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Lane Lacoy

OPEN HOUSE!

$1.2 MILLION

1312 Chartres St.

Historic Home Specialist

Asociate

Broker/Realtor®

2612 ROYAL STREET

One-of-a-kind Marigny center hall single, 2 lots, off-street parking, all original architectural details… Easy walk to French Quarter & CBD.

504-957-5116 504-948-3011

SUNDAY, APRIL 15 • 1-3 PM

NEW ORLEANS, LA 70116 Lovely Victorian Condo. 893 SQFT 1BD/1BR. Lots of natural light and comfortable floor plan with two balcony's.

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UPCOMING EVENTS

CLASSES FOR $33

April 17 Soul School Yoga Teacher Training Program Info Session

New Orleans’ home for heart-centered yoga + down-to-earth spirituality

April 19 Peaceful Mamas May 10 Sound as a Gateway to Your Inner World w/ Igor Iwanek

Axel Oestreicher (504)-638-5339 • (504)-944-3605

840 Elysian Fields Ave N.O., LA 70117

www.lanelacoy.com - ljlacoy@latterblum.com

Crescent City Cat Club is a visitation and adoption community for cats

Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty 2340 Dauphine St.

LICENSED IN LOUISIANA • EACH OFFICE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Downtown + Uptown

COME HANG

OUT with

CATS AND

1021 Marigny St. 833-NOLACat

KITTENS!

BULLETIN BOARD

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Do you feel passionately about making the world a kinder place?

MJ’s

••••••••

Would you like to work with people from all walks of life?

COMMUNION TIME

••••••••

Have you been looking for a way to give back to your community? Disciples Cross Necklace $6.50 (Assorted Colors)

We are seeking volunteers at Canon Hospice to donate their time towards helping patients and families who are dealing with end-of-life issues.

Ways to Volunteer: • Talk, listen, pray with, read to, or sit with patients • Support bereaved family members in their healing • Assist with clerical work, data entry, and mailings • Help with events like bingo nights, “Celebrations of Life,” and fundraisers • Use individual skills, creativity, and life experience to help in your own unique way

Sterling Silver Birthstone Cross $8.99 Chain sold separate

10TH ANNUAL GIANT INDOOR GARAGE SALE

April 21st, 2018 • 8:00am-3:00pm Over 20 vendors. FREE ADMISSION!!! Door Prizes, Face Painting, Food & Drinks. Elmwood Self Storage & Wine Cellar, 1004 S. Clearview Parkway, Elmwood Shopping Center (504) 737-7676 mail@elmwoodselfstorage.com

Kids Stretch Cross Bracelets $7.99ea.

S/S Holy Communion Medal $11.99

BUYING MIGNON FAGET JEWELRY

OLD U.S. COINS AND MARDI GRAS DOUBLOONS. CHRIS’S FINE JEWELRY, 3304 W. ESPLANADE AVE., METAIRIE. CALL (504) 833-2556.

We are an extremely flexible and supportive environment, and are looking forward to hearing from you at 504-818-2723

St. Stephen’s Catholic Elementary School Alumni Reunion, Classes 1964-1968, Saturday, April 28th • 7pm - 10pm St. Stephen’s School Cafeteria, 1027 Napoleon Ave. at Chestnut. Contact Carol Vonderhaar Herbert, 504-258-4101 for details.

Kids Stretch Necklace $9.99 ea.

MJ’s

1513 Metairie Rd. • 835-6099 Metairie Shopping Center www.mjsofmetairie.com MJSMETAIRIE


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LIMITED EDITION

SIGNED AND NUMBERED BY BRENDA BURKE $20

CONTENTS

APRIL 17-23, 2018 VOLUME 39 || NUMBER 16 NEWS

OPENING GAMBIT COMMENTARY CLANCY DUBOS

7 10 11

BLAKE PONTCHARTRAIN

12

FEATURES

WWW.SUZANNEORMONDPOTTERYLLC.COM

LOCAL PICK UP BY APPOINTMENT ONLY CALL LISA 504-899-0504 UPTOWN

7 IN SEVEN EAT + DRINK PUZZLES

5 31 54

LISTINGS

MUSIC

40

GOING OUT

47

EXCHANGE

53

@The_Gambit

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@gambitneworleans

The 300

It’s New Orleans’ big birthday. See what’s planned around the city as this old town enters its fourth century.

STAFF

@GambitNewOrleans @gambit.weekly

COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

Publisher | JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER Administrative Director | MARK KARCHER

EDITORIAL (504) 483-3105// response@gambitweekly.com Editor | KEVIN ALLMAN Managing Editor | KANDACE POWER GRAVES Political Editor | CLANCY DUBOS Arts & Entertainment Editor | WILL COVIELLO Special Sections Editor | KATHERINE M. JOHNSON Senior Writer | ALEX WOODWARD Staff Writer / Listings Coordinator | KAT STROMQUIST

ADVERTISING Advertising Inquiries (504) 483-3150 Advertising Director | SANDY STEIN BRONDUM (504) 483-3150 [sandys@gambitweekly.com]

Sales Administrator | MICHELE SLONSKI Senior Sales Representatives JILL GIEGER (504) 483-3131 [ jillg@gambitweekly.com] JEFFREY PIZZO

Contributing Writers | D. ERIC BOOKHARDT,

(504) 483-3145 [jeffp@gambitweekly.com]

HELEN FREUND, DELLA HASSELLE, ROBERT MORRIS, NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS

Sales Representatives

Contributing Photographer | CHERYL GERBER

BRANDIN DUBOS

PRODUCTION Production Director | DORA SISON Assistant Production Director | LYN VICKNAIR Pre-Press Coordinator | JASON WHITTAKER Web & Classifieds Designer | MARIA BOUÉ Graphic Designers | DAVID KROLL, WINNFIELD JEANSONNE

BUSINESS & OPERATIONS Billing Inquiries (504) 483-3135 Business Manager | MAUREEN TREGRE Accounts Receivable Clerk | PAULETTE AGUILAR Administrative Assistant | LINDA LACHIN

(504) 483-3152 [brandind@gambitweekly.com] TAYLOR SPECTORSKY (504) 483-3143 [taylors@gambitweekly.com] ALICIA PAOLERCIO (504) 483-3142 [aliciap@gambitweekly.com]

Inside Sales Representative RENETTA PERRY (504) 483-3122 [renettap@gambitweekly.com]

MARKETING Marketing Assistant | ERIC LENCIONI Marketing Intern | JANIE GELFOND

Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Gambit Communications, Inc., 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans, LA 70119. (504) 486-5900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2018 Gambit Communications, Inc. All rights reserved.


IN

SEVEN THINGS TO DO IN SEVEN DAYS

P H OTO BY GREG MILES

Lone wolf Walter “Wolfman” Washington releases My Future Is My Past

The Black Angels and Black Lips THU. APRIL 20 | Austin psychedelic rockers The Black Angels open their 2017 album Death Song with the heavy and brooding “Currency,” but more wistful angst marks an album created during the 2016 election cycle. Atlanta garage rockers Black Lips open at 8:30 p.m. at the Civic Theatre.

BY ALEX WOODWARD @ALEXWOODWARD WALTER WASHINGTON WAS RARELY IN SCHOOL , digging ditches and

stocking shelves at a grocery store at the corner of Poydras and Galvez streets before he told his boss, “You can take this job and do whatever you want to it.” He was 16 years old. “From that day on I had just been playing guitar,” says Washington, now 74. Washington learned to play by watching other players’ chord shapes, or by swatting at open-tuned strings with one finger pressed against the fretboards. He played with a spiritual group before he found his calling in rock ’n’ roll. Then-budding local hero and R&B star Johnny Adams got him a job playing countless long nights in the house trio at the Dew Drop Inn, where Adams also housed Washington in a small apartment above the club. Later, Washington hit the road with Lee Dorsey on the heels of “Ride Your Pony.” Then he led The Tornados, the band backing Irma Thomas. When Adams needed a guitar player, he hired Washington for a gig that lasted nearly 20 years. Earning the nickname “Wolfman” from saxophonist David Lastie (for “wolfing” around on guitar or for getting into trouble), Washington has steered his own band, The Roadmasters, for more than three decades and anchored himself as a Maple Leaf Bar staple with Joe Krown and Russell Batiste. Typically clad in bright red and topped in a flat cap and sunglasses, Washington’s guitar twists velvety jazz riffs into ecstatic, treblerich shredding, sometimes with his teeth, and often in roller coaster solos. But his not-so-secret weapon is his voice, a sandpapered howl that cuts into his latest album My Future Is My Past, out April 20 on Anti- Records. Shedding his bands and sidemen, the album reveals Washington as a timeless soul singer melting into a suite of intimate performances. Galactic’s Ben Ellman approached Washington about producing an album

WED.-SUN. APRIL 18-MAY 6 | Danai Gurira, who stars in the film Black Panther, wrote this drama about forced “wives” of a rebel leader during Liberia’s 2003 civil war. The women support each other as they try to negotiate the ongoing assault on their freedom and dignity. Southern Rep presents the show at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at Loyola University New Orleans’ Marquette Theatre.

Screaming Females

for him, telling Washington, “I’ve got some stuff I’d like for you to hear.” “Then when he told me the musicians,” Washington says with a wide smile, “I was thinking I was going to use my band. He said, ‘No, I’ve got cats I’d like to put on the session.’ I said, ‘OK then.’” Joining Washington are Jon Cleary, Stanton Moore, Ivan Neville, James Singleton and Irma Thomas, reuniting with Washington for the stirring duet “Even Now.” “That was the first time I ever really had jitters,” he says. “I got myself together, kind of cool, got me a little swig of Jack [Daniel’s]. Comfortable. … It took me a month to really get myself into understanding what’s really happening. I went in there and did all the songs all over again.” Ellman challenged Washington to focus on his voice, placed front and center, vulnerable and imperfect but present and powerful. “I’m comfortable with me and just me,” Washington says. “But mostly I’ve been doing stuff like that when I’m home just hanging around, not recording. … It gave me a good idea of how I sound and how I react to not having a full band. It was kind of scary. … It was kind of weird hearing my real self.” Washington opens the album with the sound of ice rattling in the glass and a “let’s go to work” before an acoustic version of “Lost Mind,” introducing the mantra informing everything to follow: “Know this before

APRIL 21 WALTER “WOLFMAN” WASHINGTON MY FUTURE IS MY PAST ALBUM RELEASE 10 P.M. SATURDAY TICKETS $10 THE MAPLE LEAF BAR, 8316 OAK ST., (504) 866-9359; WWW.THEMAPLELEAF.COM

FRI. APRIL 20 | Pew-surfing at First Unitarian Universalist Church last October, Marissa Paternoster’s New Jersey punk trio had just leaked two tracks from its forthcoming LP All at Once (Don Giovanni). This second coming follows the album’s release in February. HIRS, Gland and Woof open at 10 p.m. at Gasa Gasa.

