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Matt Lemmler, 6; Lisa Lynn & guests, 9:30

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Raphael Bas, Jack Fine & Norbert Slamma, 8

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Blues Frenzy, 7; Dr. Funk, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Chip Wilson & Mark McGrain, 5:30; Paul Sanchez, 8; Todd Clouser, 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Good Enough for Good Times, 10

44

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 EUCLID RECORDS — Hawn, 7

3-6pm DAILY • HAPPY HouR $2 mondayS gAme RentAls • PBR PInts jameSon ShotS

THURS. • 9pm • LADIES NITE

FRIDAY • 9/30 • 9 pm

BurgerS n’ FrIeS $5 sAtuRDAY • 10/1 • 10pm

dj KodIaK

free

EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

KaraoKe

Fo o tB all

On 10’ Big SCreen & 30 FlAt scReens, 16 SPeaKer SurrOund SOund $50 RAFFle At enD oF eAcH gAme

4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M r O C K Pa r T Y. C O M

GREEN ROOM — Nomad, 7; xDefinition, 10; Syllable 7, midnight

TUE COMEDY NIGHT 9/27

IS BACK!! 8PM

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

9/28 BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

NEW ORLEANS’ ROCK SPOT

THU JOE ADRAGNA & 9/29

KILL CLOUSEAU 9PM

FRI

9/30

BROWN IMPROV 8:30PM

GROVE ON FULTON ST. SAT THE COME TAILGATE FOR THE OLE MISS GAME 10/1

OLE MISS VS FRESNO ST 6PM

THE REDZONE SUN IN W/ JOHN FOURCADE & MITCH GIBBS 3-6PM 10/2

COMPLIMENTARY FOOD DURING BLACK & GOLD GAMES

608 FULTON STREET NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell Trio, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES — Summertime Showcase, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Rici Jo, O.B.A., Gino Barletta, Say! Don’t Play, 7 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Zero Dialect, 10

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Javier Guitterrez & Vivaz, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Tom McDermott, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Patrick Cooper, 5; Foot & Friends, 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Cindy Chen, 7 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — At Fault, 10

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Gypsy Space Caravan, 10; Dirty Bourbon River Show, 11:15

preview Tune-Yards

With no rusted foliage or mercury mercy to announce the arrival of fall, New Orleans has come to count on other seasonal bellwethers: painted faces in the grocery checkout, student drivers clogging Uptown roadways and a One Eyed Jacks concert calendar that, once it starts, doesn’t quit. This year’s marathon — a whopping 26 recommendable shows over the next two months — commences this week with visits by Junior Boys, Cymbals Eat Guitars and Tune-Yards, aka Merrill Garbus, a Northern oddity and unlikely vanguard of the advancing army. As recently as 2010, Garbus was known only to the most voracious of mp3-blog gluttons, her solo music project given to the kind of willful eccentricities — recording an entire debut via dictaphone, alternating upper- and lowercase characters like a disobedient kindergartener (tUnE-yArDs, BiRd-BrAiNs) — that seem designed to tweak copy editors and mainstream listeners. Then something happened: People heard her songs. On w h o k i l l (4AD), her crowded and yet purposefully spaced April breakthrough, Garbus raises a conductor’s baton over the schizoid orchestra in her head, commanding with precision an unhinged, self-looped symphony: hiccuping hip-hop beats and pots-andpans percussion tickled by acid-jazz horns and plucky ukeleles, their aboriginal chieftain singing sweetly one second and yelling elephantine bellows the next, an ideal presider over a primeval rock equinox. Pat Jordache opens. Tickets $14. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

OCT

02

Tune-Yards 10 p.m. Sunday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Khris Royal & Dark Matter CD release, 10:30 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Bryce Eastwood, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30 MUSÉE CONTI WAX MUSEUM — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 9 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Mario Ortiz, 9

OAK — Amanda Walker, 6; Cristina Perez, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Lil Red & Big Bad, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Junior Boys, Royal Teeth, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Vox & the Hound, 10 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Hellbenders, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 9:30 RUSTY NAIL — Country Fried, 10 SHAMROCK BAR — Burger ’N’ Fries, 9

SIBERIA — The Devil’s Rain, Built To Destroy, Crotchbreaker, Slowtheknife, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Wendell Brunious Quintet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Jayna Morgan, 6; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Alley Cats, 8

THREE MUSES — Moonshiners Trio, 4; Zazou City, 6:30; Glen David Andrews, 10 TIPITINA’S — Big Sam’s Funky


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Nation, Stooges Brass Band, 10

TULANE LAVIN-BERNICK CENTER QUAD — Stooges Brass Band, 4

Saturday 1 ABITA SPRINGS TOWN HALL — Louisiana Swing feat. BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet, Don Vappie’s Louisiana Swing Band, 7

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Madeline, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Lollies & Rooks CD release, 9 BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Dr. Funk, 6; Rites of Passage, 9

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10:30 THE CYPRESS — Wake Into the Nightmare, Man vs. Machine, 7

D.B.A. — John Boutte, 8; Cedric Burnside Project CD release, 11 HERMES BAR — John Rankin Trio, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES — Machina, Southdown, Poltern Kinder, Black Magnolia, 9 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Supercharger, 7:30

THE MAISON — Ramblin’ Letters, 7; DJ Jubilee (upstairs), 10; Yojimbo, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight MAPLE LEAF BAR — Cole Bruce Hampton & the Pharoah Gummit, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Igor, 7; Destiny, 8; Beth Trepagnier, 9; Terrina & Jon, 10

OLD POINT BAR — October Fest feat. Miss Claudia & Her Bier Gartners, 5; Dana Abbott, 9:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Debauche CD release, 10 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7

PONTCHARTRAIN PARK — Gentilly Fest feat. Sharon Martin, 11 a.m.; Wise Guys, 12:30; Higher Heights, 2; Real Love, 3:30; Doug E. Fresh, 5 PONTCHARTRAIN VINEYARDS — Jazz ’n the Vines feat. Benny Grunch & the Bunch, 6:30 PRESERVATION HALL — Gregg Stafford’s Jazz Hounds, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Scott Schmidt, 10

SATURN BAR — Bills, Die Rotzz, Super Destroyers, Concrete Shoes, 10 SIBERIA — WATIV CD release, Aurora Nealand, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Astral Project, 8 & 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Alley Cats, 8

TIPITINA’S — George Porter Jr. & Runnin’ Pardners CD release feat. Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

TUGENDHAFT’S TAVERN — The Blue Max, 9

Sunday 2 BANKS STREET BAR — Blue Crabs Blues Band, 9 BOMBAY CLUB — Matt Lemmler, 7

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Scott H. Biram

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30

GREEN ROOM — Bobby Blaze, 9 THE HANGAR — Katatonia, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF — The Movement, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Nickel-A-Dance Concert Series feat. Lucien Barbarin & the Magnificent 7, 4; Josh Reppel Quartet, 7; Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 10 MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD — Sunset Sundays feat. Don Vappie & the Creole Jazz Serenaders, 4:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

ONE EYED JACKS — Tune-Yards, Pat Jordache, 10 PONTCHARTRAIN PARK — Gentilly Fest feat. Soul Heirs, 12:30; Mike “The Soulman” Baptiste, 2; Wanda Rouzan, 3:30; Kermit Ruffins, 5 PRESERVATION HALL — New Orleans Legacy Band feat. Tommy Sancton, 8 SIBERIA — Sic Waiting, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Will Thompson CD release, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Alley Cats, 11 a.m.

THREE MUSES — Jayna Morgan, 7 TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 UNO LAKEFRONT ARENA — Mindless Behavior, Diggy, The New Boyz, Jacob Latimore, Hamilton Park, OMG Girlz, 6

DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm

D.B.A. — Glen David Andrews, 9

WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm

DOMINO SOUND RECORD SHACK — Tune-Yards, noon

THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till

GREEN ROOM — Todd Lemoine, 10 THE MAISON — Royal Roses, 7; New Orleans Super Jam, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Mark Braud, 8

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

3 full bars • 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530

FRI:

Ladies Night- FREE Drinks Domestic & Well

SAT:

Karaoke

SUN: Happy Hour ALL DAY

HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

SIBERIA — White Crime, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 10 THREE MUSES — Bart Ramsey, 4:30; Kristin Diable, 7

classical/ concerts DER RATHSKELLER — Tulane

University, Lavin Bernick Center, McAlister Drive — Thu: Jazz at the Rat presents Roderick Paulin, 7

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF COVINGTON — 16333 Hwy.

1085, Covington, (985) 8922149; www.fbccov.org — Fri: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents Mahler Symphony No. 1 feat. Gabriela Montero, 7:30

MAHALIA JACKSON THEATER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS — 1419 Basin St., 525-1052;

www.mahaliajacksontheater.com — Sat: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra presents Mahler Symphony No. 1 feat. Gabriela Montero, 8

SATCHMO’S (DANNA CENTER) — 6363 St. Charles Ave. — Thu: Celebrating Cannonball and Coltrane Concert, 7:30

ST. JOSEPH’S CHURCH — 1802 Tulane Ave., 522-3186 — Sun: A Concert of Sacred Wedding Music, 7 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6; Sun: Suzanne Cartreine, 5 URSULINE CHAPEL — 2701 State St. — Sun: Musica da Camera, 4

call for music

Monday 3

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL. Accepting applications from bands to perform at the 2012 festival. Visit www.nojazzfest.com/apply for details. Application deadline is Saturday.

