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Secrets and Indifference

I

general counsel to Hurricane Katrina point man under Homeland Security Director Michael Chertoff. When regional FEMA director Marty Bahamonde warned Brown via email, “Thousands are gathering in the streets with no food or water. … Estimates are many will die within hours,” Brown’s press secretary replied with a note that he needed extra time for dinner at Ruth’s Chris Steak House in Baton Rouge: “Gievn (sic) that Baton Rouge is back to normal, restaurants are getting busy.” Deadly indifference, indeed. It was also Brown who, more than 72 hours after the disaster, told CNN’s Paula Zahn “The federal government did not even know about the Convention Center people until today.” That, after the entire world had

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It’s easiest for profiteers to make money when people are still numbed by the shock of a disaster. been watching New Orleanians waiting for rescue there for days on round-the-clock live TV. Brown sniffs that people “broke into the Convention Center” and that it “should not have been used in the first place.” (On his Twitter feed, Brown told Gambit to read the book before criticizing him. We agree with the reader who told him, “Don’t need to read the book. Lived it.”) One of the tenets of The Shock Doctrine is that it’s easiest for profiteers to make money when people are still numbed by the shock of a disaster. We’d like to believe that had either of these men published their books when refrigerators lined our curbs and New Orleans was still burying its dead, they would have been reviled by the press and the public. It’s now been almost six years since Katrina. New Orleans and the rest of the world have moved forward. Ray Nagin and Michael Brown have not. They obviously think there’s still a buck to be made.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 28 > 2011

n her book The Shock Doctrine, Naomi Klein wrote about “disaster capitalism” — how corporations rush in after a calamity to profit while the public is still in shock. Thankfully, New Orleans and the Gulf Coast are no longer reeling from Hurricane Katrina, which makes last week’s publication of two Katrina memoirs — Katrina’s Secrets, by former Mayor Ray Nagin, and Deadly Indifference by former FEMA head Michael “Heckuva Job, Brownie” Brown — of little interest to those who suffered from each man’s incompetence in the wake of the federal floodwall failures. Still, the two books are getting some attention, which makes them worthy of comment. To his credit, Nagin offers an easy-tounderstand timeline of the days following Katrina, from the levee collapses to the growing desperation at the Louisiana Superdome and the slow federal response. And his explanation of how politically connected contractors profited in the wake of President George W. Bush’s suspension of the Davis-Bacon Act is a part of the Katrina story that is too often ignored. Sadly, Nagin’s legendary ego also is on full display. “It was destiny I was mayor of New Orleans when Katrina hit,” he says early on (yes, really). The cluelessness just gets thicker from there, as do the conspiracy theories. Nagin snipes at Gov. Kathleen Blanco (“she entered the governor’s office without any meaningful executive level experience”) — ignoring both her two terms as lieutenant governor and his own previous job at a cable-television monopoly. He also implies Blanco held a grudge over his endorsement of her GOP opponent, Bobby Jindal, in 2003. (“There will be hell to pay for you in the future!”) “It was actually prophetic,” Nagin writes. Later, when he accuses Blanco of not providing prompt aid to New Orleans, he concludes, “There was clearly some unspoken ulterior motive.” As for his own foul-ups, he’s more philosophical: “Since this was unprecedented, we made our share of mistakes and I made many tough calls.” For all his faults, at least Nagin has a legitimate claim to a Katrina story. That cannot be said of Brown, the FEMA director whose performance was so disastrous (and politically embarrassing for then-President Bush) that Brown resigned on Sept. 12, 2005 — barely two weeks after the world watched New Orleans unravel on live TV. In his memoir, Deadly Indifference, Brown describes the city as “equal parts Creole cooking, zydeco music and hubris,” which shows how little he’s learned since 2005. Before joining FEMA, Brown had been a commissioner for the International Arabian Horse Association. He rose from FEMA

07

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Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

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HEY BLAKE,

DEAR DR. MIKE,

HAVE THE SYMBOLS ON THE CITY SE A L OF NE W ORLE A NS A LL REMAINED THE SAME? AND WHERE IS IT RECORDED THAT THE SE A L WA S COINED IN 1805?

In 1970, George Wein, jazz impresario behind the Newport Jazz Festival and the Newport Folk Festival, was hired to design and produce a unique festival for New Orleans. The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, a nonprofit organization, was established to oversee the festival, and the first festival weekend was April 22-26, 1970. Before this, however, two other jazz festivals were held in New Orleans. The first annual New Orleans International Jazz Fest was held May 12-19, 1968, an adjunct of New Orleans’ 250th anniversary celebration. There were parades, concerts in the Municipal Auditorium and a “battle of the bands” that took place on the steamboat S.S. President. Bands representing New Orleans, Chicago and New York showed how jazz started in New Orleans and spread to Chicago, New York and the rest of the world. The auditorium concerts featured Louis Armstrong, Dave Brubeck, Woody Herman, Pete Fountain, Duke Ellington and many other famous musicians. The first festival was so successful that a second was scheduled for June 1-7, 1969. Headliners that year were Sarah Vaughan, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie and Pete Fountain. They were joined by scores of other jazz greats and performed in a series of concerts, parades and jam sessions. Two doubloons were issued for the International Jazz Festival of 1969 as special commemoratives. The Jazz Fest as we know it today dates from 1971 and moved from Congo Square to the Fair Grounds Race Course in 1972. Today the Jazz Fest presents thousands of musicians on multiple stages and is host to about 400,000 visitors a year. Various stages and tents showcase jazz, gospel, Cajun, zydeco, rock and other musical genres. By the way, the same week the city’s musical heritage was being celebrated in 1969, New Orleans also was host to Food Festival Week, a culinary extravaganza featuring dishes of Louisiana and The Big Easy.

JOHN

DEAR JOHN,

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It is generally agreed that the city seal, which has remained relatively unchanged over the years, dates back to Feb. 17, 1805, when the legislature of the Territory of Orleans authorized James Pitot, mayor of the city of New Orleans to procure and use a seal on all official acts and documents. However, in 1836, the city was divided into three municipalities — and each had a seal of its own. The municipalities were reunited in 1852, and the seal in use today was adopted. Records in the City Hall archives show that in June 1852, the City Council authorized New Orleans Mayor A.D. Crossman to order a city seal and that the council “Paid John Douglas, 17 St. Charles Street, for engraving die and printing of seal, according to the ordinance of June 26, 1852 — $16.00.” Because there is no official description of that seal, folks disagree as to the symbolic meaning of the figures on it, but most experts agree as to the meaning of the stars that surround the figures. On the top of the seal are 12 stars in the outer circle and one star in the center. These represent the 13 original states admitted to the Union; the 12 stars in the inner circle represent the 12 states admitted from 1791 to 1836, and the three stars on each side of the seal represent the six states admitted from 1837 to 1850. HEY BLAKE, EVERYONE KNOWS THAT THIS WAS THE 41ST ANNUAL JAZZ FEST, YET I HAVE A JAZZ FEST POSTER FROM JUNE 1-7, 1969. THAT WAS 42 YEARS AGO. HOW CAN THAT BE? DR. MIKE

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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“Senator Vitter must resign his post, too … The public’s perception of Vitter as a sleazy, hypocritical Christian only served to tarnish the name of Christ among unbelievers.” — Joe Glover, head of the Family Policy Network (FPN), a conservative Christian organization which this week called for Sen. David Vitter to step down. After Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., stepped down in the midst of his own sex scandal, liberal political commenters like Rachel Maddow contrasted Weiner’s resignation with Vitter’s refusal to do so in 2007, when he admitted his association with the “D.C. Madam.” FPN, which says its primary issue is “definition of the traditional family,” was the first conservative Christian organization to call for Vitter to step down this year. Vitter’s office did not comment.

Coupon Culture BUSINESSES TRYING TO ATTRACT NEW CUSTOMERS OFFER DEEP DISCOUNTS VIA DAILY DEAL SITES, BUT WHO COMES OUT AHEAD? BY L AUREN L ABORDE

O

expected. Many complain the deals attracted the wrong kind of customers, the rabid deal-seekers of the Extreme Couponing variety who may be rude and don’t tip properly. Others say they lost money in the process; although it costs nothing to appear on the daily deal sites, the sites do take a cut of the voucher sales. If customers don’t spend much — or anything — beyond the deal amount, the cash from the business’ cut might not make much of a dent in what it costs the business to provide the products or services. Jessie Burke, owner of Posies Bakery & Cafe in Portland, Ore., has become a poster child for bad experiences with Groupon. An open letter published on her cafe’s website went viral; in it she speaks of bad tippers and a customer who asked for the Groupon discount but hadn’t actually purchased a voucher. Worse than the undesirable clientele, Burke says, her cafe lost nearly $8,000 because of the Groupon campaign, forcing the owners to pull from their personal savings to keep the place afloat. What draws businesses in despite the risks is the potential for new customers. In using a daily deal site, especially the big ones like Groupon or LivingSocial, these small businesses get exposure via

“Louisiana has family values, Christian values and is antipornography.” — Sen. Mike Michot, R-Lafayette, expressing his support for a ban on sexually explicit content on all cable TV systems across the state. Rep. Sam Jones, D-Franklin, had proposed House Bill 142, which would bar any “public entity” from buying or selling sexually explicit materials — a law which would affect the Lafayette Utilities System’s (LUS) cable TV service, the only publicly owned cable TV outfit in Louisiana. Michot was concerned LUS would be at a disadvantage against private cable companies like Cox if it was unable to offer its current lineup, which brings Michot’s presumably antipornography-minded constituents pay-per-view channels like Spice:Xcess, Playboy and VAVOOM. “Listen, I am a prominent citizen over here with my mayor and everything. I’m just asking for a little leniency. Yes, sir. That’s all I’m asking for. I don’t want any trouble.” — Rep. Bobby PAGE 11

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pastor of the popular Franklin Avenue Baptist Church in New Orleans, recently was elected first vice president of the Southern Baptist Convention at the group’s annual conference in Phoenix. Rev. Luter is the first African-American clergyman to hold a senior position in the formerly all-white Baptist group. He was the overwhelming favorite to win the position, and his election coincides with the Southern Baptists’ new plan to increase diversity.

Crucial Inc.,

a Gretna-based oil cleanup company, recently was named a finalist in the Wendy Schmidt Oil Cleanup X Challenge, a worldwide competition for oil spill cleanup ideas and designs. Crucial finished in the top 10 and now will build a functional model for the final round of competition. The company makes one of the world’s highestrated oil skimmers, which it entered in the Schmidt competition and soon will deploy in Prince William Sound in Alaska, site of the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

Carlos Ayala,

who graduated from Loyola University in 1957 with a degree in business, bequeathed $1.5 million to Loyola’s College of Business. Ayala, who had invested in the stock market and parlayed a $30,000 stake into millions, died earlier this year, but his gift will add $900,000 to Loyola’s studentmanaged investment fund, increasing its value tenfold. Profits from the fund go to scholarships for future business students.

Benjamin Franklin High School,

located on the UNO campus, was the topranking high school in the state of Louisiana in Newsweek’s annual tally of 500 of “America’s Best High Schools.” Ben Franklin, which came in at No. 27 nationwide, was cited for its 100 percent graduation and college-bound rates, as well as its average SAT score (1,883). Earlier this year, U.S. News & World Report named Ben Franklin the 27th best magnet school in the nation.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

n a Monday night at the Warehouse District eatery Feast, groups shared plates of blood sausage, warm pork fat on toast and the restaurant’s other rustic European fare. It was a typical Monday night for a New Orleans restaurant — quiet, with only two or three tables filled at one time — except for one aspect: when diners paid for their meal, many handed the waiter a large sheet of white printer paper. Diners were redeeming the coupons they had purchased on the daily deal site LivingSocial before those vouchers expired the following Saturday. The deal, which ran in February, was a good one: Buy the coupon for $20 and get $40 worth of food at a buzzed-about restaurant where a plate of stewy pork cheeks or offal can go for more than $20. Millions of people subscribe to daily deal sites like LivingSocial, its precursor Groupon and myriad copycats. The sites send subscribers email blasts with often-snarky write-ups offering deals for anything from food at restaurants to Botox sessions, for at least 50 percent off regular prices. Capitalizing on the post-recession, discountseeking consumer landscape, these sites have become immensely popular. Groupon, the site that spearheaded the daily deal trend, recently filed for a $750 million initial public stock offering, and the site may be worth even more once it goes public. While users of these sites benefit from discounts at places that usually don’t run deals or give away coupons (Dick & Jenny’s, the tony Tchoupitoulas Street restaurant, did a LivingSocial deal in November 2010), the Internet is filled with horror stories from small businesses whose experience with Groupon and its ilk was not what they

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Rachael Jaffe, cO-OwNeR Of the Uptown creole restaurant cafe atchafalaya, wanted a new stove for the restaurant’s kitchen. Instead of taking out a loan, she decided to do a livingSocial deal, anticipating a small cash boost from the restaurant’s cut of the deal sales. In her case, the motivation for using the site was mostly financial, but many business owners say they participated in the sites as an alternative to traditional advertising. “advertising is very expensive, especially for a small business,” says Duke Morgan, owner of the eponymous Duke Morgan the Spa. “I would do quarterpage ads, and they might run me $800 to $900 for the week, and I couldn’t bear that anymore.” as of press time, Morgan’s spa has been featured on livingSocial four times with deals on services ranging from manicures to couples massages. So many deals sold the first time he was on the site, Morgan says, livingSocial promoted the spa to an elite status on its site, allowing him more control over which days his deals run. “I’m actually thinking about what (deal) I’m going to be doing next,” he says. chris Reams, a co-owner of the Oak Street clothing and accessories store Skip N’ whistle, used Groupon as a way to promote the store’s Saints-related items during peak holiday shopping time. “we knew we’d reach out to a whole lot of people who were on Groupon’s mailing list who may not otherwise have heard about our store, or had heard about it and hadn’t come in yet,” he says. “It’s an incentive to get them in the store and see what else you have. that worked really well — a lot of people came into the store.” Still, as Internet stories attest, sometimes using a daily deal site can result in headaches. Juliet Pritchett, manager at fat hen Grill in harahan, used both Groupon and livingSocial to fill tables during the slow times at the restaurant, and says she encountered some difficult customers. “I had a customer calling on the day the livingSocial coupon was expiring and asked if we would extend it and if we didn’t, they would write negative reviews about us online,” she says. “So you know what I did? I sent her a gift certificate. whatever you can do to keep (customers) from getting angry. Now that I think about it, why did I even do that?” Pritchett says the restaurant ended up losing money from the deals — but she expected that would happen. “You still have to pay for the cost of food that’s sold, so you’re not making money off of it at all,” she says. “You

want customers to come and redeem (the vouchers), but it’s not about making money up front. Optimally, they come and spend a little more, enjoy the restaurant, have a great experience and come back.” It seems the key to not getting burned by these daily deal sites is being prepared for worst-case scenarios. Businesses should have enough product in stock to satisfy a sudden influx of customers, and remember that while livingSocial gives its clients their share of voucher sales up front, Groupon doles out the cut over a series of three payments. “the worst that can happen is that everyone comes in at once with Groupons,” Reams says. “are you prepared? Do you have enough inventory to give that away in one day and not get paid by Groupon in 30 days? and that’s only the first third of what’s due to you. You better be prepared to give it all away and finance yourself for three months. … Just plan accordingly.” Morgan, who says many of the livingSocial customers have become regulars, agrees that’s all part of the risk of using these sites. “that’s the gamble,” he says. “You think, ‘Yeah, I’m going to give something away or reduce it, but with the hope that I will gain more in the long run.’” christian Galvin, website project manager for the louisiana Small Business Development center, which provides free and low-cost consulting services to entrepreneurs, says the daily deal sites can present a great opportunity for small businesses. they just have to be smart about it. “(Deal sites) allow a small business to market their product without any money out of their pocket initially,” he says. “that’s thrilling for a small business who [doesn’t] have $4,000 to spend on an advertisement or radio campaign and then they’re not sure what type of hits they’re going to get. … here, they can really track and see results.” Galvin says businesses using these sites should think about ways to engage and capture consumers and might consider having other deals ready for customers who come in using coupons. for someone redeeming the Botox deal, for example, a business might offer them another cosmetic service at a discount during their visit. “(Using daily deal sites) has to be looked at as a way to kick off a new campaign to get new customers, build the sales and generate long-term revenue, not just this one-time thing,” Galvin says. “So that’s where the business needs to think beyond, and it has to be a marketing tool and not just a one-off.” cafe atchafalaya’s Jaffe says creating buzz for a business is more important than profit when it comes to daily deals. “Of course you get the people who don’t normally eat with us and just spend

more scuttlebutt page 11

    Worley said the board is not entertaining any more offers.      Meanwhile,  on  June  21,  the  guild  held  a  rally  at  the  Columns  Hotel,  which  was  attended  by  subscribers,  supporters  and  several  prominent  members  of  the  New Orleans theater community, including actors Becky Allen, Heidi Junius and  Vatican Lokey.  At  the  rally,  organizers  displayed  a  petition  they  said  had  been  signed by 1,650 theatergoers opposed to  the  deal.  In  the  audience  was  a  prominent  sign  reading  “LE  PETIT  FILET?”  —  a  poke  at  the  proposed  restaurant-theater  combo. District C Councilmember Kristin Gisleson Palmer, in whose district Le Petit  stands, attended in what she said was “a  listening capacity.”     At the rally, guild members complained  they had called a meeting of the full board,  in  accordance  with  the  theater’s  bylaws,  but nothing had been done. (Nowhere in  the bylaws is a deadline for such a meeting  to  be  held  once  requested;  Worley  says  they  are  waiting  until  July,  when  board  member  Bryan Batt  returns  from  a  trip  to  Australia.)  Nor  was  the  guild  satisfied with City Council president and  board  member  Jackie Clarkson’s  assurance  at  a  press  conference  two  weeks  ago that the board struck “the best deal  possible.” (Clarkson is a veteran Realtor.)  “What  is  this,  a  Ray Nagin  deal?”  Allen  said at the rally. “We don’t want ‘Dickie’s  on the Square.’”     Le Petit’s next season is set to begin in  fall 2012. — Kevin Allman & Will Coviello