Where Y’acht FRI. APRIL 20 | Captained by chameleonic frontman Adam Campagna and human metronome Eric Rogers, the dead-serious (or at least comatose-serious) smoothie kings ride steerage on Tall Ships 2018 with a so-tight-it’s-loose borrowed oeuvre of no-wake-zone jams, from Loggins all the way to Messina. At 10 p.m. at One Eyed Jacks.

The Soft Moon you start / My soul’s been torn apart.” “Everything’s been happening so fast,” Washington says. “I’m still trying to stay in tune with what’s happening and see it through. … I’ve been through a lot of things. I see where the things I’ve been through have paid off with what’s going on now in my life.” For Washington, the album is a humbling, unexpected plunge into the spotlight, decades after a spark of inspiration from his cousin Ernie K-Doe, whose “I Cried My Last Tear” Washington turns into a churchfilling prayer. “I’ve always — when I first saw my cousin and the recognition he started getting — said, ‘I wanna be a pillar, too,’” he says. “I wanna be someone New Orleans recognizes as a New Orleans musician.”

SUN. APRIL 22 | On his fourth album, Criminal, Luis Vasquez howls at The Soft Moon, the moniker for his gothic-tinged, post-punk cries for help against a backdrop of ambient discord and unrest. Boy Harsher opens at 9 p.m. at Gasa Gasa.

Big Easy Awards MON. APRIL 23 | Winners of annual music and theater awards will be announced at the Big Easy Entertainment Awards gala and there are performances by Irma Thomas, Germaine Bazzle, Little Freddie King, Samantha Fish, Delish Da Goddess and the casts of Ain’t Misbehavin’ and Fun Home. At 7 p.m. at Orpheum Theater.

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Women lobby at the Capitol ... recycling suspended ... Gambit sold to The Advocate ...

# The Count

Thumbs Up/ Thumbs Down

6 cents/94 cents The amount Louisiana has to put toward Medicaid spending this year vs. the amount it receives from the federal government.

Rohan Padmakumar,

a Lusher Charter School student, will travel to New York City April 23 to participate in the English in Action National Shakespeare Competition at Lincoln Center. High school students from around the country compete in reciting sonnets. Padmakumar is one of 57 from around the U.S. chosen to compete. First prize is a scholarship to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art Young Actors’ Summer School.

American Humane and Chicken Soup for the Soul Pet Food delivered 71,000

pounds of food to the CATNIP Foundation at Big Sky Ranch in Folsom. CATNIP (Care, Advocacy and Treatment of Neglected and Indigent Pets) is a no-kill shelter that cares mostly for cats, but also other animals that have been neglected or abused. Big Sky also provides foster and adoption services for domestic and farm animals in need.

New Orleans Online, the

city’s official tourism website, described the recent Freret Street Festival with these words: “Some New Orleanians locals [sic] refer to Freret Street as ‘The Middle Passage’.” No one does, but surely someone at the city’s tourism board should have known that the Middle Passage was the main route that brought slaves from Africa to America. Mark Romig, president of the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation, had the phrase removed and offered an apology.

‘JUSTICE FOR LOUISIANA WOMEN’ DAY AT STATE CAPITOL More than 100 women — many of them affiliated with women’s advocacy groups including Lift Louisiana, Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, Feminist Majority Foundation, Women With a Vision, New Orleans Abortion Fund and Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault — convened at the state Capitol April 11 to call for “Justice for Louisiana Women.” The event was part lobbying day, part activist workshop and part response to a legislative session that has included many bills that are consequential for women. In the current session, lawmakers are considering bills dealing with health care, LGBT discrimination protections, equal pay for women, sexual violence, stalking, abortion access and other issues that advocates say could impact women’s health and economic security or even endanger their lives. At last week’s lobby day, organizers began training a new generation of activists in the grinding, sometimes multiyear process of influencing and educating Louisiana’s largely male and mostly conservative Legislature. “Lawmakers have often overlooked and outright ignored the plight of women in this state ... by passing laws that have negatively impacted us,” said Petrice Sams-Abiodun, vice-president of external services for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast. “You know what we need to remember, women? [The Capitol] is our house.” Women (and a few men) who attended the event spent the day learning about legislative advocacy and networking with prominent organizers who support women’s rights in Louisiana. They joined legislators to offer comment in committee hearings and got a crash course in approaching lawmakers for face-to-face conversations on issues. Many who attended the event were in the Capitol for the first time; some were just learning the names of their state legislators. Though the event focused on influencing current lawmakers, it wasn’t hard to imagine some participants ultimately joining the record number of women running for office themselves — or digging deep into the long, often-frustrating process of changing representatives’ minds, one vote at a time.

LOUISIANA’S MEDICAID EXPANSION, which began in 2016 under Gov. John Bel Edwards, is predicated on the state ponying up a small amount of money to get much more from the federal government. By 2020 the state will have to put up 10 cents to receive 90 cents from the feds. “In all of these cases, there is an economic ripple effect that creates jobs, earnings, and state and local tax receipts that, otherwise, would not have occurred,” the Public Administration Institute report concluded. — KEVIN ALLMAN SOURCE: PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION INSTITUTE AT LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY.

C’est What

?

Should the Louisiana legislature change the law so students can wear bulletproof backpacks to school?

47%

SHOULDN’T BE OUTLAWED IN THE FIRST PLACE

Quote of the week “A Kevlar backpack is not a Captain America shield. You are not going to run out there blocking bullets with a good outcome.” — State Sen. J.P. Morrell, speaking last week when the Louisiana Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill that would let students wear body armor on school grounds or buses. The bill, which passed 34-2, now heads to the House. (Morrell and state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, both New PAGE 8

39% BAD IDEA; WHAT ABOUT GUNS INSTEAD?

14%

GOOD IDEA; COULD SAVE LIVES

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com

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Orleans Democrats, were the dissenters.) “When you have a bill like this,” Morrell said, “you push a false sense of security on parents that purchasing these would assure safety.” — DREW WHITE | MANSHIP SCHOOL NEWS SERVICE

Gambit sold to parent company of The New Orleans Advocate Gambit, New Orleans’ signature weekly news and entertainment paper, was purchased last week by the parent company of The New Orleans Advocate. Advocate owners John and Dathel Georges purchased the weekly from Margo and Clancy DuBos, native New Orleanians who have owned Gambit since 1991. Terms were not disclosed. (See Margo and Clancy DuBos’ letter to readers, p. 10.) John Georges said the purchase was in line with his vision of preserving iconic Louisiana brands and creating a locally owned media company dedicated to traditional journalistic values in print and online. Besides The Advocate, which they purchased in 2013, the Georges own the St. Tammany Farmer and weekly newspapers in Zachary and East and West Feliciana parishes. The Advocate is the state’s largest newspaper. “Dathel and I believe Gambit is a perfect fit with our other media properties and performs an important role covering Louisiana’s unique mix of arts, entertainment, politics and culture,” John Georges said. “We want to keep Gambit locally owned and thriving.” “Gambit will continue to be published as an independent voice with its own distinctive look and feel,” said Dan Shea, The Advocate’s publisher. “There may be some shared promotions and features in the future, but our plan is to let Gambit be Gambit. They have been highly successful, and this purchase ensures that Gambit will continue to succeed for years to come.” The DuBoses will continue with Gambit, Clancy as a columnist, and Margo as a business and marketing adviser. The couple has worked at Gambit from its earliest days — Clancy starting as political columnist in December 1981, and Margo as an advertising sales rep in November 1982. Margo served as Gambit’s publisher from 1987 to 2016. The DuBoses made Gambit one of the country’s most successful alternative weeklies, a genre which grew up in the 1970s as traditional daily newspapers eschewed coverage of social changes and other issues important to younger readers. “Looking to Gambit’s future, we wanted to make sure that what we built would continue as it always has,

under a company that shares our vision and our mission,” Margo DuBos said. “When we bought Gambit in 1991, our goal was to provide local ownership of a beloved local institution — and to cement Gambit’s place as a strong, independent voice for the community we serve. “Joining the Georges family of publications continues and strengthens our mission because it gives Gambit more resources than ever to serve our readers and advertisers.” Jeanne Exnicios Foster, Gambit’s publisher; Kevin Allman, its editor; and Sandy Stein, its advertising director, are all remaining with the company, as is its entire editorial staff. The purchase will add two dozen journalists and ad sales staff to the combined Gambit-Advocate team. “Our writers will continue to tell the stories that matter most to Gambit readers, and our account executives and designers will continue to create print and digital products that are effective for our advertising partners.” Foster said. “Having so many talented people working together means more growth for both Gambit and The Advocate.” Sometime this summer, Gambit will move from its Mid-City location on Bienville Street to The New Orleans Advocate headquarters in the Warehouse District. The two papers will share The Advocate’s exhibition and assembly space at 840 St. Charles Ave. and plan to increase open-tothe-public programs that add to the civic life of the city. Gambit will be printed at The Advocate’s state-ofthe-art print facility in Baton Rouge. Gambit was launched in 1981 and currently distributes 36,000 free copies per week at 350 locations across metro New Orleans.

Survey: residents support criminal justice reforms, Medicaid expansion A survey by the LSU Public Policy Research Lab found that a majority of Louisiana residents support criminal justice reform and Medicaid expansion, two major policies pushed by Gov. John Bel Edwards’ administration. The survey comes at a time when legislators are considering proposals to scale back last year’s changes in criminal justice and cut funding for some Medicaid programs. Of those surveyed, 61 percent of Louisiana residents approve of the criminal justice changes. Louisiana’s expansion of its Medicaid program also remains popular with residents, with an overall approval rating of 69 percent. Among Democrats, 74 percent supported the criminal justice changes. Ninety-two percent approved of the Medicaid expansion, which Edwards, who is up for re-election next year, pushed through in 2016.


