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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

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scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“These are tight times. I’d rather spend money on services than litigation.” — State Sen. Lydia Jackson, D-Shreveport, remarking on the scuttling of House Bill 277, which would have allowed erecting a Ten Commandments monument on the Capitol grounds in Baton Rouge. On June 15, the state Senate and Governmental Affairs Committee voted 5-2 to defer the bill, largely over fear of litigation. Similar religious displays on public property in other states have led to expensive — and losing — court battles paid for by taxpayers.

Tara New One A CLAIBORNE PARISH TEACHER IS TRYING TO DO WHAT MOST PUNDITS SAY IS IMPOSSIBLE: BEAT BOBBY JINDAL IN THE OCTOBER GUBERNATORIAL ELECTION, AND DO IT AS A DEMOCRAT.

“What the governor has done with this veto is repudiate his life’s work.” — Rep. Harold Ritchie, D-Bogalusa, commenting on Gov. Bobby Jindal’s veto of the renewal of a 4-cents-apack tax on cigarettes. Earlier in the week, the Baton Rouge Advocate unearthed a 1997 paper written by Jindal when he led the state’s Department of Health and Hospitals. In the position paper, Jindal suggested higher taxes might be the solution to the public health problems caused by tobacco use.

B Y WA LT E R P I E R C E

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“I’m not coming back. It’s hard to work here when it has become theater.” — Rep. Juan LaFonta, D-New Orleans, in his farewell address to the House on June 16. In November 2010, LaFonta announced he would not run for re-election, but would return to practicing law full time.

STAGE FIGHT Haynesville Democrat Tara Hollis says she will run for governor if that’s what it takes to get Bobby Jindal out of the Governor’s Mansion. Democratic New Orleans isn’t high on her list of places to campaign at the outset. She figures she needs to press the flesh in Jefferson, St. Bernard and St. Tammany parishes first. “She’s operating in a very difficult environment,” Chervenak adds. “Even though people are unhappy with Gov. Jindal at this point, they’re very unhappy with the Democratic Party, and a lot of that, I think, has to do with the association with President Obama.” Hollis says she is raising money — in small dabs and dollops — yet her chance of building a war chest resembling Jindal’s roughly $10 million is virtually nonexistent. Nonetheless, Hollis says she’s getting supportive signals from the state Democratic Party. She recently rubbed shoulders with party elite at the Donkey Romp, an annual fundraiser in Baton Rouge that serves as a party

The bitter feud between Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre’s board of governors and its support guild took on a nasty new twist June 15, when the guild announced it had obtained a temporary restraining order halting the sale of 60 percent of the financially challenged theater to restaurateur Dickie Brennan, who plans to open his fourth French Quarter restaurant in the building. PAGE 11

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BoUQuets

The New Orleans Rugby Football Club

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

won the USA Rugby national championship June 5 in Colorado, bringing the title home for the first time in its nearly 40-year history. New Orleans defeated Tampa, Fla., the defending 2010 national champion, in a 27-21 game. Led by coach Jerry Malina, the club rose to the top in a field of 137 teams from across the country competing for the championship.

Hyatt Regency New Orleans

and representatives from the Hyatt Corporation presented $300,000 to the Make It Right Foundation June 14 at a ceremony at the foundation’s eco-playground in the 9th Ward. The donation will enable Make It Right to construct two more of its green, affordable houses for people who lost their homes in the flooding after Hurricane Katrina. Make It Right is the nonprofit founded by actor Brad Pitt.

The Trinity Wall Street Choir

of New York will perform June 28 at Trinity Episcopal Church on Jackson Avenue as a benefit for All Souls Episcopal Mission in the 9th Ward. It’s the third annual visit from the group, the members of which also will conduct a children’s choir camp during their stay, and the children of All Souls will perform their own concert July 1. Admission to both is free; donations are suggested.

Michael “Brownie” Brown,

the feckless head of the Federal Emergency Management Association (FEMA) during Hurricane Katrina, returns to the scene of the crime this week to peddle his new memoir Deadly Indifference. The irony of the title surely escapes Brownie, but isn’t likely to be missed by New Orleanians. “Indifference” sums up how we feel about Brownie coming to New Orleans trying to make a buck off his epic foul-up.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

ara who?” you ask. Tara Hollis. She’s running for governor. Of Louisiana. Her new series of 30-second commercials concludes with a refrain — “Where’s the guy I voted for?” — a reference to Gov. Bobby Jindal, whom she supported in 2007 and, three-and-a-half years into his first term and a near lock for a second, now wants to replace in the Governor’s Mansion starting next January. When she announced her run last month, one newspaper prefixed its headline with the phrase “This week in quixotic.” But Tara Hollis is no Don Quixote. She’s a smart, articulate, camera-friendly north Louisiana public school teacher. A first-time office seeker and self-styled “conservative Democrat,” Hollis says she was so fed up with state cuts to education and with Jindal’s infamous accumulation of frequent-flyer miles, often for personal gain yet at taxpayer expense, that she decided to run against him. “I’ve been kind of laying back waiting for something to happen — someone to stand up, and that just hasn’t been happening,” Hollis said recently. “But in talking with my husband and with some of the other teachers and people in my community, we decided to start a movement and bring this out to the state, and I hope to catch fire with it.” The 39-year-old Haynesville educator has four months to do it. Impossible? Almost certainly. “Tara Hollis?” replied Ed Chervenak, a UNO political science professor, when asked about Hollis’ chances. That a New Orleans political science professor drew a blank in response to Hollis’ name isn’t surprising; she has only begun traveling the state, and reliably

09


811 Conti Street

scuttlebutt

Walter Pierce is managing editor of The Independent in Lafayette.

Mon-Sun 10am-6am www.erinrosebar.com

page 9

The two sides will meet in court June 24, and the guild-backed group Save Le Petit will hold a rally June 21 at the Columns Hotel. “We urge all (Le Petit) subscribers from last season to attend, as well as all those who cherish the iconic landmark on the corner of Jackson Square,” said guild president Jim Walpole. City Councilwoman Kristin Gisleson Palmer, in whose district the building stands, is scheduled to attend. According to the theater’s board, Le Petit currently has a $700,000 mortgage and “desperately” needs $1 million in repairs, both of which would be addressed immediately with the Brennan infusion of cash. Meanwhile, Gambit has obtained copies of emails about another offer — this one made June 13, four days after the Brennan deal was announced. The proposal was from former Le Petit artistic director Gary Solomon Jr. and his father, banker Gary Solomon Sr. In the email, the Solomons offered to buy the building’s mortgage, “holding it for five years without payments. At the end of the fifth year, the debt would be forgiven one-fifth of the outstanding amount for each year up to five more years, provided the entire Le Petit Theatre facility ... continues to operate as a theater for the community.” The Solomons’ offer also included “100 percent of the building in the theater’s control” and a five-year, $1.25 million endowment for “operating costs.” In a letter the next day, board member Michael S. Mitchell said the board had “decided to reject [the offer] for a variety of reasons,” including the fact that management of the theater was not addressed and the “angel” investors were not identified by name. He also noted the Solomon offer wouldn’t pay off the mortgage for 10 years, while the Brennan deal would retire the debt immediately. Mitchell’s letter also said the offer was made “at the last possible moment,” concluding, “Frankly, we are disinclined to enter into business dealings with someone who has recently threatened to sue us.” — Kevin Allman

Le Petit NORD?

At the June 9 press conference where the board of governors of Le Petit Theatre announced the impending sale of 60 percent of the theater to restaurateur Dickie Brennan, board president Cassie Steck Worley mentioned the theater board “had discussions with representatives of the City of New Orleans. … While Le Petit would have been granted a long-term lease, the theater would forfeit all ownership of the building.” Asked about the particulars of the potential city deal, Ryan Berni, spokesman for Mayor Mitch Landrieu, wrote in an email, “The administration was approached by members of the Board at

some point. We were interested in the possibility of using Le Petit for NORDC [New Orleans Recreation Development Commission] programming and to create a theater center.” Berni clarified, “It was discussions with board members and not a formal presentation to the full board.” (Currently NORD partners with the Crescent City Lights Youth Theater, which stages musicals at the NORD Ty Tracy Center at Gallier Hall.) Le Petit was one of the few French Quarter buildings that suffered major damage during Hurricane Katrina, leaving open the possibility that it might be eligible to use FEMA funds for some of the repairs. Berni declined comment on questions regarding how much the city had proposed to pay for the building, and said it hadn’t been formally decided where the money would have come from to buy and renovate it. On June 14, Landrieu acknowledged he may have to cut another $3.5 million from the city’s operating budget this year. — Allman

tax RePeaL Death RattLe

A proposal to phase out the Louisiana income tax over a 10-year period starting in 2014 appears to be in its death rattle in the final days of this year’s legislative session. Senate Bill 259 by Sen. Rob Marionneaux, D-Livonia, started out as a measure to cut income taxes and replace them with a combination of cuts and other revenue measures, but it has been amended repeatedly and now barely resembles its original text. The measure came out of the Senate with an amendment that turned the phase-out into a “study resolution,” which rendered it meaningless. The bill’s tax-reduction provisions were later restored in a House committee, which stripped off the Senate floor amendment and returned the bill to its original form. Last week, however, the full House amended the bill again — this time putting back the “study commission” provision — before deferring final action on it. It is probably dead for the session. Proponents and opponents of the bill chided each other for playing politics with the measure, which is a sure sign that neither side really wants to deal with the issue. — Clancy DuBos

CLaRifiCatiON

In last week’s cover story (“Under Pressure,” June 14, 2011), New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas estimated that NOPD had lost 150 officers over the last year, and had his staff follow up with an email with the exact number. After the story ran, the NOPD contacted Gambit to say their initial email was incorrect. The correct figures, according to the NOPD: The department had 1,539 officers in May 2010, and 1,386 officers in May 2011 — a total loss of 153 officers.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

to oppose Jindal. “She’s going to need help from the Democratic party, she’s going to need endorsements, but the thing she’s going to need the most is money,” Chervenak says. “The best thing the Democrats can do is find someone who is willing to spend $10 million of their own money for this office, and that’s about their only shot.” And that’s not even factoring in the “D” that will follow Hollis’ name on the ballot. Foster, like several recent highprofile state politicos, switched from Democrat to Republican on the eve of qualifying for governor after stumping for months as a conservative Democrat. Louisiana politics, like its budget, is deep in the red these days. That fact alone favors Jindal’s re-election, no matter how disingenuous his critics say he can be at times. Overall, Louisiana voters may not be as enthusiastic about Jindal today as they were in 2007, but the same polls indicate they’re likely to pull a lever for him over a Democrat. But Hollis says she has something on her side, too: numbers. When Jindal took office in 2008, unemployment in Louisiana was a shade below 4 percent. Now it’s over 8 percent. The $1 billion budget surplus Jindal inherited from Kathleen Blanco is now a $1.6 billion deficit. Jindal will of course make the relativity argument, as he frequently does — that Louisiana has fared well compared to the rest of the nation — which is true. Maybe Hollis can tap into the lingering frustration and disillusionment felt by many over the fact that no matter who occupies the Governor’s Mansion, our state forever languishes near the bottom on virtually every meaningful national ranking of health, education and income. She also may get some traction with the metastasized perception that the jet-setting Jindal has been a part-time governor whose national aspirations trump everything else, or his hypocrisy on the issue of ethics reform (he has “reformed” everyone but himself). Hollis acknowledges that her campaign for governor is a long shot. “I’m not naive about the position or the undertaking. I’m not naive about the amount of work. I’m not going to pretend that I have all the answers,” she says. “But I do know that in talking to the people of this state, this is not just a movement of my parish or the people around me; this is across the board. People are looking for a voice, and no one has stood up to be that voice. And if that’s something that I need to do, then that’s what I’m going to do.”

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what’s in Your Bookbag? Public schools can choose their own textbooks under a bill headed to the senate. By K andace P ower Gr aves

he Louisiana Senate is expected to pass a bill the Louisiana Coalition For Science (LCFS) fears is an end-around to allow creationism in public classrooms but the state Department of Education (DOE) sees as a way for local school boards to make better use of taxpayer money. The Senate Education Committee sent HB580, filed by Rep. Frank Hoffmann, R-West Monroe, to the full Senate June 16. It would enable local school boards to buy textbooks that haven’t been approved by the State Textbook Adoption Committee without the budget restrictions now in place. Current law states that no more than 10 percent of a district’s total budget can be spent on books not on the state’s list. “It passed overwhelmingly in the full House; I’m sure it will pass in the full Senate,” says Ian Binns, an LCFS member and assistant professor in Louisiana State University’s Department of Educational Theory, Policy and Practice. “We were critical about it being open season on the materials they can buy with

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state money and how they will oversee those resources,” Binns says. “Currently our textbook adoption process … makes sure [textbooks] not only address GLEs (Grade-Level Expectations), but that the information is also appropriate.” Erin Bendily, chief of departmental support for DOE, says, the bill gives local school districts greater flexibility in selecting resources. “The schools could use any textbooks they want as long as they meet the minimum requirements,” she says. The state would maintain its list of approved textbooks, but the books would be “recommended” instead of required, she says. The bill keeps in place the people who screen textbooks. “We may do random monitoring of school districts and review textbooks and inform the district they can’t use the texts if they don’t meet the standards,” Bendily says. “The way we’ve been reading the bill, there is no oversight from BESE or the Department of Education,” Binns says. Sen. Eric LaFleur, D-Ville Platte, vice chair of the education committee, says

that’s because the issue is covered in the state constitution. “The constitution says BESE shall prescribe all books,” he says. “At the end of the day, BESE could step in if a school board goes off on a tangent.” In 2008, the Legislature passed Hoffmann’s Louisiana Science Education Act (LSEA) — the only so-called “freedom of education act” passed by a state. It allows teachers to introduce “supplemental” materials into classroom discussions, opening the door for creationism to be taught and evolution — a major tenet of biology — to be questioned. Textbook selection and approval, however, remains the purview of BESE and the DOE. Earlier this year, Baton Rouge Magnet High School senior Zack Kopplin started a campaign to have the LSEA repealed and was joined by 42 Nobel laureates. Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, introduced SB70 to do just that, but the bill failed. HB580, which the LCFS has dubbed a “stealth creationism bill” flew through the House June 8 with only five lawmakers voting against it.

Bendily says she doesn’t believe opponents’ claims that Hoffmann designed HB580 to sneak creationism into public classrooms. “All the bill does, is to add some flexibility for the school board,” says committee chair Sen. Ben Nevers, D-Bogalusa. “Some of our textbooks are a number of years old ... and there could be better or more modern textbooks school boards want to use. I didn’t look at [the bill] as something that would hurt education in Louisiana; I think it could improve it.” The LCFS also says HB508 could allow “inappropriate understanding of other areas, not just science,” Binns says. “How will BESE know that a parish or a teacher has chosen to use inappropriate materials?” “Those teachers and school boards have too much to lose by teaching stuff that’s off the wall,” including lawsuits and low standardized test scores LaFleur says. “I hope it doesn’t come to a lawsuit,” Binns says. “I wish they would wake up and realize what they are playing with. It’s not something small, it’s a child’s future.”

