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WWW.BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM

December 6 2016 Volume 37 Number 49

MUSIC A Mermaid Lounge reunion 5 | FOOD Review: Seaworthy 22 | PETS Pullout


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CONTENTS

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DECEMBER 6, 2016

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VOLU M E 37

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NUMBER 49

STAFF President & CEO | MARGO DUBOS Publisher | JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER Administrative Director | MARK KARCHER

EDITORIAL Editor | KEVIN ALLMAN Managing Editor | KANDACE POWER GRAVES Political Editor | CLANCY DUBOS Arts & Entertainment Editor | WILL COVIELLO Special Sections Editor | MISSY WILKINSON

NEWS

Senior Writer | ALEX WOODWARD Calendar & Digital Content Coordinator | KAT STROMQUIST

I-10

6

THE LATEST

7

COMMENTARY

8

CLANCY DUBOS

9

BLAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

Contributing Writers D. ERIC BOOKHARDT, RED COTTON, ALEJANDRO DE LOS RIOS, HELEN FREUND, DELLA HASSELLE, KEN KORMAN, BRENDA MAITLAND, NORA MCGUNNIGLE, ROBERT MORRIS, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

Contributing Photographer | CHERYL GERBER

PRODUCTION Production Director | DORA SISON

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Assistant Production Director | LYN VICKNAIR Pre-Press Coordinator | JASON WHITTAKER Web & Classifieds Designer | MARIA BOUÉ Graphic Designers | DAVID KROLL, EMILY TIMMERMAN,

FEATURES

WINNFIELD JEANSONNE

ADVERTISING Advertising Director | SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 / fax: 483-3159 [sandys@gambitweekly.com]

7 IN SEVEN: PICKS

5

WHAT’S IN STORE

13

Sales Administrator | MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140 [micheles@gambitweekly.com]

EAT + DRINK

22

Senior Sales Representatives

PUZZLES

66

483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com]

JILL GIEGER

PETS

JEFFREY PIZZO

PULLOUT

483-3145 [jeffp@gambitweekly.com] Sales Representatives

15

LISTINGS MUSIC

40

FILM

47

ART

50

STAGE

56

EVENTS

58

EXCHANGE

64

BRANDIN DUBOS

483-3152 [brandind@gambitweekly.com]

A MOST UNUSUAL KAT George Herriman left New Orleans to become one of the most influential cartoonists of his day, creating Krazy Kat. A generation after his death, Herriman’s biggest secret was revealed: He was black.

TAYLOR SPECTORSKY

483-3143 [taylors@gambitweekly.com] ALICIA PAOLERCIO

483-3142 [aliciap@gambitweekly.com] GABRIELLE SCHICK

483-3144 [gabrielles@gambitweekly.com]

REAL ESTATE / EMPLOYMENT Inside Sales Representative | CHRISTIN GREEN 483-3138 [christing@gambitweekly.com]

COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

MARKETING Marketing Assistant | ERIC LENCIONI Intern | KALI BERTUCCI

BUSINESS & OPERATIONS

GAMBIT COMMUNICATIONS, INC.

Chairman | CLANCY DUBOS + President & CEO | MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2016 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.

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STORY TIME

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8119-21 OAK STREET 504-866-9944 HAASES.COM

Billing Inquiries 483-3135 Business Manager | MAUREEN TREGRE Credit Officer | MJ AVILES Operations Director | LAURA FERRERA


TUE. DEC. 6 | As Pele dos Santos, the embedded troubadour and David Bowie devotee in 2004’s The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, Seu Jorge set “Starman” and “Lady Stardust” adrift on Portuguese-tongued, acoustic-memory bliss. For this tribute tour, Jorge performs his loving covers on a stage set-dressed to evoke the deck of Zissou’s Belafonte. At 8:30 p.m. at the Civic Theatre.

IN

SEVEN THINGS TO DO IN SEVEN DAYS

Mermaid Lounge, revisited

LUNA Fete WED.-SAT. DEC. 7-10 | The Arts Council of New Orleans’ annual video and light projection project combines art and technology such as digital mapping to project largescale images on notable buildings, plus other displays. From 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Lafayette Square.

A two-day festival features bands from The Mermaid Lounge’s heyday

Gogol Bordello with Nick Zinner

BY ALEX WOODWARD @ALEXWOODWARD ANTHONY DELROSARIO BOOKED MORE THAN 400 SHOWS AT THE MERMAID LOUNGE, the dive bar and music venue

on the edge of the Warehouse District that closed in 2004. For more than a decade, the venue — a centuryold former po-boy shop on the narrow John Churchill Chase Street, now occupied by The Rusty Nail — served as an alternative concert hall, squeezing in crowds around the bar with bare stage spaces in the corners. From 1999 through 2004, DelRosario and his Turducken Productions booked more than 500 shows in New Orleans, with local bands filling opening slots several times a week. “The Mermaid was my home away from home,” DelRosario says. “It was like family there. My friends hung out there, worked there. I spent hours and hours and hours there.” DelRosario resurrects Turducken for Mermaid Lounge Reunion — A Festival at The Truck Farm Dec. 9 and 10 with bands and artists (all Mermaid regulars) including Rob Cambre, Chef Menteur, Egg Yolk Jubilee, The Geraniums, the New Orleans Klezmer All-Stars, Royal Fingerbowl, Norco Lapalco and others. “With people moving here, I don’t know if they know the history of independent music in New Orleans,” DelRosario says. “Do they know what the Mermaid is?” Tuducken’s show history reads like a chronology of rising independent artists from the late 1990s to mid 2000. DelRosario booked Smog with Joanna Newsom (with Silent Cinema opening), Stars of the Lid, Animal Collective, and Godspeed You! Black Emperor with Labradford, with Godspeed band members filling most of the bar. The Mermaid also hosted Cat Power, who started reading a newspaper during her set, and Jim

White, who played for only the bar staff before Hurricane Georges made landfall in 1998. Turducken booked dozens more shows at venues around the city, including Elliott Smith at the Howlin’ Wolf in 1999, Bratmobile at El Matador in 2002 and Arcade Fire opening for The Unicorns at One Eyed Jacks in 2004. The Mermaid was fertile ground for a growing local scene of independent rock bands (Hotchkiss, Silent Cinema, Testaverde, Rotary Downs) and a beloved nucleus in a pre-Hurricane Katrina scene. DelRosario typically got to the bar at 9 p.m. with a pot of black beans and rice and a dirt-cheap case of Schaefer Beer for the bands. “The Mermaid shows always started late,” he says. “A lot of bands were expecting to get there early to soundcheck. I was like, ‘Well, you can get there at 9.’” The PA soundboard was mounted on the wall around the corner from the bar, “so the person running sound couldn’t see the stage,” DelRosario says, laughing. Crowds often spilled into the backyard if it was too busy, loud or hot. During a brief period without airconditioning inside the bar, Warren Ellis’ Dirty Three kicked open the doors. During Halloween and Mardi Gras, DelRosario also produced annual Masked Balls starting in 1996, with local bands dressing up as and performing songs as Brian Eno, Prince, Joy Division, The Ramones and Kraftwerk). There also were weekendlong festivals, art markets, a oneoff elaborate Glenn Branca tribute, fundraisers and album release parties. In 1999, Turducken released

Quintron orchestrates a performance at The Mermaid Lounge. P H OTO C O U R T E S Y O F ANTHONY DELROSARIO

FRI.-SAT. DEC. 9-10 | Following last weekend’s inspired town hall (Lost Bayou Ramblers, Rickie Lee Jones, Langhorne Slim and Spider Stacy), this “Dada Western” centennial is a creative shootout between Eugene Hutz’s Gogol Bordello crew and Yeah Yeah Yeahs guitarist Nick Zinner at the Music Box Village at 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.

Notes of a Native Song DEC. 9-10 MERMAID LOUNGE REUNION — A FESTIVAL 5 P.M.-11 P.M. FRIDAY; 2 P.M.-11 P.M. SATURDAY TRUCK FARM, 3020 ST. CLAUDE AVE.; WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ TURDUCKENPRODUCTIONS TICKETS $20; $35 FOR TWODAY PASS

a compilation record featuring several New Orleans garage and punk bands (Ramparts, Leopolds, Persuaders, Royal Pendletons, Darkest Hour, Famous Monsters and MacGillicuddys), recorded live over several nights at the Mermaid in 1998. (DelRosario modeled the album artwork after the 1980 New Orleans punk compilation N.O. Experience Necessary on Oblique Records.) Bartenders from the Mermaid also will bartend the reunion festival, and there’s food from Juan’s Flying Burrito, Sugar Park, Two Girls One Shuck and Gianna Chachere. “It crossed so many varieties of people, so many cross sections of art scenes, music scenes, and all kinds of crowds mingled together,” he says.

FRI.-SAT. DEC. 9-10 | Singer-songwriter Stew’s bluesy song cycle is his reaction to James Baldwin’s writing, specifically the writer’s examinations of race and class. The band features collaborator Heidi Rodewald and the performance includes multimedia projections. At 7:30 p.m. at the Contemporary Arts Center.

Jim Jefferies SAT. DEC. 10 | On his Freedumb Netflix special, Aussie comic Jim Jefferies had a good laugh at the crazy idea of electing Donald Trump president. His Twitter feed proves he’s still getting his head around the election as his “Unusual Punishment Tour” comes to town. At 6:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. at Joy Theater.

Nick Waterhouse MON. DEC. 12 | On his third LP, the California songwriter embraces R&B, soul and rock ’n’ roll with tailored tweed and record storeas-grad school chops. Recorded live to tape in a mobile studio, September’s Never Twice is a warm, hiss-and-pop tribute to Leiber and Stoller’s “we make records” maxim. Guitar Lightnin’ Lee opens at 8 p.m. at One Eyed Jacks.

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7 SEVEN

Seu Jorge


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I-10 News on the move

1. WAGE PROTEST DOWNTOWN More than 100 service workers and supporters took part in a “Fight for $15” protest in downtown New Orleans Nov. 29, marching with a brass band from Armstrong Park on North Rampart Street to Canal Street near a McDonald’s between Royal and Bourbon streets. Protesters blocked car and streetcar traffic in all directions for nearly an hour and linked arms, demanding a $15 an hour minimum wage and the ability to unionize. Six people sitting at the intersection were arrested for obstructing street traffic and released with citations. New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Los Angeles and Washington D.C. recently adopted $15

2. Quote of the week “We did the last Neville Brothers last year. … We did 40 years with the Brothers, and they were great years. I gave 300 percent every night, and now I have to give 300 percent to this. I have a long way to go and a short time to make it in — that makes it simple. I have to do some stuff before I get out of here — before the Lord comes and says, ‘Aaron, bring it up, son.’” — Aaron Neville, who just turned 75, talking to Relix magazine about the possibility of a Neville Brothers reunion.

3. Trump: Price is right President-elect Donald Trump last week named U.S. Rep. Tom Price, R-Georgia, as his choice to head the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS). Price, an ardent foe of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), aka Obamacare, is expected

PHOTO BY ALEX WOODWARD

minimum wage laws, and California will have a $15 minimum wage by 2019. In New Orleans, city workers earn at least $10.10 an hour, with some city contractors earning at least $10.55 an hour. New Orleans sets a citywide minimum wage at $1 more than the federal rate. But Louisiana has no minimum wage, relying on the $7.25 federal rate. More than 64,000 people in the metro area work in food service, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, with roughly 15,000 of those workers relying on tips and the base federal tipped wage of $2.13 an hour.

to lead efforts to have the ACA repealed quickly after Trump takes office. House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said last week that GOP leaders would be willing to repeal the ACA even if there are no immediate plans to replace it. On the shortlist for the HHS job, reportedly, was former Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, who headed Louisiana’s Department of Health & Hospitals when he was 24. Could Jindal have quashed his own chances? When he was running for president against Trump, Jindal called him an “egomaniacal madman,” “an unserious and unstable narcissist” and said, “Electing Donald Trump would be the second-worst thing we could do this November.”

4.

Richmond to lead Congressional Black Caucus U.S. Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-New Orleans, was elect-

ed last week to chair the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) in the upcoming 115th Congress. “As we move into a new Congress and the onset of a new Administration,” Richmond said in a statement, “our Caucus will remain committed to the values that have made the CBC among the most influential institutions in the nation.” The CBC is a bipartisan group of lawmakers dedicated to the concerns of African-Americans, and currently has 45 members from across the U.S. It was founded in 1971; Richmond will be its 25th chairman.

5.

Say hello to the hotel next door The New Orleans City Council passed a series of ordinances Dec. 1 to legalize short-term rentals on websites such as Airbnb. The new regulations include the controversial allowance of short-term rentals of entire homes (not occu-

pied by their owners) for up to 90 days a year; residents and housing advocacy groups fear landlords will take properties off the long-term rental market for more profitable short-term renting. The new rules also ban all short-term rentals in the French Quarter. Council members Jared Brossett and Susan Guidry were the only “no” votes. Brossett offered an amendment to limit the 90-day rule to 60 days and to require homestead exemption for those types of rentals. Without those protections, he said, he would not support the ordinance. The city will begin staffing an enforcement wing early next year, funded by nearly $1 million in anticipated revenue from permits and fees, and it will begin collecting taxes on short-term rentals Jan. 1. The rules kick in April 1.

6.

Krewe of Pandora a no-go for 2017 The metro area’s newest all-woman Mardi Gras krewe, Pandora, announced last week it would not roll at next year’s Carnival and would spend a year regrouping before returning to the traditional Metairie route in 2018. Pandora first rolled on Lundi Gras 2016, and the hiatus will leave Jefferson Parish with no parade on the night before Fat Tuesday.

7. Main library to close for two weeks

The New Orleans Public Library’s main branch will close Dec. 5-18 for electrical repairs, joining the Nix branch, which also is shuttered for repair. The Mid-City branch, which is moving to the Automotive Life Insurance Building at 4140 Canal St., was scheduled to hold a grand opening Dec. 5, but last week City Librarian Charles Brown emailed staff and supporters that the opening had been postponed and no new date was scheduled.

8. Baby Cakes release inaugural schedule

The Triple-A ball team formerly known as the New Orleans Zephyrs released its 2017 schedule last week. The first game of the season will be April 6, and the season will

close on Labor Day, Sept. 4. In all, 71 games will be played at the team’s home stadium on Airline Drive, which has yet to be christened with an appropriate name (the Crib, perhaps?). For all dates, visit www.cakesbaseball.com.

9.

Cohen tribute to benefit Standing Rock “Hey, That’s No Way to Say Goodbye,” a tribute to the late singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen (who died Nov. 7 at 82) will be held at Sanctuary Cultural Arts Center (2525 Burgundy St.) Dec. 6. Organizer David Symons will perform with Luke Allen, Bremner Duthie, Helen Gillet, Ingrid Lucia, MaeDea Lady LaRose, Harry Mayronne, Micah McKee, Lydia Stein and Bart Ramsey, with house band The Salt Wives. Tickets are $10$20 on a sliding scale, and all proceeds benefit protestors near the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota facing down construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, where the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has given the hundreds of Native Americans and their supporters a Dec. 5 deadline to leave. Hundreds of people have been arrested, tear gassed, blasted with water hoses and shot with rubber bullets.

10. Country music Superfest moves to New Orleans

Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton, Brooks & Dunn and Rascal Flatts will headline the 2017 Bayou Country Superfest, which moves from Baton Rouge to the Superdome Memorial Day weekend, May 26-28, 2017. The country music festival’s Saturday lineup features Lambert, Brooks & Dunn, Rascal Flatts, Brett Eldridge, Jon Pardi and Chris Lane. Sunday includes Shelton, Thomas Rhett, Hank Williams Jr., Old Dominion, Dan + Shay and Maddie & Tae. There’s a free Friday night concert in Champions Square. Festival Productions Inc., producer of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, created Bayou Country Superfest in 2010 at Baton Rouge’s Tiger Stadium. The festival moves to New Orleans due to renovations at Tiger Stadium.


THE LATEST O R L E A N S

Y@

Speak NEW ORLEANS’ WEEK IN TWITTER

Rep Cedric Richmond

@RepRichmond Working full-time should mean you don’t have to live in poverty. #Fightfor15

Elizabeth Crisp @elizabethcrisp

Fighting words in #lasen from @CampbellforLa: “I don’t think that John Kennedy would know the difference between a bulldog & a billy goat.”

JaredCBrossett @JaredCBrossett

I voted against short term rentals to protect the quality of life of our residents and preserve the character of New Orleans!

N E W S

# The Count

+

V I E W S

PAGE 29

1 in 56

The risk that a Louisianan will be diagnosed with HIV during his or her lifetime. The national average: 1 in 99.

PH OTO BY TH O MA S SCHAU E R

C’est What

? President-elect Donald Trump has said overturning the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) and replacing it with something else will be an early priority in his administration. What do you think?

Source: Centers for Disease Control

18%

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y N AT I O N A L I N S T I T U T E S O F H E A LT H

THIS PHOTO, TAKEN IN 1999 AT A DEMONSTRATION AT THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH in Bethesda, Maryland, shows the Shreveport chapter of ACT-UP demanding government action on the AIDS crisis. Seventeen years later, Louisiana ranks among the states with the highest rate of HIV infection in the nation, with 29.2 infections for every 100,000 residents (only Washington D.C. is higher, with a 66.1 infection rate). In the South, 55 percent of diagnosed HIV infections in 2015 were among African-Americans, while the percentage for white residents was less than half that: 22 percent. “In most areas of the country, HIV is concentrated in urban areas, so states reporting more diagnoses or higher rates of persons living with diagnosed HIV infection or ever classified as AIDS usually contain major metropolitan areas,” wrote the Centers for Disease Control in a recent report. “But in the South, larger percentages of diagnoses are in smaller metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas.” — KEVIN ALLMAN

GREAT

40% TERRIBLE

42% NEED TO KNOW WHAT THE REPLACEMENT WILL BE

Tyrann Mathieu @Mathieu_Era

Damn RIP Joe McKnight. Killed in his own city, #504Boys4Life

Thumbs Up/Thumbs Down

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

Wendell Pierce @WendellPierce

RIP Joe McKnight. I was able to watch my hometown phenom here at USC. Killed in our hometown of metro New Orleans. We are in crisis NOLA

Shaun King @ShaunKing FYI. I’m all over the murder of #JoeMcKnight. I’m following every move of the police department, investigators, and his murderer.

For more Y@Speak, visit bestofneworleans.com every Monday.

Propeller and the The Midlo Center New Orleans Start- for New Orleans er Fund received Studies at the Uni-

Louisiana continues to have one of the highest rates of STD $250,000 to create the versity of New Orleans diagnoses in the U.S., illustrated in a recent Propeller Social Impact received a $2,000 Equity Fund, part of Rebirth Grant from the report from the Centers for Disease Control. a $15 million national Louisiana Endowment Using data from 2015, initiative from the U.S. for the Humanities Louisiana ranked high Economic Develop(LEH) to collect oral ment Administration’s histories from members among U.S. states for rates of chlamydia (No. Regional Innovation of the Sisters of the 2), gonorrhea (No. 1) Strategies Program. The Holy Family, foundand syphilis (No. 1). The fund will help invest in ed by free woman of state also has the highnew local companies color Henriette DeLille est rates of HIV/AIDS dithrough a three-month in 1842. Parts of the agnoses in Baton Rouge accelerator program. project will be used by and New Orleans. WWNO-FM’s “Tripod” program and published by the LEH.

!

N.O.

Comment

Under the story “The fight for $15 in New Orleans,” readers said: “What different labor is worth is a pointless argument. A $15 minimum wage would put a lot more money in the hands of the poorer end of the labor market. They would spend that money locally - it would be a boon to local businesses.” — John Holmes

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COMMENTARY

Rye

Vote this Saturday

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head to the polls one more time this Saturday, Dec. 10, to elect a new U.S. Senator. Locally, voters in Orleans and Jefferson parishes also will decide the fate of a half-dozen important ballot propositions. In Jefferson, the ballot features four tax renewals for public schools, recreation, drainage, infrastructure and public safety. Renewal of these existing levies will not increase local taxes. We urge approval of all four renewals. In Kenner, we endorse Jefferson Parish Councilman Ben Zahn for mayor. New Orleans voters will consider two citywide propositions — a new 2.5-mill property tax increase for fire protection services and renewal of an existing property tax

for drainage services. We support both propositions. For more information about the ballot propositions, see our Commentary from last week at www.bestofneworleans.com/ ballotprops2016.

Saturday, December 10th 2 to 6 pm SECOND LINE BREWING 433 N. BERNODETTE ST.

THE GAMBIT BALLOT GAMBIT’s Endorsements U.S. SENATOR

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Ben Zahn

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JEFFERSON PARISH PROPOSITIONS SALES TAX RENEWAL

DRAINAGE TAX RENEWAL

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SCHOOL TAX RENEWAL

RECREATION TAX RENEWAL

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CLANCY DUBOS

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@clancygambit

‘Editor’s note’ FOR YEARS I HAD THE PLEASURE OF EDITING JEREMY ALFORD’S WEEKLY COLUMNS AND TYLER BRIDGES’ OCCASIONAL STORIES IN THIS NEWSPAPER.

Both writers are firstrate journalists and terrific storytellers. When they asked me to edit Long Shot (see Cover Story Nov. 29), their book on the 2015 governor’s race, I was honored. And daunted. From the outset, we all knew that collaborating on such an epic story would present challenges as unique as Louisiana’s storied brand of politics. For starters, Jeremy and Tyler have very distinct writing styles, and each has his own “take” on state politics. Add to that mix an opinionated editor and it’s a small miracle Long Shot got done at all. Then there are the readers, many of them experts in their own right. No doubt there will be plenty of critics. That’s only fair. In the end, Jeremy and Tyler’s commitment to getting it right and telling the story as honestly — and as thoroughly — as possible overcame every obstacle. Above all, they did a magnificent job of giving the book one “voice.” In doing so, they made my job as editor easy — and a genuine pleasure. Every time I finished editing a chapter, I literally could not wait to receive the next one. I hope readers will enjoy Long Shot as much as I did. If I contributed anything to the work, I hope it was my challenge to the authors to tell the story in a way that would appeal to readers outside Louisiana. I believed from the get-go that while the tale of John Bel Edwards’ come-from-nowhere campaign should capture Louisiana’s colorful characters and unrivaled political mystique, the fundamental lessons inherent in his victory hold true in all 50 states. Tyler and Jeremy met that challenge and more. In fact, the book at one point mentions Donald Trump’s equally improbable up-ending of the

GOP primary field as an example of how an underdog can still win — especially when he or she faces a notably flawed opponent. Truly, the political lessons imparted in Long Shot apply across the board, not just across the country, in races large and small. I’m fond of saying there’s never a recession in Louisiana politics. The events and characters recounted in Long Shot prove that beyond all doubt. It arrives in bookstores this week, just in time for Christmas. I can’t wait to read it again. Gambit and Martin Wine Cellar are co-sponsoring a book signing of Long Shot from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11, at Martin Wine Cellar (3827 Baronne St.). New Orleans’ most famous political experts, James Carville and Mary Matalin — who wrote dueling forewords to Long Shot — are co-hosting the event. It’s a great chance to mix and mingle with Carville, Matalin, Alford and Bridges — and to shop for wine, spirits and copies of Long Shot for gift-giving. Attendance is free but limited. Sign up at www.bestofneworleans/longshot and order advance copies of the book at www. louisianalongshot.com. Hope to see you there.

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BLAKE PONTCHARTRAIN™

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@GambitBlake | askblake@gambitweekly.com

Hey Blake, A while ago you wrote about a large sculpture of red roses in City Park. That sculpture has now been replaced with a smaller one of roses that are blue. Is this going to be a changing exhibit of roses?

Dear reader, One of the great things about New Orleans City Park is that there’s always something new to discover there. In this case, it’s something new but familiar. That’s because the new blue rose sculpture is similar to the towering red one a reader asked about in August 2015. Both sculptures are the work of New York artist Will Ryman. The piece he originally installed at the park was unveiled in October 2014 as part of the Prospect.3 New Orleans art festival. That 30-foot-tall cadmium red sculpture, complete with roses, stems and thorns, was titled Icon. Though the art festival ended in January 2015, the sculpture remained on view well past that.

Encore was sculpted by New York artist Will Ryman. P H OTO B Y K A N DAC E P O W E R G R AV E S

A City Park spokesman joked that there was a hard freeze last winter and the red roses took it hard, shriveled and changed color. After a laugh, he explained that the real story is that the red rose sculpture was sold and now resides in California. The blue rose sculpture, titled Encore, is on display at the same location in the park on a temporary basis, or until it sells and is moved to a new home.

BLAKEVIEW WHERE WERE YOU ON DEC. 5, 1981? If you were one of the 87,500 people at the Superdome to see the Rolling Stones, you may remember making music history. This week marks the 35th anniversary of the show that broke the record for the largest attendance at an indoor concert with 87,500 audience members. The concert — which featured opening acts The Neville Brothers and George Thorogood and the Destroyers — came near the end of the English group’s three-month U.S. tour. According to online set lists, the Stones opened with “Under My Thumb” and included classics such as “Let’s Spend the Night Together,” “Start Me Up,” “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” and the band’s version of the song also associated with New Orleans’ own Irma Thomas, “Time Is On My Side.” The Stones closed with “Satisfaction” and “The Star-Spangled Banner.” “Clad in a red and white Hawaiian shirt with sweat pouring off, Mick Jagger danced and gyrated across the stage of the Superdome Saturday night as the stadium shook with the deafening music of the Rolling Stones,” The Times-Picayune reported on its front page the next morning. A few days before the concert, columnist Betty Guillaud chronicled a private party hosted for the Stones aboard the riverboat President, catered by Paul Prudhomme and featuring music from The Meters, Deacon John Moore, Clarence “Frogman” Henry and The Neville Brothers. In all, the Stones have played the Superdome four times (1978, 1981, 1989 and 1994). The 1981 attendance record held for 33 years before it was topped by a June 2014 George Strait concert in Dallas that drew 104,793 people.