OPENING GAMBIT

Dr. Michael Henderson is the director of the Public Policy Research Lab at LSU.

a poll of 852 Louisiana residents by researchers at LSU’s Manship School of Mass Communication. The researchers also have found general disillusionment with state political leaders. In the first installment of the survey, about half of the respondents said they believed the state is headed in the wrong direction. Last year’s criminal justice package that found favor with a majority of respondents included changes in parole, sentencing and after-prison policies aimed at reducing the state’s notoriety as the incarceration capital of the world. But support for letting judges determine sentencing without mandatory minimums — requiring minimum prison sentences for people convicted of certain crimes — decreased. Seventy-two percent of state residents supported judicial discretion in sentencing over mandatory minimums, down from 64 percent last year. Additionally, 58 percent of those surveyed favor the death penalty for people convicted of murder, significantly higher than the national average of 49 percent reported by Pew Research Center in mid-2016. A House committee on criminal justice rejected a proposal to eliminate Louisiana’s death penalty Wednesday, after a version of the bill advanced in a Senate committee Tuesday. This seems to mirror the trajectory of a similar bill last year that died after rejection by a House committee, despite its success in a Senate committee. The state expanded Medicaid in 2016 to include those making up to 138 percent of the federal

poverty level. However, a lack of public awareness of the expansion exists, with only 35 percent of survey respondents reporting they knew about the expansion. Favored by the public across party lines is the implementation of work requirements and copayments for Medicaid recipients, with 79 percent favoring work requirements and 69 percent favoring copayments. Republicans have pushed hard for both measures, and Edwards has expressed his support for the two policies. Both of the measures were attached to tax bills that died when the recent special session collapsed. Changes to the Medicaid program also have been discussed during the current regular session. Because legislators failed to create any new revenue raising measures during the special session earlier this year, Edwards’ doomsday budget proposal could become reality if legislators are unable to find an alternative solution before a temporary sales tax increase expires July 1. Edward’s budget plan included a $656 million reduction in the Health Department’s budget and a loss of nearly $1.6 billion in federal matching funds. While Medicaid, which is primarily funded by the federal government, would continue to receive state dollars under the proposed budget, some services are at risk. They include a low income-based program providing long-term care for aged, blind and disabled individuals. Nearly 46,000 residents who receive funding for nursing homes and disability centers under the program could lose that coverage.

Municipal glass recycling suspended; compost dropoff service added Glass recycling in New Orleans will be suspended starting April 14 due to expansion by the city’s glass recycling contractor, according to a press release from the city. No date was given for resumption, though the city notes that all local Target locations offer glass recycling dropoff containers in front of their stores. New Orleans instituted curbside glass recycling in 2015 for the French Quarter and Downtown Development District, but suspended the practice in 2017, citing low citizen participation. For those who want to compost egg shells, coffee grounds, fruit and vegetable scraps and more, the city has good news: New Orleans is partnering with The Composting Network to accept compost materials via dropoff at its monthly event at the City’s Recycling Drop-Off Center (2829 Elysian Fields Ave.). Note that The Composting Network will not accept dairy products, meat products and other things.

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Republicans were notably divided on both issues. Forty-six percent of Republicans surveyed approved of the criminal justice changes and 42 percent disapproved. The Medicaid expansion received support from 47 percent of Republicans, while 46 percent disapproved. The report was the fifth installment of the 2018 Louisiana Survey,

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COMMENTARY West Jefferson Flood Millage: YES

A Letter to Our Readers FOR THE PAST 27-PLUS YEARS, we had the great

honor of owning Gambit. Throughout that time, we strived always to keep Gambit true to its original mission of speaking truth to power while highlighting New Orleans’ unique arts, entertainment, cultural and political scenes. It was great fun, but now it’s time to pass the baton to Gambit’s fourth owner — Capital City Press LLC, publisher of The Advocate newspaper. We do so with many fond memories and great optimism for Gambit’s future. Gambit was founded in December 1980 by writereditor Gary Esolen and former Vieux Carre Courier publisher Philip Carter. In those early years, Gambit burnished its reputation as a take-no-prisoners observer of

local news and politics. Five years later, Virginia-based Landmark Communications Inc. bought Gambit. Landmark, a family-owned media giant that once owned The Weather Channel as well as daily and weekly newspapers, brought needed business structure and a deep reservoir of resources to the fledgling company. When we bought Gambit with local investors in 1991, it marked a return to local ownership. In the ensuing decades, Gambit covered the rise and fall of David Duke and Edwin Edwards, the onset of casino gaming, Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, too many political scandals to count, the BP oil disaster, New Orleans’ ongoing struggles to create a safe and sustainable city that offers economic opportunity to

EARLY VOTING BEGAN THIS WEEK and continues through

all its citizens — and every aspect of local arts, entertainment and culture. We created the Big Easy Entertainment Awards to recognize the best of local music, theater and classical arts; and we entered the world of digital publishing with our bestofneworleans.com website. These are exciting — and challenging — times for journalists, particularly those who work in local media. Although we no longer own Gambit, we’re both still active in its operations. Clancy will continue writing the Politics column he has penned since

1981, and Margo will continue helping with sales and marketing strategies. As we move with Gambit into this next phase of local ownership and additional resources, we are reminded of Gambit’s Commentary announcing the paper’s acquisition by Landmark in 1985: “More than ever before, we can look at Gambit and know how secure it will be and how solid its future is in New Orleans.”

Margo DuBos Clancy DuBos

Saturday, April 21, in several parts of metro New Orleans. Voters on the West Bank of Jefferson Parish will decide the fate of a critical millage proposition for flood protection. The West Jefferson Levee District seeks voter approval of a 10-year, 4.75mill property tax dedicated to constructing, raising, armoring and maintaining levees — and for flood and hurricane protection. If approved, the tax is expected to generate $4.75 million annually. The federal government recently improved West Jefferson’s flood protection infrastructure, and those improvements require constant maintenance. Existing levee district revenues are inadequate to bear those costs. In addition to funding critical maintenance, the new tax also will help control flood insurance rates. We recommend voting YES on this proposition.


TALK OF HOLDING A CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION TO ADDRESS LOUISIANA’S STRUCTURAL DEFICIT has

gained momentum. The idea has merit on several fronts, but it’s also an admission that our state legislators are either unwilling or unable to do their jobs. And, ultimately, there’s a danger that not much would change. That’s not to say it’s a bad idea or not worth the risk. The sad political reality is that most Louisiana lawmakers know perfectly well what needs to be done to stabilize our state’s revenue stream, change our budgeting process and make state government more efficient. Unfortunately, most of them lack the political will to do it. There’s no denying that we need to restructure Louisi-

ana’s tax system. It must be broader and fairer, which would lower rates for most taxpayers. We also need to remove most (but not all) statutory and constitutional budget dedications, shift responsibility for certain services from the state to local governments, and let local governments tax their citizens at an appropriate level to sustain key services without state interference. That’s a tall order, which explains lawmakers’ reluctance to tackle meaningful fiscal reform. It’s so much easier just to talk about it. Sort of like talking about a constitutional convention. Truth is Louisiana has a constitutional convention every time our Legislature convenes. Legislators can propose constitutional amendments

every year, and many of them do. But none has ever proposed a global fix to Louisiana’s fiscal train wreck. Instead, our lawmakers have proposed — and we, their constituents, have approved — a hodgepodge of fiscal amendments since our constitution was adopted in 1974. What began as a muchneeded rewrite of Louisiana’s unwieldy 1921 constitution (one of the longest and most-amended in the nation) resulted in a streamlined version of the Huey Long model of state government. The 1974 constitution was more concise than its prede-

cessor, but it did not change what is fundamentally wrong with Louisiana government: We concentrate power (and money) at the state level and stifle local governments’ ability to serve people where they actually live and work. Now, more than four decades after it was written, our current constitution is beginning to resemble its antiquated predecessor.

The only thing more attractive than our fresh cut flowers is the stunningly low price. So, if you want to save on stylish arrangements for a wedding or colorful seasonal flowers for your home, stop in and see us. To Order, Call 504-834-8216

710710 Veterans Blvd., Metairie | dorignacs.com Veterans Blvd., Metairie | dorignacs.com

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@clancygambit

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Would a constitutional convention change much?

CLANCY DUBOS That’s probably the best argument in favor of a convention. Others include the fact that our current constitution does not establish a good model for modern governance; it contains too many fiscal restrictions that lead to structural deficits; and it is too restrictive. A handful of bills now pending legislative approval call for a “limited” constitutional convention that would focus on the constitutional articles dealing with taxing, budgeting, state and local government relationships and financing education. Those are the key areas, and there may be enough support for the idea of such a convention, but let’s not lose sight of another political reality: Whether legislators or convention delegates gather to rewrite our constitution, the forces that favor various aspects of the status quo will do all they can to make sure nothing changes. So far, with or without a constitutional convention, those forces are winning.


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BLAKE PONTCHARTRAIN™ @GambitBlake | askblake@gambitweekly.com

Hey Blake, I see NOPSI manhole covers all over town, and now there’s the NOPSI Hotel downtown. I know it was once the city’s utility company, but what’s the history of NOPSI and the name?

Dear reader, The acronym NOPSI stood for New Orleans Public Service Inc., a company founded in 1922 as the city’s gas and electricity provider. It also ran the city’s public transportation system until the 1980s. NOPSI was formed to succeed the old New Orleans Railway and Light Company, which was founded in 1905 but became insolvent. Soon after its creation, NOPSI merged into the Electric Bond and Share Company of New York (EBASCO). The company, a subsidiary of General Electric, created the Electric Power and Light Corp. Among its holdings were NOPSI and Louisiana Power and Light Co., which served the rest of the state and was known as LP&L. It was the Roaring Twenties, and the demand for electrical, gas and streetcar service was booming. The company grew, and in 1927 it opened a new headquarters at 317 Baronne St. In describing the new, nine-story building, The Times-Picayune harkened back to the company’s early years. “Under new management, under a new agreement with the city, with assurances of ample financing and with a pledge to the public that street railway, gas and electric service would be modernized and expanded to keep step with the growing city, the company (NOPSI) started out with a clean slate.”