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jeremy ALFORD

THE STATE OF THE STATE

Inside the Rails HOW GOV. BOBBY JINDAL DAMPENED THE LEGISLATURE’S RECENT BOUT OF INDEPENDENCE. hen something happens “Inside The Rails,” meaning those tiny, intricately carved borders that keep lobbyists and others off the floors of the House and Senate, it’s usually a reference to an event or occurrence that impacts or is known to lawmakers only. It’s juicy fodder for hacks and flacks but typically doesn’t mean much to the general public. That’s how the Legislature’s recent streak of independence measures up. It’s “inside the rails” and likely doesn’t resonate with your mom, your neighbor or your postman. Gov. Bobby Jindal saw to that June 14, when he vetoed a bill to extend a 4-centsa-pack cigarette tax. Lawmakers whooped and hollered about getting it to Jindal’s desk, but he had the final say. With the stroke of his oft-used veto pen, he sent the measure back to lawmakers. Two days later, House members failed to override the governor’s veto. Their effort came up a dozen votes shy of the 70 needed. How did Jindal bring lawmakers to heel,

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especially since House Bill 1, the state’s annual budget bill, is devoid of any funds that normally would be used for, um, reasoning with recalcitrant legislators? It’s no secret that this year things are different for Jindal; without the governor’s customary ability to veto earmarks and advance local projects, his hand is not as strong as usual. For generations, governors have offered up such enticements when looking for votes on difficult issues, and the absence of extra cash in HB1 this year has been blamed for some of Jindal’s political setbacks since lawmakers convened in April. (Examples: merging UNO and SUNO; selling off three state prisons; deep cuts in areas Jindal wanted to protect; tuition increases rejected by the House; and so on.) Then there’s House Bill 2, the state’s annual construction budget — home of prime Louisiana pork. It, too, is very much in play as the session winds to a close this Thursday (June 23). Known as the capital outlay bill, HB2 includes projects in every corner of the state, but it isn’t

finalized until the fall — by the commissioner of administration and the state Bond Commission — regardless of how lawmakers write the bill. One state senator who requested anonymity (but asked that the interview take place within earshot of administration staffers), said the capital outlay bill has been “dangled over our heads like meat” by Team Jindal for every major floor vote recently. “That’s all you hear people talking about,” the senator said. “We’re being threatened with these projects.” A high-ranking House staffer added that the administration in many cases is telling lawmakers their priorities could be changed if they don’t toe the line. Projects in HB2 are prioritized in five distinct strata. Those in Priority 1 are holdovers that automatically get funded in the coming fiscal year, while those in Priority 2 are next in line, but funding depends on the administration and Bond Commission. Those farther down the line are essentially on the waiting list. And the wait is often long. House members who are term-limited

are saying goodbye, even though some hope to move over to the Senate, where other outgoing pols are bidding adieu. In his farewell speech, Rep. Richard “Rick” Gallot, D-Ruston, suggested that thumbing one’s nose at power is sometimes required, if only to keep things lively. “If you’re good, you get called to the Governor’s Mansion to eat cookies, maybe get a company man T-shirt,” he said sarcastically. Last week, after several lawmakers switched their votes to protect Jindal’s veto, some got cookies while others waited for crumbs. Meanwhile, Jindal’s veto means $12 million a year less for health care programs — and those who bucked Jindal will see their local projects grow moss. Gallot offered some wisdom for that latter group as well. “What goes around comes around,” he said, “sometimes quicker than you think.” Jeremy Alford can be reached at jeremy@ jeremyalford.com.

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clancy

POLITICS

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Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Post-K Reforms Continue he wave of political reform that swept across southeast Louisiana in the wake of Hurricane Katrina continues to have an impact in Orleans and Jefferson parishes. Among the most significant reforms are the new offices of inspector general and compliance directors. The idea for an Office of Inspector General (OIG) is not new in New Orleans. It first gained a foothold in the mid-1990s when then-Mayor Marc Morial pushed for revisions to the City Charter, but the OIG didn’t come into being until after Katrina. Today, New Orleans has an inspector general and is in the process of hiring a compliance officer. Jefferson Parish is the mirror image of New Orleans in that it is contemplating the creation of an inspector general’s office but has already appointed an ethics and compliance officer. She is Kim R. Chatelain, a former assistant state attorney general who also practiced employment law in her private practice. Chatelain’s appointment was confirmed last week by the Jefferson Parish Council. (By way of disclosure, I should point out that Chatelain and I practiced law at the same firm before Katrina.) In October, Jefferson voters will be asked to amend

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the parish charter to establish the Office of Inspector General. In her new job as director of ethics and compliance, Chatelain will report to a special committee composed of parish President John Young, parish Chief Operating Officer Chris Cox and three parish council members. On the surface, it may appear that an ethics and compliance officer does much the same thing as an inspector general, but that’s not the case. As envisioned in Orleans and Jefferson, the inspector general is independent of the administration as well as the council. New Orleans IG Ed Quatrevaux and his predecessor have already proved the value of the OIG concept, and the office is hitting its stride with the steady release of reports and recommendations. High on Quatrevaux’s to-do list right now is an investigation into the private paid detail scandal at NOPD. The independence of his office is crucial to the credibility of his findings. The same will be true in Jefferson, if voters approve the charter referendum in October. Jefferson Parish’s compliance officer does not have political independence, but

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advisor on matters relating to parish policies and procedures, particularly as they pertain to employees and their conduct. Both offices have a high “preventive” value in that the IG will look at contracts with the aim of eliminating waste and corruption, while the compliance officer will look at policies and procedures to make sure the parish is following all state and federal laws. Chatelain also will monitor compliance with financial disclosure requirements at the state and local level, among other duties. Another important distinction is that the inspector general has subpoena power; the compliance officer does not. “The compliance officer does not deal with numbers,” Young says. “She will deal with policies and procedures, whereas the IG will deal with numbers and other matters. Above all, I think the creation of these offices will help change the culture of parish government.” Katrina was a terrible tragedy, but it also spurred citizens to get engaged and demand more of their elected officials. That engagement continues to produce results.

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 21 > 2011

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Chatelain does not report directly to one branch of government over the other. In addition, her duties will not be the same as those of an inspector general. An IG is more of an independent auditor, whereas Chatelain will function more as an in-house

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MAPLE STREET BOOK SHOP SPECIAL SUMMER EVENTS

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FRIDAY, JUNE 24

Jeff Kinney On Friday, June 24, 2011, Jeff Kinney will be at the Nims Fine Art Center on The Academy of the Sacred Heart’s campus at 4301 St. Charles Ave. Doors open at 3:00 P.M. and you must have a bracelet, which can be picked up at Maple Street Book Shop, to attend. You can purchase the Wimpy Kid books, including the latest, The Wimpy Kid Do-It-Yourself Book (revised and expanded edition), at Maple Street Book Shop and onsite at the event, and you need a sales receipt from Maple Street Book Shop to get any books signed. People may bring one book from home, and Mr. Kinney will sign this additional book along with those purchased through Maple Street. Hope to see you there. SUNDAY JUNE 26

SATURDAY JUNE 25

Tomie DePaola 2:15 to 3:15 P.M.

Richard Peck 1:00 to 2:00 P.M.

& His Whole Host of Sunshine! Kevin Henkesis coming to visit Maple Street and to sign his two latest books, Little White Rabbit and Junonia. While I know we’ll have food, Mr. Henkes may lead y’all through an art project and read a little of his work.

Richard Peck , author of Three Quarters Dead and many other middle reader and young adult classics, will sign his books at Maple Street Book Shop. MONDAY JUNE 27

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

David Unger N.O. Public Library

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Join David Unger at 1:00 P.M. at the New Orleans Public Library, 219 Loyola, for a discussion and signing of his book Price of Escape.

Michael Brown Former FEMA Director, Michael D. Brown, will be with us on Saturday, June 25, 2011, 3:00-4:30 P.M. His new book (co-authored with Ted Schwartz), Deadly Indifference The Perfect (Political) Storm: Hurricane Katrina, the Bush White House, and Beyond, presents Brown’s side of things without pulling any punches for himself or others. Please join us for this enlightening conversation.

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Tomie DePaola), author and illustrator of such children’s favorites as Strega Nona and the newest, Let the Whole Earth Sing Praise.

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N.H. Senzai and Frances O’Roark Dowell N. H. Senzai, author of Shooting Kabul and Frances O’Roark Dowell, author of Ten Miles Past Normal and The Secret Language of Girls will be with us on Monday, June 27, 2011, 1:00 P.M.

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CoVeR StorY

What the media say about

GIVERS AmericAn Songwriter “… while Vampire Weekend seems polished and refined, befitting the band members’ Ivy League roots and reputation, GIVERS is a decidedly uncouth explosion of joy, their scrubby, skinned knee musicianship jibing beautifully with their facepainted disco flower child mentality.”

filter “The quintet display an incredible talent for their Louisiana indiefolk style moving from its bright, charismatic rhythms to its slow, tranquil moments.”

“… In Light, their official debut, fortunately transcends their transparent inspirations the oldfashioned way: by twisting the nuances of their heroes into a pretzel, paying homage by taking others’ good ideas and going someplace new.”

Spin “Everything sparkles — bubbly beats, luminous guitars and synths, and most of all, the exuberant voices of Taylor Guarisco and Tiffany Lamson (who apparently have unfettered access to happy meds).”

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“major accidents that became very fruitful occurrences,” Guarisco says. For their Baton Rouge show, Brooklyn’s offbeat pop band Dirty Projectors had a rare opening slot — Scruggs gave it to GIVERS. Dirty Projectors were so impressed they asked the band to open for the remainder of their tour. Rock band Ra Ra Riot caught wind of them and booked the band for its 2010 tour. “To see people that actually come to our shows — and we’ve never even been to some of these places — and see them dance and know the words, it’s been really mind blowing,” Lamson says. The band also has been embraced by celebrity fans (Green Lantern star Ryan Reynolds says he’s “obsessed”), and by the end of 2010, the momentum and buzz landed the band a record deal. In Light (which premiered on National Public Radio’s high-profile First Listen series, with the entire album posted on npr.org for listeners to stream), recorded last year, gathers material over those years of improvised, loose sessions and whirlwind touring, from early EP singles “Ceiling of Plankton” to standout track and fan favorite “Up Up Up.” “It’s been our baby, in the womb for a year,” Guarisco says. “We get to finally see it out and about in the world.” ON ThE Way TO BONNaROO, ThE BaND’S TRaILER BROkE down in Little Rock, ark., and the band missed a day of press and promotion. They made it, just barely. In the audience were fans like Win Butler, the lead vocalist and songwriter of arcade Fire, along with various booking agents and music industry suits and, of course, hundreds of fans. When asked, “how many of you are from Louisiana?,” hundreds of hands shot up. “It was like, all of a sudden I want to be from Louisiana,”

says Daniel Glass, a music industry giant whose Glassnote Entertainment Group signed GIVERS last year. “It was one of those moments, this bond: ‘Whatever you are, we are.’ … They were accepted in the club.” Glass has made or helped boost the careers of dozens of artists, from Billy Idol and the Pretenders to Erykah Badu and D’angelo, and he delivered late-career rebirths from Steve Earle and the late Warren Zevon. In 2007, Glass founded Glassnote, an independent label (named by Rolling Stone as the “best indie label in 2011”) with only a handful of artists on its roster — including Grammywinning buzz bands Phoenix and Mumford & Sons. Last year, GIVERS joined the lineup, after Glass discovered the band at austin City Limits, a gig he would’ve missed if he didn’t run the mile from his train to the venue. “I was mesmerized by the performance, the physicality. It was a visceral moment for me,” he says, calling from New york, steps from 30 Rockefeller Plaza, where GIVERS just wrapped rehearsals for their national TV debut on Late Night. “I don’t fall in love a lot. The only time this happened to me was when I walked into a brasserie in Paris and I met Phoenix.” Unlike GIVERS’ previous releases, which were self-produced and offered free or cheaply on the Internet, In Light is a studio-polished monster. For its fiercely bright production, the band hooked up with maestro Ben allen, who helmed animal Collective’s pop-crossover breakthrough Merriweather Post Pavilion, a favorite on dozens of publications’ “best of” lists in 2009. That album gave the critically acclaimed experimental outfit a glossy pop makeover, with the single “My Girls” as that summer’s de facto jam. page 23

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

pASte

photo By Zack Smith

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Carpoolers Unite

loCaVore rising RestauRants, bloggeRs and goveRnment officials get in on the inauguRal eat local challenge.

Eat Local Challenge participants receive a discount on Hollygrove Market & Farm’s produce boxes, featuring locally grown fruits and vegetables and other goods.

b y a l e x W o o d Wa R d

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the leafy green. Kale and strawberries are also in high demand.     At La Provence, John Besh’s  French-inspired restaurant in  Lacombe, chef Erick Loos hosts a  dinner with a menu using all local  ingredients (with wine from the  Northshore’s Ponchartrain Vineyards) Wednesday, June 22, in conjunction with the challenge. Also on  board, Riverbend restaurant Matt &  Naddie’s is serving dishes using all  local ingredients, down to the salt.     “Restaurants investing in the  local economy are getting their  money back — plus,” says Eat Local  organizer Lee Stafford.     Stafford says the concept for the  challenge came from a simple idea:  “You should know where the food  on your plate comes from.” Taking  that advice is Mike Strain, Louisiana  commissioner of agriculture and  forestry. Since 2008, Strain has  issued the challenge to other state  officials, asking to support local  farms and get kids interested in  healthy, fresh foods. This year he  joins the New Orleans movement.     To inspire fellow challengers,  participants in the blogosphere are  sharing recipes, or in the case of  Tumblr blogger Caroline Heylman  (nolavore.tumblr.com), uploading  a photo of every meal for every day 

of the challenge. Aryanna Gamble  (www.aryannagamble.blogspot. com) also is sharing recipes, including baked goods like caramel pecan  macaroons and canillas de leche.  Other participants have shared recipes like chilled berry or vegetable  soups, along with where to find the  local ingredients. Veronica Del Bianco (www.veronicadelbianco.com)  signed up for the challenge despite  traveling to Texas for a week in  June. On her blog, she offers tips  to stay local while away from your  home base.     The challenge provides some  leeway, however, with three levels  of “strictness” challengers can  choose to follow. For the Ultrastrict,  participants must stick to the 200mile rule. The Bienville level allows  nonlocal spices (like ginger and  saffron) and coffee, so long as it’s  locally roasted, and locally brewed  beer (like Abita or NOLA Brewing)  despite imported hops and other  nonlocal ingredients. The Wild Card  level allows all of the above, plus  chocolate and sugar. (Challenge  organizers advise participants to  stick as closely to the rules as possible.) Stafford notes that he not  only founded the Eat Local group,  page 26