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

serving new orleans'

favorites

Po-Boys, Pizzas & Plates

including Seafood Muffeletas, Italian Meatballs, Veal Marsala, Mirliton Casserole, Fettucine Alfredo, Grilled Chicken or Grilled Shrimp Salad, Gumbo and more. 3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade® -Sold Only At-

435, 600, 610, 721, 727 Bourbon St.

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink! Live Entertainment Nightly

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Mumbles, 1; Andre Bouvier, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7:30; Alexey Marti Band, 11

THREE MUSES — Kristina Morales, 6:30; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

MUSIC

45


PETER TRAVERS

and most ViscerallY

EXCITING FILMS OF THE YEAR. BRAD PITT NAILS EVERY NUANCE. JONAH HILL SCORES A KNOCKOUT!

REX REED

“A GREAT AMERICAN MOVIE

THAT WILL LEAVE YOU CHEERING.

POSITIVELY THRILLING. KAREN DURBIN

“‘MONEYBALL’ IS

hilarioUs.

BRAD PITT SHOWS US ONCE AGAIN JUST HOW GOOD HE IS.

NOW SHOWING ABDUCTION (PG-13) — Taylor Lautner runs for his life while trying to find the truth about his family. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 APOLLO 18 (PG-13) — The found-footage-style horror depicts a failed mission to the moon. Grand CONTAGION (R) — A lethal

airborne virus rapidly spreads across the world in the drama starring Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude Law, Kate Winslet and Laurence Fishburne. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

THE DEBT (R) — Helen Mirren

SENSATIONAL.”

DOLPHIN TALE (PG) — Harry Connick Jr. stars in the true story of people who helped a dolphin. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

RICHARD CORLISS

DRIVE (R) — Ryan Gosling

plays a Hollywood stunt driver by day and a getaway driver for heist operations by night. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9

THE HELP (PG-13) — In the

A FILM BY BENNETT MILLER

film adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s hit novel, an aspiring journalist shakes up her Southern town when she interviews black maids. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

KILLER ELITE (PG-13) — Jason

“MONEYBALL” COLUMBIA PICTURESEXECUTIVEPRESENTS A SCOTT RUDIN/MICHAEL DE LUCA/RACHAEL HOROVITZ PRODUCTION BASED ON THE MYCHAEL DANNA PRODUCERS SCOTT RUDIN ANDREW KARSCH SIDNEY KIMMEL MARK BAKSHI BOOK BY MICHAEL LEWIS PRODUCED STAN CHERVIN SCREENPLAYBY STEVEN ZAILLIAN AND AARON SORKIN DIRECTED BY MICHAEL DE LUCA RACHAEL HOROVITZ BRAD PITT BY BENNETT MILLER

MUSIC BY STORY BY

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review Moneyball

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

stars as a former Israeli Mossad agent who must confront her past. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place

BRAD PITT IS Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

MONEYBALL’ CRUISES INTO THE HIGH GEAR OF THE SAVVIEST OLD HOLLYWOOD COMEDIES.

“‘

46

FILM

“‘MONEYBALL’ IS ONE OF THE BEST

LISTINGS

Statham, Clive Owen and Robert De Niro star in the action film about an exspecial ops. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

LAUGH AT MY PAIN (R) — The

film documents Kevin Hart’s Los Angeles show during his 90-city stand-up comedy tour. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

THE LION KING 3-D (G) — The Disney classic gets a 3-D update. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies,

© Columbia Pictures 2011 It’s an odd David and Goliath story when millionaires have to struggle against bigger millionaires, but Moneyball sentimentalizes that baseball drama. What makes Oakland A’s general manager Billy Beane’s (Brad Pitt) plight heroic and fun is that the film is as much about fighting the stodginess of old ideas and defeating crusty skeptics as it is about trying to beat the New York Yankees (which still provides pretty good fallback appeal). Based on Michael Lewis’ 2003 book, Moneyball chronicles Beane’s influential efforts to change the way Oakland evaluated players as he tried to compete against the Yankees and other better funded clubs. In 2001, The Oakland A’s took the Yankees to five games before losing in the division series playoffs. That’s not bad considering the A’s had a payroll of $40 million compared to the Yankees’ $115 million, but as a reward, Oakland’s best players (Johnny Damon, Jason Giambi and Jason Isringhousen) were bought by richer teams, including the Yankees taking Giambi off their hands. Beane couldn’t afford to pay competitive salaries for the game’s biggest stars so he decided to find another way to win. In the film, he recruits Peter Brand (Jonah Hill), a young Yale grad with an economics degree, who tells him that teams are using outdated and highly subjective criteria to evaluate players. Brand proposes using different statistical analyses to identify undervalued players they can not only afford but use to win, though some of the players look like a motley set of replacements for the former stars. Hill is best known for roles as pudgy nerds in films like Superbad, and he’s used to similar entertaining effect here. (The man Brand is based on was neither short, fat nor unattractive.) The old warhorse, sunburnt, leathery-skinned Oakland talent scouts take one look at the soft-spoken, chubby kid with glasses and a laptop and balk at his methodology. But Beane believes the kid’s numbers don’t lie, and before long, he forces the terrified Brand to take a future all-star player aside and fire him. Beane and Brand become an unlikely duo as they try to change the thinking and culture of an organization, and the film humorously and convincingly captures how difficult that can be. Philip Seymour Hoffman is brilliant as manager Art Howe, who simply does not buy into the new system. As the A’s lose games while adjusting, the media piles on, and it’s funny to hear the actual snippets of overheated pronouncements of failure. Throughout it all, Pitt exudes charm and confidence as Beane juggles what he values in a world where money and winning are usually all that matter. — Will Coviello

Moneyball Staring Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill and Philip Seymour Hoffman Wide release Grand, Hollywood 14 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) — The origin

story of the cult classic takes

place in modern-day San Francisco, where a geneticist’s engineering begets intelligent apes. AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14


FILM

LISTINGS SARAH’S KEY (PG-13) — While

in France pursuing a story, an American journalist’s life intertwines with one of her subjects’. Chalmette Movies

review Tucker & Dale Vs. Evil

SHARK NIGHT 3-D (PG-13) —

YOUTH SPORTS EQUIPMENT RECYCLE PROGRAM AIMED AT OUTFITTING NEW ORLEANS YOUTH WITH SPORTING GOODS.

Drop off used or new youth equipment or donate to the REPLAY fund at sonofasaint.org Equipment will benefiit Son of a Saint kids, NORDC kids and the New Orleans Kids Partnership DROP OFF PARTNERS:

OCTOBER 15 Cut-Off Playground • AL Davis Playground Easton Playground • Kenilworth Playground Pontchartrain Playground

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

48

LEAGUE GAMES & EVENTS

STRAW DOGS (R) — A couple moves back to the wife’s hometown in the South, where they face conflict with the locals. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BELLFLOWER (R) — Two friends

MONTH OF NOVEMBER

OCTOBER 2 - 8

While at a Louisiana lake house, a group of friends happens upon hundreds of flesh-eating sharks in the Shreveport-filmed horror. Grand

OCTOBER 3 - 17 RIVERSIDE

OCTOBER HOME FOOTBALL GAMES

BRILLIANT , HILARIOUS, GENIUS. It truly is one of the funniest, brightest and just all-around fun horror movies in recent years.” - Benjamin Dolle, FANGORIA

who spend their time building weapons meet a young woman who introduces them to violent life. Tickets $6.50 for New Orleans Film Society members, $8.50 general admission. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

COMING TO AMERICA (R) —

DJ Soul Sister presents the screening of the comedy starring Eddie Murphy. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

MRS. MINIVER (NR)— Greer Garson stars in her Academy Award-winning role as the matriarch of a British family trying to survive World War II. Free admission. 6 p.m. Thursday, Stage Door Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org PEARL JAM TWENTY (NR) — To

commemorate Pearl Jam’s 20th anniversary, Cameron Crowe’s documentary includes rarely and neverbefore-seen footage of the band, plus recent interviews and concert footage. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

SHOW BOAT (NR) — The 1951 movie-musical is about a daughter of a riverboat captain who falls for a charming gambler. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com SHUT UP LITTLE MAN! (NR) —

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY

STARTS FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

ARTS CENTER

New Orleans 504-827-5858 DAILY: 7:30 PM

W W W. M A G N E T R E L E A S I N G . C O M / T U C K E R A N D D A L E V S E V I L

The film tells the story of San Francisco roommates recording their noisy neighbors. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618

PHOTO COURTESY OF MAGNOLIA PICTURES

Just like the ambiguity of the classic Twilight Zone episode “To Serve Man” (alien cookbook or instructions to obey?), the line “We got your friend” causes a big misunderstanding in the comic gorefest Tucker & Dale Vs. Evil. A film festival darling, the movie features an Appalachian backwoods battle between archenemies: hillbillies and preppy college kids. Dale (Tyler Labine) and Tucker (Alan Tudyk) buy a cabin in the woods as a vacation home and bring in all sorts of heavy equipment (chainsaws, axes, a wood chipper) to fix it up. They cross paths with a bunch of kids camping for the weekend and inadvertently startle one of the girls. When she faints and falls in the lake, they gallantly rescue her and set out to return her to her friends, who instead believe she’s been kidnapped by homicidal backwoods people, a la Deliverance. When a few students inadvertently off themselves in failed rescue attempts, Dale and Tucker assume the college students have a suicide pact and try to protect the girl. The action is a zany blend of bruising slapstick and grotesque parody. Much of the humor comes from profound misunderstandings and defying expectations, i.e. instead of a leering brute, Dale is a trivia whiz who is too shy to talk to women, and every time he tries, he bumbles his way into something cryptic and horrifying. It’s both funny and a refreshing take on stereotypes of hillbillies. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

SEPT

30 THRU OCT

06

Tucker & Dale Vs. Evil 7:30 p.m. Friday-Thursday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net TO CATCH A THIEF (NR) — Cary Grant and Grace Kelly star in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1955 mystery romance. Tickets $5.50. Noon Friday-Saturday and Oct. 5, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14

(Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Scan for movie times.