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

    The  Louisiana  Senate  allowed  a  controversial proposal that opponents called  a  “stealth  creationism  bill”  to  die  June  23  as  the  legislative  session  came  to  an  end.  House  Bill  580  by  Rep.  Frank Hoffmann,  R-West  Monroe,  sought  to  allow public school boards to use taxpayer  money  to  buy  textbooks  that  haven’t  been  approved  by  the  Department  of  Education’s  (DOE)  Textbook  Adoption  Committee, potentially opening the door  for teachers to present creationism alongside evolution in public classrooms.      The DOE and the Board of Elementary  and  Secondary  Education  (BESE)  are  charged  with  making  sure  all  textbooks  used  in  public  schools  address  basic  Grade-Level  Expectations  (GLEs),  which  are covered on standardized tests.     Baton  Rouge  Magnet  School  senior  Zack Kopplin was in the Senate last week  as lawmakers supporting the bill failed to  get the two-thirds vote necessary to pass  it. “It’s a controversial bill the [Senate] has  voted down twice,” he says. “The [Senate]  did  not  want  to  debate  this  issue.  It’s  a  bad law.”      The  Louisiana  House  passed  the  bill  June  8  with  only  five  nay  votes.  “The  House is just a tougher chamber for us,”  Kopplin  says.  “The  Senate  is  kind  of  a  safety  valve.  It’s  a  chamber  that  usually 

gets rid of bad legislation.      “This  is  great  news  for  Louisiana.  This  bill,  frankly,  takes  away  the  power  from  BESE  and  gives  it  to  people  without  the  oversight that’s needed.”     Earlier  in  the  session,  Kopplin  mounted  a  campaign  to  repeal  the  Louisiana  Science  Education  Act  (LSEA),  which  the  Legislature  passed  in  2008.  That  law  allows public school teachers to use “supplemental” materials in classrooms, clearing the way for creationism, or intelligent  design, to be introduced in public schools.  Forty-three  Nobel  laureates  joined  Kopplin’s  effort  to  have  the  Legislature  repeal  the  LSEA  during  the  2011  session,  but those efforts failed.      Although he will attend Rice University  in  Houston  in  the  fall,  Kopplin  says  he  has  recruited  high  school  students  in  Louisiana  to  take  up  his  banner  against  the  LSEA  during  the  next  legislative  session.  “Luckily  I’ll  have  a  lot  of  kids  next  year, which is the best thing for us. I have  found a number of kids who want to be  part of this effort,” he says.     “I think we have a good shot at getting  this  repealed  next  year.  (Repealing)  the  LSEA  will  always  be  faster  than  (getting  it overturned through) a lawsuit. This will  be  a  long,  tough,  expensive  one  for  the  state  of  Louisiana.  Eventually  someone  is going to look at the number of science  conventions  that  are  being  lost  because  of this … and say, ‘That is a lot of money.’  We’re  holding  out  hope  the  Louisiana  Legislature  will  support  our  children’s  future  …  (and)  give  Louisiana  students  the science they need.”     Ian Binns,  a  member  of  the  Louisiana  Coalition  For  Science  (LCFS)  and  an  assistant  professor  in  Louisiana  State  University’s  Department  of  Educational  Theory,  Policy  and  Practice,  argued  against  HB  580  when  it  was  considered  by the Senate Education Committee June  16. He says he has been very disappointed  in  how  the  Senate  has  handled  both  HB  580 and the LSEA.     When  he  was  testifying  before  the  Senate  Education  Committee,  he  says,  vice chair Sen. Eric LaFleur, D-Ville Platte,  challenged  Binns’  contention  the  textbook bill would allow inappropriate materials such as creationism in the classroom.  “I think he wasn’t remembering correctly,  but  since  they  allowed  the  repeal  effort  of the Louisiana Science Education Act to  stop, they haven’t stopped inappropriate  materials into the classroom. Because of  the  LSEA,  we  have  allowed  that  to  happen,” Binns says.     “We  really  shouldn’t  be  wasting  our  money  and  our  time  on  legislation  like  this.  They  want  to  improve  education;  this is not the way to do it. If people truly  understood that science is not out to get  religion and that science cannot be supernatural, they would not allow this. A lot of  these arguments are attempts to redefine  science.” — Kandace Power Graves

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jeremy ALFORD

Pulled Pork

THE STATE OF THE STATE

Parting Words

Sandwiches

THE CURTAIN FELL ON THE ANNUAL LEGISLATIVE SESSION LAST WEEK — AND ON THE CAREERS OF TERM-LIMITED LAWMAKERS.

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Sen. Joe McPherson, D-Woodworth, explained as much when he justified taking a reference book during his first years in office — even though it was clearly marked “Do Not Take.” It’s one of those things you won’t find in a civics textbook. “Senators do not steal,” McPherson said. “They acquire.” Back in the House, Rep. Noble Ellington, R-Winnsboro, said he was giving his third and final — really — parting speech. Several retiring lawmakers used PowerPoint presentations — some to good effect, like early campaign photographs; others not so good, like using the U.S. Capitol as a backdrop. Some lawmakers quoted their fathers, others Dr. Seuss. Few were as bold as Sen. Butch Gautreaux, D-Morgan City. He delivered a nearly 10-minute tirade, accusing Jindal and his administration of abusing public resources, rigging high-dollar contracts, hatching a plan to fire certain state workers and generally failing the voters of Louisiana. Though his prepared speech was filled with inflammatory rhetoric, Gautreaux delivered it in an even tone, without crescendo. “Gov. Jindal, our most traveled governor in Louisiana history, has logged well over a thousand hours in state police helicopters, spending Sundays campaigning in churches mostly in north Louisiana,” Gautreaux said. He also said Jindal has “logged hundreds of hours in Army National Guard helicopters traveling to the coast after hurricanes Gustav and Ike and the BP oil spill in an effort to point out that President (Barack) Obama was not here and that the federal government was doing nothing.” Who can blame Gautreaux and other Jindal critics for having loose lips on the last days? Tucker, an independent-minded speaker, knows what it feels like to be on Jindal’s bad side — and why it’s easier to say such things on the way out rather than when you first land. “I feel like I’ve survived more coup attempts from the fourth floor than a South American dictator,” he said. Sometimes you just can’t keep professional politicians down. Even when they’re out. Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@jeremyalford.com.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 28 > 2011

egislators. They say the darnedest things. Quite a few of them, chiefly those on the cusp of retirement, did so with a touch of finality last week. As each day blew by, another retiring lawmaker or two went to the mic on a point of “personal privilege” to deliver parting words. Once upon a time, the timing of farewell speeches was less predictable. Term limits changed all that. For his star turn, Rep. Ernest Wooton, No Party-Belle Chasse, thought it might be fun to rattle cages over at the FBI. From behind the dais on the House floor, he pointed to his seat at the back of the chamber. “When all the attention is up here, the envelopes come under the rail,” Wooton said to thunderous laughter. “Without lobbyists, I couldn’t afford to be here. I don’t have a real job. The governor vetoed my pay raise. I had built that into my budget for years.” Comparing former House Speaker Joe Salter and current Speaker Jim Tucker, R-Algiers, Wooton said: “I told [Salter] he was too nice for the job. The things he had to do wasn’t in his nature — the kind of things Jim Tucker does just in stride. [Tucker] seems to kind of relish in them.” Wooton, a former Plaquemines Parish sheriff and current Criminal Justice Committee chair, slipped on a pair of novelty eyeglasses with an oversized nose and mustache to continue: “Some things just need to be done.” He then read a poem sprinkled with barbs aimed at Gov. Bobby Jindal and his staff. As the former sheriff put it, “Up his butt they go.” Wooton ended his remarks by standing tall at the dais as a recording of Johnny Cash belted out “Ragged Old Flag.”’ Sen. Mike Michot, R-Lafayette, recalled his first orientation as a lawmaker, at which he learned about all of the ways he no longer could earn a living because of conflicts of interest. He said he heard a voice behind him mutter, “All this and you get to go bankrupt.” After all these years, Michot finally attributed the comment to Sen. Danny Martiny, R-Metairie. Speaking of Martiny, Wooton joked that the Kenner lawmaker built his law practice around the claim of “keeping me out of the federal courthouse.” Legislators. They certainly are a wily bunch sometimes.

Every Monday

15

clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Da Winnas & Da Loozas ouisiana lawmakers generally avoid divisive, controversial issues in election-year sessions, and Louisiana governors generally have their way with lawmakers. What a difference a $1.6 billion revenue decrease makes. The 2011 legislative session, which ended last week, contained more than its share of surprises, but in the end not much got done beyond the bare essentials. Despite all the advance wailing, the sky didn’t fall after lawmakers passed a smaller budget with no earmarks. That’s pretty much how everything went: This session will be remembered more for what didn’t happen than for what did. Which brings us to our annual recap of the political carnage — da winnas and da loozas, starting with …

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Jindal’s one consolation: The ass-kicking he received from lawmakers will have little if any effect on his re-election chances.

The biggest loser: Gov. Bobby Jindal. DA LOOZAS 1. Gov. Bobby Jindal — He lost just about every major issue that he took on: the UNOSUNO merger, the 4-cent tobacco tax hike (his veto was upheld by the House, but the same House then out-maneuvered him by tacking the tax on the TOPS constitutional amendment, which is not subject to a veto), the college boards merger, larger college tuition hikes, selling state prisons and increasing state employees’ retirement contributions — to name a few. Lawmakers also kneecapped his plan to privatize management of Louisiana’s $6.6 billion Medicaid program by making it sunset in 2014 — unless they vote to extend it. That provision, however, could be vetoed. Jindal’s one consolation: The ass-kicking he received from lawmakers will have little if any effect on his re-election chances. 2. The LSU System — It lost control of UNO and lost ground on the local teaching hospital front when Jindal appeared

to ratchet down his support for a 424-bed facility after U.S. Sen. David Vitter, House Speaker Jim Tucker and state Treasurer John Kennedy united behind a proposal for a smaller hospital. Clearly, LSU is no longer the 800-pound gorilla of Louisiana politics. 3. The Religious Right — Bills promoting several social and faith-based issues failed to win approval this year, which is unusual in the God-fearing (well, Christian Right-fearing) Louisiana Legislature. Among them: a bill to post the Ten Commandments on the Capitol lawn; Rep. John LaBruzzo’s draconian antiabortion bill; LaBruzzo’s perennial welfare drug-testing bill; and a measure to give local school boards more freedom to use money for non-approved textbooks (a scrim for creationism and “intelligent design” texts). 4. Big Oil and Big Business — The Louisiana Association of Business and Industry (LABI) doesn’t lose many legislative battles, particularly when it joins forces with Big Oil, but both lost the battle to rewrite the rules for cleaning up oilfield sites. 5. Anti-Smoking Advocates — Even though the 4-cents-a-pack cigarette tax extension made it onto the TOPS amendment, anti-smoking advocates lost the bigger battles. Bills to increase the cigarette tax by 70 cents a pack and to ban smoking in bars and casinos died without a floor vote. They also could not hold 70 House votes to override Jindal’s veto of the 4-cent extension in the face of Team Jindal’s lobbying. 6. Birthers — A bill to require presidential candidates (read: Barack Obama) to prove their U.S. citizenship before their names can appear on a state ballot died in committee. 7. Gays and Lesbians — The “family values” and “Christian” forces browbeat lawmakers into killing bills to outlaw bullying at schools and to allow same-sex adults to adopt children together, which makes defeat of the Ten Commandments bill all the more metaphoric. What were those two greatest commandments again?

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

DA WINNAS 1. UNO — Defeat of the UNO-SUNO merger was a slap at Jindal but a godsend to UNO, as it ignited a push to get the Lakefront campus out of the oppressively controlling LSU System. The bill moving UNO to the eminently more hospitable University of Louisiana (UL) System sailed through both houses, and the UL System appears much more likely to perceive UNO as a partner rather than a competitor. 2. Higher Ed Governing Boards and SUNO — The state’s four post-secondary education boards survived Jindal’s push to combine them. The governor’s merger plan fizzled quickly after the UNO-SUNO merger failed to get off the ground in the House. SUNO, which has two employees serving as House members, wielded more clout than LSU this year. 3. Casinos — Even though the bill seeking to ban smoking in bars and casinos was amended to exempt casinos, the gambling moguls figured they were next, so they provided the muscle needed to kill the antismoking bill — and proved once again they

have replaced Big Oil as the Big Shots of state politics. 4. College Students and Parents — More tuition increases are in the offing at state colleges and universities, but the TOPS constitutional amendment, if approved by voters, will guarantee funding for the popular program for years to come. For many, that will offset any pain from the 5 percent tuition hike approved this year. 5. Major Landowners — It’s rare for Big Oil to lose a big issue in the Legislature, but when its adversary is Big Land (and trial lawyers, for good measure), the oil barons were no match. Landowners killed a proposal to take jurisdiction over oilfield cleanup lawsuits away from district courts. 6. Techie Drivers — A bill to ban handheld cellphone use while driving was defeated, and lawmakers approved a measure allowing front-seat passengers (but not drivers) to be able to watch DVDs on front-seat screens. Buckle up and pass the popcorn, cher. 7. Private School Parents — Soon they will be able to deduct up to $5,000 in tuition from their taxable income on Louisiana income tax returns.