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WHAT’S IN STORE

BY KATHERINE M. JOHNSON

Pies, cakes and other desserts are available at Chez Pierre French Bakery. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

BY MISSY WILKINSON

EVEN PEOPLE WHO NEVER VISIT CHEZ PIERRE FRENCH BAKERY (2901

David Drive, Metairie, 504-267-5839; 3208 Clearview Parkway, Metairie, 504-467-3176; www.chezpierreneworleans.com) may have tasted one of its confections. For 15 years, Chez Pierre has catered events at venues citywide, including the Superdome, Smoothie King Center and the National World War II Museum. Owner Katrina Tran’s previous ventures include Lin’s Bakery and Frosty’s Caffe. Since opening Chez Pierre’s Clearview location in 2015, she and her team of bakers also have provided pastries to all Puccino’s and Fairchild’s Ice Cream locations. “The other bakers (and I) put our hearts in everything we make, and we put our passion in it,” Tran says. “You can taste the difference.” Chez Pierre French Bakery opened in the 1980s, but Tran expanded the business when she bought it in 2005. Blocks of fresh butter and sacks of flour cover nearly every surface in the Metairie bakery’s kitchen. The shop’s gleaming countertops and refrigerated cases showcase options for every sweet tooth. “We do everything from the sim-

SHOPPING NEWS PILOT AND POWELL (3901 Magazine St., 504-8271727; www.pilotandpowell. com), a luxury women’s clothing store, held its grand opening last week. Designer brands include Marni, Phillip Lim and Tabitha Simmons. SECOND LINE BREWING (433 N. Bernadotte St., 504248-8979; www.secondlinebrewing.com) hosts a holiday market from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10. Goods including leather items, ceramics jewelry and more will be for sale, and there will be a food truck and coffee.

ple to the extravagant,” says Tran, who employs a multilingual staff. Petit fours, casino mousse, red velvet cakes, eclairs and croissants are wrapped and packaged by the staff. Custom orders for special events include sculpted 3-D cakes and multi-layered Chantilly wedding cakes. Born in Vietnam, Tran learned to cook from her grandmother. Vietnam’s French culinary influence inspired Tran, who serves tradition-

al and modern Vietnamese food alongside classic French pastries at Chez Pierre. She devotes equal attention to pho and chocolate ganache. Scones and flaky meat pies share a display case. Crawfish pies and banh mi are on the menu as well. “We make everything from scratch, and it’s freshly made every day,” Tran says. “If I won’t eat it myself, I’m not going to serve it. … I cook for the whole town to eat.”

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS/ NEW ORLEANS LITERARY FESTIVAL (www.tennesseewilliams.net) holds an online auction through Friday, Dec. 9. Goods and services from 75 local businesses are for sale, and proceeds benefit the festival’s programs and educational outreach. Visit www.501auctions. com/twfest to bid. THE OUTLET COLLECTION AT RIVERWALK (500 Port of New Orleans Place, 504-5221555; www.riverwalkneworleans.com) holds a fashion sale to raise funds for Dress for Success from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10 and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11.

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One of the 20th century’s most influential cartoonists kept a secret until his death: He was black. In a new book, Michael Tisserand explores the world of George Herriman, the New Orleans-born creator of Krazy Kat. BY KEVIN ALLMAN | @KEVINALLMAN

GEORGE HERRIMAN’S PEN TOOK HIM FAR FROM HIS CHILDHOOD HOME ON NORTH VILLERE STREET IN TREME. By the time he

was in his early 20s, he was a newspaper illustrator, working in New York and Los Angeles and dipping into the relatively new medium of the funny pages. By the time he died in 1944 at age 63, he had created dozens of strips — the most

famous, influential and long-lasting of which was Krazy Kat, a 31-year exploration of the love-hate relationship between a cat and a mouse. Charles Schulz (Peanuts) cited him as an influence, as did Dr. Seuss. In later years, artists as varied as R. Crumb and Bill Watterson (Calvin and Hobbes) reflected Herriman’s anarchic, surreal style in their

own drawings. Jack Kerouac cited Krazy Kat as an inspiration for the Beats. But Herriman had a secret all his life, one that wasn’t discovered until 26 years after his death, when a researcher pulled his birth certificate from the records of the New Orleans Health Department. On it was a three-letter designation: “col.,” for “colored.”


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George Herriman was acclaimed in his day, but his black Creole heritage wasn’t discovered until a generation after his death.

In this 1939 color panel, the zeitgeist of Krazy Kat is laid out simply: Ignatz Mouse won’t stop lobbing bricks at the oblivious Krazy Kat, while Officer Pupp dreams of putting Ignatz in jail for good. Behind them is one of Herriman’s trademark surreal Southwestern landscapes, which always seemed in constant motion.

The most influential pioneering cartoonist in American newspaper history was a black man. And until 1970, no one ever had suspected. HERRIMAN’S LIFE HAD BEEN EXPLORED ONLY PIECEMEAL UNTIL MICHAEL TISSERAND TOOK AN INTEREST. A fan of comics and

cartoons, Tisserand — a former Gambit editor — had planned to do a cover story for the paper on Herriman and his legacy when Hurricane Katrina hit and the levees failed. Weeks later, when he was able to get back into Gambit’s offices, Tisserand found that floodwaters had come to the very top of his desk but not overtopped it, and that his preliminary research sat there, intact. That was the beginning of a nearly 10-year research odyssey that culminates this month with the publication of Krazy: George Herriman, A Life in Black and

White (Harper Collins, $35), an exhaustive look at the cartoonist and how he expressed himself through Krazy, a crudely drawn, lovesick black cat that was both male and female, depending on what the strip called for. “Krazy Kat has racial implications we’re still trying to grapple with and understand as a country,” Tisserand says. Tisserand was living in Chicago when he saw the touring exhibit Masters of American Comics, which included some of Herriman’s work. That, along with his initial research, inspired Tisserand to write a book proposal. “Once I had the contract I had no idea how to do the book,” he says. “But I felt a need to write New Orleans history. This was 2006 [one year after Hurricane Katrina]. Our understanding of our home here needs to be continually deepened.”

That proved to be more tenuous than might be thought. Though Herriman was born in New Orleans, his family left for California when he was young, and in later years he traveled back and forth from Los Angeles to New York, never returning to his hometown. The backgrounds of the Krazy Kat strips are distinctly Southwestern, drawing from Herriman’s memory of the mesas and canyons of Arizona. Only Krazy’s odd patois — which Tisserand describes as “Elizabethan English, German, Creole, newspaper slang and more that I’m still trying to identify” — bears any obvious relation to New Orleans. The strip itself is deceptively simple: Krazy is a dimwitted cat who pines for Ignatz, a perpetually grouchy mouse who lives only to clock Krazy with an endless supply of bricks. (Krazy mistakes each painful brick as a token of Ignatz’s love: “Lil Aingil!” Krazy exclaims.) Meanwhile, a third character, Officer Pupp, schemes to put the violent Ignatz in jail; in later years, Pupp develops a crush on Krazy, setting up a constantly thwarted love triangle. This simple setup inspired many other cat-mouse pairs, from the obvious like Tom and Jerry, Herman and Katnip and The Simpsons’ Itchy and

Scratchy (“I think it’s hard for any cat-and-mouse comic not to be in the shadow of Krazy,” Tisserand says) to the less obvious; Tisserand points out that Charlie Brown’s endlessly botched attempts to kick a football in Peanuts were taken directly from a Herriman panel where Ignatz snatches away a ball. Both Charlie Brown’s crush on the Little Red-Haired Girl and Lucy’s love of the oblivious Schroeder echo Krazy’s fruitless pursuit of Ignatz. After reading Krazy Kat, Tisserand says, “Charles Schulz said very specifically that he needed to make a strip about more than just the funny antics of little children.” Then there are Ren and Stimpy, the gonzo 1990s dogand-cat pair of the TV show of the same name, whose own gender fluidity is a direct reflection of Herriman. Of Ren and Stimpy’s violent and often gross antics, Entertainment Weekly wrote, “Comic-strip aficionados will recognize that R&S’s unfulfilled attraction is a cruder echo of the one between George Herriman’s Krazy Kat and Ignatz Mouse.” Like Krazy and Ignatz, the two occasionally have a domestic relationship (even sharing a bed), and like Krazy, the moronic Stimpy — who adores Ren completely — is PAGE 19


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Krazy: George Herriman, a Life in Black and White PAGE 16

6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6 Octavia Books 513 Octavia St., (504) 899-7323

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(Tisserand will sign books and present a program of classic film comedy that includes a vintage Krazy Kat short subject and the 1928 comedy Steamboat Bill Jr.) PAGE 20

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PAGE 19

Krazy’s “dual personality.”

Krazy and Ignatz: “a study in black and white.”

In Krazy and Ignatz’s world, changing one’s complexion was a prank.

able to switch gender; in one episode, Stimpy becomes pregnant. Eighty years before Ren and Stimpy, though, Krazy was mulling, “I don’t know if I should to take a husband or a wife [sic],” and according to Elisabeth Crocker, who wrote a 1994 essay on the topic, Herriman claimed even he wasn’t sure of Krazy’s gender. This sort of cheerful, anarchic surrealism on the funny pages was unusual in Herriman’s day and wasn’t popular with the public. If not for the backing of a patron — powerful newspaperman William Randolph Hearst — Krazy Kat surely would have gone the way of Herriman’s less successful comic strips, such as The Dingbat Family and Baron Bean. Though intellectuals liked it (both President Woodrow Wilson and poet e.e. cummings were fans), Tisserand reports that in 1944, Krazy Kat appeared in only 44 papers, while Blondie was in more than 1,000. “Krazy Kat always ranked at the bottom,” Tisserand says. “There were letters to the editor that said things like, ‘Tie a rope around that cat and throw it in the river.’ Having a lead character that was both male and female — it affected people the way transgender bathrooms drive people crazy today. It was just unthinkable.” JUST AS UNTHINKABLE, IT SEEMS, WAS THE IDEA THAT A FAMOUS, CELEBRATED CARTOONIST COULD BE BLACK.

Herriman avoided the topic, according to Tisserand (though he listed himself as “Caucasian” on his war papers) and his colleagues knew him variously as having French, Greek or Jewish roots. The secret was so well-kept, according to Stanley Crouch in his essay Blues for Krazy Kat, that not even other black intellectuals suspected; in the 1970s, Ralph Ellison, author of Invisible Man, expressed astonishment that Herriman was “a Negro.” Reading Krazy Kat today with this knowledge adds further dimension to the cartoon, as Krazy (and sometimes Ignatz) changes color from time to time, whether by going into a beauty parlor, getting covered with paint or for no reason at all.

In one multipanel strip, Krazy gets doused with whitewash by a house painter and changes from black to white. Meanwhile, Ignatz sits by a creek and rhapsodizes, “Gosh, I wish a beautiful nymph would come along, and take a bath right now while I’m here. And sure enough, here comes one now — white as a lily, pure as the driven snow.” Of course, it’s Krazy, who emerges from the creek black again — and Ignatz, enraged, clocks the cat with a brick. To modern eyes, Herriman’s creation may seem crude, and Krazy’s strange patois might take some patience, but Tisserand says, “With a little bit of time invested and a little bit of careful reading out loud, the work speaks for itself. … The rest of the strip is poetic. It’s only Krazy [who speaks in a strange manner]. One of my hopes is that this biography — while it’s not needed to appreciate Krazy Kat — will make Krazy Kat accessible to readers. “It also helps to imagine a guy not being sure who he is,” Tisserand adds. “He never came back to New Orleans, he never talked about it; there was a sort of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ about his ethnicity. It would have been a scandal. Even when he was in his late 20s, the newspaper ran stories about people who had ‘Negro blood.’ Herriman is a model of maintaining a stubborn vision despite how people are reacting to your work.” Herriman lived a celebrated, storied life, but despite nearly 10 years of research, Tisserand found a number of mysteries and dead ends in the cartoonist’s life. Those are illustrated — literally — in some of the dozens of cartoons in Krazy, many not seen since their original newspaper publication. “He said sometimes he tries to do what is expected of him, but he just can’t do it,” Tisserand says. “When you see the work he did as a teenager in the Los Angeles Herald — from the very beginning he was going way beyond what’s expected of him.”


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Shell game

Email dining@gambitweekly.com

On tap FRERET BEER ROOM (5018 Fre-

ret St., 504-298-7468; www. freretbeerroom.com), the beerfocused restaurant from owner Eli Gay, opened Nov. 30, but there was no booze as of press time because it hasn’t obtained alcohol permits. The casual eatery’s concept is built around beer education and beer pairings. Chef Charles Vincent formerly worked at Emeril’s Delmonico and La Petite Grocery. His menu includes beef carpaccio; a fall vegetable salad with toasted pepitas, shaved pecorino and

Seaworthy specializes in oysters from America’s coasts and Canada BY H E L E N F R E U N D @helenfreund “AMERICAN OYSTERS DIFFER AS MUCH AS AMERICAN PEOPLE,” AUTHOR M.F.K. FISHER FAMOUSLY WROTE in

Consider the Oyster, her love letter to the bivalve mollusks. That sentiment is the driving force behind Seaworthy, a new restaurant with a maritime attitude featuring oysters from the East, West and Gulf coasts, tucked inside a historic townhouse sidling the Ace Hotel. Exploring the delicate nuances of oysters here is a delight, but a costly one (most oysters are $3 apiece, though prices sometimes are reduced during happy hour). Each oyster is distinct, from the shape and coloring of its shell to its tiny pale body, full of flavor and liquor. There are the fluted shells of Fanny Bay oysters, plucked from the pristine and chilly waters of British Columbia’s Baynes Sound. Hammersley Inlet oysters feature a strong essence of cucumber and travel all the way from South Puget Sound. And the Beausoleil oysters from Miramichi Bay in New Brunswick, Canada, are petite yet plump, with a slight buttery taste and just a hint of brine. Oysters hailing from the Gulf South, on the other hand, are milder in flavor: a little sweet and often creamy, carrying a touch of seawater but never enough to be called truly briny. Though they have a long history devoid of superlatives, that’s changed with the emergence of off-bottom cultivation techniques in the Gulf, where oysters are suspended in floating cages, as opposed to traditional bottom-harvesting methods. Seaworthy’s selection of Gulf oysters is on constant rotation. A recent selection read like a road map of the

FORK CENTER

Gulf South: creamy Bama Beauties came from Sandy Bay, Alabama, slightly salty Bama Bay oysters from neighboring Mobile Bay, and milder tasting Champagne Bay and Area 3 oysters (taken from the Chandeleur Sound) represented Louisiana. There is nary a saltine in sight, but the house-made oyster crackers pack a buttery, salty crunch. Though oysters are the focus, chef Daniel Causgrove’s menu includes several excellent fish and seafood dishes. A whole-roasted speckled trout arrives with crisped skin, drizzled in an emerald chimichurri and draped over soft potatoes. Both that dish and the butter-poached sheepshead are prime choices, but the latter is especially decadent and comes swimming in a chili-spiked nantua sauce, a French-inspired cream medley flavored with crawfish tails. Brandade, a creamy Provencal fish dish that traditionally employs salt cod, swaps in smoked sturgeon, which lends the whipped spread a slight smoky touch, while a garnish of compressed cucumbers adds crunch. A tiny mountain of blue crab arrives topping toasts slathered with Creole-spiced aioli; cherry tomatoes add a burst of sweetness and acidity, while the flavors of tarragon and basil tie together the dainty starter. Some aspects that come off as precious, such as glass salt shakers

A variety of oysters is displayed on a bed of ice at Seaworthy. P H OTO B Y C H E R Y L G E R B E R

serving as mignonette dispensers. The lobster roll is a nice take on the East Coast staple with fennel, lemon and pickled cucumbers; the size, however, is not appropriate for the $27 price tag. For culinary landlubbers, there’s a brisket and chuck burger, earthy andouille dirty rice stuffing and a pork belly starter in which glazed hunks of the belly are coupled with dollops of fresh ricotta cheese and crispy Granny Smith apples. There’s a masculine, seaman’s lodge aesthetic to the restaurant, which is striking, featuring Prussian blue accents, dark wood and the bright glimmer of marble and oysters. Though the multi-level space is beautiful throughout, the best spot in the house is at the downstairs bar, where oysters are displayed from hanging wire baskets and nestled on a gleaming bed of ice. Here, one can get closest to the shuckers who engage in friendly banter and the oysters themselves — the source, and the very heartbeat of this place. Email Helen Freund at helensfreund@gmail.com

?

$

WHERE

WHEN

630 Carondelet St., (504) 930-3071; www.seaworthynola.com

dinner Mon.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun.

HOW MUCH

WHAT WORKS

WHAT DOESN’T

expensive

oysters, butter-poached sheepshead

lobster roll is small for the price

CHECK, PLEASE North American oysters are highlights at buzzy, maritimethemed Warehouse District restaurant

satsuma vinaigrette; and tomatobraised meatballs with polenta and arugula. Prince Edward Island mussels are served with smoked oyster and tomato aioli. Entrees include pan-roasted Gulf fish, chicken confit served with popcorn rice, a soft-boiled egg, pickles and vegetables, and a grilled Two Run Farm pork chop with lentils, turnips and kale. The list of beers available on tap includes Weihenstephaner Hefeweizen, NOLA Brewing Company’s Irish Channel Stout and Tart of Steel, New Belgium Brewing Company’s Accumulation White IPA, Bell’s Brewery’s Best Brown Ale and others. Freret Beer Room is open for dinner Monday and Wednesday through Sunday. Brunch is served on Saturday and Sunday. — HELEN FREUND

Snowball warning IT’S GOING TO GET A BIT CHILLIER

when snowball favorite Hansen’s Sno-Bliz (4801 Tchoupitoulas St.,


EAT+DRINK

Hot and cold OWNERS RIA AND ROSS TURNBULL HELD A GRAND OPENING OF PICCOLA GELATERIA (4525 Freret

Avo’s Feast of Seven Fishes menu includes linquine with clams.

St., 954-618-8141; www.facebook. com/piccolagelateria) Dec. 2. The cafe specializes in Italian coffee drinks and gelato, with 18 house-made flavors, many of which will change seasonally. Ross makes the small-batch gelato in-house daily. There are traditional flavors such as vanilla, chocolate and Nutella and a rotating list of daily creations including pomegranate sorbet and pistachio, sea-salted caramel, lemon mint and tiramisu gelato. The opening menu also includes snacks, such as piadina — Italian flatbreads topped with savory items including prosciutto, Stracchino cheese, arugula and tomatoes. A breakfast version features eggs, rosemary ham, Stracchino, tomatoes and arugula. The Turnbulls plan to add sweet and savory crepes to the menu. Piccola Gelateria is open from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday and Sunday and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. — HELEN FREUND

chefs at the event, including Kevin Nashan of Peacemaker Lobster & Crab Co. in St. Louis, Ryan Pruitt and Stephen Stryjewski of Peche, Mike Lata of The Ordinary in Charleston, South Carolina and Chris Hastings of Hot and Hot Fish Club in Birmingham, Alabama. The dinner includes a cocktail hour with snacks at 6 p.m., five courses, a dessert and wine pairings. Tickets are $125 per person. Call the restaurant to buy tickets or for more information. Chef Nick Lama also has created a Feast of Seven Fishes menu at Avo (5908 Magazine St., 504-5096550; www.restaurantavo.com) available Dec. 10-24. It’s a sevencourse tasting menu that includes a Sicilian frutti de mer salad, charred octopus with pineapple and Calabrian chilies, linguine and clams and more. It costs $78 per person or $108 with selected wines. — HELEN FREUND

Newer Neyow

Windsor Court casual

NEYOW’S CREOLE CAFE (3332

CAFE ANGLAIS IS NOW OPEN INSIDE THE WINDSOR COURT HOTEL

Bienville St., 504-827-5474) moved to a new building around the corner from its former location. The much larger spot features a long bar, floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking Bienville Street and a patio. Much of the Creole-Southern comfort food menu remains the same, but additions include barbecued shrimp and desserts, such as mini praline cakes. Neyow’s is open for lunch and dinner Monday through Saturday. — HELEN FREUND

Merry fishmas JOSEPHINE ESTELLE (600 Carondelet St., 504-930-3070; www.josephineestelle.com) hosts a five-course dinner Tuesday, Dec. 6, to celebrate the Italian-American Feast of the Seven Fishes tradition. Chefs Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman will be joined by five guest

(300 Gravier St., 504-523-6000; www.windsorcourthotel.com). The cafe is part of a recent $22 million renovation at the luxury hotel that also included a new lobby cocktail bar and a spa. The grab-and-go cafe serves French Truck Coffee and light fare, including a Mediterranean salad with lemon and dill, a chicken salad pita, a prime rib focaccia sandwich and a ham and Swiss cheese croissant. Confections and desserts from hotel pastry chef Shun Li include muffins, Danish pastries, a chocolate pot de creme, yuzu tarts and vanilla panna cotta. It also offers beer, half-bottles of wine and locally made soft drinks such as Fest Cola and Big Easy Bucha. Cafe Anglais is open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday. — HELEN FREUND

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504-891-9788; www.snobliz.com) opens for a three-day run. The popular snowball shop announced it will sell specialty snowballs Dec. 16-18. Hansen’s typically operates seasonally, from spring to late summer, and it closed its doors on its 77th season on Oct. 1. There’s no word yet on what holiday snowball flavors will be. — HELEN FREUND

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EAT+DRINK nora@nolabeerblog.com

BY NORA McGUNNIGLE

@noradeirdre

NEW ORLEANS’ NEWEST BREWERY,

Wayward Owl Brewing Company (3940 Thalia St,, 504-827-1646; www.waywardowlbrewing.com), has opened a tasting room to sell test batches of beer before its official grand opening event Dec. 17. Located in the renovated Gem Theater in Broadmoor, the brewery’s tasting room is open 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. The brewery began a soft opening Nov. 25. Initial offerings are brewer-owner Justin Boswell’s Clean Slate IPA, which uses Mosaic and Equinox hops for a piney and citrus hop flavor, and the early tasting-room favorite, Tawny Twit English Pale Bitter, an ESB (extra special bitter) originally brewed to propagate yeast to use in the brewery’s Scotch Ale. “Now that we have it, we love it,” Boswell says. Boswell plans to add the Englishstyle beer to its regular rotation. Test batches of Wayward Owl’s Kristallweizen and Scotch Ale also are available for sampling. “The soft opening is all about getting feedback in order to be sure that the beers are finely tuned before sending them out to retailers, which is our main focus as a production brewery,” Boswell says. • Nuit Belge, an event featuring Belgian and Belgian-style beers,

OF WINE THE WEEK

Justin Boswell pours a beer at Wayward Owl Brewery. P H OTO B Y N O R A M C G U N N I G L E

returns to New Orleans at 7 p.m. Feb. 3, 2017 at Generations Hall. Tickets are available at www. nuitbelge.com for both the general session ($99) and the VIP session ($149). The VIP session begins at 5:30 p.m. and features a special tasting of rare beers from Blackberry Farm Brewery. Seating is limited. Among the 13 restaurants scheduled to pair food with Belgian or Belgian-style beers are Maypop, Patois, Peche, Angeline and Compere Lapin. Ticket buyers can get $10 off the price of the general session by using the code nora10 until midnight Dec. 11.

winediva1@bellsouth.net

BY BRENDA MAITLAND

2014 Santo Cristo Seleccion Garnacha Campo de Borja, Spain Retail $9-$13

Tempranillo is Spain’s most planted grape. Garnacha, a precursor to French grenache, is the second most planted grape and produces easy-drinking, fruit-forward, lively wines. Santo Cristo Seleccion Garnacha was produced in the Campo de Borja Denominacion de Origen (DO) northwest of the Zaragoza province, between the plains of the Ebro River and the Sistema Iberico Mountains. The region’s elevated vineyards (1,200 to 1,800 feet above sea level) receive good sun exposure, and the low-yield vineyards, averaging 25 to 40 years old, produce concentrated fruit. Santo Cristo’s 2014 harvest of whole clusters occurred in late October. The grapes were destemmed, crushed and placed into vats for temperature-controlled fermentation. In the glass, the wine offers aromas of ripe red berries and a whiff of spice. On the palate, taste raspberry, cherry, spice, dusty tannins and a pleasant minerality. Open 15 minutes before serving. Drink it with skewered beef, roasted vegetables, sausage, poultry, veal or pasta dishes. Buy it at: Pearl Wine Co., Spirit Wine and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. Drink it at: Lola’s and Patois.

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DECEMBER 8

Tales of the Toddy 6:30 p.m. Thursday Hyatt Regency New Orleans, Celestin Ballroom, 601 Loyola Ave., (504) 561-1234 www.talesofthecocktail.com The Tales of the Cocktail event features more than 50 local bartenders making holiday drinks, including nogs and toddies. There’s food from area restaurants such as Balise, Broussard’s, Kenton’s, La Thai Uptown, Primitivo and others. A portion of proceeds supports the United States Bartenders Guild education programs. Tickets $49.

DECEMBER 10

Jingle Bugs holiday celebration 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, 423 Canal St., (504) 524-2847 www.auduboninstitute.org The holiday celebration at the Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium includes fruit fly cake, peppermint cricket bark and bug nog. There’s also a gumdrop hunt, face painting, balloons, visits with Santa and more. Free with regular museum admission ($19.95 adults, $14.95 children and seniors).

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Cookie Stations! 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday Southern Food & Beverage Museum, 1830 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., (504) 569-0405 www.natfab.org The cooking class for kids ages 7-15 features stations for mixing, baking and decorating cookies and focuses on sugar and gingerbread cookies, but thumbprint cookies and chocolate eggnog also are included. Tickets $20, $15 for Southern Food & Beverage Museum members.

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Carrollton Market

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EST. 1946

Open Tuesday - Saturday 5:30 PM –9:30 PM

504.436.8950 504.436.9942

DECEMBER 11

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FIVE PLACES FOR HOLIDAYTHEMED COCKTAILS

8132 Hampson St., (504) 252-9928 www.carrolltonmarket.com The Mistletoe is made with cava, pomegranate juice and sugar, and the Poinsettia has gin, cava and cranberry juice.

914 Union St., (504) 603-2442 www.catahoulahotel.com The rooftop bar features hot buttered rum and house-made coconut milk eggnog.

