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CAPITOL IMPROVEMENTS For Louisiana GOP members, the elections for U.S. Senate and a U.S. Representative seat promise to be wide-open, no-holds-barred affairs. By ClanCy DuBos GULF MEDIA BLACKOUT

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Commentary

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Blake Pontchartrain

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News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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C’est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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Mr. Mayor: Do right by NORD New Orleans know-it-all

Blackout: BP and the Coast Guard deny it, but journalists say the media are being blocked from reporting on the Gulf oil disaster

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This week’s heroes and zeroes Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears

Shop Talk

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Best of New Orleans 2010

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Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe

Your ballot determines the city’s superlatives

VIEWS Chris Rose / Rose-Colored Glasses

A New Orleans family vacation at the beach — in Maryland

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

From the inspiring couple featured in THE BLIND SIDE

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

Thursday July 22, 7 PM

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A&E News

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Gambit Picks

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Cuisine

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Distillers are getting creative with that blank slate of spirits: vodka Best bets for your busy week

David Bowie meets burlesque

Sean Payton • Wed. July 28 12 - 3 PM • Booksigning

Ian McNulty on some new kinds of fish that are turning up in New Orleans restaurants 5 in Five: 5 places for spicy jerk chicken Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

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Gambit Communications, Inc. CHAIRMAN CLANCY DUBOS PRESIDENT & CEO MARGO DUBOS Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in The Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2010 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

The art of negotiation and law at its best.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

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right now, knowing that other city agencies have fiscal crises as well. We’ll defer to him on that — for now — but we still support a dedicated millage for NORD in the long run. On the issue of appointments to the proposed NORD commission, however, Landrieu is clearly wrong. The advisory panel worked hard to renew public confidence in NORD and to depoliticize the commission by ensuring that no mayor could stack it with cronies. Landrieu’s plan is basically a gussied-up extension of the status quo. Nyka Scott, a lawyer who served on Landrieu’s NORD transition team, sums up the problem: “Right now we have a great mayor that nobody has any issues with, but what if we get another Ray Nagin?” Babs Johnson, a parks advocate who also sat on the committee, is even

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The advisory panel got it right, Mr. Mayor. Show your strength by trusting and respecting its work. more blunt: “A lot of people I know aren’t going to vote for something that’s a continuation of the mayor’s political patronage of NORD.” There is some good news: Landrieu’s plan to take over the commission is not yet the law. The City Council will determine the commission’s structure after voters approve the charter proposition in October. There’s still time to do the right thing. “That discussion will be subject to community input over the coming months,” says Council President Arnie Fielkow. A fundamental goal of the public-private partnership is to wrest control of NORD from political insiders. Unfortunately, Landrieu’s first instinct seems to be to seize control, a trait many strong leaders share but one that also reflects a reluctance to trust others. We urge Landrieu to change his mind and embrace a true public-private partnership for NORD. NORD deserves better than the status quo. So do New Orleans’ children. The advisory panel got it right, Mr. Mayor. Show your strength by trusting and respecting its work.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

n his recent State of the City speech, Mayor Mitch Landrieu noted the longstanding problems of the New Orleans Recreation Department. “When I was a kid,” Landrieu said, “NORD had great playgrounds and sports teams and even theater, dance and music programs. But when I came into office 67 days ago, I found a recreation department that would make you weep, one that is underfunded and under-prioritized. We found many of NORD’s facilities are in shambles — swimming pools without filtration systems, no restrooms and no shower facilities.” NORD’s problems are even worse than that (see our cover story, “Where Do the Children Play?”, June 13). They include bulldozed lots listed as playspots, rusted equipment, and abandoned and dangerous buildings left wide open. NORD is so dysfunctional, we had to get our list of playgrounds from FEMA rather than City Hall. Even our blundering former mayor, Ray Nagin, recognized that NORD was an agency in crisis. The city formed a NORD Citizens Advisory Panel two years ago, chaired by businessmen Rod West and Roy Glapion and attorney Bobby Garon. After receiving public input for more than a year and looking at best practices in other cities, the panel presented the City Council with a 42-page report in August 2009. Among the group’s recommendations: establishing a public-private partnership to run NORD; dedicating a millage to fund the program; and creating a 12-member commission to oversee it all. The first step is a charter referendum on Oct. 2 establishing the commission. As a candidate for mayor, Landrieu promised to support the proposed public-private partnership for NORD (www. mitchformayor.com/agenda/nord) . Unfortunately, he has since broken part of that promise by seeking to take over the proposed governing board. The Citizens Advisory Panel recommended a depoliticized NORD commission appointed mostly by local university presidents from nominees submitted by the mayor and the City Council. The New Orleans Saints and the Hornets each would name a commissioner as well. Now, Landrieu wants a 13-member commission — with eight members appointed by the mayor, two by the City Council, and others from the Recovery School District, the Orleans School Board, and the City Planning Commission. The Saints, the Hornets and the university presidents would have no appointments. So much for a “partnership” with the private sector. The mayor also has backed off the millage idea, promising instead to double NORD’s annual budget from $5 million to $10 million. We understand the mayor’s reluctance to ask for a millage increase

07


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Dear GreGory, Yes. It was somebody’s big idea as far back as 1807. By that year, New Orleans already was served by the Carondelet Canal, which connected Lake Pontchartrain and the French Quarter via Bayou St. John. Its turning basin was along what became known as Basin Street, near the site presently occupied by the Municipal Auditorium. Congress passed a law in 1807 that would have allowed extending the canal to the Mississippi River. The extension was never built, but its proposed route was made into Canal Street. It was just as well, because the Carondelet Canal (better known as the Old Basin Canal) was eventually closed, too. Hey Blake, what do you know about charles roudanez, the owner of the fIrst black-owned newspaper publIshed In new orleans In 1862, la trIbune de la nouvelle orleans? I understand he was a free man of color and a practIcIng physIcIan. when dId the paper go out of busIness and what happened to roudanez?

Laura

Dear laura, La Tribune was not the first black-owned newspaper in New Orleans, but it was the first black-owned daily newspaper to be published here. The weekly L’Union was the first black-owned newspaper in Louisiana, and Louis Charles Roudanez started it in 1862. It was published in French and was considered a militant Republican journal that supported equality for free men of color. It lasted two years. After L’Union failed, Roudanez started the daily La Tribune de la Nouvelle Orleans in 1864, published in both French and English. It was the country’s first bilingual black newspaper. The book Our People and Our History (originally published in French in 1911) by Creole historian Rodolphe Lucien Desdunes,

said La Tribune was recognized as the official organ of the state’s Republican Party, and Roudanez, who was born in St. John Parish in 1823, was a leader in the party. La Tribune was outspoken during Reconstruction and critical of carpetbaggers who had moved into Louisiana. The newspaper didn’t last long — it folded in 1870 — partly because of white residents’ hostility toward a black-owned,

pro-Republican In New Orleans, media voice. Louis Charles Ro u d an e z ’s Roudanez was father was a an early voice for French merchant the rights of freed slaves and other and his mothpeople of color. er was a black woman. He was born in 1823 in St. James Parish. He was registered as white on his baptismal record, but throughout his life identified more closely with people of color, according to the Dictionary of American Negro Biography. He and the editorial staff at La Tribune used the newspapers’ pages to advocate for free public education for all Americans and other rights for freed slaves. Roudanez also was active in the Freedman’s Aid Association, a group that sought to establish jobs for former slaves. After the newspapers foundered, Roudanez returned to practicing medicine (he had studied medicine in France and the United States). He died on March 11, 1890 at the age of 67.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> more scuttlebutt chris rose < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < knowledge < < < < < < < < < < <is < <power <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 12 13 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“I’ve never entered a race in my life that I didn’t enter to win.” — State Rep. Ernest Wooton, I-Belle Chasse, after bolting from the GOP to challenge U.S. Sen. David Vitter in the Nov. 2 general election as an independent. “There will be time to discuss endorsements in the coming months.” — Kyle Plotkin, spokesman for Gov. Bobby Jindal. Jindal has appeared with Sen. David Vitter at fundraisers, but has so far declined to endorse the GOP incumbent in the Senate primary.

VITTER DRINKS THE TEA

Blackout The media ShUTOUT ON The LOUiSiaNa cOaST: BP aNd The cOaST GUard Say iT dOeSN’T exiST, BUT rePOrTerS Say iT’S aLL TOO reaL — aNd The Lack Of acceSS meaNS They’re NOT aLLOwed TO BriNG The STOry TO The PUBLic. By ale x woodward

W

page 12

photo courtesy scott walker

viewed on MSNBC’s Countdown with Keith Olbermann. Soon, other reporters fired back, reporting similar access (or lack thereof) to the Louisiana coast in the wake of BP’s oil disaster. A month later, Walker spoke again with Dillon — who had been fired. Dillon described BP’s deliberate attempts to keep the media at bay and the public in the dark, saying anyone who talks to reporters would face termination. Is getting fired what it takes to get people talking? BP contractors and cleanup workers are given cards and guidelines so they know how to deal with media — but it’s not making the media’s jobs any clearer. Even as

c'est what? what do you think is the state of the city?

53% trending up

19%

trending down

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com this week’s QUESTION

page 10

BoUQuets

28%

holding steady

How much faith do you have that U.S. Attorney Jim Letten and NOPD Superintendent Ronal Serpas will be able to institute real reform in the NOPD?

this week’s heroes and zeroes

Special Olympics Louisiana (SOLA)

saluted its 2010 lineup with a dinner in Metairie July 16, the night before 62 athletes and 18 coaches left to compete in the Special Olympics 2010 in Lincoln, Neb. The week before, the organization held its annual awards banquet in Shreveport, where golfer Joel Murray and gymnast and basketball player Denise Louque were honored as SOLA’s Athletes of the Year. Both are national Special Olympics medalists.

Drew Landry,

a charismatic young crawfish farmer and musician from Scott, La., provided some of the most riveting testimony on July 12 at the opening day of the presidential commission convened to investigate the oil disaster. Landry testified eloquently about the loss of his job and his way of life — and surprised the panel by performing an original song, “BP Blues,” live on C-SPAN. The video of Landry’s moving performance went viral on the Internet almost immediately.

The Louisiana SPCA

is providing pet care to fishermen and seafood workers on the Louisiana coast who have been affected by the oil disaster, including free exams, inoculations, microchipping and spaying and neutering. Ana Zorrilla, CEO of the LA/SPCA, says the coastal parishes are seeing two to three times as many pets relinquished to shelters as they did last summer. The service will run through November. If you qualify, call 363-1333.

Fox News

assembled a panel of religious pundits to analyze “today’s news” on the July 1 edition of Glenn Beck. Among them: Texas pastor John Hagee, whose views are so extreme Sen. John McCain publicly rejected Hagee’s endorsement in his 2008 presidential bid. Hagee has called Hurricane Katrina “the judgment of God against the city of New Orleans,” and said “New Orleans had a level of sin that was offensive to God, and they are — were recipients of the judgment of God for that.” This isn’t punditry; it’s prejudice.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 20 > 2010

hen WDSU-TV anchor Scott Walker visited a Grand Isle beach in June to speak with oil cleanup workers, representatives from “Talon Security” — hired by BP — prevented him from getting any closer than the beach. A BP subcontractor, Adam Dillon, told Walker he wished he could say more on camera — but he couldn’t. Walker’s encounter, caught on video, went viral on YouTube, blogs and other news outlets; he was inter-

Scott Walker’s on-camera encounter with BP-hired security forces became a viral video. Walker, an anchor for WDSU-TV, has returned to Grand Isle for more reporting.

U.S. Sen. David Vitter is taking some hits for being a “birther” — after addressing the “issue” of President Barack Obama’s birthplace at a Tea Party gathering in Metairie on July 11. At the meeting, a member of the audience asked Vitter what he intended to do about Obama’s birth certificate, an issue that one leading GOP strategist has pronounced “outrageous and ridiculous” — and “a stupid and divisive issue.” Apparently Vitter didn’t get that memo. The Obama birth-certificate conspiracy theory surfaced during the 2008 presidential campaign. It speculates the President was secretly born in Africa and that all records to the contrary have been planted. The theory has been debunked by official birth records of the state of Hawaii and contemporaneous birth announcements that appeared in both Honolulu newspapers in 1961, and even Obama’s critics in the media have disavowed it; Tea Party favorite Glenn Beck has called it the “dumbest thing I ever heard.” More recently, Bradley Blakeman, a Republican strate-

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officials assert there is no media blackout along the coast and that workers are free to speak with the press, it’s often not the case, at least on camera or on the record. Recent attempts by Unified Incident Command (which includes BP, the U.S. Coast Guard, Transocean and several government agencies) to bar media members from a 65-foot “safety zone” near boom and oil operations were scrapped after howls from reporters, photographers and even Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser. Today, members of the media need “credentials,” a simple Microsoft Word document exempting them from the 65-feet restriction — as long as they are traveling by boat. Access to beaches and other oil-related areas is still left to the discretion of those controlling them. Violating the law is now considered a Class D felony with a fine of $40,000 and up to five years in prison. But under whose authority are these restrictions enforced? “We have no idea,” says Marjorie Esman, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Louisiana, which, she says, has been flooded with complaints from members of the press who’ve experienced access problems. “One of the concerns we’ve had all along is nobody seems to know who’s making these decisions — whether it’s BP telling the Coast Guard what to do, whether it’s the Coast Guard telling BP what to do, we don’t know. It’s an important distinction because we can’t have a private company running our government.” In May, a CBS News crew was prevented from filming an oil-covered beach by BP officials, who were accompanied by two Coast Guard officers on a boat. After threatening to arrest the reporter and cameraman, the Coast Guard seemed to apologize to the news crew when it told them, “This is BP’s rules. This is not ours.” Kelly McBride, ethics group leader at the Poynter Institute, a Florida-based school and resource for journalists, says BP doesn’t have any right to restrict citizens from anything other than BP’s private property. “They can keep you off the oil rig, but they cannot keep you from a beach or a wetland, and it doesn’t matter how much they’re spending on the cleanup — they don’t own the property,” McBride says. But things get complicated when private security forces are involved, along with an “impenetrable conglomeration of local law enforcement, Coast Guard, BP and the FBI,” McBride says. “We really do a have a right to be there if they don’t have anything to hide,” Walker says. RESTRICTED ACCESS COULD jUST BE AN honest miscommunication as word flows down the chain of command — or it could

be a deliberate attempt to ban media by BP, its subcontractors, the Coast Guard, local law enforcement — or any combination of these. “There’s a lot of conflicting information, and everybody can interpret things their own way, and that leads to a lot of confusion among the rank and file when it’s coming down from the top,” Walker says. “There’s a lot of people down there who just want do their job and do the best they can.” And those jobs are on the line. Walker says BP first told its employees they might be fired if they spoke to the media, though National Incident Commander Thad Allen and other officials, including those from BP, have clarified that there is no restriction. “If you’ve been threatened before, are you really going to jump out and talk?” Walker says. “I’m like the dark cloud they don’t want hovering over them,” says WWL-TV reporter Bigad Shaban, who also reports difficulty speaking with cleanup workers. “It’s not their fault. They’re told something, and their livelihood is at stake. You take it for what it is.” Mother Jones human rights reporter Mac McClelland has been in Grand Isle and along the Gulf Coast since May 3, where she’s kayaked over and photographed booms, witnessed what she says are lazy cleanup operations and relied on a BP “mole” who says he is under a strict “no talking or you’re fired” rule — despite a BP document provided to workers that says “BP supports the rights of all individuals to share their personal thoughts and experiences with journalists, if they so choose,” and “BP has not and will not prevent anyone working in the cleanup operations from sharing his or her own opinions.” McClelland says BP is either “outsourcing the blame” to its subcontractors who are pushing reporters off the beach, or the blackout is a “willful, dishonest propaganda scheme,” where the media and public are told one thing while oil responders have “purposefully been keeping us away this whole time, and they were just paying lip service to the idea of treating us fair.” Compare this to Pensacola, Fla., where McClelland says the difference is significant. “They’ll let you do whatever the f—k you want in Florida,” she says. “You can take pictures, talk to cleanup workers, there’s no cops. It’s not like here where there’s a creepy, police-state feel. The only thing I reported on site in Florida was they apparently don’t care.” On a july 10 trip to Grand Isle, Talon Security employees (the same company that intercepted Walker) instructed Gambit editor Kevin Allman to get no closer to the shoreline than a fence set up away from inflatable Tiger Dam boom — which, Allman says, was “stretched across


SoMe JoURnALISTS SAy BReAkInG The rules isn’t out of the question, especially when it’s the only way to tell a story as important as the oil disaster. “Journalist loyalty resides with uncovering the truth and sharing that with his audience,” McBride says. “oftentimes there will be barriers, often legal barriers,

This distant photo of cleanup operations in Grand Isle State Park was taken from a pier. The Coast Guard has established a 65-foot “safety zone” around areas of its choosing. Violating the zone was made a Class D felony in July. PHOTO BY KEVIN ALLMAN

to get at the truth. And journalists then face a choice: Do they uphold these laws or search for a way to tell their audience a story? That said, there’s nothing that will protect a journalist if they’re arrested for breaking the law. … Sometimes you have to say, ‘ok, I pay the fine. To tell the audience the truth, that’s what I have to do.’ I would never encourage a journalist to think he’s above the law, but I would encourage him to take risks and endure the consequences to get a story.” McClelland says if the 65-feet rule — which was enacted in July — had applied to her coverage from the beginning of the disaster, “I probably would’ve only written half the stories. … I feel like my readers would have my back. I feel like I could raise that $40,000, easily. “If I see something I really need to see, I might go anyway. I don’t like conflict. I’ve already been yelled at by so many police officers — not a good way to spend your day. … I haven’t decided what my strategy is yet. It seems to be kind of stupid to say I’m just not going to follow that. how could they arrest me? Could they really? Are they really going to arrest anybody? Part of me wants to be a jerk and kind of call their bluff.” Those threats may also be keeping national attention from the story as it unfolds. Walker says the media presence in Grand Isle isn’t nearly as strong as it was at the beginning of the disaster, and locals fear they, and their businesses, will suffer for it. They want their stories told. “I just wish Grand Isle was a little closer,” he says.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

the beach like police tape.” Allman and his party were approached by a “beach volunteer,” he says. “She was an older woman who said she had worked for an oil company all her life, and was now volunteering with BP — almost like a Walmart greeter,” he says. “She talked about how the workers were taking the sand away to have it cleaned in a machine that was like ‘a big Maytag,’ and that when they were done, the beach would be ‘better than new’ — but she had no idea where the ‘big Maytag’ was.” While attempting to photograph oiled marsh in Grand Isle State Park that day, Allman says, a pickup truck with blue lights materialized behind his car. “The guy said I couldn’t park on the side of the road, and he meant business,” Allman says. “I didn’t know if he was state police or private security. There was no one else around, no witnesses, and we didn’t push the point.” Shaban was also denied entry at Fort Jackson’s Bird Rehabilitation Center in Buras, La. — even though he had permission not only from Sen. David Vitter, R-Metairie, who invited Shaban, but also from Unified Command. Vitter and Coast Guard Lt. Commander Christian Lee spoke in private for 15 minutes after Vitter argued to let Shaban and his crew inside. Shaban never got an answer why he couldn’t enter, other than that he would “disturb the wildlife” — though the Coast Guard allowed Vitter to enter the center with 20 others, a scene broadcast on WWL-TV. “I don’t think the oiled birds were worried about a reporter coming in. I think they’re worried about the oil covering their entire body,” Shaban says.

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gist and former Bush administration official, wrote in a July 13 blog post on Politics.com, “Any person who raises a challenge to the legitimacy of President Obama to serve as our president is a nut. Any elected official who raises such a challenge is unstable, and voters should seriously consider their ability to continue to serve at their next voting opportunity.” In the same post, Blakeman also wrote, “The entire Republican Party is tainted by Vitter’s remarks. No candidate deserves to win this November relying on such a stupid and divisive issue.” Vitter seems to disagree. In videotape from the Tea Party event, he tells the questioner he would support “conservative legal organizations and others who would bring that to court” — ignoring the fact that in October 2009, U.S. District Judge David Carter dismissed a similar suit, Barnett v. Obama. That created yet another opening for Vitter’s senatorial opponent, Rep. Charlie Melancon, to pounce. Melancon spokesman Jeff Giertz told Gambit, “David Vitter’s endorsement of this nonsense is just the latest evidence that he’s been in Washington too long. While Louisiana families are suffering from the biggest man-made disaster in history, David Vitter is trying to score political points by perpetuating a completely debunked conspiracy theory.” On July 15, Vitter fired back against both Melancon and his own Republican critics with a statement: “This attack is ridiculous. I’m not a birther, and I even said the issue is distracting. But I think people should have appropriate access to the courts. Is even that statement unacceptable now to the liberal thought police?” A better question: Then why did he say it in the first place? One good possibility: Two days prior to the Tea Party, former state Supreme Court justice Chet Traylor entered the senatorial race as a Vitter challenger. Traylor has a strong base in north Louisiana and high marks from the Christian Coalition. Could Vitter be feinting even farther to the right in the primary to protect what must surely be an exposed flank? Certainly Vitter’s supporters wasted no time trashing Traylor. On July 16, Sally Campbell, the former chair of the Louisiana Christian Coalition, was interviewed on Baton Rouge public radio station WKRF-FM, where she said, “There’s some things here that go to character that certainly need to come out with this former Supreme Court justice.” Campbell did not elaborate. — Kevin Allman


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

not know that there’s a school of stingrays right next to me. But my kids, they know none of these irrational fears. Sure, they hate getting stung by jellyfish, and horseshoe crabs freak them out to the proper degree, but they love being in the water. They let their feet touch the bottom and everything. They fear nothing. To me, they’re brave, but to most people I guess they’re just normal. They even try to pick up crabs which, in my own personal psychological portfolio, is tantamount to grabbing a rattlesnake by its tail. It’s just not something you do. So we love the beach together and we go every summer. And, as I write this, I am in Maryland because the beaches we’ve been going to since my kids were born have been destroyed — at least, in my psychological portfolio. I’m sure there are still beaches on the coast that haven’t been despoiled. I just don’t know where they are. And I don’t want to be there the day the oil comes in. So I had to take my children 1,200 miles to go to the beach this summer. And that makes me so angry that I feel like the Macondo well, ready to just blow my own damn top, spew my bad karma like thick black crude all over — not brown pelicans — but anyone and everyone who asks me my opinion on the state of affairs in the Gulf of Mexico, “my” Gulf of Mexico, my family retreat, our beach, our playground, the place we love best on this whole planet. Ruined. Or damn near. Or gonna be. And for God knows how long. I possess an anger about this that I have never known before. Sometimes, I feel like I want to hurt these people who toyed so frivolously with our lives and marched along so cavalierly in their hunt for riches, seemingly unmoved by having destroyed an enormous body of water, just flat-out destroyed it. The bastards. All of ’em. And so to go to the beach, we had to travel 1,200 miles. Hey, the great part is we get to spend some time with my parents, who live in Maryland. That’s a perk. And my kids are filled with the energy and abandon that accompanies the “endeavor” of travel — the flights, the chaos, the motel ice machines, sleeping on screen porches, late-night card games, the flashing lights of the boardwalk, the whole shebang. And so it is I take my kids 1,200 miles from home this week to go to the beach, with playful mind, buoyant soul — and firmly grounded feet. And murder in my heart.