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DINING

cheap

recent lunch at Commander’s Palace (1403 Washington Ave., 899-8221; www.commanderspalace.com) delivered all the hallmarks of this famous Creole dining destination. The room was elegant, the service was polished and the food — a Creole tomato gazpacho followed by smoky pulled pork and spicy boudin in pastry — was original, precise and delicious. The martini, too, was mixed to spec. In fact, the only part of the meal to veer from the high-aiming expectations of Commander’s Palace was the bill. The entire repast was under $20. The two-course meal was $16, the martini just 25 cents. You can spend more for fried seafood and a couple of beers at some neighborhood joints, yet the bargain prix fixe lunch remains one of the lesserknown pleasures of Commander’s Palace — and many other fine New Orleans restaurants. The idea of a bargain meal is a relative one. After all, spending $20 on a multi-course lunch only seems like a bargain if you’re accustomed to paying that much for a single dish. But finding such a meal at one of the city’s most acclaimed restaurants illuminates the deals that are out there. With a sharp eye for specials, the flexibility to follow their particular rules, a little insider knowledge and maybe even some teamwork, you can find ways to eat out for less at establishments across the spectrum. It could be a similarly inexpensive meal at Emeril’s Restaurant (800 Tchoupitoulas St., 5289393; www.emerils.com), the famous flagship for culinary superstar Emeril Lagasse, or at the inventive and always-impressive Iris (321 N. Peters St., 299-3944; www.irisneworleans.com), which both serve three-course lunches for $20. On the other hand, it could mean the longstanding “taco Tuesday” night at Pal’s Lounge (949 N. Rendon St., 488-7257), where bar patrons can get a pair of chicken tacos off the grill for $2. Or it could be the completely free vegetarian buffet supplied each Sunday at 6:30 p.m. in the garden of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness (2936 Esplanade Ave., 486-3583; www.iskconneworleans.org), which is the temple’s traditional prasadam, or “love feast.” Like the countless free red beans and rice pots laid out at bars across the city on Monday nights, a donation of any amount (or a tip at the bars) is the proper payback.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

Fills

GETTING A BARGAIN MEAL SOMETIMES MEANS tapping into widely varying ideas of happy hour. There are half-price drinks and pizzas from the wood-burning oven at Domenica (123 Baronne St., 648-6020; www.domenicarestaurant.com) every day from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., while at Feast (200 Julia St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com), happy

DO SOME HOMEWORK AND GO WITH THE FLOW TO FIND DINING BARGAINS ALL OVER TOWN. B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

Pizzas from the wood-burning oven at Domenica are half price every day from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

hour means you can sip wines and eat appetizers from its rustic, European-themed menu for half price from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. It could be the quartet of mini filet mignon sandwiches for $6 served from the bar at the otherwise pricey Morton’s the Steakhouse (365 Canal St., 566-0221; www.mortons.com) during its happy hour Sunday through Friday, or it could be the free antipasti table set up early Mondays through Thursdays at the upscale Italian eatery Eleven 79 (1179 Annunciation St., 299-1179; www.eleven79.com). Such fine-dining deals don’t always have limited hours either. For instance, Mimi’s Restaurant in River Ridge (10160 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-6464; www.mimisriverridge.com), where chef Pete Vazquez recently transformed the menu with traditional, regional Italian cuisine, now has a midweek special, offering two courses for $20 Tuesday through Thursday, while on Wednesday bottles of wine are half price. Vega Tapas Cafe (2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com) does a similar half-off wine deal on Monday nights. In Mid-City, Ralph’s on the Park (900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com) has revived a popular summertime deal of three appetizers and

one glass of wine for $28. ONE OF THE GREAT MYSTERIES OF VIETNAMESE eateries, at least to many of us outside the culture looking hungrily in, is their ability to turn a profit selling entire sandwiches for less than a five spot. But this is the hallmark of a proper banh mi — aka the Vietnamese po-boy. Dong Phuong Oriental Bakery (14207 Chef Menteur Hwy., 254-0214; www.dpbanhmi.com) in the far eastern stretches of New Orleans is a prime source, and here most banh mi go for less than $3, some for less than $2. Hong Kong Market (925 Behrman Hwy., Gretna, 394-7075), a onetime Walmart converted to an Asian food superstore, serves its own banh mi just as cheaply and proves less of a haul from downtown, while Eat Well Food Store (2700 Canal St., 821-7730) might have the most centrally located banh mi around. These beauties do break the $5 mark (barely, they’re $5.25 each), but you can get them where Broad and Canal streets meet. When it comes to more traditional New Orleans sandwiches, the french fry po-boy is a reliable refuge for those scrounging a cheap meal. There’s a representative version for less than $5 at Parkway Bakery PAGE 22

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

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Lunch at Commander’s Palace features 25-cent martinis and meals under $20. PHOTO COURTESY COMMANDER’S PALACE PAGE 20

& Tavern (538 Hagan Ave., 482-3047; www.parkwaybakeryandtavernnola.com), where it goes by the regal name of “golden potato po-boy.” Parkway dives deeper still with a gravy po-boy (and that’s the meaty, debris-strewn house gravy) for less than $4 and the truly bare-bones but somewhat pathetic lettuce and tomato po-boy for $2.15. If you can find a few people to agree on how to dress their po-boy, the whole loaf option at a number of groceries and po-boy shops provides a bargain bonanza. Generally 33 to 36 inches long, these whales are easily subdivided to feed four, and the simple spectacle of hauling away such an enormous sandwich is satisfying in its own right. The whole loaf is a particular specialty at Koz’s (515 Harrison Ave, 484-0841; 6215 Wilson Ave., Harahan, 737-3933), where you can get the kitchen’s signature barbecue ham po-boy for $18. Whole loaves are right there on the menu at Mandina’s Restaurant (3800 Canal St., 482-9179; www.mandinasrestau-

rant.com), where a four-top can split a “half-and-half” shrimp and oyster combo right there in the dining room for $24. Cross over to Chalmette and Tag’s Meat Market & Deli (1207 E. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 2776594) will set you up with a 33-inch po-boy filled with innumerable links of its own excellent Italian sausage for about $17. ONE OF THE CITY’S GREAT DINIng deals is seasonal, and it’s coming around soon. For the month of August, dozens of local restaurants will participate in the city’s COOLinary promotion, with two- or three-course lunches for $20 or less and three-course dinners for $35 or less. As the start date approaches, the list of participating restaurants will be updated at www.coolinaryneworleans.com. The idea is to help fill dining rooms during the typical summer lull in tourism and convention business. For locals who take up the offer, it can be a bargain tour of some of the city’s best restaurants.

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somewillys.com) for Funk & Crunk Fridays. The bar’s catering service offers free food from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., whether it’s ice cream, a crawfish boil, chicken and sausage gumbo, hot dogs, smoked ribs and more — with Jell-O (in shot form) for dessert. Rendezvous Tavern (3101 Magazine St., 891-1777) serves free Indian food from Nirvana on Sundays — fill a plate with samosas and rice dishes. But the week’s piece de resistance

for frugal diners is the Hare Krishna Love Feast at International Society for Krishna Consciousness (2936 Esplanade Ave., 486-3583; www.iskconneworleans.org), the 30-year-old weekly event, serving vegetarian Indian food from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Dancing, chanting, prayer services and inviting vibes surround the “by donation” vegetarian dining experience. It’s also busy with travelers, broke students and neighbors — so you can make a few friends.

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estivals are great places to get maximum entertainment value for minimal bucks, with many offering smorgasbords of music, food, drinks and eye candy, plus a chance to absorb the culture of the area. Through the end of the summer, there are several free or almost-free festivals in the New Orleans area — entire days or weekends of frolicking outside, listening to live music and sampling cuisine, all for about the price of a meal. New Orleanians love parades (and celebrations in general), and second-line parades are staged throughout the year. Though not technically a festival, these parades are festive and include brass bands, costumes and music. To keep up with when and where these free events occur, look to Big Red Cotton on Gambit’s blog www.blogofneworleans.com. The four-day Seafood Festival at Fontainebleau State Park in Mandeville (www.seafoodfest.com) July 1-4 has two music stages, and admission is only $5 if you enter before 5 p.m. (seniors 65 and older, children 10 and younger and active military personnel always get in free). There are more than 50 dishes — lots of them made with seafood — from 20 vendors, arts and crafts, a midway of carnival rides, a car show, ’50s night on Sunday and other activities to keep everyone in your group engaged until the festival closes at midnight each night. (It starts at noon every day except Friday, when gates open at 4 p.m.) The popular attraction draws about 10,000 people a day. Saturday and Sunday feature a Mandeville Idol contest for solo singers between 9 and 17 years old and a battle of the bands with first-place winners receiving cash prizes. The music lineup includes a variety of local acts playing a range of genres as well as a debut performance by Circle of Light, composed of the four original members of Louisiana Music Hall of Famers Lillian Axe. A fireworks show choreographed to music starts at 8:45 p.m. July 4. The following week is San Fermin in Nueva Orleans (www.nolabulls.com), based on the weeklong celebration in Pamplona, Spain. In the five years since its inception, the event has grown from a group of 200 participants to about 8,300 and has a uniquely New Orleans twist. The enciero, or Running of the Bulls at 8 a.m. on July 9 features thousands of runners chased through the French Quarter by about 300 “bulls,” in this case roller derby girls wielding plastic bats and making mischief. It’s followed at 8 p.m. with La Fiesta de Pantalones (the pants party: white outfits with red accents) at 12 Bar. This party features music by Los Po-Boy-Citos. Admission is $5. The festival culminates July 10 with the free El Pobré de Mi (Poor Me), a brunch of Spanish tapas and drinks that features an Ernest Hemingway Talent Contest in which six teams perform readings of Papa’s works (the hook is that before they arrive, no teams know what Hemingway piece they will perform). The free Satchmo SummerFest (www.fqfi.org) Aug. 4-7

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

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at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter is a weekend of live local music, seminars, speakers, a traditional second-line parade and a jazz Mass, all celebrating the life of Louis Roller derby members chase runners Armstrong. The and try to ‘gore’ them during the 11th annual event Running of the Bulls. also includes food PHOTO COURTESY vendors, activiSAN FERMIN NOLA ties for children, a birthday party for Satchmo and, to close the festivities, a trumpet tribute. White Linen Night started as a fundraiser for the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) in 1994 (and it still serves that function), but it now is a huge four-block-long street party drawing about 20,000 people to the Warehouse/ Arts District. Visitors, who are encouraged to dress in New Orleans’ traditional pre-air conditioning beat-the-heat white linen garb (not required), can listen to live bands playing on stages along Julia Street, sample food and beverages from local restaurants and bars and visit galleries all over the district that open their doors to art lovers. The street party is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Aug. 6, followed by an after-party at the CAC featuring more live music, food, drinks and art displays. The street party is free, with a cash bar and food for sale; tickets to the party at the CAC on Camp Street from 9 p.m. to 11 p.m. are $10 (CAC members get in free). Inspired by White Linen Night, businesses on Royal Street started Dirty Linen Night 10 years ago as a way to reintroduce locals to the French Quarter arts district and give customers a chance to meet artists. On Aug. 13, about 60 galleries and businesses along an eight-block corridor of Royal Street, as well as on Jackson Square and other side streets, will participate in the art stroll/block party, keeping their doors open late and offering refreshments, conversation, special sales, wine tastings and more. There also is live music — and the event is free. For those who can’t wait a whole year between Carnivals, the Krewe of Oak Midsummer Mardi Gras parade Aug. 27 starts at the Maple Leaf bar about 8:30 p.m. Led by a brass band, decorated golf cart floats roll through the Carrollton area stopping at bars along the way, finally ending where they began for a party at the Maple Leaf. The parade is free, and costumed spectators can march with krewe members, but there is a cover for the party, which features live music. To end the summer on a high note, Southern Decadence in the French Quarter offers days of free street parties and nights filled with dancing Aug. 31-Sept. 5. 2011 marks the 40th year for the festival, the largest gay event in the city. Not all Southern Decadence activities are firmed up yet, so visit www.southerndecadence.net closer to the festival dates to get full details.

Seats THE

CHEAP

BY WILL COVIELLO ew Orleans theater houses aren’t as busy in summer as they are the rest of the year, but there are plenty of new shows, original local work and special deals on tickets. The New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane (http://neworleanssummershakespeare.tulane.edu) and Summer Lyric Theatre at Tulane University (www.summerlyric.tulane.edu) both offer professional productions. The Shakespeare Festival offers half-price tickets during preview nights, and every show has a pay-what-you-will night. The next ticket deals are available for the comedy Twelfth Night (July 7-23). Preview nights are Thursday and Friday, July 7-8, and the paywhat-you-will performance is July 17. Summer Lyric doesn’t offer single-ticket discounts. Until its new season opens in September, Southern Rep presents two monthly shows featuring original works. Pat Bourgeois’ serialized soap opera Debauchery! runs Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for it and installments of 6x6, a monthly showcase of short plays about a common theme, are just $10. Visit the website for schedule information. During its regular season, Southern Rep offers $20 tickets for preview nights, and student last-minute rush tickets are $10. (The Jefferson Performing Arts Society offers $10 tickets for preview performances during its regular season.) Harry Mayronne and Ricky Graham’s musical Waiting Around gets a reprise at AllWays Lounge July 8-25. The show looks at restaurants from the waitstaff’s point of view. Tickets are $15 for Monday performances. Also at AllWays in July (29-30) is the third installment of Potluck, a variety show featuring original local theater, music and dance. Admission is $5 if you bring a shared dish, or $12 if you don’t.

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Radio Cheapo

BY KEVIN ALLMAN

D I T C H Y O U R M O N T H LY S AT E L L I T E R A D I O B I L L S .

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and Slacker offer limited commercials and the option of upgrading to an inexpensive ad-free subscription, which also allows an unlimited number of skips. • ooTunes ($4.99): This program is the most expensive of its kind, but compared to monthly satellite bills, it’s a bargain at $5. ooTunes is for serious radio enthusiasts: more than 30,000 stations from around the world, searchable not only by genre but by country of origin, along with free streaming of the BBC and live broadcasts of NFL and NHL games — all for a one-time $5 payment. This app’s killer feature is radio recording and playback on your phone, making it great for plane trips — along with a sleep timer, alarm clock and other fancy features. • SHOUTcast: Another app with a lot of depth and perhaps the simplest interface of them all; finding the type of music you like is a snap … at least in theory. In practice, Shoutcast often seems to hang up on loading and drop its signal more often than does other radio apps. • SomaFM ($3.99): This app only plays SomaFM stations, but it may be worth it. SomaFM is a 24-hour, totally ad-free, listener-supported network of about two dozen music stations — intelligently programmed and in better-than-CD quality. (I am addicted to Soma’s Indie Pop, Underground ’80s and Lounge channels.) Before you buy, you can try it out by searching for SomaFM stations on ooTunes or TuneIn Radio, both of which carry Soma for free. • TuneIn Radio: If you download one radio app, make it TuneIn. It’s available for nearly every phone, it boasts 50,000 easily searchable stations from around the world, it allows you to store presets just like you would on a car radio, and it’s highly intuitive, with a clean interface. You also can search for a song or an artist and find the stations playing it right that moment. For someone switching from satellite, this couldn’t be easier — search for the sorts of stations you enjoy, save them as presets and forget your satellite bill.