The Sazerac Bar The Roosevelt New Orleans, 130 Roosevelt Way, (504) 648-1200 www.therooseveltneworleans.com Santa’s Candy Cane features Rumple Minze Peppermint Schnapps, creme de cacao, a raspberry swirl and a candy cane.

4

5

Revel Cafe & Bar 133 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 309-6122 www.revelcafeandbar.com Bartender Chris McMillian offers a hot seasonal cocktail each week in December.

DINING CASUALLY IN THE FRENCH QUARTER DOESN’T GET ANY FINER.

Superior Seafood and Oyster Bar 4338 St. Charles Ave., (504) 293-3474 www.superiorseafoodnola.com The Golden Child cocktail features Earl Grey-infused gin, rosemary syrup, egg white and a rosemary sprig.

OPEN EVERYDAY FROM 11AM-10PM

95 FRENCH MARKET PLACE 504.522.9500

2015

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29 G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

3-COURSE INTERVIEW

Lior Lev Sercarz CHEF/SPICE PURVEYOR AT HIS NEW YORK STORE LA BOITE (WWW.LEBOITENY.COM), LIOR LEV SERCARZ SELLS CUSTOM SPICE BLENDS TO CHEFS AND HOME COOKS.

After training with chef Olivier Roellinger in Cancale, France, Sercarz worked at New York’s Daniel before opening his spice shop in 2006. His book The Spice Companion: A Guide to the World of Spices was released Nov. 1. On Dec. 6, Sercarz teams up with chef Alon Shaya for a family-style dinner featuring custom spice blends at 7 p.m. at Shaya (4213 Magazine St., 504-891-4213; www. shayarestaurant.com). Tickets for the dinner are $150 and include a copy of the book. (Sercarz signs the book at Octavia Books at 6 p.m. Dec. 5.) Sercarz spoke with Gambit about spices.

Gambit: What initially drew you to the word of spices? SERCARZ: Over 20-some years of cooking as a chef all over the world, I realized that I wanted to explore different ways within the culinary world that don’t necessarily end up in the restaurant. I met so many chefs and home cooks and was surprised to find out how little they really knew about spices. I guess what really triggered the interest was the seven to eight months I worked in Brittany (France). I’ve seen and used spices my whole life, including back home in Israel, but I had never seen anyone using them this way. It was a bit more of an upscale dining scene, with influences from Indian to French cuisines, where local produce from Brittany was used with these spices from all over the world in a smart way. That was kind of a breakthrough moment for me. ... I started thinking about what would happen if I could really revive the craft or the spice trade to help professionals and home cooks cook better and enjoy food in a better way.

: What spice blends did you create for the Shaya dinner? S: The average number of spices I

use (ranges) from nine to 23 ingredients. In the book, they are mostly three to five ingredients. I don’t have just one (favorite spice), although I always have some form of salt and some form of a heat component. Paprika, cumin and cinnamon are the things I try to keep on hand at all times. (For the Shaya event) there’s a combination of spices from the new book, and there are a couple of unique blends we made for the dinner. It’s a very natural project for us. (Alon Shaya and I are) great friends, so it was very easy for us to put the dinner together. ... Every course has a different component to it, and we’re using local products from New Orleans. There’s one blend that we call “pasha.” It’s made from Urfa, which is also the name of a town in the south of Turkey. Urfa is a chili flake that has a really dark red color with smoky notes, with an almost chocolate and tobacco scent. It’s really wonderful and we use it so that people understand that chili is not just about the heat, but that it can be used for savory (dishes) or in brownies or chocolate chip cookies. We’re serving that with a roasted leg of lamb. There’s also one we call “black and yellow.” It has black cumin and yellow turmeric. Black cumin is not something that most people know of. It has notes of cumin, but it’s also a little smoky and a little floral, and it combines

well with the turmeric. With that, we’re going to make a seafood chraime, a tomato and chili pepper stew that’s traditionally made with a piece of braised fish. It’s a little bit like North Africa meets New Orleans.

: How long can you keep spices before they need to be thrown out? S: The good news is that you don’t get sick from spices. So, even five years later, you’re not going to get food poisoning. However, there comes a point where they fade out and become just a powder with no scent or taste. I recommend that whatever you buy, the moment you bring it home, take a pen and date it one year from the date of purchase. Try to make a point to use them before the end of that year. Certain spices could stay good for two or three years, especially if they’re whole, but I don’t like to promote that fact. It’s also good to buy the smallest quantity possible. You have to be honest with yourself and know how much you’ll be using. Unless you have a family of 30, there’s really no point to stock up on large quantities. It’s better to rotate your stock and buy small quantities. They will be fresher and better. — HELEN FREUND

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TO

Contact Will Coviello willc@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3106 | FAX: 866.473.7199 C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S .C O M Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN

BURGERS

Treasure Island Buffet — 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 443-8000; www. treasurechestcasino.com — The all-youcan-eat buffet includes New Orleans favorites including seafood and dishes from a variety of cuisines. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Bayou Burger & Sports Company — 503 Bourbon St., (504) 529-4256; www.bayouburger.com — Cochon nachos top freshly fried tortilla chips with melted cheeses, house-smoked pulled pork, house barbecue sauce, coleslaw, onions and sour cream. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL The American Sector — 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1950; www.nationalww2museum.org/american-sector — Chef Eric Cook’s menu features all-American and Southern favorites such as shrimp and grits, chicken-fried steak and burgers. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ The Rivershack Tavern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Warehouse Grille — 869 Magazine St., (504) 322-2188; www.warehousegrille. com — The menu features upscale bar food, burgers, steaks, seafood, salads, sandwiches and noshing items. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily, brunch Fri.-Sun. Credit cards. $

BREAKFAST/BRUNCH Red Gravy — 125 Camp St., (504) 5618844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves rustic Italian fare including handmade pastas, ravioli and lasagna and seafood dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and brunch Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$

Dis & Dem — Rue St. Louis Bar, 814 St. Louis St., (504) 509-7092; www. disanddem.com — The Hawaii 5-0 burger features a glazed patty, a hot sausage patty, a fried egg, bacon, cheese and grilled pineapple. No reservations. Banks Street: breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun. St. Louis St.: lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE Antoine’s Annex — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www.antoines.com — The coffee shop serves pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Brick & Spoon — 2802 Magazine St., (504) 345-1352; www.brickandspoonrestaurant.com — The Grown Up grilled cheese sandwich includes smoked Gouda and Monterey Jack cheeses, bacon, a fried egg, tomato, spring greens and aioli on sourdough bread. Both are served with french fries. Reservations accepted. Brunch and lunch daily. Credit cards. $$ Cafe Maspero — 601 Decatur St., (504) 523-6520; www.cafemaspero.com — The muffuletta combines pastrami, salami, Swiss cheese and olive salad on a bun. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Cafe NOMA — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 482-1264; www.cafenoma.com — The cafe serves shrimp salad, chipot-

THEOSPIZZA.COM 2125 VETERANS BLVD. 504-510-4282

1212 S. CLEARVIEW PKWY 504-733-3803

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4024 CANAL ST. 504-302-1133

Chartres House — 601 Chartres St., (504) 586-8393; www.chartreshouse. com — A creamy blend of crawfish, spinach and mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses is stuffed into Leidenheimer French bread. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ The Delachaise — 3442 St. Charles Ave., (504) 895-0858; www.thedelachaise.com — The bar offers wines by the glass and full restaurant menu including mussels steamed with Thai chili and lime leaf. No reservations. Lunch Fri.-Sun., dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$ Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees, pastries and desserts baked in house and a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Pearl Wine Co. — 3700 Orleans Ave., (504) 483-6314; www.pearlwineco.com — The wine bar offers cheese plates. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Pierre Maspero’s — 440 Chartres St., (504) 524-8990; www.originalpierremasperos.com — Two pan-fried crab cakes made with Louisiana blue crab, onions, peppers and seasoning are topped with a tangy sauce and served with mirliton slaw. No reservations. Breakfast Fri.Mon., lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CAJUN Daisy Dukes — 121 Chartres St., (504) 561-5171; 123 Carondelet St., (504) 5222233; 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 883-5513; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — The New Orleans sampler features red beans and rice, jambalaya, a cup of gumbo, fried green tomatoes and a biscuit. Delivery available from Carondelet Street location. No reservations. New Orleans locations are open 24 hours. West Napoleon Avenue: Breakfast and lunch Wed.-Sun., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Mulate’s Cajun Restaurant — 201 Julia St., (504) 522-1492; www.mulates.com — Cajun dishes include Catfish Mulalate’s, fried seafood platters, gumbo, boudin, stuffed shrimp, po-boys and more. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Tres Bon Cajun Meats — 10316 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge, (504) 405-5355;

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www.tresbonmeats.com — The market serves brisket, pulled pork, house-made sausages and cracklings with layers of skin, fat and meat fried in hog lard. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

CHINESE August Moon — 3635 Prytania St., (504) 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — The menu includes Chinese and Vietnamese dishes such as sweet and spicy tilapia glazed in tangy sweet-and-spicy sauce served with bok choy. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Five Happiness — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935; www.fivehappiness.com — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations to lo mein dishes. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/DESSERT Angelo Brocato’s — 214 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — This sweet shop serves its own gelato, spumoni, Italian ice, cannolis, fig cookies and other treats. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Chez Pierre French Bakery & Cafe — 3208 Clearview Parkway, Metairie, (504) 467-3176; www.chezpierreneworleans. com — The bakery specializes in cakes and there is a breakfast menu and Vietnamese dishes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY Bayona — 430 Dauphine St., (504) 5254455; www.bayona.com — Favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include crispy smoked quail salad with pear and bourbon-molasses dressing. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ Boulevard American Bistro — 4241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 889-2301; www.boulevardbistro.com — Pan-seared crab cakes are served with fries and coleslaw. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Brown Butter Southern Kitchen & Bar — 231 N. Carrollton Ave., Suite C, (504) 6093871; www.brownbutterrestaurant.com — Vinegar-braised grilled beef short ribs are served over stone-ground yellow grits with arugula and boiled peanut salad. A fried chicken breast is served over

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31 G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

OUT EAT

le-marinated portobello sliders, flatbread pizza topped with manchego, peppers and roasted garlic and more. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Fri. Credit cards. $


OUT TO EAT

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a Belgian waffle with smoked ham, aged cheddar and Steen’s mustard glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Chais Delachaise — 7708 Maple St., (504) 510-4509; www.chaisdelachaise. com — The eclectic menu includes bouillabaisse, grilled Caribbean lobster, jerk shrimp and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sat.-Sun., early dinner Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Rebellion Bar & Urban Kitchen — 748 Camp St., (504) 298-7317; www.nolarebellion.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s menu features globally inspired takes on casual fare. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Mon., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Suis Generis — 3219 Burgundy St., (504) 309-7850; www.suisgeneris.com — The constantly changing menu features dishes such as pan-fried Gulf flounder with kumquat-ginger sauce, crispy Brussels sprouts and sticky rice. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner Wed.Sun., late-night Thu.-Sat., brunch Sat.Sun. Credit cards accepted. $$

CREOLE Antoine’s Restaurant — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www.antoines. com — Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Bar Redux — 801 Poland Ave., (504) 5927083; www.barredux.com — The Cuban sandwich features house-made roasted garlic pork loin, Chisesi ham, Swiss cheese, pickles, mustard and garlic mayonnaise on pressed French bread. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$ Brennan’s New Orleans — 417 Royal St., (504) 525-9711; www.brennansneworleans.com — Eggs Sardou is poached eggs over crispy artichokes with Parmesan creamed spinach and choron sauce. Reservations recommended. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Cafe Gentilly — 5325 Franklin Ave., (504) 281-4220; www.facebook.com/ cafegentilly — Breakfast is available all day, and the creamed spinach, crawfish and Swiss cheese omelet can be served in a po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ The Landing Restaurant — Crowne Plaza, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-5611; www.neworleansairporthotel. com — The Landing serves Cajun and Creole dishes with many seafood options. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ MeMe’s Bar & Grille — 712 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, (504) 644-4992; www.memesbareandgrille.com — MeMe’s serves steaks, chops and Louisiana seafood. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Now Delivering!

Messina’s Runway Cafe — 6001 Stars and Stripes Blvd., (504) 241-5300; www. messinasterminal.com — Jimmy Wedell seafood pasta features Gulf shrimp, Lake Pontchartrain crabmeat, crawfish, fresh herbs and angel hair pasta. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Palace Cafe — 605 Canal St., (504) 5231661; www.palacecafe.com — Creative Creole dishes include crabmeat cheese-

cake topped with Creole meuniere. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Roux on Orleans — Bourbon Orleans, 717 Orleans Ave., (504) 571-4604; www. bourbonorleans.com — This restaurant offers contemporary Creole dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Tableau — 616 St. Peter St., (504) 934-3463; www.tableaufrenchquarter. com — Tableau’s contemporary Creole cuisine includes marinated crab claws in white truffle vinaigrette. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. $$$ Willie Mae’s Scotch House — 2401 St. Ann St., (504) 822-9503 — This neighborhood restaurant is known for its wet-battered fried chicken. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

DELI Bagels & Bytes — 1001 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 831-7968; www.bagelsandbytes.com — The bagel selection includes whole wheat, poppy seed, pumpernickel, garlic, blueberry and other varieties from Davidovich Bakery in New York City. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ Kosher Cajun New York Deli & Grocery — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 8882010; www.koshercajun.com — This New York-style deli offers corned beef and pastrami from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $ Martin Wine Cellar — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, (504) 896-7350; 2895 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (985) 951-8081; 3827 Baronne St., (504) 899-7411; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium’s dinner menu includes pork rib chops served with house-made boudin stuffing, Tabasco pepper jelly demi-glaze and smothered greens. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, early dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Qwik Chek Deli & Catering — 2018 Clearview Pkwy., Metairie, (504) 456-6362 — The menu includes gumbo, po-boys, pasta, salads and hot plate lunches. The hamburger po-boy can be dressed with lettuce, mayo and tomato on French bread. Shrimp Italiano features shrimp tossed with cream sauce and pasta. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Welty’s Deli — 336 Camp St., (504) 5920223; www.weltysdeli.com — The New Orleans AK sandwich features a choice of four meats plus cheddar, provolone, pepper Jack and Swiss cheeses on a warm muffuletta bun. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH Cafe Degas — 3127 Esplanade Ave., (504) 945-5635; www.cafedegas.com — The menu of traditional French dishes includes pate, cheese plates, salads, escargots bourguignons, mussles and fries, hanger steak with fries and garlic bordelaise and more. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Wed.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $

GOURMET TO GO Breaux Mart — Citywide; www. breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” and weekday


OUT TO EAT

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INDIAN Nirvana Indian Cuisine — 4308 Magazine St., (504) 894-9797 — The restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ Tandoori Chicken — 2916 Cleary Ave., Metairie, (504) 889-7880 — The menu features tandoori dishes with chicken, lamb, fish or shrimp, mild and spicy curries, rice dishes such as chicken, lamb or shrimp biryani, and many vegetarian items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ITALIAN Andrea’s Restaurant — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Mosca’s — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant. com — Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$ Nonna Mia Cafe & Pizzeria — 3125 Esplanade Ave., (504) 948-1717; www.nonnamia.net — Shrimp Diablo features panseared shrimp, house-made fettuccine and spicy arrabbiata sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

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Specialty Italian Bistro — 2330 Belle Chasse Hwy., Gretna, (504) 391-1090; www.specialtyitalianbistro.com — The menu combines old world Italian favorites and pizza. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Osso buco features a veal shank with angel hair pasta and veal demi-glace. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE Mikimoto — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi. com — Sushi choices include raw and cooked versions. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ Miyako Japanese Seafood & Steakhouse — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 4109997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, including sushi, hibachi dishes, teriyaki and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

KOREAN Little Korea BBQ — 2240 Magazine St., (504) 821-5006 — Dolsot bibimbap feaPAGE 35

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Good old boys Caring for an aging pet PAGE 3

The need for feed How to give your pet optimum nutrition PAGE 4

Pest arrest

Wild side

Natural flea control tips

All about exotic pets

PAGE 9

PAGE 10

Outside the (litter) box Can cats be toilet-trained? PAGE 1 1


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G A M B I T ’ S PETS • W I N T E R 2 0 1 6


Old friends How to care for aging pets BY S A R A H R AV I T S

O

There are advancements in treating pain, she says, including acupuncture, cold laser therapy, physical therapy and new and improved drugs. Keeping a pet at a healthy weight also can increase quality of life. SOME PET OWNERS CHOOSE HOSPICE CARE DURING THE LAST MONTHS OF THEIR PETS’ LIVES. Dr.

Ashley Tahir of Fur De Lis Mobile Veterinary Services says it’s an option for people who understand that their pet is dying and want inhome care. “Generally, by the time a client comes to me, they’ve already received the diagnosis, so we work on short-term care,” she says. This can include opiate-based or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory pain management treatments. Tahir also connects her clients with professionals who offer alternative or homeopathic treatments to manage pain and discomfort. Tahir’s business is mobile — she operates out of her Jeep — and she sees most of her clients for about an hour twice a week. “I show the owner how to perform certain therapies and provide them with materials,” including medications, she says. HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN TO LET GO? Euthanizing a pet is a deeply

personal decision. “It really depends on how much people are willing to put their pet through,” Akers says. “When they’ve been diagnosed with something, people have different thresholds.” Akers and Wegmann recommend pet owners monitor a pet’s general happiness — and have empathy for pain or discomfort it might feel. “I tell people to pick three of their pet’s favorite activities to do,” Akers says. “If they are only doing one of them, then their quality of life might not be good.” She also suggests daily tracking. “Keep a calendar and mark off whether your pet had a good day,” she says. “Did he or she seem to enjoy their day? When those notso-good days start to outnumber the good ones, it’s time to consider euthanasia.”

“I try to determine what the pet’s quality of life is,” Wegmann says. “Can they get up and walk and go to the bathroom on their own? If we can’t get the pet to eat, that’s a big sign that it’s time. Each situation is unique, so there is no black-andwhite answer, but we do our best to guide the owner.” There are gray areas. “We’ve had patients that are paralyzed that still have a good quality of life,” she says. “Do they respond to you? Are they aware that you’re there? A lot of older dogs can’t hear or see, some of them don’t know where they are, but they can still smell their owner.” Many local vets, including those at Magazine Street Animal Clinic and MSAH, make house calls when the time comes to say goodbye. “Our job is to prevent pet suffering, so when we know that there’s nothing left, we speak up and recommend humane euthanasia,” Wegmann says. “We offer that service at home. We often go to the owner’s home and do [the procedure] in a non-stressful environment.” She notes that some pets get upset upon entering vet clinics, so owners often don’t want to make the pet nervous during its final moments. “The typical procedure involves an IV catheter,” Wegmann says. “That way the owner is able to hold them. And then we give them a

sedative and it relaxes them. It is generally a peaceful process and it usually takes less than a minute.” The final step is determining what to do with a pet’s body. Heaven’s Pets at Lake Lawn Metairie Funeral Home and Cemeteries offers a range of services. Pet owners can opt for a communal cremation service or a private cremation in which a family keeps a pet’s ashes in a box or urn. Heaven’s Pets also offers memorial tokens, such as paw prints, nose prints or a lock of the animal’s fur. “Some people choose to bury their pets if they are small, but most people don’t elect to do that,” Wegmann says. “We stay out of that decision-making.” Many veterinary clinics also offer options for dealing with the body, and there is a variety of pet cemeteries in the state. Some people choose to scatter a pet’s ashes at its favorite play spot or keep the ashes in their home. Other owners want to have their pets buried with their human’s remains, which isn’t legal in Louisiana. State Sen. Conrad Appel, R-Metairie, introduced a bill in April that would have allowed such burials, but cemetery owners opposed the proposal and it remains in a Senate judiciary committee. Appel says he will revise the bill and may reintroduce the measure during the 2017 legislative session.

G A M B I T ’ S PETS • W I N T E R 2 0 1 6

wning a pet brings love to and builds empathy and compassion for animals. Pets become our best friends and part of our families. But saying goodbye to an aging or sick animal — and knowing when to do so — is a challenge. With advancements in technology and veterinary medicine, a pet’s life can be prolonged even in the face of a chronic illness. But when it’s time to let go, there are several options for paying final respects and memorializing your pet. “One of the most important things for pets as they age is to receive preventive care,” says Dr. Rita Akers, a veterinarian at Magazine Street Animal Clinic. Preventive care is instrumental throughout a pet’s life, but Akers says as pets get older they should receive regular screenings to diagnose or identify problems. “Sometimes you can catch [diseases] while they are still fixable,” Akers says, adding that proper dental care throughout a pet’s life also is key. Dr. Allison Wegmann, a veterinarian and partner at Metairie Small Animal Hospital (MSAH), encourages pet owners to develop a long-lasting relationship with their veterinarians before a pet reaches an advanced age. “Early detection is so important, so having a good relationship with your vet going into the senior years is huge,” she says. The risk of cancer, arthritis, organ failure and discomfort increases as an animal ages, but Akers says age itself isn’t an illness. “I always tell people that being old doesn’t mean unhealthy,” she says. “Age is not a disease. There are lots of things we can do to keep pets happy and healthy. There are a lot of ways to keep pets comfortable as they age.” Even if a pet has been diagnosed with a terminal illness, it can have a good quality of life with proper care. “We start to see senior pets — generally 8 years and older — for physical exams and wellness lab work every six months,” Wegmann says. “Once we detect something, we may see them every three months, so we can fine-tune their care.”

3


Food for thought When it comes to pet food, here’s what you need to know. BY DELLA HASSELLE

I

G A M B I T ’ S PETS • W I N T E R 2 0 1 6

n 2007, the world saw an international pet food crisis that resulted in the deaths of cats and dogs. Many animals who survived experienced massive, expensive-to-treat kidney failures. The culprit? According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, several brands of pet food had contaminants in certain vegetable proteins imported into the United States from China. According to Patrick Mahaney, a holistic veterinarian and certified veterinary acupuncturist, any poor-quality ingredient — vegetable or not — can produce disastrous results when it’s mixed with Fido’s food. Mahaney says that’s because pet food manufacturers attempt to create a less expensive product by using ingredients that cause companion animals to suffer a “life-threatening toxicity.” Pet owners and pet food companies currently are dealing with a comparable crisis stemming from the toxic effects of China-made chicken jerky treats. For Mahaney, the solution is clear: feed pets only high-quality nutrients, with whole-food-based diets that meet the same standards as human diets. “By providing their pets with commercially available dry and moist foods and treats, owners are lulled into a false sense of security that their pet’s best health is being

4

served,” he writes on his blog at www.patrickmahaney.com. “Cumulatively, consumption of highly processed foods and excess calories has led pets to suffer from a variety of health problems having potentially irreversible consequences, including obesity, arthritis, periodontal disease, diabetes, and cancer.” But what about pet owners who don’t have the time to create catered, whole-food-based diets for their furry friends? Prepackaged pet foods are safe, as long as people know exactly what ingredients are acceptable and which are dangerous. According to Adrianna Smith, a veterinarian who works in the community clinic at the Louisiana SPCA, some prepackaged food can be beneficial to dogs or cats.That’s partly because there are several foods designed for specific stages of life, she says. Puppies or kittens and geriatric dogs and cats have foods made with specific formulas, for instance, while other foods provide hypoallergenic nutrition or have ingredients that help control specific health conditions like heart or kidney disease. In terms of allergies, Smith says “nine times out of 10” the product that causes problems for dogs is a protein — which means that buying food with no corn or wheat often won’t help the situation.

Smith suggests trying a prescription diet for dogs with allergies, and also trying different options for proteins to pinpoint the source of the problem. “When we change it, we try to pick something completely new and different,” Smith says. “If a dog is allergic to chicken now, you can’t pick duck as something new, because that’s poultry. Anything beef, venison and buffalo is close [to cause a problem in dogs who have a beef allergy], too.” Avoiding human food can help prevent problems like obesity or allergic reactions, Smith says, adding that the advice is “usually lost on most people.” “Ideally we don’t give [pets] anything [in terms of human food],” Smith says. “But I can appreciate that’s an ideal fantasy that’s never going to happen.” Never give pets certain human foods. Among the most dangerous are sugar substitutes that can be found in a variety of products, including peanut butter. Also on the “no” list are grapes, onions, garlic, chocolate, almonds and raisins.

Regardless of pets’ special needs, or warnings about human food, the overall gist is simple, Smith says: Like humans, animals need a certain combination of protein, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins, minerals and water every day in order to function normally. For animals, each of those proteins, fats and other ingredients play a vital role in animals’ health. Dogs need glucose in the diet for energy, and both dogs and cats need protein to build muscle mass. They need good fats and omega-3 fatty acids for good skin coats and to “have a nice balanced health body,” she says. Cats are carnivores and need to be on higher protein diets. Too much fat in a diet can cause animals to store excess fat and have a buildup of cholesterol in the body, which can break down joints, cause diseases like diabetes and poor organ function,” she says. “Too much of anything in excess is not good,” Smith says. “If we can feed good, healthy diets, we can avoid diseases in our pets, just like with us.”


PRESENTS

THE 2016

P R O M O T I O N

Holiday

PET PHOTO CONTEST 1

WINNER

Good old boys

2

ng pet

Caring for an agi PAGE 3

The need for feed

Pest arrest

pet How to give your tion optimum nutri

Natural flea control tips PAGE 8

Wild side All about exotic pets PAGE 10

Outside the (litter) box Can cats be toilet-trained? PAGE 1 1

PAGE 4

3

Coby

1: Boudreaux Adams (Photo by: Hilary Adams); 2: Tuck (Photo by: Jennifer Core);

PHOTO BY: EMILY COIA

3: Ruby (left) and Paisley (right) (Photo by: Jessica Pham);

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No flea zone

G

iven enough time, most Louisiana pet owners know the itchy, infuriating, ankle-slapping hell of a bad flea problem. The blood-sucking bugs love Southern heat and humidity. Though topical medications such as Advantage, Revolution and Cheristin are the first line of defense against fleas, pet owners can incorporate more natural methods in their ongoing flea control strategy and to help pets recover from an outbreak. Below, find tips about chemical-free flea recovery. CHOOSE YOUR WEAPONS WISELY.