SHOEFTY

’ve gone on record with this before: Me like the beach. Very much. Even better, so do my kids. And I say that because, well — I wasn’t a very adept beach kid. Truth to tell: I was a complete wuss about it. Don’t get me wrong, I loved going with my family. But that was more about the whole vacation endeavor: The upheaval, the overpacked car, staying up late, sleeping on screened-in porches, the smell of coconut oil, late night card games, hot dog omelets for breakfast and dinner, all the pinball I could play and nights on the boardwalk with all its flashing lights and Tilt-a-Whirl and soft-serve ice cream. You’ll notice I didn’t say anything about the actual beach. And that’s the thing. It scared the hell out of me. I grew up on the beaches of Maryland, Delaware and Jersey; once the water gets up to your knees, you can’t see your feet. And I knew there were lots of things down around my feet that I couldn’t see — stingrays, crabs, jellyfish and regular fish, in diminishing order of terror. And up on those Northeast beaches, there’s a species of crustacean alien to Southern beaches, an alien called the horseshoe crab, a large, black primeval beast that looks like nothing more than Darth Vader’s helmet with a long stingerlike tail in the back. They’re a clumsy lot, horseshoe crabs, having no control over their movements once they get near the surf, so they get picked up by waves and tossed into your legs and it feels like a hubcap smashing into you. A hubcap with legs. And a tail. That looks like a stinger. Never mind that it wasn’t; at 9 years old, perception is everything. To me, deadly hubcaps lurked in the sea. So it is that, when I was finally coaxed, prodded or shamed into going into the water with my brothers or friends, I spent the whole time treading water — even at three feet deep — so my feet wouldn’t touch the bottom. Like I said, pretty much of a wuss about it. And this was in the pre-Jaws era, mind you. That came out when I was 15 and, after that — forget it. I didn’t go in the water for years. But I’ve come a long way since then. This city boy learned to love the water. Learned to love it in the 25 years I’ve lived in New Orleans, over on the Gulf Coast where, oddly enough, the water is clear enough to see everything around you and that eventually led me to the conclusion that the dark beach water of the Northeast might be better than the pristine Gulf waters because maybe — just maybe — I’d rather

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

BY CLANCY DUBOS

Republican hoping to hang onto a seat in a district that is overwhelmingly black and Democratic. “In the general election, I’m sure you’ll see the Democratic Party taking aim at Vitter, assuming he’s the Republican nominee,” says local demographer Greg Rigamer, who has advised numerous campaigns. “As to whether Vitter can be beat at that point, it’s an open question.” Vitter has been hounded by a prostitution scandal that came to light in 2007, and last month a new scandal arose: He retained an aide who had several DUI arrests and who held a woman at knifepoint for 90 minutes, then cut her badly enough to require stitches. The senator now faces a GOP primary challenge from former state Supreme Court Justice Chet Traylor of Monroe, who says he’s running because Vitter is a bad political risk for the party. Traylor’s late entry offers Republicans a viable alternative to the embattled incumbent. To make matters worse, Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal — at least for now — remains neutral in the party primary. PAGE 17

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For entirely different reasons, Cao also faces a tough re-election fight — although he has no opposition for the GOP nomination. “I don’t think lightning is going to strike twice,” says UNO political scientist Ed Chervenak, who called Cao’s victory in a hurricanedelayed 2008 race “a fluke.” In that December 2008 race, the percentage of black voter turnout was extremely low — 14.1 percent — only slightly more than half that of white voters. The skewed turnout meant that blacks that day cast less than 49 percent of the votes in a district that is more than 61 percent black. Cao won with a 49.5 percent plurality. Chervenak estimates that Cao received only about 2 percent of the black vote in 2008, and that was against a scandalized Bill Jefferson. “If that pattern holds this year, and blacks turn out nearly as much as whites do, that should help the African-American candidate,” Chervenak says. The Cao campaign, meanwhile, recently released a poll showing him with much improved numbers among black voters and a good chance of retaining his seat. The new congressman is conceding no votes, black or white, to his Democratic challengers. Four black Democrats have quali-

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

IN POLITICS, MONEY TALKS — BUT it doesn’t always win. Vitter has more than $5 million in his campaign account and consistently has led his main Democratic challenger, U.S. Rep. Charlie Melancon of Napoleonville, in early polls. Melancon’s war chest is less than half the size of Vitter’s, and Traylor starts out with even less. Then again, Vitter will need every penny he can scrape together to overcome the scandals that have hounded him since his cell phone number turned up in the records of the notorious (and now deceased) D.C. Madam, Deborah Jeane Palfrey, in 2007. Unlike Cao, he also has an opponent in the Republican primary. Vitter, 49, has other problems as well. His infamous temper, if he shows it on the campaign trail, will surely hurt him, as will his retention of aide Brent Furer, who held a female friend at knifepoint, threatened to kill her, and then cut her in 2008. Vitter suspended Furer for five days, then put him back on the payroll — in charge of women’s issues. He fired Furer last month after ABC News brought the aide’s criminal record to light. Vitter has been ducking reporters ever since, and now he faces more

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cover story

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than a dozen opponents. Traylor’s late entry into the GOP primary caught many by surprise. Another Republican, Nick Accardo of Franklin, also qualified against Vitter but is a relative unknown. “The Republican primary only addresses about 753,000 registered voters,” says Rigamer, whose specialty is helping candidates identify and turn out their supporters. “And remember, the primary is going to be on Aug. 28, which is not a typical election weekend in Louisiana. If you get a 30 percent turnout in that primary, that would be huge. The peak turnout would be about 225,000 — but it could be as low as 150,000 statewide. That’s not a lot of votes.” Rigamer says Vitter has an advantage in the primary because of his existing statewide organization, but nothing is certain. “For Traylor, the issue is money,” Rigamer adds. “He needs to get his name out and organize enough support to get people motivated to go out and vote for him.” Easier said than done, but given Vitter’s history of misconduct and the fact that he can no longer claim to be the family-values champion that he ran as in 2004, not an impossible task. There’s also an uneasy feeling among many leading Republicans that there’s more dirt out there on Vitter — and that Democrats are “saving it” for the general election to help elect Melancon. Based on that fear, a lot of Republicans welcomed Traylor’s candidacy. In addition to financial challenges, Traylor, 64, has just six weeks to get his message out. His ace in the hole is that Vitter has become a lightning rod for controversy ever since the D.C. Madam scandal, and the incumbent is universally known — so he has little room to grow. Traylor has solid conservative credentials. A former military police officer, state trooper and prosecutor, he was a darling of the business community as a judge. His northeast Louisiana base also cuts into Vitter’s support in an area that is solidly Republican. Traylor says he will make Vitter’s record — particularly the scandals — an issue in his campaign. Another issue that he will use against Vitter is the senator’s attempt to cap BP’s damages from the Gulf oil catastrophe. Vitter proposed raising the existing cap to a year’s worth of the company’s profits. Traylor says he opposes any move to limit what BP owes the state and its citizens. Traylor will need to launch a state-

wide TV and radio blitz soon to make this a real race, and he has assembled a formidable team in media consultant Roy Fletcher (who was deputy chair of John McCain’s 2000 campaign in Louisiana) and veteran pollster Verne Kennedy. Fletcher is known for his hard-hitting TV ads. “Some people say I need a million dollars to take on Senator Vitter, but I think I can do it for less than that,” Traylor says. He also hinted at a strategy that will target female voters, noting that the Furer furor is “a concern for a lot of people, and certainly to women. I don’t believe you put someone in charge of women’s affairs who’s had the kind of problems he’s got.” That portends a white-knuckle GOP primary. IF VITTER GETS BY TRAYLOR AND then beats Melancon (who is expected to breeze past token Democratic challengers) on Nov. 2, he should send President Barack Obama a thank-you note. The president is extremely unpopular in the Bayou State, particularly after his offshore drilling moratorium. At every turn, Vitter touts his opposition to Obama’s policies and Melancon’s Democratic ties. In many ways, Vitter isn’t running against Melancon; he’s running against Obama. “John McCain got a larger majority in Louisiana than in any other state, including his home state of Arizona,” notes Rigamer. “It will be a challenge for a Democrat to take the Senate seat.” The federal elections in Louisiana will follow a different timetable and different rules than state and local contests. Candidates for federal offices must run in separate party primaries on Aug. 28, followed by party runoffs (if necessary) on Oct. 2, and then face independents and other party nominees in a general election on Nov. 2. In races for state and local offices — lieutenant governor, various judgeships, and numerous local elections across the state — candidates will run in an open primary on Oct. 2 (the same date as federal party runoffs, if any), followed by runoffs, if needed, on Nov. 2. Perhaps the most important differ-

ence is the fact that the Nov. 2 runoffs for state and local offices will feature only two candidates in each contest. Vitter and Cao’s general elections, on the other hand, will feature the leading Democrat, the leading Republican and any independent, small party or “no party” candidates who have qualified. That could make a huge difference in the election results, because the winners of the federal contests need only a plurality to win. Cao’s 2008 victory, which he won with less than 49 percent of the vote, proves that “minor” candidates can make a major difference. The Libertarian and Green Party candidates garnered less than 4 percent of the vote, but that was enough to tip the election in Cao’s favor. In this election, Vitter drew a total of 16 opponents. The Nov. 2 ballot will feature 12 of them: the GOP nominee, the Democratic nominee, the Reform Party nominee (William McShan, who is unopposed for his party nomination), the Libertarian Party nominee (two candidates qualified as Libertarians), and eight others who are running as independents, “no party” candidates or “other party” hopefuls. While most of Vitter’s general election opponents are political unknowns, one has the potential to be a spoiler: state Rep. Ernest Wooton of Belle Chasse, who shed his GOP affiliation to appear on the Nov. 2 ballot against the incumbent. Wooton, 68, a former sheriff in Plaquemines Parish, is a wild card in every sense of the word. Known for his colorful rhetoric and sharp wit, he is a threat to

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: DAVID VITTER (REPUBLICAN), CHARLIE MELANCON (DEMOCRAT), ERNEST WOOTON (INDEPENDENT) AND CHET TRAYLOR (REPUBLICAN) both Vitter and Melancon. His history as an outspoken, pro-gun Republican will certainly attract conservatives who might otherwise go for Vitter, and his Plaquemines political base puts him squarely in Melancon’s congressional district. The fact that Plaquemines is catching much of the brunt of the BP oil catastrophe also gives him a platform. “Everybody is talking, but nobody is getting anything done,” Wooton says of the spill. “I’m not saying that nobody’s trying, it’s just that they’re not getting anything done.” Of his decision to bolt from the GOP, Wooton says he should have done it long ago. “I’ve always been a free spirit who’s not afraid to ask the tough questions,” he says, adding that his decision to bypass the GOP primary allows him to go “straight to the finals.” As for issues, Wooton says he decided to run because “we have to understand that our country is at stake. Our country is in trouble. We need to do something about it. I’m a fighter, so let’s fight.” If Louisiana voters have to choose among the lesser of evils on Nov.


wild cards cover story

2 — that is, between their dislike of Obama and their distaste for Vitter — the incumbent could be in good shape. Anyone who doesn’t understand that dynamic should study Bill Jefferson’s successful reelection campaign in 2006. On the heels of FBI agents finding $90,000 in marked C-notes in Dollar Bill’s freezer, he still beat a large field for a ninth consecutive term. Then, of course, came Hurricane Gustav and Joseph Cao in 2008.

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JOsepH CAO mAy Be THe Only Republican in the louisiana delegation in serious danger of losing his seat, but he won’t be a pushover. The 43-year-old freshman has walked a political tightrope between his sharply divided allegiances — to his GOp patrons locally and in the Beltway, and to his Democratic constituents, who voted overwhelmingly for Barack Obama in 2008. Cao faces no challengers for the GOp nomination, but four Democrats qualified against him: state Reps. Richmond and laFonta, and eugene Green and Gary Johnson. Three independents also jumped into the race and will appear on the nov. 2 ballot with Cao and the Democratic nominee. If the nov. 2 general election is another nail-biter, the independents could once again tip the balance. Almost from the moment Cao declared victory on Dec. 6, 2008, pundits have written him off as a one-termer. even now, with more than $300,000 in the bank, political handicappers don’t give him much of a shot. It’s all in the numbers. “If you look at the October 2008 election, when new Orleans was electing a new district attorney, 59 percent of the votes cast that day in Orleans parish were by African Americans,” says Rigamer. “If you look at the presidential race in Cao’s district, 61 percent of the votes were cast by African Americans in november 2008. Then look at Cao’s race in December 2008, and 48 percent of the votes cast were by African Americans. “That’s the tale of the tape. It literally is all about turnout. If the vote is heavily African-American, as you would expect it to be, it tends to favor the Democratic candidate.” Chervenak agrees. “The second District was created for the purpose of allowing African Americans to elect a candidate of choice,” he says. “In this state, about 30 percent of the registered vot-

ers are African American, but there are no African-American members of Congress from this state. I expect the African-American community to rally behind a black candidate in the general election.” In past elections, that logic held up most of the time. But since Katrina, a growing number of black voters in black-majority jurisdictions have shown a willingness to support nonblack candidates. examples abound: District Attorney leon Cannizzaro, mayor mitch landrieu, at-large Council members Arnie Fielkow and Jackie Clarkson, and district Council members stacy Head and Kristin palmer. A good many white judges and other parochial officials likewise are evidence of that trend. Cao hopes to become the latest example. In a recent poll taken for his campaign by Verne Kennedy, 46 percent of the voters surveyed said they wanted to see him return to Congress, compared to 29 percent who preferred someone else. Generally, incumbents should poll higher than 50 percent on the “reelect” question, but given the demographics of Cao’s district, those are not bad numbers. moreover, in a head-to-head trial heat against leading Democrat Cedric Richmond, Cao out-polled Richmond by a 51-26 percent margin. Of course, that poll was taken for Cao, and Richmond will spend much of his time reminding voters in the heavily black, heavily Democratic second District that Cao voted against most of president Obama’s agenda. Financially, Cao paid a price for the few times he voted with the president. After initially voting for health care reform (he later voted against it), he had to cancel several fundraisers. Chervenak cites another critical statistic in Cao’s financial reports. “Cao is only getting about 18 percent of his contributions from political action committees,” Chervenak says. “The average for the other six louisiana congressmen is 29 percent. Compared to his colleagues from louisiana, he’s lagging in contributions from pACs — possibly because he gave Obama a few votes, and possibly because they see him as vulnerable and a bad investment.” Ultimately, voters will determine on nov. 2 whether Cao, Vitter, or any of their challengers are worthy investments.

19


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Brew Dat! Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe (5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001; www.lakeviewbrew. com) satisfies more than just caffeine cravings. An outdoor patio hosts wine tastings and poetry readings while the cafe’s interior, bedecked with work by local artists, is reminiscent of a small-town pie shop. Owner and Lakeview native Randy Porobil takes pride in providing friendly ambience to Lakeview residents. “Our customers have come to feel like they’re family,” Porobil says. Concerned by Lakeview’s slow comeback following the 2005 federal levee failures, she began transforming a former gas station into a restaurant in June 2007. The coffee cafe opened in January 2008 and has since become established as a comfortable neighborhood hangout. “My main goal was to give people good coffee, fresh food and a meeting place,” Porobil says. The kitchen provides an array of homemade pastries, gourmet sandwiches, salads and soups, as well as a variety of hot and cold beverages. A menu of fresh, homemade items is Baristas Alex Cook (left) capable of satisfying a sweet tooth or an appetite for and Brittany Judice something savory. serve up coffee, meals The cafe’s wide selection of desserts includes the and dessert at Lakeview “Million Dollar Pie.” With a fluffy but rich taste, the Brew. confection lives up to its name: a pillowy mixture of whipped cream, pieces of mandarin orange and nuts top a graham cracker crust. For a savory experience, customers can sample a specialty sandwich, such as the Lakeview Brew club. Piled high with bacon, oven-roasted turkey, smoked ham, American cheese, romaine lettuce and tomato, this triple-decker creation is served on toast. Flavorful meals, a knowledgeable staff and welcoming vibe have made the eatery a Lakeview staple, filling a neighborhood void that was not only gustatory, but also social. “People have gotten re-acquainted with each other here, and that’s what I was after,” Porobil says.

If you’re engaged or just thinking about tying the knot, head to LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER’s Center Court (3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 831-5288; www. lakesideshopping.com) for Welliver Production’s 16th Annual Bridal Expo. Saturday, July 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, July 25, from noon to 4 p.m. Participants can register for prizes and enjoy wedding-related seminars, performances and displays from local wedding professionals. The event is free with a nonperishable food item to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank. The River Garden area welcomes an addition to the neighborhood with the recent opening of its newest coffee shop, SEATTLE’S BEST COFFEE CAFE (506 St. Andrew St.; www.seattlesbest.com). The coffee shop carries a variety of hot and cold drinks and is open seven days a week. MAT AND NADDIE’S RESTAURANT (937 Leonidas St., 861-9600; www. matandnaddies.com) offers summer savings: three appetizers and one glass of wine for $28.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

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22

Southern rockers Drivin N Cryin screeched out of Atlanta in the mid1980s but always had a rough ride with labels, in spite of being tapped to tour with R.E.M. and building a solid fan base. Its 2009 release Great American Bubble Factory had its own long road to travel: the band started recording in 2001. Tickets $15.

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Behind the Ironic Curtain your love/Hate relationsHip WitH vodka by will Coviello

V

that Thompson jokingly calls “the school of all things brown and stirred”). In spite of the lack of color or taste, not all vodkas are alike. Finer palates distinguish them by body and character. Thompson favors the body Russian Standards gets by using Russian wheat and water. Voisey also likes the hoppiness provided by grains such as wheat and rye. But around the world, vodkas are made with everything from potatoes, corn and rice to grapes and sugar beets. Russian Standard vodka was started in 1998 by the Russian billionaire Roustam Tariko, who owns a bank and insurance company by the same name. Its main bottling is the best-selling premium brand in Russia, and Russian Standard is aggressively pursuing the global premium market. At Tales, Thompson will frame its tastings with Russian culture. “Russian Standard is an authentic vodka,” Thompson says. “This cocktail community is obsessed with authenticity, origins, stories.” Vodka means water in Russian, and the earliest recorded distillery appears in records from 1174. Starting with Ivan III in 1470, the tsars intervened to control the vodka trade. Peter the Great granted the aristocracy the exclusive rights to produce vodka in 1716. And in 1894, Dr. Dmitri Mendeleev, creator of the periodic table of the elements, was commissioned to determine the ideal alcohol content (roughly 40 percent). During the 20th century, Stolichnaya became the best-known Russian brand, and it was exported to the United States beginning in the 1970s when page 24

Everyone’s favorite hip-hop subgenre is now as New Orleanian as Hubig’s apple pie. Hours after Ms. Tee and Magnolia Shorty double the decibel level at the Ogden Museum, Republic hosts a veritable retrospective of bounce and bounce-inspired acts, from progenitor DJ Jubilee (pictured) to spinners (Rusty Lazer), sissies (Big Freedia, Katey Red, Vockah Redu) to Shreveport (Jean-Eric). Admission $8 ($5 students with ID).

The Wiz p.m. Fri.-Sat.; 2:15 p.m. 23 7:15 Sun.; through Aug. 1 Anthony Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater.com JUL

Irma Thomas leads a cast of more than 50 kids and teens in the Anthony Bean Community Theater and the New Orleans Recreation Department version of the hit Broadway musical The Wiz, the soul- and R&B-filled version of The Wizard of Oz. Theater campers also perform a short spoof called Ghetto Wiz. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 children 16-under.

QuinTron anD Miss PussyCaT 24 10 p.m. Saturday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net JUL

Q&P’s “welcome home” from tour is also a eulogy for crony King Lee and a belated record release for Tire Shop (Goner), a 7-inch slow jam built from ass-rattling bass, Lee’s rambling speak-singing and assorted wrench noise at the Spellcaster-neighboring, “no cat selling” garage where he worked. Power-pop godfather Paul Collins (ex-Nerves) and King Louie’s Missing Monuments open. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 day of show.

Former all-pro New Orleans Saints offensive lineman and fan favorite Kyle Turley brings his namesake power country By Will Coviello band to One Eyed Jacks (615 Toulouse St., )at 9 p.m. Friday ($10). He misses the Saints, which is clear on songs like “My Soul Bleeds Black and Gold” and “Flying Helmets,” in which he also sings “F—k Mike Martz, I never liked him anyway.”