under Cover FIND FREE (AND A L M O S T- F R E E ) M U S I C AT T H E S E VENUES AND GIGS. B Y A L E X W O O D WA R D aybe music pirates had the right idea. You don’t have to look too hard to find a free or cheap show in New Orleans. Any corner on almost any street is a good place to start, and everyone knows Frenchmen Street offers a bounty of free (or dirt cheap) shows. Wander into The Saint (961 St. Mary St., 523-0050; www.thesaintneworleans.com) any night of the week and you’ll likely bump into a free show — a DJ (or several), rock bands or bounce rappers. Upstairs at Blue Nile (532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com), catch the Open Ears music series every Tuesday at 10 p.m. Jazz A second-line parade at Satchmo artists like Sasha Masakowski, Helen SummerFest Gillet, Aurora Nealand and James PHOTO BY ZACK SMITH/COURTESY Singleton perform improvised FRENCH QUARTER FE STIVAL S INC. and experimental sets — with an “open” door policy. Performances are recorded and available at www.openearsmusic.org (also for free). Don’t have the dough for a premier gig at your favorite club? Throughout the summer, Tipitina’s (501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com) hosts a Free Friday series, featuring performances by bands like To Be Continued Brass Band, Supagroup, Good Enough for Good Times, New Orleans Bingo! Show, Honey Island Swamp Band and Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes. Every Sunday from 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., Tipitina’s also opens for a free all-ages music workshop, where artists instruct (and play alongside) aspiring musicians. On the West Bank, hear free music at Wednesdays on the Point (Algiers Ferry Dock, 200 Morgan St.; www.wednesdaysonthepoint.com) series, through Aug. 10. This week, find soul singer Luther Kent. Next month: Bonerama, Stooges Brass Band, Wild Magnolias, Irvin Mayfield, Amanda Shaw and others. Tip: The Algiers Ferry is free for pedestrians, so leave the car at home. The ferry leaves the Canal Street dock 15 and 45 minutes after each hour; it leaves Algiers at the top and middle of each hour. Impress your friends or treat your parents: At New Orleans City Park, the Thursdays at Twilight series invites you to spend a little ($8 admission) and get a lot — sip mint juleps (from the cash bar) in the Botanical Garden and listen to artists like Washboard Chaz, the New Orleans Ragtime Orchestra, the Symphony Chorus of New Orleans and the Pfister Sisters (performing this week). Louisiana Music Factory’s (210 Decatur St., 586-1094; www.louisianamusicfactory.com) free in-store performances begin every Saturday at 2 p.m. (Joyful USA and Sasha Masakowski close the store’s June lineup.) Put on your dancing shoes. There are free dance parties (hosted by Tony Skratchere, DJ Jubilee and others) upstairs at Maison (508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com) at 10 p.m. every Saturday. Need to learn to get down? Take dance lessons with NOLA Jitterbugs — check the group’s website (www.nolajitterbugs.org) for schedules and locations. The Jitterbugs offer three free swing dancing and Lindy Hop lessons a month. At Chickie Wah Wah (2828 Canal St., 304-4714; www.chickiewahwah.com), the group offers lessons for $5 every Thursday beginning at 6 p.m. In August, look for the Satchmo SummerFest (www.fqfi.org/satchmosummerfest) at Louisiana State Museum’s Old U.S. Mint. The free music festival held Aug. 4-7 marks its 11th year, with dozens of bands paying tribute to trumpeter Louis Armstrong.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

hen cable television rates got too expensive, people began to return to over-the-air TVs with new HD antennas, which offered better reception and various free subchannels. Combined with online services like Hulu, it was finally possible to replicate, if not duplicate, the cable experience on the cheap. Satellite radio isn’t much different. If you love the variety of Sirius or XM (but not the monthly bill), you can closely replicate the satellite radio experience in your car for free with an Internet-enabled smartphone and some inexpensive accessories. You’ll need one of the following downloadable apps, as well as a way to connect your smartphone to your car’s speakers (an auxiliary cable or a cassette adapter are the cheapest ways). All these apps are available for iPhone, and several are available for BlackBerry or Android. The basic versions are all free, except where noted. • AOL Radio: This app features Sirius/XM-style stations from various musical genres and subgenres, some of them highly specific. Under the category “Alternative,” for instance, you’ll find sub-stations like “emo,” “goth,” “’80s alternative” and “’90s alternative” — along with more than 350 local affiliates of CBS Radio from cities across the country, making this a good choice for someone who misses a specific station from another city. Both the genre stations and the affiliate stations here come with commercials, and you often have to listen to ads at startup, which is a drag and very AOL of them. • Pandora and Slacker: Both apps offer plenty of pre-programmed stations, as well as highly personalizable stations: Tell Pandora or Slacker an artist or song you like, and the app will create a station on the spot with songs that are similar — from familiar and unfamiliar artists. You can give a thumbs-up or thumbsdown to each song, which further refines the station to your tastes, and both offer a limited number of song skips per hour. Both Pandora

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F R E E C Y C L E G R O U P S + C L O T H E S WA P

BY MISSY WILKINSON Bywater resident Elizabeth Underwood leaves her unwanted goods on a table for passersby to take home.

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trying to lighten my load, but I don’t want to fill a landfill,” she says. “Pedestrians see the stuff and take it. Friendships have grown out of people taking things off the table.” In addition to fostering a sense of community, the act of sharing unwanted goods has special resonance with some residents. “Being New Orleanians, we remember the big piles of garbage on West End Boulevard (following Hurricane Katrina),” says Victor Pizarro, director of Plan B, the New Orleans Community Bike Project, a nonprofit organization that recycles and rebuilds bikes from scrap parts. “The waste of industrialized nations is something (Plan B) has always been concerned with.” Freecyclers can score some great finds while supporting an ethos of social responsibility. Underwood hits up the Tulane and Loyola University campuses during finals week in mid-May, when students vacate their dorms and apartments. Many students throw out furniture and computers rather than deal with the hassle of storing it, Underwood says. “After the semester ends, the dumpsters are full of really fantastic stuff, including books, dishes, furniture and bikes.” She’ll also study trash collection schedules and cruise through neighborhoods the day before pickups are scheduled. “I’ve gotten some really great stuff Uptown,” she says. There’s one caveat to scavenging: “You have to struggle not to become a pack rat,” Pizarro says. “People are programmed to be consumers, so our battles are consumption impulses — people are like, ‘Oh, that’s free. I’ll take it.’ Realize the intrinsic worth of things, and (consider) whether you will use them or not.” Once people master that lesson, scavenging becomes an act of joy and abundance, like a treasure hunt, Underwood says. “I can find what I need by looking for it,” she says. “I can decorate my house with anything. I can make art out of anything. The world is my oyster.”

Swap

one stop

BY MISSY WILKINSON

t’s a curious phenomenon most people have experienced at least once: a closet stocked with clothes that are perfectly acceptable and yet totally uninspiring. The knee-jerk response to the wardrobe doldrums is a quick jaunt to the mall. But cumulatively, these impulse shopping trips add up, eating into an individual’s budget as well as the planet’s finite supply of resources. To that end, many women have begun organizing swaps where they trade unwanted clothes. “I call (swapping) socially conscious consumption at its most stylish,” says Rachael LaRoche, who hosted her first clothing swap last August. “Swapping is a great way to eliminate waste, declutter your closet, freshen your wardrobe, try something new with your wardrobe and just have fun with other women.” LaRoche’s Ruffian Swap is a public event that has drawn as many as 60 women to one swap. Participants pay a cover charge ranging from $15 to $20 and take home as much clothing as they desire. “Some women have left with three bags (of clothing) and some have left with five things,” says LaRoche, who estimates 15 percent of her wardrobe came from swaps. Armoire Boutique owner Erin Hebert has hosted more intimate swaps with her friends. “We’d get garbage bags of our stuff and take it to The Kingpin (bar),” she says. “It was win-win for everyone. You get clothes, a beer, and you hang out and chat with the girls.” Any unclaimed items were donated to thrift stores after the swap. Organizing a swap between friends is easy, Hebert says. All you really need is a space, which could be somebody’s living room, and clothes. Shower curtain rods and chin-up bars can double as garment racks; coffee tables and dining room sets can hold folded clothes and accessories. Music, snacks and wine help create a party atmosphere. “(Swaps) expose you to different things you might not see when you go shopping for yourself,” Hebert says. “And if you get your friends involved, everyone wants to help you find something cute.”

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

reeganism. Urban foraging. Dumpster diving. Scavenging. If the everincreasing number of synonyms for a simple activity (retrieving and reusing items someone else has tossed out) is any indication, the trend is gaining traction. “I have never lived in a city with such good trash,” says Bywater resident Elizabeth Underwood, who directs the annual sustainable fashion show Worn Again NOLA. “Once I started looking at trash bins as a potential resource, I started seeing material everywhere. Just open your eyes and you’ll be amazed at what you find out there.” Many websites exist to facilitate the free exchange of goods. The Freecycle Network (www.freecycle.org) has a chapter in New Orleans, and Craigslist.org features an entire section devoted to free stuff. Among the postings: A vegetarian who wants to get rid of MREs containing beef entrees, and a retired stripper who no longer needs 40-plus bikini outfits. “All the reasons for people throwing things away aren’t necessarily because things aren’t good or useful,” says Andrea Duhe, a resident of the St. Roch neighborhood who estimates she’s been scavenging clothes and furniture for more than a decade. “A lot of times, people just don’t have a place for it in their lives anymore.” Though Duhe peruses Craigslist listings every few days, a good find can be as close as a neighbor’s curb. “I would say 80 percent of my furniture came from the side of the road — all my chairs, my bed, my bathroom and kitchen shelves,” says Marigny resident Jane Stubbs, who breathes new life into her finds by reupholstering, sanding, painting or decoupaging them. “And when I want to get rid of stuff, I put it outside because I know someone will take it.” Underwood, too, sets no-longer-needed books, craft items, CDs, magazines and kitchen utensils outside her corner apartment on a table she’s designated for that purpose. “I am

PHOTO BY ELIZABETH UNDERWOOD

Live Free or buy

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 39 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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ART

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EVENTS

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KANYE WEST AND MARY J. BLIGE RETURN TO HEADLINE ESSENCE. BY ALEX WOODWARD

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typically garish and ESSENCE MUSIC b r a v a d o - b a r i n g FESTIVAL West has remained 7 P.M.-UNTIL, FRIDAYSUNDAY, JULY 1-3 fairly low-key, both on Twitter and in LOUISIANA SUPERDOME performance — WWW.ESSENCEMUSICthough his already FESTIVAL.COM elaborate stage TICKETS $50 AND UP setups have only become more so. This year’s Essence also includes R&B sensation Usher, singer and rapper Trey Songz, vocalist Jennifer Hudson and Jill Scott, the Philadelphia songstress, spoken-word artist and Roots collaborator. Scott’s first album in four years, 2011’s The Light of the Sun is an intimate, emotional front seat to her powerful soul and R&B. Essence is never without throwback legacy artists, and this year’s guests include Morris Day & The Time (protege to Prince), Chaka Khan and hip-hop pioneers Doug E. Fresh and Naughty By Nature. A reunited New Edition brings back the all-star R&B lineup — which includes Bobby Brown and Johnny Gill, Brown’s replacement following his 1985 departure, as well as Ricky Bell and Ronnie DeVoe (of Bell Biv DeVoe fame). This year marks the group’s 30th anniversary. The boy band predecessors reached instant international acclaim with the saccharine dance jam “Candy Girl,” followed by multiplatinum sales through the ’90s. The group last performed as a sextet in 1996 with the album Home Again and is set to release another in 2012. New Edition’s New Jack Swing contemporaries and Philadelphia heroes Boyz II Men also join the lineup. Since the departure of Michael McCary in 2003, the now-trio has recorded one album of original material (2006’s The PAGE 39

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Scatterjazz and the Blue Nile Balcony Room’s Open Ears Music Series present this Texan/ Portuguese ensemble, a free-jazz freak show by four improvisation savants: guitarist and bandleader Luis Lopes, saxophonist Rodrigo Amado and brothers Aaron (bass) and Stefan (drums) Gonzalez. Call for ticket information. 10 p.m. Tuesday. Blue Nile, 532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com

CIGARETTE WITH JAMES HAYES, DAVE FERA AND OPPOSABLE THUMBS

JUN

28

Acoustic sets by two of New Orleans’ finest singer/songwriters, Dave Fera of Big Blue Marble (pictured) and James Hayes of Lovey Dovies, highlight this afternoon showcase at Euclid Records. Opposable Thumbs opens. Free admission. 5 p.m. Tuesday. Euclid Records, 3401 Chartres St., 947-4348; www. euclidnola.com

JUL

BROTHER

Lisa Ebersole’s Brother explores everything that can go wrong when a couple of sniping sisters invite a stranger into an impromptu late-night birthday party in their tiny New York apartment. The intimate play is full of unexpected disclosures and explosive confrontations. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday; through Aug. 6. The Elm, 220 Julia St., 218-0055; www.elmtheatre.org

GO 4TH ON THE RIVER

01

JUL

04

Celebrate the 4th of July at the downtown riverfront. A host of downtown attractions sponsor Go 4th on the River and offer special deals and entertainment. There’s live music at Spanish Plaza from noon until the fireworks display over the Mississippi River at 9 p.m. Visit the website for schedule and details. Free admission. Noon-10 p.m. Monday; www.go4thontheriver.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

ssence, nearing half a century as a premier African-American fashion and lifestyle magazine, will once again transform downtown New Orleans into a hotbed of R&B, hip-hop and funk over the Fourth of July weekend. The annual Essence Music Festival, held July 1-3 at the Louisiana Superdome and Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, features dozens of artists, as well as empowerment seminars and speeches, and is the largest U.S. festival celebrating African-American music and culture. Mary J. Blige, the queen of hip-hop soul, returns for her 10th year as an Essence headliner. Her soulful vocals topped ’90s R&B charts, from 1992’s What’s the 411? hit “Real Love,” to 1995’s “I’ll Be There for You/ You’re All I Need to Get By,” a Grammywinning duet with Method Mary J. Blige Man. She recent- headlines her ly has embraced 10th Essence Music Festival. rock ’n’ roll, in collaborative performances with Steve Vai and Blink 182’s Travis Barker, and covering Led Zeppelin classics “Whole Lotta Love” and “Stairway to Heaven” — all showcasing her otherworldly soul-pop sensibilities. Also returning to Essence is Kanye West, who is virtually a different performer since his 2008 appearance. West’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, which topped critics’ lists of the best albums in 2010, is a visceral whirlwind of arenapop production, operatic hiphop and West’s ever-present id-centric lyrics. Produced after his self-imposed exile and hiatus, Fantasy became one of 2010’s pop cultural events. Following its release, however, the

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HUMANIZATION 4TET

Dome Sweet Home

CUISINE

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ESSENCE MUSIC FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS

Friday, July 1 Usher, Jennifer Hudson, Fantasia, Boys II Men, Irma Thomas, Macy Gray, Mavis Staples, Alexander O’Neal and Cherrelle Saturday, July 2 Kanye West, Jill Scott, Chaka Khan, El Debarge, Eric Benet, Morris Day & the Time, Naughty by Nature Sunday, July 3 Mary J. Blige, Trey Songz, New Edition, George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, MC Lyte, Kourtney Heart, Doug E. Fresh, Trin-i-Tee 5:7

LISTINGS

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

preview Lion Tamer

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 28 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Tintypes, Picnic, 10 BACCHANAL — Mark Weliky, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — NOLA Treblemakers, 9; Micah Mckee & Friends, 11 BAYOU PARK BAR — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 9 BISTREAUX ��� Aaron LopezBarrantes, 6 BLUE NILE — Humanization 4tet, 10 BMC — Willie C. Stebon, 6; Royal Rounders, 8:30; Free Spirits Brass Band, 11 BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7 CAFE NEGRIL — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Domenic, 7; Luxury Music Grove, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Grayson Capps, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — John Rankin & Friends, 8 D.B.A. — The New Orleans Suspects, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 EUCLID RECORDS — Cigarette, James Hayes, Dave Fera, Opposable Thumbs, 5 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 GENNARO’S — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8 THE HANGAR — OTEP, Blackguard, Destrophy, Sister Sin, One Eyed Doll, 8 HOUSE OF BLUES — Hot Chelle Rae, Cody Simpson, Porcelain Black, The Vettes, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bill Summers, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Ched Reeves, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Truman Holland, 9 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — John Michel Bradford, 6; Lagniappe Brass Band, 9:30 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Bruce Barnes & Matt Hampsey, 3 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

MUSIC

The David Bazan who grew up the son of a preacher man, and the one who led the haloed Seattle rock band Pedro the Lion for a decade (1995-2005), might be disappointed in David Bazan, the solo artist. The feeling would be mutual. “You can’t be right about the future/ When you’re wrong about the past,” Bazan sings, to himself as much as anyone else, on Strange Negotiations (Barsuk), his second LP since slaying the Lion. (Elsewhere, the sentiment is distilled more harshly: “You’re a goddamn fool.”) Bazan has never shied away from pointed messages in titles and lyrics; his first solo EP, 2006’s Fewer Moving Parts, begins with a song called “Selling Advertising,” which poses four rhetorical questions that hit like hooks to the ribs: “Am I a Christian?/ Are you a Jew?/ Did you kill my Lord?/ Must I forgive you?” But Strange Negotiations’ clean, catchy guitar parts frame some of his most probing reflections — nowhere more than on “People,” a serene strummer that erupts into a mountainous rocker for Bazan’s disenchanted chorus, a mission statement for losing your religion: “You’ve got to find the truth/ And when you find that truth, don’t budge/ Until the truth you found begins to change/ And it does, I know.” Bon Iver sideman S. Carey opens. Tickets $14. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

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David Bazan 8 p.m. Thursday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 5698361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — The Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 SIBERIA — Fast Boyfriends, Teen Wolves, Autistic Fit, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Loren Pickford Quartet, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Voodoo Town, 10

Wednesday 29 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 8:30 ALGIERS FERRY DOCK — Wednesdays on the Point feat. Luther Kent, The Mumbles, 6 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — The Big Way, Low Stress Quintet, 10 BACCHANAL — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10 BIG AL’S SALOON — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 11 BMC — Peter Novelli, 6; Blues4Sale, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9 CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Solid Giant, Secret Society, 9 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8 D.B.A. — Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Joe Krown, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

Remedy) and three covers albums. The group is better known for its early ’90s hits “End of the Road,” “I’ll Make Love to You,” and 1991 breakout debut single “Motownphilly.” The trio’s 2009 album Love is a covers collection of popular love songs by artists ranging from Sam Cooke to Journey. Essence also features a host of local performers, including Charmaine Neville, Irma Thomas and the Hot 8, Rebirth, Soul Rebels and To Be Continued brass bands. Making her Essence debut is up-and-coming R&B sensation Kourtney Heart, who at 17 dropped the massive radio smash “My Boy,” featuring the late Magnolia Shorty, and the album Eye Dee Kay, released through a Jive Records subsidiary. Ever-present rapper Soulja Boy remixed the song, creating another instant radio success. The Superlounges present Alexander O’Neal and Cherrelle, Macy Gray, Mint Condition, Mavis Staples, and George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, who lends a hint of rock ’n’ roll to the event. In addition to the music, the festival offers three days of empowerment seminars and speeches focused on “Transforming Your Life, Community and Soul.” Comedian and radio host Steve Harvey and CNN anchor Soledad O’Brien are featured speakers, among dozens of other presenters ranging from comedians to authors and politicians. The seminars kick off with a blessing from both Essence president Michelle Ebanks and Mayor Mitch Landrieu. The Livestage schedule includes workouts, celebrity appearances and fashion shows. There are also fashion, beauty, and arts and crafts expos at the convention center.