VoiCes needed in Wetlands restoration

    The U.S. Geological Survey issued a report this month  showing Louisiana’s coastline is losing its wetlands at a  rate of one football field every hour. The Urban Conservancy and the Delta Discussion Group are addressing  wetlands loss — and giving residents a voice to help  restore it.     The organizations host “Getting it Done Together:  The Public’s Role in Shaping Our Coast’s Future” from 5  p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 23. The forum addresses public opportunities for shaping the future of Louisiana’s coastline and wetlands restoration. The conference outlines the federal and state processes allowing  public input, and how to navigate the often byzantine,  long-term planning process for coastal development.     Michele Deshotels and Leslie Suazo from the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration will  present Louisiana’s 2012 Master Plan, and Mark Davis  with Tulane’s Institute on Water Resources Law & Policy  will discuss the Natural Resource Damage Assessment,  the critical study, performed following the Gulf oil disaster, that could determine the coast’s future protection  (and current health). Amanda Moore with the National  Wildlife Federation will discuss legislation for coastal  restoration projects, and the Gulf Restoration Network’s  Cynthia Sarthou will address the citizen advisory council  representing the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration  Task Force.     Scott P. Milroy will detail his research with the University of Southern Mississippi on polycyclic aromatic  hydrocarbons (PAH), the carcinogenic contaminants  found in oil and gas waste. Milroy’s research analyzes  PAH presence in the Mississippi Sound and its impact on  seafood safety.     The free program is held at Longue Vue House &  Gardens (7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com). Registration is required; visit www.gettingitdonetogether.eventbrite.com for details.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

t Hollygrove Market &  Farm’s first Saturday  market in June, hundreds  of shoppers flowed in, changing the  pace of the usual steady traffic with  a nearly overwhelming crowd.     It was the first market day for  “locavore” shoppers participating in  the inaugural Eat Local Challenge,  which asks participants to eat foods  sourced from no more than a 200mile radius of New Orleans. More  than 200 people are participating in  the challenge, which lasts through  June. Registration included a discount on Hollygrove’s weekly boxes,  filled with locally grown produce  and other local goods.     Hollygrove director Paul Baricos  says about one of every five shoppers this month are Eat Local challengers — not counting the dozens  of restaurants the market supplies.  Linda Michurski, Hollygrove’s  restaurant sales manager and Eat  Local Challenge co-organizer, says  the market and farm supplies 30 to  40 restaurants on a weekly basis.  Iris chef Ian Schnoebelen bases the  menu at his restaurant around Hollygrove’s offerings. (Michurski says  she makes deliveries to the restaurant twice a week.) Restaurants’ No.  1 most requested item? Arugula.  The farm grows a quarter-acre of 

    The Regional Planning Commission’s (RPC) Metro  New Orleans GreenRide is a ridesharing matchmaker —  the program offers a free carpool matching service for  metro New Orleans commuters. Create a profile, and  the program will match you with commuters in your  area. The program also will calculate your shared commute into cost savings and emissions reductions: how  much gas will you save, and how much carbon emissions you will prevent from entering the atmosphere.     The program, part of the RPC’s Congestion Management Plan (itself a part of the comprehensive  Metropolitan Transportation Plan), intends to reduce  congestion on roads and highways. RPC transportation  planner John King says GreenRide hopes to have up to  1,500 users within the program’s first year. (Its first few  weeks saw 100 registered users.) “It’s all pretty new to  us,” King says. “We’re still getting a feel for what works  well in this region.”     The website takes commuters’ travel information  and returns a map pointing to nearby participants with  similar commutes. The website may soon sync users  to their Facebook accounts for easier access. “Eventually it’ll reach critical mass where it’s easy to find a ride  wherever you want to go in the region,” King says.      Visit www.norpc.greenride.com for more information.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

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he’s also participating in the challenge. “I started off on Day One with everyone else,” he says. But participants haven’t missed out on much. They can find popular proteins throughout the challenge including Gulf seafood, crawfish, chicken and eggs. Dairy farms also provide goat cheese and milk. Perhaps challengers’ most helpful resource — despite local experts in partners like Hollygrove, Rouses and Crescent City Farmers Market — is the Eat Local Challenge forum (at www.nolalocavore. org), where participants — all doing their best to stick to the rules of the challenge — trade recipes, tips and suggestions for where to find local goods. Not only participants get access to the forums, so do retailers. The website opens a dialogue for people who previously hadn’t had a place to address local

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roadmoor Development Corporation broke ground last week on the first of its four planned LEED Platinum-certified homes. The U.S. Green Building Council’s 2010 Natural Talent Design Competition selected the home’s sustainable designs, created by two student-led groups and two emerging professional teams. The four groups — representing Connecticut, Hawaii, New York City and Pittsburgh — maintained the neighborhood’s aesthetic and added innovative highlights like an “outdoor living room,” storm-water collection systems and breakthrough drainage and ventilation features. Wuijoon Ha, the only single-person design team, conceived the “E.A.S.Y. House,” featuring operable skylights, a green

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availability issues. “They’ll ask questions, ‘Why aren’t you carrying these products that are Louisiana made?’ And (retailers) respond, ‘We’ll see what we can do,’” Stafford says. “There are 300 marketers out there looking for Louisiana products, and then they have the blog to discuss with the retailer, ‘I found this, why not make this available?’” Stafford says the next challenge is scheduled for June 2012 — though he knows participants now accustomed to June’s late-spring and summer seasonal goods may be tired of them for next year. Many participants, he says, were bored with rice — a widely available local grain — by the end of the challenge’s first week. For 2012, however, Stafford says the Eat Local organizers found local wheat (and someone to grind it), which opens the culinary door to starches that currently are off-limits.

++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ ++++++++++++++++ roof and a wheelchair lift. The Salvation Army’s EnviRenew initiative, which aims to rebuild communities using green building practices, is helping fund the project along with the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority and New Orleans Metropolitan Area Realtors. First NBC Bank is financing the homes; each is estimated to cost $135,000 (and eligible for up to $75,000 in grants). Landis Construction, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple and Green Coast Enterprises also are helping build the homes. The homes join Broadmoor’s Andrew H. Wilson Charter School in the neighborhood’s commitment to getting greener buildings in as rebuilding continues. The school, completed in January 2010, received $29 million in renovations and construction. The school features a 12,000-gallon rainwater-collecting cistern, a solar panel array that heats 90 percent of the kitchen’s water, and other energy efficiency measures.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 34 38 41 45 46 51 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > JUN << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <MY LIFE WITH THE THRILL KILL KULT >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> The many (and mostly former) members of My Life With The Thrill Kill Kult must wonder what they have to do to offend someone and get some press. Since the early hit “A Daisy Chain 4 Satan,” the group’s lyrics, videos The Definition of Bounce CD and album covers and release and book signing titles have gratuitously NOON-2 P.M. SATURDAY embraced everything racy, vice-y and degenerPEACHES RECORDS, ate. But its sleazy-funky 408 N. PETERS ST., 282-3322; WWW. PEACHESRECORDSNEWORLEANS.COM post-industrial lounge-core grooves have remained 3 P.M. SATURDAY cheap thrills from a mostly cult following. Twitch the Ripper and 16 Volt open. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Howlin’ Wolf, NUTHIN BUT FIRE RECORDS, 907 S. Peters St., 529-5844; www.thehowlinwolf.com 1840 N. CLAIBORNE AVE., 940-5680

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9 P.M. SATURDAY BEHIND THE 8 BALL CLUB, 3715 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 897-3415

Rapper 10th Ward Buck (center) at a block party with Sissy Nobby (on ladder) and Big Freedia. PHOTO BY JORDAN BLANTON

Bounce Party

A failed poet and tax collector, Miguel de Cervantes finds himself in jail on the eve of the Spanish Inquisition — he tried to foreclose on a monastery. In this play within a play, he is set upon by other prisoners and offers a drama as a defense, with the prisoners playing roles in his recreation of Don Quixote’s tale. The musical opens the season for Tulane’s Summer Lyric Theatre. Tickets $28-$37. 8 p.m. Thu.-Sat., 2 p.m. Sun. Tulane University, Dixon Hall, 865-5269; http://summerlyric.tulane.edu

JUN

salutes to the camera. Many of the photos are at events in front of Buck’s Jackson Avenue restaurant, Finger Lick’n Wings. In extended narrative sections transcribed from interviews (as told to former Gambit columnist Alison Fensterstock) Buck and Johnson relate their experiences growing up with the music and becoming producers and performers. The tone is relaxed but the text is very loose and sometimes lacks specificity for a book striving to define bounce’s birth and context. But the book does contain a detailed timeline of recordings and events in New Orleans bounce from the late 1980s through 2010. Buck was first encouraged to record a song by DJ Jubilee, whom he did background work for, but performing wasn’t totally new to him. He had appeared in the film Dead Man Walking. He became better known for rapping and the song “Drop and Gimme 50,” which he later sold to Mike Jones, who re-released it. Radio play and TV exposure for the song convinced Buck that there was a wider market for bounce music. Bounce rapper Big Freedia (who appears often in the book, along with rapper Sissy Nobby) has gotten wider exposure, both in print in the New York Times and in booking shows. As bounce has gained wider attention, Buck is releasing his new album and preparing both a stage and film version of the book, all sharing the same title.

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A living link between Puerto Rican salsa’s history and its future, Gilberto Santa Rosa has recorded with the late legend Tito Rodriguez (1992’s digital duet A Dos Tiempos De Un Tiempo) and modern sensation Victor Manuelle (2005’s live Dos Soneros…Una Historia). Irrepetible (Sony Music Latin), Santa Rosa’s 25th LP in as many years, hit No. 1 on the Billboard tropical album chart in 2010. Tickets $37. 8 p.m. Thursday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

GENERATIONALS WITH GIANT CLOUD, EMPRESS HOTEL AND AU RAS AU RAS

JUN

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Harmonizing pop quintet Giant Cloud seemed primed to pick up the defunct Peekers’ dropped baton — until it, too, abruptly broke up late last year, leaving a nearly finished Park the Van debut in the cutting room. This long-scheduled show will either be a road to reconciliation or a one-off reunion. Empress Hotel and Au Ras Au Ras open; Generationals headlines. Tickets $11 in advance, $13 at the door. 8:45 p.m. Saturday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

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GILBERTO SANTA ROSA

10TH WARD BUCK TALKS ABOUT BOUNCE BY WILL COVIELLO ith more than 200 pictures of block parties, concerts and recording sessions, The Definition of Bounce: Between Ups and Downs in New Orleans looks like the slickest scrapbook produced about New Orleans music culture. It is an account of bounce music narrated by 10th Ward Buck, aka Marlon Horton, and his business partner Lucky Johnson. Buck is scheduled to release his fifth album on July 4, also titled The Definition of Bounce. Buck grew up listening to bounce at block parties in the St. Thomas housing project, but he got the idea for a book when he was displaced to Houston following the levee failures in 2005. “We were playing to New Orleans people” he says. “But there were people from Houston saying ‘What is this music?’” Subsequent touring took him to other Southern cities where there were displaced New Orleanians and new audiences. Coincidentally, G.K. Darby of Garrett County Press (www.cgpress.com) had been interested in a book project about bounce prior to Hurricane Katrina, when he saw a video for Buck’s song “Faster Faster.” After returning to New Orleans, Buck eventually met with Darby and started working on the project. Though slickly designed by Kevin Stone, the book maintains a raw, vibrant feel from a brash collage of group shots at parties, candid closeups, blurred dancing and alternate waves and middle-finger

JUN

MAN OF LA MANCHA

33


MUSIC

Showcasing Local Music MON 6/20

Papa Grows Funk

TUE 6/21

Rebirth Brass Band

WED 6/22

Roy Jay Band

THU The Trio featuring 6/23 Johnny V & Special Guests FRI 6/24 SAT 6/25

Mia Borders Feed the Kitty

TrioTrio w/ Walter SUN Joe JoeKrown Krown SUN “Wolfman” Washington feat. Russell Batiste & Walter& 6/26 3/13 Russell Batiste Wolfman Washington

New Orleans Best Every Night! 8316 Oak Street · New Orleans 70118

(504) 866-9359

www.themapleleafbar.com

LISTINGS

OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 7

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Duke Heitger & Tim Laughlin feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7

PAVILION OF THE TWO SISTERS — Thursdays at Twilight feat. Pfister Sisters, 6 PRESERVATION HALL — Tornado Brass Band feat. Darryl Adams, 8 PRIME EXAMPLE — Philip Manuel, 8 & 10 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Brent George, 7

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Chris Ardoin, 8:30 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Treme Brass Band CD release, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Washboard Rodeo, 7:30 TIPITINA’S — Righteous Buddha, Easy Company, Yo Jimbo, 9

VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

Friday 24 BABYLON LOUNGE — Cape Of The Matador, Snake Oiler, 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

BANKS STREET BAR — Granade Man, Slack Assister, 9

36

haPPy hour $1.50 PBR PInts $2 gAme RentAls $3 ImPortS

$2 monDAYs gAme RentAls • PBR PInts jameSon ShotS

FRIDAY • 6/24 • 9 pm

ZynC & PrytanIa $5 sAtuRDAY • 6/25 • 10pm

dj KodIaK

free

EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

KaraoKe 1/2lB. tuRBo BuRgeR wIth FRIes $6 4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M r O C K Pa r T Y. C O M

preview

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 7

BALCONY MUSIC CLUB (BMC) — Moonshine & Caroline, 7

• 3-6pm DAILY •

Flavored Kisses, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11

BMC — Moonshine & Caroline, 7; Soul Project, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Lisa Lynn & Trio, 9:30 BOOMTOWN CASINO — Brandon Foret, 9

CARROLLTON STATION — The Tanglers, Darla & the Hip Drops, 9:30

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — El Camino Royales, Rotten Cores, Rok Boms, 10 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Pfister Sisters, 5:30; Paul Sanchez, 8; Twangobangorama, 10

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; The Iguanas, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10

THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10

FRENCH MARKET — Sweet Jones, 4; Flow Tribe, 5

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

Melting Potpourri

After performing and directing for 63 years, 86-year-old trombonist Milton Bush leads his New Orleans Trombone Choir in a set of patriotic music at Trinity Episcopal Church’s annual Patriotic Music Festival. His ensemble is fronted by anywhere from seven to 10 trombones, and the group will play “New York, New York,” “Stardust” and a medley of music by George M. Cohan at the festival. The band joins the typically eclectic lineup organized by music ministry director Albinas Prizgintas for its Independence Day celebration. Other performers include the New Orleans Navy Band (pictured), the National World War II Museum’s Victory Belles, Prizgintas, who will perform music by John Philip Sousa and other American composers, and others. The Trombone Choir also will offer a crowd pleaser, Bush says. “We usually finish with (‘When the Saints go Marching In’), which is New Orleans patriotic.” Free admission. — Marta Jewson

JUN

26

Patriotic Music Festival 3 p.m.-6 p.m. Sunday Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., 670-2520; www.trinitynola.com

HERMES BAR — Sasha Masakowski & Sidewalk Strutters, 9:30 & 11

HEY! CAFE — Spraynard, The Lollies, 8 HI-HO LOUNGE — The Great In Between, Thomas Jefferson, 10 THE HOOKAH — Gravity A, Earphunk, 9

HOUSE OF BLUES — Zoso, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — All I Am, Divebomb, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown, 8; Little Freddie King, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, 12 a.m. JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 11

Johnny Burke, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7 THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8 RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Refried Confuzion, 9:30

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Beth McKee feat. Barbara Menendez & the Help, 9:30 SHAMROCK BAR — Prytania, Zinc, 9

SIBERIA — Crime Wave, Pallbearers, Die Rotzz, Zero Progress, She’s Still Dead, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

THE MAISON — Nasimiyu, 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30; New Orleans Cotton Mouth Kings, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Jerry Jumonville, 4; Alex Bosworth, 7; Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10:30

TIPITINA’S — Flow Tribe, To Be Continued Brass Band, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Mia Borders, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Richard Scott & Stephen Dale, 2 NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART — Friendly Travelers, 5:30 OAK — Reed Alleman, 6; Christina Perez, 10 OLD COFFEE POT RESTAURANT — Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 7 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — The Larry Hall Band, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — James McMurtry,

THREE MUSES — Glen David Andrews, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9

VOILÀ — Mario Abney Quartet, 5

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Saturday 25

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Johnny Sketch & the Dirty Notes, 10

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Gypsy Elise & Ryan Way, 8; Eudora Evans & Deep Soul, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Legendary Luther Kent & His Quartet, 9:30

BOOMTOWN CASINO — Burgundy, 9

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Royal Rounders, 8 CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 CARROLLTON STATION — Loaded Dice, Joshua Richoux, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Blues Frenzy, 7; Peoples Blues Richmond, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Kelcy Mae Band, 9

COLUMNS HOTEL — Andy Rogers & guest, 9 THE CYPRESS — Monks Of Makumba, Clement Brothers, Liquid Peace Revolution, 7 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 7; Rotary Downs, 11 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — The Roebucks, 10

HERMES BAR — Paul Sanchez, 9:30 & 11

HI-HO LOUNGE — Joey Allcorn, The Unnaturals, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — The Psychedelic Furs, 8

HOWLIN’ WOLF NORTHSHORE — For Karma, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Diamond D, Lyrikill and others, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Joe Krown Swing Band, 8; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 12 a.m. JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 3; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 6 & 9

LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Dave Reis, 7; Ernie Vincent & the Top Notes, 11

LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Joyful, USA, 2; Sasha Masakowski, 3 THE MAISON — Josh Reppel, 5; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10; Yojimbo, 12 a.m.