Block and Roll

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

odka is the popular kid that everybody hates,” says Jeremy Thompson, a brand ambassador and researcher for Russian Standard vodka (and as of this week, a new New Orleanian). “People prefer cocktails that don’t taste like alcohol. They are looking for the fuel, but without savoring the spirit.” That’s the irony of vodka’s appeal. “So smooth you can’t feel it,” quips Simon Ford, a brand representative for Absolut, about some vodka-lovers’ appreciation. From centuries of control by Russian tsars, as well as the Soviet Union, to fueling three-martini lunches and becoming the world’s best selling spirit, vodka is storied, tasteless and popular, the fiery punctuation to a loud Russian toast and the barely detectable common denominator in endless cocktail menus. That’s also the subject of the seminar “I Hate Vodka, I Love Vodka” at Tales of the Cocktail this week. The annual drinks festival has become the premier event for hospitality and liquor industry insiders to mingle with each other and the public and talk about spirits. Vodka brands from around the globe will be heavily represented. “There’s nothing not to like about vodka,” says Charlotte Voisey, a bar consultant and representative for Stoli and William Grant & Sons’ portfolio of liquors. The neutral spirit is accessible and easy to mix, which makes it popular with both consumers and bar owners. But just as white zinfandel is the scourge of wine to many connoisseurs, vodka gets a mixed reception from some cocktailians (including a whiskey- and cognac-focused trend in New York

Scott Newitt and Jim Irvin created Firefly Sweet Tea Vodka at Irvin’s distillery in Wadmalaw, S.C.

BounCe p.m. Thursday 22 11Republic, 828 S. Peters St., 528-8282; www.republicnola.com JUL

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

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Pepsi-Cola negotiated a deal to sell soda in the Soviet Union. At the Monteleone, Thompson expects to play Russian music, teach attendees to deliver long, loud Russian toasts and complement drinks with the Russian version of tapas known as zakuskis, savory bites of caviar, dried meats, pickles and other items Russians eat in between straight shots of chilled vodka, the preferred method of drinking the spirit. Vodka was popularized in the United States in the 1940s via a cocktail called a Moscow Mule, a mix of vodka, lemon and ginger beer served in a special copper mug, which appeared in several films, Thompson says. Later, vodka martinis became a lunchtime staple due to the claim the neutral spirit was undetectable on one’s breath. Whether it was much less noticeable than gin is debatable, but vodka’s image as a clean spirit helped it gain in popularity, Voisey says. Beginning in the 1990s, competition at the premium end of the American market tightened as Absolut and Stoli were joined by Ketel One, Belvedere, Grey Goose, Ciroc and others. American vodkas joined the mix, including corn-based Tito’s Handmade Vodka, created by Tito Beveridge, a former geologist and mortgage seller turned distiller from Texas. He switched from hobby home-brewing to distilling. “I just ended up MacGyvering a still with a propane setup,” says the former oilfield scientist. “I believed you could solve any problem by being tenacious.” Endless tinkering with ingredients and mechanics ended up being far easier than opening a legal still (his was the first in Texas) and negotiating the arcane federal laws and regulations of liquor distribution. His shoestring approach included maxing out credit cards and applying for more as he hand-bottled and sold his product himself. After selling 1,000 cases in 1997, his business increased steadily and the premium product is on shelves in all 50 states. Beveridge’s determination seems to have made the difference in a difficult market. Major distillers have resorted to bottles designed by architects (Frank Gehry for Polish Wyborowa Single Estate vodka), high-end marketing campaigns (Absolut) and a stream of flavored-vodka releases to maintain market share. Stoli and Absolut have released large portfolios of flavored versions, and Absolut introduced its first limited edition city namesake, mango and pepperflavored Absolut New Orleans, at Tales of the Cocktail in 2007. While flavors like lemon and orange remain popular, the concept seems to require new annual releases. Voisey will introduce attendees to Stoli White Pomegranik and Stoli Gala Applik (apple flavored) at Tales.

“Large restaurant chains want something ‘new and exciting,’” Voisey says. The marketing angle is a strong draw, even if there are tradeoffs with bottling flavors. Lemon-flavored vodka doesn’t deliver fresher taste than straight vodka and fresh lemons. But Voisey points out that while fresh lemons or strawberries are preferable, some ingredients are not readily or consistently available, and for quality and consistency’s sake, flavored products can expand a bar’s offerings. After creating and dominating the premium vodka market, Absolut has to compete with its past. Brand representative Simon Ford began working with the Swedish import (owned by Pernod Ricard) in the early 2000s when vodka bottles far outnumbered all other spirits in upscale bars, and 90 percent of cocktail menu drinks included it. Part of his job is to reach out to bartenders with new products, such as recently released Absolut Brooklyn, and professional development, like sensory analysis seminars he has presented at Tales. Extending the concept of flavored vodkas is Firefly Sweet Tea Vodka. It’s the brainchild of Jim Irvin and Scott Newitt, who grew up on the Northshore and attended LSU. Both live outside Charleston, S.C., where Newitt had settled during his career in liquor distribution. Irvin was distilling wine when he approached Newitt about distributing his product. Newitt already had his mind set on distilling vodka for a regional market. Their first release was a muscadine vodka now available only in South Carolina. After selling microbrewed beers, Newitt knew there was little to distinguish their vodka from others. Their big idea hit at a time when McDonald’s was advertising sweet tea across the nation. “Everybody in the South grows up drinking sweet tea,” Newitt says. Using Lousiana sugar and tea from South Carolina, the two devised a 70-proof vodka, which tastes like sweet tea, but with a finish that has a hint of alcohol. And it caught on immediately. They released it in April 2008 and by the summer of 2009, it was available in all 50 states, and it’s as popular in the Pacific Northwest as it is in the South. With production at maximum capacity at their home base in Wadmalaw, S.C., Buffalo Trace distillery is producing the rest. Newitt says his greatest incentive for growth is to make sure newcomers taste Firefly first, instead of cheaper copycat brands. Firefly has the rare luxury of creating its own niche within the vodka market, but like the rest of it, even with a trend in growth, competition is fierce. Visit www.talesofthecocktail.com for a full schedule of seminars, tastings, speakers, events and more.


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3 full bars â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-til 738 Toulouse St. â&#x20AC;˘ 523-5530 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prepare to hear everything from New burlesque meets classic rock T. Rex to Of in a show with Montrealâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and a David Bowie perhaps a live theme. surprise. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Silent Cinemaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Micah McKee did a whole set of Prince covers. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to interject a little of that.â&#x20AC;? OpenHouse Music is on hiatus in August, but Kushner is already planning his September tribute; Dusty Springfield is one target. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;My first concept,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one that the girls seem to really want to do.â&#x20AC;?) Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also conceptualizing something larger for the fall, a narrative show about a deity that kidnaps burlesque dancers on vacation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beach Blanket Bingo meets Polynesian tiki god horror movie kind of thing,â&#x20AC;? Kushner laughs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With lots of boobs.â&#x20AC;? JUL

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

hink certified public accountants arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the most fun-loving lot? All it takes to loosen their ties, Zac Kushner learned, is a CPA-centric drink special, a few burlesque dancers and some apropos theme music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(The Beatlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Taxman,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; (Pink Floydâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Money.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lots of fake $20 bills flying around,â&#x20AC;? the producer and OpenHouse Music founder recalls of his first event in New Orleans, an April 15 striptease at Cafe Prytania. (Tagline: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Show Us Your Hidden Assets.â&#x20AC;?) â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a private party scheduled that night. I had already put a hold on for a burlesque show, so we were like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we just do a tax day burlesque show? Maybe theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stick around.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; They did stick around.â&#x20AC;? For Kushner, a New York City transplant who relocated here in August 2009, the gig was the start of a monthly series of freelance burlesque tributes: in May, a bow to Prince; for June, a reanimation of cartoon temptresses like Jessica Rabbit and Betty Boop. They were mere warmups â&#x20AC;&#x201D; undressed rehearsals, if you will â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main event, he says: a nod to David Bowie titled, appropriately, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh! You Pretty Things.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a concept Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always enjoyed,â&#x20AC;? says Kushner, whose family has vaudeville and Broadway ties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I could not think of an icon that works any better for this kind of thing. David Bowie is more than a musical icon. Having there be some sexiness, some fashion, some theatrics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this is definitely the one weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve all been looking forward to.â&#x20AC;? Kushnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original group of Tillie Vermillion, Lana Allure and Jessa DeNuit has grown to encompass dancers of differing experience levels from outfits across town. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of a rotating group,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the Prince show, we had six different troupes. The guys from BurlesqueScene.com are kind of freaking out. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good place to see a sampling of a lot of performers, as well as traveling performers. For this show, Vivienne Vermouth is in from Texas.â&#x20AC;? Sprinkled between the monthly tributes is a less-structured weekly residency at the Howlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Wolf dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Big Busk!â&#x20AC;? The variety show features a house band, often the Dirty Bourbon River Show, as well as jugglers, magicians, comedians and dancers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great opportunity for new performers, a place where girls can come work on acts,â&#x20AC;? Kushner says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tillie and Jessa had only performed like once or twice in front of an audience. Tillie is now doing Burlesque Ballroom. Jessaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got a great following as well.â&#x20AC;? At the Big Top, he says DJ Yrs Truly will spin tracks from every stage of Bowieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career, Ziggy Stardust to Labyrinth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A couple of girls are still working on a few

July 23 | SYLLABLE 7 + SEKOND ELEMENT | 10PM July 24 | BULLETS & #S + SLAVE TO THE DAY | 10PM

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25


r e m m u S

Entertainment Series

musiC

ListiNgs

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly. com; FAX:483-3116

stick this in yoUr ear

preview Late Checkout

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Wednesday Night Comedy Billy D. Washington

July 21 • 7:30pm & 9:30pm Coming soon: Olivia Allen-Arrington (7/28)

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

tuesday 20 AllwAys lounge — Raw Nerves, No Babies, Roman Gabriel Todd’s Beast Rising Up Out of the Sea, VapoRats, 10 BAcchAnAl — Mark Weliky, 7:30

BAnks street BAr — N.O. Low Geaux Trio, 10

Thursdays - Karaoke, Live Band & Ladies Night Budweiser specials throughout the night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials.

Karaoke • 8:30pm-9:30pm No Idea • July 22 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: Foret Tradition (7/29)

BAyou pArk BAr — Cortland Burke, 9

BeAch house — Candy RiedlLowe, 7

Blue nile — Naked Orchestra, 10 Bmc — Wendy Darling, 7; Bo Dollis Jr. & the Wild Magnolias, 9:30

cAfe negril — Glen David Andrews, 9:30

circle BAr — Tom Paines, 6; Man at Home, Summer Pledge, High in One Eye, 10 columns hotel — John Rankin & Friends, 8

Local Favorite Fridays

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

Junior & Sumtin Sneaky

26

July 23 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: Brandon Foret (7/30)

d.B.A. — New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

dos Jefes uptown cigAr BAr — Tom Hook, 9:30 gennAro’s — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

hostel new orleAns — Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 howlin’ wolf (the den) — Big Busk: A Night of Burlesque & Live Music, 9

Louisiana Saturday Nights Bag of Donuts July 24 • 9:30pm-1:30am Coming soon: Tab Benoit & BeauSoleil “Alone & Together” (7/31)

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road • Harvey

boomtownneworleans.com/boomers-nightclub Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2010 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? C A L L 8 7 7. 7 7 0 . S T O P

irvin mAyfield’s JAzz plAyhouse — Jason Marsalis, 8

After nine months in creative gestation, Empress Hotel, a songwriting collaboration between singer Micah McKee (Silent Cinema) and guitarist Ryan Rogers (ex-Antenna Inn), arrives this week as a fully formed sextet, with an infectious self-titled upcoming fall release and a record deal from local imprint Park the Van in hand. The two musicians’ past and present projects might engender visions of a bar-band Steely Dan, but the two-hooks-a-minute songs in circulation so far hint at something more radical for this region: a lithe, aerodynamic pop vehicle following Phoenix’s vertical flight plan. Hits-in-utero “Auld Lang Something,” “Bells Ring,” “Search Lights” and the already remixed title track (an equally killer cut courtesy of the Control) appeal instantly, employing toy piano melodies, guy/girl harmonies, wind chime vocals and precise, metronomic drum-machine dance beats. The recent additions of multiinstrumentalist Leo DeJesus and percussionist Eric Rogers, both of MyNameIsJohnMichael, amp up the performance acumen. If the live show holds a candle to its stage-crashing parent bands, New Orleans has its next breakout candidate. Empress Hotel performs between headlining Lafayette labelmate Brass Bed and local opener Native America; J Daiquiri (DJ nom de plume of Defend New Orleans’ Jac Currie) spins between sets. Free admission. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

JUL

23

Empress Hotel with Brass Bed and Native America 11 p.m. Friday Blue Nile, 532 Frenchmen St., 948-2583; www.bluenilelive.com

Crooner Blues, 9

yuki izAkAyA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

wednesday 21 61 Blues highwAy — Blues Highway Jam feat. Lefty Keith, 8

the mAison — Smoking Time Jazz Club, 7; No Name Trio, 10

Aunt leni’s cAfe — Wednesdays at the Point feat. Little Freddie King, 6

my BAr — Danny T, 8

BAnks street BAr — Bionica, 10

oz new orleAns — Action Afterdark!, 11

BeAch house — Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8

mAple leAf BAr — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

BAcchAnAl — Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30

old point BAr — West Bank Mike, 6:30

BAyou pArk BAr — Lynn Drury & Friends, 10

rock ’n’ Bowl — Tim Laughlin, 8:30

Big Al’s sAloon — Jumpin’ Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

snug hArBor JAzz Bistro — Holly Bendtsen & Amasa Miller CD release, 8 & 10

spotted cAt — Brett Richardson, 4; Jumbo Shrimp, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 whiskey dix — Quiet Loudly, GunFight!, Serge Villanova,

Blue nile — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10 Bmc — Domenic, 7; Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30 cAfe negril — World Jazz Project, 9:30 cAndlelight lounge —

Treme Brass Band, 9

check point chArlie — Landmine Marathon, Mars Classhole, Black Skies, 10

circle BAr — Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6; Sons of an Illustrious Father, Meg Roussel, Mallory, 10 columns hotel — Ricardo Crespo, 8

d.B.A. — Mirlitones, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

deckBAr & grille — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 8; Dr. Porkchop Blues Band, 10 dos Jefes uptown cigAr BAr — Bob Andrews, 9:30 gennAro’s — Funagles, 8 hi-ho lounge — Ratty Scurvics, 7

howlin’ wolf (the den) — Booty Trove Brass Band, 9

huddle sports BAr — Band of Brothers, 9 irvin mAyfield’s JAzz plAyhouse — Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8; Nueva Tierra, midnight page 32


READER’S

POLL BALLOT It’s time again for you to praise and raze your favorite things about New Orleans in a variety of categories — from Best Local Scandal to Best Strip Club. (Well, those might end up being the same thing.) Restaurants, shops, the arts, local celebrities, they’re all in here awaiting your judgment.

To vote, go to: www.bestofneworleans.com and cast your online ballot … or snail-mail this one to: BEST OF NEW ORLEANS 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119-5102

VOTE ONLINE

(Online voting is easier on you, and us — and the earth. Just sayin’.) THE FINE PRINT: At least 50 percent of the ballot must be completed for your votes to be counted. One ballot per person only. Ballots must be received by Gambit by the close of business July 30. Winners will appear in our Best of New Orleans issue Aug. 31. (Gambit assumes no responsibilty for the outcome, so if you don’t want chain restaurants topping the results, be sure to vote.) NAME |

FOOD and RESTAURANTS (Specify location if there is more than one)

CITY/STATE/ ZIP | PHONE |

AGE |

Best New Restaurant __________________________________________ Best Metairie Restaurant _____________________________________ Best New Orleans Restaurant ____________________________________

EMAIL | THE BUSINESSES L ISTED ON THIS PAGE ARE PA ID ADVERT ISEMENTS .

Gambit Readers voted:

Best Day Spa 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 & 2009! Best Place to Get a Manicure Best Place to Get a Pedicure Best Place to Get a Massage

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

ADDRESS |

ENTERTAINMENT AND NIGHTLIFE Best Live Theater Venue ________________________________________ Best Local Theater Performer ___________________________________ Best Dance Club ______________________________________________ Best Sports Bar ______________________________________________ Best College Bar _____________________________________________ Best Gay Bar _________________________________________________ Best Neighborhood Bar ________________________________________ Best Hotel Bar _______________________________________________ Best Gentlemen’s/Strip Club ____________________________________ Best Happy Hour _____________________________________________ Best Bar for Nonsmokers ______________________________________ Best Place to Dance to a Live Band ________________________________ Best Bar to People-Watch ______________________________________ Best Movie Theater (specify location) ______________________________ Best Place to See Stand-Up Comedy _______________________________ Best Place to Karaoke _________________________________________ Best Place to Get a Bloody Mary __________________________________ Best Place to Get a Sazerac _____________________________________ Best Place to Get a Margarita ___________________________________ Best Place to Get a Martini _____________________________________ Best Place to Get Wine by the Glass _______________________________ Best Beer Selection ___________________________________________ Best Local Beer ______________________________________________ Best Bar for Creative Cocktails __________________________________ Best Casino _________________________________________________ Best Live Music Venue _________________________________________ Best Live Music Show in the Last 12 Months ________________________ Best Jazz Fest Performance 2010 ________________________________ Best Local Rock Band/Artist _____________________________________ Best New Local Band __________________________________________ Best Local Jazz Band/Artist _____________________________________ Best Cajun/Zydeco Band/Artist __________________________________ Best Local Brass Band _________________________________________ Best Local Rap/Hip-Hop Artist ___________________________________ Best DJ __________________________________________________ Best Funk/R&B Band/Artist ___________________________________

27


28

®

Best Kenner Restaurant _______________________________________ Best Northshore Restaurant ___________________________________ Best West Bank Restaurant ____________________________________ Best St. Bernard Parish Restaurant ______________________________ Best Neighborhood Restaurant _________________________________ Best Hotel Restaurant ________________________________________ Best Restaurant for Barbecue __________________________________ Best Chinese Restaurant ______________________________________ Best Cajun Restaurant ________________________________________ Best Creole Restaurant ________________________________________ Best Italian Restaurant ________________________________________ Best Japanese/Sushi Restaurant ________________________________ Best Latin American Restaurant ________________________________ Best Mexican Restaurant ______________________________________ Best Middle Eastern/ Mediterranean Restaurant _________________________________ Best Seafood Restaurant ______________________________________ Best Soul Food Restaurant _____________________________________ Best Steakhouse _____________________________________________ Best Thai Restaurant _________________________________________ Best Vietnamese Restaurant ___________________________________ Best Small Plates Restaurant __________________________________ Best Breakfast Spot __________________________________________ Best Brunch ________________________________________________ Best Lunch Specials ___________________________________________ Best Late-Night Dining ________________________________________ Best Kid-Friendly Restaurant ___________________________________ Best Cheap Eats ______________________________________________ Best Menu for Vegetarians ____________________________________ Best Dessert and Where to Get It _______________________________ Best Buffet __________________________________________________ Best Wine List _______________________________________________ Best Chef ___________________________________________________

READER’S POLL BALLOT

Best Outdoor Dining __________________________________________ Best Deli ____________________________________________________ Best Restaurant to Nurse a Hangover ____________________________ Best Seafood Market _________________________________________ Best Burger _________________________________________________ Best Gourmet-To-Go __________________________________________ Best Gumbo _________________________________________________ Best Muffuletta ______________________________________________ Best Pizza Place ______________________________________________ Best Red Beans and Rice Place __________________________________ Best Salad and Where to Get It _________________________________ Best Oyster Po-Boy ___________________________________________ Best Shrimp Po-Boy __________________________________________ Best Roast Beef Po-Boy ________________________________________ Best Banh Mi ________________________________________________ Best Crepes _________________________________________________ Best Tacos __________________________________________________ Best Cup of Coffee ___________________________________________ Best Place to Get Ice Cream ____________________________________ Best Place to Get Gelato _______________________________________ Best Frozen Yogurt ___________________________________________ Best Sno-Ball Stand __________________________________________ Best Coffeehouse ____________________________________________ Best Restaurant That Delivers __________________________________ POLITICS Best State Rep. or State Senator _______________________________ Best New Orleans City Councilmember __________________________ Best Jefferson Parish Councilmember ____________________________ Best Political Rising Star _______________________________________ Best Mudslinger _____________________________________________ Best Local Scandal ____________________________________________ Best Problem for Mayor Mitch Landrieu to Solve ___________________ Best Local Politician You Love to Hate ____________________________

BEST OF NEW ORLEANS

LOCAL LIFE Best Grammar School _________________________________________ Best High School _____________________________________________ Best Saints Player (current member) _____________________________ Best Hornets Player (current member) ___________________________ Best Zephyrs Player (current member) ___________________________ Best Jesters Player (current member) ____________________________ Best Local Novelist ___________________________________________ Best Local Artist _____________________________________________ Best Art Gallery ______________________________________________ Best Museum _______________________________________________ Best Art Market ______________________________________________ Best Place to Live Downtown __________________________________ Best Food Festival ____________________________________________ Best Festival Outside of New Orleans ____________________________ Best Place for a Kid’s Birthday Party ______________________________ Best Local 5k/10k Race ________________________________________ Best Golf Course _____________________________________________ Best Tennis Courts ____________________________________________ Best Place to Work Locally _____________________________________ Best Carnival Day Parade ______________________________________ Best Carnival Night Parade ____________________________________ Best Bike Path________________________________________________ Best Local Charity Event ________________________________________ Best Nonprofit _______________________________________________ Best Place for Continuing Education _____________________________ Best Community Role Model ___________________________________ Best Place for a Wedding Reception ______________________________ Best Cellphone Drop-Out Spot __________________________________ Best Pothole to Avoid __________________________________________ MEDIA Best Radio Station _____________________________________________ Best Local Radio Show __________________________________________

THE BUSINESSES L ISTED ON THIS PAGE ARE PA ID ADVERT ISEMENTS .