Saturday, October 1, 2011 6–9pm FREE ADMISSION Citywide Gallery Openings Julia Street Block Party with DJ Brice Nice Cash Bar & Cuisine (300–600 blocks of Julia Street) CAC NOLA NOW, Part I Exhibition Opening Reception (900 Camp Street) continues ’til 11pm

9–11pm FREE ADMISSION CAC Official After-Party (900 Camp Street)

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

The CAC’s 35th Birthday Concert featuring NEA Jazz Master Ellis Marsalis plus DJ Soul Sister

52

Supported by the State of Louisiana and the City of New Orleans.

35

Contemporary Arts Center | 900 Camp St. New Orleans I 504.528.3800 I www.cacno.org

fall is in

bloom 40

ARRANGEMENTS $ STARTING AT

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400

$5 OFF {WHEN YOU SPEND $50.} MUST BRING IN AD TO RECEIVE DISCOUNT. GW. EXP. 10-17-11

3700 Orleans Ave.

in the Shops at the American Can Company

504.483.6314 • www.cbwines.com


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

ANTIEAU GALLERY. 927 Royal St., 304-0849; www.antieaugallery. com — “Gambling for Souls,” works by Molly McGuire and Stephen Warde Anderson, through Oct. 10. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Martin

Welch and Dexter Brecht, jewelry by Don David, through Friday.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — “Precipice,”

paintings and constructions by Kathleen Loe, through Saturday. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Altered Spaces:

Conversations, Reflections, and Observations,” silkscreen prints by Brian Folley Kelly, through Oct. 4.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. 2820 St. Claude Ave., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Works by

members of Galerie Nothburga, featuring Elisabeth Melkonyan, Johanna Bair, Inge von Reusner, Anna-Maria Achatz and Gabriela Nepo Stieldorf, through Friday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “And the Earth Begot

...” works by Michele Basta, through Oct. 8.

DIGEST. 723 Louisa St.; www. digest.723louisa.org — Mono-

types, watercolor, paintings and mixed media by Patch Somerville, Cayla Zeek and Mark Waguespack, through Friday.

lectible vinyl albums by Judy Di George; oil paintings by Sean Friloux, through Friday. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Fas-

cinate Me: A Culinary & Sculptural Extravaganza,” sculpture by Jean-Luc Albin, ice carving by Dawson, chocolate sculpture by Cloud Candi and 3-D designs by The Bikery, through Friday.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Pictures for Books,” photographs by Thomas Roma; “Jazz People: New Orleans Portraits,” photographs by Lee Friedlander; “Pop Shots,” Polaroid portraits by Andy Warhol; all through Oct. 9. ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local

and national artists, ongoing.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PETER O’NEILL STUDIOS. 721 Royal St., 527-0703; www.oneillgallery. com — Works by Peter O’Neill, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com —

Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Fear is a Man’s

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — “Poetry &

by Perry Morgan III, through Thursday.

Best Friend,” paintings by Jeremy Willis, through Nov. 5.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — Works

by Clay Blancett, Tod Seelie, Megan Hildebrandt and Valorie Polmer, through Sunday.

GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St.; 267-5991 — “Cycles of

Discovery,” photos by Thomas Kiefer and Stewart Harvey, through Oct. 9.

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, 615 City Park Ave., 671-6363; www.dcc.edu — “Boys/Bunnies/

Singles/Doubles,” works by Alex Podesta, through Tuesday.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com —

“Sunstruck,” paintings by Carol Hallock, through Friday.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — Alumni exhibition,

through Friday.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — Venetian glass

mosaics by Randy Sanders; “Capture the Moment,” clocks made from vintage and col-

Motion,” mixed media on panel and canvas by Demond Matsuo and Karoline Schleh, through Oct. 13. RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS GALLERY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by Margo Manning,

Chris Menconi, Chip Tipton, Andrew Jackson Pollack and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

review Michele Basta

Michele Basta’s hybrid creatures at Coup d’Oeil Art Consortium are fantastical by any measure. A mix of hallucinatory surrealism and a carnival sideshow take on mythology, her humanoid beasts are paradoxical in so many ways it is almost as if their mannequinlike appendages and oddly mammalian features were products of an alternate reality where such bizarre incongruities are normal. How else to explain From What I Remember/Metamorphosis, a cat-headed female wearing a tattered hoop skirt and long black gloves. With her lynxlike head thrown back as she appears to exhale a huge plume of crimson paper flames, she dominates her corner of the gallery while posing no end of enigmatic possibilities for which there are no immediate answers. In a nearby alcove, a related piece, Sphinx, inverts the equation with the body of a lioness below a human female upper torso topped with a demonic hybrid head. Instead of arms, she sprouts wings comprising hundreds of pages of poems in an extravagant new take on the term “literary lion.” There also are some oddly expressive human heads that seem to sprout from Victorian-era springmounted mechanisms of mysterious provenance. For dog lovers there is Companion (pictured), a hyena with conjoined human and canine heads. On the walls are some Victorian-looking light boxes with glowing panels made of pressed flowers embedded in colored resin to yield a cathedral-like glow. But what gives Basta’s beasts and light boxes their uncanny resonance is their sense of being artifacts from a parallel universe. Taking her cues from the esoteric inner symbolism of alchemy, Basta externalizes the baser demons that roam the wilds of the psyche in a process of transformation that puts their feral energy to use on behalf of a more holistic understanding of human potentiality, a quest that propelled both Carl Jung’s psychology and no end of surrealist experimentation — parallel currents long known to Europeans, but only slowly coming to light on these shores. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU OCT

8

“And the Earth Begot...” Mixed Media Sculpture by Michele Basta Coup d’Oeil Art Consortium, 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com

rustypelicanart.com — Works by Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing. SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

works, ongoing.

SLIDELL CULTURAL CENTER. 444 Erlanger St., (985) 646-4375 — Annual Artists of the Year

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY.

exhibit, through Friday.

400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Sportman’s Paradise,” works by Ed Smith, through Friday. STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — Works

by Maysey Craddock, Drew Galloway, Ruth Marten and Jamie Baldridge, through Friday. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Small Heads/

Little Busts,” works by Alan Gerson, through Sunday.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — “Architectural

Treasures of New Orleans,” works by Marlena Stevenson; paintings by Sarah Stiehl; both through Friday.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. Emerging and established artists and curators can apply for an opportunity to exhibit in the Bywater gallery during the 2012 season. Email bob@press-street.com or visit www.press-street.com/ antenna for details. Application deadline is Saturday. @PHONOGRAPHY. 3 Ring Circus’ Big Top Gallery hosts a show in December combining tweets and cell phone photos for PhotoNOLA, the citywide photography event. There is a $25 entry fee. Visit www.3rcp.com or email bigtop3ring@gmail. com for details. Submissions deadline is Oct. 29.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 5 ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe

in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-

created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th Star:

Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “It’s Carnival Time in

Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing.

MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — “Roosevelt, Rockwell, and

the Four Freedoms: America’s Slow March from Isolation to Action,” original posters by Norman Rockwell and museum artifacts, through Nov. 13. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — “Drapetomania: A Disease

Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; “Restore the Oaks: Art Under the Overpass in Treme,” paintings by artists of the murals under the 1-10 overpass; both through Oct. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “The Elegant Image,”

figural bronzes from the Indian Subcontinent from the collection of Siddharth K. Bhansali, through Oct. 23. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

“Mississippi Mud: The Potters of Mississippi”; “Looking to Learn,” works by New Orleans Center for Creative Arts visual art students, through Friday. “Whispering Pines,” photographs by Birtney Imes, through Oct. 16. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun: Forced

Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit and more; ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Jump ’N’ Jive,” oil paintings

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

ART

53


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER CHICAGO. Rivertown Repertory

Theatre, 325 Minor St., Kenner, 468-7221 — John Kander and Fred Ebb’s musical satire is set in Prohibition-era Chicago, where the justice system is corrupt and murderers have celebrity status. Tickets $35 general admission, $33 students and seniors, $17 children. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 8852000; www.jpas.org — While listening to a recording of a fictional musical comedy in his dingy apartment, an agoraphobic Broadway fan — played by Ricky Graham — is transported into the glitzy production with a cast of colorful characters. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students, $15 children. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 16. THE FUTURE IS A FANCYLAND PLACE. AllWays Lounge, 2240

GOD OF CARNAGE. Southern

Rep Theater, The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep. com — In Yasmina Reza’s comedy, a meeting of two sets of parents hoping to resolve a conflict between their sons becomes increasingly chaotic as the evening progresses. Tickets $29 Thursday and Sunday, $35 Friday and Saturday. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday through Oct. 9.

IN THE BLOOD. Lower Depths

Theater, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage.loyno. edu — Suzan-Lori Parks’ drama is a modern story of the protagonist of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, who is a single mother of five children living in poverty. Tickets $13 general admission, $8 students, seniors and Loyola employees. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Oct. 6-8, 2 p.m. Sunday.