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MUSIC

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday 11am-2pm

LIVE MUSIC

Monday, Thursday-Saturday NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com NOW OFFERING THE FOLLOWING CLASSES

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 28 > 2011

ADULT SCENE STUDY CHILDREN ACTING YOUNG ADULT ACTING COMMERCIAL WORKSHOPS MECHANICAL MODELING MODELING MAKE-UP 101 FASHION / MODA

40

504.324.3782 • 1.877.997.5688 delcorralandassoc@msn.com www.delcorralmodel.com

Shanghai grilled Shrimp or ChiCken Salad — Grilled shrimp or chicken with romaine lettuce, cucumber, tomato, edamame and honey roasted pecans in chef’s sesame vinaigrette dressing. Served with sesame wheat noodles.......... with ChiCken $9.95 · with Shrimp $10.95 Beef Chow fen noodle — Marinated beef with fen noodle and Chinese vegetables................................................................................................................................$9.50 aSparaguS Sautéed with ChiCken — In brown or garlic sauce... $10.95 fried Bean Curd in teriyaki SauCe — Teriyaki sauce with black mushrooms, peas and carrots.............................................................................................................$8.95 Stuffed ChineSe eggplant — Chinese eggplant stuffed with pork and shrimp with chef’s special sauce.................................................................................................... $10.95

3605 South Carrollton ave · reServationS / take-out 482-3935 · www.fivehappineSS.Com mon-thurS 11am-10pm · fri & Sat 11am-11pm · Sun 11am-10pm

LISTINGS

Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Lisa Lynn, 3; Joe Bennett, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Jeff “Guitar” Nelson & Daryl Hance, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Monica McIntyre, 6; Eudora Evans Band, 9:30 MOJO STATION — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8 NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Jim Hession, 12 OAK — Amanda Walker, 7 OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Vibe, 8:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 REPUBLIC NEW ORLEANS — Borgone, 9 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Swing-ARoux, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 8 SIBERIA — Meta the Man, Roarshark, Proud Father, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, 12 THREE MUSES — Davis Rogan, 7 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Thursday 30

Mojitos has become an even ‘cooler’ place to go for dinner, Sunday Jazz Brunch, and Happy Hour. Enjoy scrumptious food and refreshing cocktails in our cool, misted courtyard. Live music every night! Spirited Happy Hour 4-7pm Tues-Fri Jazz Brunch 11am-3pm Sunday HOURS: 4pm-close, Tues-Fri 11am-close, Sat-Sun

437 Esplanade at Frenchmen  www.mojitosnola.com  504.252.4800

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Aiui, Punch Drunk Apollo, Scout, 10 BACCHANAL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7 BAYOU PARK BAR — Pocket Aces Brass Band, 9 THE BEACH — Chicken on the Bone, 7 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BMC — The Ramblin’

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR Letters, 6; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 9:30 BOMBAY CLUB — Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Chee Weez, 8 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Blues Frenzy, 7; Junkrod, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — Mr. Smoker & Papa Mali, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Chuck Chaplin, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Matt Bauer, 9 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Duke Heitger & Tim Laughlin feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7; Stooges Brass Band, 10 HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Circle Lurk!, Kid Kamillion & Money P DJ sets, Lucas Wylie, 10 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Beth Patterson, 3; Colin Lake, 6; Captain Leo, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Chapter: SOUL, 10 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 7; Righteous Buddha, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli Band, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9:30 OAK — Kristin Diable, 8 OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — Ogden After Hours feat. Gypsy Elise & the Royal Blues, 6 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Craig Paddock, 9 ONE EYED JACKS — David Bazan, S. Carey, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Duke Heitger & Tim Laughlin feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7 PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. Symphony Chorus Of New Orleans, 6 PRESERVATION HALL — New Birth Brass Band feat. Tanio Hingle, 8

PRIME EXAMPLE — Wes “Warm Daddy” Anderson, 8 & 10 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Jason Scott, 7 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Gena Delafose, 8:30 SIBERIA — Local Celebrity DJ Night feat. DJ YRS TRLY & Friends, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Nicholas Sanders Trio, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Luke WinslowKing, 7:30 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Friday 1 AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Marathon, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BAYOU PARK BAR — The Urban Achievers, 9 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11 BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOOMTOWN CASINO — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Shotgun Jazz Band, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Element, 9:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Worldwide Zoo, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Leroy Jones Quartet, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9 JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, PAGE 42

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

MUSIC

42

LISTINGS

PAGE 40 Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Danny Burns, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Reis, 7; Pontchartrain Wrecks, 10 THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Some Like it Hot!, 7; Nasimiyu, 10; Young Pinstripe Brass Band, midnight MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Alex Bosworth, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Javier Olondo, 10:30 NOMA — Pfister Sisters, 5:30 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Major Bacon, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Wendell Brunious & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Refugeze, 9:30 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Top Cats, 9:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Ricky Stein & the Warm Guns, 9 SIBERIA — Holly Tamale Variety Show, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Liquid Peace Revolution CD release feat. Punch Drunk Apollo, Zama Para and Justin Molaison, 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10 THREE MUSES — Christina Perez, 7; Schatzy, 10 TIPITINA’S — Supagroup, Rocky City Morgue, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 2 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Big Blue Marble CD release, 9 ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Jimmy Gnecco, Erik Corveau & Lukas Rossi, 10 APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7 BACCHANAL — Gypsy Swing Club, 7 BANKS STREET BAR — Grant Watts & the Old Family, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7 BLUE NILE — St. Louis Slim, 7; GNO Orchestra (upstairs), 10; Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11 BMC — The Lushingtons, 3;

Cristina Perez, 6:30; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Leroy Jones Quartet, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Foret Tradition, 9 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8 CARROLLTON STATION — Songwriter Showcase feat. Andrew Duhon, Marc Belloni and others, 9 COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers & guest, 9 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Suplecs, The Unnaturals, 10 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8 DEUTSCHES HAUS — Danny O’Flaherty, 7 DRAGON’S DEN — Grassroots Hip-Hop Showcase feat. Truth Universal and others, 10 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Jaz Sawyer, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Patrick Cooper, 5; Andre Bouvier’s Royal Bohemians, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Juice, 10 THE MAISON — DJ Jubilee (upstairs), 10; Soul Project, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — The Mumbles, 12:30; Kristina Morales, 4; Banu Gibson, 7:30; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 11 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Jeff Chaz, 9:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7 RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Pigeon Town, 10 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Boogie Men, 9:30 SIBERIA — Beta Rhythm, Secret Society In Smaller Lies, Tropical City, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Donald Harrison Jr., 8 & 10

preview

Fantasy League

Supagroup’s energetic throwback rock is in the vein of AC/DC — a brassy and freewheeling mix of power blues, heavy bass and screeching guitars. The roll-out of its forthcoming album Hail! Hail! is taking on other late 1970s and ’80s rock trappings. The cover image by local artist Blake Boyd (known for reproducing pop images of Playboy bunnies, Disney’s Snow White and Darth Vader) is a riff on the 1981 animated cult film Heavy Metal, an orgy of juvenile male fantasies combining sex, rock and sci-fi adventure. The title referred not to the emerging musical genre, but the magazine of eroticized fantasy comics typically featuring sword-wielding, bikini-clad heroines. Hail! Hail! (a reference to Taylor Hackford’s film about Chuck Berry) includes liner notes with a cartoon by Boyd. Supagroup’s Christopher and Benji Lee also created music videos for several of the songs and a short film titled Amped! to promote the album. The video for “Sexy Summertime” is available on YouTube, and it epitomizes the album’s primary interests in drinking, partying, playing rock and staying forever young. With highlights like “Hail! Hail! (Rock and Roll)” and “Where’d You Put the Whiskey?” the album is full of the band’s signature smug, strutting, kung fu-style rock ’n’ roll. This Tipitina’s free Fridays show is not the official album release, but CDs will be available. Rock City Morgue opens. Free admission. — Will Coviello

JUL

1

Supagroup 10 p.m. Friday Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 985-8477; www.tipitinas.com

SPOTTED CAT — Luke WinslowKing, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Davis Rogan Band, 10 THREE MUSES — Hot Club of New Orleans, 7; Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 TIPITINA’S — 101 Runners feat. Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Cornell Williams, members of Rebirth & Dirty Dozen brass bands, War Chief Juan & the Golden Commanches, 10 TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9 YUKI IZAKAYA — Mexicans with Guns, 10

Sunday 3 BANKS STREET BAR — The Bad Assets, 9 BLUE NILE — John Dobry Band, 7:30; Mainline, 10 BMC — Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 1; Kipori “Baby Wolf” Woods, 7;

Jack Cole & Friends, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Captain “Chiggy Chiggy” Charles, 7 BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m.; Coco Robichaux, 8 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m. DRAGON’S DEN — Worldwide Zoo, Nasimiyu, 9 FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark & the Pentones, 4 HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m. HOWLIN’ WOLF — RX Bandits, Maps & Atlases, Zechs Marquise, Happy Body Slow Brain, 7:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ

PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Ched Reeves, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 8 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Chapter: SOUL, 10 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. LUCKY’S — Rotten Cores, 9 MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9 THE MAISON — Dave Easley Trio, 5; Cindy Scott, 7; Rik Ducci & Rq Away (upstairs), 10; Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs Birthday Bash & CD release feat. Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Tom McDermott & Kevin Clark, 11 a.m.; Julio & Caesar, 4:30; Javier Olondo & Asheson, 8 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1 OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8 THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30 RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Vince Vance’s Louisiana Legends, 3 ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m. SIBERIA — Big Freedia, Katey Red, Lucky Lou, DJ Q and others, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — John Mahoney Big Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey, 10 ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Mary Flynn Thomas & Prohibition Blues, 10 a.m. THREE MUSES — New Orleans Moonshiners Trio, 4:30; Margie Perez, 7 TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 4 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8 BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9

BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 BLUE NILE — Big Pearl & the Fugitives of Funk, 9 BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Blues Jam, 9:30; Bo Dollis Jr. & the Wild Magnolias, 12:30 a.m. COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8 DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7 FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Ched Reeves, 9 KERRY IRISH PUB — Rites of Passage, 8 THE MAISON — Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 7; New Orleans Super Jam feat. Rue Fiya, 10 MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 4; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 7; Free Spirits Brass Band, 10:30 NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Jefferson Chorale, noon; New Orleans Concert Band, 2 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Leland Sundries, Sold Only As Curio, 7 OLD POINT BAR — The Lady-Killers, 7:30; -ish, 9 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. Maynard Chatters, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7 SIBERIA — Weirdo Fest feat. Fight the Goober, Dummy Dumpster, The Bills, Indian Givers and others, 3 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

classical/ concerts DUTCH ALLEY — Near French

Market, on North Peters Street — Sun: Summer Twilight Romance Series presents Harmoniemusik, 7 TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www. trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Tue: Trinity Wall Street Choir, 7:30; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Mon: Taize, 6 For complete listings, visit www. bestofneworleans.com.

FILM

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

7Ă&#x160;",  -½Ă&#x160;*,  ,Ă&#x160;<<Ă&#x160; 1

27 TUE 28 WED 29 THU 30 FRI 01 SAT 02 SUN 03 MON

CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND LOREN PICKFORD QUARTET DELFEAYO MARSALIS & UPTOWN JAZZ ORCH. NICHOLAS SANDERS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

review

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In the

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

latest installment of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (PenĂŠlope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

ELLIS MARSALIS QUARTET DONALD HARRISON JR.

NOW SHOWING

JOHN MAHONEY BIG BAND

-"7/ -\ nĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;*

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THE ART OF GETTING BY (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A

lonely teen makes it to his senior year of high school without doing a day of work, and he meets a popular girl who finds in him a kindred spirit. AMC Palace 20

SUPER 8 (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A group of

friends in 1979 start to witness strange occurrences after a catastrophic train crash in J.J. Abramsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; sci-fi drama. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand

BAD TEACHER (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cameron Diaz plays a foul-mouthed, gold-digging seventh-grade teacher. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Terrence Malickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film, Palme dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Or winner at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, follows a man through his innocent childhood to his disillusioned adult years. Canal Place

THE BEAVER (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In the odd-

ball drama, Mel Gibson plays an unstable man who can only communicate through a beaver puppet. Chalmette Movies

VOTED

Live Music Nightly -No Cover

Zagat Rated

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

TUES 6/28

HONKY TONK OPEN MIC w/ JASON BISHOP WED 6/29 CHIP WILSON THUR 6/30 ANDRE BOUVIERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROYAL BOHEMIENS FRI 7/1 DAMIEN LOUVIERE DANNY BURNS SAT 7/2 PATRICK COOPER ANDRE BOUVIERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ROYAL BOHEMIENS SUN 7/3 CHIP WILSON MON 7/4

HAPPY 4th OF JULY w/ RITES OF PASSAGE

9PM 9PM 9PM 5PM 9PM 5PM 9PM 8PM

The museum screens a 4-D film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater BRIDESMAIDS (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A comically

struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maid of honor. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

CARS 2 (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Pixar sequel

finds its characters competing in an international race. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

DEEP SEA (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Audiences experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In the

8PM

331 Decatur St. â&#x20AC;˘ 527-5954 www.kerryirishpub.com

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

DC Comics adaptation that was filmed in New Orleans, a hot-shot test pilot must maintain peace in the universe using a mystical green ring. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania THE HANGOVER PART II (R) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; After

the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but things once again go awry. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The book

series by Megan McDonald gets a big-screen adaptation. AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

JUMPING THE BROOM (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Worlds collide when two AfricanAmerican families from disparate socioeconomic backgrounds get together for a wedding in Marthaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vineyard. AMC Palace 16

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The

44

Portland is Burning

The members of the former Portland, Ore., performing troupe Sissyboy are not drag queens. They wear facial hair and makeup and they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;tuck.â&#x20AC;? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come a long way since Jennie Livingstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paris is Burning (1990), about New York drag queen beauty pageants in which the ideal was â&#x20AC;&#x153;to passâ&#x20AC;? as female. The men in Katie Turinskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s documentary Sissyboy are not trying to pass. They embrace masculine and feminine-identified looks, and they each have their own visions of their sexual identity. Their shows tend toward outrageous social satire and they arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t polished or glitzy. The film includes a hilarious song parody about teen pregnancy and a dark version of the Wizard of Oz, in which Dorothy is Matthew Shepard, the young gay man lured out of a Laramie, Wyo., bar by two men who beat him savagely and left him for dead â&#x20AC;&#x201D; martyring him in Sissyboyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s musical version. Other bits are more abstract and bizarre, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one serious performance art piece Lee Kyle (aka Splendora Gabore) does about his brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suicide. After performing in bars and club spaces for three years in Portland, the troupe piled into a borrowed RV and went on tour, and much of Turinskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s project comes off like a road-trip film. They journey to Seattle and San Francisco, where they perform with that cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alternative drag show Trannyshack, which revels in horror camp. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a mostly upbeat film, and at only 68-minutes Turinski could have spent more time getting to know some of the many troupe members, particularly Kyle, who talks briefly about growing up gay in a small town in east Texas. The film runs in conjunction with NOLA Pride Festival. Tickets $7, $5 New Orleans Film Society and CAC members. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Will Coviello

JUN

28

Sissyboy 7 p.m. Tuesday Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org

animated sequel stars Jack Black as the voice of the titular warrior. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; In

the Woody Allen film, a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling

back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand MR. POPPERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PENGUINS (PG) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim Carrey plays Mr. Popper, a business man whose world is turned upside down when six penguins turn his swanky New York apartment into a snowy winter wonderland.

UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The prequel tells the origin story of the Marvel Comics supergroup. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING TUESDAY TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A mysterious

event from the past threatens to bring war to Earth in the third installment of Michael Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giant robot franchise.

OPENING FRIDAY LARRY CROWNE (PG-13) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; After

being downsized from the hot-shot position at his job, the affable Larry Crowne (Tom Hanks) decides to go back to college.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRIT WIT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Big Top screens

British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com

CASABLANCA (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The 1942

drama follows an American expatriate who meets a former lover in Africa during the early days of World War II. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

RAY (NR) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jamie Foxx won an Oscar for his portrayal of Ray Charles in this film shot in New Orleans. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, The Porch 7th Ward Neighborhood Center, 1943 Pauger St.

FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

preview

The British Are Coming

Zeitgeist hosts a slate of new independent British films curated by the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the UK Film Council and Emerging Pictures. The lineup includes Toast (9:30 p.m. July 1-2), starring Helena Bonham Carter, based on foodwriter Nigel Slater’s account of his childhood infatuation with food and his family’s suspicions regarding it. Africa United (7:30 p.m., July 1-2) is a quirky and upbeat film (for audiences 12 and up) about kids in Rwanda who undertake their own whimsically cursed trek to attend the 2010 World Cup in South Africa. A Boy Called Dad (7:30 p.m. July 3 & 5) is about a 14-year-old boy who tries to live up to the demands of being a father at a young age. The readjustment to civilian life is the subject of In Our Name (9:30 p.m. July 3 & 5), in which a female soldier returns from the Iraq War and finds her relationship with her daughter strained. Third Star (7:30 p.m. July 6-7) follows a young man’s last hurrah with his best friends as he battles cancer. The original slate also included NEDS, which previously ran at Zeitgeist. Each film runs for two nights only. Tickets $7, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

JUL

FROM BRITAIN WITH LOVE—

The Film Society of the Lincoln Center, UK Film Council and Emerging Pictures presents the touring showcase of British films. Films include Toast, Africa United, A Boy Called Dad, In Our Name and Third Star. Visit www.frombritainwithlove.org for the full schedule. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members, $20 series pass (includes all five films). Nightly through July 7, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net JAWS (PG) — A great white shark begins to menace a small island community. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com THE LORD OF THE RINGS (PG-13) — Local theaters (AMC Palace

20, AMC Palace 16, Hollywood 14) screen the Academy Award-winning trilogy in three parts. 7 p.m. Tuesday. SISSYBOY (NR) — Katie Turinski’s documentary follows a group of avant-garde Portland drag queens. Tickets $5 New Orleans Film Society and CAC members, $7 general admission. 7 p.m. Tuesday, Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org THE WIZARD OF OZ (NR) —

Judy Garland plays Dorothy, a girl swept away in a tornado to a magical land, in the 1939 classic. Tickets $5.50. Noon Friday-Monday, then daily through July 7, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 8912787; www.theprytania.com AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386;

AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 2624386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 6411889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 5276012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

RLAKE E B M I T N I T S U J ” TEACHER VAL TOM WOLFE D A B “ Z A I D N O R UCTION CAME L SUPERVISMIOUNSICBY MANISH RA GENE STUPNITSKY D O R P C I A S O RESENTS A M GINS AND JASON SEGE SDAN LEE EISENBERG DIRECTEDY JAKE KASDAN P S E R U T C I P COLUMBIA UNCH JOHN MICHEXAECEULTIVHEIG ORGIA KACANDES JAKE KA DAVID HOUSEHOLTER B LSICUCY P ANDREWS PRODUCERS GE PRODUCEDBY JIMMY MILLER MU M I C H A E L NBERG E S I E BY E E L & Y K S T I WRITTENY GENE STUPN B check local listings for theaters and showtimes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

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From Britain With Love 7:30 p.m. & 9:30 p.m. Friday – Thursday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

45

LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

OPENING PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “Worn, Torn, Wet & Wild,” works by Jessica Langley and Christi Birchfield, through July 25. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.

GALLERIES A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “Counter-

feit,” works by Louviere + Vanessa, through Thursday. Exhibition of gallery artists featuring Louviere + Vanessa, Sebastiao Salgado, Joshua Mann Pailet and Herman Leonard, through Sept. 30.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — Annual

student exhibition, through July 23.

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 — Works

by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — Works by Peter

Mars, through Aug. 8.

painted wall sculptures by Ken Mentel, through Sunday.

ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibition

featuring Cheri Ben-Iesau, Isabelle Dupuy, Susan Landry, Ro Mayer, Myra Williamson Wirtz, Alicia Windham and Maria Etkind, through July 30.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paintings, sculpture

and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on

site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing.

BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery.com — “The New

Orleans Big Deal Show,” paintings, mixed media and music by Silke Thoss and Bob Tooke,

through July 9. BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com —

Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United

We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BONJOUR GALLERY & MARKETPLACE. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 635-7572 — “Classic

Cars,” paintings by Nancy Lowentritt, through Thursday.

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean

Mitchell, ongoing.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery. com — Artfully Aware exhibi-

tion, through July 5.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de

Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Ital-

ian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery

showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — Mono-

types by Marie Bukowski and plein air paintings by Phil Sandusky, through July 30.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the Blue

Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium. com — “Prospect.1.75, Blake

Boyd: The Batman Years,” mixed-media works by Blake Boyd, through July 23.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time,

Again,” exhibition of work by gallery artists from the past year, through Aug. 4.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink” print-

making invitational, through Aug. 6.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www.fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through July 15. “Good Wood,” furniture and sculpture by Michael Robinson, through Aug. 1. “Foot-a-Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing. FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington, (985) 377-2212 —

Metal sculpture by Keith Villere, through July 13. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints

by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by

Fredrick Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “Love,

the Front,” a group exhibition featuring old and new gallery artists, through Sunday.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Pho-

tography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale. com — “Expressions of Me,”

mixed media on canvas by Kim Albrecht, through Monday.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — “My Pinocchio Syn-

drome for Abigail ... Ten Years Later. This Aint’t Disney Jeff,” mixed media by Blake Boyd, through July 23.

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Seeing Music,” a group exhi-

bition exploring interpretations of music, through Sunday.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com —

“Grant v. Lee,” contemporary works related to the Civil War, through Sunday.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers;

Schooler, ongoing.

review Grave Impressions The Civil War was the great cataclysm of 19th century America. Miscalculations on both sides led to unspeakable carnage that still haunts us. Featuring the work of 14 artists from all over, and curated by Sophie T. Lvoff, this show is less about history and more about the war’s psychic legacy as a subtly pervasive influence. Chris Domenick’s semiabstract Calvary Monologues are graphite grave rubbings from Civil War-era headstones with memorial inscriptions layered in expressionistic patterns that evoke the chaos of the war itself — a theme echoed in James Taylor Bonds’ painting of battlefield mayhem with Civil War soldiers seemingly joined by haggard youths from later conflicts in which the venues changed but the mayhem remained the same. Even so, what stood out about the Civil War was the awful intimacy of battles fought on the combatants’ home turf, pitting friends or family against each other. Something of that violent intimacy is evoked by Markus Fiedler’s precise beeswax sculpture of a lifesize military knife, or Grant Willing’s large photos of knives resting on planks framed by dark forests. Katherine Wolkoff’s large color photograph of a human-size hollow in high weeds suggests the imprint of a fallen body, an eerily pastoral touch reinforced by Paul Mpagi Sepuya’s psychically fraught photographs of his Louisiana aunt’s rural home. Erik Kiesewetter’s digital images of darkly distressed paper with boldface type announcing It Was No Riot — It Was A Massacre (pictured), recall the turmoil of the times even as Rachel Jones’ line drawings of Civil War soldiers whimsically portray the perpetrators and victims of the carnage. But the most whimsical work is Nina Schwanse’s video of herself as two drag queens acting out the roles of Grant and Lee in a catfight that either trivializes the conflict, or illustrates how it still pervades American life — in a show that is either thoughtfully subtle or overly vague, depending, like everything about the war, on your perspective. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU J U LY

03

Grant v. Lee: Group show of contemporary works related to the Civil War Good Children Gallery, 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com

both ongoing. GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — Group exhibition featuring works by nine gallery artists, through July 9.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“Wrong Sounding Stories,” paintings by Adam Mysock; “Eternal Moment,” drawings by Rieko Fujinami, through Thursday.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery

specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Breaking Muse!”

ceramic assemblages by Shannon Landis Hansen; textile constructions by Christine Sauer, through July 30.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans

is Alive,” acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays. MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY NEW ORLEANS. 433 Royal St., 299-9055; www.martinlawrence. com — Works by René Lalonde,

through Thursday.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown glass works

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com —

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing.

by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “Rhythm on the River,”

paintings by Derenda Keating, through Thursday.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon

“Embers of a Floating World,” works by Caroline Wright, through July 9.

MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Illumi-

nated glass sculpture by Curt Brock; enameled copper jewelry by Cathy DeYoung; hand-pulled prints by Dominique Begnaud,

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — “The Phoenix,”

ART

47

ART

The best kept secret in New Orleans

LISTINGS

through July 30. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www.newcombartgallery. tulane.edu — “The History of the Fu-

ture,” photographs by Michael Berman and Julian Cardona, through Wednesday.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — Acrylic on canvas by

Plant sales & rentals

Cleland Powell, through Tuesday.

1135 PRESS ST. @ NEW ORLEANS

2900 ST. CLAUDE

(504) 947-7554

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing. PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www.photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing. REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Priscilla

Busch, Natalie Nichols, Andrew Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

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RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www.riverstonegalleries. net — Multimedia works by Ri-

cardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

Hand-blown glass works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

MARK’S

MUFFLER SHOP since 1984

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www.sorengallery.com — “Horsing Around,” oil

paintings by Campbell Hutchinson, through Thursday.

STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Street Children,” a

AUTHORIZED FLOWMASTER DEALER

group exhibition of works by Zambian youth, through Aug. 1.

5229 St. Claude Ave. New Orleans 504-944-7733

and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

w w w. m ar k s mu f f l e r sh o p . c o m

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET 0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through Thursday.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the

Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works by Bill

Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave — “Mara/Thalassa/Kai: The Sea,” works by Anastasia Pelias, Rian Kerrane and Melissa Borman, through July. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VIEUX CARRE GALLERY. 507 St. Ann St., 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery. com — Works by Sarah Stiehl and

Brock Swanson, through July 15.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — “Françoise Gilot and the

Figure: 1940-2010,” paintings and drawings by the artist, through Thursday.

CALL FOR ARTISTS DRAWING THE LINE. Octavia Art Gallery, 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — The

gallery seeks works in all media that focus on the use of line for a upcoming juried exhibition (Aug. 6-27). Email art@octaviaartgallery.com for details. Submissions deadline is Friday. MONUMENTAL. Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — Antenna

seeks proposals for imaginative reinterpretations of 19th- and early 20th-century New Orleans monuments for a show in February 2012. Submissions deadline is Nov. 15, and there is a $15 entry fee. Email courtney@courtneyegan.net for details.

NOLA NOW! The Contemporary Arts

Center seeks submissions for an exhibit featuring works produced in the last two years by artists currently living and working in the greater New Orleans area. The exhibition opens Oct. 1. Call 528-3805 or visit www.cacno.org for details. Submissions deadline is July 8.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent exhibits of

jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond

Barthe: Builder of Pictures,” an

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org — Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing. CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno. org — “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gacc-nola. com — Museum exhibits depict the

colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum features fossils,

taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads of

Memory: Spain and the United States,” a traveling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain, through July 10. “The Golden Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — “Magic Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011. LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum features

props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — “Before

During After,” photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, through Sept. 25. LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc. org — The Supreme Court of Loui-

siana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias.org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the

city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail.org — “Absinthe

Visions,” photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Ancestors of

Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art,” through July 17. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Thalassa,” a 20-foot-tall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about

19th-century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Endangered

Species Day Art Contest Exhibition, through July 16. “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50”; “New Orleans Craft & Design”; “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes; both through July 24. OLD URSULINE CONVENT. 1100 Chartres St., 529-3040 — “France in

America,” photographs by Arielle de la Tour d’Auvergne, through Thursday.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state.la.us/site/ mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www. africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits works

that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

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RICKY GRAHAM’S SHOW OF SHOWS. Le Chat Noir, 715

St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Frequent collaborators Yvette Hargis, Jefferson Turner and Brian Albus join Graham in the show. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Tuesday.

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AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www. theallwayslounge.com — Becky Allen stars in the campy cult classic about a young, naive couple that stumbles onto a mansion with strange inhabitants. Contests, games and prize giveaways begin an hour prior to performances, and official audience participation bags will be available for purchase. Tickets $20; available at the door only. Call 452-9836 or visit www.rockyrocksnola.com for details. 8 p.m. and midnight FridaySaturday, 8 p.m. Sunday.

VOTED

TUE

2400 St. Claude Ave., 5237469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Paul Oswell is a befuddled Englishman trying to come to grips with New Orleans culture in his one-man comedy. Tickets are by donation. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

In the Shakespeare Festival at Tulane’s production of Julius Caesar, director Amy Boyce Holtcamp assembled an able cast and elicited nuanced, convincing performances. By setting the tragedy in 1930s America, she both freshened up the play and created some odd contradictions. Huey Long-era politicos wearing cool suits and fedoras (by costume designer Cecile Casey Covert), hustle about while paparazzi shoot flash photos. Aside from the Bard’s entrancing iambic pentameter, all seems normal — until the Ides of March! Long was gunned down in the halls of the state Capitol. These Roman conspirators, however, assassinate the aspiring dictator with daggers they’ve tucked away in their three-piece suits. The anachronism suggests that human beings killed in the past, kill in the present and will kill in the future. Only the weapons change with time. After the murder, the conspirators dip their hands in Caesar’s blood. When Marc Antony sees his slain friend, he shakes hands with each of the murderers, and the gesture takes on an ominous tone. Although the play is named for Caesar (Ron Gural), the action centers on the conspirators, chiefly Marcus Brutus (John Neisler) and Cassius (Silas Cooper). Do they strike out of envy or are they driven by concern for the republic? Antony (Shad Willingham) thinks their motives are venal — except for Brutus, whom he famously praises as the noblest Roman of them all. Antony offers the eulogy over the fallen Brutus on the fields of Philippi, where he and Octavius defeat the conspirators. The anachronisms run amok in the long, confusing battle scenes, as soldiers in business suits carry weapons ranging from daggers to muskets to Tommy guns. Caesar turns on the question of who can rouse the rabble most effectively. The idealistic Brutus expects to sway the masses by claiming Caesar aspires to establish a dictatorship. Antony, whom Brutus foolishly allows to address the crowd, resorts to devious rhetorical tricks to enrage the people against the murderers. One of the pleasures of the production was that every word, phrase and sentence was crystal clear. The ensemble as a whole was strong, and there were notable performances by Gural, Neisler, Cooper and Willingham (whose impressive Antony had a touch of the young Ernest Hemingway). Caesar is mostly a man’s play, but Emilie Whelan (Portia) and Carmen Torres (Calpurnia) turned in strong performances. Julius Caesar may not be one of the Bard’s most seductive plays, but at the Shakespeare Festival, it held the audience spellbound. — Dalt Wonk

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AN ENGLISHMAN IN NEW ORLEANS. Shadowbox Theatre,

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Julia St., 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — In Lisa Ebersole’s play, race and class tensions arise after a stranger crashes a boozy, late-night birthday celebration. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through Aug. 6. No show July 8.