SWEET STUFF

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READER’S POLL BALLOT

Best Local Radio Talk Show Host __________________________________ Best Local Publication _________________________________________ Best Local Columnist __________________________________________ Best Local TV Newscast _______________________________________ Best Local Blog ______________________________________________ Best Local TV Anchor _________________________________________ Best Local TV Reporter Who’s Ready to Go National _______________________________ Best LocalTVWeathercaster_____________________________________ Best Local TV Sportscaster _____________________________________ Best Investigative Reporter _____________________________________ Best Reason to Pick Up Gambit __________________________________ GOODS AND SERVICES (Specify location is there is more than one) Best Men’s Clothing Store _____________________________________ Best Women’s Clothing Store _________________________________ Best Children’s Store __________________________________________ Best Shoe Store ______________________________________________ Best Store for Evening Wear ___________________________________ Best Place to Buy a Man’s Suit ____________________________________ Best Store for Lingerie _______________________________________ Best Store for Sportswear ______________________________________ Best Store for Vintage Clothing ________________________________ Best Thrift Store ______________________________________________ Best Consignment Shop ______________________________________ Best Tailor __________________________________________________ Best Shopping Mall ___________________________________________ est Place to Buy Furniture ______________________________________ Best Place to Buy Lamps/Lighting _______________________________ Best AntiquesStore____________________________________________ Best Place to Buy a Gift ________________________________________ Best Bridal Shop ______________________________________________ Best Maternity Shop ___________________________________________

THE BUSINESSES L ISTED ON THIS PAGE ARE PA ID ADVERT ISEMENTS .

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

BEST OF NEW ORLEANS

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

BEST OF NEW ORLEANS

30

Best Jewelry Store ____________________________________________ Best Local Jewelry Designer _____________________________________ Best Smoke Shop _____________________________________________ Best Sweet Shop _____________________________________________ Best New Retail Store (Opened September 2009 or later) ____________ Best Dry Cleaner ______________________________________________ Best Place That Ain’t Dere No Mo’ ________________________________ Best Hospital_________________________________________________ Best Dermatologist ___________________________________________ Best Cosmetic Surgeon ________________________________________ Best Chiropractor _____________________________________________ Best Acupuncturist ___________________________________________ Best PhysicalTherapist _________________________________________ Best Health Club ______________________________________________ Best Personal Trainer ________________________________________ Best Yoga Class ______________________________________________ Best Pilates Class _____________________________________________ Best Dance Class ____________________________________________ Best Barbershop ______________________________________________ Best Manicure/Pedicure ______________________________________ Best Hair Salon ______________________________________________ Best Day Spa ________________________________________________ Best Place to Get a Massage ____________________________________ Best Tanning Salon ___________________________________________ Best Body Piercing/Tattoo Parlor ________________________________ Best Place to Buy Local Music ____________________________________ Best Bookstore _______________________________________________ Best Car Dealership ___________________________________________ Best Bank ___________________________________________________ Best Home Electronics Store ___________________________________ Best Bedding Store __________________________________________ Best Local Camera Shop ______________________________________ Best BicycleStore______________________________________________

®

READER’S POLL BALLOT

Best Veterinary/Animal Clinic __________________________________ Best Place to Board Your Pet _____________________________________ Best Place to Have Your Pet Groomed ______________________________ Best Hotel ___________________________________________________ Best Hardware Store ___________________________________________ Best Oil Change _______________________________________________ Best Cheap Gas ______________________________________________ Best Florist __________________________________________________ Best Garden Store _____________________________________________ Best Place toBuyWine__________________________________________ Best Liquor Store _____________________________________________ Best New Orleans Neighborhood Grocery _________________________ Best Jefferson Neighborhood Grocery ____________________________ Best Northshore Neighborhood Grocery __________________________ Best Supermarket _____________________________________________ Best FarmersMarket ___________________________________________ Best Bakery __________________________________________________ Best King Cake _______________________________________________ Best Wedding Cake ____________________________________________ Best Jazz Fest Food ____________________________________________ Best Real Estate Agent _________________________________________ Best DWI Attorney ____________________________________________

REMEMBER – YOU CAN

VOTE ONLiNE Just go to: www.bestofneworleans.com

THE BUSINESSES L ISTED ON THIS PAGE ARE PA ID ADVERT ISEMENTS .


presents

TaLeS AFTeR DaRK

Where Jazz Meets the Cocktail

July 21-24 • MIDNIGHT - 2AM N Ue

FriDaY, JUlY 23

Ja

zz

Ve

SoUNDS oF SToRYVILLe

Pr O rle aN s

em

ie

r

ThUrsDaY JUlY 22

featuring

BURLeSQUe BALLRooM sTarriNG

TRIXIe MINX

and

Jayna morgan & the sazerac sunrise Band

KeepING IT RIo featuring CHeGÃDo The rhythms of Brazil with leblon Cachaca

shimmy in the red-light district with SHAKe YoUR BRASS meukow featuring HoT 8 BRASS BAND Cognac

saTUrDaY JUlY 24

plus special guest

weDNesDaY JUlY 21

- Ê 6 ° Ê U Ê  /  , 

(ONE BLOCK FROM CLEARVIEW MALL)

371-5195

IRVIN MAYFIeLD

HAVANA NIGHTS featuring NUeVA TIeRRA Cuban Jazz with Bacardi rum Cocktails

JULY

{ΣÈÊ6 / ,

Dance to the sounds of Brass fueled by Benchmark Bourbon

Thursday 22, 29 JOHNAYE KENDRICK Friday 23, 30

Tuesday 20 JASON MARSALIS LEON “KID CHOCOLATE” BROWN Tuesday 27 ED “SWEETBREAD” PETERSEN Saturday 24, 31 SHAMARR ALLEN Wednesday 21, 28 IRVIN MAYFIELD and the NOJO JAM Sunday 25 DON VAPPIE

CoMe pLaY WiTH US! irvinmayfield.com imJazzPlayhouse 300 Bourbon Street • New Orleans • 504.553.2299 • www.sonesta.com

SELF SERVE 14 FLAVORS DA9 40 /"** SUN - THU ££‡£ä*  ,  Ê E Ê - / ££‡££*

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

New

31


music

Listings

page 26 Kerry IrIsh Pub — Chip Wilson, 9 Lacava’s sPorts bar — Crossfire, 9

the MaIson — Teddy Bear Elvis, 7; Cat’s Pajamas, 10

Mojo statIon — Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

oLd FIreMen’s haLL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 oLd PoInt bar — Mike Burkart, 8 one eyed jacKs — Reverend Beat-Man, 9

PaLM court jazz caFe — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band & Duke Heitger, 8

rocK ’n’ bowL — Jerry Embree, 8:30 rusty naIL — Jenn Howard, 8

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Delfeayo Marsalis & Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

sPotted cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Loose Marbles, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 yuKI IzaKaya — By and By, 8

thursday 22 aLLways Lounge — Mincemeat or Tenspeed, Nero’s Day at Disneyland, C-Section 8, Candida, Relax Band, 10 aPPLe barreL — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 10:30

bacchanaL — Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

banKs street bar — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10

32

bayou ParK bar — Ron Hotstream, 9

beach house — Beach House All-Stars, 8 bIg aL’s saLoon — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8

bMc — Low-Stress Quintet, 7; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 10 carroLLton statIon — Cortland Burke, 9

cIrcLe bar — Sam and Boone, 6; Velveteen Elvis, 10 coLuMns hoteL — Freddy Omar, 8

d.b.a. — Glen David Andrews, 10

dos jeFes uPtown cIgar bar — Todd Duke Trio, 9:30 French Quarter PIzzerIa — Big Joe Kennedy, 9

hI-ho Lounge — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30

house oF bLues — Legalpalooza feat. N’awlins Johnnys, Mia Borders, Cou-Zan Band, 7 howLIn’ woLF northshore — Black Magnolia, 10

IrvIn MayFIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Roman Skakun, 5; Johnaye Kendrick, 8; Chegadao, midnight

jIMMy buFFett’s MargarItavILLe caFe — Eddie Parrino, 7 Kerry IrIsh Pub — Quite Contrary, 9

Le bon teMPs rouLe — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

the MaIson — Soul Project, 9

MaPLe LeaF bar — The Trio, 10

oLd PoInt bar — Andre Bouvier & the Royal Bohemians, 9:30 PaLM court jazz caFe — Otis Bazoon & Leon Brown feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PreservatIon haLL — Tornado Brass Band, 8

rePubLIc new orLeans — BOUNCE feat. DJ Jubilee, Big Freedia, Rusty Lazer, Jean-Eric, Katey Red, 10 rocK ’n’ bowL — Curley Taylor, 8:30

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Loren Pickford Bebop Quartet, 8 & 10 southPort haLL — Morning Life, Lynam, 9

sPotted cat — Brett Richardson; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 tIPItIna’s — Drivin’ ’N’ Crying, 10

vaughan’s — Kermit Ruffins & Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 yuKI IzaKaya — Wazozo, 8

Friday 23 61 bLues hIghway — Jack Yoder & Li’l G Delta Blues, 8 banKs street bar — Egg Yolk Jubilee, 10 bayou ParK bar — Crystal Rivers, 10

beach house — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9 bLue nILe — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Brass Bed, Empress Hotel, Native America, 11

bMc — Sasha Masakowski, 7; Fredy Omar Con Su Banda, 10:30; Medianoche International, 1 a.m.

boMbay cLub — Banu Gibson, 9:30

booMtown casIno — Junior & Sumtin Sneaky, 9:30 carroLLton statIon — Kelcy Mae Band, 9:30

cIrcLe bar — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6; Debauche, 10 cLever wIne bar — Courtyard Kings, 8 cLub 7140 — Michael Ward, 8 coLuMns hoteL — Alex Bachari, 5

d.b.a. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; John Mooney, 10

dos jeFes uPtown cIgar bar — Eric Traub Trio, 10 French Quarter PIzzerIa — Big Joe Kennedy, 9 green rooM — Syllable 7, Sekond Element, 10

herMes bar — Panorama Jazz Band, 9:30 & 11 hey! caFe — Altar of Plagues, Velnias, Tirefire, Thou, 7

hI-ho Lounge — Cheeky Blakk, 10

house oF bLues — New Orleans Beatles Festival feat. The Topcats, Chuck Credo IV, Beatin’ Path and others, 9 howLIn’ woLF — Rebirth Brass Band, Lee Boys, 9 howLIn’ woLF (the den) — Casey Robinson Band, 9

IrvIn MayFIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Tom Worrell, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Band, midnight jIMMy buFFett’s MargarItavILLe caFe — Eddie Parrino, 7

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Buddy Francioni & Home Grown, 5; Hurricane Refugees, 9 Le bon teMPs rouLe — Dave Reis, 7; Groovesect, 11 the MaIson — Some Like it Hot!, 7:30; WCP, 10

MaPLe LeaF bar — Jesse Hiatt Ban, 10

oLd PoInt bar — Lil’ Red & Big Bad, 9:30 oLIve branch caFe — Jack Yoder, Greg “Lil G” Rosary, 6

one eyed jacKs — Kyle Turley Band, City Below, Robert Fortune Band, 9

PaLM court jazz caFe — Clive Wilson & Gerry Adams feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

PreservatIon haLL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 rePubLIc new orLeans — Wolves, Where?, 10

rocK ’n’ bowL — Flow Tribe, 9:30 rusty naIL — Kirk Holder, 10

saturn bar — Poppets, Sweet Sixteens, Die Rotzz, Sopors, 10

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Ellis Marsalis Trio feat. Johnaye Kendrick, 8 & 10 sPotted cat — Brett Richardson; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9:30 st. roch tavern — The Way, 9 tIPItIna’s — Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, Mia Borders, 10

toMMy’s wIne bar — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10 wIndsor court hoteL (PoLo cLub Lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7; Anais St. John, Harry Mayronne Trio, 9

saturday 24

bayou ParK bar — Headcase, 10 bLue nILe — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Mike Dillon’s Go-Go Jungle, Hairy Apes BMX, 11

bMc — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Benny Turner & Real Blues, 9:30; One Mind Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. boMbay cLub — Tim Laughlin, 9:30 booMtown casIno — Bag of Donuts, 9:30

caFe negrIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 caFe rose nIcaud — Troy Sawyer, 8

carroLLton statIon — Good God Damn Show, 9:30 chIcKIe wah wah — Mia Borders, 9

cIrcLe bar — Jazzholes, 6; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 10 coach’s corner — One, 10

d.b.a. — John Boutte, 8; Eric Lindell, 11

Band, 8

PreservatIon haLL — Preservation Hall Band feat. William Smith, 8 rocK ’n’ bowL — Bonerama, 9:30

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Wess “Warmdaddy” Anderson Quintet, 8 & 10 sPotted cat — Michael & Ben, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Dominic Grillo & Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 10

taQueros — Coco Cruz Band, 10 tIPItIna’s — Juice, Andrew Duhon & the Lonesome Crows, 10

toMMy’s wIne bar — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Quartet feat. Matthew Shilling, 10

tooLouLas — Black Magnolia, 9 uno LaKeFront arena — Wisin y Yandel, 8

wIndsor court hoteL (PoLo cLub Lounge) — Michael Pellera, 7; Anais St. John & the Harry Mayronne Trio, 9

sunday 25

decKbar & grILLe — Miche & MixMavens, 8

banKs street bar — Marc Stone & Friends, 7

French Quarter PIzzerIa — Big Joe Kennedy, 9

bMc — Sweet Jones, 5:30; Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9; George Sartin & Jack Cruz Project, midnight

dos jeFes uPtown cIgar bar — Gringo do Choro feat. Rick Trolsen, 10

green rooM — Bullets & Numbers, Slave to the Day, 10 henry’s bar — Henry’s Bar Anniversary feat. Third Line Brass Band, John Lisi & Delta Funk, Weathered, 1 herMes bar — Sasha Masakowski, 9:30 & 11

hI-ho Lounge — Machine Made Slave, Fat Stupid Ugly People, Moonhoar, 10 howLIn’ woLF (the den) — Lobbyists, Auto Pilots, 9

IrvIn MayFIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Shamarr Allen, 8; Hot 8 Brass Band, midnight jIMMy buFFett’s MargarItavILLe caFe — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 4 Kerry IrIsh Pub — TobinSpecht Trio feat. Heidi Campbell, 5; Lynn Drury Band, 9

Le bon teMPs rouLe — Pinettes Brass Band, 11 Loews hoteL new orLeans — YaDonna West Jazz Trio, 5 & 8 Lucy’s retIred surFers bar & restaurant — Annual Block Party Luau feat. Rotary Downs, Unnaturals, Bills, Americanos, 2

the MaIson — Loose Marbles, 7 MaPLe LeaF bar — Maple Leaf All-Stars, 10

bayou ParK bar — Aysia 999 benefit show, 12

caFe negrIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10 cIrcLe bar — Micah McKee & friends, 6; Peace of Mind Orchestra, 10

yuKI IzaKaya — Luke Winslow King, 7

Monday 26 aPPLe barreL — Sam Cammarata, 8

bacchanaL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30 banKs street bar — N’awlins Johnnys, 9

bMc — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30 cIrcLe bar — Dimestore Troubadours, 10

coLuMns hoteL — David Doucet, 8

d.b.a. — Glen David Andrews, 9 donna’s bar & grILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9 hI-ho Lounge — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

IrvIn MayFIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Lynn Drury, 9

the MaIson — Musicians Open Jam feat. Soul Project, 10 MaPLe LeaF bar — Papa Grows Funk, 10 Mat & naddIe’s restaurant — Courtyard Kings, 7

oLd PoInt bar — Brent Walsh Trio, 8 PreservatIon haLL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Charlie Gabriel, 8

hIgh ground — Contortionist, For the Fallen Dreams, Legend, I Declare War, 6:30

sPotted cat — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

donna’s bar & grILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

howLIn’ woLF (the den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9 IrvIn MayFIeLd’s jazz PLayhouse — Don Vappie, 7 jIMMy buFFett’s MargarItavILLe caFe — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 4

Kerry IrIsh Pub — Who Dats, 9 the MaIson — St. Claude Serenaders, 4; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, Larry Scala & the Rhythm Jesters, 7; Amy Trail CD release, 10

oLd PoInt bar — Chip Wilson, 3:30; John Autin, 7 PaLM court jazz caFe — Tom Fischer feat. Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

aPPLe barreL — Peter Orr, 7

PreservatIon haLL — Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

banKs street bar — Mike Darby & the Cards, 10

PaLM court jazz caFe — Lionel Ferbos feat. Palm Court Jazz

sPotted cat — Rights of Swing,

one eyed jacKs — Quintron & Miss Pussycat, Paul Collins, 9

tIPItIna’s — Cajun Fais Do Do, 8:30

d.b.a. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Mas Mamones, 10

oLd PoInt bar — Dana Abbott, 9:30

bacchanaL — Gypsy Swing Club, 8

3; Loose Marbles, 6; Pat Casey, 10

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Tarik Hassan CD release feat. Johnaye Kenrick, 8 & 10

snug harbor jazz bIstro — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

zeItgeIst MuLtI-dIscIPLInary arts center — Dana Jessen, Matt Rhody, Brad Walker, Rob Cambre, 8

concerts PavILIon oF the two sIsters — City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 482-4888 — Thu: Twilight in the Garden Concert Series presents the New Orleans Gay Men’s Chorus, 6 PontchartraIn vIneyards —

81250 Hwy. 1082 (Old Military Road), Bush, (985) 892-9742; www.pontchartrainvineyards. com — Sat: Chuck Cavette & the All-Stars, 6:30

trInIty ePIscoPaL church —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Thu: Trinity Artist Series presents Evensong Choir, 6:30; David Bode & Larry Lyden, 5; Mon: Taize, 6


Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

33


fiLm

Summer Satwtheings

Li LiStiNgS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A Room wiTH A ViEw

review Border Petrol

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

The Dukes of Dixieland July 23-24-25

Now ShowiNg

Their name says it all! The Dukes of Dixieland blow traditional jazz and Dixieland music into the 21st Century, weaving strands of pop, gospel and country with authentic New Orleans sounds. This renowned musical group steps forward with strong tradition, new ground, and great sounds! Friday & Saturday evenings: Dinner @ 6pm; Show @ 7:30; $45 (Show Only: $20) Sunday Brunch Matinee: Brunch @ 11am, Show @ 1pm; $55

CYRUS (R) — A down and out divorcee meets the woman of his dreams, only to discover she has a 21-year-old son with whom she shares an unconventional relationship. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place DESPICABLE ME (PG) — Steve

Salute to Satchmo!

Carell, Kristen Wiig, Jason Segel and others provide the voices in this animated comedy about orphans who see dad potential in a diabolical supervillan. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

July 30 – 31 & August 1

Back by popular demand! Troy Anderson’s musical tribute was a sellout during his last run at the Stage Door Canteen. Don’t miss this fabulous musical event celebrating one of America’s musical greats. Jazz radio host Stu Gant called the performance “simply the best Satchmo tribute I have had the pleasure to see and hear!”

THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (R) — In the second film

Friday & Saturday evenings: Dinner @ 6pm; Show @ 8pm; $60 (Show Only: $20) Sunday Brunch Matinee: Brunch @ 11am, Show @ 1pm; $55

installment of Stieg Larsson’s Millenium trilogy, computer hacker Lisbeth Salander is on the run after being framed for murder. Canal Place

Magazine Street at Poeyfarre H 504-528-1943 H www.stagedoorcanteen.org

GROWN UPS (PG-13) —

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 20 > 2010

WW2-00000_SummerSwings_Gambit_4c_ad_No4.indd 1

34

7/15/10 9:48 AM

Childhood best friends get together during Fourth of July weekend to meet each other’s families for the first time. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

INCEPTION (PG-13) — A thief (Leonardo DiCaprio) skilled at extracting secrets from deep within the subconscious gets a chance at redemption. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK (R) — Glimpse the comedic

process and private life of the pop culture icon. Canal Place

THE KARATE KID (PG) — A

12 year old who moves to China with his family seeks the mentorship of a kung fu master after becoming the target of bullying. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) — A wholesome woman

(Cameron Diaz) accidentally gets involved with an international super spy (Tom Cruise). AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) — In M. Night Shyamalan’s fantasy film, the Fire nation launches a centuries-long war against the Earth, Water and Air nations. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

Given his love of political intrigue and controversy, it’s not surprising Oliver Stone (JFK, Platoon, Born on the Fourth of July) decided to make a film focused on Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez. The documentary begins with a series of hysterical (both rabid and funny) clips of Fox News anchors and commentators demonizing Chávez over matters both political and petty. Stone announces he intends to cut through the propaganda, much of it from overheated Bush administration talking points endlessly repeated by the American news media, including The New York Times. Bush called Chávez a dictator; Chávez says it’s all about Venezuela’s oil resources. Stone trekked across South America and interviewed leaders including Chávez, Evo Morales (Bolivia), Nestor Kirchner and Cristina Kirchner (the married former and current president of Argentina), Lula da Silva (Brazil) and Raul Castro (Cuba). There’s obviously a lot that could be included in such a broad suvery, but Stone is particularly focused on the role of the IMF (International Monetary Fund), a development organization basically run by the U.S. with policies that overwhelmingly favor the interests of foreign investors vis-à-vis native control of resources. With frequent references to Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), who helped many South American nations gain independence from Spain, Stone observes a struggle of left wing politics and native populations against the allied interests of industrialized nations from the Northern Hemisphere and the wealthy and enfranchised few within each nation. The 2002 failed coup against Chávez provides an interesting case study. At 78 minutes, the film is brief, and it is full of chummy meetings — occasionally in heavily contrived scenes — between Stone and South American presidents. Novelist, historian and political writer Tariq Ali worked on the screenplay and appears on camera. It’s not an exhaustive history of the region, but it does sketch out the framework of relations between the United States and South American nations. And it shows basic courses different nations have followed, but given Brazil’s success, it would have benefited from more content about that nation, the world’s ninth largest economy. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

THRU AU G

02

South of the Border 5:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Sun.; 5:30 p.m. & 7:30 p.m. Tue.-Thu., July 27-29 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

PREDATORS (R) — Mercenary

warriors try to stay alive while being hunted by alien trackers called predators. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SOLITARY MAN (R) — A once

successful Manhattan mogul tries to turn things around

when his life falls apart after several indiscretions. AMC Palace 20 STANDING OVATION (PG) —

Five junior high friends join a singing group and compete in a music video contest against their rich, unscrupulous arch rivals. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand


review Dragon Tat-two Anyone who liked the The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, the first installment in Stieg Larsson’s trilogy, is bound to like the second part, The Girl Who Played With Fire. It returns much of the same cast for another venture into the shadowy underworld of corruption and depravity that apparently lurks beneath everything sunny and blonde in Sweden. Lisbeth Salander (Noomi Rapace) is still an accomplished computer hacker and as fierce as ever, but also more skilled as a fighter and appears to have picked up some tricks of the spy trade. The opening scenes suggest a clumsy sequel. After escaping the hellish network of abusers and murderers in the original, Salander’s return to Sweden seems both unwise and unnecessary, and given the enemies she’s made, she isn’t very careful about it. Meanwhile, the disgraced/redeemed journalist from the original, Mikael Blomkvist (Michael Nyqvist), is back at Millennium magazine, which is on the verge of publishing an explosive expose, this time about sex trafficking and police and government agents who abuse underage foreign prostitutes. It’s not long before Salander restarts a relationship with an old girlfriend, secret police crawl out of the woodwork, bodies pile up and Stockholm again looks like a cauldron of murder and predatory sex. The intrigue digs up new villains and old connections, and the plot isn’t as compelling as the first film’s, rather it comes off as episodic. But it adds a compelling dimension of insight into Salander’s past and pathos and why she became such an avenging dynamo. It helps to know from the first film why Blomkvist cares about her, but the story and suspense work on their own, even if the tattoo has faded a bit. (In Swedish with English subtitles.) — Will Coviello

the modern take on the classic short film sequence from Disney’s Fantasia. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

TOY STORY 3 (G) — Woody and

Buzz return to the big screen when Andy prepares to go to college. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) — Bella tries to choose

between vampire and werewolf. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

opening FRiDAY MICMACS (R) — An orphan

seeks revenge against an arms manufacturer with the help of junkyard dealers.