THE MARVELOUS WONDERETTES. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — In Roger Bean’s jukebox

musical, an all-girl quartet in the 1950s sings the hits of the era. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday. THEOPHILUS NORTH. NOCCA Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2875; www.nocca.com — NOCCA students perform Matthew Burnett’s play based on Thornton Wilder’s final work. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday. THE WEIR. Deutsches Haus, 1023

Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www. deutscheshaus.org — In Conor McPherson’s play, drinkers at a pub in rural Ireland regal each other with ghost stories that get darker and more personal as the night progresses. Tickets $15 suggested donation. 7:30 p.m. Monday-Wednesday through Oct. 12.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

AN EVENING FOR OL’ TIMES SAKE. One Eyed Jacks, 615

Toulouse St., 569-8361; www. oneeyedjacks.net — Vinsantos and Miss Oblivious host the evening of live performances by BonBon Vivant, Vinsantos, Triptych and Mudlark Puppeteers. Tickets $7. 10 p.m. Friday.

FAMILY STAGE PETITE ROUGE. St. Joseph Abbey Church, 75376 River Road, St. Benedict, (985) 892-1800; www. sjasc.edu — The musical is the story of Little Red Riding Hood set in the Louisiana swamps and bayous. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. SaturdaySunday.

AUDITIONS

review God of Carnage

The French tradition of taking a satiric look at contemporary society goes back at least as far as Moliere. Yasmina Reza, author of God of Carnage, carries that tradition into the 21st century with flair. The play takes place in a modern, chic, somewhat austerely furnished living room. Two couples are having a meeting because one of their sons hit the others’ boy in the mouth with a stick, knocking out a couple of teeth. The parents are struggling to arrive at a civilized resolution about the violence. Director Ricky Graham puts his remarkable cast through their paces deftly. Michael (John “Spud” McConnell) and Veronica (Maureen Brennan) are the owners of the apartment and the parents of Henry, the injured boy. Annette (Lara Grice) and Alan (Gary Rucker) are the parents of Benjamin, the assailant. Part of the fun arises from the very different personalities of the two couples. Everyone is middle class, but Michael and Veronica seem to live more modestly than Alan and Annette. Michael sells home furnishings and Alan is a lawyer who represents a pharmaceutical company. Alan wears a three-piece suit and — using a cellphone earpiece — he constantly interrupts the parents’ meeting to talk to his clients, broadcasting for everyone present. Some amusing chaos results from outbursts, which seem part of the conversation but are really directed at the phone call about one of the company’s drugs that may have harmful side effects. When the house phone rings, it’s Michael’s ailing mother. She’s taking the very medicine in question and Michael shouts, “I forbid you to take it!” Veronica reads a statement about the boys’ conflict that the two sets of parents are supposed to sign. It reads that Benjamin was armed with a stick. Alan objects to the word “armed,” and the parents compromise with “furnished.” Obviously, this is not going to be simple. Will the aggressor child apologize? Should he? Was he provoked? Is he a “maniac”? Is the victim a “snitch”? Eventually, the parental summit becomes a free-for-all, and it’s surprising none of the parents get clouted with a stick. Much of the fun comes from odd detours in the plot, like the effects of leftover clafoutis on Annette’s nervous stomach. Last but not least, Michael evicted Nibbles, his children’s pet hamster, because he hates rodents. This may all sound a long way from Moliere. But there’s a passage in Moliere in which a pompous middle-class gent brags that he can speak “prose” impromptu. With a change of clothes, he would fit right in with Reza’s hilarious squabblers. — Dalt Wonk

THRU OCT

9

GOD OF CARNAGE 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat.; 3 p.m. Sun. Southern Rep, The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545; www.southernrep.com

A CHRISTMAS STORY. Playmakers

Theater, 19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — The theater holds auditions for the December production of the Charles Dickens play. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS.

Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc. edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday. JUNGLE BOOK KIDS. Teatro

Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — JPAS seeks children ages 7-12 for the December production. Auditions are by appointment only. Call 885-2000 ext. 211 or email lynne@jpas.org for details. Saturday.

COMEDY COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a

safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS/GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday. GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The

Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday. OPEN MIC COMEDY SHOWCASE.

12 Bar, 608 Fulton St., 212-6476; www.12barnola.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the show. Free admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

THE REAL @CHRISTREW SHOW.

Republic New Orleans, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com — The comedian performs a talk/variety show hybrid with musical guests, eating competitions and more. Tickets $10. 9 p.m. Thursday. SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — Andrew Vaught and Christopher Kaminstein’s play follows a group of Americans obsessed with apocalyptic prophecies. Call 264-1776 for reservations. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. FridaySunday.

STAGE

55


EVENTS

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

FREE DELIVERY

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

TO MID-CITY & LAKEVIEW FAMILY Tuesday 27 KINDER GARDEN: BACK TO SCHOOL IN THE GARDEN. Longue Vue

GOI CUON

Spring Roll, salad roll highly recommended

PHO GA

Chicken traditional large bowl of soup

BUN TOM

Grilled Shrimp over rice or vermicelli noodle

BRUNCH WEEKDAYS ONLY DINNER MENU 4PM-9:30PM MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

135 N. CARROLLTON 309-7286 / FAX 309-7283

More than just great food...

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $10 members, $12 nonmembers. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana Children’s

Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 29 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > SEPTEMBER 27 > 2011

Saturday 1

56

MASTER GARDENERS. Hollygrove

Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 483-7037; www.hollygrovemarket.com — The program focuses on peanuts, but it also includes feeding the chickens and making Halloween decorations. Free admission; registration is required for groups of four or more. Email luerla@bellsouth.net for details. 10 a.m. to noon.

6

book your holiday parties private dining now areas corporate parties rehearsal dinners business meetings

Call Our Special Events Planner Gift Certificates Available

mon-fri 9am-5pm

504.581.1103 or

504.525.4790 tommysneworleans.com

VEGETABLE GARDENING CLASS.

Veterans Park, Williams Boulevard, next to Kenner City Hall — The workshop topic is homegrown container vegetables. Call 468-7268 for details. Free admission. Parent and child (ages 7 and up) class 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., adult class 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

EVENTS

BE THERE DO THAT Tulane University Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DINING INTERNATIONALLY: DESTINATION SPAIN . Vega Tapas

Cafe, 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — The World Affairs Council of New Orleans hosts the five-course tapas sampling with an overview of the region’s food culture by chef Glen Hogh. Reservations are required. Call 2805591 or visit www.wacno.org for details. Admission $38. 7 p.m. EXCELLENCE IN JOURNALISM CONFERENCE . Sheraton New

Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., 5955511; www.sheratonneworleans. com — The Radio Television Digital News Association and Society of Professional Journalists’ convention features speakers including CNN anchor Soledad O’Brien, workshops, tours of local newsrooms, book signings, critique sessions and more. Visit www.excellenceinjournalism.org for the full schedule and other details. 8 a.m. NEW DOCENT TRAINING . Ogden

Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden trains prospective docents, people who lead museum tours, in museum techniques and education strategies for engaging visitors. Call 5399608 or email ebalkin@ogdenmuseum.org for details. 10 a.m.

ROBERT MEACHEM BIRTHDAY DINNER & FUNDRAISER . Lil’ Dizzy’s

Cafe, 610 Poydras St., 212-5656 — The New Orleans Saints wide receiver hosts the dinner to benefit the Robert Meachem Christmas Toy Giveaway. Space is limited; call 212-5656 or email lildizzyscafe@ yahoo.com for details. Admission $30. 7 p.m. SCRABBLE NIGHT. St. Tammany

Parish Public Library, Mandeville Branch, 844 Girod St., (985) 626-4293; www.sttammany.lib. la.us — The library hosts a night of Scrabble playing for adults and teens. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

Wednesday 28 BLACK MEN & BOYS INITIATIVE. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The center hosts the community education and discussion series. Call (985) 643-6186 or email trap@movingforwardgc.org for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

COMPREHENSIVE ZONING ORDINANCE MEETING. The city

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET.

French Market, French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www. frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Tuesday 27 hosts public meetings at various locations where residents can view draft zoning text and maps, meet with city planners, and submit written comments. Call 658-7033 or visit www.cpc-nola.gov for the full schedule and other details.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala Ave., Sala

Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WWII PUB QUIZ. Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen. org — The quiz tests knowledge of general trivia as well as WWII questions. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Thursday 29 BLACK TIE BOWLING FUNDRAISER .

Rock ’N’ Bowl, 3016 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-1700; www.rocknbowl. com — Irvin Mayfield is honorary chairman of the Common Ground Health Clinic’s fundraising event, which features food, drinks, live music, a silent auction, a “best dressed” contest and bowling. Call 365-8800 or visit www.commongroundclinic.org for details. Tickets start at $45. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 733-5005 for details. 6:30 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS. Victory

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m.

NEW ORLEANS FILM SOCIETY GALA .

Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., 525-2951; www.eiffelsociety. com — The society honors its 2011 Celluloid Hero, John Goodman, at the gala, which also features live music by the Living Rumors and Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, a live auction, food and specialty cocktails. Visit www.neworleansfilmsociety.org for details. Admission $50-$250. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. patron party, 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. general admission.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 30 FALL SEAFOOD FESTIVAL. St. Mary Magdalen School, 6425 W. Metairie Ave., Metairie, 465-8415 — The school’s fair features food, rides and live entertainment by the Wise Guys, 5 Finger Discount, Liquid Peace Revolution and the Topcats. 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday, noon to 11:30 p.m. Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. Saturday. HOLY NAME OF MARY FALL FAIR . Holy Name of Mary Church, 400 Verret St., Algiers, 362-5511 — The fair includes a red bean cook-off, food, crafts, games, raffles and live music by the Top Cats and Bucktown All-Stars. Call 362-5511 for details. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. Saturday. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N. Rampart

and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

PLAQUEMINES ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY GALA & AUCTION.

Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www. generationshall.net — Angela Hill is the mistress of ceremonies at the gala supporting the no-kill animal rescue and adoption organization. Visit www.pawsgala.org for details. Admission $150 per person, $200 per couple. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. TULANE BUSINESS FORUM. Hilton New Orleans Riverside, 2 Poydras St., 561-0500; www.hilton.com — The annual forum features speakers addressing a variety of business topics. Call 861-7921 or visit www. tulanebusiness.com for details. Event is $160 general admission, $130 Tulane alumni. 8:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www. noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 1 ART & JEWLERY SALE . CC’s

Coffeehouse, 2800 Esplanade Ave. — The sale benefits 411 NOLA. Call 585-1325 or email info@411nola.com for details. 9 a.m. to noon.

ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park,

333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague.info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

ART IN THE YARD. Algiers Folk Art Zone, 207 Le Bouef St., Algiers — The free fundraising event features live music by Sunpie Barnes and the De Soto Street Band, a silent auction of locally made art work and artists demonstrations. Call 2616231 or visit www.facebook.com/ groups/folkartzone for details. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. BROUSSARD’S OKTOBERFEST.

Broussard’s Restaurant, 819 Conti


Kickoff October and

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

St., 581-3866; www.broussards.com — The restaurant celebrates German culture with traditional cuisine, beer and wine, live music and a costume contest. Admission $10. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday-2. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. CYNTHIA MITCHELL. Staple

Goods, 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium. org/staplegoods — The documentarist brings film clips, film stills and artistic partners for a day of filmmaking discussion. The program is part of Local Threads, a free arts festival in the St. Roch Neighborhood. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

E-WASTE AND PAINT DROP-OFF. Whole Foods Market Arabella Station, 5600 Magazine St., 899-9119 — Whole Foods and the Green Project offer a monthly electronic waste and paint drop-off event. Visit www.greenproject.org for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EAGLE WATCH. Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING. Christ Church

FRERET MARKET. Freret

Market, corner of Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue, 6382589; www.freretmarket. org — The market offers food, arts, live music and crafts from local exhibitors on the first Saturday of each month. Noon to 5 p.m.

GENTILLY FEST. Pontchartrain

Park, Press Drive and Prentiss Avenue — The festival features live music from Doug E. Fresh, Kermit Ruffins, Wanda Rouzan and more; arts and crafts, food from local restaurants and caterers, children’s activities and recovery resources. Visit www.gentillyfest.com for details. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon.

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets,

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP FOR CHILDREN & TEENS. Grief

Resource Center, 1221 S. Clearview Pkwy., fourth floor, 723-3628 — Facilitated by licensed counselors and therapists, the Akula Foundation Grief Resource Center’s group is open to any family that has experienced a death or other significant loss. Space is limited; pre-registration is required. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. children ages 5-12; 11 a.m. to noon teenagers.

ISLENOS IN LOUISIANA PROGRAM. Jean Lafitte

National Historical Park and Preserve, French Quarter Visitor Center, 419 Decatur St., 589-2636 — Descendants of the Islenos of St. Bernard Parish share traditional skills like carving wood and making lace, pirogues and model boats. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

JUNIOR LEAGUE NONPROFIT BOARD TRAINING PROGRAM.

Junior League New Orleans, 4319 Carondelet St., 891-5845; www.jlno.org — The Junior League of New Orleans presents the course that prepares community volunteers for nonprofit board leadership, and upon completion of the course connects participants with local nonprofits for further training. Pre-registration is required. Call 891-5845 for details. Admission $250. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NEW ORLEANS ON TAP BEER FESTIVAL . City Park, 1 Palm

Drive — The Bulldog and LA/ SPCA host the event featuring more than 200 types of beer, live music by Rotary Downs and Flow Tribe, pet adoptions, raffles and more. Visit www. neworleansontap.org for details. Free admission. 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays.

ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock

Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www. visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

UNITED NEGRO COLLEGE FUND WALK FOR EDUCATION . The

Fly, behind Audubon Zoo (6500 Magazine St.) at the river — The 5K walk/run helps raise money to provide college scholarships for underrepresented Louisiana students. Call 581-3794 or visit give. uncf.org/neworleanswalk for details. Registration is $30 general admission, $15 students 18 and under. 7:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

WILD GARDEN LOUISIANA IRIS WORKSHOP. Longue

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — The workshop is in partnership with the New Orleans Master Gardeners. Call 293-4718 for details. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

TM

For a good, sweet, chocolaty year

hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

Join us for

Art for Art’s Sake Saturday, October 1 Open House

6:00-9:00 Enjoy Chocolate Goodies and

Icy HOT CHOCOLATE

Sunday 2 INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM .

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave. — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m. Sundays. Through Feb. 26. PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SILKSCREEN WORKSHOP.

Staple Goods, 1340 St. Roch Ave., 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — Ron Bechet and art students from Xavier University lead the workshop. The program is a part of Local Threads, a free arts festival in the St. Roch Neighborhood. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Monday 3 TOASTMASTERS MEETING .

Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www. notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS LOUISIANA CULTURAL ECONOMY FOUNDATION ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY FUND GRANT. The foundation

awards grants to individual

5707 Magazine St. 504.269.5707 www.BlueFrogChocolates.com

Bring in this ad for 10% off of your purchase during October. *special orders excluded

Shanah Tova Umetukah!

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

Showcasing Local Music MON 9/26

Papa Grows Funk

Tom Sancton and the New Orleans All Stars

TUE 9/27

Rebirth Brass Band

SEPTEMBER 29

WED 9/28

Up Close & Personal

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

THU The Trio featuring 9/29 Johnny V & Special Guests Adults: $8 / Children 5-12: $3 Children 4 & Under = FREE Mint Juleps and other refreshments available for purchase For more information call

(504) 483-9488

FRI Khris Royal & Dark Matter 9/30 CD Release Party SAT 10/1

Col. Bruce Hampton & the Pharoah Gummit

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter 10/2 & 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

CHOCTOBERFEST!

57


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <BROUSSARD’S GOES BAVARIAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Broussard’s Restaurant (819 Conti St., 581-3866; www.brous< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <sards.com) is known as an old-line Creole establishment, but on Saturday, Oct. 1, the restaurant celebrates German heritage with an Oktoberfest. The courtyard and dining rooms will be styled WHAT after a German beer garden, with beer and traditional OktoberThe Rib Room fest foods sold from booths around the property. The daylong festival starts at 11 a.m. and includes Bavarian music, cooking WHERE demonstrations and a costume contest. Admission is $10. 621 St. Louis St., 5297046; www.ribroomneworleans.com WINES BY THE CLASS

am

B

WHEN

Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. HOW MUCH

Expensive

RESERVATIONS

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

Rotisserie dishes, seafood, old standbys WHAT DOESN'T

In a grand setting, service is much less so.

CHECK, PLEASE

New vigor and flavor at a local institution.

Chef Rene Bajeux has reinvigorated the Rib Room.

The Grill Room (Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 5236000; www.grillroomneworleans.com) has a new series of wine classes, which are led by sommelier Sara Kavanaugh and offer a dinner deal tie-in. The series begins Oct. 5, at 6 p.m., with a guided tasting comparison of Old World and New World wines. The series continues the first Wednesday of each month through May. The cost is $25, and those who dine in the Grill Room that same night get a free bottle of wine selected by Kavanaugh for their meal.

five 5 IN

Five Outdoor Eateries Near City Park

CAFE DEGAS

3127 ESPLANADE AVE., 945-5635 www.cafedegas.com

French bistro classics on the deck make the right impression.

CAFE NAVARRE

800 NAVARRE AVE., 483-8828

There are shaded tables for casual brunch and sandwiches.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

NONNA MIA CAFE AND PIZZERIA 3125 ESPLANADE AVE., 948-1717 www.nonnamia.net

Prime Time A FAMILIAR FACE TURNS HEADS AT A FRENCH QUARTER STALWART. BY IAN MCNULTY

P

Room. No more. In fact, dishes like the exceptional (though startlingly expensive) shrimp and tasso salad and the wild salmon with cucumber mint coulis can be some of the best options here, and bargain threecourse lunches, recently featuring redfish, lemon fish or pompano, are worth scheduling a visit around. Perhaps most exciting is the expanded role of the restaurant’s massive rotisserie. Its chicken grand mere is classic, and its honeyed duck legs even better — but quail is best of all. Smoked and stuffed with Manchego and ham, these quail come out aromatic, taut and golden, and when you first cut in to them, their tiny wings swell against the trussing string as juice bubbles forth. This is a restaurant of ocean liner proportions, and not every corner is so tidy. A few dishes fall flat, including bland calamari “steak fries,” underweight and spongy crab cakes, and a seafood risotto that, while tender, was hardly creamy at all. Those who liked the Rib Room just fine before may be relieved to see prime rib isn’t the only holdover. The veal Tanet, pounded and paneed, remains a lunch favorite, and the prime rib debris po-boy is making its own bid at modern classic status. A short, crisp French loaf overflowing with an enormous amount of chopped beef in rich gravy, it can make a $19 sandwich somehow seem reasonable. Bajeux says more menu changes are to come and that training is ongoing too. Already though, this major restaurant is a more exciting place to visit both for all the old reasons and for plenty of new ones.