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49

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com STAGE women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www. crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday. Drive, Slidell, (985) 643-2992; www.slidellhigh.stpsb.org — Slidell Little Theatre seeks actors for the upcoming production of the musical. Actors should prepare 16-32 bars of an uptempo contemporary song for the audition. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL. The annual theater

festival, held Nov. 16-20, seeks applications for 30-60 minute alternative theater performances. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. There is a $25 application fee. Submission deadline is Friday.

BROADWAY THEATRE CONNECTION. BTC offers 12

scholarships for their four-day musical theater workshop for students ages 10 to 20 years old to be held August 1-4 at NOCCA. Ten of the scholarships will be need-based, and two will be talent-based. Application deadline is July 11. Email info@broadwaytheatreconnection.com for details.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Com-

edy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four “androids” improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252

Veterans Blvd., 456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by select cast members of the improv comedy troupe. Visit www. brownimprovcomedy.com/ BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for performers, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www. lostlovelounge.com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX.

Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in

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Dr. Wagih Mando, FACS 504-464-8619 • www.DrMando.com Who fathered the twins is an ongoing mystery in Pat Bourgeois’ ongoing soap opera Debauchery! (7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Southern Rep). the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday.

show is 8 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday.

Nail, 1100 Constance St., 5255515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

DEBAUCHERY! Southern Rep, The Shops at Canal Place, 365 Canal St., third floor, 522-6545;

www.southernrep.com — Pat Bourgeois’ serialized Louisiana-set soup opera is presented in monthly staged readings. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday.

FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday. GARY CONRAD. Boomtown

Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedian performs. 8p.m. Wednesday.

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY.

The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www.maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.;

IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany. com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday.

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SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria

Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carroll-

ton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Alex Woodward listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

EVENTS

deutscheshaus.org — The Celtic musician performs a concert for children that teaches American history. Admission $10. 2 p.m.

EVENTS

FAMILY

Tuesday 28

Tuesday 28

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBIT.

ECOS LATINOS. Old Metairie

Library, 2350 Metairie Road, Metairie, 838-4353 — The group of Hispanic musicians, dancers, visual artists and others performs for children. 2:30 p.m.

TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 30 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 2 KIDS CRAFTING NATURE . Bayou

Sunday 3 DANNY O’FLAHERTY’S RED, WHITE, BLUE & YOU CHILDREN’S CONCERT. Deutsches Haus, 1023

Ridgewood St., 522-8014; www.

BUSH MAN COMPETITION 2011 SIGN-UP & TRYOUTS. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Eco-Lifestyles seeks black males ages 21-35 who are creative, mentally and physically fit and socially responsible for the competition that promotes eco-friendly role models. Men should be prepared to discuss “going green” and to showcase a talent. Email info@bman2011. com or visit www.bman2011. com for details. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. IRON RAIL ZINE READING BENEFIT. Zeitgeist Multi-

Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The event features a screening

SCRABBLE NIGHT. St. Tammany

Parish Public Library, Mandeville Branch, 844 Girod St., (985) 626-4293; www. sttammany.lib.la.us — The library hosts a night of Scrabble playing for adults and teens. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m.

Wednesday 29 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. NEW ORLEANS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE LUNCHEON. Astor

Crowne Plaza Hotel, 100 Bourbon St. — The quarterly luncheon series features John White, superintendent of the Recovery School District, as the guest speaker. Admission $40 chamber members, $50 non-

members. Call 799-4260 or email rsvp@neworleanschamber.org for details. 11 a.m. registration, program at noon. OUTDOOR COOKING. Bogue

Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The Interpretive Ranger leads the session about outdoor cooking and the use of a Dutch oven over an open fire. 10 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. TALENT SHOWCASE. Le Roux, 1700

Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 30 BAYOU SOUL WRITERS & READERS CONFERENCE . Various

locations, visit website for details — The inaugural twoday conference brings together New York Times best-selling authors, publishers and literary agents for master classes, panel discussions, meet-and-greets and awards presentations. Visit www.bswconference. com for the full schedule and other details. 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday-Friday.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

COMMUNITY PARTNERS WORKPLACE WELLNESS LUNCHEON . Ashe Cultural Arts

Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — The luncheon celebrates fathers — both biological fathers and those who embrace that role. RSVP before noon June 29. Free admission. Noon to 1:30 p.m.

DRUM WORKSHOP. Ashe

Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Cuban master percussionist Roman Diaz leads the free workshop. 6 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

LA/SPCA SIP & SOCIALIZE .

Ralph’s on the Park, 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — The event features specials on cocktails, select wines and beer, plus a speciality cocktail that benefits the LA/SPCA. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

the first Friday of each month. Artists pay a $15 application fee and, if accepted, a $20 booth fee. 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. THE FASHION LAB. Buritto Juke

Joint, 915 N. Dupre St. — Gris Gris Lab hosts the men and women’s fashion and shopping event, with a DJ Soul Sister set following the event. Call (440) 539-6344 or visit www.grisgrislab.com for details. Fashion lab 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., DJ Soul Sister 8 p.m. to midnight.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. ROCKIN’ ON THE RIVER CELEBRITY BOAT CRUISE. Creole

Queen Paddlewheel Boat, Spanish Plaza, 524-0814; www. neworleanspaddlewheels.com/ cruise_dinnerjazz.html — The cruise, which benefits a charity helping to end childhood obesity, features appearances by NFL and NBA players. Visit www.robertroyalfoundation. org for details. Tickets start at $45. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Friday 1

Saturday 2

ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

ART AT THE MARKET. Griffith Park, 333 Erlanger St., Slidell — The Slidell Art League hosts a monthly art market at the Camellia City Farmers Market. Visit www.slidellartleague.info for details. 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

EASTSIDE ART MARKET. Eastside Studios, 107 S. Orange St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113 or (985) 543-0403 — Eastside Studios holds a juried art market for professional artists on

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

Segnette State Park, 7777 Westbank Expwy., Westwego — Children of all ages join the park staff in learning a new nature topic each month, and everyone will get to create and take home a craft based on the topic. 10 a.m.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — Columnist Dan Savage and comedian and actress Molly Shannon are two of the speakers at the annual conference, which brings together librarians, educators, authors, publishers, literacy experts, illustrators and suppliers. Visit www.alaannual.org for the full schedule and other details.

of the film $100 and a T-shirt!, live music from Leyla McCalla and readings from various zinemakers. Admission $5. 7 p.m.

53

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

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page 71

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> BURGERS BY BURGAU <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Aaron Burgau is best known as the chef at Patois (6078 Laurel > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >St., 895-9441; www.patoisnola.com), his contemporary Creole < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <bistro, but lately he’s been putting his stamp on Oak Street. He’s responsible for the menu at Oak (8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www.oaknola.com), and this month he and his partners from WHAT Patois opened TruBurger (8115 Oak St., 218-5416) across the Jung’s Golden Dragon street. The menu offers hand-ground burgers, Zweigle’s hot dogs, fries, chili, milkshakes and soft drinks. The kitchen also WHERE makes a veggie patty, and gluten-free buns are available. Tru3009 Magazine St., Burger serves lunch and dinner Tuesday through Sunday. 891-8280; www.jungsgoldendraLAKEVIEW TEX-MEX gon2.com The owners of the local Bulldog taverns (www.draftfreak.com) have opened The Velvet Cactus (917 Harrison Ave., 301-2083; WHEN www.thevelvetcactus.com), a Lakeview restaurant with a Lunch and dinner large brick patio. The menu features Tex-Mex standards and daily adds unusual items like crawfish banditos, a popular snack RESERVATIONS from the Bulldog kitchens. It’s open for dinner nightly. Accepted

am

B

HOW MUCH

Moderate

WHAT WORKS

The “Chinese” menu of homespun, vividly seasoned dishes WHAT DOESN'T

An elementary wine list doesn’t match the cooking. CHECK, PLEASE

A Chinese standby relocated and reinvigorated

Fine China on Magazine Street A NEW “CHINESE” MENU REVEALS TRUE, AND SPICY, SZECHUAN FLAVOR.

Jung Tan offers a menu of authentic Chinese dishes at Jung’s Golden Dragon. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

FIVE PEANUT BUTTER INDULGENCES BLUE DOT DONUTS

4301 CANAL ST., 218-4866

Peanut butter frosting over a jelly donut honors the lunchbox classic.

EMERIL’S RESTAURANT

800 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 528-9393 www.emerils.com

Peanut butter pie has an Oreo crust and caramel topping.

THE JOINT

801 POLAND AVE., 949-3232 www.alwayssmokin.com

After smoky barbecue, try this light, nutty mousse in pie crust.

pared and eaten in China (see www.blogofneworleans.com for more). Tan tested these waters a few years back at the old Golden Dragon in Metairie, where she served a traditional “Chinese breakfast” on weekends. It didn’t catch on with customers, but when she moved to Magazine Street in 2010, she instituted today’s two-menu system full time. Sturdy, predictable dishes like lemon chicken, egg rolls and beef with broccoli are there for those playing it safe, though not everything on the Chinese menu is as peculiar as the tongue-numbing tongue dish. It’s easy enough to wade in with sizzling beef, which looks — and sounds — like Chinese fajitas, or the memorably named but mildly flavored “ants climbing a tree,” for which rice noodles (the “tree”) are smothered with ginger and sesame sauce with bits of ground pork (the “ants”). Cool sesame noodles woven with shredded cucumber make a light and refreshing first course in hot summer weather. Once you’ve found your sea legs here, try the “fish in squirrel shape” for a fillet deeply and elaborately scored, fried to the texture of a blooming onion, coated with thick, tangy sauce and arranged more or less in the shape of its namesake. This restaurant space, encased in sleek lacquered paneling, is small but comfortable. The way to make a night of it here is to bring a group, secure one of the larger round tables and order dishes to share. That’s the familiar format at Chinese restaurants anywhere, but with Jung’s new menu there is a lot more to talk about as the dishes go around the table.

817 COMMON ST., 412-2580 www.milaneworleans.com

A peanut butter cup gone gourmet is topped with crisp tuile.

RALPH’S ON THE PARK

900 CITY PARK AVE., 488-1000 www.ralphsonthepark.com

Try a sweet terrine of peanut butter ice cream, peanut praline and chocolate.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2010 Charles & Charles Rose

COLUMBIA VALLEY, WASHINGTON / $10-$13 RETAIL

With the label’s Jasper Johns-like version of the American flag, this rose may be the wine best suited to the Fourth of July. Produced from 100 percent Syrah grapes, it offers strawberry, watermelon and floral notes. On the palate, taste red berry, minerality, lively acidity and a crisp finish. Drink it with barbecue, burgers, grilled fish, pork, fried chicken, boiled crawfish, salads and po-boys. Buy it at: Cork & Bottle, The Wine Seller, Habano’s of Slidell Wine Cellar and the Mandeville Market and Deli. Drink it at: St. James Cheese Company, Three Muses and Louisiana Pizza Kitchen. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

I

IN

MILA

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y n business in Metairie for more than 30 years, Jung’s Golden Dragon was a place where successive generations of locals learned about Chinese food, or at least its familiar American iterations. Relocated Uptown and significantly reimagined, this restaurant is still dishing out Chinese cuisine lessons, but now more of them concern flavors and traditions a great deal closer to the source material. The new Jung’s Golden Dragon is a place where tender, house-made, pork-filled dumplings arrive molded into a circular disk, ready to be broken with chopsticks into individual bulbs that squirt juice at the first bite. It’s a place for seafood stews with thin but salty, ferociously spicy broths laden with boiled snapper or speckled trout. And it’s a place for chilled beef tongue, sliced thin, topped with curling tripe and seasoned with a special pepper that causes a tingly, fleetingly numbing sensation on your tongue. These dishes are among the offerings on what owner Jung Tan calls her “Chinese menu.” It’s occasionally slipped into the regular Chinese-American menu, though sometimes you have to request it. Most of the dishes come from the Szechuan tradition, a particularly robust, famously spicy branch of China’s vast and multifarious cuisine. Tan says many items are based on family recipes her mother brought here when she immigrated in the 1970s. With its new approach, Jung’s joins a growing roster of local restaurants where diners can experience Chinese food more in line with how it’s actually pre-

five 5

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>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

5300 TCHOUPITOULAS Suite F4 in the riverside market

504.895.2911

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- getta bo

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Le Unique 4001 GENERAL DE GAULLE

(504) 368-9846 • Open Daily 9am-9pm (Kitchen Closes at 8:30PM) • Closed Sun & Thurs

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HOT PASTRAMI & CORNED BEEF • FALAFEL CHOPPED LIVER • MATZOH BALL SOUP

Buy 1 Sandwich & Get 1 FREE of equal or lesser value.

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Dine in only. Up to $5.95 Value. Expires 07/25/11

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TR CH AT LUDN AY! TO

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in New Orleans”

3519 SEVERN

Mon-Thur 10am-7pm Fri.& Sun. 10am-3pm www.koshercajun.com

888-2010

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

and Bistro FRESH GREEN FRIENDLY

Breakfast and Lunch! JOIN US FOR

(CORNER OF N. SCOTT)

MID-CITY, NEW ORLEANS 561.6585 | WWW.ECOCAFENO.COM

OR

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

7329 FRERET • 861-7890 (1 block off Broadway)

Now Accepting NOLA Bucks!

Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; www. fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634 S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128

Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — The kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

There’s a revolutionary air sweeping the world. Whether from farm to table, or by shaking shoes at corrupt dictators, people are dedicated to making peaceful changes. The Green Goddess salutes all these revolutionaries! Together, we share the dreams, blood, sweat, and fierce determination to make it happen, NOW!

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

LONG LIVE THE REVOLUTION

Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

The Green Goddess

307 Exchange Alley in the French Quarter www.greengoddessnola.com

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks, fries with cheese or gravy and more. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59,

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks

ORDER ONLINE

St., 202-4741; www.bookoobbq. com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828 Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory

BAR & GRILL

REVOLUTION at the Green Goddess!

58

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>

<<<< <<< <<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<< >> <<

113 C Westbank Expwy • Gretna, LA 70053

504.362.3900

MI

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

30 years in business

3903 CANAL ST

>>>>>

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. >>>>>>>>>

now carrying ke’rastase

G

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

2035 METAIRIE ROAD

www.marktwainspizza.com

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at

this brewpub. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL —

4905 Canal St., 488-7357; www. beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or house-made hickory sauce. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St.,

861-7890; www.cafefreret.com — Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.Wed., Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches, fresh-squeezed juices, and tapas on Friday and Saturday evenings. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 5811112; www.pravdaofnola.com — The kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Crabcakes Benedict is two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates, sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations.

Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, bell peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. . Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms comes with oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Me-

tairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — The Fat Elvis cupcake is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $ MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501

Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices, parfaits and geen tea smoothies.