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Feed the Kitty, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Kristina Morales, 4; Charley & the SoulaBillySwampBoogie Band, 7; Dana Abbot Band, 10:30; the Mumbles, 12:30 a.m. MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Dr. Jazz & the New Orleans Sounds, 2

BANKS STREET BAR — Gravy

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

BABYLON LOUNGE — 4 Mag Nitrous, No Room For Saints, Large Marge, 10

OAK — Glen David Andrews, 9


A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

JUMPING THE BROOM (NR) — Worlds collide when two

African-American families from disparate socioeconomic backgrounds get together for a wedding in Martha’s Vineyard. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) — The

NOW SHOWING THE ART OF GETTING BY (PG-13) — A lonely teen makes it to

his senior year of high school without doing a day of work, and he meets a popular girl who finds in him a kindred spirit. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

BEYOND ALL BOUNDARIES (NR) — The museum screens a 4-D

film, bringing audiences into battle using archival footage and special effects. National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater

BRIDESMAIDS (R) — A

comically struggling woman (Kristen Wiig) tries to get her life in order while also serving as her best friend’s maid of honor. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

DEEP SEA (NR) — Audiences

experience the depths of the ocean. Entergy IMAX FAST FIVE (PG-13) — Vin Diesel

and Dwayne Johnson star in the latest installment of the Fast and the Furious franchise. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

GRAND CANYON: RIVER AT RISK (NR) — Robert Redford

38

narrates a 15-day river-rafting trip that highlights the beauty of the Colorado River. Entergy IMAX

UNCH S P Y C U L ” R E H C AD TEA MUSICBY MICHAEL ANDREW B “ N O I T C U D O R P SAIC AL TOM WOLFE TUPNITSKY O M A S T N E S E R P NE S URES SIC RAV COLUMBIA PHICITGGINS SUPERVISMIOUN BY MAENIKSAHSDAN LEE EISENBERGRGGE JOHN MEXICECHUUTCAIVEERESLGEORGIA KACWARITNTEDNES JEAKSTUPNITSKY & LEE EISEDNIRBECETEDBY JAKE KASDAN PROD BY GEN LTER O H E S U O H D I V A LER D PRODUCEBDY JIMMY MIL locAl lISTINgS FoR STARTS FRIDAY, JUNE 24 chEck ThEATERS AND ShowTImES

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) — In the DC Comics adaptation that was filmed in New Orleans, a hot-shot test pilot must maintain peace in the universe using a mystical green ring. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania THE HANGOVER PART II (R) —

After the infamous bachelor party in Las Vegas, Stu (Ed Helms) tries to play it safe for his wedding in Thailand — but things once again go awry. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) —

The book series by Megan McDonald gets a big-screen adaptation. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

animated sequel stars Jack Black as the voice of the titular warrior. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) — In the Woody Allen film,

a screenwriter and aspiring novelist (Owen Wilson) finds himself travelling back in time to the Jazz Age while touring Paris at night. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand

MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) — Jim Carrey plays Mr.

Popper, a business man whose world is turned upside down when six penguins turn his swanky New York apartment into a snowy winter wonderland. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) — In the latest installment

of the franchise, Captain Jack Sparrow’s (Johnny Depp) past comes back to haunt him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a pirate he once loved. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

SUPER 8 (PG-13) — A group

of friends in 1979 start to witness strange occurrences after a catastrophic train crash in J.J. Abrams’ sci-fi drama. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand

THE TREE OF LIFE (PG-13) —

Terrence Malick’s film, Palme d’Or winner at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival, follows a man through his innocent childhood to his disillusioned adult years. Canal Place UNDER THE SEA 3-D (G) — Jim Carrey narrates the documentary exploring the Great Barrier Reef. Entergy IMAX X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) —

The prequel tells the origin story of the Marvel Comics supergroup. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

OPENING FRIDAY BAD TEACHER (R) — Cameron Diaz plays a foul-mouthed,

FILM

LISTINGS

gold-digging seventh-grade teacher. CARS 2 (PG-13) — The Pixar

sequel finds its characters competing in an international race.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BLANK CITY (NR) — Celine

Danhier’s documentary tells the story of renegade filmmakers who emerged from the economically bankrupt and dangerous New York of the 1970s and ’80s. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:15 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net

BRIT WIT — The Big Top

screens British comedies every week. 7 p.m. Tuesday, 3 Ring Circus’ The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com

CASABLANCA (NR) — The

1942 drama follows an American expatriate who meets a former lover in Africa during the early days of World War II. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and June 29, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

THE FILMS OF HELEN HILL — The American Library

Association and friends of the late filmmaker present a selection of her works. Tickets $15 in advance, $17 at the door. Proceeds will benefit the 2012 Helen Hill Award and the Francis Pop Education Fund. 7 p.m. hors d’oeuvres and cash bar, 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. screening. Sunday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net

FROM BRITAIN WITH LOVE—

The Film Society of the Lincoln Center, UK Film Council and Emerging Pictures presents the touring showcase of British films. Films include Toast, Africa United, A Boy Called Dad, In Our Name and Third Star. Visit www.frombritainwithlove.org for the full schedule. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members, $20 series pass (includes all five films). Tuesday-Thursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net THE LORD OF THE RINGS (PG13) — Local theaters (AMC

Palace 20, AMC Palace 16, Hollywood 14) screen the Academy Award-winning trilogy in three parts. 7 p.m. Tuesday and June 28. PAGE 40


Garden Concert Series

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FILM

Thursdays at Twilight

PAGE 38 ON TIME — The center premieres a

series of locally produced short films. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

PSYCHO (NR) — Alfred Hitchcock’s

1960 thriller follows an embezzler who is hiding at the eerie Bates Motel. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN (NR) — Gene Kelly’s 1952 movie-musical follows a silent film production company as they make a difficult transition to talkies. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com THE TERMINATOR (R) — Arnold Schwarzenegger stars in the 1984 action flick about an unstoppable, human looking cyborg sent on a kill mission. Tickets $8. Midnight Saturday-Sunday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com !WOMEN ART REVOLUTION (NR) — Lynn Hershman Leeson’s film

explores the “secret history” of feminist art through conversations, observations, archival footage and works of artists, historians, curators and critics. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc. net

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 4687231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde


10% OFF with this ad ART

LISTINGS

PAGE 41

Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana!

United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

“comfort food incarnate”

Happy Hour Food and Drink Specials from 5-6:30pm 200 Julia St • 504-304-6318 www.feastneworleans.com

BONJOUR GALLERY & MARKETPLACE. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 635-7572 — “Classic Cars,” paintings by

Nancy Lowentritt, through June.

tropical isle® HOME OF THE Hand Grenade® -Sold Only At-

738 Toulouse St. • 523-5530 VISIT OUR WEBSITE

www.originaldungeon.com

Mitchell, ongoing.

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — Artfully Aware

exhibition, through July 5.

435, 600, 610, 721, 727

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil

New Orleans’ Most Powerful Drink!

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

Bourbon St.

3 full bars • 10:30-til

BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean

Live Entertainment Nightly

paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing.

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

Po-Boys, Pizzas & Plates

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including Seafood Muffeletas, Italian Meatballs, Veal Marsala, Mirliton Casserole, Fettucine Alfredo, Grilled Chicken or Grilled Shrimp Salad, Gumbo and more. 3939 Veterans • 885-3416

(between Cleary Ave & Clearview) Mon-Tues 11-3 • Wed-Thurs 11-7:30 Fri 11-8:30 • Sat 11-8:00 www.parranspoboys.com

DAMAGED ART WORK? Paintings • Prints • Frames • Mirrors Photos • Sculpture • Glass • Ceramic Professionally Restored

The New Orleans Conservation Guild, Inc. 13 years in New Orleans 3620 Royal St • In Bywater 10-4pm • Mon-Fri [504] 944-7900 www.art-restoration.com

REVOLUTION at the Green Goddess! There’s a revolutionary air sweeping the world. Whether from farm to table, or by shaking shoes at corrupt dictators, people are dedicated to making peaceful changes. The Green Goddess salutes all these revolutionaries! Together, we share the dreams, blood, sweat, and fierce determination to make it happen, NOW! LONG LIVE THE REVOLUTION The Green Goddess 307 Exchange Alley in the French Quarter www.greengoddessnola.com

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com — “Inter-

twined,” paintings by Karen Stastny, through Saturday.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www. collectiveworldartcommunity. com — Paintings from the

Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “So Much Art, So Little Time, Again,” exhibition of work by gallery artists from the past year, through Aug. 4. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Cold Drink”

printmaking invitational, through Aug. 6.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra,

Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “An American Memory,” a group exhibition curated by Michael Martin, through July 15. “Foot-a-Night,” installation by Hannah Chalew, ongoing. FIELDING GALLERY. 525 E. Boston St., Covington, (985) 377-2212 — Metal sculpture by Keith

Villere, through July 13.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org —

“Love, the Front,” a group exhibition featuring old and new gallery artists, through July 3.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 —

Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www. galerieroyale.com — “Expres-

Magazine St., 899-4687; www. guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by

David Harouni, ongoing.

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino.com — Group exhibition featuring works by nine gallery artists, through July 9. ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 7793202; www.isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www. jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing. JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg. com — “Rhythm on the River,”

paintings by Derenda Keating, through June.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

sions of Me,” mixed media on canvas by Kim Albrecht, through July 4.

“Wrong Sounding Stories,” paintings by Adam Mysock; “Eternal Moment,” drawings by Rieko Fujinami, through June.

GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu.com — “My Pinocchio Syndrome for Abigail ... Ten Years Later. This Aint’t Disney Jeff,” mixed media by Blake Boyd, through July 23. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery.com — “Seeing Music,” a group ex-

hibition exploring interpretations of music, through July 3.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George Schmidt, ongoing. GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www. goodchildrengallery.com —

“Grant v. Lee,” contemporary works related to the Civil War, through July 3.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Breaking Muse!”

ceramic assemblages by Shannon Landis Hansen; textile constructions by Christine Sauer, through July 30.

LIVE ART STUDIO. 4207 Dumaine St., 484-7245 — “New Orleans

is Alive,” acrylics by Marlena Stevenson, through July.


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, Mondays-Fridays. MARTIN LAWRENCE GALLERY NEW ORLEANS. 433 Royal St., 299-9055; www.martinlawrence. com — Works by René Lalonde,

through June.

MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — “Embers of a Floating World,” works by Caroline Wright, through July 9. MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Illumi-

nated glass sculpture by Curt Brock; enameled copper jewelry by Cathy DeYoung; hand-pulled prints by Dominique Begnaud, through July 30.

NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane.edu — “The History of the Future,”

photographs by Michael Berman and Julian Cardona, through June 29.

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — Acrylic

on canvas by Cleland Powell, through June 28.

PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “Chicken Lovers,” works

by Barbie L’Hoste and Megan Hillerud, through Friday.

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works

by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com —

Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patron Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Priscilla Busch, Natalie Nich-

ols, Andrew Jackson Pollack, Barbara Roberds and others, ongoing.

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing.

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing. VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — “Françoise Gilot and the Figure: 19402010,” paintings and drawings by the artist, through June. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by

“B Movie Double Feature,” photographs and ceramic collectors’ plates by Heather Weathers, Wednesdays-Sundays. Through July. METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “The Unconventional

RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George Rodrigue, ongoing.

Will Smith, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown glass

by Juli Juneau; photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco — Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

CALL FOR ARTISTS

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 8913381; www.neutralground.org —

works, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SOREN CHRISTENSEN GALLERY. 400 Julia St., 569-9501; www. sorengallery.com — “Horsing Around,” oil paintings by Campbell Hutchinson, through June. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Street

Children,” a group exhibition of works by Zambian youth, through Aug. 1.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary

sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works

by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

TAYLOR/BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Intri-

cate Terrain,” works by Maysey Craddock, through Wednesday. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s

the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing.

TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

UNO-ST. CLAUDE GALLERY. 2429 St. Claude Ave. — “Mara/Thal-

assa/Kai: The Sea,” works by Anastasia Pelias, Rian Kerrane and Melissa Borman, through July.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

DRAWING THE LINE. Octavia Art Gallery, 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.octaviaartgallery.com — The gallery seeks

works in all media that focus on the use of line for a upcoming juried exhibition (Aug. 6-27). Email art@octaviaartgallery. com for details. Submissions deadline is July 1.

NOLA NOW! The Contemporary Arts Center seeks submissions for an exhibit featuring works produced in the last two years by artists currently living and working in the greater New Orleans area. The exhibition opens Oct. 1. Call 528-3805 or visit www.cacno.org for details. Submissions deadline is July 8.

SPARE SPACES BUD’S BROILER. 500 City Park Ave., 486-2559 — Works by

Andrew Bascle, Evelyn Menge and others, ongoing.

CAFE ROSE NICAUD. 632 Frenchmen St., 949-3300 — Paintings

by Clarke Peters, through June. CAMPBELL’S COFFEE & TEA. 516 S. Tyler St., Covington, (985) 2466992; www.campbellscoffee. com — Multimedia works by

Margaux Hymel, ongoing.

Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

Work by local artists, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 9430010 — Oil landscapes of the

Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

PEACHES RECORDS. 408 N. Peters St., 282-3322 — “Gospel and

Blues,” photographs by Rita Posselt, ongoing.