The NOPSI Hotel now occupies the building that once was a headquarters for New Orleans Public Service Inc. P H OTO B Y K A N DAC E P O W E R G R AV E S

EBASCO’s Electric Power & Light Corp. was dissolved in 1949 and a new company was formed: Middle South Utilities Inc. It remained the parent company of NOPSI for 40 years and in 1989 changed its name to Entergy Corporation. The name was an amalgam of “enterprise, energy and synergy,” then-chairman Ed Lupberger told The TimesPicayune. In 1994, NOPSI was reorganized and renamed Entergy New Orleans Inc. NOPSI operated the city’s streetcars and buses until 1983. In 1979, the state Legislature created the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority (RTA), and by 1983 NOPSI had transferred the city’s transit operations to the public agency. Since 2008, the French-based company Transdev has operated the transit system under contract with the RTA. NOPSI remained at the Baronne Street building until 1983, when the company’s headquarters was moved to Poydras Street. The building on Baronne was sold and last year reopened as the NOPSI Hotel.

BLAKEVIEW THIS WEEK WE TRAVEL BACK 60 YEARS to the opening of the first span of what we now call the Crescent City Connection, the bridge that links the East and West Banks. Originally called the Greater New Orleans Bridge, the $65 million toll bridge opened to traffic at 12:01 a.m. on April 15, 1958, following three years of construction but six months ahead of schedule. Official dedication ceremonies followed in October of that year. At the time, it was the longest cantilever bridge in the world, with a 35-cent toll. In May 1964, newly inaugurated Gov. John J. McKeithen honored a campaign promise to remove the toll. Construction on the second span, which cost $500 million, began in 1981 and was finished in September 1988. A year later, the bridge was renamed the Crescent City Connection, which was among the names submitted in a contest. Tolls went back on the bridge in 1989 but were removed in 2013 after a voter referendum.


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The massacre at the Mechanic’s Institute WHAT WE KNOW AS THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL NEW ORLEANS was

NEW ORLEANS IS GEARING UP THIS WEEK FOR ITS OFFICIAL

TRICENTENNIAL EVENTS, which include a commemorative interfaith prayer service at St. Louis Cathedral (April 17), NOLA Navy Week (April 19-25), Tall Ships New Orleans (April 19-22), International Weekend (April 20-22), Voices of the Congo Square (April 20), a citywide “family reunion” (April 22), a Tricentennial dog parade in New Orleans City Park (April 22) and quite a bit more. In this section, we look at some often-overlooked people and events in the city’s history, examine how the city celebrated its bicentennial in 1918, and give you all the details on celebrations around town. And Gambit’s own Blake Pontchartrain has a 20-question quiz to see how much you know about the history of New Orleans.

BY KAT STROMQUIST & ALEX WOODWARD @KSTROMQUIST @ALEXWOODWARD

Gail Etienne, Tessie Prevost and Leona Tate THE SAME DAY 6-YEAR-OLD RUBY BRIDGES ENTERED WILLIAM FRANTZ ELEMENTARY, three girls

entered McDonogh 19. Known as the McDonogh Three, they joined Bridges as the first black students to integrate all-white schools in New Orleans — more than six years after the Brown vs. Board of Education decision that dismantled segregation in schools. Anti-segregationist district court Judge J. Skelly Wright ordered the Orleans Parish School Board to desegregate its schools in 1956, and on Nov. 16, 1960, federal marshals escorted Gail Etienne, Tessie Prevost and Leona Tate into McDonogh 19 on St. Claude Avenue. “As we arrived near the school, the car slowed down and everything I remember from that point seemed to go in slow motion,” Tate wrote in 2004. “Somehow, we were able to maneuver through a crowd of cursing, screaming, yelling people who were being held back by the police.” When they arrived inside, white students fled their classrooms. Windows were papered over with brown parchment. For the next school year and several months into the next one, they were the only students at McDonogh 19. They continued to face abuse and violence from classmates after helping to integrate another school, T.J. Semmes, in 1962. Etienne and Prevost also helped integrated Rivers Frederick Junior High School. Tate joined Bridges at Frantz Elementary for fourth grade, then attended Kohn Middle School and she and Etienne integrated Francis T. Nicholls High School. Prevost attended Joseph S. Clark High School.

once the Mechanic’s Institute — and the site of one of the city’s worst incidents of racial violence. At that time in U.S. history, the federal government was taking a “soft touch” on ex-Confederates, says Sean Benjamin, public services librarian at Tulane University. In Southern states, little effort was made to rebuild a more inclusive government; it seemed as though former Confederate states were trying to recreate the conditions of slavery. In July of 1866, Louisiana Republicans had convened a constitutional convention at the Mechanic’s Institute to consider offering black residents the right to vote. A group of abolitionists, African-American political activists and their advocates marched toward the building to offer support. But before they arrived, the crowd of a few hundred people was attacked by a white mob, which included ex-Confederates and members of the local police and fire departments. A few dozen people were killed by gunfire and many others were injured. The U.S. Congress and residents of the North were shocked by the violence. The event sparked a congressional investigation, and outrage over the incident was a factor in the passage of the 14th amendment. Benjamin says one could argue that Reconstruction started in earnest on the heels of the incident. As the changes of that period started to take hold in Louisiana and New Orleans governments, the city also saw the rise of a new wave of black journalists, activists and other political figures, many of whom were galvanized by the massacre and the events that followed.

An illustration of the Mechanics Institute during the riot of 1866. I M AG E C O U R T E S Y LIBR ARY OF CONGRESS

Joseph Logsdon and Sue Eakin FIRST PUBLISHED IN 1853, SOLOMON NORTHUP’S PIVOTAL MEMOIR TWELVE YEARS A SLAVE illustrates the brutality

he endured after being captured and enslaved for more than a decade. The harrowing story was revived in the Academy Award-winning 2013 film 12 Years a Slave, partially filmed in Louisiana. Northrup was sold in New Orleans at the largest market of enslaved people in the U.S. and was forced to work for 10 years at a plantation in Avoyelles Parish. His book sold thousands of copies upon its release and after subsequent reissues by the end of the 19th century. But it remained relatively obscure and out of print in the following decades, until it was reprinted with annotations by LSU Press in 1968, thanks to the work of historians Sue Eakin and Joe Logsdon, a history professor at the University of New Orleans (UNO). Logsdon (a “titan in the department” at UNO, says UNO historian Dr. Nikki Brown) and Louisiana State University professor Eakin traveled to the plantations and other locations mentioned in the book, mapping out Northup’s journey and providing a historical basis to his account. Originally from Chicago, Logsdon lived in New Orleans for more than 30 years and was active in local and national chapters of the NAACP.


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THE YOUNGER SISTER OF CIVIL RIGHTS ACTIVIST ORETHA CASTLE HALEY, Doris Castle spent her 19th

birthday inside Mississippi State Penitentiary. She was arrested during a Freedom Riders protest ride from Montgomery, Alabama to Jackson, Mississippi, where she was arrested in 1961. “Those on the bus with us were a group of people who had never been in each other’s company, bonded by a common goal,” she said in a 1986 interview. “Our only weapon was that we were right in what we were doing.” Two years later, Castle was photographed outside New Orleans City Hall being carried by four policemen while sitting in a chair protesting the building’s segregated cafeteria. She was among three plaintiffs who successfully sued the city to desegregate the building, and with her sister Oretha, she fought to desegregate New Orleans public transit. Along with the New Orleans chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Castle also organized student-led protests at several universities and worked to eradicate housing discrimination. She also worked as a counselor at Odyssey House, according to the Historic New Orleans Collection. In a 1964 article in the CORE-lator, Castle wrote that she had been arrested five times for nonviolent action — she spent three days in jail after picketing three downtown theaters for refusing to admit blacks.

Doris Jean Castle protesting segregation policies at Woolworth’s and McCrory’s on Canal Street in New Orleans in 1961. P H OTO C O U R T E S Y 5 0 Y E A R S / 5 0 C O L L E C T I O N S : K I M L AC Y R O G E R S / A M I S TA D R E S E A R C H C E N T E R , NEW ORLEANS

DAVID HENNESSY WAS ONLY 30 YEARS OLD when he was promot-

The WPA ALTHOUGH MOST PEOPLE KNOW THE WORKS PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION (WPA) as the labor force

behind buildings, roads and other New Deal infrastructure projects, the program had initiatives in New Orleans that touched a broader segment of the population and comprised quieter work that would become essential to historians. Out-of-work professors, writers and academics in the city got WPA jobs indexing New Orleans Police Department records and obituaries, translating archival records from their original French and Spanish and binding thousands of library books, many of which still are in use by archivists today and are easily identifiable by their distinctive WPA binding. “People who work in these systems can pull out a book and pretty much instantly know it was a WPA book,” says Christina Bryant, head of the Louisiana Division City Archives at New Orleans Public Library. WPA workers also made mattresses and quilts for the needy during the Depression and taught household skills. One of the most enduring things to come out of the program, Bryant says, were city guides published by WPA workers nationwide. In addition to discussions of architecture, cuisine, Carnival traditions and cemeteries of the day, the WPA’s city guide looks at New Orleans’ government background, its racial distribution and economic and social development. The guides also show a clear and unsettling snapshot of segregated New Orleans during the 1930s.

ed to superintendent of the New Orleans’ police force in 1888. He was a popular police chief, but he would serve only two years before he was shot while walking home in October 1890. On his deathbed, Hennessy accused Italian residents of killing him. Hennessy had testified in a court case against an Italian criminal, and his killing was widely considered an act of vengeance by the local mob. Prosecutors rounded up both Italians and Italian-Americans thought to have mob connections, and 11 people stood trial for Hennessy’s murder, while another eight were tried as accessories before the fact. The prosecutions ended in acquittals and mistrials, which stoked anger against the city’s Italian community. After the trial — but before the defendants were released — a mob of as many as 8,000 New Orleanians, including many prominent businessmen and high-ranking citizens, stormed the parish prison. Members of the crowd shot and hung some of the men and 11 were killed. The incident had a lasting impact on New Orleanians’ perspectives on local Italians. Tensions weren’t helped by then-Mayor Joseph Shakespeare’s comments to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch about the Mafia (he said the vigilante killings had a “most excellent effect” on a “society of cut-throats”), and the Italian government was very unhappy with what had transpired, which contributed to a diplomatic rift in U.S.-Italian relations. Hennessy’s killer never was identified, and court records about the trials were thought to have been lost but recently resurfaced.