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.therustynail.biz — The Wild Turkey sandwich is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St.,

Metairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — This deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY www.555canal.com — The lobster mac and cheese combines lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

525-4455; www.bayona.com — Sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce is a favorite. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.Sun. Credit cards. $$ OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485;

www.oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747 — The menu includes crawfish etouffee, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes such as Caribbean mac and cheese pie. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL — 1100 Constance St., 722-3168;

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 El-

meer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — Sandwiches, salads, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — Homemade Indian dishes include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 8366859 — The menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

delicious house specialties free delivery* 5pm–9:30pm *($15

minimum)

catering available

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie, shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp, crabmeat and cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Hand Made Freshly Prepared Dough With Our Own Sauce

Create your own 10” Pizza with our favorite toppings or try our specialty pizzas.

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

gourmet pizzas Mediterranean • Blackened Shrimp Grilled Chicken Alfredo • Margarita Pizza We also have lactose free soy mozzarella cheese

3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview)

865-1428 · 704 s. carrollton mon–sat 11am–10pm · sun noon–10pm www.chinaorchidneworleans.com

Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

CATERING available

COLD BE ER !

Lunc starti h Specials ng at $6.99 !

Come visit us soon, only 2 miles north of I-12 on the left

985-892-0205

Tues-Thurs 11-8, | Fri-Sat 11-8:30

69399 Highway 59 | Abita Springs, LA

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St.,

586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Breakfast & Lunch Sunday Brunch

Bloody Mary's & Mimosas Cold Beer POBOYS PANINIS SOUPS SALADS

Dog friendly outside patio 800 NAVARRE AVE. [NEAR CITY PARK]

OPEN 7 DAYS 8AM - 3PM • 504-483-8828

MEXICAN & CUBAN FOOD

Best Fajitas in Town!

PUERCO FRITO - $10.50 ROPA VIEJA - $8.15 Come Have Lunch With Me!

COUNTRY FLAME

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

St. Louis St., 581-4422; www. antoines.com — Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave.,

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

59

CLASSIFIEDS Animal Helper Adoption Day

Bon Bon is a 5 year old German Shorthaired Pointer looking for a special home where she is the only dog. Meet Bon Bon and other adorable Animal Helper rescues on Saturday, July 23rd from 1-3 PM at Adventure Pets, 2989 Hwy 190, Mandeville. Photo courtesy of Zoeica Images.

Animal Helper Adoptions

Boris, a 10 year old retired NOPD Belgian malinois, deserves a wonderful place to live out his retirement. Meet Boris and other wonderful Animal Helper rescues at the Kenner PETCO, 3500 Williams Blvd. on Saturday, July 16th between 11 AM and 2 PM. Photo courtesy of Zoeica Images.

BASHFUL

DSH/MAIN COON MX. Gray/Black Tabby w/ white chest, feet. Appx. 1year old, Vet Ck/Neut./litter trained/ Rescue. Very sweet and gentle but a little shy (504) 460-0136. Wt. 11 lbs.

CHATTY CAT

KOJAK

large cuddly orange Morris the cat look a like. Neutered ,shots rescue 504 462-1968

Lab Mix

3 yr/ M, Neuterd, House Broken, Up to date on vaccines, Playful & Sweet Brenda 504-838-0736 bmigaud@ cox.net

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

DSH, Gray/Brown/Black Tabby white chest, chin, feet. Appx. 1years, Neut. Vacs/Vet Ck/litter trained/Rescue. Small, Precious, Talkative & Super gentle! Would be great pet for child or Senior. Wt. 7 lbs. (504) 460-0136

Shepherd mx pup

Elijah

Tigger

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

Kirin

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Kit Kit

Muted Gray Tabby DSH , appx. 1 year old, VetCk/Vacs/Spayed/ Litter Trained/Super Sweet/ Rescue (504) 460-0136

Merlin (approx 15 wks) very friendly w/ ppl & other animals. housebroken. contact Tracy tscannatella@gmail.com 504-874-0598

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

LEGAL NOTICES

Toto deserves a loving homeb est in a home w/ no kids housebroken &obeys commands. good watch dog contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Lab Mix

To Advertise in

ANNOUNCEMENTS

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ADAMS COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED

CAUSE NO.: 2010-770 GERALDINE SEWELL, PETITIONER SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF ORLEANS TO: ALL BORN, KNOWN, ABSENT OR UNKNOWN HEIRS OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED, TOLLIVER CARTER, CYNTHIA ELLIS, SHAREE JACKSON, TERRY JACKSON AND ANTONY JACKSON WHO ARE NOT TO BE FOUND IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI AFTER DILIGENT INQUIRY You have been made a respondent in the Petition to Determine Heirs filed

within the Court by Geraldine Sewell, seeking a judicial determination of the heirs of Catherine Ellis, Deceased. You are summoned to appear and defend against said petition filed against you in this action before the Honorable George Ward, July 28, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., at the Adams County Chancery Court Building, Natchez, Mississippi, and in case of your failure to appear and defend a judgment will be entered against you for the things demanded in the petition.

Very sweet male 2 yr pld golden brown tabby. shots ,tested ,neutered. 504 462-1968

You are not required to file an answer or other pleading but you may do so if you desire. ISSUED UNDER MY HAND AND SEAL OF THIS COURT, this the 7 day of June, 2011.

Tommy O’Beirne, Chancery Clerk Adams County Chancery Court Clerk

WHERE PET LOVERS LOVE TO SHOP!

SPAYMART Thrift & Gift Shop & Second Chance Adoption Center NOW OPEN Mon-Sat 10am-4pm 6601 Veterans Blvd Metairie Century Plaza Mall by TJ Maxx 504-454-8200 VOLUNTEERS & DONATIONS NEEDED www.spaymart.org SpaymartThriftandGift@gmail.com

By: R.M. EDMOND D.C. Publish Dates: JUNE 14, 2011, JUNE 21, 2011, JUNE 28, 2011 OF COUNSEL: JOHN D. GIDDENS, ESQUIRE (MSB # 9357) John D. Giddens, P.A. Post Office Drawer 22546

Jackson, Mississippi 39225-2546 (601) 355-2022 (601) 355-0012 fax

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2010-DR-10-4117 CHARLESTON COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS CHIMERE JASMINE, STEPHEN JASMINE, WALLACE FRANCOIS AND DUANE HURSTON. NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on October 27, 2010. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court. The Hearing on the Merits of this action has been scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on August 11, 2011, in the Family Court for the Ninth Judicial Circuit, located at 100 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS ADOPT

Adoring couple longs to adopt your newborn. Secure life. Endless love awaits. Mary & Mike, 1-800-693-1904. Expenses paid. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe GENTILLY

OLD METAIRIE

BILOXI, MS

RIVER RIDGE 9012 Rosecrest Lane

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities. Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

324 Metairie Rd - $1,950,000 Desirable Met Rd prop. Comm retail under non-conforming use. Inc 16,090 sq. ft. of land w/ exc. frontage on Met Rd & Vincent Ave. Loading dock & 7 parking spaces. Exc. redevel opp. for commercial/townhomes/single-family. Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

Only Beachfront Resort in Biloxi/Gulfport - Bank Owned 3 bedroom/3 bath, 2161 sf. Amenities, covered parking Call Janine 228-313-1352 FIDELIS REALTY Please ask me about other foreclosures

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

Reduced! $184,000

Call (504) 915-3220

FRENCH QUARTER

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

938 Royal St. A $228K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

835 Royal St. 374.5K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

GENTILLY

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

65

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000

Steve

RichaRdS

A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

Specializing in Historic French Quarter Property, Greater New Orleans and Mandeville/Covington on the NorthShore.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

504 258 1800 (Cell) • 504 948 3011 (Office)

SRichards@LatterBlum.com www.Latter-Blum.com/SteveRichards COVINGTON

16062 LAKE RAMSEY RD

109 BELLE TERRE BL

RENTALS VENETIAN ISLES

Charming cottage on huge lot. 3br, 2 ba. Great schools. 9’ ceil. Den, sunrm, garage converted to huge game rm. Huge bkyd & storage galore. $250,000. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

Better than new! 3 br, 2 ba. High ceil & crown mouldings. Beaut wd flrs. Huge master ste. Close to town, on a lrg 100 x 300 lot! $179,000. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

REAL ESTATE

ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Call (504) 483-3100

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com

201 N. SILVER MAPLE DR

Ashton Oaks, 4 BR, 2.5 BA. Gameroom, Kit with granite, wood floors down. Big Master ste, hi ceil. Never flooded. Home wrnty. Carole Woodward, Keller Williams Realty. (504)5787691. www.YourHomeYourCastle.com

20152 PALM BLVD

To Advertise in

The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist

66

Custom design, 5 br, 3.5 ba, pristine cond. Open flr plan, hdwd flrs. On 1 acre in River Heights. Lg fen yd, x-large gar, work area. More! $350,000. Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com. Classy & Custom Built! From the architectural style roof, to hrdwd flrs, & everything in between! Granite counter tops, cherry-wood cabinets, dual vanities. Agent, Tontinette Puissegur, Latter & Blum, 985-630-8465

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

19084 S. FITZMORRIS

Min. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main house 3500 sf ft 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest house 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

MANDEVILLE 12 CHANDON CT

Waterfront home nr Causeway. 4 br 3.5 ba. 2 story. Huge back deck, 2 fabulous firepl, kit has custom ss countertops, new ac & heat. $337,500. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985264-1125. soboloff@aol.com

147 E RUELLE

Organic Modern! Open, flex flrplan, 5 br, 4.5 ba. Master bath is a spa! Top of line dream kit. Media game rm. On golf course, end of cul-de-sac. $690,000. Joan Soboloff, Owner/Agent 985-2641125. soboloff@aol.com.

208 Chateau De Brie

Stunning custom home in Grande Maison. 4 BR, 3.5 BA. On cul-de-sac lot backing greenspace. Gourmet kit, keeping rm, butler’s pantry, bonus rm, basketball court & more. $499,000. 504-248-0945. www.sharpmls. com/114561

Stunning Sanctuary Elegance

90 Cardinal Lane. Upgrades Galore. 5305 / 7106 sq ft. Approx 1 acre lot . Reduced to $999,000. Call Marlene Zahn 504-236-8262 or Cindy Saia 504-577-5713. Latter & Blum Realtors, 985-246-3505. mzahn@latterblum. com

SLIDELL 120 PARADISE POINT

Outstanding view of majestic wildlife. 2 story, 4BR, 3BA, study, upstairs loft. Bathrooms & kitchen updated. Deck, patio & porch. Quiet cul-de-sac. $419,900. 985-640-8775. www.sharpmls.com/114609

133 ABERDEEN DRIVE

Cross Gates Beauty 4 br 2.5 ba . Beautiful landscaping. Big kitchen, den, formal din rm, office. No flood zone. Home wrnty. Carole Woodward, Keller Williams Realty. (504) 578-7691. www. YourHomeYourCastle.com

VENETIAN ISLES ON THE WATER

Renov’t since Katrina, 2300’ living. 3/2.5, jacuzzi tub, boat dock, W&D & all appl stay. Cherry cabs, partially furn. $235,000. 504-914-6352 Hera Realty

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

METAIRIE 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

4608 FAIRFIELD ST.

3 Br, 2.5 Ba. Approx 1800 sq ft. Lg fenced yard. Small pet OK $1200/mo plus deposits.. 504-442-0618

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

CONDO FOR SALE

Rent $970/mo 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $149,900. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352 Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS THERAPIST OFFICE SPACE

Victorian Building in Lower Garden District. Fridays Only. Call 670-2575 for information

ALGIERS POINT High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 3626 Upperline

Upr dplx, 3 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, cei fans, furn kit, w/d, off st pkg. Nice area. $1200/mo. Louis, 874-3195.

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

CBD 339 CARONDELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1275/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS warehouse dist. saLe PeNdiNG

• 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 65

70

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

BaYou st. JohN saLe PeNdiNG

330 s. diaMoNd st.

1216 North LoPeZ

hIStoRIC BuIlDInG In WaRehouSe DIStRICt PRe-1850. Stand alone building on street with beautiful neutral ground. Artist studio since 1997, open floor plan-loft style. Can be developed into exquisite residence or commercial space. Enclosed patio. Zoned CBD-8. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. $425,000

Bayou St John 4 Plex on huge lot. Well maintained. Owner’s unit has open flr plan, crown molding & whirlpool. Hdwd flrs throughout. Totally renov in 2007. Re-wired, plumbing, roof, drywall, & cen A/C throughout. Living rm opens onto patio & pool. Enjoy this tranquil setting from porch or huge balc. Pool house has storage & guest accommodations with 2 full baths. 4153 sq. ft. plus 576 Sq ft pool house. $595,000

(504) 895-4663

a utomotive

EYES ON THE ROAD By Jim motava l l i Dis t riBu t eD By Fe at ure w el l .c om

T

he owner’s manual for a Lexus GPS system I recently tested warned in boldface type: “Do not use any feature of this system to the extent it distracts you from safe driving.” Carried out to its full lawyer-inspired meaning, that probably would require disconnecting the system. I also was dismayed to encounter Beverly Hills Motoring’s customized version of the Ford Expedition, which features not only two high-resolution TV monitors in the back of the front-seat headrests, but a third monitor in the dashboard facing the driver. On a trip to Delphi Automotive Systems in Indiana, a $29 billion company that makes electronic components for automobiles, I found myself sitting in the deep leather seats of a Cadillac Seville. The next generation of mobile electronics was staring me in the face. Nestled in the Caddy’s dash, where the radio would be, was AutoPC, a full-service unit that goes way, way beyond the systems seen in cars today. If you think cellphones are a distraction for the driver, just think of the attention this integrated system will demand. The prototype AutoPC at least makes an effort to reduce driver distraction. It receives email through a built-in modem and reads it back with a synthesized voice. It had a hands-free phone. It records and plays threeminute reminder memos from the driver. It has full GPS equipment, with maps of the entire United States. It can interact with an online service to deliver news and sports scores on demand — and it will read them aloud. Ron Knockeart, vice president of Intelligent Transportation Systems for sup-

plier Siemens Automotive, told Popular Mechanics in 1999 that within a decade, “Navigation and AutoPC technology will be installed in one-third of all cars sold in the United States.” Even if nobody will actually look at a screen while driving, these telematic features — even those designed, ironically enough, for added safety — can be dangerous. “The thing is, there is a limit to how much you can pay attention to, and people already are multitasking beyond the level of their abilities,” says Stephanie Faul, communications director for the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. “Once you pile on the distractions, who knows what kind of effect you will have?” Carmakers chant a mantra that goes something like, “Both eyes on the road, both hands on the wheel,” but people conditioned by a lifelong addiction to television have a tendency to look at a display screen when it’s covered with moving images. Dr. Donald Redelmeier, a professor of medicine at the University of Toronto, conducted a 1997 study on the effects cellphone usage has on driving. “Our data show that cellphone conversations decrease the ability to pay attention and drive safely, and those detrimental effects far outweigh the benefits,” he said. The study showed that drivers using cellphones are four times as likely to get into a crash as drivers not using one. Well, the car I’m driving this week, a Cadillac CTS, doesn’t have AutoPC, and I limit my in-motion cellphone use, but I could get distracted by XM NavTraffic, the first “real time” satellite-based traffic information service for GPS systems. It’s relatively simple to use. You plot your route, and XM Satellite Radio hooks you up to current information about the average speed of traffic on highways along your route. It identifies congestion, accidents and ongoing construction. The system worked fine but offered so much useful information that it was hard not to scroll through the messages. Can you imagine plowing into a dump truck while reading about the construction crew ahead? I imagine the prudent thing to do is take a look at the route while safely ensconced in your driveway. If you order NavTraffic, you’ll pay $9.99 a month, or you can get it bundled with XM Satellite Radio for $13.98 a month.

aDvertorial

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504-368-5640 • www.SuperiorHonda.net *See dealer for details. 36 mo. lease 12k/yr. WAC thru AHFC. Ends 6/30/11. CRV: First mo. lease, $2080 cap red in adv, plus TT&L; Pilot: First mo lease, $2210, cap red in adv, plus TT&L. *MPG based on 2011 EPA mileage estimates. Use for comparison purposes only. Do not compare to models before 2008. Your actual mileage will vary depending on how you drive and maintain your vehicle.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 28 > 2011

H T PRICES! HONDA

Simply

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