Though all-natural flea treatment might work in other environments, VetNaturally veterinarian Ashley Geoghegan (known professionally as Dr. G) cautions that a fully chemical-free strategy isn’t effective in Louisiana. “There are lots of natural remedies you can use (for prevention), but if you’re actually having a flea problem in the home … they’re harder to get control of,” she says. “And you have

to use Western medicine for those cases.” A topical flea treatment can protect your pet from uncomfortable and even dangerous consequences of flea infestation, such as anemia. After applying medication, you can move on to natural methods to dampen infestations and prevent recurrence. Substitute an intensive cleaning regimen for sprays and bug bombs. Wash bedding and pet bedding regularly — organic detergent is fine; use the washer’s hottest water setting. Vacuum daily to remove fleas and flea eggs from the carpet. Use a narrow-toothed flea comb on your pet.

TRY ESSENTIAL OILS. As part of an

overall prevention strategy, Geoghegan suggests experimenting with essential oils with flea-repelling smells, such as lavender or peppermint. Essential oils can be toxic in high doses, so exercise caution when introducing them to the home. Try putting a few drops on your pet’s breakaway collar or in a diffuser,

Chemical-free boosts to your flea control regimen. B Y K AT S T R O M Q U I S T

but pay close attention to your pet’s reaction. “Pets have a way stronger nose than we do,” she says. “Everyone has sat next to the lady on the airplane with too much perfume … that’s the equivalent of putting scents [around] a pet that they don’t like.” If your pet shows signs of scent aversion, like refusing to enter a room with an essential oil diffuser, discontinue use. Also, make sure you’re buying high-quality oils that are properly sealed and labeled with official designations such as “organic,” rather than vague terms such as “natural” or “medical-grade.” FIGHT ITCHING WITH A HOST OF NATURAL TREATMENTS. As your pet

recovers from a case of fleas, you may notice ongoing itching. “If [pets] have a severe allergy to it, they can have an associated scratching … up to three weeks past the last flea bite,” says veterinarian Michelle Jobert of Well Adjusted Pet. To help soothe itching, flea allergy dermatitis and associated skin prob-

lems like bacteria and yeast infections, Jobert suggests an oral solution of apple cider vinegar at a dose of one tablespoon per 50 pounds of body weight. If a picky cat won’t cooperate with an oral dosage, pet owners can mix a dilute solution of one part vinegar to two parts water as a topical spray to calm itchy skin. For a dry coat or skin flakiness in the wake of a flea infestation, Jobert recommends an oral dose of coconut oil. The maximum dosage is one teaspoon per 10 pounds of body weight, but pet owners should start at a quarter or half that dosage to prevent stomach upset and loose stools. Geoghegan adds that dry kibble can cause inflammation and dehydration, which can make pets more reactive to the effects of flea and mosquito bites. Switching to wet food may make your pet more comfortable. Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine, offered by both vets, may address a tendency toward itchiness and skin problems.

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B Y K A N D A C E P O W E R G R AV E S

B

irds, ferrets, guinea pigs, rabbits and reptiles are the most common patients at the Avian & Exotic Animal Hospital of Louisiana (3635 N. I-10 Service Road W., Metairie, 504-455-6386; www.gregrichdvm.com), according to Dr. Gregory Rich, who opened the clinic in 1993 and sees exotic pets exclusively. He also sees sugar gliders, hedgehogs, rats and monkeys. “The new thing we are seeing are pet chickens,” he says. What he doesn’t see are very large snakes, big monkeys or wild cats; Louisiana law prohibits individuals from possessing “bears, cougars or non-human primates as pets.” The law also bans venomous snakes and constricting snakes 12 feet or longer require a permit. Rich’s office also has pets available for adoption, since there are no rescue organizations in the area that deal with exotic animals. Exotic pets require different care than dogs and cats, Rich says, and owners need to learn the specific needs of their animals. “An Amazon parrot will live 55 to 65 years,” Rich says. “That’s the glory, that it’s going to live that long. You get to grow up with those pets. You get to grow old with those pets. A rabbit can live 12 to 14 years, and chinchillas can live 15 to 18 years. ... At home, I’ve got a 41-year-old Amazon parrot and a 26-year-old hawk-headed parrot.” Owning exotic pets is a different experience than sharing a home with a dog or cat. “It certainly takes an owner who is committed to having a pet that is indoors all the time,” Rich says, “a pet that you are going to give fresh food and water every day and clean their area every day.” Most people walk their dog outside, where it relieves itself, and cats use litterboxes, but owners must clean the living area of caged animals often to cut down on smells as well as bacteria that can cause skin sores and respiration problems, he says. To keep these pets healthy, Rich recommends an annual veterinary

Metairie veterinarian Dr. Gregory Rich with some of his patients. P H OTO C O U R T E S Y G R E G O R Y R I C H

checkup that includes a thorough physical exam and blood panels to check on liver and kidney function and nutritional status. Rich’s office also can check cholesterol levels, take X-rays to detect kidney stones and CT scans to detect sinus, kidney and other issues. Nutritional imbalances are a common problem. “That’s probably the biggest health issue we see in the realm of exotics,” Rich says. “It’s not so much deficiencies but imbalances; it’s more not eating the right thing for your environment.” For example, birds that live outside and use a lot of energy flying can use the nutrients in sunflower seeds and peanuts, but those same ingredients can cause high cholesterol in caged birds. Veterinarians can help find products suitable for each pet’s lifestyle, Rich says. “Using the veterinary community and the zoological community to educate [pet owners] about dietary needs for their individual pet is a great idea,” he says. “There are a lot of things we try to help owners understand about the pet they have, from caging to diet to veterinary care. Preventative care is a lot cheaper than emergency care.”


Dumping the

litterbox

T

eventually you just remove the bowl, and make sure the toilet is always open with the seat down and the lid up.” Kits like the Litter Kwitter and the CitiKitty make the process easier. Flushable litters, like the corn-based World’s Best Cat Litter, are useful as well. But before dropping dough on cat toilet training supplies, think about who’s at home. Are there young children who are learning how to use a toilet? Or people who’ll be so grossed out that they won’t want to help with cleanup? And will someone be home often enough to keep the toilet clean and ready for the cat and offer positive reinforcement? For example, Katy Reckdahl tried toilet-training her cat Pipsqueak, but her then 7-year-old son and his friends often forgot to take the training box off the toilet when they used the bathroom, especially in the middle of the night. Unless everyone at home is on board, prepare to waste money and about a month of time. However, there’s the possibility that your cat might be the rare toilet prodigy. Aimee Landreneau-deTurk and Karen Henry wondered who was using the toilet without flushing. They learned their cats had hidden talents by catching them in the act. “So one morning I’m brushing my teeth and Domino walks in, pauses and gives me this look,” Henry says. “Waits, hops on the toilet and balances himself, glares at me again and pees. Cat looked at me like he wanted to be left alone with his newspaper. When he was done, he gave me another fierce look and then walked out, tail high and proud. And so we left the lids up after that. I mean, what else can you do?”

BY MEGAN BRADEN-PERRY

When cats can’t pee

I

f cat toilet training goes wrong, it can provoke a litterbox crisis, ending in confused cats who don’t know where to pee. However, if your usually trained cat starts urinating outside of the litterbox, a medical issue may be at play. Feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD), or stress cystitis, is one of the most common feline diagnoses, according to the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. Marked by inflammation of the bladder, bladder stones or urethral blockage, it’s a serious condition that can result in kidney failure if not properly treated. “If cats are urinating outside the box, going in and out of the litterbox, excessively licking the genitals, vocalizing or straining to urinate, any of those signs warrant an exam by a vet,” says Dr. Gordy Labbe of Metairie Small Animal Hospital. Follow his tips to keep your cat hydrated, happy and in good health. — MISSY WILKINSON PAY ATTENTION TO DIET.

“It’s tricky to tell if cats are drinking enough water,” Labbe says. “Feed your cat a canned pate diet, which has more water than dry food. Or add water to dry food that is formulated specifically for bladder health. These foods maintain a good pH of the urine, to prevent crystals from building up in the bladder.” MAKE WATER AVAILABLE AND ENTICING.

“Place water bowls throughout the house to allow cats easy access,” Labbe says. “Some cats are finicky about the type of bowl, and some only drink from fountains. Get a bowl with fountains to get them more into [drinking]. [The issue] could be type of water — bottled water may be more palatable than tap water.” GIVE THEM A SAFE PLACE TO ELIMINATE.

“We recommend at least one litterbox per cat,” Labbe says. “Sometimes the type of litter matters too. If they are avoiding or stressed about their litterbox, that can cause [urine] retention.” ENRICH THEIR ENVIRONMENT.

“Urinary issues in cats can be due to stress in part,” Labbe says. “One conversation we have with owners is making sure there is some good environmental stimulus for cats.” Toys, perches and playtime can make cats happy, but if that doesn’t work, antidepressants are an option. “If [your cat is treated for FLUTD] and continues to eliminate outside the litterbox, sometimes we put those animals on Prozac for cats,” Labbe says.

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G A M B I T ’ S PETS • W I N T E R 2 0 1 6

oilet training cats takes time, tenacity and treats. Be warned: it’s a wet, smelly process. I tried toilet-training my cat Ellington in 2013. I was too busy doing overnight crime reporting and my then-husband would rather deal with a litterbox than clean the dirty bathroom. When company came over, it was also hard to ask them to move the training box before and after using the toilet. As we approached what I thought would be the last week of training, Ellington acted out. He started going everywhere but the toilet: in the trash can next to the toilet, under a bathroom rug or in the tub. Frustrated, we went back to the traditional litterbox. While my attempt to toilet-train my cat failed, other New Orleanians have found success. They begin by placing a litterbox gradually closer to the toilet until it’s on the seat. Then they make a hole in the bottom of the box, gradually enlarging it until the cats learn to perch with their bottom over a boxfree bowl. Victor Pizarro used the following tricks to toilet-train his cat. “[Eventually], get rid of the litterbox and find a bowl that fits under your toilet seat but is snug in the toilet bowl, like a metal mixing bowl,” he says. “You put a bunch of litter in there and gradually decrease the amount of litter until the cat gets comfortable peeing in the bowl with nothing in it at all.” However, the adjustment process can be unpleasant, he says. “It smells really bad,” Pizarro says. “You have to be really on top of getting rid of the waste, especially at this, the stinkiest stage. You eventually start adding water little by little into the bowl over the last few days and then

Give cat toilet training a go.

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OUT TO EAT

PAGE 33

Baked stuffed Creole redfish is served with crabmeat and green tomato crust, angel hair pasta and Creole tomato jam. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY

Dick & Jenny’s — 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 894-9880; www.dickandjennys.com — Braised Niman Ranch pork cheeks are served with sauteed Southern greens, grit cakes, sweet potatoes and country gravy. Reservations recommended. Dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$$

Audubon Clubhouse Cafe — 6500 Magazine St., (504) 212-5282; www.auduboninstitute.org/visit/clubhouse-cafe — Crispy duck features citrus glaze, boudin, Brussels sprouts, pickled mirliton slaw and duck demi-glass. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Sun.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Bombay Club — Prince Conti Hotel, 830 Conti St., (504) 577-2237; www.bombayclubneworleans.com — New Orleans barbecue shrimp are simmered in garlic Creole meuniere sauce and served with toasted ciabatta. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Broussard’s — 819 Conti St., (504) 5813866; www.broussards.com — Broiled black drum Rosalie is a mustard- and rosemary-crusted fillet served with haricots verts and ginger-apple glaze. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Creole House Restaurant & Oyster Bar — 509 Canal St., (504) 323-2109; www. creolehouserestaurant.com — Grilled Louisiana oysters are topped with smoked bacon, Monterey Jack cheese and garlic butter. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Criollo — Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., (504) 681-4444; www.criollonola.com —

Heritage Grill — 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 150, Metairie, (504) 934-4900; www.heritagegrillmetairie.com — This power lunch spot offers dishes like duck and wild mushroom spring rolls with mirin-soy dipping sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $$ Kingfish — 337 Chartres St., (504) 5985005; www.kingfishneworleans.com — Blackened barbecue shrimp in chili-butter piquant sauce top a fried stone-ground grit cake. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ Le Bayou Restaurant — 208 Bourbon St., (504) 525-4755; www.lebayourestaurant. com — Shrimp Ya-Ya features Gulf shrimp sauteed with Cajun pesto and served with garlic toast. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night Mon.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Ralph’s On The Park — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include turtle soup finished with sherry, grilled lamb spare ribs and barbecue Gulf shrimp. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

The Red Maple — 1036 Lafayette St., Gretna, (504) 367-0935; www.theredmaple. com — Gulf fish Pontchartrain is grilled and topped with crabmeat and sherry mushroom sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Pyramids Cafe — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — Diners will find Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Restaurant R’evolution — 777 Bienville St., (504) 553-2277; www.revolutionnola. com — “Death by Gumbo” is an andouilleand oyster-stuffed quail with a roux-based gumbo poured on top. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN

Tomas Bistro — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 527-0942 — Tomas serves dishes such as bouillabaisse New Orleans, filled with saffron shrimp, mussels, oysters, Gulf fish, crawfish and pesto aioli croutons. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Tommy’s Wine Bar — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN Hummus & More — 3363 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 833-9228; www.hummusandmore.com — The menu includes hummus, baba ghanoush, stuffed grape leaves, mousaka, seared halloumi, gyros, kebabs, shawarama dishes, wraps, salads and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Juan’s Flying Burrito — 515 Baronne St., (504) 529-5825; 2018 Magazine St., (504) 486-9950; 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 569-0000; www.juansflyingburrito.com — Juan’s serves tacos, burritos, quesadillas, nachos, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MUSIC AND FOOD The Columns — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — The menu offers such Creole favorites as gumbo and crab cakes and there are cheese plates as well. Reservations accepted. Breakfast daily, lunch Fri.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Thu., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Gazebo Cafe — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ House of Blues — 225 Decatur St., 3104999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Panseared jumbo shrimp top a grit cake and are served with chipotle-garlic cream sauce and tomatoes. Reservations

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tures rice, seasoned vegetables, egg, chili paste and a choice of meat or tofu in a hot stone pot. No reservations. Lunch Mon. & Wed.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

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G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

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Cannoli Pancakes!

OUT TO EAT accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Live Oak Cafe — 8140 Oak St., (504) 2650050; www.liveoakcafenola.com — The cafe serves huevos rancheros with corn tortillas, black beans, fried eggs, ranchero sauce, salsa and Cotija cheese. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $$

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The Market Cafe — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD biscuits & buns on banks — 4337 Banks St., (504) 273-4600; www.biscuitsandbunsonbanks.com — Signature dishes include a waffle topped with brie and blueberry compote. Delivery available Tuesday to Friday. No reservations. Brunch and lunch daily. Credit cards. $$ Cafe B — 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 934-4700; www.cafeb.com — This cafe serves an elevated take on the dishes commonly found in neighborhood restaurants. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Chef Ron’s Gumbo Stop — 2309 N. Causeway Blvd., Metairie, (504) 8352022; www.gumbostop.com — Stuffed gumbo features a hand-battered and fried catfish fillet atop chicken, sausage, shrimp and crabmeat gumbo. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Joey K’s — 3001 Magazine St., (504) 891-0997; www.joeyksrestaurant.com — This casual eatery serves fried seafood platters, salads, sandwiches and Creole favorites. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Katie’s Restaurant — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity. com — The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. No reservations. Lunch daily, Dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ Koz’s — 515 Harrison Ave., (504) 4840841; 4445 W. Metairie Ave., Metairie, (504) 887-2010; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, (504) 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Red beans and rice with fried chicken is a Monday and Wednesday special. The roast beef po-boy features housecooked roast beef on Gendusa Bakery bread and is dressed with lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

PIZZA Louisiana Pizza Kitchen — 95 French Market Place, (504) 522-9500; www.lpkfrenchquarter.com — Jumbo Gulf shrimp are sauteed with sherry, tomatoes, white wine, basil, garlic and butter and served over angel hair pasta. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Marks Twain’s Pizza Landing — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8032; www.marktwainpizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ Mid City Pizza — 4400 Banks St., (504) 483-8609; www.midcitypizza.com — Din-

ers can build their own calzones or pies from a list of toppings. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Slice Pizzeria — 1513 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., (504) 897-4800; www.slicepizzeria.com — Slice serves pizza by the pie or slice, plus salads, pasta and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies and diners can build their own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Wit’s Inn — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600; www.witsinn.com — The neighborhood bar and restaurant offers a menu of pizza, calzones, salads, sandwiches, chicken wings and bar noshing items. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS The Big Cheezy — 422 S. Broad St., (504) 302-2598; www.thebigcheezy.com — The menu of gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches includes a namesake triple-decker Big Cheezy with Gouda, Gruyere, pepper Jack, cheddar, mozzarella and Monterey Jack on challah bread. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Killer Poboys — 219 Dauphine St., (504) 462-2731; 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys.com — Killer Poboys offers a short and constantly changing menu of po-boys. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Cash only at Conti Street location. $ Liberty Cheesesteaks — 5031 Freret St., (504) 875-4447; www.libertycheesesteaks.com — The Buffalo chicken steak features chicken breast dressed with wing sauce, American and blue cheese and ranch dressing is optional. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Magazine Po-boy Shop — 2368 Magazine St., (504) 522-3107 — Po-boy fillings include everything from fried seafood to corned beef. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ Short Stop Po-Boys — 119 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, (504) 885-4572; www.shortstoppoboysno.com — Popular po-boy options include fried shrimp or fried oysters and roast beef slow cooked in its own jus. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat., early dinner Mon.Thu., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $

SEAFOOD Basin Seafood & Spirits — 3222 Magazine St., (504) 302-7391; www.basinseafoodnola.com — The menu includes grilled whole fish, royal red shrimp with garlic butter and crab and crawfish beignets with remoulade. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Blue Crab Restaurant & Oyster Bar — 7900 Lakeshore Drive., (504) 284-2898; www.thebluecrabnola.com — The seafood restaurant serves shrimp and grits, stuffed whole flounder, fried seafood and seasonal boiled seafood. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$


OUT TO EAT

37 G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

Bourbon House — 144 Bourbon St., (504) 522-0111; www.bourbonhouse.com — Bourbon House serves seafood dishes including New Orleans barbecue shrimp, redfish cooked with the skin on, oysters from the raw bar and more. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Charles Seafood — 8311 Jefferson Hwy., (504) 405-5263 — Trout is stuffed with crabmeat, topped with crawfish Acadiana sauce and served with vegetables, salad and bread. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood & Italian Restaurant — 910 West Esplanade Ave., Kenner, (504) 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, (504) 838-0022; www.mredsno.com — The menu includes seafood, Italian dishes, fried chicken, po-boys, salads and daily specials. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ Mr. Ed’s Seafood & Oyster House — 1327 St. Charles Ave., (504) 267-0169; www. mredsrestaurants.com — The menu includes raw oysters, seafood, steaks, fried chicken, crawfish etouffee and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ Pier 424 Seafood Market — 424 Bourbon St., (504) 309-1574; www.pier424seafoodmarket.com — Lightly battered frog legs are tossed with Buffalo sauce and served with celery and ranch dressing. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$$ Red Fish Grill — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood favorites include hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ Royal House Oyster Bar — 441 Royal St., (504) 528-2601; www.royalhouserestaurant.com — Clams, mussels, shrimp and scallops sauteed with garlic and herbs are served with marinara over linguine. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$ The Stuffed Crab — 3431 Houma Blvd., Suite B, Metairie, (504) 510-5444 — Crab au gratin features crabmeat in cream sauce topped with cheddar cheese and is served with garlic bread and soup or salad. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

STEAKHOUSE Austin’s Seafood and Steakhouse — 5101 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s serves prime steaks, chops and seafood. Reservations recommended. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

Every Morning Since 1985

Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse — 716 Iberville St., (504) 522-2467; www.dickiebrennansrestaurant.com — The house filet mignon is served atop creamed spinach with fried oysters and Pontalba potatoes. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH Vega Tapas Cafe — 2051 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — The tapas menu includes barbacoas featuring jumbo Gulf shrimp in chorizo cream over toasted bread medallions. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

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FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC with RSVP bestofneworleans.com/longshot (SPAC E IS LIMITED) Long Shot is the inside story of Louisiana’s 2015 race for governor —and John Bel Edwards’ improbable victory over David Vitter. It’s an inconceivable and sometimes hysterical odyssey that unfolds against the unique backdrop of Louisiana’s back roads, bayous, barrooms, and ballrooms.


39 G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6


MUSIC Contact Kat Stromquist listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 | FAX: 866.473.7199

C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M

TUESDAY 6

WEDNESDAY 7

21st Amendment — 30x90 Blues Women, 7:30

21st Amendment — The TradStars, 5; Royal Street Windin’ Boys feat. Jenavieve Cook, 8 Ace Hotel, 3 Keys — Helen Gillet, Tim Robertson, 9 Bacchanal — Jesse Morrow Trio, 7:30 Bamboula’s — Bamboula’s Hot Trio feat. Giselle Anguizola, 2; Mem Shannon, 10 Banks Street Bar — Major Bacon, 10 Blue Nile — New Breed Brass Band, 10 BMC — Lefty Keith, 5; Sierra Leone, 8; Brian Miller & Funkzone, 11 Bombay Club — Kris Tokarski, 8 Breezy’s Spot — Nite Pup, Treadles, Sharks’ Teeth, 7 Cafe Negril — WilFunk, 6; Another Day in Paradise, 9:30 Casa Borrega — Leonardo Hernandez con Banda Borrega, 6:30 Checkpoint Charlie — T-Bone Stone & the Happy Monsters, 7; Quinton Corvette, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — Dave Hickey & Jacob Tanner, 6; Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8 Circle Bar — The Iguanas, 7 Columns Hotel — Andy Rogers, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — The George French Trio, 9:30 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — Reggae Night with DJ T-Roy, Bayou International Sound, 10 Gasa Gasa — Cracker, The Whiskey Gentry, 9 House of Blues (The Parish) — Howard Jones, 8; Jet Lounge, 11 Howlin’ Wolf Den — David Wax Museum, Violet & the Undercurrents, 9 Jazz Cafe — The Key Sound, 8 The Jazz Playhouse — Glen David Andrews, 8 The Jefferson Orleans North — Jerry Embree & the Heartbeats, 6 Joy Theater — The Fixx, 9 Kerry Irish Pub — Patrick Cooper, 8:30 Loa Bar — Alexandra Scott, 8 The Maison — New Orleans Jazz Vipers, 6:30 Maple Leaf Bar — Terence Higgins & Friends, 10 National World War II Museum, Stage Door Canteen — The Vic-Tones, 11:45 a.m. Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman, Palm Court Jazz Band, Greg Stafford, 8 Prime Example Jazz Club — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation, 8 & 10

Bacchanal — Mark Weliky Trio, 7:30 Bamboula’s — Dana & the Boneshakers, 6:30 Blue Nile — PJ Morton, 10 Bombay Club — Matt Lemmler, 8

WED • 12.7 TUES • 12.6

Cafe Negril — 4 Sidemen of the Apocalypse, 6; Mutiny Squad, 9:30

10PM | PJ MORTON +

AFTER PARTY WITH DJ RAJ SMOOVE 10PM | NEW BREED BRASS BAND

THURS • 12.8

7PM | MICAH MCKEE AND

FRI • 12.9

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LITTLE MAKER

INTERNATIONAL SOUND 11PM | BAYOU SYSTEM PRESENTS REGGAE NIGHT WITH DJ T-ROY

BLUE NILE BALCONY ROOM

NIGHT WITH HIGHER 11PM | REGGAE HEIGHTS REGGAE BAND 7PM | CAESAR BROTHERS 11PM | KERMIT RUFFINS BLUE NILE BALCONY ROOM

KETTLE BLACK DJ BLACK PEARL WWW.BLUENILELIVE.COM

10PM | 1AM |

532 FRENCHMEN STREET • 504.948.2583

Casa Borrega — Leonardo Hernandez con Banda Borrega, 6:30 Checkpoint Charlie — Jamie Lynn Vessels, 7; Itchy & Scratchy, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — Albanie Falletta, 6; Jon Cleary, 8 Circle Bar — Carl LeBlanc, 6 The Civic Theatre — Seu Jorge (David Bowie tribute), 8:30 Columns Hotel — John Rankin & Friends, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — DinosAurchestra, 7; Treme Brass Band, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Hook & Wendell Brunious, 9 Ellis Marsalis Center for Music — Jan Clements & Family, 6:30 Gasa Gasa — Dolo Jazz Suite, Abeo, ObiWan Kendobi, Blk, 8 Hi-Ho Lounge — Grass Mud Horse, 6:30 House of Blues — Lupe Fiasco, 8 House of Blues (Restaurant & Bar) — Michael Liuzza, 6 The Jazz Playhouse — Johnny Vidacovich, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Jason Bishop, 8:30 The Maison — New Orleans Swinging Gypsies, 4; Gregory Agid Quartet, 6:30 Maple Leaf Bar — Rebirth Brass Band, 10:30 Preservation Hall — The Preservation Hall All-Stars feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8, 9 & 10 Prime Example Jazz Club — Sidemen+1, 8 & 10 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Rare Form — Mark Appleford, 4 RF’s — Vincent Marini, 4; Lucas Davenport, 7 Sanctuary Cultural Arts Center — Leonard Cohen tribute feat. Helen Gillet, Luke Allen, Harry Mayronne, Micah McKee, The Salt Wives, 8 Siberia — Continental, The Rotten Cores, The Sufficients, 9 Snug Harbor — Stanton Moore Trio, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Monty Banks, 2; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Shotgun Jazz Band, 6; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10

Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Rare Form — Nervous Duane, 1; Joe Pollock & Beardsly, 5; Matt Galloway, 9 RF’s — David Bach, 4; Sunshine Brass Band, 7 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Creole Stringbeans, 8 Saenger Theatre — Tony Bennett, 8 Siberia — Gloom, Invoking the Abstract, The Devil Himself, Dawn of Flames, Psydonia, 8 Snug Harbor — Uptown Jazz Orchestra feat. Delfeayo Marsalis, 8 & 10 Southport Hall — Battlecross, Allegaeon, Necromancing the Stone, Electric Age, 7 Spotted Cat — Chris Christy’s Band, 4; Shotgun Jazz Band, 6; Antoine Diel & the Misfit Power, 10 Three Muses — Albanie Falletta, 5; Hot Club of New Orleans, 7 Three Muses Maple — Dr. Sick, 7

THURSDAY 8 21st Amendment — G & the Swinging Three, 5:30; Bon Bon Vivant, 9 Ace Hotel, 3 Keys — Pat Casey (Jaco Pastorious tribute), 10 Bacchanal — The Courtyard Kings, 7:30 Bamboula’s — Kala Bazaar Swing Society, 2 The Bayou Bar — Philip Melancon, 8 Blue Nile — Micah McKee & Little Maker, 7 Blue Nile Balcony Room — Bayou International Reggae Night feat. Higher Heights and DJ T-Roy, 11 BMC — St. Roch Syncopators, 5; Johnny Mastro & Mama’s Boys, 8 Bombay Club — Kris Tokarski Duo, 8 Buffa’s Lounge — Lynn Drury, 5; Tom McDermott & Chloe Feoranzo, 8 Cafe Negril — Revival, 6; Soul Project, 9:30 Checkpoint Charlie — The Mark Wayne Band, 7; Gate, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — Holiday Haiku feat. The Bandicoot, 8 Circle Bar — Natalie Mae, 7 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 d.b.a. — Jon Cleary, 7; Luke Winslow King, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Haruka Kikuchi & the Big 4Tune, 9:30 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — Amina Scott Trio, 6 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — NOLA Fam, 9 Gasa Gasa — Tinnarose, Bantam Foxes, Ben Milburn, 9 Hi-Ho Lounge — The Grid, Nesby Phips, Nebula Rosa, 9 House of Blues — Soul 2 Soul with DJs Slab and Raj Smoove, 11:30 Jazz Cafe — Jeff Chaz, 12:30; Louise Cappi, 8 The Jazz Playhouse — Ashlin Parker Trio, 5; The James Rivers Movement, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Will Dickerson, 8:30 Loa Bar — Lilith Singer-Songwriter Showcase feat. Kathryn Rose Wood, 8 The Maison — The Good For Nothin’ Band, 4; Dysfunktional Bone, 10 Maple Leaf Bar — The Trio feat. Johnny Vidacovich, 11 Marigny Brasserie — Jamey St. Pierre & Dave Freeson, 7 PAGE 42


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Ogden Museum of Southern Art — Evan Christopher’s Clarinet Road, David Torkanowsky, 6 Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30 Old Point Bar — Hallelujah Hat Rack, 9 Old U.S. Mint — Leroy Jones, 2 One Eyed Jacks — Fast Times ’80s and ’90s Night, 10 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Tim Laughlin & Crescent City Joymakers, Ben Polcer, 8 Pour House Saloon — Dave Ferrato, 8:30 Preservation Hall — The Preservation Hall Legacy Band feat. Gregg Stafford, 6; The Preservation Hall All-Stars feat. Louis Ford, 8, 9 & 10 Prime Example Jazz Club — Billie Davies (album release), 8 & 10 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Rare Form — Jason Danti, 2; Heroes of the Day, 6; Justin Donovan Band, 10 Republic New Orleans — Animals As Leaders, Intervals, Pliny, 7 RF’s — Monty Banks, 5; Meghan Stewart Band, 8 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Lil Nathan & the Big Timers, 8:30 Siberia — Esqueleto, Naughty Palace, Mr. Universe, 9 Snug Harbor — Jason Marsalis Vibes Quartet, 8 & 10 Spice Bar & Grill — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7 Spotted Cat — Monty Banks, 2; Sarah McCoy, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; Jumbo Shrimp, 10 Three Muses — Tom McDermott, 5; Keith Burnstein, 7 Three Muses Maple — Linnzi Zaorski, 7 Vaso — Bobby Love & Friends, 5

FRIDAY 9 21st Amendment — Juju Child, 6; Antoine Diel & the Misfit Power, 9:30 Andrea’s Restaurant (Capri Blu Piano Bar) — Bobby Ohler, 8 Bacchanal — Raphael Bas, 4:30; The Organettes, 7:30 Bamboula’s — Co & Co Traveling Show, 11 a.m.; Chance Bushman’s Rhythm Stompers, 1; Smoky Greenwell, 5:30 Bar Redux — Ruby, Caffetine, 9 The Bayou Bar — Philip Melancon, 8 Blue Nile — Caesar Brothers, 7; Kermit Ruffins, 11 Blue Nile Balcony Room — Kettle Black, 10; DJ Black Pearl, 1 a.m. BMC — St. Roch Syncopators, 3; Tradstars, 6 Bombay Club — David Harris, 8:30 Buffa’s Lounge — David Hull, 5; Debbie Davis & Josh Paxton, 8; Rebecca Zoe Leigh, 11 Cafe Negril — Jamey St. Pierre, 4; Dana Abbott Band, 6:30; Higher Heights, 10 Checkpoint Charlie — Domenic, 4; The Pallbearers, AR-15, The Bills, Donkey Puncher, The Unnaturals, 8 Chickie Wah Wah — Michael Pearce, 6; James McMurtry, Alvin Youngblood Hart, 8 Circle Bar — Rik Slave’s Country Persuasion, 6 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Tuba Skinny, 6; 007, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Vivaz!, 10 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — The Tipping Point with DJ RQ Away, 10 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Buena Vista Social Latin Dance Party, 10 Frenchy Gallery — Josh Paxton, 7 Gasa Gasa — Gravy (album release), Dignity Reve, 10 Hi-Ho Lounge — Relapse: ’80s, ’90s, ’00s with DJ Matt Scott, 10 House of Blues (Foundation Room) — Jake Landry, 5:30 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Crooked Vines, Burris, See Schaff Run, 10 Jazz Cafe — Jeff Chaz, 12:30; Louise Cappi, 8 The Jazz Playhouse — Piano Professor Series feat. Joe Krown, 4; Luther Kent, 7 Kerry Irish Pub — Vincent Marini, 5; Beth Patterson, 9 Le Bon Temps Roule — Tom Worrell, 7:30 The Maison — Shotgun Jazz Band, 7 Maple Leaf Bar — Russell Batiste’s Birthday Party, 11 Marigny Brasserie — Valerie Sassyfras, 1; The Key Sound, 5:30 Music Box Village — Gogol Bordello, 6:30 & 8:30 Oak — Chris Klein & the Boulevards, 9 The Office Sports Bar — Signal 21, 9 Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30 Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; Diablo’s Horns, 9:30 One Eyed Jacks — HAMP Fest feat. Morning 40 Federation, Debauche, Cole Williams Band, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Kevin Louis & Palm Court Jazz Band, James Singleton, 8 Preservation Hall — The Preservation Hall Legacy Band feat. Wendell Brunious, 6; The PresHall Brass feat. Daniel “Weenie” Farrow, 8, 9 & 10 Rare Form — Nervous Duane, 2; Justin Donovan, 6; Junko Beat, 10 Republic New Orleans — MSTRKRFT, Bulkhead, Lleauna B2B Rye, 11 RF’s — Jamie Lynn Vessels, 6; James Martin Band, 9 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Karma, 9:30 Siberia — Machine Girl, Nag, Weapon Man, Psychic Hotline, Alex Black, 9 Snug Harbor — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Andy Forest, 2; Geovane Santos, 2; Rhythm Stompers, 6; Cottonmouth Kings, 10 Three Muses — Matt Johnson, 5:30; Meschiya Lake, 9 Three Muses Maple — Russell Welch, 7 Tipitina’s — Flow Tribe’s Christmas Crunktacular, 10 Vaso — JoJo and Mo Blues, 11 a.m.; Bobby Love & Friends, 3

SATURDAY 10 21st Amendment — Big Joe Kennedy, 2:30; Juju Child, 6; The Ibervillianaires, 9:30 Ace Hotel, 3 Keys — HouxNola feat. Jack Freeman, 9 Andrea’s Restaurant (Capri Blu Piano Bar) — Margarita, 8 Bacchanal — Red Organ Trio, 4; Will

PREVIEW

The Afghan Whigs: A Benefit for Dave Rosser

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN NEW ORLEANS’ MUSIC SCENE MAKES FOR A MESS OF CROSSED PATHS, entwined bands and gutter allies. Dave Rosser had all that cinched before he got tangled up in Greg Dulli’s nev• Dec. 10 er-ending loop, a Gordian knot of Crescent City associations that threads from Daniel • 8 p.m. Saturday Lanois’ famed Kingsway Studios (where • Civic Theatre the Afghan Whigs recorded 1965 in the late • 510 O’Keefe Ave. 1990s) through an apartment recording space one block down Esplanade Avenue, • (504) 272-0875 in which producer Mike Napolitano strung • www.civicnola.com Rosser’s guitar over the frets of Dulli’s Twilight Singers, beginning an inseparable connection that continued into The Gutter Twins and, eventually, the Whigs’ 2014 comeback, Do to the Beast. In late October, the band announced that Rosser had been diagnosed with inoperable colon cancer and opened a GoFundMe account (www.gofundme.com/daverosser) that blew past its $20,000 goal in the first 24 hours. (It has since raised more than $50,000 from nearly 700 donors.) This show is the first of three benefit performances (here and in Los Angeles) in physical, spiritual and monetary support of Rosser, with reinforcements provided by Mark Lanegan, Ani DiFranco, Morning 40 Federation, King James & the Special Men, C.C. Adcock & The Lafayette Marquis and, of course, Dulli and family, who will perform the Whigs’ 1996 LP Black Love in its sobering, ringing entirety. Tickets $50-$250. — NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

Thompson Quartet, 7:30 Bamboula’s — Kala Bazaar Swing Society, 11 a.m.; G & the Swinging Three, 1 The Bayou Bar — Philip Melancon, 8 Blue Nile Balcony Room — Ambush Reggae Band, 10; DJ Black Pearl, 1 a.m. BMC — Crescent City Blue Blowers, 3; Willie Lockett & the Blues Krewe, 6 Buffa’s Lounge — Mikayla, 5; Dave Ferrato Later on Decatur, 8; Michael Liuzza, 11 Cafe Negril — Jamie Lynn Vessels, 4; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7; Dana Abbott, 10 Casa Borrega — Blake Amos & Friends, 7 Checkpoint Charlie — Mike Berger, 4; Sweet Familiar, Trash Mavericks, 11 The Civic Theatre — The Afghan Whigs (performing Black Love, feat. Mark Lanegan, Ani DiFranco, Morning 40 Federation, King James & the Special Men, C.C. Adcock & the Lafayette Marquis), 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Slick Skillet Serenaders, 4; John Boutte, 8; Rebirth Brass Band, 11 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Sunpie & the Louisiana Sunspots, 10 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Mark Farina, 9

Gasa Gasa — Erin McKeown, Sean Bruce, 7; Pudge, Hound, US Weekly, Planet Manhood, 11 Hi-Ho Lounge — Hustle with DJ Soul Sister, 11 House of Blues (The Parish) — Amanda Shires, 9 Jazz Cafe — Jeff Chaz, 12:30; Louise Cappi, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Van Hudson, 5; Hurricane Refugees, 9 Louisiana Music Factory — Reece Sullivan, Beth Patterson, 2 The Maison — Chance Bushman & the Ibervillianaires, 1; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7 Maple Leaf Bar — Naughty Professor, Organized Crime, 11 Music Box Village — Gogol Bordello, 6:30 & 8:30 Oak — Dapper Dandies, 9 The Office Sports Bar — Signal 21, 9 Old Point Bar — Maid of Orleans, 9:30 PJ’s Coffee — Valerie Sassyfras, 7 a.m. Preservation Hall — The Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 5 & 6; The Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8, 9 & 10 PAGE 45


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SUNDAY 11 21st Amendment — Christopher Johnson Quartet, 7 Bacchanal — The Tradsters, 4; The Roamin’ Jasmine, 7:30 Bamboula’s — NOLA Ragweeds, 1; Carl LeBlanc, 5:30; Ed Wills & Blues 4 Sale, 9 Blue Nile — Mykia Jovan, 7; Street Legends Brass Band, 11 BMC — The Mark Appleford Band, 3; Ruth Marie, 7; Steve Mignano Blues Band, 10 Buffa’s Lounge — Some Like It Hot, 10:30 a.m.; Steve Pistorius, 7 Cafe Negril — Ecirb Muller’s Twisted Dixie, 6; Dana Abbott, 9:30 Chickie Wah Wah — Pat Flory & Mike Kerwin, 6 Circle Bar — Micah McKee & Friends, Blind Texas Marlin, 6; Country Night with DJ Pasta, 9:30 d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mainline, 10 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — Anuraag Pendyal, Dignity Reve, 7 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Church with Unicorn Fukr, 10 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 Irish House — Patrick Cooper, 6 The Jefferson Orleans North — The Pat Barberot Orchestra, 6:30 Kermit’s Treme Mother-In-Law Lounge — Kermit Ruffins, Paris Harris, DJ Sugar Ray, 4 Kerry Irish Pub — Chip Wilson, 8 The Maison — Chance Bushman & the NOLA Jitterbugs, 10 a.m.; Higher Heights, 10 Old Opera House — Chicken on the Bone, 7:30 Old Point Bar — Amanda Walker, 3:30; Romy Vargas & the Mercy Buckets, 7 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Mark Braud & Sunday Night Swingsters, Gerald French, 8 Preservation Hall — The Preservation Hall Legacy Band feat. Gregg Stafford, 6; The Preservation Hall All-Stars feat. Wendell Brunious, 8, 9 & 10 Siberia — Lost in the Holler, Cactus Thief, 6; Max & the Martians, Sabine McCalla, Jackson & the Janks, 9 Snug Harbor — Stanton Moore Trio, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Jazz Band Ballers, 2; Kristina Morales & the Bayou Shufflers, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10 St. Louis Cathedral — John Rankin & Tim Laughlin, 6

MONDAY 12 21st Amendment — Sierra Leone Band, 7:30

Bacchanal — Helen Gillet, 7:30 Bamboula’s — Mark Rubin & Chip Wilson, 2; NOLA Swingin’ Gypsies, 5:30; Sunshine Brass Band, 9 Banks Street Bar — Dignity Reve’s Piano Night, 7; Lilli Lewis, 9 Blue Nile — Brass-A-Holics, 10 BMC — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 6 Bombay Club — Josh Paxton, 8 Buffa’s Lounge — Arsene Delay, 5; Antoine Diel, 8 Cafe Negril — Noggin, 6; In Business, 9:30 Chickie Wah Wah — Benny Maygarden & Thomas “Mad Dog” Walker, 6; Alex McMurray, 8 Circle Bar — Phil the Tremolo King, 7 d.b.a. — Alexis & the Samurai, 7; Glen David Andrews, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — New Orleans Jazz Manouche, 7 House of Blues — Niykee Heaton, 8 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Sarah Simmons, 9 Kerry Irish Pub — Patrick Cooper, 8 Mag’s 940 — Jordan Hull, The Kid Carsons, Alex Bosworth, 9 The Maison — Chicken & Waffles, 5; Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, 7 Maple Leaf Bar — George Porter Jr. Trio, 10 Mudlark Theatre — Calyx, Ekumen, Chamois Boys, 7 One Eyed Jacks — Nick Waterhouse, 8 Ooh Poo Pah Doo Bar — James Andrews & the Crescent City All-Stars, Bobby Love, 8 Preservation Hall — The Preservation Hall All-Stars feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8, 9 & 10 Saturn Bar — King James & the Special Men, 10 Snug Harbor — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Sarah McCoy & the Oopsie Daisies, 2; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; New Orleans Jazz Vipers, 10 The Willow — The Vibers feat. CoolNasty, New World Slaughter, 9

CLASSICAL/CONCERTS Albinas Prizgintas. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., (504) 5220276; www.trinitynola.com — The organist’s “Organ & Labyrinth” performance includes selections from baroque to vintage rock by candlelight. Free. 6 p.m. Tuesday. All Strings Orchestra. Loyola University New Orleans, Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 865-2074; www.montage.loyno.edu — String musicians affiliated with Loyola play a variety of classical pieces. Free. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Christmas with Palestrina and Praetorious. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., (504) 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — The vocal ensemble performs Renaissance and Baroque Christmas music. Suggested donation $15. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. A Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols. Christ Church Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., (504) 895-6602; www.cccnola.

org — The choir performs Christmas music with organist Emmanuel Arakelian. Free. 4 p.m. Sunday. A Garden District Christmas Concert. Our Lady of Good Counsel, 1307 Louisiana Ave., (504) 891-1906 — Local soprano, mezzo-soprano and tenor singers perform a program of holiday and classical works. Donations welcome. 4 p.m. Sunday. Indigo Strings Music. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., (504) 5220276; www.trinitynola.com — Violinist Anne Hibbs, pianist Marta Vincent, cellist Rebecca Holmes and vocalist Arynne Fannin play classical and Americana selections. Free. 5 p.m. Sunday. Musica da Camera. Holy Name of Mary Church, 400 Verret St., Algiers, (504) 362-5511; www.facebook.com/holynameofmary — Vox Feminae joins the chamber group for its “Cristo e Nato” program of medieval Spanish and Italian Christmas music. Free. Sun., Dec. 11, 3 p.m. Orpheum Holiday Spectacular. The Orpheum Theater, 129 University Place, (504) 274-4871; www.orpheumnola.com — Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra plays, and the 610 Stompers perform. Tickets $20-$40. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Shades of Praise Christmas Concert. Academy of the Sacred Heart, 4521 St. Charles Ave., (504) 269-1213; www.ashrosary.org — The gospel choir performs a holiday program; Academy of the Sacred Heart choirs join during select songs. Tickets $15-$20, kids free. 7 p.m. Thursday. Songs of the Season. Metairie Ridge Presbyterian Church, 215 Phosphor Ave., Metairie — Louise LaBruyere directs the Jefferson Chorale’s holiday program. Free. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The same program is performed at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church (610 Sixth St., Gretna) at 2 p.m. Sunday. Symphony Chorus of New Orleans. Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave., (504) 861-3693; www.templesinaino.org — The chorus performs Handel’s “Judas Maccabaeus.” Tickets $25-$55. 7 p.m. Sunday.

CALL FOR MUSIC Crescent City Sound Chorus. Singers of all levels are welcome to join the women’s chorus for a variety of vocal exercises. Reading music is not required. Contact Corinna at (601) 550-0983 or email corinna@ccschorus.org with questions. Kinderchor. Deutsches Haus, 1023 Ridgewood St., Metairie, (504) 522-8014 — The New Orleans German-American Children’s Chorus meets Saturday afternoons from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Membership is open to all ages and no prior experience in German or singing is necessary. Visit www.neworleanskinderchor.blogspot.com for details. New Orleans Volunteer Orchestra. The orchestra seeks musicians at an intermediate level or higher. Visit www.novorchestra.com for details.

MORE ONLINE AT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM COMPLETE LISTINGS

bestofneworleans.com/music

CALLS FOR MUSIC

bestofneworleans.com/callsformusic

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Rock ’n’ Bowl — Elvis Christmas Show, 9 Saenger Theatre — Santa Meets Sousa feat. Marine Corps Band New Orleans, 7:30 Siberia — Big Freedia’s Holiday Bounce Around the Block, 8 Snug Harbor — John Ellis & Double Wide, 8 & 10 Spotted Cat — Shotgun Jazz Band, 2; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; New Orleans Jazz Vipers, 10 Tipitina’s — Dragon Smoke, Colin Lake, 10

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JAN

15 December 8

Here Comes The Funny Tour with Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider, David Spade & Nick Swardson December 23  Disney Live! Mickey and Minnie’s Doorway to Magic January 15  Ladies Choice Concert Series – Joe, Dru Hill & Jagged Edge February 11  Valentine’s Music Festival with Keith Sweat, Bobby Brown & El Debarge February 17  Festival Of Laughs with Mike Epps, Sommore & more! February 22  Sting March 3  The Lumineers March 24  10 th Annual Big Easy Blues Festival March 31 & April 1  Hogs For The Cause April 7  NuSoul Revival Tour with Musiq Soulchild, Chrisette Michelle & more! 

Step into Spotlights with us prior to the event and enjoy our exclusive lounge with private entry, complimentary premium bar and light hors d'oeurves. Tickets for Spotlights can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com or at the Box Office.

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, Lakefront Arena Box Office, or charge by phone at 800-745-3000.

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FILM

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C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M = OUR PICKS

OPENING THIS WEEKEND American Pastoral — Yet another adaptation of a Philip Roth novel. Chalmette The Bounce Back (PG-13) — A self-described relationship guru experiences relationship drama. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank Evolution — A boy discovers the disturbing truth about his village. Zeitgeist Frank and Lola — “A psychosexual noir love story set in Las Vegas and Paris...” Zeitgeist The Love Witch — The tribute to ’60s Technicolor pulp thrillers features a vampy maven’s sex magic. Broad A Man Called Ove — Curmudgeonly Ove accidentally befriends his neighbors in this Swedish black comedy. Broad Office Christmas Party (R) — As if your own office party wasn’t nightmare enough. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank

NOW SHOWING Allied (R) — This World War II romance with Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard was rumored to have a hand in the Brangelina breakup. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Chalmette, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place Almost Christmas (PG-13) — A patriarch beckons his bickering family home in this comedy. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Chalmette, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place Arrival (PG-13) — A linguist (Amy Adams) learns to speak alien. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Broad, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place Bad Santa 2 (R) — The dregs of sequelmania. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Chalmette, Kenner, Slidell, Regal Believe (PG) — In this sure to be Hallmark-y drama, a man struggling to fund a Christmas pageant befriends a boy who believes in miracles. Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell, Regal Bleed for This (R) — Miles Teller takes a swing in the Vinny Pazienza boxing biopic. Elmwood, West Bank, Slidell Desierto (R) — Immigrants attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border encounter a racist vigilante. (Too real.) Chalmette Doctor Strange (PG-13) — “Fast hands” Benedict Cumberbatch is a surgeon-turned-sorcerer in the ever-expanding Marvel universe. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place The Edge of Seventeen (R) — Teen Nadine struggles onscreen in the John Hughes vein. Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Chalmette

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (PG-13) — Open your wallets, devoted fans, for this tangentially related Harry Potter tale. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Broad, Chalmette, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place Hacksaw Ridge (R) — Mel Gibson directs Andrew Garfield as World War II pacifist/veteran Desmond T. Doss. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place Hurricane on the Bayou — Director Greg MacGillivray explores Hurricane Katrina and Louisiana’s disappearing wetlands. Entergy Giant Screen I’m Not Ashamed (PG-13) — The Christian film is based on the diaries of Rachel Joy Scott, the first victim of the Columbine school shooting. Chalmette Incarnate (PG-13) — An exorcist does battle with the powerful demon possessing a child. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell, Regal Loving (PG-13) — The drama tells the story of Richard and Mildred Loving, whose interracial marriage was the subject of a landmark Supreme Court decision. Elmwood, Canal Place Man Down (R) — Shia LaBoeuf takes a crack at the “tormented veteran” role. Elmwood Moana (PG) — Disney’s modernized princess musical features Moana, the daughter of a South Pacific chieftain. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Broad, Chalmette, Kenner, Slidell, Regal Moonlight (R) — Critics have high praise for this movie, in which a young African-American man comes of age. West Bank, Broad, Canal Place Rules Don’t Apply (PG-13) — An allstar supporting cast (Warren Beatty, Annette Bening, Matthew Broderick) carries this comedy about two religious conservatives in Howard Hughes’ employ. Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell, Regal, Canal Place Secret Ocean 3-D (NR) — Filmmaker Jean-Michel Cousteau explores the ocean’s food chain from phytoplankton to the largest whales. Entergy Giant Screen Shut In (PG-13) — Misery meets The Babadook, as cheery as that sounds. Slidell Trolls (PG) — Plastic figurines live an eternal bad hair day. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Chalmette, Kenner, Slidell, Regal Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween (PG-13) — Madea: Arbor Day has entered pre-production. West Bank, Slidell Wild Cats 3-D (NR) — Big kitties roam the African plains and Victoria Falls. Entergy Giant Screen PAGE 49

REVIEW

Manchester by the Sea

SOMETIMES THINGS JUST DON’T WORK OUT for films that once seemed destined for adulation and awards. There’s no better example from • Directed by Kenneth recent years than celebrated playwright Kenneth Lonergan’s Margaret. Lonergan The follow-up to You Can Count on Me, Loner• Starring Casey Affleck, gan’s Oscar-nominated debut as a film director, Michelle Williams Margaret got buried in lawsuits after years in which Lonergan wouldn’t — or couldn’t — deliver and Kyle Chandler a contractually obligated, 150-minute edit of his • Limited release post-9/11 New York City epic. In the end, Margaret’s story was told by The New York Times MagPHOTO BY CLAIRE FOLGER/COURazine in a piece headlined “Kenneth Lonergan’s TESY AMAZON PRODUCTIONS Thwarted Masterpiece.” An extended cut of the movie is now available (and should be seen by anyone interested in current film), but the bottom line is that Margaret will never find the audience it deserves. No such fate awaits Lonergan’s masterful third feature, Manchester by the Sea, the story of a handyman with a troubled past and broken spirit made to confront his demons after a death in his family. The film has all the ingredients that make many of Lonergan’s previous works for stage and screen so special. Most important is a screenplay with the language and rhythm of real-world conversation. Lonergan’s understated dialogue makes most screenplays look hopelessly artificial by comparison. Combine that elusive quality with the deep insight into human nature on display in Manchester by the Sea, and you’ve got the foundation for both a devastating film and a long and potentially unparalleled filmmaking career for Lonergan. Manchester by the Sea also possesses the one element that was missing from Margaret and seemed to cause Lonergan so much trouble by its absence: a cohesive structure at a limited length that does the story justice. Manchester by the Sea’s insights and secrets are told mostly in flashback, but the ebb and flow of time feels more like the experience of personal memories than a storytelling device built for the screen. The film generates its own sense of mystery as puzzle pieces slowly fall together. None of this would add up to much without a cast capable of enhancing the grace and beauty of Lonergan’s work. With his unsparing central performance as handyman Lee Chandler, the famously private and celebrity-averse Casey Affleck’s cover finally has been blown. He’s earned every “best actor” award or nomination announced since movie-awards season began last week, with many more to come. Remarkably, Michelle Williams works just as much magic with the smaller role of Randi, Lee’s estranged ex-wife. There’s one heartbreaking scene in particular, shared by Affleck and Williams near the end of the film, that is so infused with raw emotion it seems certain to earn each actor a prominent and well-deserved place on Oscar night. It’s often best to see a great film without too much knowledge of its story details. This is especially true for Manchester by the Sea because its structure and methods are unique. When and how aspects of the story arrive on screen is central to the experience of the film. So do yourself a favor and avoid seeing its trailers, all of which give away far too much. Both the audience and the film deserve better. — KEN KORMAN

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Brow Design by Dina Beauty is now permanent!