Police Chief David Hennessy’s murder sparked a massacre of Italians who were charged in the crime but whose cases ended in acquittal or mistrial.

bicentennial THAT wasn’t THE

BY KAT STROMQUIST

@KSTROMQUIST

“NEW ORLEANS WILL CONDUCT A CELEBRATION THAT WILL SEND ITS ECHOES AROUND THE WORLD,” runs the lead of a 1917

Times-Picayune story announcing plans for the city’s bicentennial celebration. Drawing on materials that recently had surfaced in French archives,” the story said, city planners had pegged the date of the city’s founding as Feb. 9, 1718 — coincidentally, the bicentennial would be the Saturday before Mardi Gras. Much was planned for New a multi-day bicentenOrleans’ nial celebration that would host governors, last 100-year mayors and the U.S. celebration ambassador to France. Festivities were to bedidn’t go gin with the arrival of a so well replica of the French ship Neptune, which allegedly carried New Orleans’ earliest European inhabitants, at the Place d’Armes — today’s Jackson Square — at “10 o’clock in the forenoon.” Other celebrations included a military salute to the flag of France, a parade to New Orleans City Park, a 1718-era costume ball at the ill-fated French Opera House at Bourbon and Toulouse streets (it burned down in 1919) and the presentation of a key to the city to the Duke of Orleans on Lundi Gras. But the bicentennial became mired in a familiar swamp of logistical and circumstantial issues. As The Times-Picayune reported, bicentennial committee planners shifted the celebration’s date forward by two months to complete a restoration of St. Louis Cathedral and to offer French officials additional time to travel. In the meantime, the U.S. entered World War I and it became apparent that a celebration of this scale would be difficult to execute in wartime and not in the proper taste. In an editorial that ran the same day as a news story headlined “NO BICENTENNIAL CELEBRZATION (sic) UNTIL THE WAR IS OVER,” The Times-Picayune noted, “It was not patriotic to hold a festival at this time, when we are engaged in so gigantic a struggle, and when so many Orleanians are absent from their city in the service of their country and unable to take part in the ceremonies.” Most Mardi Gras celebrations also were canceled that year. Little was left of plans to salute the city’s 200th anniversary, and celebrations largely were symbolic. A last-minute celebration was planned for Dec. 20 at the Cabildo, featuring appearances by Louisiana civic and business leaders, the French consul and Archbishop John W. Shaw as well as music and more. But it’s not clear if this more subdued party actually happened. No record of it survives in the paper.

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David Hennessy’s murder

Doris Jean Castle


ANSWERS French Quarter 1. C. French Market Place — Gallatin Street was only two blocks long but had a reputation as a headquarters of vice, prostitution and crime in the city in the mid1800s. The street was renamed French Market Place in 1935. 2. A. William McKinley — He became the first sitting president to visit New Orleans when he came here in May 1901, just four months before he was assassinated. 3. D. Bourbon Orleans Hotel — A free woman of color, Mother Henriette Delille co-founded the Sisters of the Holy Family in 1837. In 1881, the order moved its convent to the former Orleans Ballroom at 717 Orleans Ave. (now the Bourbon Orleans Hotel), also establishing St. Mary’s Academy there. Both relocated to Chef Menteur Highway in 1955. 4. A. 1948 — The Desire streetcar line, which ran through the French Quarter, was in operation from 1920 until 1948. Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize-winning play A Streetcar Named Desire, which is set in New Orleans, premiered on Broadway the year before.

Uptown 5. C. 9. — The green streetcars on the St. Charles line, which dates to 1835, are numbered in the 900s. The riverfront streetcars are in the 400 series, while the RTA’s three other lines have cars in the 2000s.

waitress looked at me and said, ‘Ray, you sure look beat.’” 11. A. Municipal Auditorium — The Coker Room at the Municipal Auditorium was a space used for banquets, parties and receptions. Opened in 1956, it was named after William “Bill” Coker, the facility’s general manager for eight years. 12. D. John Boutte — In 2003, singer/songwriter John Boutte wrote “Treme Song,” which he performed as the theme for the HBO series. He told The Times-Picayune he wrote the song while living in Treme and witnessing a jazz funeral at St. Augustine Church.

Lakeview 13. B. Studio A — In the 1960s, future D.A. Harry Connick Sr. and his wife Anita, a future judge, ran Studio A record shop at 6266 Marshal Foch St. off Harrison Avenue. The income helped put both of them through law school. 14. A. St. Dominic Church — John Chase designed the large stained glass window over the Harrison Avenue entrance to St. Dominic. It depicts “The Transfiguration,” showing Jesus Christ between figures of Moses and Elijah. 15. C. Harrison Avenue — A statue of Mother Cabrini, who lived and worked in New Orleans, is located on the neutral ground near Canal Boulevard and Harrison Avenue. It was placed there in 1949 by the Order of Alhambra. 16. B. Joe “King” Oliver — Joe “King” Oliver, who was Louis Armstrong’s mentor, wrote “West End Blues” and was the first to record it.

Algiers 17. A. C. Ray Nagin — Clarkson and Nagin were classmates at O. Perry Walker in Algiers. 18. D. Martin Behrman — Martin Behrman was mayor for 17 years, serving four consecutive terms from 1904 to 1920. He was elected to a fifth term in 1925. He died a year later in his Algiers home, where he lived for most of his life.

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6. D — Florence Graham — Anne Rice, who was given the name Howard Allen Frances O’Brien at birth, used the pen names Anne Rampling and A.N. Roquelaure to write erotic fiction. 7. C. St. Mary’s Dominican College — John Kennedy Toole taught English and literature at the now-defunct St. Mary’s Dominican College in the early 1960s, about the same time he finished the manuscript for A Confederacy of Dunces. 8. A. Fump and Manny — John “Fump” Flynn opened F&M Patio Bar with his brother-in-law, Emmanuel “Manny” Guillot, in 1947. Guillot, who also owned Manny’s Sanitary Supply Co., lived on Tchoupitoulas Street across from the bar.

Treme

17. New Orleans-born actress Patricia Clarkson attended O. Perry Walker High School in Algiers with another wellknown New Orleanian. Who is he? A. C. Ray Nagin B. Bryan Batt C. Ralph Brennan D. Branford Marsalis

19. C. Victory Drive — Gen. Charles DeGaulle, the French president and military leader during World War II, visited New Orleans in 1960 and was present when Victory Drive in Algiers was dedicated in his honor.

10. Dooky Chase’s restaurant, a Treme landmark since 1941, is mentioned in a song by what well-known performer? A. James Brown B. Fats Domino C. Ray Charles D. Nat King Cole

ALGIERS

9. B. Earl King — Ernie and Antoinette K-Doe (and fittingly, K-Doe’s mother-in-law, about whom he complained in his hit song) are buried in a tomb in St. Louis Cemetery No. 2 that also contains the remains of songwriter and guitarist Earl King. K-Doe family friend Heather Twichell offered use of her family tomb to them.

20. The Carnival krewe of Alla, founded in Algiers in 1932, refers to its monarch by a name other than king. What is he called? A. Boss B. Maharajah C. Dictator D. Big Chief 19. What was the original name of the street now known as Gen. DeGaulle Drive? A. Habans Street B. Patterson Street C. Victory Drive D. Brechtel Boulevard 18. The city’s longest-serving mayor lived most of his life in Algiers and died there as well. Who was he? A. A.D. Crossman B. Walter Flower C. Denis Prieur D. Martin Behrman 16. Louis Armstrong’s 1928 rendition of “West End Blues” is considered the definitive version of the song. Who wrote it? A. Jelly Roll Morton B. Joe “King” Oliver C. Sidney Bechet D. Buddy Bolden 15. There is a statue of St. Frances Xavier Cabrini in Lakeview. Where is it located? A. Canal Boulevard B. Robert E. Lee Boulevard C. Harrison Avenue D. West End Boulevard 14. Noted editorial cartoonist and historian John Chase designed a stained glass window in which Lakeview church? A. St. Dominic Church B. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church C. Lakeview Presbyterian Church D. St. Luke’s United Methodist Church

@GAMBITBLAKE

NEW ORLEANS HISTORY?

20. B. Maharajah — Longtime Alla krewe captain and float builder Blaine Kern said the tradition of calling the king and queen Maharajah and Maharanee dates to 1978. Kern said since the name of the krewe (which stands for Algiers, La.) sounds like it comes from a different part of the world, Alla, founded in 1932, decided to change the monarch’s titles as well, to breathe new life into the club.

13. Harry Connick Sr., former Orleans Parish district attorney and father of singer Harry Connick Jr. once ran a record shop. What was it called? A. Harry’s Place B. Studio A C. Anita’s D. Smith’s Records

LAKEVIEW 12. Who sang the theme song for HBO’s Treme? A. Luther Kent B. Deacon John C. Jeremy Davenport D. John Boutte 11. Where was the Coker Room? A. Municipal Auditorium B. Candlelight Lounge C. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts D. St. Peter Claver School 9. Ernie K-Doe and his wife Antoinette, who opened the Mother-in-Law Lounge on North Claiborne Avenue in 1995, are buried in a tomb that contains the remains of what other local music great? A. Danny Barker B. Earl King C. Allen Toussaint D. Benny Spellman

TREME 8. What do the initials in F&M Patio Bar stand for? A. Fump and Manny B. Frank and Mike C. Fred and Marty D. Floyd and Martin 7. A Confederacy of Dunces author John Kennedy Toole once taught at what Uptown school? A. Loyola University B. Tulane University C. St. Mary’s Dominican College D. Notre Dame Seminary

TRICENTENNIAL QUIZ

blake

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW

10. C. Ray Charles — Ray Charles, a frequent customer of Leah and Dooky Chase’s, mentioned the restaurant by name in his 1961 song “Early in the Morning,” singing “I went to Dooky Chase’s to get something to eat / The

6. Novelist Anne Rice, who was born in the Irish Channel and lived Uptown for many years, has written under several names. Which of the following isn’t one of them? A. Anne Rampling B. A.N. Roquelaure C. Howard Allen Frances O’Brien D. Florence Graham 5. The St. Charles Ave. streetcars all are labeled with numbers in a series. What is the first number on each one? A. 8 B. 2 C. 9 D. 4

UPTOWN 4. In what year was the famous Desire streetcar line discontinued? A. 1948 B. 1942 C. 1953 D. 1960 3. Venerable Henriette Delille, founder of the Sisters of the Holy Family and a candidate for sainthood, established a convent in the French Quarter in the 1800s. What is located at the spot today? A. Royal Sonesta Hotel B. Omni Royal Orleans Hotel C. Jax Brewery D. Bourbon Orleans Hotel 2. Who became the first sitting U.S. president to visit New Orleans when he spoke at the Cabildo during a stop in the city? A. William McKinley B. Theodore Roosevelt C. Andrew Jackson D. Thomas Jefferson 1. Before Storyville, the French Quarter’s Gallatin Street had the reputation as a rough and tumble red light district. By what name is the street known today? A. Decatur Street B. Exchange Place C. French Market Place D. Dutch Alley

FRENCH QUARTER

pontchartrain THE

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18 THE TRICENTENNIAL IS BOTH A CITYWIDE CELEBRATION AND A MARKETING OPPORTUNITY FOR THE

TOURISM INDUSTRY

BY KEVIN ALLMAN @KEVINALLMAN

AS MUCH A MARKETING OPPORTUNITY AS A CITYWIDE CELEBRATION , New Orleans’ Tricentennial has gotten press from around the world. Tourism leaders have thrown many annual events (Jazz Fest, the New Orleans Wine & Food Experience, Luna Fete) under the umbrella of tricentennial celebrations this year, but there are a few events going on this week — the “official” 300th birthday — solely dedicated to the Crescent City entering its fourth century. For more information on all of them, visit the city’s official website www.2018nola.com/events.