ROYAL BLEND CAFE. 621 Royal St., 523-2716 — Black-and-white

photographs by Jocelyn Marquis, through September.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media paint-

ings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www. surreyscafeandjuicebar.com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing. THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses. com — Portraits by Zack Smith,

ongoing.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR. 5535 Tchoupitoulas St., 891-8500; www.dosjefescigarbar.com —

exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin

AMISTAD RESEARCH CENTER. 6823 St. Charles Ave., 862-3222 — “Richmond Barthe: Builder

Works by Mario Ortiz, ongoing.

Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing.

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel. com — Paintings by YA/YA se-

nior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA

youth artists, ongoing.

JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works by

Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings

on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing.

MARIGNY PHO. 2483 Burgundy St., 267-5869 — Selections from

of Pictures,” an exhibition highlighting the life and career of the Harlem Renaissance sculptor, through June.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “As We See It:

Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 5235525 — The museum features

fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and more.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The Threads

of Memory: Spain and the United States,” a traveling exhibition of rare materials from the Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain, through July 10. “The Golden Legend in the New World: Art of the Spanish Colonial Viceroyalties,” paintings from the New Orleans Museum of Art collection, through Aug. 14.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic

Spell of Memory: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011.

City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — “Ancestors of Congo Square: African Art in the New Orleans Museum of Art,” through July 17. “Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection,” more than 200 pins from Albright’s personal collection, through Aug. 14. “Thalassa,” a 20-foottall suspended sculpture by Swoon, through Sept. 25. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 565-8027; www.pharmacymuseum.org — Exhibits about 19th-century

pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org —

Endangered Species Day Art Contest Exhibition, through July 16. “Art & Jazz: Preservation Hall at 50”; “New Orleans Craft & Design”; “One World, Two Artists,” works by John Alexander and Walter Anderson; “Juke Joint,” photographs by Birney Imes; all through July 24.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www.louisianafilmmuseum.org — The museum

OLD URSULINE CONVENT. 1100 Chartres St., 529-3040 — “France

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — “Race: Are We So Different?” an exhibit exploring the history, science and everyday experience of race, through March 31.

features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana.

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. “Holding Out and Hanging On: Surviving Hurricane Katrina,” photographs by Thomas Neff, through Sept. 12. “Living With Hurricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays. through Sept. 25. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and others items, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 310-2149; www.lasc.org — The Supreme

Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years. MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,”

photographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART.

in America,” photographs by Arielle de la Tour d’Auvergne, through June.

SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood.org — “Aca-

dian to Cajun: Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; all ongoing.

TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum.com — The museum exhibits works

that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

ART

43


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER HAIRSPRAY. St. Lukes Method-

ist Church, 5875 Canal Blvd., 486-3982 ext. 104 — A cast of 80 performs the musical about a plump teen who gets her dream of dancing on a popular 1962 TV show and tries to use her newfound stardom to racially integrate the program. Tickets are free, but donations are accepted. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday.

JULIUS CAESAR. Lupin Theatre,

Tulane University, 865-5106; www.tulane.edu — The production sets the William Shakespeare tragedy in 1930s America amid a poverty-stricken population lead by scheming politicians. The play is part of the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane. Call the box office or email box@tulane.edu for reservations. Tickets $30. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. LOUISIANA LADIES. Louisiana

State Museum Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 568-6968; www. lsm.crt.state.la.us — In celebration of Louisiana’s 200th anniversary of statehood, the show features monologues and songs by Troi Bechet, Margarita Bergen, Leslie Castay, Tari Hohn Lagasse and others. Tickets $25 general admission, $45 reserved seating. Call 522-6545 or visit www.southernrep.com for reservations. 7 p.m. Monday.

0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions.org — A self-diagnosed agoraphobic’s fears begin to permeate his dysfunctional household in Bud Faust’s comedy. Tickets $18.50. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW.

AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Becky Allen stars in the campy cult classic about a young, naive couple that stumbles onto a mansion with strange inhabitants. Contests, games and prize giveaways begin an hour prior to performances, and official audience participation bags will be available for purchase. Tickets $20; available at the door only. Call 452-9836 or visit www.rockyrocksnola.com for details. 8 p.m. and midnight Friday-Saturday, 8 p.m. Sunday through July 2.

THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL. NOCCA Riverfront, Nims Blackbox Theatre, 2800 Chartres St., 940-2875; www.nocca.com — The cast of professionals and NOCCA students performs Horton Foote’s drama about a widow longing to return to the small town of her youth. Call 940-2875 or email boxoffice@ nocca.com for reservations. Tickets $20 general admission, $12 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

University, Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — Summer Lyric Theatre at Tulane University presents the Tony Award-winning musical based on Cervantes’ Don Quixote. Tickets start at $28. Call 8655269 for reservations. 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

CHIPPENDALES. Harrah’s Casino

MILDRED, DEAREST. Le Chat

SOUTHERN VOICES: DANCE OUT LOUD 4. Contemporary Arts

Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 5815812; www.cabaretlechatnoir. com — Running With Scissors regulars star in the send-up to Hollywood’s greatest legends. Tickets $26 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 6 p.m. Sunday June 10-26. ON THE AIR. Stage Door Canteen

at The National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Bob Edes Jr., Gary Rucker and others star in the musical that pays tribute to the heyday of radio broadcasts. Call 528-1943 or visit www.stagedoorcanteen.org for details. No show June 25. 6 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Sunday.

OUTSIDE IN. Cutting Edge

Theater at Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-

(Harrah’s Theatre), 1 Canal St., 533-6600; www.harrahsneworleans.com — The theater hosts the iconic all-male revue. Tickets $33.60 (includes fees). 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Friday.

DANCE Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — D’Project’s festival highlights New Orleans dancers, choreographers and dance companies through two showcases. Tickets $20 general admission, $16 CAC members and students. Showcase 1 is at 8 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday; showcase 2 is at 8 p.m. Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday.

STAGE EVENTS

STORER BOONE AWARDS. Le

Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Members of the New Orleans theater community vote for the best performers and productions

CALL FOR THEATER

review Hand Jive

In the 1920s, sculptor Alexander Calder created performers for his miniature circus of found objects. Calder served as ringmaster and puppeteer. The Fruit of Zaloom, recently on stage at the Contemporary Arts Center, is a descendant of Calder’s approach. Paul Zaloom is the writer, director, performer and puppeteer of Fruit. He sets a charming, offbeat tone, and when something goes awry, Zaloom often comments on it with impromptu irony. Fruit combines two radically different parts. The Adventures of White-Man is an ingeniously updated puppet show. Zaloom stands behind a small theater and manipulates a wide variety of toys and objects, and a video camera projects the action onto a large screen. He narrates the show, speaks as the puppets and adds simple, childish verbal sound effects. White-Man first appears in a space suit walking around a moonlike celestial body. He’s taking his “morning constitutional” on the curved surface. He thanks God for gravity. In response, God — a giant white beard — appears and commands him to go discover exotic people and places. After soaring through light-years of space, White-Man sees Earth (a small globe). He likes the place at first sight. There’s a line of cut-out trees and a blue sky, lit by a sunny-side-up egg. A pair of flying scissors cuts down the trees to reveal a row of little green aliens — the indigenous people. White-Man soon improves Earth with “civilization” — a line of skyscrapers (enlarged cellphones), traffic, politicians, dentists, hairdressers and others. Several more acts follow — maybe a few too many — but each contains choice moments. Zaloom also presents a “postmodern Punch and Judy show” called The Punch and Jimmy Show, a gender-bending take on the classic puppet duo. At the top of a miniature Victorian building, there is a black curtain through which the hand puppets enter and then wallop each other mercilessly with clubs and truncheons. In addition to romantic discord, Punch tangles with a policeman, a hangman and Death. One of the funniest moments comes when Punch tosses a baby he’s minding off the rooftop, and it lands with a thud on the stage floor. “Well, that certainly cast a pall,” Punch says to the shocked audience. “Come on, folks, it’s just a beanbag wrapped in swaddling!” This outrageous puppet show was a delight. Zaloom works out of Los Angeles, but I hope he will return to New Orleans soon for more of this inspired work. — Dalt Wonk

in 29 categories. Tickets $10. 8 p.m. Monday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS.

Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc. edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit

www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday. THOROUGHLY MODERN MILLIE.

Slidell High School, 1 Tiger Drive, Slidell, (985) 643-2992; www. slidellhigh.stpsb.org — Slidell Little Theatre seeks actors for the upcoming production of the musical. Actors should prepare 16-32 bars of an uptempo contemporary song for the audition. 7 p.m. Monday and June 28.

NEW ORLEANS FRINGE FESTIVAL.

The annual theater festival, held Nov. 16-20, seeks applications for 30-60 minute alternative theater performances. Visit www.nofringe.org for details. There is a $25 application fee. Submission deadline is July 1.

COMEDY A.S.S.TRONOTS. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Four “androids” improvise a space voyage based on audience suggestions. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BILLY D. WASHINGTON. Boom-

town Casino, Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www.boomtownneworleans.com — The standup comedian performs. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday. BROWN HQ. Pip’s Bar, 5252 Veter-

ans Blvd., 456-9234 — Audience members can participate in the show performed by select cast members of the improv comedy troupe. Visit www. brownimprovcomedy.com/ BrownHQ for details. Tickets are free for performers, $5 general admission. 8 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 949-2009; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’

Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Tickets $8. 11 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Friday. FRIDAY NIGHT LAUGHS. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.

com — Jackie Jenkins Jr. hosts the open-mic comedy show. Free admission. 11 p.m. Friday. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 3715543; www.maisonfrenchmen. com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m; show is 8 p.m. Friday. IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www.therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly openmic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday. JODI BORRELLO. Lakeview Har-

bor, 911 Harrison Ave., 486-4887 — Comedians JD Sledge and James Cusimano also perform. Tickets $15. 8:30 p.m. Sat., June 25.

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday.

LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

MAN OF LA MANCHA. Tulane

STAGE

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 21 ALADDIN . Rogers Memorial Chapel, Tulane University, 8623214 — The Patchwork Players present their outside-the-box, audience participation-heavy version of the tale. Reservations are recommended. Call 3142579, email patchworkplayersnola@gmail.com or visit www. patchworkplayersnola.com for details. Tickets $8. 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. Saturday. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 23 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Friday 24

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

BUTTERFLY TEA . Windsor Court

46

Hotel, 300 Gravier St., 522-1922; www.windsorcourthotel.com — The hotel and the Audubon Insectarium host the tea with live butterflies on every table and butterfly-themed treats. Reservations are recommended. Call 596-4773 or visit www. grillroomneworleans.com/ le-salon for details. Admission $19-$38. Seatings at 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. FridaySaturday.

Saturday 25 BAYOU BRIDGE BREAKFAST.

Bayou St. John, Magnolia Bridge, Moss Street and Harding Drive — Re-Bridge hosts the children’s event that includes breakfast, a walking tour of Bayou St. John, a demonstration on how to interpret specimen samples from the bayou, and the painting of a mural to span Magnolia Bridge. Call 309-2116 or visit www. rebridge.org for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 21 BOULIGNY LECTURE SERIES ON SPANISH LOUISIANA . Historic

BE THERE DO THAT New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc. org — Alfred E. Lemmon, director of the Williams Research Center at The Historic New Orleans Collection, discusses “Following the Paper Trail: The Daily Life of a Spanish Colonial Document.” Free admission. 6:30 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

DEALING WITH LOSS. West

Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m.

DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE. Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m. JOHN R. BEYRLE EVENTS.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum, along with the World Trade Center New Orleans, World Affairs Council of New Orleans, The University of New Orleans Centre Austria and the Consular Corps of New Orleans, hosts a luncheon honoring the U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation at 6 p.m. at the Stage Door Canteen. At 6 p.m. in the museum, Beyrle and his siblings present a discussion in conjunction with the museum’s Joe Beyrle: A Hero for Two Nations exhibit. MASTER GARDENERS DEMO. Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park, 6584100; www.noma.org — LSU Agricultural Extension Service and Master Gardeners of Greater New Orleans present a bed design and planting demonstration. Call 658-4153 or 866-2381 for details. Free admission. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Wednesday 22 COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

preview Follow the Money

New Orleanians may remember the turmoil when the Archdiocese of New Orleans announced it would close St. Augustine’s Church following Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures. Not just St. Augustine’s congregation was outraged, but before the church assented to keep the parish open, the widely popular Father Jerome LeDoux moved to Texas. The archdiocese had suffered economic losses due to flooding, and there was an outcry as other parishes were shuttered. Archbishop Alfred Hughes’ handling of the situation showed ways in which the church could be at best out of touch with its flock and at worst uninclined to be accountable to it. That saga is briefly recounted in Jason Berry’s Render Unto Rome: The Secret Life of Money in the Catholic Church (Random House). The focus of the book is how the church handles its money. Even without scandal, how a global organization manages its finances is an interesting question. The church has an estimated 1.2 billion members worldwide and massive wealth and assets, yet it is largely free to disclose only what it chooses about its income and spending. As the church has had to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to settle clergy sexual abuse lawsuits — and at the same time close parishes — Berry examines how such a large financial entity accounts for itself. The book is another installment in Berry’s reporting on the Catholic church, and it picks up on issues and church figures he’s covered previously, including clergy abuse (Lead Us Not Into Temptation) and Father Marcial Maciel, a major fundraiser for the church who was involved in both abuse scandals and money issues (Vows of Silence). Berry introduces many Catholic parishioners, some who became disillusioned with the church and others who became more involved in addressing its monetary management. With the costs of the clergy abuse scandals, the church’s actual wealth is an intriguing subject. Given the way the church chronically failed to handle its problem with pedophile priests, frequently “recycling” them to different parishes, one isn’t inspired with confidence that money is better managed. The book investigates the church’s fundraising and various monetary arms, including the secretive Vatican Bank. Other areas of seemingly failed oversight include a Philadelphia cardinal who spent $5 million renovating a church-owned vacation home. Berry also analyzes the way scandals and parish closings depress contributions. He tenaciously follows various money trails, including court cases, reports made public and stories told by church insiders. Ultimately, the question is what does the church owe its followers, especially when it asks for their support every Sunday? — Will Coviello

JUN

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Jason Berry signs Render Unto Rome 5:30 p.m. Wednesday Garden District Book Shop, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE.

St. Matthew/Central United Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. MODEL GREEN HOUSE. Global

Green Holy Cross Project, 409 Andry St.; www.globalgreen. org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details. TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. TAPAS CRAWL . Riverbend-area

restaurants including Saltwater Grill, Brigtsen’s Restaurant, Barcelona Tapas, Sara’s and Hana serve wine and a choice of tapas-sized dishes. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Fourth Wednesday of every month.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS &

FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 23 ALVAR CHESS. Alvar Library, 913

Alvar St., 596-2667 — Library guests can play chess with expert player Bernard Parun Jr. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND EXHIBIT.

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, 900 Convention Center Blvd. — Columnist Dan Savage and comedian and actress Molly Shannon are two of the speakers at the annual conference, which brings together librarians, educators, authors, publishers, literacy experts, illustrators and suppliers. Visit www.alaannual.org for the full schedule and other details. Thursday-Monday and June 28.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332 Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. THE GATHERING. On the first

Thursday of the month, a local restaurant will host the dinner event featuring special menus, featured artists and discussion topics to raise money for a charity. The location will be revealed when the reservation is made. Email gatheringnola2011@gmail.com or visit www.gatheringnola.blogspot. com for details. Admission $50. 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

HAITIAN DRUM & DANCE CLASS.

Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — Haitian master drummer Damas “Fan Fan” Louis, drummer David Braswell and Haitian dancer Michelle Martin lead the class. Free admission. 6 p.m.

RENOVATORS’ HAPPY HOUR .

The Preservation Resource Center event features a renovation-in-progress in the Carrollton neighborhood (8826 Willow St.). The event also has wine and light refreshments. Call 636-3399 or email sblaum@prcno.org for details. Admission $5 for PRC members, $7 non-members. 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday.

Friday 24 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets at 6:15 p.m. Fridays. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details.

JESUIT HIGH SCHOOL FISHING RODEO. Jesuit High School,

4133 Banks St., 483-3816 — Participants can fish anywhere, then bring their fish to the high school for the weigh-in. The weigh-in also features food and door prizes. Rodeo registration is required by noon Thursday. Call 486-6631 or visit www.jesuitnola.org for details. Admission $15-$35. Fishing begins at 6 a.m., weigh-in 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PAGE 48


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 21 > 2011

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EVENTS

LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

PAGE 46 PARK. Armstrong Park, North

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays. NEW ORLEANS MEDICAL MISSION SERVICES GALA.

Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 581-4367; www. generationshall.net — The nonprofit that provides health care to the poor hosts a gala. Visit www.nomms.org for details. Tickets start at $60. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. NOLA PRIDE FESTIVAL. Various

locations, visit website for details — Events include a pub crawl, family activities, a block party, book signings, the Grand Marshal reception and a parade and street festival featuring performances by Amanda Shaw, Jason Dottley, the 80s pop star Tiffany and others. Visit www.nolapride. biz for the full schedule and other details. Friday-Sunday.

SQUIRE CREEK LOUISIANA PEACH FESTIVAL. Railroad Park,

107 Park Ave., (800) 392-9032 — The annual festival features more than 200 artisans and vendors, a parade, rodeo, tennis tournament, 5K run, antique car displays and more. Visit www.louisianapeachfestival.org for details. Admission $5-$10. 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > JUNE 21 > 2011

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

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Saturday 25 ALLIGATOR LIFE . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The program focuses on one of Louisiana’s most well-known residents: the American alligator. 11 a.m.

BARKING BOOT CAMP. LA/ SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — A fitness trainer teaches the dog-and-owner class that mixes cardio, resistance training, obstacle courses and “doga” (dog yoga). Proceeds benefit the LA/SPCA. Preregistration is required. Call 810-1835 or visit www.barkingbootcamp.com for details. Admission $40 for four sessions. 7 a.m. to 7:45 a.m. BUSH MAN COMPETITION 2011 SIGN-UP & TRYOUTS. Tekrema

Center for Art and Culture, 5640 Burgundy St. — EcoLifestyles seeks black males ages 21-35 who are creative, mentally and physically fit and socially responsible for the competition that promotes

eco-friendly role models. Men should be prepared to discuss “going green” and to showcase a talent. Email info@ bman2011.com or visit www. bman2011.com for details. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. COOKING DEMONSTRATION WITH MARTHA HALL FOOSE.

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — The author demonstrates her recipe for fudge and signs copies of her newest book, A Southerly Course. 2 p.m. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . Christ Church

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. FOCUS ON WOMEN LUNCHEON . La Maison Creole,

1605 8th St., Harvey, 3623908 — The Epsilon Sigma Chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority hosts the luncheon spotlighting women who have promoted leadership and service within their communities. Call 458-8383 or email dominiquempayne@gmail. com for details. Tickets $40. 11:30 a.m.

FRENCH AMERICAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SUMMER WINE FESTIVAL . Shops at Canal

Place, 333 Canal St., 522-9200; www.theshopsatcanalplace. com — Besides more than 20 wines, the French-themed festival features French music and cuisine and an auction. Call 458-3528 or email info@ facc-la.com for details. Tickets $45 FACC/LA members in advance, $55 non-members in advance, $65 at the door. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. FRIENDS OF HARBOR CENTER GALA . Northshore Harbor

Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — The Friends of the Northshore Harbor Center present the gala featuring live music, food, an open bar with a speciality cocktail and a chance to win a cruise for two. Call (985) 7813650 for details. Admission $75. 7 p.m. to midnight. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables,

fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

INDOOR TRI-CHALLENGE . East Jefferson General Hospital Wellness Center, 3601 Houma Blvd., Suite 204, Metairie; www.ejgh.org — The indoor race includes a 15-minute swim, a 15-minute bike race and a 15-minute run for individuals or relay teams. Pre-registration is required by 4 p.m. Friday. Call 456-5000 for details. Admission $25 Wellness Center members, $35 non-members. 9 a.m. LACOMBE CRAB FEST. John

Davis Park, Bayou Lacombe, Lacombe, (985) 882-3010 — The crab-themed festival features food, rides, an interactive cultural village, children’s activities, and live music by Rockin’ Dopsie, the Boogie Men, the Mighty Supreme and others. Admission $5, free for children under 10. 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. Sunday.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

RENAISSANCE MARKETPLACE OF EASTERN NEW ORLEANS.

Renaissance Marketplace, 5700 Read Blvd. — The market offers cuisine from area restaurants, shopping, arts and crafts, children’s activities and more. 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. ST. BERNARD PARISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS EXPO. Frederick J. Sigur Civic

Center, 8201 W. Judge Perez Drive, Chalmette, 278-4242 — The expo gives guests the opportunity to learn more about area businesses and the services they provide. Call 250-6121 or email director@ stbernardchamber.org for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Sunday 26 DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE . New Orleans

Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’

The Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. SUNDAY SALON. Longue

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Dr. Richard Vinroot Jr. presents “Healing in the Hot Zone: One Doctor’s Passion for Medicine in Critical Parts of the World.” Refreshments will be served. Call 293-4726 or email hschackal@longuevue.com for details. Free admission. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Monday 27 TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www.notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS.

SPORTS NEW ORLEANS ZEPHYRS. Zephyr Field, 6000 Airline Drive, Metairie, 734-5155; www.zephyrsbaseball.com — The Zephyrs play the Round Rock Express. 7 p.m. TuesdayFriday. NEW ORLEANS JESTERS. Pan American Stadium, City Park, 1 Zachary Taylor Drive — The Jesters play the Baton Rouge Capitals. Visit www.nolajesters.com for details. 7 p.m. Saturday.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS L’OREAL PARIS WOMEN OF WORTH. Ten women dedi-

cated to volunteerism and community will be awarded money for their charities of choice. Visit www.womenofworth.com for details. Application deadline is June 30.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The

faith-based nonprofit seeks homes to rebuild that suffered damage of 50 percent or more

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL . The charter school

that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson Parish’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details. OPERATION REACH. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help

seniors live independently. Call for details. START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work oneon-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

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Actual results from a patient treated by Dr. Schmidt after wearing the Essix aligners for 9 months.* * Actual treatment times may vary.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 8978107 for information. BEFORE

WORDS BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. BOOK SIGNINGS AT NOLA PRIDE FESTIVAL. French

Quarter, corner of St. Anne and Bourbon Streets — Faubourg Marigny Art & Books hosts book signings with David Lummis, Michael Patrick Welch, Tom Carson and others during the NOLA Pride Festival. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. CASSANDRA CLARE & ELLEN HOPKINS. Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — Clare, author of City of Fallen Angels, and Hopkins, author of Crank, Burned, Impulse and others, sign and discuss their books. 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — Sheri Castle discusses and signs New Southern Garden Cookbook. Bringing food is encouraged but not required. 6 p.m. Monday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

DAVID UNGER . New Orleans Public Library, Main Library, 219 Loyola Ave., 596-2602 — The author signs and discusses Price of Escape. 1 p.m. Saturday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s

at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

Goodwill Training Center, 3400 Tulane Ave. — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. Email susan_unp@ yahoo.com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

from Hurricane Katrina. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

49


S:2.281”

EVENTS

LISTINGS

reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

FREE DELIVERY TO MID-CITY & LAKEVIEW

ELANA JOHNSON, JENNY HAN, JESSI KIRBY & JOHN COREY WHALEY. Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The young adult book authors sign their works. 2 p.m. Monday.

FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Buy 2 Entrees Get 1 Free Appetizer Buy 3 Entrees Get 2 Free Appetizers

nothing like juicy gossip over a filet with the girls.

MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

BRUNCH WEEKDAYS ONLY DINNER MENU 4PM-9:30PM

309-7286 / FAX 309-7283

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

INGRID LAW, JAY ASHER & MAUREEN JOHNSON . Octavia

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The authors sign their books. 3 p.m. Sunday. JASON BERRY. Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Render Unto Rome: The Secret Life of Money in the Catholic Church. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

JEFF KINNEY. Academy of the

Sacred Heart, Nims Fine Arts Center, 4301 St. Charles Ave., 899-7323 — The author and cartoonist signs The Wimpy Kids Do-It-Yourself Book. 4 p.m. Friday.

JESUS ANGEL GARCIA . Antenna

Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www.antennagallery.org — The author presents a “transmedia” reading of badbadbad. 7 p.m. Saturday.

JOSH KILMER-PURCELL & BRENT RIDGE . Anthropologie, The

Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 592-9972; www. anthropologie.com — The stars of the Planet Green network show The Fabulous Beekman Boys sign The Bucolic Plague: How Two Manhattanites Became Gentlemen Farmers: An Unconventional Memoir. 10 a.m. Saturday.

JULIE KANE . Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 523-4352; www.leh.org — Louisiana’s poet laureate reads from her poetry collections. 6 p.m. Thursday. KATE DICAMILLO. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The author of Because of Winn-Dixie signs her books. 2 p.m. Sunday.

Metairie • New Orleans • Biloxi ruthschris.com

KEVIN HENKES. Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The children’s author signs Little White Rabbit and Junonia. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. LAUREN MYRACLE . Octavia

50

BE THERE DO THAT

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The young adult book author signs and reads from Shine. 2 p.m. Saturday.

866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The young adult book author signs Three Quarters Dead. 1 p.m. Sunday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP.

SARAH DESSEN . Octavia

Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. MICHAEL BROWN . Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs Deadly Indifference: The Perfect (Political) Storm Hurricane Katrina, The Bush White House, and Beyond. 6 p.m. Friday. The author also appears at Maple Street Book Shop (7523 Maple St., 8664916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com) at 3 p.m. Saturday. MO WILLEMS. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The children’s author discusses and signs Should I Share My Ice Cream and Hooray For Amanda and Her Alligator. 3 p.m. Saturday. N.H. SENZAI & FRANCES O’ROARK DOWELL. Maple

Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — Senzai, author of Shooting Kabul, and Dowell, author of Ten Miles Past Normal and The Secret Language of Girls, sign their books. 1 p.m. Monday.

ORDERLY DISORDER: LIBRARIAN ZINESTERS IN CIRCULATION TOUR . Newcomb

College Center for Research on Women, Caroline Richardson Hall, 62 Newcomb Place, 865-5238 — Librarians hosts a discussion and reading of zines in conjunction with the American Library Association’s 2011 conference. Email zinelibtour@gmail.com or visit zinemobile.wordpress.com for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. PASS IT ON . George & Leah McKenna Museum of African American Art, 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — Poet Gian “G-Persepect” Smith and Alphonse “Bobby” Smith host a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $6. 9 p.m. Saturdays. POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. RICHARD PECK . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St.,

Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The young adult book author signs What Happened to Goodbye. 1 p.m. Saturday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spokenword, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday. STIEG LARSSON BOOK CLUB.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses the movie version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. 6:30 p.m. Sunday. TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. TOM FRANKLIN & LAURA LIPPMAN . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — Franklin, author of Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter, and Lippman, author of I’d Know You Anywhere, sign their books. 6 p.m. Monday. TOMIE DEPAOLA . Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The children’s author signs Strega Nona and Let the Whole Earth Sing Praise. 2:15 p.m. Saturday. TOMIE DEPAOLA & RICHARD PECK . Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — Children’s book author dePaola, author of the forthcoming Streganona’s Gift, and Peck, author of A Year Down Yonder, sign their books. Noon. Sunday.

UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www. lyceumproject.com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m. WOMEN’S POETRY CIRCLE . St. Anna’s Episcopal Church, 1313 Esplanade Ave., 947-2121; www.stannanola.org — The group meets at 2 p.m. Mondays. Call 289-9142 or email poetryprocess@gmail. com for details. YOHANNES GEBREGEORGIS.

New Orleans Public Library, Martin Luther King Branch, 1611 Caffin Ave., 529-READ; www.nutrias.org — The author reads from Silly Mammo and Tirhas Celebrates Ashenda. 10 a.m. Friday.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> DINING DUO <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Two related restaurants opened simultaneously beside > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >each other on Freret Street. Ancora Pizzeria & Salumeria < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <(4508 Freret St., 324-1636) serves a short, focused menu of Neapolitan-style pizza and salumi. Next door, High Hat Cafe (4500 Freret St., 754-1366) serves a mix of Louisiana and Deep South comfort food. Chef Adolfo Garcia is part owner of both WHAT restaurants, along with partners Jeff Talbot at Ancora and Chip Cafe Gambino Apperson at High Hat.

am

B

WHERE

4821 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-7500; www.gambinos.com WHEN

Lunch Mon.-Fri. RESERVATIONS

Accepted

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

Dishes made from scratch, plenty of local seafood

WHAT DOESN'T

The dessert list omits the bakery’s specialties.

ZIMET BENEFIT, PART I

This week marks the first of two major benefits for Nathanial Zimet, the chef/owner of Boucherie (8115 Jeannette St., 862-5514; www.boucherie-nola.com) who is recovering from gunshot wounds suffered during a robbery last month. Local breweries and liquor providers come together June 24 for “Beers Not Bullets,” a tasting event at NOLA Brewing (3001 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-7727; www.nolabrewing.com) with food and live music. Advance tickets are $30. See www.beersnotbullets.eventbrite.com. Zimet’s supporters also are planning a July 10 benefit called “Beasts and Brass.”

five 5 IN

FIVE PLACES FOR CHEESE PLATES A MANO

870 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 208-9280 www.amanonola.com

Savor an Italian cheese tour with traditional accompaniments.

CHECK, PLEASE

Down-home CreoleItalian lunch in an unexpected setting

BACCHANAL

600 POLAND AVE., 948-9111 www.bacchanalwine.com

The wine shop serves generous cheese plates.

Any Way You Slice It

Chef Wanda McKinney prepares hearty Creole and Italian dishes at Cafe Gambino.

HAVE YOUR CAKE AND EAT, TOO, AT CAFE GAMBINO.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

DOMENICA

123 BARONNE ST., 648-6020 www.domenicarestaurant.com

Cheese boards come with unique fried bread and house-made garnishes.