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FILM

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SPECIAL SCREENINGS Elf (PG) — The four main food groups: candy, candy canes, candy corns and syrup. 3 p.m. Saturday. Los Islenos Heritage and Cultural Society (1357 Bayou Road, St. Bernard) From Here to Eternity — The origin of that endlessly parodied “making out on the beach in the surf” scene. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday. Elmwood, Regal, Canal Place Frozen (G) — Let it go. No, really. 6:30 p.m. Friday. Spanish Plaza Happiness — Todd Solandz’ experiment in misleading titles. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Burgundy Picture House It’s a Wonderful Life — Classic film’s most heartwarming suicide attempt. 10 a.m. Sunday. Prytania Kiki: Love to Love — Spanish couples dabble in unpronounceable fetishes. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Zeitgeist Kiki’s Delivery Service — In the Hayao Miyazaki film, a young witch and her black cat strike out to make their fortune. 7 p.m. Monday. Cafe Istanbul Meet Me in St. Louis — The Judy Garland musical chronicles a year in the life of four sisters. 10 a.m. Wednesday. Prytania The Metropolitan Opera: L’amour de Loin — The modern opera by Finnish composer Kaija Saariaho is about unrequited love. 11:55 a.m. Saturday. Elmwood, Regal Moscow on the Hudson (R) — Robin Williams (RIP) flees to the U.S. in the Iron Curtain era. 3:05 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday. Clearview Mother of George — A Nigerian couple living in Brooklyn struggles with infertility. 7 p.m. Friday. Saint Heron House (1340 Montegut St.) National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (PG-13) — Future Trump voters come to Christmas at the Griswolds’. Noon Saturday. Regal

Nerdland: The Special Event — Paul Rudd and Patton Oswalt voice two friends on a last-ditch quest to become famous. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Elmwood, West Bank, Regal The Rocky Horror Picture Show — An engaged couple forgets to leave a trail of breadcrumbs when they find a strange castle in the woods. Midnight Friday-Saturday. Prytania The Rolling Stones: Ole Ole Ole — The concert film culminates in an epic show in Havana. 8 p.m. Monday. Elmwood Spirited Away — The celebrated anime beat out Titanic’s record at the Japanese box office. 7 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Elmwood, West Bank Steamboat Bill, Jr. — Buster Keaton stars as the reluctant son of a riverboat captain. 2:30 p.m. Sunday and 7:30 p.m. Monday. Chalmette A Street Cat Named Bob — A cat hitches his wagon to a homeless busker. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Zeitgeist Suicide Squad (PG-13) — Superstar super villains are recruited by the government in this muddled effects bonanza set in the DC Comics universe. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Freeman Auditorium Sunset Boulevard and Double Indemnity — The sinister truth is gradually revealed in this pair of films noir. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Bar Redux Three Amigos and Nacho Libre — Other ’80s era comic actors who almost appeared in Three Amigos: John Belushi, Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray and Rick Moranis. (Chevy Chase, Steve Martin and Martin Short starred.) 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Tuesday. Black Label Icehouse

MORE ONLINE AT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM FIND SHOWTIMES AT bestofneworleans.com/movietimes

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Amy Adams stars as a linguistics expert in Arrival.

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G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

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ART

Contact Kat Stromquist listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 | FAX: 866.473.7199

C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M = OUR PICKS

HAPPENINGS LUNA Fete. Lafayette Square, 601 S. Maestri Place; www.lafayette-square. org — Artists create lighted installations and video-mapping projections in the square. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. PhotoNOLA. Citywide — The photography festival features exhibitions at galleries and museums across the city, portfolio reviews, lectures, book signings and more. Notable photographers, including Maude Schuyler Clay and Joel-Peter Witkin, speak at various venues. Visit www.photonola.org for details. Thursday-Sunday. St. Claude Second Saturdays. St. Claude Arts District — Galleries surrounding St. Claude Avenue host receptions. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

OPENING A Gallery for Fine Photography. 241 Chartres St., (504) 568-1313; www.agallery.com — “The World Is Not Enough,” Joel-Peter Witkin photography retrospective; opening reception 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Antenna Gallery. 3718 St. Claude Ave., (504) 298-3161; www.press-street.com/ antenna — “Blue Library Vol. 2: Conversations,” group exhibition of photobooks made in conversation with notable photographers; “UnNatural History,” photographs shot in natural history museums by Diane Fox; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Artisan Bar & Cafe. 2512 St. Claude Ave., (504) 510-4340 — “Louisiana Captured,” photographs by Jasmine LeFlore and Ryan Lips; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Bar Redux. 801 Poland Ave., (504) 592-7083; www.barredux.com — “In Our Nature,” photographs by Jason Kerzinski, Traer Scott and Han Shun Zhou; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday. Barrister’s Gallery. 2331 St. Claude Ave., (504) 525-2767; www.barristersgallery. com — “Smoke and Levitation and Mirrors: Analog Manipulation in the Digital Age,” new work by Jayme Kalal; “Starting Problems,” photographs by Matthew Shain; “Installation,” new work by Herbert Kearney; opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. CANO Creative Space at Myrtle Banks Building. 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. — “Of Human Bonds,” photographs by Marti Corn, Ashley Lorraine and Joe Quint; opening reception 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday. CJ Nero. 839 Spain St., (504) 875-2008; www.facebook.com/craig.who.dat.nero — “Lifting the Veil II,” black-and-white photographs by Craig J. Nero, Darcy Culp, Jill Shampine and Tish Douzart;

opening reception with Santa 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Frank Relle Photography. 910 Royal St., (504) 388-7601 — New selections from “Until the Water,” “Nightscapes” and “Nightshade,” night photographs of Louisiana by Frank Relle; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Hall-Barnett Gallery. 237 Chartres St., (504) 522-5657; www.hallbarnett.com — “Run for the Woods,” new work by Merrilee Challiss, Stacey Johnson and Paton Miller; opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday. Louisiana SPCA. 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., (504) 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — “Homeless Not Hopeless,” photographs taken by New Orleans Mission residents of homeless individuals paired with homeless animals; opening reception 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday. LeMieux Galleries. 332 Julia St., (504) 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Louisiana Living,” hyper-realist Louisiana scenes by Shirley Rabe Masinter; “Circles of Prayer,” colored pencil drawings by Mary Lee Eggert; reception during LUNA Fete 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday. Martin Lawrence Gallery New Orleans. 433 Royal St., (504) 299-9055; www.martinlawrence.com — “Erte,” works by the Art Deco artist; opening reception and holiday party 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. New Orleans Art Center. 3330 St. Claude Ave., (707) 779-9317; www.theneworleansartcenter.com — “PoliticoPopUp 2,” multimedia group show about contemporary political issues curated by Catalyst Collective; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. New Orleans Community Printshop & Darkroom. 1201 Mazant St.; www. nolacommunityprintshop.org — “Lost + Found,” new large-format photographs by Sarah Paz Hyde and Chrystal Lea Nause; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. Octavia Art Gallery. 454 Julia St., (504) 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “SurREAL,” new photographs by Tina Freeman, Kenny Morrison, Irby Pace and Chuck Ramirez; opening reception 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. Ogden Museum of Southern Art. 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “CURRENTS: New Orleans Photo Alliance Members Showcase,” juried exhibition of new work by NOPA members; opening reception and portfolio walk 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday. “Art of the Cup and Teapot Spotlight,” new work by Southern ceramicists, through Tuesday. “Mississippi History,” Southern color portraits by Maude Schuyler Clay, through Jan. 15, 2017. “Simon Gunning and the Southern Louisiana Landscape,” paintings by the Australian-born artist, through Feb. 5, 2017. “Profligate Beauty,” work inspired by the

American South from the museum’s permanent collection, through Sept. 30, 2017. Second Story Gallery. New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., (504) 710-4506; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — “Spiritual Yaya: Vodou,” new work by David Seelig and Mary Lou Uttermohlen; opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Staple Goods. 1340 St. Roch Ave., (504) 908-7331; www.postmedium.org/staplegoods — “Your Endless Pleasure Stop,” photographs of Chengdu, China by Chen Gu; encore opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Valiant Theatre & Lounge. 6621 St. Claude Ave, (504) 298-8676; www.valianttheatre.com — “The Corpse Is the Wax Museum: Photographs from the Musee Conti,” black-and-white photographs by Jan Arrigo and Richard Mayer; opening reception 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday.

GALLERIES Academy Gallery. 5256 Magazine St., (504) 899-8111; www.noafa.com — “Miniature Exhibition,” group show of small paintings and sculpture, through Jan. 13, 2017. Angela King Gallery. 241 Royal St., (504) 524-8211; www.angelakinggallery.com — “Peter Max: A Neo-Retro-Kaleido-Spective Exhibition,” retrospective of Peter Max paintings, through Dec. 16. Antieau Gallery. 927 Royal St., (504) 304-0849; www.antieaugallery.com — “Illuminated,” new work and installation about seasons by Chris Roberts-Antieau, through Jan. 15, 2017. Anton Haardt Gallery. 2858 Magazine St., (504) 309-4249; www.antonart. com — Selected folk art by Mose Tolliver, Jimmie Sudduth, Mary T. Smith and Sybil Gibson, ongoing. Art Gallery of the Consulate of Mexico. 901 Convention Center Blvd., (504) 5283722; www.culturalagendaoftheconsulateofmexico.blogspot.com — “Identity,” new work by Gustavo Duque, Luisa Restrepo and Belinda Shinshillas, through Dec. 15. Arthur Roger Gallery. 432 Julia St., (504) 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — Exhibition by gallery artists, through Dec. 24. Arthur Roger@434. 434 Julia St., (504) 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Blindsight,” mixed-media work by Rob Wynne, through Dec. 24. Beata Sasik Gallery. 541 Julia St., (504) 322-5055; www.beatasasik.com — New work by Beata Sasik, ongoing. Berta’s and Mina’s Antiquities Gallery. 4138 Magazine St., (504) 895-6201 — Paintings by Mina Lanzas and Nilo Lanzas, ongoing. Brand New Orleans Art Gallery. 646 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 251-2695; www. brandneworleansartgallery.com — “Angels Collection,” new work by Ramon Reyes, through December. Callan Contemporary. 518 Julia St., (504) 525-0518; www.callancontemporary. com — “Sublime,” white and grayscale abstract paintings by Udo Noger, through December. Carol Robinson Gallery. 840 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Annual Christmas Exhibition,” new work by gallery artists, through Dec. 30.


ART

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Claire Elizabeth Gallery. 131 Decatur St., (843) 364-6196; www.claireelizabethgallery.com — “Southern Exotic,” group exhibition exploring Southern flora and fauna, through Jan. 21, 2017. Cole Pratt Gallery. 3800 Magazine St., (504) 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — “En Tout Cas,” paintings by David Armentor, through December. Collins C. Diboll Art Gallery. Loyola University, Monroe Library, fourth floor, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 861-5456; www. loyno.edu/dibollgallery — “Marais Press: 20 Years of Collaborations and Migrations,” works made using new and alternative printmaking techniques by Brian Kelly and others, through April 16, 2017. Ellen Macomber Fine Art & Textiles. 1720 St. Charles Ave., (504) 314-9414; www.ellenmacomber.com — Exhibition by gallery artists, ongoing. The Foundation Gallery. 1109 Royal St., (504) 568-0955; www.foundationgallerynola.com — “Flat File,” group show benefiting Antenna, through Dec. 30. Gallery 600 Julia. 600 Julia St., (504) 895-7375; www.gallery600julia.com — “Two for the Show,” impressionistic still life and plein air paintings by Camille Barnes and Steve Bourgeois, through December. Gallery B. Fos. 3956 Magazine St., (504) 444-2967; www.beckyfos.com — Paintings by Becky Fos, ongoing. Gallery Burguieres. 736 Royal St., (504) 301-1119; www.galleryburguieres. com — Mixed-media work by Ally Burguieres, ongoing. Gallery Orange. 819 Royal St., (504) 701-0857; www.gallery-orange.com — “Stone Sober,” new work by South African artist Kurt Pio, ongoing. Guy Lyman Fine Art. 3645 Magazine St., (504) 899-4687; www.guylymanfineart.com — “Water Dance,” photographs by Kathy Gamble Walkley, through Saturday. Hammond Regional Arts Center. 217 E. Thomas St., Hammond, (985) 542-7113; www.hammondarts.org — “Fine and Functional,” contemporary crafts curated by stained glass artist Jerry Hymel, through Dec. 21. Jonathan Ferrara Gallery. 400 Julia St., (504) 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “Recent Video Works,” videos by Peter Sarkasian; “Here Be Dragons,” mixed-media work by Carmon Colangelo; both through December. M. Francis Gallery. 1228 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 931-1915; www.mfrancisgallery.com — Paintings by Myesha Francis, ongoing. Martin Welch Art Gallery. 223 Dauphine St., (504) 388-4240; www.martinwelchart.com — Paintings and mixed-media work by Martin Welch, ongoing. Michalopoulos Gallery. 617 Bienville St., (504) 558-0505; www.michalopoulos. com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. M.S. Rau Antiques. 630 Royal St., (504) 523-5660; www.rauantiques. com — “Napoleon: General, Emperor, Legend,” Napoleonic art and design, through Jan. 7, 2017. New Orleans Glassworks & Printmaking Studio. 727 Magazine St., (504) 5297277; www.neworleansglassworks.com — Works in sugar and glass by Robert

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ART

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REVIEW THE TITLE OF THIS NEW EXHIBITION AT THE OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART SOUNDED LIKE OVERKILL FROM THE START. Profligate Beauty conjures up

Profligate Beauty • Through Sept. 30, 2017 • Profligate Beauty: Selections from the collection of the Ogden Museum of Southern Art • Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600, www.ogdenmuseum.org

rapturous visions like fever dreams of glittering Swarovski crystals or grand ballrooms bursting with bejeweled Faberge eggs. This sprawling expo, which occupies much of the museum’s third floor, is a quirky sampler of mostly 20th-century local and regional works that evoke Francis Bacon’s great quote: “There is no excellent beauty that hath not some strangeness in the proportion.” A more accurately evocative title might have alluded to the sublime and tropical, yet often rather gothic, aspects of the works on view. Certainly Mamou native Keith Sonnier’s neon and glass Split Dyad radiates a certain sleekly luminous gorgeousness, but its seductive, sci-fi allure is really quite otherworldly. New Orleans artist Jacqueline Bishop’s fantastical painting From the Vine to the Vein portrays a kind of humanoid, bird-headed tree standing defiantly under a red sky like a specter from tribal mythology. Inspired by the widespread burning of the Amazon rainforest in the 1990s, it presaged the global warming-induced wildfires that devour much of America today. That sense of nature spirits living below the surface of our techno- and money-obsessed modern world is seen in the late Shreveport savant Clyde Connell’s richly mythic red clay, acrylic and graphite pictograph Creatures from the Hot and Humid Earth, which melds ancient sensibilities with latter day expressionism. Avery Island native Robert Gordy facilitated a similar merger between neo-deco and expressionism in his massive Untitled Male Head (pictured) — an extraordinary sort of mixed-media primal scream that suggests a painterly premonition of our recent presidential election. There also are numerous interesting works by lesser-known Texas and Southeastern artists, but the one that perhaps best epitomizes the paradox of old Dixie today would have to be Clyde Broadway’s colorful, gold-framed acrylic painting of the modern Southern Trinity: Elvis, Jesus and Robert E. Lee. — D. ERIC BOOKHARDT


ART Pamela Marquis Studio. 221 Dauphine St., (504) 615-1752; www.pamelamarquisstudio.com — New paintings by Pamela Marquis, ongoing. Pelican Bomb Gallery X. 1612 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd.; www.pelicanbomb. com — “Of Moving and Being Moved,” video and sound works by Erin Johnson, through Dec. 18. Pineapple Gallery. 829 Asbury Drive, Mandeville, (985) 626-0028; www. pineapplegallery.com — “Louisiana Expressions,” new work about Louisiana life by Carol Hallock and Tanya Firmin Dischler, through December. PORT. 2120 Port St.; www.2120port.com — “The Dream Eating the Dream,” work about transformation by Thomas Beale and Heather Hansen, through Dec. 19. RidgeWalker Glass Gallery. 2818 Rampart St., (504) 450-2839; www. ridgewalkerglass.com — Glass, metal sculpture and paintings by Teri Walker and Chad Ridgeway, ongoing. Rodrigue Studio. 721 Royal St., (504) 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — “Blue Dog for President,” presidential and political portraits by George Rodrigue, through Jan. 8, 2017. Shinebone Gallery. 2241 Valence St. — “Batjuju,” Batman-inspired work by Brent Houzenga, through Dec. 18. ShiNola Gallery. 1813 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., (504) 223-5732; www. facebook.com/shinolagallery — Exhibition by gallery artists, ongoing. The Spielman Gallery. 1332 Washington Ave., (504)899-7670; www.davidspielman.com — Travel, Hurricane Katrina and Gulf South black-and-white photographs by David Spielman, ongoing. Stella Jones Gallery. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, (504) 568-9050; www.stellajonesgallery. com — “Visual Folklores,” mixed-media work about the slave trade and African history by Georgette Baker and Epaul Julien, through Jan. 28, 2017. Ten Gallery. 4432 Magazine St., (504) 333-1414; www.tengallerynola.com — “Rumination,” abstract works by University of New Orleans fine arts chair Cheryl Hayes, through Jan. 3, 2017. The Tigermen Den. 3113 Royal St.; www. facebook.com/tigermenden — “Role Models,” paintings about the feminine subconscious by Rose McBurney, through Jan. 15, 2017. UNO-St. Claude Gallery. 2429 St. Claude Ave., (504) 280-6493; www.finearts.uno. edu — “Cut Tear Burn Sew,” photographs and photographic experiments by Valerie Corradetti, Maria Levitsky and Jeffrey Rinehart, through Sunday. Vieux Carre Gallery. 507 St. Ann St., (504) 522-2900; www.vieuxcarregallery.com — New work by Sarah Stiehl, ongoing. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www.zeitgeistnola.org — “International Art Exhibition,” group show of international contemporary art, ongoing. PAGE 55

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Stern; works in copper enamel by Cathy DeYoung; both through December.

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ART

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MUSEUMS

The Building 1427. 1427 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 352-9283; www.building1427.com — Work by Daniel Jupiter, Mark Lacabe and Maurice Hicks, ongoing.

Abita Springs Museum & Trailhead. Tammany Trace, Abita Springs, (985) 8923597 — “Hometown Teams: How Sports Shape America,” Smithsonian exhibition about sports, through Jan. 1, 2017. Ashe Cultural Arts Center. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — “Art Is the Driving Force,” contemporary works curated by Louise Mouton-Johnson, through Dec. 30. The Historic New Orleans Collection. 533 Royal St., (504) 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — “Clarence John Laughlin and his Contemporaries: A Picture and a Thousand Words,” photographs and writings by the 20th-century photographer, through March 25, 2017. “Goods of Every Description: Shopping in New Orleans, 1825-1925,” period merchandise, ceramics, silver, furniture and clothing sold in the French Quarter, through April 9, 2017. Hand-carved decoy ducks; “The Seignouret-Brulatour House: A New Chapter,” model of a 200-year-old French Quarter building and historic site; both ongoing. Louisiana Children’s Museum. 420 Julia St., (504) 523-1357; www.lcm.org — Historic French Quarter life and architecture exhibit by The Historic New Orleans Collection, ongoing. Louisiana State Museum Cabildo. 701 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm. crt.state.la.us — “Louisiana: A Medley of Cultures,” art and display exploring Louisiana’s Native American, African and

M. Furniture Gallerie. 2726 Royal St., Suite B, (504) 324-2472; www.mfurnituregallerie.com — Paintings by Tracy Jarmon; copper work by Giovanni; watercolors by Bill James; furniture by John Wilhite; all ongoing. New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation. 1205 N. Rampart St., (504) 522-4786; www.jazzandheritage.org — “Preserving New Orleans Second Line Culture,” historic and contemporary images of second lines, through Dec. 18. Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery. 535 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 527-5271; www. old77hotel.com — “Fairer Sex: Part One,” work about women by Ember Soberman, Lori Sperier and Saegan Swanson, through December. Tulane University. 6823 St Charles Ave., (504) 865-5000; www.tulane.edu — “Drawings of Grace Dunn for the WPA,” pen, ink and pencil drawings by New Orleans artist Grace Dunn, through Dec. 15. “Black Arts Movement,” manuscripts, fine arts and texts from Amistad Research Center holdings, through Dec. 16. “Thomas Sully: At Home and at Leisure,” drawings, blueprints and photographs of residences and yachts by Thomas Sully, through June 3, 2017.

European influences, ongoing. Louisiana State Museum Presbytere. 751 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm. crt.state.la.us — “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” interactive displays and artifacts; “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items; both ongoing. National World War II Museum. 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — “Tom Lea: LIFE and World War II,” paintings and illustrations by the war correspondent, through December. New Orleans Museum of Art. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Kenneth Josephson: Photography Is,” work by the 20th-century American photographer; “Something in the Way: A Brief History of Photography and Obstruction,” photographs with obstructing elements; both through Jan. 1, 2017. “Seeing Nature: Landscape Masterworks from the Paul G. Allen Family Collection,” five centuries of landscape painting including works by Cezanne, Monet, David Hockney, J.M.W. Turner and others, through Jan. 15, 2017. “Elements of Chance,” George Dunbar retrospective, through Feb. 19, 2017. Newcomb Art Museum. Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Place, (504) 314-2406; www.newcombartmuseum.tulane.edu — “Marking the Infinite,” contemporary women’s art from Aboriginal Australia, through Dec. 30. Old U.S. Mint. 400 Esplanade Ave., (504) 568-6993; www.louisianastatemu-

seum.org/museums/the-old-us-mint — “Time Takes a Toll,” conserved instruments featuring Fats Domino’s piano, through December.

CALL FOR ARTISTS LEH Humanities Awards. The Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities seeks nominations for its annual Humanities Awards in several categories, including documentary photography, humanities book of the year and more. Visit www.leh.org for details. Magazine Street Art Market call for vendors. The organization seeks jewelry, costume and arts and crafts vendors for its weekend markets. Email magazineartmarket@gmail.com for details. #PutYourStampOnLoving. The New Orleans Loving Festival seeks stamp designs commemorating the Loving v. Virginia Supreme Court decision. Visit www.charitablefilmnetwork.submittable. com/submit for details. Utility box street gallery artists. Community Visions Unlimited seeks artists to paint public utility boxes around the city. Visit www.cvunola.org or email cvunola@ gmail.com for details.