TUE APRIL

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Interfaith Prayer Service 7 P.M. • ST. LOUIS CATHEDRAL

The public is invited to this prayer service for people of all faiths.

Arrival of Tall Ships ALL DAY WOLDENBERG PARK

The kickoff to NOLA Navy Week brings mighty vessels from the U.S. and the Netherlands to the Mississippi River — as well as 2,000 sailors to the city April 19-25. Free tours of the ships will be given to groups on the mornings of April 20 and 24, and anyone interested can board the ships and look around from noon to 5 p.m. on Friday and Saturday (10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday). There also will be Navy band concerts during the week, as well as a seafood cookoff and other assorted activities.

Tricentennial Citywide Family Reunion

The Oosterschelde is among the tall ships that will be lining the Mississippi River this week. P H OTO B Y ARTHUR OP ZEE

Tricentennial Dog Parade

12 P.M.-5 P.M. • ARMSTRONG PARK

11 A.M. • CITY BARK DOG PARK NEW ORLEANS CITY PARK

This festival and picnic will be coordinated with International Jazz Day, with a Tricentennial Stage featuring performances by Mia Borders, Ivan Neville and Friends, Kermit Ruffins and the BBQ Swingers and other local acts. A jazz stage in Congo Square (starting at 2 p.m.) will feature Herbie Hancock, Terence Blanchard, Patti Austin, Ledisi and other guests. Food and beverages will be on sale in the park, but organizers say people are welcome to bring their own food.

This day in the park for pooches and those who love them is presented by Gambit and NOLA City Bark. There will be a costume contest (pre-registration required), a photo booth, a food truck and beer for purchase from Port Orleans. New Orleans Saints mascot Gumbo will lead the parade, and there will be a brass band. People are welcome to bring picnic materials and hang out with a DJ after the parade. Register at www.bestofneworleans.com/dogparade. The Tricentennial Citywide Family Reunion in Armstrong Park will feature Mia Borders, Terence Blanchard and many other musicians.


P R O M O T I O N A L

F E A T U R E

LET’S GO

New Orleans Opera Association

504-529-3000 • www.neworleansopera.org

1970 New Orleans Opera Association production of Charles Gounod’s Faust, Act II.

New Orleans Opera Association (NOOA) presents its 75th Anniversary Concert April 20 and PHOTO COURTESY NEW OR22 at Mahalia Jackson Theater for the PerformLEANS OPERA ASSOCIATION ing Arts. International stars and Louisiana’s ARCHIVES, LOYOLA UNIVERleading talent come together with a 90-memSITY NEW ORLEANS SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & ARCHIVES, ber chorus and the Louisiana Philharmonic NEW ORLEANS, LA Orchestra, led by Robert Lyall, to perform selections by Verdi, Mozart, Offenbach, Rossini, Puccini, Wagner, Bizet and Gershwin, as well as Broadway favorites and more. A soiree before the show on Friday celebrates 75 years of New Orleans Opera History. There’s also a brunch on Sunday. Tickets are available for all events at www.neworleansopera.org or by calling the box office at (504) 529-3000.

New Orleans Tricentennial Dog Parade For more information visit www.bestofneworleans.com/dogparade NOLA City Bark and Gambit present the dog parade and contest for best New Orleans-centric pet costumes at 10 a.m. April 22 in celebration of the city’s tricentennial. The event includes a morning walk outside the dog park at New Orleans City Park, costume contests and more. The event is sponsored by Metairie Small Animal Hospital, Dogtopia, Jefferson Feed, Magazine Street Animal Clinic, Agee’s Pet Crematorium, Pet Care Center, New Orleans City Park and Port Orleans Brewery.

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NOLA City Bark dog park is a 4.6 acre plot of land located in beautiful City Park. An afternoon in NOLA City Bark dog park offers fun and a place to exercise the canine members of your family. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON NOLAÂ CITY BARK DOG PARK MEMBERSHIPS, PLEASE VISIT WWW.NOLACITYBARK.ORG


27 G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

CELEBRATE NEW ORLEANS’ 300TH BIRTHDAY WITH A FOUR-LEGGED PARADE. Show your NOLA spirit with a morning dog walk around NOLA City Bark. This fun event will also include a costume contest for the best New Orleanscentric dog attire. Let’s celebrate with the “lucky dogs” that get to call New Orleans home. BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM/

D O G PA R A D E

NOLA CITY BARK 30 Zachary Taylor Dr. SUNDAY, APRIL 22 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. TICKET PRICE: $40 SPONSORS:


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Email dining@gambitweekly.com

1,001 bites

Besh restaurant keeps Shaya name CAPPING A MONTHS-LONG LEGAL BATTLE in federal court, John Besh

(pictdured) and Alon Shaya reached a settlement over use of the name Shaya at the modern Israeli restaurant they opened together in 2015. BRG Hospitality (www.brg-hospitality.com), formerly called the Besh Restaurant Group, released a joint statement from both parties announcing the settlement, which severs Shaya’s involvement with restaurants Domenica, Pizza Domenica and Shaya. BRG Hospitality will retain the name Shaya for the Magazine Street restaurant.

Shahrazad Cafe serves Middle Eastern dishes in Uptown BY H E L E N F R E U N D @helenfreund SHAHRAZAD CAFE, which opened in January, can feel like a one-man show. Often on slower nights, owner Jamal Ismail is the sole person greeting and serving diners, which feels welcoming and puts guests at ease. Ismail is Palestinian and hails from Jerusalem, and the menu at his restaurant advertises itself as both American and Mediterranean. Though I hoped to find a few new or unfamiliar dishes from the Mediterranean or Middle East, the kitchen takes a safe approach and the menu features many familiar dishes. As is the case with many Middle Eastern and Mediterranean restaurants, a selection of shared appetizers served with warm pita bread provides a nice start to a meal. Silky hummus drizzled with olive oil is good, but a cauliflower version is better — topped with bronzed and caramelized fried florets. I also was taken with the baba ghanoush, a creamy eggplant dip that was less smoky than other local iterations, but delicious nonetheless, tinged with citrus and fresh parsley. In a refreshing take on tabbouleh, the bulgur wheat base is topped with fresh parsley, tomatoes, mint, onions and plenty of citrus. Most entrees include a salad of tomatoes and cucumbers in a light, citrusy dressing with crumbled feta cheese on top. Spice is applied with caution, and most dishes have warming notes characteristic of Middle Eastern dishes, such as cumin, cardamom and fenugreek. The subtle nuances and interplay of the spices are especially winning in a bowl of thick lentil soup, where traces of cumin provide plenty of warmth and depth of flavor. Though many Palestinian falafel recipes call for chickpeas, the one here uses fava beans. The falafel mimic

those made in Egypt and have a pale green color, creamy texture and a light crumb. Fried to a crispy dark brown on the outside, the crunchy croquettes pair well with the cooling complement of tangy labneh, a thick and creamy strained yogurt. Larger dishes include pita sandwiches with a variety fillings, such as fat falafel patties, gyro meat and beef or chicken shawarma. Char-grilled lamb chops have a caramelized, crispy exterior that is equal parts fatty, smoky, juicy and delicious. Also good is a medley of charred vegetables that acts as a bed for the chops. Zucchini, red and yellow bell peppers and onions arrive slick with olive oil, heavy with smoke from the grill and flavored by juices dripping from the lamb. Some items seem out of place. Pickled cauliflower, carrots and bell peppers don’t do much to complement other dishes. The menu also includes

Jamal Ismail opened Shahrazad Cafe in Uptown. P H OTO B Y C H E R Y L G E R B E R

a burger, a Philly cheese steak and french fries, which seem like unnecessary attempts to broaden the restaurant’s appeal. The dining room has pictures on its crimson walls, and flowers decorate wooden tables, creating a homey and warm atmosphere. No alcohol is served, but at the end of a meal, a cup of thick and potent Turkish coffee provides all you need to cap an evening at this humble Mediterranean restaurant.

Email Helen Freund at helensfreund@gmail.com

“Both parties acknowledge the difficult circumstances that are inherent with a business dispute, but also recognize the significant achievements accomplished together over the course of many years of collaboration,” the statement says. The public split between longtime business partners Besh and Shaya came last fall amid news reports of widespread sexual misconduct at the Besh Restaurant Group. Following the split, Shaya — whose namesake Israeli restaurant has garnered national acclaim — launched his own restaurant group, Pomegranate Hospitality (www.pomhospitality. com). His team plans to open a new modern Israeli restaurant, Saba (5757 Magazine St.) as well as Safta restaurant in Denver. — HELEN FREUND

Byblos expands WHERE

4739 Magazine St., (504) 571-5003; www.shahrazadscafe.com

?