RAMONA AND BEEZUS (G) —

Beverly Cleary’s book series gets a big-screen adaptation. SALT (PG-13) — A CIA agent

(Angelina Jolie) goes rogue when superiors think she is out to kill the president.

speciAl scReenings AMC SUMMER MOVIE CAMP — AMC Theatres screen kid-

friendly movies. Visit www. amcentertainment.com/smc for details. Tickets $1. 10 a.m. Tuesday.

DINNER AND A MOVIE SERIES — The museum screens Cut/

Chop/Cook and Capital Q, both about barbecue. Tickets $10, free for members. 4 p.m. Sunday, Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org DUCK SOUP (NR) — In the

Marx brothers’ classic, the wealthy Mrs. Teasdale insists

Rufus T. Firefly (Groucho Marx) be appointed leader of the small, bankrupt country of Freedonia. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Cafe e Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www. ladivinagelateria.com

“SALT

IS THE NEWEST, SEXIEST SPY IN TOWN.” Dave Basner, MTV / VH1 RADIO NETWORKS

DOUBLE TAKE (NR) — Johan Grimonprez’s montage uses Alfred Hitchcock’s films and TV appearances. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 members. 9:15 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net THE JEFF KOONS SHOW (NR) —

Alison Chernick‘s documentary is a comprehensive and comical retrospective of the artist’s career. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 members. 6 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

OWNING THE WEATHER (NR) — The film explores weather

from the rainmaking days to modern engineering amid the threat of catastrophic climate change. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

THE PRINCESS BRIDE (PG) — The 1987 film screens in

the park after the Mid-City Neighborhood Association’s monthly mixer at the MidCity Yacht Club (440 S. Saint Patrick St., 483-2517; www. midcityyachtclub.com). Free admission. 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, St. Patrick’s Park, corner of St. Patrick and Baudin streets

STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 23

4.729" X 5.333" (1/4 PG SQ) TUE 7/20 “ I ORLEANS NEW GAMBIT WEEKLY LOVED THIS DOCUMENTARY!” - Bill Maher

“ PROVOCATIVE.”

- Stephen Holden, The New York Times

“Oscar®-winning Director

STRIKES ONCE AGAIN

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (NR) —

Gene Kelly stars in the musical comedy classic. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

into the political heart of darkness.” - Laura Emerick, Chicago Sun-Times

“ AN EYE-OPENING

WILLY WONKA AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY (G) — A

poor boy wins the oppurtunity to tour Willy Wonka’s eccentric, and sometimes dangerous, candy factory. Tickets $5.50 noon shows, $8 midnight shows. Midnight Friday-Saturday, noon Saturday-Sunday and June 28. AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), 429-9090; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), 734-2020; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), 734-2020; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), 734-2020; Canal Place, 363-1117; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787;

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

DOCUMENTARY.”

- Owen Gleiberman, EW.com

“ VALUABLE glimpse of historical and social change.” - Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post

www.southoftheborderdoc.com

MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes - Text BORDER With Your ZIP CODE To 43KIX (43549)

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY, JULY 23 ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd 504/352-1150 CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORY OR CALL FOR SOUND INFORMATION AND SHOWTIMES

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT COUPONS ACCEPTED

Don’t miss the Q&A this Friday 7/23 with Aaron Schneider, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Tulane University after the 7:30pm show! Area Codes: (225), (228), (504), (601), (888), (985)

New Orleans Gambit Weekly

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE (PG) — Nicholas Cage stars in

Film

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

35


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lisTings

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

Opening DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Art Chaud,”

a summer group exhibition featuring new work by 17 local artists, through Sept. 4. Opening reception 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday. GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 8985858 — “A Summer Place,” photographs and beach glass mosaics by Sylvia Langlinais, through July. Opening Wednesday. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — Young Artists Young Aspirations (YA/YA) group exhibition, through July. Opening Saturday. HIGHWATER GALLERY. 7800 Oak St., 309-5535 — Global Gala

2010, a collection of folk art from six continents, through Aug. 30. Opening reception 6 p.m. to midnight Wednesday.

galleries Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

review From the Depths

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

36

WHAT yoU see is WHAT yoU GeT

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others. ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Group exhibi-

tion of gallery artists, through July.

ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limitededition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine

It’s called Swamp Tours, but in some ways it’s more like a big curiosity cabinet. A few months back, New Orleans Museum of Art curators William Fagaly and Miranda Lash set out to unearth some of the lesser-known works by contemporary Louisiana artists stored in the depths of the museum’s inner sanctum. The result includes 27 rarely seen treasures, oddities and curiosities. Which is which is strictly up to the viewer, but overall there is an appealing mix of novelty and revelation that makes for an unusual summer expo. Of course, any show that features a first-rank Noel Rockmore painting is an automatic must see, and The Sorcerer, his 1967 vision of three darkly occult figures partaking of a psychedelic repast, leads the viewer into a realm of incomprehensible yet coherent cosmic craziness. A romantic reprobate bohemian malcontent, Rockmore was the French Quarter’s favorite lost genius until he died at age 67 in 1995. Then in 1997, the great Mike Frolich, perhaps best known as the “Saturn Bar painter,” passed away at age 75. A former deep-sea diver turned artist and laundromat operator, Frolich is legendary for the surreal populism of paintings like St. Louis Cemetery, which looks unexpectedly rural, with an old-time outhouse amid the crypts under a looming, apocalyptic Caspar Friedrich-cum-Jackson Pollock sky. Reclusive Charles Blank is represented by his colorful 2001 canvas, Cybernaut Theatre (pictured), a sci-fi visionary-imagist account of two demonic cosmonauts attacking each other with futuristic and antique weaponry as a rogue aircraft flames out in the sky above. Sometimes seen as a response to 9/11, it actually dates from earlier in 2001. While the above artists are legendary underground figures, there are lots of unusual or rarely seen works by more mainstream artists including Lynda Benglis, Keith Sonnier, Robert Gordy, Jeffrey Cook, Clementine Hunter, Kendall Shaw, George Dureau and Ron Bechet. Unexpected views and air conditioning make this show a stimulating change of pace. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU AUG

29

swamp Tours: Hidden gems from the archives New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 658-4100; www.noma.org

St., 895-6201 — “Second Line: Lifting Our Souls Up Into Heaven,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Gulf Spray,” oil

spill-inspired spray paint art, through Aug. 10.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CANARY GALLERY. 329 Julia St., 388-7746; www.thecanarycollective.com — “Images from


HELPING NEW ORLEANS ONE STEP AT A TIME!

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

the End of the Earth,” photographs of Grand Isle by Zack Smith. CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www. carolrobinsongallery.com — “30 Year Anniversary Exhibition,” works by David Goodman, John Oles, Christina Goodman and Jere Allen, through July. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 5240671; www.casellartgallery.com —

Pastels by Joaquim Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — “Details: Works on Paper,”

paperworks by Robert Berguson, Robert Lansden and Dale Newkirk, through Aug. 15.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Dew

Point,” a group show featuring 12 artists, through Saturday.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — Annual group exhibition featuring sculptures, paintings and mixedmedia works by gallery artists, through Aug. 3. DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 412-9220; www.dutchalleyonline.com — Works

by New Orleans artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by Fredrick

Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “SPORTS,” an

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by Todd

White, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 — “The

Journey: Abstract Landscapes,” paintings by Al Champagne, through July. “Don’t Be Koi,” paintings by Muriel Dauterive, through Wednesday. More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “Transfer,” prints by Teresa Cole,

through Thursday.

THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “Trea-

sures of the Gulf,” a group exhibition featuring more than 12 artists, through July.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www.georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Is Oil Here?:

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,”

works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,”

works by Susan Dory, ongoing.

HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “Dog Star,” a

group exhibition featuring Oscar Quesada, through July.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by

Jon Schooler, ongoing.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www.jonathanferraragallery.com — “reconsidered,”

new paintings by Stephen Hoskins, through July 28.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com —

“Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 5655445; www.kakogallery.com — New

paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org —

“Knead,” works by Kristian Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles and William Murphy, ongoing.

KURT E SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes

in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 5225988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com —

“Growing Pains,” a group exhibition curated by Christy Wood; “Our Gulf Coast,” a group exhibition featuring works inspired by the Gulf Coast; both through Saturday.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works

from guild members, ongoing.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y.

Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111;

www.noafa.com — Student art exhibition, through Saturday. NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Glisten With Glass, Print and Metal,” works by Michelle Knox, David Lindsley, Melissa Clark and Carrie Quandt, through July. OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — “The Colors of Summer,” a group show of gallery and invited artists featuring mixedmedia paintings, drawings and photographs, through July. PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and

Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart.com —

“Vintage New Orleans Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Works by

Teri Walker, Chad Ridgeway, Tamra Carboni and others, ongoing

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue. com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing. ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com —

Hand-blown glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www.rustypelicanart. com — Works by Travis and Lexi

Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I Genti H2O,”

works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing. SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www.sheilaart. com — Works by Sheila Phipps,

ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Works on Paper,”

works by Stephanie Hierholzer and Amanda Sibley, through July.

SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY. Historic Slidell Train Depot, 1827 Front St., Suite 201, (985) 847-9458 — “Out

of the Blue,” a group exhibition and competition, through Feb. 3. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION. 320 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-8650; www.sttammanyart. org — “Summer Show,” a group

exhibition of juried works by artists across the country, through Aug. 15. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “The Talented Tenth:

African American Artists and Musicians of the Harlem Renaissance, the W.P.A. and Beyond,” through July. STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart. com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing. STUDIO 525. 525 E. Boston St., Covington; www.studio525covington.com — Works by Sarah Dunn, through

July.

t o o f PAIN?

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 9420200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel

Sessions: First Installment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., third floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/ YA artists, ongoing. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www. venusiangardens.com — “Luminous

GARDEN DISTRICT PODIATRY

2820 Napoleon Ave., Ste. 500 NOLA 70115 • 504-891-1911

Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Works by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works by Juli

Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

Call for artists

fresh

FLOWERS for any

budget roses

6

CASH& $ 50 DZ CARRY

LOS INVISIBLES. Documentary pho-

tos of the Latino immigrant workers who aided in the reconstruction of post-Katrina New Orleans are sought for a juried exhibition at Barrister’s Gallery. Email jose@ torrestama.com for details. Submission deadline is July 30.

PROTECT OUR WETLANDS, PROTECT OURSELVES VIDEO CAMPAIGN. The

Charitable Film Network invites participants to make videos about environmental issues facing Gulf Coast communities for a chance to win cash and prizes. Visit www. charitablefilmnetwork.org for details. Submission deadline is Aug. 6.

815 FOCIS STREET [OFF VETERANS ]

837-6400 SAVE THE

TURTLES

museums ASHÉ CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

50% OFF SALE

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Swamp Tours,” a

group exhibition featuring contemporary Louisiana artists, through August 29. “Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965–2010,” an exhibition featuring female artists who have lived or worked in New Orleans, through September 12.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — “Where

They At: New Orleans Bounce and Hip-Hop in Words and Pictures,” by Aubrey Edwards and Alison Fensterstock, through Aug. 1. “Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues,” photographs by William Ferris; William Ferris Folk Art Collection; through Sunday. TEKREMA CENTER FOR ART AND CULTURE. 5640 Burgundy St., 247-2612 — “Healing Waters: Reflections of

the Gulf,” an exhibition and meditation site centering around “Healing Waters” by Niko Ciglio, through August.

41 FRENCH MARKET PLACE 299-9225 { A r oun d t h e bl o c k f r o m Ma r g a r i tav i l l e } www.s t e r l i ng s i lv i a .c o m

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 20 > 2010

interactive multi-media experience by Dave Greber, Adam Montegut, Roel Miranda and others, through Aug. 8.

A Snapshot,” video and pictures by Robert Hannant; “Last Line of Defense,” documentation of interventions in the wetlands by Rajko Radovanovic; both through Aug. 7.

art

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BEER

SINCE BEFORE YOU WERE

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E AND SONIAT 5101 MAGAZINE ST. [ MAGAZIN CORNER OF

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

CATS & DOGS: THE REVENGE OF KITTY GALORE

38

SATURDAY JULY 24TH AMC Palace 20 Elmwood 11:00 AM

TheaTeR 6X6. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Local playwrights join actors and directors to present six staged readings of new 10-minute plays. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. BETTER NOW/I WANT SEX ALL THE TIME. AllWays Lounge,

2240 St. Claude Ave., 2185778; www.marignytheatre. org — The theater and Clove Productions hosts a double bill of short plays by two up-andcoming playwrights. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through July 30.

BLACKBIRD. Elm Theatre,

220 Julia St., 218-0055; www. elmtheatre.org — A Gulf War veteran and a drug-addicted former stripper cling to each other in hopes of escaping their grim lives. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday through Aug. 14.

19106 Playmakers Road (off Lee Road), Covington, (985) 893-1671; www.playmakersinc. com — The theater hosts a production of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. Tickets $25 general admission, $15 students. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

EVER AFTER: THE MUSICAL. St. Philip Neri Parishioners’ Center, 6500 Kawanee Ave., Metairie, 887-5600; www.stphilipneri. org — St. Philip Neri’s drama program presents the musical, which is a different take on the famous fairy tale. Tickets $10 reserved seating, $7 general admission, $4 children. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday. 2:30 p.m. Sunday. NICKELODEON STORYTIME LIVE!. Mahalia Jackson Theater

Pick up your complimentary pass

FRIDAY JULY 23RD 11 AM - 1 PM at

4920 Tchoupitoulas St. While supplies last. Passes are available on a first-come, first served basis. No purchase necessary. Each pass admits 4 people Limit one pass per person. Rated PG.

IN THEATERS FRIDAY, JULY 30

review Grand Vapids

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

CATS. Playmakers Theater,

INVITE YOUR FAMILY TO AN ADVANCE SCREENING OF

Get in on the Act

of the Performing Arts, 1201 St. Peters St., 525-1052; www. acetheatregroup.com — Favorite Nickelodeon characters come to life in this stage show. Tickets start at $15. 7 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday.

RUTHLESS! THE MUSICAL.

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 639-8294 — The off-Broadway musical tells the story of a dull housewife and her talented 8-yearold daughter who is desperate to perform. Tickets $17. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday. STAGE DOOR IDOL. Stage Door

Canteen at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Contestants in

The premise behind the off-Broadway hit Celebrity Autobiography is as simple as it sounds: people reading aloud from the literary works of the famous — and the more fatuous and self-indulgent, the funnier. (Did Diana Ross really describe her rained-out Central Park concert as a “wet dream”? Yes, she did.) Developers Eugene Pack and Dayle Reyfel brought the show to Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre July 11 as a benefit for the Greater New Orleans Foundation’s Gulf Coast Oil Spill Fund, assembling an amazing cast. Bryan Batt opened the show as Wheel of Fortune’s Vanna White describing the surprising difficulties of her job, which segued into Jay Thomas’ reading of Kenny Loggins’ unctuous public love letter to his wife (“I want to hold really still and let the us of us in”). Ryan Reynolds and Mario Cantone brought down the house as Geraldo Rivera and Liza Minnelli, respectively, describing a mutual sexual encounter in a bathroom at Studio 54, and Cantone killed as Zsa Zsa Gabor, describing the tortures of her infamous 72-hour jail stint, during which she washed her face with Evian water and read Town & Country magazine. Burt Reynolds and Loni Anderson’s autobios were read in counterpoint by John Goodman and Jennifer Coolidge, who put just the right deadpan dim-blonde spin on lines like “I didn’t know whether to levitate — or cry.” But the funniest interlude included the men in the show as the five members of ’N SYNC, describing their most embarrassing moments; watching Goodman and Batt enact the roles of teenage boy-band members was worth the price of admission alone. All this hilarity raised more than $10,000 for the Gulf, and after the show producer Pack said he’d like to bring Celebrity Autobiography back to town for a proper run. Two words — Ricky Graham. Imagine the possibilities. — Kevin Allman

the museum’s 1940s-themed singing contest vie to star in a show with the Victory Six Swing Band. Free admission. 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. THE TEMPEST. Lupin Theatre, Tulane University, 865-5105 ext. 2 — The cast of the play, part of the Shakespeare Festival at Tulane, stars middle and high school students from the All Things Shakespeare training program. Tickets $13. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. VERBATIM VERBOTEN. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — Actors perform staged transcripts of verbal gaffes of notable people. Tickets $7 (includes one drink). 7 p.m. Sunday. THE WEDDING SINGER. Le Petit

Théâtre du Vieux Carré, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www. lepetittheatre.com — The the-

ater hosts a production of the stage-musical adaptation of the 1998 film. Tickets $23-$60. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. THE WIZ. Anthony Bean Com-

munity Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www. anthonybeantheater.com — Irma Thomas appears as Glinda the Good Witch in the theater’s youth production of the musical. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 children. 7:15 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2:15 p.m. Sunday through Aug. 1.

ZOMBIE TOWN: A DOCUMENTARY PLAY. Le Chat Noir, 715 St.

Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — The mockumentary follows a San Francisco theater troupe that travels to the site of a zombie attack to interview survivors. Tickets $20. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 6 p.m. Sunday. Tickets $25.


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com STAGE

BURLESQUE & CABARET

review

BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www.sonesta. com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

CORDELIA WAS THE FOOL. AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre. org — The cabaret revue features a rotating slate of women performing poetry, comedy, dance, music and storytelling. Tickets $7 (includes one drink). 8 p.m. Tuesdays through July 27.

DITA VON TEESE. House of Blues,

225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www. hob.com — The burlesque artist performs with special guests from Bustout Burlesque. Tickets $28.50. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark. com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

REVEREND SPOOKY LESTRANGE & HER BILLION DOLLAR BABY DOLLS.

Dragon’s Den, 435 Esplanade Ave. — The burlesque troupe’s Church of Burlesque performs with the Swaggers featuring DJ J. Song. 10:30 p.m. Saturday.

AUDITIONS BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY.

CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The chorus holds weekly auditions for women ages 16 and older for its original show A Streetcar Named Who Dat to be performed in October. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four androids improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursdays. BLUE MONDAY STAND-UP COMEDY.

Bullets Sports Bar, 2441 A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the weekly open mic. 9 p.m. Monday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. Zeitgeist

Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken

What’s the difference between a large pizza and a musician? A large pizza can feed a family of four. That quip could serve as prologue to The Wedding Singer, the recent Broadway musical (book by Tim Herlihy and Chad Beguelin, music and lyrics by Chad Beguelin) based on the 1998 movie (also written by Herlihy). At Le Petit, director Holly-Anne Ruggiero has assembled a game cast and ignited them in a nonstop, full-blast musical fantasia so full of verve you hardly notice how thin the plot is. Basically, wrong boy meets wrong girl, or perhaps right boy meets right girl, but under the wrong circumstances. Robbie (Sal Mannino) is the lead singer for a band that mostly plays weddings. He is due to get married, but not to Julia (Kristin Witterschein), whom he loves. Julia is due to marry Glen (Keith Claverie), a rich stockbroker, apparently just for his money. There are 24 song numbers (musical direction by Jefferson Turner) with much vibrant dancing (choreography by Jeffrey Gunshol). The songs and terpsichorean delights are the show’s main attraction. Much of the dialogue and lyrics, however, are pure nonsense. One youthful lover pledges his everlasting devotion: “I want to keep you by my side, until they fill us with formaldehyde.” Robbie’s grandmother Rose (Janet Shea) is a bit racy, despite her years, performing an exuberant rap number titled “Move That Thang!” But no one is as exuberant as Holly, a 1980s Madonna-esque character who tries to put the make on Robbie. The young lovers wander in confusion, like their predecessors in A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Some are doomed, like Linda (Jessie Terrebonne), who was Robbie’s intended. Finally, the band members (Ken Thompson and Ian Hoch) are shocked to learn that Robbie has approached Glen about a job in his company’s mailroom. All these romantic shenanigans take place in a striking abstract set by Michael Kramer, under Paul Miller’s bold, evocative lighting Does love or money win out? If you want a lighthearted, tuneful answer to that eternal question, go see The Wedding Singer. — Dalt Wonk

THRU JUL

25

The Wedding Singer 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat.; 2 p.m. Sun. Le Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www.lepetittheatre.com

GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 309-7137 — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m. Show is 8 p.m. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515 — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Tarantula Arms, 209 Decatur St., 525-5525 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B.97 FM personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturdays. ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost Love

Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 4006145 — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.howlin-wolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY LIVES. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedy teams Dr. Awkward and Men Not Mars perform weekly improvisational comedy. Admission $10. 9 p.m. Thursday.