MORE ONLINE AT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM COMPLETE LISTINGS

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C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M = OUR PICKS

THEATER The Amazing Acro-Cats. The Theatre at St. Claude, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 638-6326; www.thetheatreatstclaude. com — The performing cats reprise their Meow-y Catsmas in New Orleans show. Tickets $20-$34. 7 p.m. Friday-Sunday, 4 p.m. Sunday. Charles Dickens Presents A Christmas Carol. Fuhrmann Auditorium, 317 N. Jefferson St., Covington, (504) 892-2624; www.fpa-theater.com — Actor Mike Randall portrays Charles Dickens in a reading of selections from the holiday tale. Tickets $15-$20. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The Lion in Winter. Sanctuary Cultural Arts Center, 2525 Burgundy St. — See ’Em on Stage presents James Goldman’s play about the Plantagenet family’s power struggles. Visit www.seosaproductioncompany.com for details. Tickets $25-$30. 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. Mama Tee’s Christmas Stage Play. Cafe Istanbul, New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., (504) 940-1130; www.cafeistanbulnola.com — Trinese Duplessis directs her holiday-themed play with an inspirational message. Tickets $20, children $12. 7 p.m. Friday. The Nutcracker: A Magical Musical Inspired by R.T.A. Hoffman’s The Nutcracker and the Mouse King. 30 by 90 Theatre, 880 Lafayette St., Mandeville, (844) 843-3090; www.30byninety.com — In the holiday musical, two children try to defeat magical mice and save the Prince of Make Believe. Tickets $19, military and seniors $17, students $14, kids $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Over the Edge. Cutting Edge Theater, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 640-0333; www.cuttingedgetheater.com — In Chris Rose’s one-man show, the writer performs some of his works with musical accompaniment. Tickets $25. 8 p.m. Friday. Over the River and Through the Woods. Slidell Little Theatre, 2024 Nellie Drive, Slidell, (985) 641-0324; www.slidelllittletheatre.org — An Italian-American family conspires to keep its eldest son from leaving the nest in this comedy. Tickets $16.50, students $8.25. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Rainbolt Cypher. Art Klub, 1941 Arts St., (504) 943-6565; www.artistinc.org — Nari Tomassetti’s immersive show is a journey through the life of glamorous rock star Rainbolt Cypher. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday. Steel Poinsettias. Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., Kenner, (504) 461-9475; www. rivertowntheaters.com — Ricky Graham, Varla Jean Merman and Sean Patterson star in the spoof of holiday-themed revues. Tickets $30. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. This Christmas. City Church of New Orleans, 13123 I-10 Service Road, (504) 246-5121; www.citychurchno.com — The

musical incorporates pop songs in its exploration of Christmas history. Tickets $45. 7 p.m. Friday-Sunday. A Tuna Christmas. Playmakers Theater, 1916 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc.com — Anysia Geare directs the holiday play about the small town Tuna, Texas. Tickets $20, students $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. The Ultimate Christmas Show (Abridged). Teatro Wego!, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, (504) 885-2000; www.jpas. org — Jefferson Performing Arts Society presents the holiday-themed comedy in which three actors scramble to play several roles. Tickets $25-$30. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. What Could Happen Next?. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — Chakula Cha Jua Theater Company presents the play about a middle-class family’s son’s trouble in school. Tickets $20, students and seniors $15. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

CABARET, BURLESQUE & VARIETY American Mess. Barcadia, 601 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 335-1740; www.barcadianeworleans.com — Katie East hosts local and touring comedians alongside burlesque performances. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Blind Tiger Burlesque. BMC, 1331 Decatur St. — Xena Zeit-Geist produces the burlesque show with live music by the Dapper Dandies. Free admission. 10 p.m. Thursday. The Blue Book Cabaret. Bourbon Pub and Parade, 801 Bourbon St., (504) 5292107; www.bourbonpub.com — Bella Blue and a rotating cast including Nikki LeVillain, Cherry Brown and Ben Wisdom perform classic and contemporary burlesque and drag. Visit www.thebellalounge.com for details. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. Bustout Burlesque. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com/neworleans — The 1950s-style burlesque troupe performs. Tickets $22. 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Saturday. Danger Zone. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 758-5590; www. theallwayslounge.com — Danger Rockwell presents the boylesque show. Admission $10. 10 p.m. Friday. Diverse Universe. St. Mary Majaks, 918 St. Mary St. — International performance artists Wild Torus and Non Grata present a site-specific production. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Fleur de Tease. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., (504) 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net — The burlesque troupe’s holiday performance is based on The Nutcracker. Tickets $15, reserved table $25. 8 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The Fly Movement Salon. Cafe Istan-

bul, New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., (504) 940-1130; www. cafeistanbulnola.com — The variety show has aerial acts, juggling and performance art. 8 p.m. Tuesday. Monday’s a Drag. House of Blues, Big Mama’s Lounge, 229 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com/neworleans — Nicole Lynn Foxx hosts local drag performers. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday. The Olio. Bar Redux, 801 Poland Ave., (504) 592-7083; www.barredux.com — Sara Duprix, Tsarina Magalena Hellfire, Alison Logan, Kat Shellooe, Chatty the Mime and others perform in the vaudeville revue. Tickets $10. 9 p.m. Sunday. Spooky X-mas. GrandPre’s, 834 N. Rampart St., (504) 267-3615; www.grandpres. com — Mr. Hojangles hosts Eureeka Starfish, Liberaunchy, Xena Zeit-Geist and others in the holiday and Halloween-themed drag and variety show. Tickets $7-$10. 9 p.m. Friday. Sunset Strip. Bar Redux, 801 Poland Ave., (504) 592-7083; www.barredux. com — The burlesque show pays tribute to Motorhead’s Lemmy Kilmister. 10 p.m. Saturday. A Vintage Christmas. National World War II Museum, Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1944; www. stagedoorcanteen.org — In a holiday variety show, the museum’s Victory Belles singing group presents retro Christmas music and Tom Hook portrays Burl Ives. Tickets $24-$64. 8 p.m. Friday and 1 p.m. Sunday.

DANCE The Nutcracker. Gretna Cultural Center For The Arts, Huey P. Long Avenue and Fourth Street, Gretna — Jefferson Ballet Theatre and German American Cultural Center present the holiday ballet. There are pre-show festivities, including caroling in German, at the German American Cultural Center (519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna). Visit www.jeffersonballettheatre. com for details. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Origin of Life on Earth. Loyola University New Orleans, Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 865-2074; www.montage.loyno. edu — Ashe Cultural Arts Center presents the dance performance based on African creation myths. Admission $8. 10 a.m. Wednesday.

COMEDY Adam Sandler, David Spade, Rob Schneider, Nick Swardson. UNO Lakefront Arena, 6801 Franklin Ave., (504) 280-7171; www.arena.uno.edu — The comedians perform on their “Here Comes the Funny” tour. Tickets $40$245. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Bear with Me. Twelve Mile Limit, 500 S. Telemachus St., (504) 488-8114; www. facebook.com/twelve.mile.limit — Julie Mitchell and Laura Sanders host an openmic comedy show. Sign-up at 8:30 p.m., show at 9 p.m. Monday. Comedy Beast. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 907 S. Peters St., (504) 529-5844; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Massive Fraud presents stand-up comedy. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. Comedy Catastrophe. Lost Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., (504) 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge.com — Cassidy Henehan hosts a stand-up show. 10 p.m. Tuesday. Comedy F—k Yeah. Dragon’s Den

(upstairs), 435 Esplanade Ave., (504) 940-5546; www.dragonsdennola.com — Vincent Zambon and Mary-Devon Dupuy host a stand-up show. 8:30 p.m. Friday. Comedy Gold. House of Blues (Voodoo Garden), 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com — Leon Blanda hosts a stand-up showcase of local and traveling comics. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Comedy Gumbeaux. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 907 S. Peters St., (504) 529-5844; www. thehowlinwolf.com — Frederick “RedBean” Plunkett hosts a stand-up show. 8 p.m. Thursday. The Franchise. The New Movement, 2706 St. Claude Ave., (504) 302-8264; www. newmovementtheater.com — The New Movement’s improv troupes perform. 9 p.m. Friday. Go Ahead. The New Movement, 2706 St. Claude Ave., (504) 302-8264; www.newmovementtheater.com — Kaitlin Marone and Shawn Dugas host a short lineup of alternative comics. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Greetings, From Queer Mountain. The New Movement, 2706 St. Claude Ave., (504) 302-8264; www.newmovementtheater.com — LGBT comics perform. Tickets $8. 7:30 p.m. Friday. Hot Sauce. Voodoo Mystere Lounge, 718 N. Rampart St., (504) 304-1568 — Vincent Zambon and Leon Blanda host a comedy showcase. 8 p.m. Thursday. Jim Jeffries. Joy Theater, 1200 Canal St., (504) 528-9569; www.thejoytheater.com — The comedian performs on his “Unusual Punishment” tour. Tickets $45. 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Saturday. Knockout. The New Movement, 2706 St. Claude Ave., (504) 302-8264; www.newmovementtheater.com — Two comedy acts compete to win an audience vote. 9:30 p.m. Monday. Local Uproar. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 758-5590; www. theallwayslounge.com — Paul Oswell and Benjamin Hoffman host a comedy showcase with free food and ice cream. 8 p.m. Saturday. Night Church. Sidney’s Saloon, 1200 St. Bernard Ave., (504) 947-2379; www. sidneyssaloon.com — Benjamin Hoffman and Paul Oswell host a stand-up show, and there’s free ice cream. 8:30 p.m. Thursday. NOLA Comedy Hour. Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., (504) 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Duncan Pace hosts an open mic. Sign-up at 6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Sunday. The Spontaneous Show. Bar Redux, 801 Poland Ave., (504) 592-7083; www.barredux.com — Young Funny comedians host the comedy show and open mic. Sign-up 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. Tuesday. Stoked. Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., (504) 529-5844; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Mary-Devon Dupuy and Lane Lonion host the comedy show. 10 p.m. Saturday. Think You’re Funny?. Carrollton Station Bar and Music Club, 8140 Willow St., (504) 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation. com — Brothers Cassidy and Mickey Henehan host an open mic. Sign-up at 8 p.m., show 9 p.m. Wednesday. The TMI Talk Show. NOLA Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., (504) 231-7011; www.nolacomedy.com — Liberaunchy and Eureeka Starfish encourage audience members to overshare. Admission $8. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.


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EVENTS Contact Kat Stromquist listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 | FAX: 866.473.7199

C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M

TUESDAY 6 Anti-Defamation League Award Dinner. Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, 500 Canal St., (504) 595-5511; www.sheratonneworleans.com — Carroll W. Suggs and Walter Isaacson are the recipients of the A.I. Botnick Torch of Liberty Award at a cocktail reception and dinner. Visit www.adl.org for details. Tickets start at $200. 6 p.m. The Art of Giving. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Center for Southern Craft and Design’s holiday market features art vendors, complimentary gift wrapping, live music and drinks. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Celebration in the Oaks. New Orleans City Park, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 4882896 — The annual holiday festival features light displays in the park’s botanicalz Ωgarden, amusement rides and beyond. Admission $8. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Christmas Mass and Luncheon. Southern Yacht Club, 105 N. Roadway St., (504) 288-4200; www.southernyachtclub.org — St. Vincent Infant and Maternity Guild hosts the holiday Mass, followed by lunch. Donations of children’s toys welcome. Lunch admission $35. 11 a.m. The Divine Child: Archetype of Renewal. Parker United Methodist Church, 1130 Nashville Ave., (504) 895-1222; www.parkerchurch.net — The C.G. Jung Society hosts Jungian analyst Deedy Young’s talk. Admission $15, students $10. 7:30 p.m. Holiday Happy Hour. Eiffel Society, 2040 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-2951; www. eiffelsociety.com — Young Leaders Movement presents the happy hour, which benefits United Way. 7:30 p.m. Kulturabend. Deutsches Haus, 1023 Ridgewood St., Metairie, (504) 5228014; www.deutscheshaus.org — Brigitta Malm and Rose Mancini discuss German Christmas traditions. Singers perform German carols. 7 p.m. LikeMinded Ladies Holiday Soiree. Moxy New Orleans, 210 O’Keefe Ave., (504) 525-6800; www.moxyhotels.marriott. com — There are cocktails and a kickoff of the social club’s toy drive at the networking event. Visit www.likemindedladies.com for details. First-time guests free, returning guests $10. Miracle on Fulton Street. Fulton Street, at Poydras Street near Harrah’s Hotel — Harrah’s monthlong celebration features holiday sights and sounds including a daily “snow” fall and a gingerbread display. Santa visits 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Visit www.miracleonfulton.com for details. 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Saints Holiday Harvest. Winn-Dixie, 5901 Airline Drive, Metairie, (504) 7340702; www.winndixie.com — Bring five

non-perishable food items to the food drive and meet New Orleans Saints players, Saintsations and team mascots. Admission without canned goods $5. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Sipping with Santa. Chateau Golf and Country Club, 3600 Chateau Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-1351; www.chateaugcc.com — The fundraiser with holiday-themed martinis, caroling, DJ entertainment and a dance performance benefits Kenner Food Bank. Admission $35 plus a can of food. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 7 75th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., (504) 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — A commemoration ceremony, lectures, film screenings and a gathering of veterans mark the anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor during World War II. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sippin’ in the Courtyard. Maison Dupuy Hotel, 1001 Toulouse St., (504) 5868000; www.maisondupuy.com — At the hotel’s Christmas party, there’s a pop-up market, a tree lighting, hors d’oeuvres, eggnog and wine. Proceeds benefit the Salvation Army. 5 p.m. Yoga Class & Sound Bath. City Park Botanical Garden, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 4839386; www.neworleanscitypark.com/ botanical-garden — A yoga class and sound bath takes place in the gardens during Celebration in the Oaks. Admission $9. 6:15 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

THURSDAY 8 ABWA Luncheon. Heritage Grill, 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 9344900; www.heritagegrillmetairie.com — Peggy Scott Laborde is the guest of honor at the American Business Women’s Association networking luncheon. Visit www.abwaneworleans.org for details. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Happy Hour with a Healthy Twist. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — Footprints to Fitness hosts the happy hour, which features yoga and Pilates followed by small bites and cocktails. There’s a holiday costume contest. Admission $13.50. 6:30 p.m. Holiday Fling Open House at the Cottage. Lake Pontchartrain Basin Maritime Museum, 133 Mabel Drive, Madisonville, (985) 845-9200; www.lpbmaritimemuseum.org — Haute Dames Couture Milliners hosts a wine and cheese reception at the cottage. Couture hats are displayed and sold. Free admission. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. How to Write an Effective Grant Proposal. Central City Library, Mahalia Jackson Center, building C, room 235, 2405 Jackson Ave., (504) 596-3110; www.nolalibrary.org — Anita W. Dennis

presents the grantwriting workshop for educators, nonprofits and the general public. 5:45 p.m. New Orleans Beekeepers Club. Chalstrom House, 1031 S. Carrollton Ave. — The club discusses apiary equipment and winter activities. Free admission. 7 p.m. Sticking Up for Children. Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-9070; www.ashecac. org — The “festiva,” dinner and concert with local musicians, including Johnny Vidacovich, Alexey Marti and Evan Christopher, benefits youth education partners in Haiti. Tickets $30, couples $50, students $20. 7 p.m. Tales of the Toddy. Hyatt Regency New Orleans, 601 Loyola Ave., (504) 561-1234; www.neworleans.hyatt.com — Bartenders compete to prepare the best holiday-themed cocktail, including eggnogs, toddies and hot buttered rum. Visit www.talesofthecocktail.com for details. Tickets $49-$79.

FRIDAY 9 Friday Nights at NOMA. New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, (504) 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum stays open late for artist talks, receptions and special exhibits. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Holiday on the Boulevard. Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard; www.ochaleyblvd. org — There are open houses, a holiday marketplace and guided boulevard tours at the annual event. Noon to 6 p.m. Friday, noon to 8 p.m. Saturday. Homecoming Affair: Building New Orleans Now Gala. Ashe Power House, 1731 Baronne St., (504) 569-9070; www. ashecac.org — There’s an open bar, food from local restaurants and a silent auction at Project Homecoming’s gala. Tickets start at $50. Visit www.projecthomecoming.net for details. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Imagine Christmas. Hosanna Church, 2215 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, (504) 340-7036; www.hosannachurch.us — The family-friendly holiday event includes photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus, a Miracle on Main Street musical, food and drinks for sale, a car show, games, sleigh rides, face painting and more. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Songwriters Confab. Crown of Life Lutheran Church, 11721 Morrison Rd., (504) 242-7646; www.crownoflifenola. com — Songwriters meet to discuss recording, licensing, promoting and performing. Call Mike at (504) 7848739 for details. 6:45 p.m. Star Gazing. Northlake Nature Center, 23135 Highway 190, Mandeville, (985) 626-1238; www.northlakenature.org — Pontchartrain Astronomy Society leads the nighttime astronomy workshop. Registration required; email rue@northlakenature.org. Tickets $5. 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m.

SATURDAY 10 Bayou Road Holiday Market. Kitchen Witch Cookbooks, 1452 N. Broad St., (504) 528-8382; www.kwcookbooks. com — Vendors, food pop-ups and drinks are available at the Bayou Road holiday market and stroll. 10 a.m. Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Convening for Louisiana. Dillard University, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., (504) 283-8822; www.dillard.edu — Women PAGE 61


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2016 | 6:30 P.M. | FROZEN FRIDAY, DECEMBER 16, 2016 | 6:30 P.M. | ELF the outlet collection at riverwalk – spanish plaza

Santa Meets Sousa Holiday Concert

Presented by Marine Corps Band New Orleans

REINDEER RUN & ROMP SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2016 REGISTRATION 8:00 A.M. | RACE START 9:00 A.M. begins & ends at the outlet collection at riverwalk

MAJOR SPONSORS

Friday, December 10th 7:30PM Saenger Theatre Sponsored by and Marine Forces Reserve

Free to the public. Donations of new, unwrapped toys appreciated. For more information, visit marforres.marines.mil/band or saengernola.com or on facebook at facebook.com/MCBNOLA or facebook.com/saengernola.

for more information: www.DowntownNOLA.com/Holidays

Follow us! TWITTER @DDDNewOrleans FACEBOOK.com/DowntownNOLA INSTAGRAM.com/DDDNewOrleans #DOWNTOWNNOLA

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HOLIDAY MOVIES ON THE MISSISSIPPI


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EVENTS PHOTONOLA, NEW ORLEANS ANNUAL PHOTOGRAPHY FESTIVAL, features more than 50 shows at local galleries and museums, and there are events across town. Shows range from an exhibit of Clarence John Laughlin and his contemporaries’ work at the Historic New Orleans Collection’s Williams Research Center to a group show about second-line culture at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Foundation Gallery to the Currents 2016 show of New Orleans Photo Alliance members’ work at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Arno Rafael Minkkinen delivers a keynote address at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the New Orleans Museum of Art before the PhotoGala. The Finnish-American photographer is a professor at the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and received a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 2015. Some of his best-known work combines body and landscape images. One of PhotoNOLA’s highlights is portfolio reviews for select photographers by curators and gallery dealers, and the public can view the work at the annual PhotoWalk from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art’s Taylor Library. PhotoNOLA also includes workshops, printing demonstrations, gallery talks and more. Photographers Maude Schuyler Clay (Mississippi History) and Bill Yates (Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink) sign their books at the Ogden (at 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday, respectively). Clay’s Mississippi History expo (pictured) is open through Jan. 15, 2017. Visit the website for full schedule. — WILL COVIELLO

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with a Vision (WWAV) presents the day of discussions and panels related to reproductive rights and policy for women of color. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Celebration in the Oaks Run/Walk. City Park Botanical Garden, 1 Palm Drive, (504) 483-9386; www.neworleanscitypark.com/ botanical-garden — The 2-mile fun run is followed by festivities on the Celebration in the Oaks grounds. Visit www.ccc10k. com for details. Registration varies. 3 p.m. Champions Day. Fair Grounds Race Course & Slots, 1751 Gentilly Blvd., (504) 944-5515; www.fairgroundsracecourse. com — The program features an afternoon of high-stakes thoroughbred races. Noon. Christmas Parade. Lapalco Boulevard and Westwood Drive, Marrero — Krewe of NOMTOC presents a holiday parade with dance performances and marching bands. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Christmas Potluck and Gift Exchange. Indian Hills Resort, 2484 Gause Blvd W, Slidell, (985) 641-9998 — The clothing-optional club hosts a Christmas party and potluck. Bring a dish to share and a $20 wrapped gift. Visit www.louisiananudist. com for details. Admission varies. Dents for Kids. X-A-Dent, 730 Papworth Ave., Metairie, (504) 259-3368 — The dent repair shop hosts a toy drive. Families bringing a toy valued at $25 or more can receive a free door ding repair. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Garden Workshops. The Urban Farmstead, 4221 S. Robertson St.; www.

PHOTO COURTESY OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART

Bill with Gun, Maude Schuyler Clay

PhotoNOLA • Dec. 8-11 • Citywide; www.photonola.com

southboundgardens.com — Two days of workshops accompany a Saturday greenhouse market. Saturday covers “Veggie Growing Basics,” Sunday covers “Basics of Beekeeping.” Suggested donation $10. 12:30 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday. Holiday Ceramics Sale. Byrdie’s Gallery, 2422 St. Claude Ave., (504) 656-6794; www.byrdiesgallery.com — Locally made ceramics are sold. Noon to 9 p.m. Holiday Kids Sing-Along & Dance Party. Deanie’s Seafood, 841 Iberville St., (504) 581-1316; www.deanies.com — At a family-friendly breakfast with Santa, there’s face painting, Candy Land games, arts and crafts and a performance by Vince Vance & the Valianettes. Tickets $42, children under age 2 free. 9 a.m. Friday-Saturday. Identity Crisis. Grow On Community Farm, 2358 Urquhart St. — Grow On and One Night Stand present the evening of performances, film screenings and discussions with identity-related themes. Food is served. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Jingle Bugs. Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, 423 Canal St., (504) 4102847; www.auduboninstitute.org — The insectarium’s holiday party features “Pupa Noel,” a gumdrop hunt and readings of The Night Before Christmas, as well as seasonal treats such as peppermint cricket bark. Free with museum admission. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jolly Winter Fun. Algiers Regional Library, 3014 Holiday Drive, Algiers, (504) 5297323; www.nolalibrary.org — A craft work-

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PREVIEW

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STILL TO COME:

Last Minute

Gift Guides ISSUE DATE: DEC. 13 RESERVE DEADLINE: DEC. 2

CALL NOW!

ISSUE DATE: DEC. 20 RESERVE DEADLINE: DEC. 9

shop features holiday crafts for all ages. Children under age 13 must be accompanied by an adult. 2 p.m. Krewe of Kringle. House of Blues, Voodoo Garden, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com — The holiday-themed bar crawl features stops and drink specials at several French Quarter pubs. Costumes encouraged. Visit www. kreweofkringle.com for details. Registration $20. 6 p.m. Lights at the Lake. New Canal Lighthouse, 8001 Lakeshore Drive, (504) 282-2134; www.saveourlake.org — Santa stops by the family-friendly Christmas party, which also features caroling, food from local restaurants, drinks and raffles. There’s also a viewing of the West End Christmas Boat Parade. Free admission. 4:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Louisiana Renaissance Festival. 46468 River Road, Hammond — The Renaissance village features craft and food vendors, jousting, falconry, juggling, bagpipes, belly dancing, puppetry, costume contests and more. Admission $20, children $11. Visit www.larf.org for details. 9:45 a.m. to dusk Saturday-Sunday. Magazine Street Art Market. Dat Dog, 3336 Magazine St., (504) 324-2226; www. datdognola.com — Local artists sell art, wearable art and jewelry at a market in the restaurant’s courtyard. Noon to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. New Orleans Bookfair. Clouet Gardens, 707 Clouet St. — Independently published books and zines are sold. There also are panels, readings and kids’ activities. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Open Studio. Mini Art Center, 341 Seguin St., Algiers, (504) 510-4747; www. miniartcenter.com — At weekend art workshops, kids can make self-portraits (Saturday) and recycled paper animal houses (Sunday). Admission $5. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Piety Street Market. The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St., (504) 908-4741; www. 612piety.com — More than 50 vendors offer art, jewelry, crafts, vintage clothes, collectibles, used books and flea market treasures at this monthly market. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Reindeer Run and Romp. The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk, 500 Port of New Orleans Place; www.riverwalkneworleans. com — Runners wear reindeer antlers at a 1-mile “eggnog jog.” Visit www. downtownnola.com for details. Registration varies. 9 a.m. Santa Stumble. Hook’d Up Bar and Grill, 100 Marina Del Rey Drive, Madisonville, (985) 302-5502; www.hookdupbarandgrill.com — A Santa-themed pub crawl features costume contests and drink specials. Free admission. 7 p.m. Self-Defense for Everyone. East New Orleans Regional Library, 5641 Read Blvd., (504) 596-2646; www.nolalibrary.org — The class for all ages concentrates on mental martial arts. 1 p.m. Shop for Change. The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk, 500 Port of New Orleans Place; www.riverwalkneworleans.com — Dress for Success hosts a sale to reduce its inventory and benefit women’s support programs. 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. STEM Saturday. Joe W. Brown Park, 5601 Read Blvd., (504) 355-7175; www.friendsofjoewbrownpark.org — Kids meet STEM

college students and professionals for a variety of activities. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Teddy Bear Tea. National World War II Museum, Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — There’s food, sweet treats, tea and performances by the Victory Belles at this family-friendly holiday tea. Tickets $59. 10 a.m.

SUNDAY 11 Arts and Activism. The Foundation Gallery, 1109 Royal St., (504) 568-0955; www. foundationgallerynola.com — At the fundraiser for Antenna Gallery, writer Maurice Ruffin reads and Akasha Rabut and Darcy Mckinnon discuss Rabut’s photographs. Cocktails are served. Suggested donation $5-$15. 7 p.m. History and Holly Tour. Covington Heritage Foundation, 419 N. New Hampshire St., Covington, (985) 892-1873; www.covingtonheritagefoundation.com — A candlelight tour visits several historic Covington homes. Tickets $20. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Holiday Bazaar. House of Blues, Voodoo Garden, 225 Decatur St., (504) 310-4999; www.houseofblues.com — There’s jewelry, gift baskets, paintings and more at the holiday market. 2 p.m. Holiday Market Extravaganza. Urban South Brewery, 1645 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 517-4677; www.urbansouthbrewery. com — Louisiana Modified Dolls, Krewe of Rolling Elvi, Sirens of New Orleans and Muff-a-Lotta’s host the holiday market, which has art and gift vendors, Christmas karaoke, themed contests, gift wrapping and more. Kids and pets welcome. Free admission. 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. Intro to Dog Training. Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., (504) 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The free workshop is for new dog owners and aspiring trainers. Registration not required. There also are courses on pet first aid and reactive dog training. Visit www.la-spca.org/ petfirstaidandcpr and www.la-spca.org/ trainingregistrationform to register. Jungle Bells. Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St., (504) 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — At an outdoor party at the zoo’s picnic pavilion, Santa appears, refreshments are served and holiday tchotchkes are distributed. Tickets $30, kids $25. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen. Southern Food & Beverage Foundation, 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-0405; www.natfab.org — Kids make gingerbread, sugar and thumbprint cookies and chocolate eggnog. Admission $20. 10:30 a.m. Live Nativity. Rayne Memorial United Methodist Church, 3900 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-3431; www.rayneumc. org — There are kids’ crafts, caroling and sweet treats at the live nativity scene. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Moonlight Hike and Marshmallow Melt. Northlake Nature Center, 23135 Highway 190, Mandeville, (985) 626-1238; www. northlakenature.org — A nighttime nature hike ends with a sweet treat. Email rue@ northlakenaturecenter.org to register. Tickets $5. 4:50 p.m. Read Between the Wine. Martin Wine Cellar Deli & Catering, 3827 Baronne St., New Orleans, (504) 896-7300; www. martinwine.com — James Carville, Mary Matalin, Jeremy Alford and Tyler Bridges host a wine reception. Signed copies of Long Shot and holiday gifts are sold.


EVENTS

MONDAY 12 National Novel Writing Month Workshop. Norman Mayer Branch Library, 3001 Gentilly Blvd., (504) 596-3100; www. neworleanspubliclibrary.org — Rob Cerio leads the NaNoWriMo revision workshop and post-mortem. 6:30 p.m. Word and Image Festival. St. Bernard Recreation Center, 1500 Lafreniere St. — NORDC presents a festival featuring local authors, spoken word artists and graphic artists, workshops and readings. Free admission. Noon to 8 p.m.