BY IAN MCNULTY

M

There also is a small video poker corral. The afternoon traffic is solid with medical types in scrubs, seniors out for long luncheons and the occasional family gathered for a midweek meal. The menu is mainstream Creole Italian, though it’s done with enough scratch-made care and such frequent flashes of originality that it exceeds the typical neighborhood lunch joint standard. One of many specials on a recent Friday was a napoleon of eggplant and fried oysters held together with cheese and cream over sweet, chunky house-made red sauce. Naturally, this sauce gets a lot of play. Besides the predictable company of chicken Parmesan or meatballs, it’s also ladled over interesting Italian crepes filled with ground veal and sausage and topped with provolone. From this Italian anchor, the menu branches widely. People at half the tables dredge tortilla chips through spinach and crawfish dip, one of the few appetizers. A slab of grilled tuna gets a touch of buttery caper sauce, and the option to add a few grilled shrimp to the beef tournedos turns lunch at the back of a bakery into something like a banquet feast. Crabmeat au gratin, with large lumps of crabmeat under a bubbling, yellow crust of cheddar, would be at home at a French-Creole cafe. The dessert list, enthusiastically pushed by the familial waitstaff, is long, though it curiously omits the cakes for which Gambino’s is famous. But here you do need to look past the bakery case to find this out-of-the-ordinary lunch spot in the first place.

GREEN GODDESS

307 EXCHANGE PLACE, 301-3347 www.greengoddessnola.com

The cheese list is as eclectic and adventurous as the menu.

ST. JAMES CHEESE COMPANY 5004 PRYTANIA ST., 899-4737 www.stjamescheese.com

Plates are assembled from a global inventory at this cheese emporium.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2007 Joseph Drouhin Chorey-les-Beaune BOURGOGNE, FRANCE / $20 RETAIL

The very small appellation of Chorey-les-Beaune lies between the prestigious neighbors Savignyles-Beaune and Aloxe-Corton. This bottling is aged 12 to 15 months in 10 percent new French oak. The elegant wine exudes intense aromas of cherry, red berries and forest floor followed on the palate by red fruit with notes of dried strawberries, spice and earth. It’s a good red wine for summer and goes well with cold cuts, roast fowl or game, grilled meats, pizza, Tex-Mex fare and soft cheeses. Buy it at: Hopper’s Wines & Spirits and Hopper’s Cartes des Vins. Drink it at: Cafe Degas, Le Foret, Stella!, Cochon, Martinique Bistro, Crescent City Steak House and Meauxbar Bistro. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

ention Gambino’s Bakery and some New Orleanians automatically will crave dessert, especially a tall, multi-layered, pudding-filled slice of the bakery’s famous doberge cake. Lately, though, Cafe Gambino, a restaurant inside the vintage Metairie bakery, has been making a case for lunch. People still come here for birthday cakes and boxes of petits fours, of course, but these days some also show up with muffulettas on their minds, or a plate of liver and onions over grits or even beef tournedos slathered with parsley-flecked maitre d’ butter. My first lunch here started with a basket of hot Italian bread and a plate of herbed olive oil for dipping, progressed to creamy, smoky ham and mushroom soup and then on to shrimp and lima beans, a rarely seen, old-fashioned Creole combo. Dessert was an ice cream sundae in a praline cup. The whole meal ran about $15 and ensured I would soon return to see what else this unexpected find could offer. Gambino’s Bakery has been around since 1949, and it has locations around the area. When the company decided to centralize baking at its Kenner headquarters, the move left enough space behind the counter at the Metairie shop for chef Wanda McKinney to open Cafe Gambino in 2008. Certainly, some bakery customers may have visited since then without any idea there was a lunchroom in back. Glimpsed fleetingly, the cafe can be mistaken for a seating area for people to polish off cupcakes on the spot. But this is a full-fledged dining room with table service, beer and wine for midday libations.

51


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> of dishes from wonton soup to siz< < < < < < <zling < seafood combinations served > > > > > > > >on>a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and ban<<< quest facilities available. Reserva>> tions accepted. Lunch and dinner <daily. < Credit cards. $$ JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www.

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <jungsgoldendragon2.com < — Jung’s > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > offers > > a mix of Chinese, Thai and Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

52

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133 S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $ BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St.,

202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

tions. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St. 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or housemade hickory sauce. Other options include a grilled chicken sandwich. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BUD’S BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is known for charcoal-broiled burgers topped with hickory-amoked sauce. The menus also includes hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and 24-hour City Park location also offer shrimp and catfish po-boys. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reserva-

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112; www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult

Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range

Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes including the Fat Elvis, made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana fa-

vorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$ BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CUBAN/ CARIBBEAN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437

Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat.,

DINER DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 561-

5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the halfshell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Mag-


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GOURMET TO GO

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE —

923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-

ITALIAN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100

N. 19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmon in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave.,

Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 8913644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations

Lori Beth DeGrusha and her father Johnny DeGrusha greet guests at Johnny’s Po-Boys (511 St. Louis St., 524-8129). PhOTO By CheRyL GeRBeR

classadv@gambitweekly.com

recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$ MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola.com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch page 54

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BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez, Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 8855565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Sun. Credit cards. $$

gambit

azine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stoneground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

53


OUT2EAT page 53 and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-

COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St.,

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN

0972; www.thebombayclub.com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 3019570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

54

thentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Park Ave., 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/ MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur

St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find au-

522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave.,

948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE — 755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942

— Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reserva-

tions. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-

8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636 Franklin Ave., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Boudreaux pizza topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-0841;

6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys are available. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$ RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

Mon. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD GRAND ISLE RESTAURANT — 575

Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ LA

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS

SOUL FOOD

486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454

Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN

— 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 — Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage poboys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAF-

FLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-

7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage and bowls of steaming pho. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa Restaurant serves Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Appetizers include fried egg rolls, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


CLASSIFIEDS PET ADOPTIONS AUTOMOTIVE

483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

DOMESTIC AUTOS $10,995 504-368-5640

‘10 FORD FOCUS SES

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m. Note: Ad cancellations and changes for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at 5 pm prior to the next issue date. Please proof your first ad insertion to make sure it is correct. Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

56

Rentals &

Employment Advertise in

NOLA

Lab Mix

‘09 SCION XD $13,995 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU IMPREZA i $13,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HONDA FIT Certified $15,995 504-368-5640

‘10 HYUNDAI ACCENT $10,995 504-368-5640

SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

A Touch

gift Certificates for Father’s Day

Aloha

of

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Waxing Services Available evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com

‘04 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER

La Lic #2983 • Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

‘07 FORD EXPLORER

MERCHANDISE

$9,995 504-368-5640

40K MI $15,995 Call 504-368-5640

‘09 SUBARU FORESTER AWD $18,995 Call 504-368-5640

NOTICE

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

Summer Special Introductory price 1 hr

$40

APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Toto deserves a loving homeb est in a home w/ no kids housebroken &obeys commands. good watch dog contact Traci- tbkestler@cox.net 504-975-5971

Lab Mix

3 yr/ M, Neuterd, House Broken, Up to date on vaccines, Playful & Sweet Brenda 504-838-0736 bmigaud@ cox.net

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 SFS Cat Adoptions has a large variety of sweet beautiful rescues that need good indoor homes-Siamese , Russian blues, etc all cats are spayed /neutered and vacs. 504 462-1968

Shepherd mx pup

Merlin (approx 15 wks) very friendly w/ ppl & other animals. housebroken. contact Tracy tscannatella@gmail.com 504-874-0598

Tigger

Very sweet male 2 yr pld golden brown tabby. shots ,tested ,neutered. 504 462-1968

Almond Color. $50. Call 943-7699.

ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $50. Call 943-7699

To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

5 min from Elmwood

Hours: 10am-7:30pm Mon - Sat

Alicia LA Lic# 520

16 yrs exp. Non-Sexual call

504-317-4142

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http:// www.continentalacademy.com

ADOPTIONS PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

LEGAL NOTICES ForeSite Services, Inc., located at 5809 Feldspar Way, Birmingham, Alabama 35244, and AT&T Mobility, in accordance with requirements of Section V.B. of the March 2005 Nationwide Programmatic Agreement (NPA) for Review of Effects on Historic Properties for Certain Undertakings Approved by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are requesting comment regarding potential impacts to historical or archaeological properties listed on, or eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP), by installation of wireless telecommunications antennae on an office building rooftop, located at 8200 Hampson Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, at latitude 29° 56’ 40.71” north and longitude 90° 08’ 5.41” west. All comments should be submitted within 30 days of the publication of this notice referencing project FOR01P1123 and sent to the attention of Mr. Henry Fisher, Environmental Engineers, Inc., 11578 U.S. Highway 411, Odenville, AL 35120. Mr. Fisher may also be reached via email at towerinfo@envciv.com, via telephone at (205) 629-3868, or via facsimile at (877) 847-3060.

BABY ITEMS

Weekly Tails

Double Stroller

Mac Laren. Like New. $100. 832-1689

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES $125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122 NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

PETEY Kennel #A12480209

90 min. avail • Swedish & Deep Tissue

MARKETPLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, and more for as little as $60

Gorgeous 7 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Leather, sunroof $14,995 504-368-5640

LICENSED MASSAGE

Real Estate

Kirin

‘08 VW JETTA SE

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

ASK ABOUT OUR SPECIAL RATES FOR

Very cute sweet petite kitty, 3yrs old , only 6 lbs, white/black spayed,shots 504 462-1968

IMPORTED AUTOS

Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

Itty Bitty Inky

$12,995 504-368-5640

Online: When you place an ad in

Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com

5 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968 Free kittens to good home. We live in New Orleans please call Pricilla @ (601) 569-3661

‘09 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Elijah

PETS

LOST/FOUND PETS 20 YEAR OLD YORKIE

Female. Deaf, losing eyesight. Blonde coat. Long skinny tail. Carondelet at Washington. Call Kena, 504-615-4943

REWARD- LOST

(Mid City but could be anywhere by now),Ozzie, male, brown/black stripe (brindle), pit mix, sweet, call him & he will come, hold him &call me asap, Traci 504-975-5971.

MAXINE Kennel #A12985280

Petey is a 7-month-old, neutered, Pit Bull mix. He loves nothing better than to eat, sleep and PLAY! Petey is housetrained, crate trained, knows basic commands and gets along well with other dogs and cats. To meet Petey or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. Maxine is a 3-year-old, spayed, brown tabby DSH. She’s a playful gal who also enjoys soakingup the sun in the windowsill and a thoroughly enjoys being brushed. To meet Maxine or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.


CLASSIFIEDS

ANNOUNCEMENTS

SERVICES

LEGAL NOTICES

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF CHARLESTON IN THE FAMILY COURT FOR THE NINTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DOCKET NO. 2010-DR-10-4117 CHARLESTON COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES VERSUS CHIMERE JASMINE, STEPHEN JASMINE, WALLACE FRANCOIS AND DUANE HURSTON. NOTICE TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action filed with the Clerk of Court for Charleston County on October 27, 2010. Upon proof of interest, a copy of the Complaint will be delivered to you upon request from the Clerk of Court in Charleston, and you must serve a copy of your Answer to the Complaint on the Plaintiff, the Charleston County Department of Social Services, at the office of their Attorney, The Legal Department of the Charleston County Department of Social Services, 3366 Rivers Ave., N. Charleston, South Carolina 29405-5714, within thirty days of this publication. If you fail to answer within the time set forth above, the Plaintiff will proceed to seek relief from the Court. The Hearing on the Merits of this action has been scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on August 11, 2011, in the Family Court for the Ninth Judicial Circuit, located at 100 Broad Street, Charleston, South Carolina.

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING GULF STATES AIR

Service & Sales 3 TON A/C Condenser & Installed $1499 5 Year Warranty Service Calls only $49.50 Gulf States Air (504) 464-1267

HANDYMAN HARRY’S HOUSE HELPERS * Small Jobs *Repairs *Carpentry *Painting *Install AND MORE! Insured & Priced-Right Harry’s Helpful Ace Hardware Uptown * 504-896-1500 Metairie * 504-896-1550

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live in a more comfortable home; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

SUPERIOR AIRE INC

Trane 3 Ton Freon Replacement System, 13 seer, 10 year compressor. $3990 INSTALLED 12 months same as cash 504-465-0688

CLEANING/JANITORIAL CRISTINA’S CLEANING SERVICE

Let me help you with your Cleaning Needs including After Construction Cleaning Residential & Commerical Licensed & Bonded 232-5554 or 831-0606

ELECTRICAL/INSTALLATION DIX COMPANIES

ELECTRICAL, Construction, Concrete, Fencing, Bobcat. Licensed & Insured. Mike Dix, 504307-7195 or Elmo Dix, 504-329-2726. mdixsr@gmail.com

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF ADAMS COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

CAUSE NO.: 2010-770 GERALDINE SEWELL, PETITIONER SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF LOUISIANA PARISH OF ORLEANS TO: ALL BORN, KNOWN, ABSENT OR UNKNOWN HEIRS OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED, TOLLIVER CARTER, CYNTHIA ELLIS, SHAREE JACKSON, TERRY JACKSON AND ANTONY JACKSON WHO ARE NOT TO BE FOUND IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI AFTER DILIGENT INQUIRY You have been made a respondent in the Petition to Determine Heirs filed

within the Court by Geraldine Sewell, seeking a judicial determination of the

DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

TREE MEDICS

$50 OFF Trimming & Removal To Gambit Readers - Thru July Free estimates 504-488-9115 nolatrees.com

PEST CONTROL TERMINIX

Home of the $650 Termite Damage Repair Guarantee! WE DO IT ALL.. Termites, Roaches, Rats & Ants Too. New Orleans Metro - 504-834-7330 2329 Edenborn, Metairie www.terminixno.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. Kenner-Jefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-652-0084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

POOL SERVICES MAGNOLIA POOLS

Specializing in Saltwater Systerms Service, Maintenance, Repair 504-270-7307 www.magnoliapools.org

DRIVERS/DELIVERY

EMPLOYMENT

VOLUNTEER

DRIVERS:

EMPLOYMENT Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

Long term Local & out/back loads! Free medical, dental w/more benefits avail. CDL-A w/Hazmat, Tanker and TWIC. 1 yr. TT Exp. Req. 1-888-380-5516

RESTAURANT

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

ADVERTISING/MARKETING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Advertising Sales Bi-Lingual (English/ Spanish) The ideal candidate will be organized, self starter, motivated & have exp selling advertising. Stipend + Commission & Bonus Call for interview 504.628.1028

AUDITIONS ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS

Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations.

BEAUTY SALONS/SPAS OLD METAIRIE DAY SPA

seeks exp Nail Tech for FT position. Under new ownership. High volume salon. Fax resume to 504-837-4792.

Classifieds

w w w.martinwine.com

OperatiOns Manager/Chef Metairie BistrO-Deli

FT, salaried with benefits. Day, evening & weekend availability req’d. Seeking highly motivated, self-directed, culinary trained individual. Assist Bistro-Deli Mgr with deli, kitchen, catering & dining room. Work with Chefs to ensure quality control. Work with Inventory Mgr to manage cost & pricing. Prior experience req’d. Submit resume to HR: hr@martinwine.com; fax (504) 894-6559; PO Box 19091 NOLA 70119

MISCELLANEOUS $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

Employers...

Gambit readers are who you need! Reach the most qualified applicants by placing your open positions in Gambit Classifieds.

heirs of Catherine Ellis, Deceased. You are summoned to appear and defend against said petition filed against you in this action before the Honorable George Ward, July 28, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., at the Adams County Chancery Court Building, Natchez, Mississippi, and in case of your failure to appear and defend a judgment will be entered against you for the things demanded in the petition. You are not required to file an answer or other pleading but you may do so if you desire. ISSUED UNDER MY HAND AND SEAL OF THIS COURT, this the 7 day of June, 2011.