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-allages comedy competition between two teams. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. rubyfruit-jungle.com — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday. AN EXTREMELY CLASSY NIGHT OF LAUGHTER. Canal Place Cinema,

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Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Fridays.

SOPHISTICATED COMEDY. City Bar,

3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325 — The comedy show features Becky Allen, Jodi Borrello, RedBean and Jayson Guidry. Tickets $15. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

STAND UP NOLA. Boomtown Casino,

Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The casino hosts free, weekly stand-up performances with a changing lineup of comedians. 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Wednesday.

STAND-UP OPEN MIC. Sidney’s, 1674

Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 10 p.m. Saturday.

2 1

Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday. STAND-UP OPEN MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Fridays. STUPID TIME MACHINE. Avenue Pub, 1732 St. Charles Ave., 586-9243 — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

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Christ the King Lutheran Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctk-nola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday.

Prenuptual Disagreements

Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., (888) 943-4567 — The event featuring live music, stand-up comedy and a silent auction funds Stupid Time Machine’s trip to perform in the New York International Fringe Festival. Tickets $10-$25. 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

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events

listings l

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

family Tuesday 20 LONGUE VUE VISITS THE LIBRARY: LIFE AROUND OUR POND. East Bank Regional

Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — Longue Vue House and Gardens present discussions and activities focused on pond life in libraries around the city. Call 488-5488 ext. 320 or email jgick@longuevue.com. Free admission. 2 p.m.

TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 20 > 2010

Wednesday 21

40

START WITH ART. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Parents and children 18 months to 5 years old experience music and art in a museum setting to nurture rhythm, movement and self-expression. Call 539-9608, or email kbarron@ogdenmuseum.org for details. Admission $45 for the three-week session, $15 for each additional child; free for members. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 22 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

LONGUE VUE VISITS THE LIBRARY: LIFE AROUND OUR POND. Children’s Resource

Center, 913 Napoleon Ave., 5962628 — Longue Vue House and Gardens present discussions and activities focused on pond life in libraries around the city. Call 488-5488 ext. 320 or email jgick@longuevue.com. Free admission. 10:30 a.m.

Saturday 24 HEALTHY COOKING . Fassbender

Center Studio, 2508 20th St., Kenner, 468-7268; www.kenner.la.us — Children 6 and older and their parents learn to make fun, healthy meals. The program features a represen-

Be there do that tative from Ochsner Medical Center. Admission $15, $5 each additional child. 10 a.m. to noon. MUSIC FOR ALL AGES. New

Orleans Jazz National Historical Park, 916 N. Peters St., 589-4841; www.nps.gov/ jazz/index.htm — Children bring their own instruments and play with a professional brass band for an hour-long performance. 11 a.m.

PINOCCHIO. Children’s Castle,

501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 4687231 — The audience becomes the cast and crew in Frank Levy’s presentation of the classic story. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m. Saturday.

events Tuesday 20 AMERICAN RED CROSS SOUTHEAST LOUISIANA CHAPTER ANNUAL MEETING .

American Red Cross, Southeast Louisiana Chapter, 2640 Canal St., 620-3105; www.arcno. org — The agenda includes awarding Certificates of Merit and sharing stories from clients assisted by the chapter. 8 a.m to 10 a.m.

COMPREHENSIVE ZONING ORDINANCE MEETINGS: FOURTH, 12TH & 13TH DISTRICTS.

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 1222 N. Dorgenois, 821-0529; www. stlukesnola.org — The meeting explains and seeks feedback on the zoning principles to be used in the land use elements of the citywide Master Plan. 6:30 p.m. The 12th and 13th districts meet at the Behrman Center (2529 General Meyer Ave.). 6:30 p.m. COOKBOOK PUBLISHING 101 . Southern Food &

Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — Virginia Willis and Lis Ekus-Saffer teach the basics of cookbook writing and publishing. Admission $199. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

Market, 200 Broadway St., 8615898; www.marketumbrella. org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. DIVORCE AND BEYOND.

Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker helps group participants going through divorce. Call 835-5007 for details.

FORECLOSURE BUYING SEMINAR. Orleans Parish Civil

Court, 421 Loyola Ave.; www. orleanscdc.com — Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin N. Gusman hosts a seminar on buying foreclosed properties. Pre-registration is recommended. Call 523-6143 or visit www. trulyfreeforeclosurelist.com for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRENCH QUARTER BUSINESS WOMEN’S NETWORK MEETING .

Tropical Isle Original, 600 Bourbon St., 525-1689 — The organization meets. Email mwalker214@sglobal.net for details. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. ROAD HOME ASSISTANCE .

Community Center of St. Bernard, 1107 LeBeau St., Arabi, 281-2512 — Representatives are available at the center to assist homeowners with questions and concerns. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

Wednesday 21 BOSOM BUDDIES. East Jefferson

General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The breast cancer support group for survivors, friends and caregivers meets. 6:30 p.m. COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday.

LGBT YOUNG ADULT PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT

Community Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www. lgbtccno.org — The group supports 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. 7 p.m. LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org —

The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 5281944 ext. 229 for details. 12 p.m. MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409

Andry St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www. globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

NONPAC MEETING . Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its monthly meeting. 7 p.m.

ROUND TABLE LUNCHEON .

Begue’s Restaurant at the Royal Sonesta, 300 Bourbon St., 533-2278; www.beguesrestaurant.com — The monthly luncheon features a number of speakers. Call 553-2220 or email nscallan@royalsonestano.com for details. Admission is $38. Noon. TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WOMEN AND WINE ON WEDNESDAYS. Swirl, 3143 Ponce

de Leon St., 304-0635 — The monthly women’s socializing and networking event features wine specials. Visit www.womenwinewednesday.com for details. 5:30 p.m to 7 p.m.

Thursday 22 CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682; www. heycafe.biz — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to effect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 9480963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. JUST SAY YA/YA . 12 Bar, 608

Fulton St. — The nonprofit’s annual art showcase and fundraiser features food, live music, an open bar and an art sale. Visit www.yayainc.com for details. Admission starts at $250 for patrons, $30 general admission, $5 Ogden Museum members, free for Friends of YA/YA. 6:30 p.m. patron party, 7:30 p.m. general admission.

MASSAGE CANDLE MAKING PARTY. CC’s Coffeehouse,

2800 Esplanade Ave. — Nica Naturals teaches participants to make candles that can be burnt for their scent or used as a body emollient. Call (205) 9155954 or email info@nicanaturals.com for details. Admission $25. 5:30 p.m. REDISTRICTING MEETING .

Urban League of Greater New Orleans, 2322 Canal St., 620-2332; www.urbanleagueneworleans.org — The meeting provides details on the upcoming redistricting process in Louisiana. Email ashley@lano. org for details. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. RENOVATORS’ HAPPY HOUR .

Private Residence, call for details — The event features tours of historic homes with wine and light refreshments. Call 636-3399 or email sblaum@prcno.org for details. Admission $7, $5 Preservation Resource Center members. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashé Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 5699070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 23 NEW ORLEANS FLEAS MARKET & RESALE EVENT. Canine

Connection/Canine Culture, 4920 Tchoupitoulas St.; www. canineconnectionnola.com — The sale of women’s clothing, accessories, children’s items and more benefits animal rescue groups and shelters. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday-Sunday. SUMMER BUTTERFLY TEA .

Windsor Court Hotel (Le Salon), 300 Gravier St., 523-6000 — The Audubon Insectarium and the hotel present a traditional tea that includes live butterflies to view. Call 596-4773 for details. Admission starts at $17 for children, $28 adults. 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Saturday 24 ALLIGATOR LIFE . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190,

Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The program discusses one of Louisiana’s most well-known residents: the American alligator. 11 a.m. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING .

J. Singleton School, 1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 866-1163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GREATER NEW ORLEANS HOUSING FAIR . Dillard

University, Gentilly Campus, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., 283-8822; www.dillard.edu — Businesses from the housing industry will have booths at this event, which also offers seminars on topics including weatherization and buying a house. Call 8164346 for details. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rainor-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

HENRY’S 110TH ANNIVERSARY BLOCK PARTY. Henry’s Bar, 5101

Magazine St., 897-3289 — The bar celebrates its anniversary with live music, a pig roast and other food, and drinks. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. KNIT-IN AT THE MUSEUM . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — Guests knit for the museum’s Knit Your Bit Campaign and other projects. Visit www.nationalww2museum.org/education for details. Noon to 4 p.m. NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

PET ADOPTIONS & BAKE SALE .

Clearview Shopping Center, 4436 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 482-1890 — LA/SPCA volunteers facilitate pet adoptions. Visit www.la-spca.org for details. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

PILATES IN THE GARDEN .

Besthoff Sculpture Garden, City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 4882631; www.noma.org — The East Jefferson Wellness Center hosts a pilates session. Admission $5, free for NOMA and Wellness Center members. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m.

RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.


listings

Be there do that

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING SUMMER WORKDAY.

Berean Presbyterian Church, 1629 Simon Bolivar Ave. — Participants prepare materials needed for the next school year, learn more about STAIR and exchange ideas about tutoring. Call 899-0820 for details. 10 a.m. to noon. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. WINDOW EFFICIENCY WORKSHOP. Green Project,

2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org — The program shows how to make windows more energy efficient. Admission $5, free for members. 10 a.m. to noon. WORN AGAIN NOLA4. Howlin’

Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 5229653; www.howlin-wolf. com — The night of recycled fashion benefits Press Street. Email wornagainnola@ gmail.com or visit www. press-street.com for details. Admission $15 general admission, $50 patron party. 7:30 p.m patron party, 9:30 p.m. general admission.

Sunday 25 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

DRINK ’N’ DRAW. Circle Bar, 1032 St. Charles Ave., 588-2616 — The weekly event features a live model, happy hour drink specials and art instruction upon request. Call 299-9455 for details. Admission $20. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. GULF COAST OIL SPILL FUNDRAISER . The Esplanade,

1401 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 465-2161; www. shoptheesplanade.com — The Greater New Orleans Foundation and the mall host a benefit featuring live music, food, drinks and more. Admission $10, $9 with a canned food item. 6:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.

LAGNIAPPE LECTURE . National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Captain Rick Jacobs presents “Battle of France: Blitzkrieg.” Noon to 1 p.m.

LOUISIANA BOOKS 2 PRISONERS WORKNIGHT.

Nowe Miasto, 223 Jane Place; www.myspace.com/nowemiasto — The group sends books and letters to prisoners. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH 159TH ANNIVERSARY. Pilgrim

Baptist Church, 2114 Rev. Richard Wilson Drive, Kenner, 468-7848 — The church hosts a special service with a guest speaker for its anniversary. 8 a.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING . Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY SWING WITH SAZERAC SUNRISE BAND. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — Professional swing dancers provide coaching for dancers of all levels while musicians play World War II-era hits. Lessons 2 p.m. to 3 p.m., live music 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Monday 26 CBT GROUP. Counseling Solutions of Catholic Charities, 921 Aris Ave., Metairie, 835-5007 — A licensed clinical social worker facilitates a 12-week Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) group for depression. Call for details. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

Nonprofit Central, 1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofitcentral.org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Call for appliCations CENTER FOR CULTURAL INTERCHANGE . The center

seeks families to host foreign exchange students during the upcoming school year. Email ayp@cci-exchange.com or visit www.cci-exchange. com/host.htm for details. Application deadline is Aug. 31.

FINS AND GRINS PHOTO CONTEST. The Audubon

Aquarium of the Americas holds a contest to find the best pictures of aquarium exhibits and visitors. Visit www.audubonInstitute.org for details. Submissions deadline is July 31.

LOUISIANA YEAR OF THE SONG 2010 SONG CONTEST. The

contest winner wins a twoday writing session with

songwriter Jim McCormick. Visit www.nosongfest.com/ song+contest for details. Application deadline is Oct. 15. NEW ORLEANS TRADITIONAL JAZZ CAMP. The summer

music camp for adults accepts applications for professional and amateur musicians and vocalists. Visit www.neworleanstradjazzcamp.com for details.

CHICKEN SALAD $5.95

Come enjoy our new delightful Vietnamese items such as Spring rolls, Pho, Bun, Chicken Salad, Sweet & Spicy Fish along with all of your favorite CHINESE and VEGETARIAN dishes.

PROJECT HOMECOMING .

The faith-based nonprofit seeks homes still damaged (50 percent or more) by Hurricane Katrina to be rebuilt. Call 942-0444 ext. 244 for details.

LUNCH SPECIALS starting at $5.45 Daily soup or Salad with your lunch for only $1.95

words 17 POETS! LITERARY SERIES.

Gold Mine Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www. goldminesaloon.net — The 17 Poets! series hosts a weekly poetry reading. An open mic follows. Free admission. 8 p.m. Thursday.

DREW BREES. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The New Orleans Saints quarterback signs Coming Back Stronger: Unleashing the Hidden Power of Adversity. 1 p.m. Monday.

WE DELIVER • DINE IN • TAKE OUT • CATERING

3635 Prytania St.

(at Amelia)

New Orleans, LA. 70115

(504)899-5129 MARINATED BEEF $8.95

For full Menu please visit our web site: www.moonnola.com

INTERNATIONAL FICTION BOOK CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS.

Blue Cypress Books, 8126 Oak St., 352-0096 — The group discusses Margaret Drabble’s The Peppered Moth. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

JOHN SINCLAIR . Louisiana

Music Factory, 210 Decatur St., 586-1094; www.louisianamusicfactory.com — The author signs and reads from Sun Ra Interviews and Essays. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

JOSEPH & DEBRA GOULD.

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop. com — The authors sign Real Relationships Require Real Work. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

LEIGN ANNE & SEAN TUOHY. Academy of the Sacred Heart, Nims Fine Arts Center, 4301 St. Charles Ave., 899-7323 — The couple depicted in the Oscarnominated The Blind Side signs In a Heartbeat: Sharing the Power of Cheerful Giving. 7 p.m. Thursday. SEAN PAYTON . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3414 Hwy. 190, Suite 10, Mandeville, (985) 626-8884 — The New Orleans Saints coach signs Home Team: Coaching the Saints and New Orleans Back to Life. 5:30 p.m. Monday. UPTOWN FREE READERS. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The group discusses Augusten Burroughs’s Running With Scissors. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 20 > 2010

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

EvEnts

41


WE DO TAKE OUT, DELIVERY & CATERING SERVING HEALTHY, LOW CALORIE,NO MSG & MICROBIOTIC COOKING

NOW SERVING CHINESE TRADITIONAL DISHES LIKE CHINATOWN MENU FREE EGG ROLL SERVED WITH THE PURCHASE OF MAI TAI DRINK CHINESE BEER SPECIAL IS $2 EACH FOR THE MONTH OF JULY.

3009 Magazine St. Uptown • 891.8280 SUN - THURS 11 AM - 10 PM • FRI & SAT - 11 AM - 11 PM

WWW.JUNGSGOLDENDRAGON2.COM

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JULY 20 > 2010

sammy ’s

42

steak & lobster blackened

We Deliver Chinese Restaurant

Chinese Food to Dine-In and Take Out

We Serve Brown Rice

Place your order by phone, it will be ready when you arrive.

1116 Louisiana Ave. New Orleans, LA 70115 (Corner of Louisiana Ave & Magazine St by Block Buster)

504-899-8005

www.greenteano.com Mon-Thurs 11am-10pm Fri & Sat 11am-11pm Sunday 12noon-10pm

catfish & shrimp broiled stuffed

shrimp

crawfish pie gumbo

jambalaya

Come Try Our

Daciialyls! Spe

627 Bourbon St. | 525-8442


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <DistilleD Dining > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >Bartenders, drinks authors, liquor marketers and cocktail enthusiasts gather in New Orleans this week for tales of the cocktail, < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < puttINg < < < < < < < <everythINg < < < < < < < < < <oN < < <the < < < table < < < < < < < < < < < < < <and as part of the annual celebration of all things distilled, many will take a seat for special Spirited Dinners on Thursday, July 22. Local chefs work with guests from the liquor business during these festive meals, which feature a different cocktail pairing At Iris, chef Ian Schnoebelen is with each course. This year’s line-up includes 25 restaurants, serving more non-Gulf fish such and from Thursday to Saturday, July 24, five restaurants also will as wild salmon. host Spirited Luncheons. Reservations are required. Menus and photo BY ChERYL GERBER details are online at www.talesofthecocktail.com.

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B

Go Fish

I

Ritz foR less

As restaurants roll out summer dining specials, there’s an eye-popping value on offer at M Bistro, the revamped flagship restaurant at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel (921 Canal St., 670-2828; www.ritzcarlton.com/neworleans). On weekdays this summer you can order a two-course lunch for $10. The appetizer and entree choices change weekly and include selections from chef Matt Murphy’s regular lunch menu.

five 5 IN

FiVe Places For Jerk cHicken

coco Hut

2515 Bayou road, 945-8788

Magnificent spice contributes to perhaps the hottest jerk chicken in town.

Boswell’s JaMaican grill 3521 tulane ave., 482-6600

The house specialty is a staple in the bargain daily lunch buffet.

Mondo

900 HarriSon ave., 224-2633 www.mondoneworleans.com

Try jerk chicken thighs with pineapple salsa as a bar snack.

Juan’s Flying Burrito

2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S. Carrollton ave., 486-9950 www.juansflyingburrito.com

Get jerk chicken over nachos or wrapped in a burrito.

Jackson

1910 Magazine St., 522-5766 www.jacksonnola.net

Half a jerk-style chicken comes with a mountain of truffle fries.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Regis Bouvier Marsannay Rose

Burgundy, France / $18-$24 retail This delightful rosé produced in the Cotes du Nuit’s furthermost appellation, Marsannay, is made from the region’s only permitted red grape, Pinot Noir. While the rosés from the Loire and the south of France rake in most of the attention, this bottling can hold its own as a gentle quaffing wine, but is sturdy enough to stand up to many different foods. Crisp and refreshing, the wine offers floral notes and delicate red berry aromas leading into strawberry, tea, orange and watermelon flavors with a lengthy, acid-balanced finish. Chill and serve with barbecue, grilled fish, salads, desserts, Asian cuisines and spicy dishes. Buy it at: The Wine Seller, Bacchanal and Acquistapace’s Covington Supermarket. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

of my favorites. I love catching it when I go out on charters. But a lot of customers just don’t know about it, so it’s up to us to educate our (wait staff) and our customers too.” Seafood suppliers say restaurants’ traditional Gulf fish — like drum, sheepshead and snapper — are still out there. But with so many fishermen working on cleanup efforts instead of fishing and with others idled by fishing area closures, some say the supply chain is being twisted out of recognition. Buyers take what is available, and that increasingly means less-common species from the Gulf and elsewhere. “We want to project a positive image about our own seafood, but on the reverse side the supply is extremely limited,” says Cliff Hall, co-owner of seafood distributor New Orleans Fish House. “Restaurants are mixing and matching to make sure they get enough. It would be difficult to target any one fish and say that’s what you’re going to serve now.” But these difficulties aren’t universal. Some supNew orleaNs meNus mIx thINgs up as the pliers say they are flush with fish and some larger Bp dIsaster shuffles the supply chaIN. restaurant companies have had little trouble securing B y I a N m c N u lt y consistent supply for any local seafood besides oysters. t’s common for New Orleans menus to offer the Haley Bitterman, executive chef for the Ralph Brennan “Gulf fish of the day,” but these days the fish Restaurant Group, which includes the seafood-focused in question might be much less familiar than Red Fish Grill, says she’s had no finfish supply issues, and a spokeswoman for Dickie Brennan & Co. reports before. While the BP disaster has impacted Gulf oysters most the same experience. “The only seafood that’s been challenged is oysters,” severely, other Louisiana fisheries also are reeling from changes in supply and demand and one result is that says Harlon Pearce Jr., owner of the Kenner-based distributor Harlon’s LA Fish and chairman of the Louisiana local diners are finding different finfish on the menu. “Things have definitely changed,” says Ian Seafood Promotion & Marketing Board. “We have Schnoebelen, chef at the French Quarter restaurant Iris. plenty of fish. We just got another thousand pounds “I used to have drum, speckled trout, snapper. But now of drum. Shrimp is actually dropping in price now. We I’m using wild salmon and halibut from the Pacific and thought we’d be challenged on crabmeat but no one has run out yet.” some East Coast fish.” Suppliers and restaurateurs, however, do share conAt Patois, chef Aaron Burgau also has been serving more West Coast fish, like black cod, as well as less- cern for pompano, the robustly-flavored Gulf fish cencommon Gulf fish, like tripletail, which is similar in tral to traditional French Creole menus. While much of taste and texture to grouper. While tripletail is a prized the pompano served here today is caught around the catch for sport fishermen, it has been a rarity on local Florida Keys, by August fishermen usually begin taking menus. It was the daily fish recently at the Italian Barrel it near Louisiana’s Chandeleur Islands, an area currently and at the Latin-style seafood restaurant RioMar, and closed to fishing by the BP disaster. “It’s a day-to-day issue for us,” says Katy Casbarian, at Brigtsen’s Restaurant it now often alternates with vice president of the old-line Arnaud’s Restaurant, triggerfish, another popular Gulf sport fish. “These fish have always been in our mix to some which prepares pompano four ways. “We’ve been extent but now we’re having to use a lot more of it,” going with the flow, but we are now talking about says chef Frank Brigtsen. “Triggerfish is actually one what we’ll do if we can’t get pompano.”