$

WHEN

HOW MUCH

lunch and dinner daily

moderate

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT BYBLOS (www.byblosrestaurants.com)

WHAT WORKS

cauliflower hummus, lentil soup, char-broiled lamb

WHAT DOESN’T

a burger and cheese steak seem unnecessary

CHECK, PLEASE

Uptown restaurant takes a safe approach to Mediterranean and Middle Eastern dishes

opened its fifth location (737 Octavia St., 504-291-2300) April 11. That space was home to the restaurant Flaming Torch until a fire forced it to close last year. The new location offers an asPAGE 33

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EATDRINK

FORK CENTER


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PAGE 31

Two Morrows CHEF LENORA CHONG AND SON LARRY MORROW opened the

restaurant Morrow’s (2438 St. Claude Ave.; www.morrowsnola. com) in Faubourg Marigny April 6. It is Morrow’s first restaurant after working as an event curator, entrepreneur and author. “It’s been a journey,” Morrow said. “But I always wanted to create something fun and welcoming for other people.” Matthew Holdren and Colin Keith designed the space. The polished modern scheme features cypress banquettes, and there’s a large bar with an eye-catching dark green grasslike backdrop with “Morrow of the story” spelled out in neon lights. Morrow says it was inspired by his travels in other cities.

For years, Chong ran the restaurant Lenora’s Grill in Pontchartrain Park. Her menu at Morrow’s draws from traditional New Orleans dishes and her Korean heritage. It features fried oyster po-boys, pasta jambalaya, sesame-ginger chicken wings, bibimbap, crabmeat hush puppies, sauteed crab claws and Korean-style lettuce wraps filled with spicy chicken. Brunch is served 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, and dishes include Cajun crab cakes Benedict and bananas Foster French toast. Morrow’s is open 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 11

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a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. — HELEN FREUND

Shipley’s comes in REGIONAL DOUGHNUT AND KOLACHE HUB Shipley Do-Nuts

opened a location (2561 Metairie Road, Suite 4, Metairie; www.facebook.com/shipleyoldmetairie) in Old Metairie April 10. The first New Orleans location of the Houston-based franchise (www. shipleydonuts.com) is part of a new mixed-use development next to The Galley Seafood. WDSU-TV anchor Scott Walker, his wife Jennifer, Jimmy Licciardi, Desi Vega of Mr.

Spring

Sushi

3701 IBERVILLE ST•504.488.6582 John’s Steakhouse and Desi Vega’s Steakhouse are co-owners of the new franchise. Lisa Labit, who was the longtime general manager at Byblos on Metairie Road (and later opened Mediterranean restaurant Hummus & More) is the general manager. The regional franchise has been around since the late 1930s and includes more than 190 locations across the country. The shop has 60 varieties of yeast, cake and filled donuts and assorted pastries, including cinnamon rolls, bear claws and apple fritters. The selection of savory kolaches includes versions with sausage, cheese and jalapeno, boudin and ham and cheese fillings. The store is open 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. — HELEN FREUND

Safe harbor LAKEVIEW HARBOR HAS FOUND

a new location at 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd. The longstanding Harrison Avenue restaurant was known for its big burgers topped with shredded cheese and its signature Typhoon cocktails. After 25 years at 911 Harrison Ave., it was forced to shutter at the end of January after its lease was not renewed. The restaurant will reopen at the space formerly home to the Japanese bistro Wasabi. The owners say they are renovating the space and plan to open soon. — HELEN FREUND

katiesinmidcity.com

MON - THURS 11AM - 9PM•FRI & SAT 11AM - 10PM SUN BRUNCH 9AM - 3PM

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sembly-line ordering process, and grab-and-go and pre-packaged meals are available. Diners will find a familiar spread of Mediterranean and Middle Eastern dishes such as hummus, falafel and beef and chicken kebabs. The Mediterranean restaurant also has locations in Jefferson Parish on Metairie Road and in the food court at Lakeside Shopping Center, and inside Tulane University’s campus food court. — HELEN FREUND

EAT+DRINK


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EAT+DRINK Rene Porche CHEF/RESTAURATEUR RENE “CHEF REERO” PORCHE won the “Legume

d’Or” trophy at the second annual Bean Madness competition at the Southern Food & Beverage Museum April 7. Porche, a former bounce artist who runs the restaurant Ma Momma’s House of Cornbread, Chicken & Waffles (5741 Crowder Blvd.; www.mamommashouse.com) spoke to Gambit about the competition and her red bean recipe.

How did you develop your red beans recipe? PORCHE: (My sister and I) grew up in the (William J.) Fischer Housing (Development). When we were growing up, my mom had lupus. She was always home, so I didn’t get to be in the kitchen much as a child. By the time we got home, the food was already ready. As I got older, I started getting recipes from her, and we started trying them out. Growing up in the Fischer, we ate a lot of beans. Beans are cheap, and you can stretch them. You can buy a pound of beans, put some smoked sausage and pickled meat in it, and you can stretch that and make it last three days. My momma had a great red bean recipe, and I knew that if we were in the contest, we were going all the way. I’ve never been in a competition before, but I’m real competitive. I didn’t really change anything from my momma’s recipe. My momma always cooked with a bunch of bell peppers because we always had bell peppers around, and we still put them in almost everything. It’s the same recipe we grew up eating, and I just love it. A lot of the people we were competing against were culinary professionals — trained chefs. I haven’t had any type of traditional training. I just cooked from my momma’s recipe. So when we were in the competition and beating out these good restaurants, it really made me feel great. It was amazing.

How did you get into the restaurant business? P: My first time in a kitchen, I was a pantry chef. A friend of my mom’s (who managed the restau-

rant) told me he liked my energy and said he wanted me to come work there. (Years later,) I was a manager at a bank in Austin, and my mom had gotten in a really bad car accident, so I came home to be with her. My sister and her husband (asked me to stay) and my brother-inlaw had a restaurant, so I started helping him out. We started talking and decided we should open our own restaurant. We thought of naming the restaurant Ma Momma, because you always get great meals when you go to your momma’s house. Some of my best memories from growing up were at my momma’s house. So I started gathering recipes from my mom … and we started working on our menu, and voila! That’s how Ma Momma’s House came into existence. When I was 13 years old, we moved to a place in New Orleans East, close to where we (later) opened the restaurant. It wasn’t the best neighborhood, and when we started thinking about opening a restaurant we wanted to make sure we went to the East and gave New Orleans East a sit-down restaurant. We wanted to do something where we could meet people that grew up the same way that we grew up and let them know that if these two black girls from the projects could do it, then definitely, they could do it too.

What’s one thing you should not put in red beans? P: Tomatoes. I know some people like to put tomatoes in there, but no. ... Another thing I don’t like is celery in beans. Celery has a strong taste, and it changes the taste of your beans. — HELEN FREUND

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3-COURSE INTERVIEW

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HISTORY

SERVED BY

THE BOWLFUL. For three centuries, New Orleans has been home to a dynamic regional cuisine, blending influences from the Americas, Africa, Europe, and beyond. It’s a legendary culinary heritage that would take years to study and appreciate. On second thought, just grab a spoon.

IN THE MONTELEONE

Located at 214 ROYAL STREET. For dining reservations please call 504.681.4444 or visit CRIOLLONOLA.COM. Discount parking is available with validation.


TO

Contact Will Coviello willc@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3106 | FAX: 866.473.7199 C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S .C O M Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are for New Orleans. Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

BYWATER Jack Dempsey’s Restaurant — 738 Poland Ave., (504) 943-9914; www. jackdempseys.net — Reservations accepted for large parties. L Tue-Fri, D Wed-Sat. $$ Queenies on St. Claude — 3200 St. Claude Ave., (504) 558-4085; www. facebook.com/queeniesonstclaude — L, D daily. $ Suis Generis — 3219 Burgundy St., (504) 309-7850; www.suisgeneris.com — D Wed-Sun, late Wed-Sun, brunch Sat-Sun. $$

Riccobono’s Panola Street Cafe — 7801 Panola St., (504) 314-1810; www.panolastreetcafe.com — B and L daily. $

Bayona — 430 Dauphine St., (504) 525-4455; www.bayona.com — Reservations recommended. L Wed-Sat, D Mon-Sat. $$$ Bourbon House — 144 Bourbon St., (504) 522-0111; www.bourbonhouse.com — Reservations accepted. B, L. D daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Brennan’s New Orleans — 417 Royal St., (504) 525-9711; www.brennansneworleans.com — B, L Tue-Sat, D Tue-Sun. $$$ Criollo — Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., (504) 681-4444; www.criollonola.com — B, L, D daily. $$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse — 716 Iberville St., (504) 522-2467; www.dickiebrennansrestaurant.com — D daily. $$$

Tableau — 616 St. Peter St., (504) 9343463; www.tableaufrenchquarter.com — Reservations accepted. B, L, D daily, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$

GENTILLY Cafe Gentilly — 5339 Franklin Ave., (504) 281-4220; www.thecafegentilly.com — B, L daily. Cash only. $

Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Reservations accepted. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. $$

HARAHAN/JEFFERSON/ RIVER RIDGE

Gazebo Cafe — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — L, early dinner daily. $$

CHALMETTE

Green Goddess — 307 Exchange Place, (504) 301-3347; www.greengoddessrestaurant.com — L, D Wed-Sun. $$

Heads & Tails Seafood & Oyster Bar — 1820 Dickory Ave., Suite A, Harahan, (504) 533-9515; www.headsandtailsrestaurant.com — L, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$

Cafe Aquarius — 2101 Paris Road, Chalmette, (504) 510-3080 — L Tue-Fri, D Tue, brunch Sat-Sun. $

House of Blues — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Reservations accepted. L, D Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. $$

CITYWIDE

Killer Poboys — 219 Dauphine St., (504) 462-2731; 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys.com — Hours vary by location. Cash only at Conti Street location. $

Breaux Mart — Citywide; www. breauxmart.com — L, D daily. $

Public Service Restaurant — NOPSI Hotel, 311 Baronne St., (504) 962-6527; www. publicservicenola.com — B & D daily, L Mon-Fri, brunch Sat-Sun. $

La Carreta — Citywide; www.carretarestaurant.com — Reservations accepted for larger parties. Lunch and dinner daily. $$

Le Bayou Restaurant — 208 Bourbon St., (504) 525-4755; www.lebayourestaurant.com — L, D, late Mon-Sun. $

Welty’s Deli — 336 Camp St., (504) 592-0223; www.weltysdeli.com — B, L Mon-Fri. $

FAUBOURG MARIGNY

CARROLLTON/UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOODS

Kebab — 2315 St. Claude Ave., (504) 383-4328; www.kebabnola.com — Delivery available. L and D Wed-Mon, late Fri-Sat. $