RALPH’S ON THE PARK

900 CITY PARK AVE., 488-1000 www.ralphsonthepark.com

Sidewalk seating is directly across from the park gates.

SANTA FE RESTAURANT

3201 ESPLANADE AVE., 948-0077 www.santafenola.com

Order Tex-Mex and Latin dishes under terra cotta and timbers.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2007 Ruffino Tenuta Lodola Nuo va Vino Nobile di Montepulciano TUSCANY, ITALY / $17-$22 RETAIL This revered wine of Montepulciano’s noble families was produced from 30- to 40-year-old vineyards on an estate dating to the mid-13th century. The blend of 90 percent Sangiovese and 5 percent each Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot is aged in French oak for 18 months. The mediumbodied wine exhibits aromas of dark berry fruit, spice, coffee, hints of leather and oaky notes. On the palate, taste cassis, ripe plum and dark chocolate flavors. Drink with hearty dishes like osso buco, lamb and roast game. Buy it at: Breaux Mart in Uptown, Dorignac’s, Langenstein’s in Metarie and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Pascal’s Manale, Italian Barrel and Vincent’s Italian Cuisine. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

rime rib has a secure a place on the menu at the Rib Room, where it’s been the specialty, not to mention the namesake, for more than 50 years. But just about everything else had to audition for its spot on the roster after Rene Bajeux took over as chef last spring. His arrival here hasn’t signaled a transformation of the stately French Quarter stalwart but rather a timely reinvigoration. After all, the restaurant’s defining feature remains its big-shouldered, mid-century style, expressed in baronial mahogany and brass throughout one of the grandest dining rooms in town, in the gigantic martinis served at lunch, in the fingerbowls of horseradish and great slabs of butter brought to the table, even in the cloistered, almost secret, warren of subterranean wine rooms. And people use the Rib Room as before — the expense-account indulgence, the business lunch, the stage for celebratory meals and holiday gatherings. To this Bajeux brings a culinary approach comfortably rooted in the old school and fired up with both modern Creole touches and robust local sourcing. A native of France, Bajeux has culinary bona fides in spades, and his Rene Bistrot was a contender for the city’s best French restaurant during its too-brief tenure before Katrina. He later had a short stint at John Besh’s La Provence, followed by a series of jobs in the Caribbean and Texas. Today, his Rib Room isn’t necessarily French but Bajeux gets his chef’s message across with elemental flavors and admirable balance. Seafood has long played second fiddle at the Rib

Enjoy pizza and pastas on the porch or patio.

63


CUISINE

Scuttlebites

FEATURING CHEF SPECIALS • Sizzling jumbo Shrimp • CriSpy ginger Shrimp • CriSpy beef with blaCk pepper & onion • jumbo SCallop with aSparaguS & baby Corn

All the News thAts fit to eAt.

• Stuffed ChineSe eggplant • ChiCken almond CruSt with lemon SauCe

B y I a n M c n u lt y

POP-UP WINE BAR AT FEELINGS

    Feelings  cafe  is  a  traditional  New  Orleans restaurant in a very old, Creolestyle house with many rooms. Now, one  of those rooms is a new wine bar called  Sentiments  (2600  Chartres  St.,  9452222;  www.feelingscafe.com),  which  is  open Friday and Saturday nights from 6  p.m. on. Those hours may be expanded  in the future.      The  menu  lists  a  dozen  or  so  wines  and a varying selection of cheese, charcuterie and small plates. The bar itself is  as  snug  as  possible,  with  room  for  just  two.  There  also  are  a  few  tables  inside,  but the best seats in the house, at least  in nice weather, are on the slim, catwalk  balcony overlooking the lush courtyard.  This  is  a  romantic,  charmingly  homespun spot, practically hidden inside one  of the Marigny’s great old buildings.       Local French teacher Nikki Heathcock  and  her  partner  David  Lee  opened  Sentiments  this  summer  in  cooperation  with  the  Feelings  Cafe  owners.  Heathcock  says  they’re  interested  in  opening  on  other  weeknights  in  the  future  and  perhaps  screening  French  movies  outside  in  the  courtyard  on  nights when Feelings is normally closed. 

we deliver

3605 South Carrollton ave. Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11am-11pm • Sun 11am-10pm

reServationS / take-out 482-3935 • www.fivehappineSS.Com B A N Q U ET S & P R I VAT E PA RT I E S

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p 600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

985/626-4476

985/345-6789

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

QUE CRAWL AT THE DEN

64

vietnamese restaurant The Best Beef Noodle Soup in Town

Banh Mi • Beef Stew • Rice O P E N 7 D AY S | 7A M -7 P M

1308 manhattan blvd 504.302.2094

HARVEY

    The Den  inside  The  Howlin’ Wolf  music  club  (907  S.  Peters  St.,  529-5844;  www.thehowlinwolf.com)  normally  serves a pub grub menu, but things are  different  on  Sundays,  when  you’ll  find  dishes  like  roasted  ratatouille  and  goat  cheese  quesadillas,  Korean-style  beef  skewers and Buffalo chicken confit.      The  Den  is  a  bar  and  grill  adjunct  to  the  Howlin’  Wolf  music  club,  and  once  a  week  it’s  where  you’ll  find  chef  Nathanial Zimet,  the  chef/owner  of  the  Uptown  restaurant  Boucherie  (8115  Jeannette  St.,  862-5514;  www.boucherie-nola.com)  and  operator  of  the  Que Crawl food truck.      That truck is undergoing repairs at the  moment, but no matter. Zimet and business partner James Denio set up shop in  the Den’s kitchen to prepare the sort of  fare they normally serve from the truck.  This  “Que  Crawl  at  the  Den,”  as  they’re  calling  it,  happens  each  Sunday,  going  from  noon-until  (hungry  football  fans  take note).      Eventually,  Zimet  says,  he  wants  to  expand Que Crawl at the Den to weekdays  as  well  for  Warehouse  District  lunch business. 

HUNGRY FOR THE HYATT

    The Hyatt Regency New Orleans (601 

Loyola Ave., 561-1234; www.neworleans. hyatt.com)  is  expected  to  reopen  on  Oct.  19,  and  last  week  —  one  month  out — its public relations team released  details  of  the  restaurants  that  will  be  part  of  the  32-story  property  once  its  $275  million  post-Katrina  redevelopment is complete.      The  revamped  hotel  will  include  a  number  of  new  restaurants,  including  one  called  Borgne  from  chef  and  restaurateur John Besh. Borgne will be the  eighth location for the Besh Restaurant  Group  and  this  one  will  focus  on  Louisiana  seafood  with  Spanish  influences  in  recognition  of  the  region’s  historic  ties  to  Spain.  The  chef  de  cuisine  will  be  Brian Landry,  formerly  the  executive chef at Galatoire’s Restaurant  and  most  recently  the  traveling  “chef  advocate”  for  the  Louisiana Seafood Promotion & Marketing Board. Borgne  will have about 300 seats, and it will be  accessible from outside the hotel.       Meanwhile,  Hyatt  announced  the  executive  chef  for  the  overall  hotel  is  Eric Damidot,  a  Frenchman  who  was  previously  executive  chef  at  Caesar’s Palace  in  Las  Vegas.  Restaurants  he  will  oversee  include  8 Block Kitchen & Bar, a 360-seat eatery with a menu  mixing  regional  and  French  flavors  at  breakfast,  lunch  and  dinner.  8  Block  will have a 70-seat bar serving cheese  plates and charcuterie.      In  addition,  Hyatt  plans  to  include  a  new  sports  bar  called  Vitascope Hall.  The name is a reference to an early New  Orleans  movie  theater  on  Canal  Street,  though  with  25  flat-screen  TVs  around  the  room,  it  is  courting  the  sports  bar  crowd that once patronized Hi-Tops, the  jersey-decked  watering  hole  at  the  old  Hyatt  —  a  popular  pre-  and  postgame  drinking  destination  for  events  in  the  Louisiana  Superdome.  Vitascope  Hall  will  serve  burgers,  sandwiches  and  bar  snacks, plus a raw bar will offer oysters  and sushi.      The  hotel  will  have  a  Starbucks  location,  as  well  as  an  outpost  of  the  Little  Rock, Ark.-based barbecue chain Whole Hog Cafe,  which  is  currently  located  next  door  to  the  Hyatt  property  inside  the Entergy Building. While not open to  the public, this Hyatt-based Whole Hog  will supply smoked meats for the other  hotel restaurants, provide off-site catering  and  operate  a  booth  at  Champions Square  outside  the  Dome  before  New  Orleans Saints games this season.      Got a tip for Scuttlebites? Contact Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net.