43


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Come join the fun as you help raise money for your American Cancer Society!

ZUMBA is a Latin-dance based fitness phenomenon that has been sweeping the nation. It’s a party all by itself and we’re throwing a BIG ONE!

Saturday, July 31, 2010 @ Miley Playground Gym

6716 W. Metairie Ave. • Metairie

1st Session: 9am-12noon 2nd Session: 1pm-4pm

$20 -1 session / $30 - both sessions $75 Business Space to showcase your business Email Lynn Weber at Lynn.Weber@cancer.org

Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CON� TEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St.,

525-4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www. greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www.one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette. Reservations recommended. Lunch Thu.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

44

BAR & GRILL THE CLUBHOUSE BAR & GRILL —

4617 Sanford St., Metairie, 8835905 — Clubhouse offers burgers and sandwiches. The black and blue burger is stuffed with blue cheese and blackened on the grill. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

JIGGERS — 1645 Veterans Memori-

al Blvd., Metaire, 828-3555 — Enjoy daily specials like red and beans rice with a pork chop on Mondays or order burgers, salads and wraps. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501 Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing

lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224 Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

THE RUBY SLIPPER CAFE — 139

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Fresh Louisiana boudin made with pork, rice and seasonings is a specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — This French Quarter brewhouse serves baked oysters, salads and crabcakes stand alongside grilled strip steaks, crispy duck and tender brewhouse ribs. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE ELIZABETH’S

RESTAURANT

601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www. elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LAFITTE’S CAFE — 6325 Elysian Fields Ave., 284-7878; www.lafittescafe.com — Lafitte’s serves wraps, burgers and patty melts, salads, sandwiches and baked potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening.

N. Cortez St., 309-5531; www. therubyslippercafe.net — This casual cafe offers breakfast options such as two eggs with sausage or applewood-smoke bacon or barbecued shrimp and grits. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Fri., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE — 5004 Pryta-

nia St., 899-4737; www.stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave.,

287-0877 — Located in Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves coffee drinks and a menu of soups, salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates, plus a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 702 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 865-1428; wwww.chinaorchidneworleans.com — China Orchid serves a wide array of dishes including soups, fried rice, egg foo young, lo mein and more. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. Ask for the menu of more authentic dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carroll-

ton Ave., 482-3935 — The menu offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and din-


Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafay-

ette St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www.threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA — 600 N. Causeway Approach.,

Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen. com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE & DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8875656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SAL’S SNO-BALL STAND — 1823

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter

St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop. com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro.com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer

Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER DOT’S DINER — 2239 Willliams

Blvd., Kenner, 441-5600; 4150 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 833-9349; 6633 Airline Drive, Metairie, 7340301; 10701 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 738-9678; 12179 Hwy. 90, Luling, (985) 785-6836 — Burgers, eggs with bacon, grits and biscuits, fruit pies and daily specials are the pillars of Dot’s menu. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles Ave., 522-8198 — Steve’s serves breakfast until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908

Magazine St., 891-8495; www. martiniquebistro.com — Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GOURMET TO GO BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge

Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers Indian dishes including chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable

dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Cuban Platters BBQ | Seafood Mexican

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 8366859 — The menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DAILY SPECIALS

I DELIVER!

COUNTRY FLAME

ITALIAN ANDREA’S NORTHERN ITALIAN SEAFOOD RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

620 IBERVILLE STREET • 522.1138 OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL 8:30PM FRI & SAT ‘TIL 9:30 PM

19th St., Metairie, 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout served with lump crabmeat in a lemon-cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 8913644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. There are more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for large parties. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, including sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St.,

581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$

985/626-4476

R TF

985/345-6789

PO’BOYS!

IED

EN ICKrica! H e C Am in

CAFE DIBLASI — 1801 Stumpf Blvd.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

600 N. Causeway, Mandeville 2100 N. Morrison, Hammond

FOR

2426; www.bacco.com — Bacco blends Italian and contemporary Creole cuisine. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Now open 7 days a week in Mandeville LUNCH : Mon - Fri 11-2pm DiNNER: Mon -Thu 5-930pm Fri & Sat 5-10pm · Sun 1130a - 930p

PARKWAY

BACCO — 310 Chartres St., 522-

Gretna, 361-3106; www.cafediblasi.com — Try pan-fried veal topped with lump crabmeat and lemon cream sauce or a traditional veal shank osso buco. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$



Stay for a Bite

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

S BE

2401 St. Ann Street, New Orleans, LA 70119 Monday-Saturday 11am-3pm 504-822-9503

(504)

482-3047

NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

89

$

*

(reg. $132)

includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 08/01/10

DR. GLENN SCHMIDT • DR. MITCHELL PIERCE DR. STEPHEN DELAHOUSSAYE FAMILY DENTISTRY Call For An Appointment

UPTOWN KENNER

Now available at 2 locations!

8025 Maple St. @ Carrollton · 861-9044 www.uptownsmiles.com 1942 Williams Blvd., Suite 8 · 469-9648 www.kennersmiles.com

Thursdays at Twilight Garden Concert Series

THIS WEEK’S PERFORMANCE

Gay Men’s Chorus JULY 22 @ the Pavilion of Two Sisters NEW ORLEANS BOTANICAL GARDEN CITY PARK

Gates Open 5PM-8PM · Performance 6PM

Adults = $8 / Children 5-12 = $4 Children 4 & Under = FREE

For more information call

(504) 483-9488

www.neworleanscitypark.com

Gott Gourmet Cafe uses the fresh e s

t our get y o Dogs a g Chica Tue-Fri 11am-9pm

Sat-Sun 8am-5pm Weekend Breakfast Sat-Sun

3100 Magazine St. 504-373-6579 www.gottgourmetcafe.com www.go

t i ngredients available for our home mad e

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www. mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

Metairie Road, Metairie, 666-1823 — This 50-year-old business offers an assortment of flavored sno-balls, soft-serve ice cream, malts, banana splits or ice cream cones dipped in chocolate. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241

$5.00 Mojitos & $5.00 Margaritas

m ake all of our signature recipes daily.

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Bringing you quality, consistency and value since 1971.

meats t o

ner daily. Credit cards. $$

Stop by for a beverage

ces and d ressings, sauces

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

45


OUT2EAT LATIN AMERICAN LA MACARENA PUPSERIA & LATIN CAFE — 8120 Hampson St., 862-5252 — Try the

CATERING

COMBO SPECIAL

Sandwich Platter House Salad + Assorted Dessert Platter $11.85 per person

PLACE ST. CHARLES 201 ST. CHARLES AVE.

Mon-Fri 7am-2pm • Free Delivery 522-8198 • www.steves-diner.com

OR

MI

YAKONLI DER ON NE OLA @ .CO M

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

starting from $5.50

LUNCH:sun-fri 11am-2:30pm DINNER: mon-thurs 5pm-10pm fri 5pm-10:30pm SATURDAY 3:30pm-10:30pm SUNDAY 12 noon-10:30pm 1403 st. charles ave. new orleans 504.410.9997 www.japanesebistro.com security guard on duty

namesake Salvadoran pupusas, stuffed cornmeal disks, or Mexican favorites. Latin-style brunch is served on weekends. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Cash only. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT — 901

Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www. cafeatchafalaya.com — Contemporary Creole cooking includes shrimp and grits with head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 5860972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580;

www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark. com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitou-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

las St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

46

LOVE OUR BRUNCH?

Check out our dinners Hookin’ Seafood Specials

601 Gallier & Chartres St. · 944-9272 www.elizabeths-restaurant.com

0077 — Dine indoors or out at this comfortable Southwestern cafe. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMATILLO’S — 437 Esplanade Ave., 945-9997 — Enjoy combinations like Tomatillo’s Fiesta, which includes a taco, tamale and enchilada served with rice and beans. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-

8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 3104999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www.snugjazz.com — Try traditional Creole and Cajun fare such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD

587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St.,

861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-

1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, Cuban sandwiches and charbroiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Maga-

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANTS ACCORDING TO GAMBIT READERS

SANTE FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Magazine

595-3211; www.maggieritas.com — Mexican favorites include sizzling fajita platters, quesdillas, enchiladas and a menu of margaritas. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Magazine Location

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St.,

CARLOS MENCIA’S MAGGIE RITAS MEXICAN BAR & GRILL — 200 Magazine St.,

1501 Metairie Rd 834.9773 3218 Magazine St. 894.1233 2020 Veterans Blvd 837.9777 Lakeside Shopping Center 830.7333

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN

EST 1994

cooking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

zine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9550; www.juansflyingburrito. com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired

St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe. com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, honey-baked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT 7 BAR — 3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www.liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$ MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W. Espla-

nade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 838-0022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA

served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ POMPEII PIZZERIA — 1068 Magazine St.,

708-4213; www.pompeiipizzeria.com — The barbecue bacon cheeseburger pizza features ground beef, applewoodsmoked bacon, onions and smoky barbecue sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Wed.Mon. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-1414; 817

W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 895-7272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE RESTAURANT — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA — 4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 4861600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & POBOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368 Maga-

zine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www.mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves old favorites and original po-boys. The Peacemaker is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8350916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, poboys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125

Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave.,

943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a training-table feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700

Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www.lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MARIGNY BRASSERIE — 640 Frenchmen

St., 945-4472; www.marignybrasserie. com — Marigny Brasserie serves fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-

1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecan-crusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL WILLIE MAE’S SCOTCH HOUSE — 2401

St. Ann St., 822-9503 — Willie Mae Seaton’s landmark restaurant is run by her granddaughter and serves her renowned fried chicken. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $$

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAKHOUSE — 3633

Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 8883600; www.ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Peters

St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant. com — Galvez offers tapas, paella, a Spanish-accented bouillabaisse, grilled Black Angus sirloin, roasted chicken and more. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

MIMI’S IN THE MARIGNY — 2601 Royal

St., 872-9868 — Enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania St.,

899-5129; www.moonnola.com — There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhat-

tan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.phonola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — Enjoy beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS

Real Estate For Rent &

Employment Special Rates

2 WEEKS GET 1 WEEK

BUY

FREE Applies to line ad only.

EMPLOYMENT $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com

AGENTS & SALES HIRING ASAP!

RS&B IS HIRING!. $25/HR. Sales/ Cust Serv exp reqd & transp a plus. Submit resume to: retailshopsofla@ aol.com

CHILDCARE FT NANNIES NEEDED

All over the city. $12 -$16/hr. Call Fleur de Lis Nannies, 504-722-5752

DRIVERS/DELIVERY

SEASONAL TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Bees & honey, 12 positions; Bee Force, Danbury, TX; 3 mths exp req w/ references; clean driver’s license; tools, equipment & housing provided free. Trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guarantee from 7/16/10-11/20/10. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX480472.

TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Hay, grain & livestock, 4 positions; Cowote Dairy, Saragosa, TX; 3 mths exp req w/references; clean driver’s license; tools, equipment & housing provided free. Trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78/hr; 3/4 work period guarantee from8/22/10 6/21/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX8118452.

DRIVERS: $$ BONUSES $$

& Have a Home Life! Free Heallth Ins & Benefits. CDL-A w/ Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr. TT Exp. Required. 888-380-5516

MARINE DECKHANDS!

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Wed. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m. Thurs. 8:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. /Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com Advertise in

market PLACE

CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place an ad in The

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

Free Ads: Private party ads for merchan-

dise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thursday @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wednesday @ 5 p.m. NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

MODELING/ACTING

CANON

HOSPICE Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

Bartenders needed

PT for convention work & bartending. Call 504-296-5229.

MUSIC/MUSICIANS LA RED HOT RECORDS

Graphics/web, Sales, Marketing, Accounting jobs, $20-50K. Email resume to: louisianaredhotrecords@gmail.com

RETAIL

• Sales • New Orleans, Westbank, Northshore

Looking For A Great FT/PT Career Opportunity? Mattress Direct is seeking highly motivated, creative individuals with great people skills to join the Gulf Souths Largest Mattress Retailer. Benefits include flexible schedule, training pay, health, dental, 401k and employee disc. Send resume to careers @mdserta.com, fax 888.867.5852 or call 1.888. MD SERTA for more info.

OIL SPILL RESPONSE HOW

WILL

YOU

HELP?

Here are some suggestions on how you can help relief efforts for the Gulf Horizon Oil Spill:

Volunteer Sierra Club Delta Chapter http://www.action.sierraclub.org/oil_spill_ cleanup

National Audubon Society http://www.audubon.org/

Volunteer Louisiana http://www.volunteerlouisiana.gov/

Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/oilspill

National Wildlife Federation http://www.nwf.org/wildlife/wildlife-conservation/threats-to-wildlife/oil-spill.aspx

www.emergency.louisiana.gov www.oilspillvolunteers.com

http://www.crcl.org/

Donate To offer a vessel for service, submit alternative response technology/services/products:

CALL 281-366-5511 OR EMAIL HORIZONSUPPORT@OEGLLC.COM.

Matter of Trust seeks hair and nylon donations to help the booms absorb oil. http://www.matteroftrust.org/

report:

BP volunteer hotline, or report oil on shore: 1-866-448-5816 Report oiled wildlife: (866) 557-1401 Discuss spill-related damage: (800) 440-0858

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR BARISTA/COUNTER PERSON

Needed for gelato shop. Excellent for college students, FT&PT avail. Apply in person @ Brocato, 214 N. Carrollton, NOLA 70119

GO TO OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE UPDATES ON HOW TO HELP: http://bestofneworleans.com/oilspill.html

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

The Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

Ingram Barge Co., the leader in the Marine Industry, is accepting applications on-line at www.ingrambarge. com. Applicants can also apply at your local Workforce Development Center. Must have a valid driver’s license and H.S. diploma or GED required. Three years heavy labor work experience (i.e farming, logging, construction, etc.) preferred. Generous daily wage, excellent benefit package (401 & Retirement Plan, Health, dental, Vision, Life, AD & D, etc. Schedules may vary & opportunities for advancement. EOE, M/F/V

VOLUNTEER

47


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K 922-24 Dauphine $900K Great views of City Park & 4 unit French Quarter multiperfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 family. 3457 sqft total. Great Quarter location! Parking. br/1.5 ba totally renov. postKatrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

829 St. Roch Ave. $149K 1 bdrm, 1 ba, furn kit incl dishwasher, w/d, cen a/h, shed, rear yard. Excellent condition. Motivated seller!

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

LAKEVIEW

SLIDELL

6944 Pontchartrain Blvd. Listed for $348,000. 4 bdrm, 2.5 ba charming Lakeview raised cottage. Colleen Mooney, agent 504-236-7765 Vallon Real Estate 504-486-5437

FRENCH QUARTER

faubourg st. john

57345 Oak Ave • $125,000 Reduced, 2085 sq ft 3 bedroom home New Carpet, Refreshed kitchen Large rooms, Exposed wood beams Lisa B Simms-Hayles Broker MaRioN B REaL EStatE iNC www.marionb.com • 985-643-4452

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

2612 Esplanade Avenue $349k 3/2 with 2,300 sf renov; huge loftlike rooms w/ high ceils & all the New Orleans charm you’d expect. Bonus garage w/ remote entry! Colette Meister Re/Max Complete 504-220-1762 cell

RIVERBEND

TCHOUPITOULAS

MID-CITY

GENTILLY

MID-CITY

WESTBANK

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. • RIVER VIEW 34K sq. ft. of land. 20K sq. ft. of building. Prkg on St. James. Bounded by Celeste, St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters Streets. Asking Price:$1,200,000 Call Cassandra Sharpe/Broker Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-568-1252 • c: 460-7829

701 N. Salcedo Street, $58,000 Renovated 2BR/2BA Granite counters, custom cabinets Offstreet parking Todd Neal Fletcher Ranger Realty 504.329.4343

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

2904 St Peter Street, $49,000 Renovated 2BR/2BA, wood floors Large kitchen, Granite counters, Ceramic floors Todd Neal Fletcher Ranger Realty 504.329.4343

2429 Bristol Place, New Orleans Cute starter home for $115,000 2BR/1.5BA, Carport, Open living, dining, den, Refreshed kitchen and bath Todd Neal Fletcher Ranger Realty 504.329.4343

new price

FANTASTIC LOCATION Riverbend Victorian Camelback 1028 Joliet, close to river & Oak St., 3br, 2 ba, many original architectural details, off st parking, new roof, wood floors, high ceilings. $269,000 STO Louis Lederman • Prudential Gardner 504-874-3195

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

Find Your PERFECT FIT At

48

Specials forSUMMER

3900 NORTH HULLEN • METAIRIE, LA 70002 WWW.3900NHULLEN.COM

Bring this ad to any of the listed communities and receive

2 Weeks FREE rent! Walnut Creek

1 Bedroom $635 2 Bedroom $795

Sawmill Creek

1 Bedroom $699 2 Bedroom $875

in HOT

er Kenn East

Lafreniere

ll 65 rmim a g s $6 u S 770 droo

1 Bedroom $683 3 Bedroom $975

Park Oaks

1 Be rooms $ d 2 Be

1 Bedroom $650

Hickory Creek

1 Bedroom $775 2 Bedroom $860

Windmill South Expires 7/16/10. Prices subject to change based on availability.

1 Bedroom $625 2 Bedroom $800

Offering over 8,500 apartment homes.

Three story, beautiful 6-bedroom. 5.5 baths Chateau-like home, 5,214 sq.ft. The best of everything. Main 1st floor Kitchen, all professional lines Sub-Zero/Viking/, granite counter tops. Second floor kitchen/designer appliances, second floor great den. Master bedroom on first floor w/Jacuzzi tub. Salt water pool with outside Jacuzzi, outside bathrooms. Just minutes from the Causeway and Lakeside Shopping Center.

Offered At: $695,000 Priced under current appraisal Polly Eagan gri, crs - Agent broker licensed in state of la

504-862-0100 • pollyeagan@aol.com KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY New Orleans 8601 Leake Ave. New Orleans, LA 70118-USA

Each OfficE indEpEndEntly OwnEd and OpEratEd


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS General real estate

real estate for sale

3108 CLEARY AVE CLEARY BUILDING

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http:// www.RealRentals.com

General real estate

Southern Spirit REALTY, LLC

Office space, 460 sf 1/2 bath, renov, CCTV, 24 hr access, parking in front, side & rear. $460/mo. 504-250-7676

UPTOWN

CommerCial rentals

would like to welcome

Rodtrese Brickley

GARDEN DISTRICT

Real Estate Professional

Serving the entire

New Orleans metropolitan area

504-644-8928

1, 2 & 3 ROOM OFFICES STARTING AT $500

WAREHOUSE SPACE STARTING AT

Call 899-RENT

899-RENT

INCLUDING UTILITIES

rodtresebrickley@ymail.com Bywater ELEGANCE IN THE BYWATER

Stunning juxtiposition of architectural integrity & soignee panache. 2000’ 2- 3 bdrms, 2 ba, garden room, steps to river. Offers staring at $299,000. 626 Pauline St. 504-914-5606.

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

CommerCial ProPerties RIVER VIEW - DOWNTOWN

$750 Call

1730 Tchoupitoulas St. 34K sq.ft of land, 20K sq.ft of bldg. Pkng on St. James, Tchoupitoulas & S. Peters. Asking $1,200,000. Call Cassandra Sharpe Real Estate, Inc. 504-5681252, cell 460-7829. See our ad in todays RE showcase!

MEET THE WHO’S WHO IN THE APARTMENT INDUSTRY!

Wine & Cheese Social:

Thursday, July 29th FREE 4:30pm RSVP to Kathy 504-837-2700 HBA- 2424 N Arnoult Rd • Metairie, LA 70001

LIGHTING Check out ANTIQUES & our Mandeville Location FURNITURE 985-249-7145 504-522-9485

Exterior Designs

BEVERLY KATZ | LANDSCAPE DESIGNER 866-0276 www.exteriordesignsbev.com

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT GROUP

& METRO WIDE APARTMENTS 304-HOUSe (4687) • www.BrunoInc.com

1371 Magazine St 3/2 LGD Camelback

$1500

1207 Jackson Ave 1/1 Aquatic Garden

$750

1572 Magazine St 1/1 Lower Garden Dist.

$700

Sustainable Property Development URBAN DEVELOPMENT • REAL ESTATE CONSULTING

504.274.1930 www.JCHDevelopment.com

Sterling Financial ServiceS, llc

PARTNERSHIP IN PROTECTION Commercial Services

Mortgage Rates are still LOW!!!

137 Canvasback Drive, St. Rose, LA 70087

3.875%

15 year fixed

Call Michael Schenck www.sterlingrates.com

BEECHGROVE & CLAIBORNE HOMES

Tammy Schindler

No Upfront Fees, Pre-Approval in Minutes!

Rates effective 7/14/2010 and subject to change without notice.

Agnes Cardinale, Sales Executive

985-370-7213

BRENT COUTURE

MERIDIEN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 504-566-1777

504- 373-5581

804 Sherry Lane Westwego, LA 70094 Managed by NDC Real Estate Management

Jodie Luther 504-782-0746 2321 North Arnoult Rd., Metairie, La 70001 www.southlandplumbingsupply.com

$39,900 - $79,900

CONDOS! TOTAL MONTHLY: $380-$700 NO DOWN PAYMENT! Free Credit Restoration!

ALL UNITS LESS THAN $700 PER MONTH

Ask about the $24 million park!

888-207-1711

GIONNE JOURDAN (856) 596-3008 GJOURDAN.MDC@COX.NET

For more Information or to apply contact: Multifamily Council Director, Kathy Barthelemy (504) 837-2700 or kathy@home-builders.org www.mfcno.com Affiliated with

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

4.112% APR

Interest rate quoted assumes a minimum loan amount of $200,000.