FARMERS MARKETS Covington Farmers Market. Covington Trailhead, 419 N. Hampshire St., Covington — The Northshore market offers local produce, meat, seafood, breads, prepared foods, plants and music. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday. Crescent City Farmers Market. Citywide, New Orleans — The market offers fresh produce, prepared foods, flowers and plants at locations citywide, including Tulane University Square (200 Broadway St.) 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday; French Market 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday; the American Can Apartments (3700 Orleans Ave.) 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday and in the Central Business District (at 750 Carondelet St.) 8 a.m. to noon Saturday. CRISP Farms Market. CRISP Farms Market, 1330 France St.; www.facebook. com/crispfarms — The urban farm offers greens, produce, herbs and seedlings. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday. French Market. French Market, corner of Gov. Nicholls Street and French Market Place, (504) 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The historic French Quarter market offers local produce, seafood, herbs, baked goods, coffee and prepared foods. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Gretna Farmers Market. Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, (504) 361-1822 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 25 vendors offering fruits and vegetables, meats, prepared foods, baked goods, honey and flowers. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Grow Dat Farm Stand. Grow Dat Youth Farm, New Orleans City Park, 150 Zachary Taylor Drive, (504) 377-8395; www.growdatyouthfarm.org — Grow Dat Youth Farm sells its produce. 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. Old Algiers Harvest Fresh Market. Old Algiers Harvest Fresh Market, 922 Teche St., Algiers, (504) 362-0708; www.oldalgiersharvestfreshmarket.com — Produce and seafood are available for purchase. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. ReFresh Project Community Garden Farmers Market. ReFresh Project, 300 N. Broad St.; www.broadcommunityconnections.org — The weekly Monday market offers local produce, homemade kimchi, cocoa-fruit leather, pesto and salad dressing. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday. Rivertown Farmers Market. Rivertown, 400 block of Williams Boulevard, Kenner, (504) 468-7231; www.kenner.la.us — The market features fruits, vegetables, dairy products, preserves and cooking demonstrations. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday. Sankofa Mobile Market. Lower 9th Ward Community Center, 5234 N. Claiborne

Ave. — The Sankofa market truck offers seasonal produce from the Sankofa Garden. 11 a.m. to noon Tuesday. The truck also stops at 6322 St. Claude Ave. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Sunday.

SPORTS New Orleans Pelicans. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Girod St., (504) 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The New Orleans Pelicans play the Philadelphia 76ers. 7 p.m.

WORDS Best Food Writing 2016. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com — Stephanie Jane Carter moderates a conversation between anthology contributors Pableaux Johnson, James Nolan, Brett Martin and L. Kasimu Harris. 6 p.m. Thursday. Bill Yates, Maude Schuyler Clay. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — The photographers sign recent books: Sweetheart Roller Skating Rink (Yates) and Mississippi History (Clay). 4 p.m. Sunday. David Netto. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 8952266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com — The author presents Francois Catroux, a design book about the famed interior decorator. 6 p.m. Wednesday. George Graham. Southern Food & Beverage Foundation, 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-0405; www.natfab.org — The author signs his cookbook Acadiana Table. 2 p.m. Saturday. Kathy Finn. Hubbell Library, 725 Pelican Ave., (504) 322-7479; www.neworleanspubliclibrary.org — The author presents Tom Benson: A Billionaire’s Journey. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Peggy Scott Laborde. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, (504) 838-1190; www.jefferson.lib.la.us — The author discusses and signs The Fair Grounds Through the Lens: Photographs and Memories of Horse Racing in New Orleans. 7 p.m. Thursday. Scott Solomon. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop. com — The author presents Future Humans: Inside the Science of Our Continuing Evolution. 6 p.m. Tuesday. Simon Gunning. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The artist signs The River and the Painter: Simon Gunning, New Orleans, the Mississippi River and its Bayous, a book of full-color plates of his work. 5 p.m. Tuesday.

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GOODS & SERVICES / NOTICES G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > • D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

AUTOMOTIVE TRUCKS 1996 FORD F150 ONLY $2525 SHORT BOX, AUTO, 31K MI, V8, PACIFIC GREEN EXT. CALL OR TEXT 734-274-9235

LEGAL NOTICES Waffles On Maple LLC d/b/a Waffles on Maple is applying to the Office of Alcohol & Tobacco Control of the State of Louisiana for a permit to sell beverages of high and low alcohol content at retail in the Parish of Orleans at the following address: 7712 Maple Street, New Orleans, LA, 70118 Waffles On Maple LLC. Waffles On Maple Members: Belinda Dahan and Rotem Dahan

PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE ENTERGY NEW ORLEANS, INC. REGARDING NEW ORLEANS POWER STATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT ENTERGY NEW ORLEANS, INC. (“ENO”) WILL HOST two PUBLIC MEETINGs to provide information and answer questions surrounding ENO’s June 20, 2016 Application filed with the New Orleans City Council to build a 226 megawatt Combustion Turbine (“CT”) unit called New Orleans Power Station (“NOPS”). Building a local resource like NOPS will enhance ENO’s ability to provide reliable power to the city during the times of greatest need. In this public meeting, ENO will ADDRESS VARIOUS TOPICS RELATED TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF NOPS, INCLUDING: What is a CT unit? Why does New Orleans need NOPS? What are the benefits of NOPS? What is the Economic Impact of NOPS? What is appropriate size for the CT unit? How does NOPS fit into the Integrated Resource Plan? What is the environmental impact of NOPS? What about Renewable Resources or Energy Efficiency programs? MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC ARE INVITED TO ATTEND these meetings. The Public Meetings will be held at the following locations:

Anyone knowing the whereabouts of Francisco B. Mangahas and/or Britta Smith Mazur a/k/a Britta Smith Magru, please contact Attorney CaSandra King at (504) 982-5464.

SERVICES

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COSTUME DESIGN

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA

MARDI GRAS COSTUMES CARNIVAL DESIGNS HAS RETURNED 615-947-7551

IN THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION OF JOANELISE LEONESS GUZMAN ROSARIO, Adoptee CASE NO.: 2016-DR-001656

NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION TO: IDALMI JEANNETTE GUZMAN-ROSARIO YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Termination of Parental Rights and for Grandparent Adoption, has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on Justin Rickman, Esquire, Petitioner’s attorney, whose address is 780 ALMOND STREET, CLERMONT, FL 34711, on or before January 6, 2017, and file the original with the clerk of this court at LAKE County Courthouse, 550 W. Main Street, Tavares, Florida 32778, either before service on Petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. DATED this 1 day of December, 2016. Neil Kelly CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: T. Neece Deputy Clerk GAMBIT: 12/06/16, 12/13/16, 12/20/16 & 12/27/16

FLIP

Kennel #A19453720

Flip is a 9 1/2-year-old, neutered, Golden Retriever mix who never met a stranger—2 or 4-legged. He knows “sit,” “down,” “shake” and is housetrained. His former family didn’t have time for him and he’s currently undergoing complimentary heartworm treatment, so will require TLC for several months. Through December 23 any animal is only $25!

CHAT Thor

Tuesday, December 13, 2016 at 6 p.m. Epiphany Baptist Church Sanctuary 5200 Cannes St. New Orleans, LA 70129

Thor was abandoned and left to fend for himself. Neighbors feed him until new owners moved in. After a vicious dog attack he was rescued by Spaymart and has now fully recovered and ready to go home for the holidays. He is a senior cat and and wojld love a senior owner. Please call the spaymart thrift store at 504-454-8200 for adoption details.

Wednesday, December 14, 2016 at 6 p.m. Apostolic Outreach Center Sanctuary 8358 Lake Forest Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70126

www.spaymart.org

MOVING SERVICE • TRASH HAULING • FREE ESTIMATES. Call (504) 292-0724.

✁ ✁ ✁ ✁ INTERIOR/EXTERIOR REPAIRS

Roofing • Gutters • Plumbing • Sheetrock PATIO COVERS • SOFFIT AND FASCIA

CALL JEFFREY • (504) 610-5181

JINX

Kennel #A33843758

Jinx is a 1-year-old, neutered, DSH who LOVES treats. His family had to surrender him when their apt. complex changed to a no pet policy. Jinx will nudge for extra petting and has a healthy appetite for “Temptations” treats. Through December 23 any animal is only $25!

ADULT ENTERTAINMENT

CAT

••• C H E A P TRASH HAULING • (504) 292-0724 •••

Pressure Washing • Painting Gutter Cleaning

To meet these or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun., call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

PETS

HOME SERVICES

Playmates or soul mates, you’ll u’ll find them u on MegaMates Always FREE to listen and reply to ads!

New Orleans:

(504) 602-9813

www.megamates.com 18+

✁ ✁ ✁ ✁

64

Lakeview

Locally owned & serving the New Orleans area for over 25 years

CLEANING SERVICE

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING HOLIDAY CLEANING LIGHT/GNERAL HOUSEKEEPING HEAVY DUTY CLEANING

Susana Palma

lakeviewcleaningllc@yahoo.com Fully Insured & Bonded

504-250-0884 504-913-6615

NEED TO PLACE A FOR RENT LISTING? CALL 504-483-3138


EMPLOYMENT RETAIL Full & Part-Time. Flexible hours. Days, Nights or Weekends. Apply at 601 Royal St.

FARM LABOR Temporary Farm Labor: Billy Hinkle Farms Partnership, Aubrey, AR, has 6 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large farm equip. and machinery w/ GPS for cultivating, tilling, fertilizing, planting & harvesting cotton & soybeans w/ combines, cotton pickers, tractors, module buildings, boll buggies, transporting cotton & soybeans from field to storage; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/ failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 11/30/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order 1826072 or call 225-342-2917. Temporary Farm Labor: Taucer Honey & Bee Co., Buna, TX, has 1 positions with 3 mo. experience required as beekeeper with references; raise honeybees to produce honey & maintain colony health through feed supplements, caging queens, install queen cells, assemble hives, harvest combs, transport honey, maintain & repair buildings & equipment; long periods of standing, bending & must lift 75 pounds; obtain driver’s license within 30 days of hire with clean MVR; no bee, pollen, or honey related allergies; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/ failure to comply may result in immediate termination; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/hr, may increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends and asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 11/30/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order TX2968469 or call 225-342-2917.

FOR SALE

SMALL SPACE CALL 483-3100

Temporary Farm Labor: Bieri & Son, Angleton, TX, has 2 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large farm equip. for tilling, cultivating, planting & harvesting of crops, cow/calf operation, ear tagging, branding, feeding supplements to daves, maintain rice irrigation, transporting & stacking of hay, grain drying & transporting rice, milo & corn; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order TX8501017 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917. Temporary Farm Labor: East Half Farms, Marianna, AR, has 12 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large farm equip. for cultivating, tilling, fertilizing, planting & harvesting of grain, cotton & oilseed crops from fields to storage facilities & gins; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order 1826059 or call 225-342-2917.

Temporary Farm Labor: Sunrise Planting Co., Lyon, MS, has 2 positions, 3 mo. experience for assisting w/ cultivating, insecticide & fertilizer application for field preparation for planting & harvesting of soybeans, rice, cotton & wheat crops, transport cotton & oilseed crops from field to storage; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order MS193283 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917. Temporary Farm Labor: Dan’s Honey Co., Kirbyville, TX, has 2 positions with 3 mo. experience required as beekeeper with references; raise honeybees to produce honey & maintain colony health through feed supplements, caging queens, install queen cells, assemble hives, harvest combs, transport honey, maintain & repair buildings & equipment; long periods of standing, bending & must lift 75 pounds; obtain driver’s license within 30 days of hire with clean MVR; no bee, pollen, or honey related allergies; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/ failure to comply may result in immediate termination; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/hr, may increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends and asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 5/15/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order TX2968524 or call 225-342-2917. Temporary Farm Labor: Reece Farms, Daisetta, TX, has 15 positions with 3 mo. experience required as beekeeper with references; raise honeybees to produce honey & maintain colony health through feed supplements, caging queens, install queen cells, assemble hives, harvest combs, transport honey, maintain & repair buildings & equipment; long periods of standing, bending & must lift 75 pounds; obtain driver’s license within 30 days of hire with clean MVR; no bee, pollen, or honey related allergies; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/ failure to comply may result in immediate termination; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/hr, may increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends and asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 1/15/17 – 11/15/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply at nearest LA Workforce Office with Job Order TX2963879 or call 225-342-2917.

65 3

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

Well Established FQ Gift Shop Now Hiring

Temporary Farm Labor: Clark & Co., Shelby, MS, has 7 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large equip. for cultivating, insecticide & fertilizer application, planting & harvesting cotton, soybeans & rice crops, transport cotton & soybeans to elevators & storage locations; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order MS193284 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917.

Temporary Farm Labor: D-Bar Ranch, Katy, TX, has 3 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large equip. for cultivating, tilling, fertilizing & planting rice, pulling weeds, harvesting, drying & processing rice, seed cleaning & bagging for shipping; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/ failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order TX5189929 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-7294. Temporary Farm Labor: H Bar H Farms, Hartley, TX, has 4 positions, 3 mo. experience for transporting grain & cotton using tractors with grain carts from field to elevators & storage, operating farm & row crop equipment to cultivate, fertilize & plant, operate harvesting equipment such as row headers, cotton strippers & trash mulchers for oilseed crops & cotton; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/ hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order TX3446666 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917. Temporary Farm Labor: Reed Storey Farms, Marvell, AR, has 4 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large farm equip. & machinery w/ GPS for cultivating, tilling, fertilizing, planting & harvesting of grain, cotton & oilseed crops, transporting from field to storage, operating hay equip. for swathing, raking, baling, stacking & transporting from field to storage, operate cotton pickers for cotton harvest, load & unload grain & oilseed crops from grain bins to truck, operate bin dryers, assisting w/ vaccinating & feeding of livestock; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/ failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 12/20/16 – 9/30/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917. Temporary Farm Labor: Spoor Farms JV, Angleton, TX, has 3 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large farm equipment for cultivating, tilling, fertilizing, planting & harvesting of grain & rice, pulling weeds, operating grain dryers & seed production, transporting grain & rice to storage facilities; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $11.15/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 12/1/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order TX3446532 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917.

EMPLOYMENY

Temporary Farm Labor: Stephen & Brent Davis Farms, Cotton Plant, AR, has 4 positions, 3 mo. experience for operating large farm equipment and machinery w/ GPS for cultivating, tilling, fertilizing, planting & harvesting grain & oilseed crops, transporting grain & oilseed crops from field to storage; repair, clean & maintain building & equip; long periods of standing, bending & able to lift 75#; must able to obtain driver’s license with clean MVR within 30 days; once hired, workers may be required to take employer paid random drug tests; testing positive/failure to comply may result in immediate termination from employment; employer provides free tools, equipment, housing and daily trans; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $10.69/hr, increase based on experience, may work nights, weekends & asked but not required to work Sabbath; 75% work period guaranteed from 2/1/17 – 11/30/17. Review ETA790 requirements and apply with Job Order 1826067 at nearest LA Workforce Office or call 225-342-2917.


PUZZLES

66

NOLArealtor.com realtor.com Your Guide to New Orleans Homes & Condos

ERA Powered, Independently Owned & Operated

1839 N. RAMPART ST. • 1800 Sq Ft AL

Rare Marigny Opportunity Fully Equipped Corner Restaurant. $789,000

CI

R ME

M

CO

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

JOHN SCHAFF

CRS More than just a Realtor! (c) 504.343.6683 (o) 504.895.4663

760 MAGAZINE ST #224 • $449,000

Fantastic Location! Two Master Suites!

EXCELLENT INVESTMENT DOUBLE!

4016 COLISEUM ST.

1625-27 FRANKLIN AVENUE

Charming 3BR/2.5 BA with Lots of Natural Light! Many architectural features inc. Double Parlors, Pocket Doors, Bay Windows and hardwood floors. Walk out of Master Suite to a huge covered balcony. Front Porch, Rear Deck and a great rear building perfect for a studio! Well maintained in a GREAT location - walk to Magazine! $550,000

Renovated in 2013, this double is perfect as a rental property or an owner occupied home with inN come. Plumbing, electrical and HVAC newly installed in 2013. 2 BD/1 BA on each side. Heart of Pine floors. 9.5’ ceilings and lots of character. Side Hall provides independent access to each bedroom. Be where the action is on thriving Franklin Avenue, close to Marigny, Bywater and St Claude! OR COMMERCIAL POSSIBILITY! Zoned HU-B1 – Historic Urban Neighborhood Business District. $224,000

760 MAGAZINE ST #214 • $399,000

3915 St Charles Ave. #516 • $229,000

Rooftop Terrance! Fantastic Location in the Heart of the Warehouse District! 1BR/2BA

Adorable Condo on Historic St. Charles Ave. 1BR/1BA

THE NEWSDAY CROSSWORD Edited by Stanley Newman (www.StanXwords.com)

FUNNY BUSINESS: Explained at 107 Down by Fred Piscop G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

CLASSIC ON COLISEUM

ACROSS 1 Merit badge holder 5 Construction girder 10 Corp. boss 13 Singer LaBelle 18 Scandinavian capital 19 Jazz ensemble 20 Delhi dress 21 Fictional Frome 22 Forced into sea service 24 Largest living fish 26 Olympics dueler 27 Lively spirit 29 Cola quantities 30 Pub missile 31 Jogging pace

32 Committed to carrying out 33 Raven’s sound 36 Synagogue celebration 39 Shell game 43 Sore spot 45 Course for a horse 46 Bake-sale offerings 48 Spectrum slice 49 Venue for a play 51 Hockey great Gordie 52 Get-up-and-go 53 Take back, as testimony 55 Place for a brake job 57 Overfill

58 Launches a tirade 59 Despot’s word 60 Ax or awl 61 Prefix for hero 62 Ferber novel 64 Burger topper 66 Honolulu-based detective 69 Hornets’ home 72 Nescafé rival 74 Sight from Salzburg 75 Grapes of Wrath character 77 TMC sister channel 78 Houston ballplayer 80 Peter Pan pirate

G

TIN

EW

LIS

ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR, SRS

(504) 895-4663 Latter & Blum, ERA powered is independently owned and operated.

81 Traveling circus, e.g. 83 Big name in harmonicas 85 Sweetie 86 Caddy beverages 88 Rickety auto 89 Phrase indicating emulation 90 Clear wrap 92 Cupid alias 93 October birthstone 94 Dramatist Henley 96 Fit well together 101 UFO fliers 102 __ Malvinas (the Falklands) 104 Heavy burden 105 Entry point 107 Group of seven 109 Cheese sold in cylinders 110 Mulls over 113 Patriot of 1776 115 Six-legged indoor pest 118 Vast disarray 119 Symbols of sturdiness 120 Personnel official 121 Very dry 122 Author Ellison 123 What Teslas run without 124 Get cracking 125 Amounts risked

35 Query re a UFO, perhaps 37 To-do 38 Acid in vinegar 40 Morph 41 Female in the family 42 National League East team 44 Braggart’s overabundance 47 Person from Belgrade 50 Ft. Myers clock setting 51 To-do 52 Noggin tops 54 Son in Genesis 4 56 Get fast cash for 57 Take potshots 61 Patriot of 1775 62 Benefits 63 From here __ (henceforth) 65 Give a heads-up to 67 Quimby of kid-lit 68 Embers 70 Tried to attain 71 Sauna supplies 73 Turndowns 76 Space saving abbr. 78 Moby Dick pursuer

SUDOKU

79 Arch support 80 Persian rulers 82 “No seats” sign 84 Roomy sleeve 86 Significant successes 87 Geological time periods 91 Tough-to-pass driver 92 Name on 62 Across’ cover 95 Rap music 97 Junction points 98 Rabid fan 99 Random scribbling, for example 100 Wonderland bird 103 Hidden supply 106 Get-well program 107 Theme of the puzzle 108 Space saving abbr. 109 Reindeer cousins 110 Prefix meaning “ancillary” 111 In very short supply 112 Irked state 113 ATM maker 114 Travel-clock battery, often 116 Creative success 117 NFL successes

By Creators Syndicate

DOWN 1 Distress call 2 Big Apple’s Arthur __ Stadium 3 Sharp rebuke 4 Perfected 5 Suzuki of baseball 6 Talks big 7 Send out 8 Prez on a five 9 Middle-of-the-road 10 Lyricist Sammy 11 Prominent period 12 Pipeline problem 13 Marinara alternative 14 2004 Olympics city 15 “__ she blows!” 16 Road covers 17 Press coverage 20 Mown strip 23 Get ready, with “up” 25 This or that 28 Tax write-off 31 Defrost 32 Rickman’s Harry Potter role 33 Cellist from Spain 34 Not made up CREATORS SYNDICATE © 2016 STANLEY NEWMAN Reach Stan Newman at P.O. Box 69, Massapequa Park, NY 11762 or www.StanXwords.com

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK: P 64


1726 FOUCHER ST.

67 3

FURNISHED 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

REAL ESTATE

Reovated Downstairs Apt. 1 BD, LR, DR. Fur Kit, W/D. No Pets. $800/mo + deposit. Water Paid. Call (504) 650-4358.

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, security doors, Central A&H, shared off st pkng. Alarm ready. On st car & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,200 mo+sec dep. No pets/ smokers. Avail Now. Call (504) 866-2250.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1095

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry/3 mo. min. Avail Dec 1st. Call 504-442-0573 or 985-871-4324.

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM.

Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com!

OUT OF TOWN

MISSISSIPPI PORT GIBSON, MS 39150

509 Church St. ~ McDougall House 1820’s Historic, Renovated Greek Revival Raised Cottage 5 beds/3 baths, pool. $215,000 1201 Church St. ~ Anderson House 3 beds/3.5 baths, Studio apt + bldg w/4 beds/4 baths. Recently used as a B&B. $235,000 1207 Church St. ~ On National Register Re-creation of Antebellum Mansion 6 beds/4baths + 2 bed Carriage House. $385,000 Call Realtor Brenda Roberts Ledger-Purvis Real Estate 601-529-6710

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT METAIRIE 3BD 2BA Util inc’l 1363 sqft

Pool, BBQ house, gated. Never Flooded $1,400/mo 1 yr lse. Call (504) 456-1718 or (504) 914-8002.

OLD METAIRIE LUXURY TOWNHOME OLD METAIRIE

Great Room boasts hardwood flrs, cathedral ceilings and huge brick fireplace opening to sunset deck & patio. Sunny kit with all build-ins. 3BR, 3BA, single garage, avail 12/1. $1895/mo. Owner/Agent (504) 236-5776.

OLD METAIRIE 1&2 BDRM. APTS SPARKLING POOL & BIKE PATH

New granite in kit & bath. 12 x 24ft lr, King Master w/wall of closets. Furn Kit. Laundry on premises. Offst pkg. NO PETS. O/A, $748-$888/mo. 504-236-5776.

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN NEAR CITY PARK - DESAIX BLVD.

DORIAN M. BENNETT • 504-920-7541 propertymanagement@dbsir.com

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 840 Mandeville - 2bd/2ba ....................... $1600 2354 Constance - 3bd/2ba ........................... $2400 1301 N. Rampart #502 - 2bd/2ba w/pkng ... $3200 8616 Oak St #308 - 2bd/2ba .................. $2800 3510 Banks St. - 2bd/1ba ............................... $1350

C A LL FO R M O R E LI S T I N G S ! 2340 Dauphine Street • New Orleans, LA 70117 (504) 944-3605

French Quarter Realty 1041 Esplanade MON-SAT 10-5 Sun-1-5 • 949-5400 FQR Full Service Office w/ Agents on Duty!

FOR RENT 2166 Esplanade 2/2 large, lots of nat lite,w/d, independent bedrooms .......................................................... $1250 425 Burgundy #6 2/1.5 Furn, reno’d, balc and ctyd $2500 539 Toulouse #A - Stu All utilities included, fully furnished. Updated ........................................................... $1250 1000 St. Louis #5 2/1 2 stories, beds up, lvg & kit down, balc and courtyard ................................................... $1350 315 Chartres 1/1.5 furnished, 2 stry unit, 2 pvt balcs courtyard ................................................................... $1500 937 Gov Nicholls #7 1/1.5 open concept lv/kit, updated bath, courtyard ........................................................ $2000 3127 Nashville 2/2 Pvt porch, yard and garage parking $1850 1909 Dauphine 1/1 single home w/parking, side and back patio, security gate .................................................. $1600 1225 Bourbon 1/1 luxury unit, renovated with shared courtyard ................................................................... $2500 500 Mandeville 2/2 off st pkng,new paint, apps & flrs, patio, alarm system .................................................. $1800 1233 Marais 1/1 4 reno’d units avail,w/d hook ups, ss apps, keyless gated entry .................................................... $925

FOR SALE 919 St. Philip #8 1/1 balc, ctyd, spacious, full kit, w/d on site, can be purch furnished...............................$279,000

Single house, c-a/h, 2BR, 1BA, w/d hkps, lrg fncd yd, pets ok. $1200/mo. Avail November 1, 2016. Call 504-952-5102.

5216 Danneel 5/3.5 Complete reno, near universities uptown, off st pkng and basement ................... $829,000

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

2223 Franklin Lrg lot for sale. Home is certainly able to be reno’d, but if not there is value in the salvaging of historic and valuable components of the home if interested in a tear down. ............................................ $85,000

1 BR EFF. CLOSE TO UNIVERSITIES

Efficiency w/appliances liv room, a/h unit, ceil fans, wood/tile floors, w/d onsite. Clara by Nashville. Avail Now. $650/mo. 504-895-0016.

5520 Hawthorne 3/2.5 Only 3 yrs old, backyard, off st pkng, open kit/living .......................................... $509,000

611 Dauphine #E 1/1 reno’d kit, nat lite, ctrl A/H, new roof, furnishings negotiable ....................................... $329,000

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > • D E C E M B E R 6 > 2 0 1 6

CONDO NEAR BEACHES & OLD TOWN BAY ST LOUIS, MS. $75,000. HURRY WON'T LAST. 228-216-2628. MANIERI REAL ESTATE LLC


Gambit New Orleans, December 6, 2016  

New Orleans news and entertainment

Gambit New Orleans, December 6, 2016  

New Orleans news and entertainment