>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

and charcuterie plates with pate >>>> < < < < < < <and < cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, > > > > > > > >bruschettas, > salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., din<<< ner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ >> CHINESE << CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Ave., < 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit Weekly contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Riverbend >> restaurant offers a Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN

BARBECUE

FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

Harahan, 287-4581; 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www.fathengrill. com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pit-cooked barbecue options include St. Louisstyle spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. Reservations accepted. St. Charles Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Hickory Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $ ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thrusday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St.,

202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Grilled Brewhouse ribs are served with house-made barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with red pepper aioli. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or housemade hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Mag-

azine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slowbraised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112;

www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St.,

361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 5254455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommend-

ed. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI &

GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $

CAFE

CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

65


OUT2EAT and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MARTINIQUE

BISTRO

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

66

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/ owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines housemade angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

cado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN

wego, 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., West-

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like veal- and spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-

7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avo-

BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 3019570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942

— Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas,

Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-

8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St., 309-7557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamonraisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 4840841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a

few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 571-7561

— Get gourmet burgers and sand-


OUT2EAT wiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SEAFOOD

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

— 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland

BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy.com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Break-

fast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

K A E T S MB BO

STEAKHOUSE Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This traditional steakhouse serves USDA prime beef, and a section of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001 N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The

O

R YA ONLI DER KO NE NO @ LA. CO M

MI

NESS /GOOD ENCH ON FR AD. BRE

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

LUNCH 11:30AM - 2:30PM

Attiki

DINNER 5:30 - 10:30PM

923 METAIRIE RD. 836-6859

P

HO

- getta bo

ut i

t

bar & grill

·

CLOSED TUESDAYS

(1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

fresh.produce

SEAFOOD community.arts + crafts market exhibitors . kid’s activities

starting from $5.50

LUNCH BUFFET DAILY

7329 FRERET • 861-7890

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

ENTERTAINMENT

K

R STEA

TENDE

W

decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — 322

D AVA ELIVE IL A RY BLE !

THE

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

68

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and CreoleItalian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

experience the mediterranean

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

happy hour

TUES-SAT

OPEN AT 9AM FOR BRUNCH

3-6PM on gamedays

COME TRY OUR BLACKBERRY JALAPENO SMOKED RIBS

SATURDAYS 8AM to 1PM 409 Aycock St. • Arabi • 504.355.4442

Located at the Aycock Barn • www.visitstbernard.com

Celebrating over 100 years of Serving New Orleans the Best!

Homemade Gelato Pastries · Cannoli · Spumoni

BELLY DANCER

Every Fri & Sat Night

HOMEMADE ITALIAN ICE CREAM & PASTRIES SINCE 1905

FOOD SERVED TIL 1AM

Worldly Wine/ Martinis

214 NORTH CARROLLTON AVENUE MID CITY | 486-0078

HOOKAH 230 DECATUR

11AM-4AM DAILY

www.attikineworleans.com 504-587-3756

113 C Westbank Expwy • Gretna, LA 70053

(504) 368-9846 • Open Daily 9am-9pm (Kitchen Closes at 8:30PM) • Closed Sun & Thurs

3701 IBERVILLE STREET • NOLA 70119 504.488.6582 • KATIESINMIDCITY.COM MON.11AM-3PM • TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM • SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

IN SEASON

PEACH, WATERMELON, CANTALOUPE ICE


CLASSIFIEDS

Magnolia Discount Store

AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

NOLA

MARKETPLACE

IMPORTED AUTOS

‘07 INFINITI M35 $22,995 504-368-5640

MERCHANDISE APPLIANCES

‘’09 NISSAN SENTRA $10,995 504-368-5640

‘’09 TOYOTA YARUS $11,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA CIVIC

$15,995 Several to Choose From! 504-368-5640

‘10 Mitsubishi Galant $12,995 504-368-5640

‘10 VOLVO S40 $19,995 504-368-5640

‘11 HYUNDAI SONATA $17,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES ‘09 SUBARU FORESTER

Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT LICENSED MASSAGE

KENMORE CHEST FREEZER

7.2 CUBIC FT. LIKE NEW, HARDLY USED, GARAGE KEPT, KEY LOCK AND BOOK. $100.00. YOU PICK UP NORTHSHORE ABITA SPRINGS. 504-615-8884.

ART/POSTERS VINTAGE N.O. JAZZFEST POSTERS

Dating back to 1980, Still in protective tubes, Will sell as collection or by year. 704-681-4914.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

24 yrs exp to give you the ultimate in relaxation. Call Matteo. LA 0022, for your next appt. Metairie area. 504-8320945. No Outcalls

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123. Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

MISC. NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

Adorable male 12 wk old Bobtail kitten Very sweet and playful ,tested vacs neutered 504 462-1968

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

Stella socialite & very affectionate. Loyal & good at making friends contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Elijah

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Francis Lab/ Straffordhire

11m big swheart playfull, good w/ dogs, cats, & children. fully vetted, hrtworm neg, neutered housetrained Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

MISHKA

Beautiful long hair Russian Blue mix 5 yr old sweetie ,spayed vacs ,504 462-1968

Nina female boxer

loves belly rubbes & children, loves to be near you & spend time.Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Princess Leila

solid white 6yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

ANNOUNCEMENTS

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

MAKE MONEY EACH TIME SOMEONE FILLS A PRESCRIPTION

No Selling! Give away our free RX card. Help others, including pets. Save up to 75% off prescriptions at 56,000 pharmacies. all 866-612-3733 visit nulegacyrxcard.com/ddw

ADOPTIONS ADOPT: Loving couple promises your baby, endless love, Christine & Tom 888-316-5136 exp pd. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

Weekly Tails

MISC. FOR SALE Fiberglass, Green Bull. heavy duty. Cost $250. Sell for $125. Call 782-8418

Madre is a 2-year-old, spayed, “vocal” Hound/GSD mix. She’s quite playful, enjoys toys and will need TLC during her heartworm treatment. To meet Madre or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

PETS

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

MASSAGE EXTRAORDINAIRE

Caffe

STEP LADDER 12’

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

Open: 24/7

100 Terry Parkway, Gretna • 504-367-9076/504-253-0702 7543 W. Judge Perez, Arabi • email: karcrist1@aol.com

$19,995 504-368-5640

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

• Insurance • Title Transfer • ID Center -Money Transfer thru:

‘06 LEXUS IS 350

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Advertise in

KARCRIST SERVICES

LOST/FOUND PETS REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

MADRE Kennel #A13635211

PET ADOPTIONS Alexa

Purrfect 14 wk old adorable, beautiful & sweet kitten silver tabby ,vacs & spayed . rescue 504 462 -1968

ALLEY CAT

DSH White with Gray Tabby Markings, de-clawed, appx 1 year old, Vet Ck/ Vacs/Neut./Litter Trained/ Super Sweet/Rescue Wt. 9 lbs.. (504) 460-0136

CHATTY CAT

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

MOJO Kennel #A13436274

Mojo is a 4-year-old, neutered, grey/white DMH with the most AMAZING green eyes. Mojo is a cuddly-guy who enjoys chin rubs and catnip. To meet Mojo or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

Employment

Grocery • Good Food • Gasoline

V-6 Coupe, white, 50,000 miles, Leather, power seats, tinting all around, MP3, IPOD, DVD player, bluetooth. Call 985-210-5601

WANTED TO PURCHASE

Rentals &

At Both Locations: East Bank & West Bank

2009 FORD MUSTANG

CASH FOR CARS

Real Estate

9:00 am a 9:00 p.m.

$11,995 504-368-5640

AWD $16,995 Call 504-368-5640

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

CHECK CASHING

DOMESTIC AUTOS ‘10 CHEVROLET HHR

71


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

RELIABLE DISPOSAL CO

Now Offering Portable Toilet Service. Container Trash Removal Free Quotes; Same Day Service Keeping our Water & Environment Clean One Job at A time Since 1969 504-835-1696

AIR COND/HEATING MERVYNS Heating & A/C Service

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

SAVE $100

AC/HEATING UNIT REPLACEMENT Authentic Air, LLC Air Conditioning & Heating. Lic & Ins . 24/7 Emergency. All Major Brands. 504-421-2647. AuthenticAirLLC.com

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

GENERAL CONTRACTORS

72

For ALL your home improvement needs from foundations to roofing & EVERYTHING in between. Fully Insured, $1,000,000 General Liability & Workers Comp. LA Home Improvement Registration # 554588. 3 Generations of Quality & Excellence in SE La since 1988. 985-768-0276 www.melidainc.com

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live more comfortably; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

EMPLOYMENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

MELIDA INC. CONSTRUCTION HOME IMPROVEMENT EXPERTS

NEED HELP? Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds Call

483-3100 Fax

483-3153

INTERIOR DESIGN HELM PAINT & DECORATING

Are you having a hard time deciding on your colors? Let the Helm Paint Design Experts help! We are Now Offering Design Consultation! For a limited time only receive an in-home design consultation for only $40. We will help you pick your colors! www.helmpaint (504) 861-8179

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

Enjoy a career as a Taxi Driver IN NEW ORLEANS OR JEFFERSON

JEFFERSON FEED

Pet & Garden Center GREEN GRASS - REAL FAST The Only Certified Grade A St. Augustine Sod For New Orleans Conditions. Save with our Do-It-Yourself Lawn Maintenance Program. 733-8572.