504-889-0737

(504) 486-5846

49


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS HaraHan/river ridge

Old Metairie

1324 HICKORY

$300 OFF 1ST MONTH’S RENT - OLD METAIRIE SECRET

2 BR, 1 BA townhouse, furn kit, w/d hkps, patio, O/A, $700/mo. Call 650-8778

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ liv rm sep Din, King Master, no Pets, no Sect 8, $699 & $824 • 504-236-5777

FABULOUS RENOV 4BR/2BA

Quiet cul-de-sac, walk to levee, new hdwd/cer flrs, recess lighting, srnd snd, sec sys, grt bkyd. Never flooded. Zone X, roof 4 yrs. $1600/ mo or $194,900 For Sale. Call Sylvia 415-6501

METAIRIE TOWERS

RIVER RIDGE NR LEVEE

Rent or Lease or Lease to Buy, 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, jacuzzi, Elec & TV incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service. $1050/mo - 914-882-1212

Newly renov 4 plx. 2 br, 1 & 1/2 ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd. No pets. Quiet area suits retired person. $725/mo, refs & dep. 504737-2089.

1 br, liv area, 1.5 baths, furn kit, 1st flr, utilities & cable included. No pets. POOL. $900/mo. 833-0915.

METAIRIE TOWERS

algiers POint HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

Kenner NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

Private rm w/bath & kit. Utilities paid, $500/mo. & 3 brm/1 bath house, $900. 504-737-2068

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

Bywater 931 GALLIER ST

1/2 dbl, 2br, lr, dr, furn kit, w/d, side yd, pets ok/ fee, wtr pd, effct heating/ cooling, sec installed. $950+lse. 504-908-5210

Metairie 1 BR CONDO - $675

CarrOlltOn

w/d inside condo, kit, LR, dinette, lrg ba, lrge w/in clst, pool, sm blcny, no pets. 504/885-4304, 914-1705, 473-4304

3 BR SHOTGUN DBL

C-a/h, wd flrs, furn kit, hkps, shed, nr st car, fncd bkyd, no smkrs/pets. $850+dep. 504-858-5389, 491-4056

A HIDDEN GEM

Chic seclusion in the heart of Metairie. All new 1 br fr $675 & 1 br + study fr $795. Furn corp avail. 780-1706 or 388-9972. www.orrislaneapts.com

3949 Constance

3bd, 1ba, cen AC/H, new floors, appl., $1300/mo. 452-2356

City ParK/BayOu st. JOHn

FOR RENT OR SALE

2511 Metairie Lawn. 2BR/2BA, w/d, pool, security. Rent $1,000/mo. Sale $149,000. Call 427-1087

LUXURY APTS

2 BR, 1 1/2BA, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $750/mo. 504-443-2280

Quiet Condo

1 BR, 1 ba, liv rm, din rm, w/d, gated comm.,covered parking, water/elec. included! Pool/courtyard. $800/ month. Call 504-982-0759

2 BLKS TO CITY PARK. 1/2 dbl. Liv rm, din rm, 2 br, kit, no frig, w/d hkps, cen a/h, drapes, closets, wd flrs. No dogs. $980/mo. 482-1733.

4704 - A ST. PETER St.

Nr Delgado, all new 1 BR, kit, lr, backrm, w/d/fridge, o/s pkng. $875/ mo includes wtr & elec. pd. 504-3829477, Mark.

848 ROOSEVELT PLACE

1 br, 1 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, a/h window units, ceil fans, hdwd flrs, w/d hkps. $700/mo. 899-7657.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

French Quarter Realty

50

880 CITY PARK AVE

Overlooks City Park. Lg 1 br, furn kit, hi ceil, wd flrs, cen a/h, wtr/gas/trsh pick-up pd. $850/mo, dep. 324-6662.

NEW CONSTRUCTION!

516 David St, 3BR, 2BA, 12” ceils, ca/h, 1467 sf, new appls incl w/d, granite. 1 blk to bus/st car, walk to City Pk. $1500-$1800. 504-669-7049

dOwntOwn Furnished 1 Bdrm/1Bath

Furnished Condo in Warehouse District. Secure building, top floor. Rent includes utilities, pool, gym, cable, internet, has W/D, stainless steel appliances, central heat/air. Close to French Quarter, parade route, streetcar. Loft with desk. Ideal for students, professors. Call Bonnie at Soniat Realty 504-488-8988 or 504-220-1022. $1700, negotiable.

eastern new Orleans 4619 BUNDY RD

Single brick home, 3BR, 2 baths, patio, fenced yard, off st prkg,off Chef Menteur Hwy. $950+dep. 504-433-9394

FrenCH Quarter/ FauBOurg Marigny 1103 Royal St

Unit A, 1B/1B, cen A/H, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water included. Furnished. $1700/month. Call for appt 504952-3131

1103 Royal St.

#B, TH style guest hse. 2b/2b, pat/ bal, CA/H wd/tile fls, water incl, pking, furn/unfurn. $2,000/mo. Appt 504-952-3131

1835 BURGUNDY - LWR Studio Studio, wd/cer flrs, Alcove kit, clst, a/c, fans, w/d on premises, no pets, low cost utils, $575+dep+lse. 504908-5210

2205 DAUPHINE ST

Walk to Qtr. 2 br, 2 ba, fully equip kit, fenc patio. $1050/mo, wtr & garbage pd. w/d hkups, Lse/refs. 985-510-0231.

514 MADISON ST/ $1000

1st flr off Decatur. Two 1 br, 1 ba, liv, din area, kit, wd flrs, coin w/d. Eddie 861-4561. Grady Harper Inc

504-949-5400 FQ,loft bd,great loc,hi ceil,ctyd $975 St. car Line, Pool, Pkng, Gym $800 Hi Ceils,Lg Balc,Prkng,Exc Loc $1995 Hdwd Flrs, Ctyd, Exc Loc $850 Pkng,Pvt Balcs,Ingnd Pool $2200 furnished w/wifi, tile floors $950 Lotsofwindows,newcarpet,crtyrd$1050 furnished,courtyard w/d on site $950 spacious apt in great area! $900 furn,Utils Cable/WiFi included $1950 recently updated, wtr included $950 carriage house w/ crtyrd $995 Util included, furn., great loc! $950 Commerical, 750 sqft $2000 spacious, hi ceils, 2 small side balcs $800 new kitch&bath,great location $1500 Fully furnished apt.w/d on site $1450 condoindesirableblock,HUGEcrtyrd!$1700 Grndflraptw/beautcommoncrtyrd!$1700 Furnished, fab location $950 nice lay out,great loc,water paid $950 wd flrs, central air, water paid $950 d/w, great loc, water paid $950 street balc,prkng,prime loc $1800 Newly renov, in nice area $650

Lux fully furn 1 br, 1.5 ba, lr w/queen sleeper, kit, mahogany flrs, 2nd flr balc, w/d. $2000/mo + dep. 504-2365757 or 504-236-7060. fqrental.com.

FRENCH QUARTER APTS

Next to Rouses Grocery Store, furn/ unfurn, studio/1 BR, $650-$1200. Call 504-919-3426 or 504-581-6350.

FRENCH QUARTER CHARM

1226 Chartres. 1 bdrm apt, $900/mo. Carpet, pool, laundry room, security gate. No pets. Mike, 919-4583.

NEW RENTAL

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $600 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

gentilly INCREDIBLE APT

2 brm,/1 bath in Gentilly. Water pd. Furn kit. Cats Ok, O/S pkng,t Call Bobby. $875. Call 944-5076 or 610-4187.

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+utils • 504-283-8450

laKeview/laKesHOre 6029 BELLAIRE - $1100

Renov, cute 3 br, 2 ba, liv, eat-in kit,w/ gas appls & granite, alarm, drive. Grady Harper Inc, 861-4551.

laKeFrOnt LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $975/mo. 504/495-6044

Mid City 121 1/2 N. CLARK ST.

1 BDRM - all appl, w/d hkps, lg clos., wtr pd. Walk to streetcar. 504-343-6383 or 985-226-0340. $650 lse +dep.

2 BDRM BRICK DOUBLE

504.949.5400

Samara D. Poché 504.319.6226 sam@ fqr.com

www. frenchquarterrealty.com

French Quarter realty’S 2009 toP ProDucer

RENTALS 2054 Royal 1/1 $900 210 ChaRtRes 3B 1/1 $925 829 URsUlines #1 1/1 $950 829 URsUlines #5 1/1 $1050 1016 elysian fields 2/1 $1200 1428 ChaRtRes 2/1 $1200 210 ChaRtRes 3e 2/1 $1450 921 ChaRtRes #9 2/1.5 $1700 712 st PhiliP 1/1 $1700 1028 Bienville 2/1 $2000

1711 Second St

A UNIVERSITY AREA

1726 FOUCHER

CARROLLTON AVENUE

1837 PINE

GREAT EFFICIENCY!

2 BDRMS, 1 BATH APT

NEAR AUDUBON PARK

1 blk to St. Charles, Renov’t 3rd fl loft, lots of windows, fur kit, w/d on site $650. 895-4726 or 261-7611. Upstairs, 1 bedroom, liv rm, din rm, kit w/ appls incld, front porch. $750/ month. Call 504-606-1845 2 br, 1 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, ceil fans, hdwd flrs, w/d hkps. $1100/mo. 899-7657. Henry Clay Ave, nr Aud Pk, ac/ht, furn kit w/ w/d, hi ceils, hdwd flrs, sm patio. $1400/mo. 504/897-3816, 504/940-4831

2023 BROADWAY

3308 CAMP STREET

Small charming Gard Dist house, cen a/h, furn kit, use of crtyd & w/d, no dogs, $775/mo. Call 504-319-0531.

4601 S CLAIBORNE AVE

Spac, lwr 3BR, 2BA, all appls+w/d, fncd yd, off st prkg. $1650. Nr univ, hosp, cbd. Marie 504-236-0644, 504-453-5047

4610 CARONDELET

1 blk St Charles. Renov upr 1700 sf, 2 br, solarium, cov’d prch, cen a/h, Italian tile kit & ba, hdwd flrs, frplcs. $1500/mo. 723-0001. 2 bedrooms, washer/dryer, cen a/h, pool, closet space, water included. $885/mo. Call 452-2319 or 821-5567 Lux 3/2, 3600 sqft, 1/2 blk to St Charles. Walk to Loyola Law/Audubon Park, hi ceil, fans, hd flrs, cen A/H, beau wd wk, W/D, furn kit, pkg, sh yd. $2550. Call Steve w/Latter & Blum 650-6770.

1021 ADAMS, 7632 & 7638 ZIMPLE. Walk to univ & park. Shotgun style apts, hdwd frs, furn kit, w/d hkps, a/c units, lg shared yd. Water pd. No pets. Call Cindy at 259-5196 for info.

5300 FRERET

1 BDRM - NEAR TULANE

5327 PRYTANIA ST

1 BDRM CLOSE TO UNIV

Clara St nr Nashvl. Renov Lg upr, 1 br, dr, lr, furn kit, uti rm w/hkps, cen a/h, wd flrs, ceil fans, w/d avl on site. $900/mo. Avl now. 895-0016.

1/2 BLOCK ST CHARLES

By Jefferson. Raised cottage, upper. Deluxe 2br, lux bath/jacuzzi. Furn, W&D, hrdwd flrs, 1400sf, $1300/mo includes gas. 899-3668. 2BR, 1.5BA, Great loc! lux apt, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, wd flrs, 12ft ceils, fans, $1500/mo. 504-444-1030

6126 DELORD

Between State & Palmer Ave. Renov 2 br half dbl, 1 ba, wd flrs, cen a/h, fully equip kit, w/d, rear yd, porch. Avl Aug 1. $1195/mo. S. Talbot, O/A. 975-9763.

1629 2nd. Renov, freshly painted, upr rear bright 1 br apt, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, pvt balc, w/d facil. $775/mo, lse/refs. 895-4726 or 261-7611.

6237 ANNUNCIATION

1042 SONIAT ST

7021 WALMSLEY

3 bedrooms, 1.5 ba, lr, dr, furn kit, hdwd flrs, cen a/h, w/d, 1500 sf, 12’ ceils, $1400/mo. 504-952-5102

1106 BOURDEAUX ST

Spac 2 BR, 1 BA, frplc, cen a/h, porch, $1000/month w/ sec dep. 4 blks off St Charles. 504-891-7584 lv msg

1629 TOLEDANO #102

Nr Audubon Pk. 3 br, 2 ba, liv rm, furn kit, d/w, w/d, cen a/h, off st pkg, Pets ok. $950/mo. 504-957-1233. Lg, comfortable 2 br, 2 ba, furn kit, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, w/d hkps, bkyd, off st pkg. $950/mo, refs, dep, lease. No dogs. 861-3992.

7522 BENJAMIN - NR UNIV

1 br condo w/ pool, prkg, laundry, gated community. $650/mo w/ wtr pd. No pets. 453-8996.

1/1, $1100/mo. incl cable, wtr, elec. Wd flrs, ss appl, stone cntrtps. OS pkng, crtyd. Angela, 504-432-1034 Keller Wiiliams.

7535 JEANNETTE ST

1703 S CARROLLTON

802 FERN ST

2 br, 1 ba, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, balc, off st pkg. No pets. $1050/mo/dep. 504-865-9848 or 504-236-5757, email FQRental.com

5514 Annunciation. 1/2 dbl, 1 or 2 br, furn kit & mod ba, cen a/h, carpet/ hdwd flrs, w/d. $875/mo. 416-3791.

RENOV’D - GRT LOCATIONS!

VICTORIAN SHOTGUN

Best apt you’ll see! $1200/mo. Near the univs, beaut nb’hood, 1500 sq ft living space, 1 BA, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, No pets. Avail NOW. Paula 952-3131

521 1/2 LOWERLINE

7120 Willow Street, living room, tile bath, furnished kitchen. No pets. $700month+deposit. Call 504/283-7569

One person studio. Near TU Univ. $590/mo net + dep. All utilities pd. 866-7837

2BR, 2011 GEN PERSHING

AMAZING RENOVATION

uPtOwn/garden distriCt

1 br, furn kit, a/c unit, hdwd flrs, fresh paint, sec gate. Sm pet ok w/dep. $675-$695/mo. Call 899-RENT.

3b/2h Single Cottage. lr, dr, funr kit. C a/h w/d hook ups. hard wood flrs ceil fans $2000. 899-7657.

2840 State St.

4917 S MIRO ST

226 S Scott. Gutted/total renov upr apt. 2 br,1 ba 1.5 blk fr Canal St. Hdwd flrs, cer tile, w/d, blt-in appl, sec sys. $1200/ mo/dep. Avl 8/1. 504-455-5411.

4539 S Roman, 2000sf, 1/2 dbl, 2BR, 2BA, f-kit, w/d, c-a/h, off st pkg, wtr pd, $1100. 504-467-7052, 259-0043

#1 LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT Studio- Gated, lrg pool, laund, patio, $650/mo. #2 NAPOLEON AVE Lg 1BR - Mod kit, pool, pkng, laund. $875/mo CARONDELET 3BR /1BA hdwd flrs, yd, bal, w/d hkkps. $1000/mo 891-2420

Cls to univ/hosp/Lusher, beaut lrg 3 independent BR w/ cntr hall, lr, dr, furn kit, d/w, w/d, 1BA, wd flrs, scrnd prch. $1350 • 504-895-2683

Lg lr, hdwd frs, equip kit incl range, frig, d/w, w/d, cen a/h, off st pkg, dep & refs.1,000 sq ft. No pets. $890. 835-9099

1 & 2 BR APTS $700-$800

Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

1204 Chartres #9 1/1.5 1205 St Charles Studio 830 St Philip “G” 1/1 735 Esplanade “6” 1/1 1022 Toulouse “BC22’ 2/2 829 Ursulines #1 1/1 829 Ursulines #5 1/1 1418 Chartres A1 1/1 2054 Royal 1/1 448 Julia Unit #219 1/1 1908 Pauger 2/1 528 Gov Nicholls 1/1 739 ½ Gov Nicholls 1/1 3607 Magazine 1704 Napoleon 1/1 814 Orleans 1/1 210 Chartres “3E” 2/1 921 Chartres #9 2/1.5 712 St. Philip 1/1 727 Conti B Studio 1028 Kelerec #1 1/1 1028 Kelerec #2 1/1 1028 Kelerec #3 1/1 1229 Royal 2/1.5 911 N Derbigny 1/1

824 Charters

1BR, bath, appls, elec, wtr, int/cbl, incld. Nr Lutcher schl, yr lse, dep rqd. No smkr/pet. $850/mo. 219-1422 Corner Maple. Hist. 2 br PH, newly renov’d, ss & gran kit, vltd 12’ ceil, track llights w/d, cen a/h, all appls,$1400 723-0001.

502 Washington, 2BR, 1BA, w/d, c-fans, wd flrs, c-a/h, sec, drvwy, pool, FREE Direct TV, $1095. 813-5822

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT 2508 NAPOLEON AVE. Studio apt, 500 sq ft. $655/mo

2108 BROADWAY 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 900 sq ft, $1025 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1000 sq ft, $1225

Call 504-339-3858 nola4rent@gmail.com www.nola4rent.com rentals tO sHare ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.


CLASSIFIEDS PETS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

PET ADOPTIONS Elijah

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer.

Kit Kit

SERVICES

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS

EBONY, Black kitten, Vck, Vacs, Neut, Litter Train, Rescue. 504-451-2822

03 Dodge Ram 1500 V8 fully loaded in ex cond special sound sys, chrome wheels with custom pin stripping $200 down take over notes $115/mo w/ warranty 504-667-7810 24 hrs. 04 chrysler concorde 4 dr ls, fully ld, all pwr, stereo, perfect cond. $200 down, $75/month. Call 482-2223. GEO Metro, ‘96 $295. Still runs or parts. Call 943-7699

Elijah -Gorgeous solid white Angora male cat,very sweet and smart neutered,shots ,rescue ,504 462-1968 KIT KAT, Muted Gray Tabby, appx. 7 mos old, Vet, Ck/Vacs/Spay/ Rescue/Litter Trained Super Sweet Lap Cat, Rescue (504) 460-0136

Weekly Tails Chanel is a 2-year-old, brindle, Cairn Terrier mix. She’s curious, enjoys pig ears and would do best in a home without small children. To meet Chanel or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191.

HVAC/Spray Foam Insulation Licensed Contractor 504.606.0685

TRUCKS ‘29 antique model A truck

this 1929 modelA pickup truck runs fine. green and black with new tires. own a piece of history. $23,065.00. phone (504) 394-3078

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

Alicia Whittington

Welcome Back All Clients! 1 HOUR 90/120 min avail Swedish & Deep Tissue

$50

LICENSED MASSAGE

Appts 8:30am-9:00pm LA Lic# 520

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

call

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

601.303.7979

ABOUT MASSAGE

Tired of just a rub down? Get beyond that w/ a massage exp. by Matteo, Lic #0022. Met area. 504-832-0945

MERCHANDISE

BODYWERKS MASSAGE

Bodywerks Massage by Marilyn Tapper La. License #2771. Uptown Studio. 504-782-1452.

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

MASSAGE BY JAMIE RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

Marcello and Giovanni -14 wk old male kittens

Most adorable,sociable and sweetest ever. Neutered ,shots,rescue 504 462-1968 NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, great companion and loves everything,VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Hsbkn /microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136. NICK, PIT/BEAGLE MIX, 50# Sweetheart. Young, VetCk/Vacs/Neut./ Microchip/Rescue. (504) 460-0136

Sophia

Sophia- 1 yr old gorgeous sleek and sweet light smokey grey tabby ,spayed,shots ,tested, 504 462-1968

Winky

Winky - Very beautiful and sweet Calico lap cat ,Say ed ,shots ,rescue ,504 462-1968

NEED HELP?

CHANEL

Kennel #A10753293

Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds Call

483-3100 HUEY & LOUIE

Fax

483-3153

Kennel #A10556457 Kennel #A10556546

Huey & Louie are 3-month-old DSHs with tuxedo coloring. Cute as buttons and dressed to match, they’re friendly, playful, little guys ready to go home. To meet Huey & Louie or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

PETS FOR SALE ACE, BASENJI/WHIPPET MIX. PUP. A love bug and Great Running Partner! VetCk/Vacs/Neut/Microchip/Rescue/ Hsbkn/Crate Trained (504-460-0136)

Free English Bulldog Puppies 2 FREE ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES PLEASE CONTACT ME ASAP morrisphillip200@gmail.com.

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readers need

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I S S U E D AT E

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Reach readers & get your listings RENTED or SOLD! Please call

(504)483-3100 to reserve your space today!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

$295 Brand New Iron Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 $95 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $115 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122 Queen Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $129. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

5wk old male and female adorable kittens,thrown from car window and rescued.504 462-1968

EMPLOYMENT

Lollipop and Jellybean

51


CLASSIFIEDS

ADULT

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

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52

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

REAL ESTATE

53


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

1963-65 NORTH GALVEZ GREAT INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY 3 YEARS NEW! Architect designed construction completed in 2008. One unit is 95% complete and occupied by owners, second unit needs finishing touches. Great opportunity for owner with rental or investor. Large units, solidly built. Foundation for guest cottage in rear. $150,000

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

(504) 895-4663

54

MICHAEL ZAROU

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


BULLETIN BOARD TOO CLASSIFIEDS

CERTIFIED GRADE “A” TURF We beat all competitors! St Augustine (including Palmetto), Centipede Tifway Bermuda, Zoysia. The contractor’s choice for premium quality grass! Call DELTA SOD 504-733-0471

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Locally owned & serving New Orleans area for 19 years

Empowerment from Rosemary Donnelly's Kitchen Cookbook

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JULY 20 > 2010

LAKEVIEW CLEANING SERVICE

CRISTINA’S

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Only in new Orleans is a cOcktail festival just as much abOut the fOOd. The week may be centered on all things alcohol but for one night of Tales of the Cocktail, New Orleans cuisine shares the stage. On July 22nd, Tales of the Cocktail will host a series of Spirited Dinners at 25 of the city’s most legendary restaurants. Each pairs some of the world’s most renowned mixologists with one of city’s best chefs as they put their skills together for a perfectly balanced menu of cocktails and cuisine. Seating is limited so make your reservation today by visiting www.TalesoftheCocktail.com

july 21-25, 2010 our generous annual partners:


Gambit- July 20,2010