Tommy O’Beirne, Chancery Clerk Adams County Chancery Court Clerk By: R.M. EDMOND D.C. Publish Dates: JUNE 14, 2011, JUNE 21, 2011, JUNE 28, 2011 OF COUNSEL: JOHN D. GIDDENS, ESQUIRE (MSB # 9357) John D. Giddens, P.A. Post Office Drawer 22546

Jackson, Mississippi 39225-2546 (601) 355-2022 (601) 355-0012 fax

To Advertise or for more information call your Classified Account Executive or (504) 483-3100 or email classadv@gambitweekly.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

IN RE: THE ESTATE OF CATHERINE ELLIS, DECEASED

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE

CLASSIFIEDS EMPLOYMENT

57


REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS COVINGTON

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

109 BELLE TERRE BL

Charming cottage on huge lot. 3br, 2 ba. Great schools. 9’ ceil. Den, sunrm, garage converted to huge game rm. Huge bkyd & storage galore. $250,000. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol. com.

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 9012 ROSECREST LANE

1,420sq. ft, lot 62x120. Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors throughout, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 minutes from St. Matthews & St. Rita. REDUCED! $184,000.

16062 LAKE RAMSEY RD

Better than new! 3 br, 2 ba. High ceil & crown mouldings. Beaut wd flrs. Huge master ste. Close to town, on a lrg 100 x 300 lot! $179,000. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT

19084 S. FITZMORRIS

Custom design, 5 br, 3.5 ba, pristine cond. Open flr plan, hdwd flrs. On 1 acre in River Heights. Lg fen yd, x-large gar, work area. More! $350,000. Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985-264-1125. soboloff@aol.com.

CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. REDUCED PRICE! $149,900. Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

Organic Modern! Open, flex flrplan, 5 br, 4.5 ba. Master bath is a spa! Top of line dream kit. Media game rm. On golf course, end of cul-de-sac. $690,000. Joan Soboloff, Owner/Agent 985-2641125. soboloff@aol.com.

208 Chateau De Brie

Classy & Custom Built! From the architectural style roof, to hrdwd flrs, & everything in between! Granite counter tops, cherry-wood cabinets, dual vanities. Agent, Tontinette Puissegur, Latter & Blum, 985-630-8465

ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

Min. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main house 3500 sf ft 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest house 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

MANDEVILLE 12 CHANDON CT

Waterfront home nr Causeway. 4 br 3.5 ba. 2 story. Huge back deck, 2 fabulous firepl, kit has custom ss countertops, new ac & heat. $337,500. Call Joan Soboloff, Avalar Realty. 985264-1125. soboloff@aol.com

Stunning Sanctuary Elegance

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

90 Cardinal Lane. Upgrades Galore. 5305 / 7106 sq ft. Approx 1 acre lot . Reduced to $999,000. Call Marlene Zahn 504-236-8262 or Cindy Saia 504-577-5713. Latter & Blum Realtors, 985-246-3505. mzahn@ latterblum.com

SLIDELL 120 PARADISE POINT

New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

METAIRIE

3020 VETERANS BLVD

3000 sg ft for lease off Causeway Blvd. 1 story in small strip mall. A/C, Heat and Water included in lease. Call Rick, 504-486-8951. Kirschman Realty, LLC.

740 N RAMPART

1350 sq ft, zone VCC-2, across from Armstrong Arch, corner of St Ann. $1750. Contact: 504-908-5210

THERAPIST OFFICE SPACE

Victorian Building in Lower Garden District. Fridays Only. Call 670-2575 for information

Call (504) 483-3100

New Orleans, Louisiana

3 Br, 2.5 Ba. Approx 1800 sq ft. Lg fenced yard. Small pet OK $1200/mo plus deposits.. 504-442-0618

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE

Le Fleur De Lis Realty, LLC

4608 FAIRFIELD ST.

Rent $970/mo 1BR, 1-1/2 BA, pool. Elec & cable incld, prkg. 24 hr Concierge Service- 914-882-1212.

Where dreams come home

Outstanding view of majestic wildlife. 2 story, 4BR, 3BA, study, upstairs loft. Bathrooms & kitchen updated. Deck, patio & porch. Quiet cul-de-sac. $419,900. 985-640-8775. www.sharpmls.com/114609

133 ABERDEEN DRIVE

Cross Gates Beauty 4 br 2.5 ba . Beautiful landscaping. Big kitchen, den, formal din rm, office. No flood zone. Home wrnty. Carole Woodward, Keller Williams Realty. (504) 578-7691. www.YourHomeYourCastle.com

201 N. SILVER MAPLE DR

Ashton Oaks, 4 BR, 2.5 BA. Gameroom, Kit with granite, wood floors down. Big Master ste, hi ceil. Never flooded. Home wrnty. Carole Woodward, Keller Williams Realty. (504)578-7691. www.YourHomeYourCastle.com

Ann de Montluzin Farmer The Historic House, Luxury Home and Second Home Specialist

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

CORPORATE RENTALS 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

broker

58

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

Stunning custom home in Grande Maison. 4 BR, 3.5 BA. On cul-de-sac lot backing greenspace. Gourmet kit, keeping rm, butler’s pantry, bonus rm, basketball court & more. $499,000. 504-248-0945. www.sharpmls. com/114561

20152 PALM BLVD

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

To Advertise in

147 E RUELLE

Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

4328 Bancroft Drive $625,000 A LARge WAteRfRont HoMe on pReStIgIouS StReet. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, Elevator, Master with large walk-in closet, bonus room over garage, office and situated on beautiful Bayou St. John. Great location near City Park and just 3 miles to the French Quarter. Owner financing via Bond for Deed with 25% down on this property.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in new orleans, LA 70130

1125 Lynnette Dr. Metairie 3 BR, 2 BA, Covered Patio. $154,900

2156 Euclid St.,Terrytown Lot for Sale. 6534 sq. ft. $55,000

Jennifer Z. LeBlanc Realtor/Broker Affordable Housing Certified Native of New Orleans

great

124 Four O’clock Ln, Waggaman 3 BR, 2 BA $89,000

Cell/Office: (504) 975-1757 www.lefleurdelisrealty.com jennifer@lefleurdelisrealty.com

24/7

online resident services

pet free

friendly spaces

off street parking

fully

enclosed access gates

Features vary by community.

River Ridge Metairie Baton Rouge

Kenner Slidell Mandeville

Mandeville Jackson, MS Picayune, MS


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe OLD METAIRIE

GENTILLY

RIVER RIDGE

GENTILLY

BILOXI, MS

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

Only Beachfront Resort in Biloxi/Gulfport - Bank Owned 3 bedroom/3 bath, 2161 sf. Amenities, covered parking Call Janine 228-313-1352 FIDELIS REALTY Please ask me about other foreclosures

9012 Rosecrest Lane 324 Metairie Rd - $1,950,000 Desirable Met Rd prop. Comm retail under non-conforming use. Inc 16,090 sq. ft. of land w/ exc. frontage on Met Rd & Vincent Ave. Loading dock & 7 parking spaces. Exc. redevel opp. for commercial/townhomes/single-family. Contact Josh Gertler, Basis Brokerage 504.261.8048 josh@basis-development.com

Newly renovated brick home, 1420 sq. ft., 2 bedroom, 2 bath, hardwood floors through out, appliances included, covered carport, large 62x120 lot w/open backyard & additional shed. 5 min. from Mathews & St. Rita.

4336 St Anthony $99,000

Charming renovated 2 bedroom/1 bath/ Cen a/h/Off street Parking/ Ceramic Tile/Corner lot/ Near Universities.

Reduced! $184,000

Southern Spirit Realty Keisha Washington 504-319-2693

Call (504) 915-3220

CLASSIFIEDS ALGIERS POINT HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

BROADMOOR 3626 Upperline

Upr dplx, 3 br, 1.5 ba, wd flrs, cei fans, furn kit, w/d, off st pkg. Nice area. $1200/mo. Louis, 874-3195.

ESPLANADE RIDGE 1208 N. GAYOSO

Upper 2 BR, LR, DR, 1 BA, KIT, wood/ ceramic flrs, high ceilings, cen a/h, w/d hkups, $1150/mo. 432-7955.

2919 Lepage

2b/1b, living, din, furn kit, w/d, cen a/h, wd flrs, high cel. garage $1100/ mo, no dogs. 985-231-8597

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY 1103 ROYAL UNIT A

BYWATER 1023 PIETY ST

2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

1 bedroom, 1 bath, cen a/h, Jacuzzi tub, w/d, water incl. Furnished or unfurnished. $1500/mo. Avail June 1. Call for appt, 504-952-3131.

1200 sq.ft 1/1 FURNISHED $1800/month includes gas & water. Newly renov’t 1850’s bldg. Call 985807-5398. Pics @ vrbo.com/142813

GENTILLY SINGLE FAMILY HM

BYWATER STUDIOS

2 apts available, one mid-July and one mid-August. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, 900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

CBD 339 CARONDELET LUXURY 1 BDRM APTS

Newly renovated 1850’s bldg on CBD st car line. 600-1000 sq ft. $1200-$2000/mo. 18 Units. Catalyst Development L.L.C. Owner/Agent. . 504-648-7899

CITY PARK/BAYOU ST. JOHN 4228 ORLEANS AVE.

1/2 Dble 2 Sty, 2Bd, 1Ba, A/C, Refig, Stove, W/D, Garage. $1300/mo, 1-yr Lse Sec Dep, No Pets.. Call 225-8026554/ email dicklea@cox.net

DOWNTOWN 1327 FRENCHMAN ST.

Living room, 1 BR, kitchen, tile bath. No pets. $500/mo. Call 504-494-0970.

IRISH CHANNEL 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 BR $695/mo. 2 BR, $900/mo (2 BR includes utilities), hardwood/carpet floors. . 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew - O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up 2833 MAGAZINE 1BR/1BA Mod kit, o/s pkng, pool, coin op laun, $800/mo 891-2420

1 BLK TO AUDUBON PARK

6230 Annunciation, 3 BR, 2 BA, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, off st prkg, $1950, lease. Call 621-7795

UPTOWN/ GARDEN DISTRICT

1, 2 & 3

BEDROOMS AVAILABLE CALL

899-RENT

1 Blk to St. Charles

1205 ST CHARLES/$1075

577 S CARROLLTON

1026 LYONS ST

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

8401 WILLOW ST

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611 2 br, 1 ba, furn kit, w/d hkps, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, 10’ ceils, off st parking. $1200/mo. Call 9-5, M-F, ASC Real Estate 504-439-2481

2011 GEN PERSHING Beautiful Neighborhood!

3 BR 2 BA, Close to Univ, med & law schools. The best apt you’ll see. Cent a/h, hdwd flrs. Lots of closet space. Offst Pkg, Water pd. Avail 6/1. No smokers, no pets. $1650. Paula 504-952-3131

4129 VENDOME PLACE

Beautifully renovated spacious home. 3/4 br, 3 BA, kit w/ ss appl. w/d, cen a/h, lg yard, small gar. $2500/mo. $1500 dep. 504-621-9337

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573.

2 Eff apts. Lower $625 tenant pays elec. Upper $700 incl util, w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@ yahoo.com

1729 1/2 ROBERT ST

Studio apt, 2 rms, tile ba, effc kit, patio, wd flrs, fpl, bkcse, a/c unit/heat, security. $700/mo. 866-8118

4830 1/2 CHESTNUT

1 bdrm, furn kit, cen a/h, wd flrs, hi ceil, w/d hkps, ceil fans, balc. $750/ mo. ASC Real Estate. Call between 10am & 4pm. 504-439-2481.

REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

$1000

1726 St. Charles 1br/1ba Apartment Over Pralines $800 1207 Jackson 1br/1ba "Aquatic Garden Apt"

$750

1514 Euterpe

$600

"Efficiency Off St. Charles"

1300sf, 2 or 3br, 1ba, furn kit, laun, c-a/h, hdwd flrs, ceil fans, Offst pkg. $1200 • wtr pd. 504-865-9964

FURN 2BDRM/1BA HOUSE

Complete w/fridge, w&d, mw, stove, sec sys, CA&H, os pkng. On srtcr & Busline. Quiet n’bhood. $1,100 mo + sec dep. No pets/smokers. Call (504) 866-2250

NEAR SACRED HEART

Fantastic neighborhood, 3 br, 2.5 baths, fenced in yard. Lovely details and amenities. Ready 6/17/11 $1,800/mo. 4620 Carondelet St. 7234472 or 872-9365

RAISED COTTAGE UPPER

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES 628 Julia 1br/1ba "Arts District Apartment"

By St. Charles, 3BR, 1BA, furn kit, w/d, cen air, $1450/mo util & Direct TV incl 504-913-6999, 504-259-6999

Deluxe furn 2 Br, w/10x12 luxury ba, cent. air, wd & tile floors, ceil fans, mini blinds, yd, screen prch, w/d, 5300 Freret at Valmont. $1200-$1400/mo incl. gas/wtr 504-899-3668

RENTALS TO SHARE ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

TOWNHSE- 6604 BELLAIRE

2 story, 3 BR upstairs, 2 half BA, 1 full BA. Formal dining. Washer, dryer, backyard. $1200. 504-301-7239

MID CITY 3122 PALMYRA STREET

Completely renov, 1/2 dbl, 1BR, 1BA, hdwd flrs, new appls, ceil fans, wtr pd. $650/mo+dep. Call 504-899-5544

4322 HAMILTON

2BR/1BA lower, 1000 + sf, hdwd flrs, furn kit, w/d, porch, fen yd, off st pkg, no smokers, pet negot. $900/mo + dep. 488-2969

readers need

KAYAK ON THE BAYOU

3237 Grande Route St. John. New renovation. 2BR/1.5BA, AC & heat, balconies. $2000/mo. (504) 210-5383.

UNIVERSITY AREA 1616 SONIAT ST

Patio ent, 2br, lr, din rm, 1ba stand up shower. Kit apl inc w&d, balc, stor, garage. NOPP sec. $1500/Lease. Avail Aug 1. 504-891-1863

a new home to RENT

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

Across from Pontchartrain Golf Course! 4 BR/2 BA, CA&H. Built In electric. No smokers. Avail now! $1500/mo + deposit. Call 504-491-9834

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT GRT LOCATIONS!

REAL ESTATE

You can help them find one.

To advertise in Gambit Classifieds’ “Real Estate” Section call 504.483.3100.

59


PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS BETWEEN JEFFERSON & OCTAVIA • 3222 Coliseum • 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

(New Price!) $2,495,000 Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 Commercial $399,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 57

62

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

5419 LASALLE ELEGANT UPTOWN HOME. Nestled between Jefferson & Octavia on a quiet block , this newly renovated home features a spacious living area with high ceilings & lots of natural light. Expansive eat-in kitchen overlooks deck & gorgeous courtyrd surrounded by garden.

504.895.4663 (504) 895-4663

Living rm opens to large porch. Master bdrm suite opens onto large balcony has closet & storage space galore! Attached sitting/dressing room has additional closets. 3BR/3BA, 3,050 sq. ft. Must see!! $595,000.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > JUne 21 > 2011

ELECTRICAL

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Gambit- June 20, 2011