ONE KRAYZEE KAJUN

LAWN & LANDSCAPE Design * Install *Maintain Licensed & Insured LH#3824 “Caring for God’s green Earth, one Lawn at a time” Jacob@OneKrayzeeKajun.com www.OneKrayzeeKajun.com (504) 382-8133 The Cracked Pot Garden Center 2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

New Orleans & Jefferson Taxi School is now recruiting and hiring Free training and test preparation

NOW ENROLLING Call 504-821-6227

3001 Conti St., New Orleans, LA 70119

PEST CONTROL TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL... Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

CAREER PREPARATION EARN $75-$200 HOUR

(Now 25% Off), Media Makeup & Airbrush Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class &. Portfolio. AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-3640665

MODELING/ACTING ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

MUSIC/MUSICIANS LA RED HOT RECORDS

Jobs in Sales, Graphics/Web, Marketing, Accounting, A&R, $25-50K Email resume to: louisianaredhotrecords@ gmail.com

PART TIME NIGHT CLERK

Small hotel seeking part time, night clerk . Non-smoker. Call 566-1177 for appt.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

LEGAL SERVICES Carolyn Chesnutt ATTORNEY AT LAW

ATTN: CONDO ASSOCIATIONS Delinquent Condo Dues? Total Condo Analysis carolynchesnutt@gmail.com

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen Bartender with restaurant food server exp. Apply in person Mon-Fri, 1-4:30 pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

RETAIL FT ASSISTANT w w w.martinwine.com

CHEF, SOUS CHEF & CATERING PREPARER Great FT opportunities for candidates with 1-3 years experience who are ready to take a step up. Fine dining, french & asian cuisine a plus. Send resumes to General Manager at 714 Elmeer Ave Metairie LA 70005 (Fax 896-7370)

Needed for French Quarter fine jewelry store. Must be available on weekends. Web design, adobe, and extensive computer knowledge a must. Email resume to frenchquarterjewelry@ gmail.com

RETAIL SUZETTE’S NOW HIRING

Part-time, temporary work. Please apply after 3 pm to Suzettes, 4636 W. Esplanade, Metairie.

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016


CLASSIFIEDS

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL

Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $349K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504-352-4934. www. lanasackett.com

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $216K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. $365K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023

HISTORIC VICTORIAN

Renovated, 2 blocks from the Fr. Quarter. 4 bedrooms/4baths, 2 story with courtyard - FANTASTIC! Call Aimee with DEMAND REALTY at 319-0443 or 837-3000.

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www. JudyFisher.net

EAST NEW ORLEANS LOOK NO FURTHER! $175,000

$174,900

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Call (504) 483-3100

8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

COVINGTON COVINGTON COTTAGE

Charming 3 or 4 br, 3.5 ba, 2500 sf. Close to park. Lush landscaping, oversized lot, pool. $359K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. D. B. Sotheby’s Int’l Realty.

ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Mins. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main hse 3500 sf, 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest hse 1000 sf, 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

TCHEFUNCTA COUNTRY CLUB New remod 4 or 5 br, 3.5 ba, gour kit w/gran & Italian tile. Toto whirlpool & spa. It tile shwr in mstr. Designer fixtures. 4700+ total sf. $595K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836/504-9443605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 2320 - 2322 LOWERLINE

Spacious raised basement duplex. Craftmen windows, built-ins, large balconies. Wd flrs up & down. Lg basement. Off st. pkg. $339,000. Jennifer Pearl, Realtor. Cell 504-258-5724, Ofc 488-0950. www.jennifervpearl.com

CONDO FOR SALE

GENTILLY

7516 Ebbtide Dr. 3/2, Mstr w/jac tub & dbl vanities, wbfp, hdwd flrs, ss appl, vltd ceils, granite, custom closets, fnced yd, 2 car garage, tiled patio, auto sprinkler 504-421-4841.

REAL ESTATE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $148,000. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

FOLSOM 50175 SAGE RD, FOLSOM $249,000

Adorable Acadian Cottage on 5 cres. 3BR/2BA w/new kitchen, all new appl & updated baths. Only 40 min from NOLA. Country living close to the city! Delery Comarda Realtors, 504-8753555 www.NOLAHomefinder.com

LUSH FOLSOM ACREAGE

40 rolling acres w/2500sf cottage & 4000sf barn. Pecan & walnut grove, blueberry orchard, live oaks, friuit trees, pond. $625K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504-944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realtors

ABITA SPRINGS HISTORIC ABITA SPRINGS

Steps to Tammany Trace & Abita fairs & festivals. 5 br, 3 ba cottage w/ porches. Less than a year old. $255K. Suzy McDaniel 985-640-1836 or 504944-3605. DB Sotheby’s Int’l Realty

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

broker

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $ 1300 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000

3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

73


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE Metairie house for Lease

5 BR, 3.5 bath house for Lease, near Transcontinental & W. Esplanade, great neighborhood, schools and churches, convenient shopping. Pets ok. $1950 per month + deposit.

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable included, parking. 24 hr Concierge Service, $970/mo 914-882-1212.

CHARMING OLD METAIRIE HOME

On Elmeer Ave. Approx. 1350 sq. ft. 3BR/1.5BA. Renov’t, SS kit, beautiful hrwd flrs, ceil fans, CA&H. Study area, fenced. $1685 + dep. (504) 554-3844.

WEST BANK TERRYTOWN

434 Bruce Ave, 3 BR, 1.5 BA, patio, util rm, carport, lg liv/din, kit w/oven, refrig, cabinets, cooktop. Lg yd. Lse $1000/mo. No smoke. 451-0913.

ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 1819 S. LOPEZ ST.

Broadmoor 1/2 Shotgun dbl 2BR/1.5BA. Hrdwd flr. Cen. A/H, w/d. $1100/mo. 1 yr lse req. + sec. dep. Avail. 10/1. 504-577-0938. edgeglow@yahoo.com.

CARROLLTON 8216 FIG

Good landlord looking for good tenant! 1 blk off Carrollton. 2br/1ba, 1/2 dble, hdwd flrs, CA&H. $850/mo Call Chuck at 504-236-3609

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 1BR/1BA, 4208 Dumaine

One block from City Park. Liv rm, lge closet, cen a/h, w/d, refrig, d/w, fans, wood flrs, granite countertops, $850/mo. 504-234-0877

4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep., No Pets. Call 225-802-6554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN 1329 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, no pets. $1100 mo. 432-7955.

LAKEFRONT LARGE ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beautiful courtyard setting w/swimming pool, quiet neighborhood. $900/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504-756-7347

MID CITY SMALL OFFICE SPACE

MID CITY - Offstreet parking for one vehicle. Separate entrance. Available 10/1. Contact Jane, (504) 482-5292

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 1006 WASHINGTON AVE

1 BR, 1200 sf, furn, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, d/w, w/d, gated parking, pool, no pets, $750/mo. Lse. 504-458-6509.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. Avail 10/1. 985-871-4324, 504-442-0573.

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

2 Eff apts. Lower $650 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

1510 CARONDELET

Lg 1 BR Apt, 1 blk St. Charles. open floor plan, remodeled kit & bath, laundry facilities on site. $800.1-888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

1508 CARONDELET ST- 2 APTS

Studio, newly remodeled kit & ba, hdwd flrs. $800/mo. Util incl. Huge 2 BR Apt. Bright, spacious,, high ceilings, hdwd flrs, $1100 Both have Cent a/h, laundry facility avail 24 hrs. Walk 1 blk to St. Charles St Car, easy access to I-10, CBD & FQ. No pets/No smokers. 1-888-2396566. mballier@yahoo.com

215 MILLAUDON

Great landlord looking for great tenants! Near Tulane Univ., 1 br, 1 bath, CA & H, equip’d kit, fenced in yard. $695 Call Chuck, 504-236-3609.

3219A PRYTANIA

Perfect for prof’, Renov Vict hse, 2br/,1 full + 1/2 ba, LR, DR, kit, wd flrs, w/i balc., appls, ca&h, security, pool privileges. $1500/mo. 813-8186 274-8075.

3921 CONSTANCE

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

2 BR, Newly renov shotgun style $895/mo Also: Rms by week, private bath. $175/wk all util incl. 504-2020381, 738-2492.

ROOMS FOR RENT CANAL ST - 1 ROOM

Very, very clean. Great n’hood, 6 mo rent agreement. $140/wk, incl wtr & elec. 282-7296. NO CALLS AFT 7PM

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT CBD CONDO WITH BALC

441 Gravier cor Magazine. Large 1 bdrm, 1 ba, with garage parking, huge windows, fully equippped kit, w/d. Avail Sept 1. $2035/mo. S. Talbot 504-9759763. TALBOT REALTY GROUP

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

1/2 double, living room, bedroom, kitchen, bath, a/c unit. $675/mo. Call 895-6394 or 289-9977.

4917 S MIRO ST

2 BR, 1 BA, pool, cen a/h. $885 mo, water incl. Furn kit, w/d. Safe neighborhood. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

75


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS CUtE! CUtE! CUtE! CUtE! CUtE! CUtE! nEW LiStinG

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > september 27 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 72

78

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

2215 Soniat CHARMING VICTORIAN SIDEHALL COTTAGE! Pristine 3bdrm 2 ba home, original hardwood floors, 12ft ceilings, remodeled kitchen, granite counters. New light fixtures throughout. Plenty of closets & built in shelving. Lovely private backyard, w/deck, patio & palm trees. Off-street parking. Be part of the Freret St Renaissance. Steps from restaurants, coffee shops, groceries, night spots. Excellent value! $225,000

(504) 895-4663


Regular classes:

Every Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday in Sept. & Oct. from 7-9 p.m.

PRE-SKETCHED CANVASES NO DRAWING REQUIRED! Each person in your group can choose a different painting from our painting Gallery, we custom sketch your choice!

WE LIZE A I C E P S P IN GROUS EVENT

5200 VETERANS BLVD METAIRIE, LA • 70006

NEXT TO PUCCINO’S IN METAIRIE

CALL NOW FOR RESERVATIONS: (504) 455-4413

www.RembrandtUSA.com

Gambit Fall Arts & Entertainment Preview 2011  

a guide to the fall arts and entertainment season in New Orleans

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you