Louisiana Pizza Kitchen — 95 French Market Place, (504) 522-9500; www. lpkfrenchquarter.com — Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$

La Casita Taqueria — 8400 Oak St., (504) 826-9913; www.eatlacasita.com — L, D daily. $

Salon Restaurant by Sucre — 622 Conti St., (504) 267-7098; www.restaurantsalon.com — Reservations accepted. brunch and early D Thu-Mon. $$

El Gato Negro — 81 French Market Place, (504) 525-9752; www.elgatonegronola.com — L, D daily. $$

CBD

Chais Delachaise — 7708 Maple St., (504) 510-4509; www.chaisdelachaise. com — Reservations accepted. L SatSun, D daily, late Fri-Sat. $$

Roux on Orleans — Bourbon Orleans, 717 Orleans Ave., (504) 571-4604; www. bourbonorleans.com — Reservations accepted. B daily, D Tue-Sun. $$

Mardi Gras Zone — 2706 Royal., (504) 947-8787 — Open 24 hours daily. $ Spotted Cat Food & Spirits — New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., (504) 371-5074; www.spottedcatfoodspirits.com — B, L daily, D Mon-Sat. $$

Mikimoto — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Delivery available. Reservations accepted for large parties. L Sun-Fri, D daily. $$

FRENCH QUARTER

Pyramids Cafe — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — L, D daily. $$

Antoine’s Restaurant — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www.antoines.com — L,

Antoine’s Annex — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www.antoines.com — B, L, D daily. $

The Market Cafe — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola. com — B, L, D daily. $$ NOLA Restaurant — 534 St. Louis St., (504) 522-6652; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/nola-restaurant — L Thu-Mon, D daily. $$$

The Rivershack Tavern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — L, D daily. $ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 1212 S. Clearview Parkway, Elmwood, (504) 733-3803; www.theospizza.com — L, D daily. $

KENNER The Landing Restaurant — Crowne Plaza, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-5611; www.neworleansairporthotel.com — B, L, D daily. $$ Ted’s Smokehouse BBQ — 3809 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 305-4393 — L, D daily. $$ Vista Buffet — Treasure Chest Casino, 5050 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 4438000; www.treasurechestcasino.com — L Mon-Fri, D daily, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$

LAKEVIEW

Palace Cafe — 605 Canal St., (504) 5231661; www.palacecafe.com — B, L, D daily, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$

El Gato Negro — 300 Harrison Ave., (504) 488-0107; www.elgatonegronola. com — See L, D daily. $$

Red Fish Grill — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$$

Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001 — B, L daily, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sat-Sun. $

Restaurant R’evolution — 777 Bienville St., (504) 553-2277; www.revolutionnola. com — D daily. $$$

NOLA Beans — 762 Harrison Ave., (504) 267-0783; www.nolabeans.com — B, L, early D daily. $$ PAGE 38

37 G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

OUT EAT

D Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$$


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OUT TO EAT PAGE 37

Sala Restaurant & Bar — 124 Lake Marina Ave., (504) 513-2670; www.salanola.com — Reservations accepted. L and D TueSun, brunch Sat-Sun, late Thu-Sat. $$ The Steak Knife Restaurant & Bar — 888 Harrison Ave., (504) 488-8981; www. steakkniferestaurant.com — Reservations accepted. D Tue-Sat. $$$

METAIRIE Andrea’s Restaurant — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — L, D daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Banh Mi Boys — 5001 Airline Drive, Suite B, Metairie, (504) 510-5360; www.bmbmetairie.com — Delivery available. L and D Mon-Sat. $ Ben’s Burgers — 2008 Clearview Parkway, Metairie, (504) 889-2837; www. eatatbens.com — 24H $ Cafe B — 2700 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 934-4700; www.cafeb.com — L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$ Casablanca — 3030 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2209; www.casablancanola.com — Reservations accepted. L Sun-Fri, D Sun-Thu. $$ Chef Ron’s Gumbo Stop — 2309 N. Causeway Blvd., Metairie, (504) 8352022; www.gumbostop.com — L, D Mon-Sat. $$ Kosher Cajun New York Deli & Grocery — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — L Sun-Thu, D Mon-Thu. $ Heritage Grill — 111 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Suite 150, Metairie, (504) 9344900; www.heritagegrillmetairie.com — Reservations accepted. L Mon-Fri. $$ Marks Twain’s Pizza Landing — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8032; www.marktwainpizza.com — L Tue-Sat, D Tue-Sun. $ Martin Wine Cellar — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, (504) 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — B, L daily, early dinner MonSat, brunch Sun. $$ R&O’s Restaurant — 216 Metairie-Hammond Highway, Metairie, (504) 831-1248; www.rnosrestarurant.com — L, D daily. $$ Riccobono’s Peppermill — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 455-2226; www.riccobonospeppermill.com — Reservations accepted. B and L daily, D Wed-Sun. $$ Rolls N Bowls — 605 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 309-0519; www.rollsnbowlsnola.com — L, D Mon-Sat. $ Sammy’s Po-boys & Catering — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — No reservations. L Mon-Sat, D daily. $ Short Stop Po-Boys — 119 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, (504) 885-4572; www.shortstoppoboysno.com — B, L, D Mon-Sat. $ Taj Mahal Indian Cuisine — 923-C Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 836-6859 — L, D Tue-Sun. $$ Tandoori Chicken — 2916 Cleary Ave., Metairie, (504) 889-7880 — L, D Mon-Sat. $$ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 2125 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 5104282; www.theospizza.com — L, D daily. $ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 885-2984; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Reservations accepted. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. $$

MID-CITY/TREME Angelo Brocato’s — 214 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — L, D Tue-Sun. $ biscuits & buns on banks — 4337 Banks St., (504) 273-4600; www.biscuitsandbunsonbanks.com — Delivery available Tue-Fri. L, brunch daily. $$ Brown Butter Southern Kitchen & Bar — 231 N. Carrollton Ave., Suite C, (504) 609-3871; www.brownbutterrestaurant. com — L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sat, brunch Sat.Sun. $$ Cafe NOMA — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 482-1264; www.cafenoma.com — L Tue-Sun, D Fri. $

Emeril’s Delmonico — 1300 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-4937; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/emerils-delmonico — D daily. $$$ G’s Kitchen Spot — Balcony Bar, 3201 Magazine St., (504) 891-9226; www. gskitchenspot.com — L Fri-Sun, D, late daily. $ Joey K’s — 3001 Magazine St., (504) 8910997; www.joeyksrestaurant.com — L, D Mon-Sat. $$ Juan’s Flying Burrito — 2018 Magazine St., (504) 486-9950; 5538 Magazine St., (504) 897-4800; www.juansflyingburrito. com — L, D daily. $ Magazine Po-boy Shop — 2368 Magazine St., (504) 522-3107 — B, L Mon-Sat. $

Cafe Navarre — 800 Navarre Ave., (504) 483-8828; www.cafenavarre.com — B, L and D Mon-Fri, brunch Sat-Sun. $

Martin Wine Cellar — 3827 Baronne St., (504) 899-7411; www.martinwine. com — B, L daily, early dinner Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$

Five Happiness — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935; www.fivehappiness. com — Delivery available. Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$

Miyako Japanese Seafood & Steakhouse — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 4109997; www.japanesebistro.com — Reservations accepted. L Sun-Fri, D daily. $$

G’s Pizza — 4840 Bienville St., (504) 483-6464; www.gspizzas.com — L, D, late daily. $

Nirvana Indian Cuisine — 4308 Magazine St., (504) 894-9797 — Reservations accepted for five or more. L, D Tue-Sun. $$

Katie’s Restaurant — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — L daily, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$

Piccola Gelateria — 4525 Freret St., (504) 493-5999; www.piccolagelateria. com — L, D Tue-Sun. $

Juan’s Flying Burrito — 4724 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 569-0000; www.juansflyingburrito.com — L, D daily. $

Slice Pizzeria — 1513 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-7437; www.slicepizzeria.com — L, D daily. $

Namese — 4077 Tulane Ave., (504) 4838899; www.namese.net — Reservations accepted. L, D Mon-Sat. $$

Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; www. theospizza.com — L, D daily. $

Ralph’s on the Park — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — L Tue-Fri, D daily, brunch Sun. $$$

Tito’s Ceviche & Pisco — 5015 Magazine St., (504) 267-7612; www.titoscevichepisco.com — Reservations accepted. D Mon-Sat. $$

Rue 127 — 127 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 483-1571; www.rue127.com — D Tue-Sat. $$$

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT

Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www.theospizza. com — L, D daily. $ Willie Mae’s Scotch House — 2401 St. Ann St., (504) 822-9503; www.williemaesnola.com — L Mon-Sat. $$ Wit’s Inn — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600; www.witsinn.com — L, D, late daily. $

NORTHSHORE Martin Wine Cellar — 2895 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (985) 951-8081; www.martinwine.com — B, L daily, early dinner Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$

UPTOWN Apolline — 4729 Magazine St., (504) 894-8881; www.apollinerestaurant.com — Reservations accepted. brunch, D Tue-Sun. $$$ Basin Seafood & Spirits — 3222 Magazine St., (504) 302-7391; www.basinseafoodnola.com — Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$ Cafe Luna — 802 1/2 Nashville Ave., (504) 333-6833; www.facebook.com/cafeluna504 — B, L, early D daily. $ The Columns — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — Reservations accepted. B daily, L Fri-Sat, D Mon-Thu, brunch Sun. $$ The Delachaise — 3442 St. Charles Ave., (504) 895-0858; www.thedelachaise.com — L Fri-Sun, D and late daily. $$ Dick & Jenny’s — 4501 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 894-9880; www.dickandjennys. com — D Wed-Sun. $$$

Capdeville — 520 Capdeville St., (504) 371-5161; www.capdevillenola.com — Reservations accepted. L, D Mon-Sat. late Fri-Sat. $$ El Gato Negro — 800 S. Peters St., (504) 309-8864; www.elgatonegronola.com — L, D daily. $$ Emeril’s Restaurant — 800 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 528-9393; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/emerils-new-orleans — L Mon-Fri, D daily. $$$ Juan’s Flying Burrito — 515 Baronne St., (504) 529-5825; www.juansflyingburrito. com — L, D daily. $ Meril — 424 Girod St., (504) 526-3745; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/meril — Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$ Vyoone’s Restaurant — 412 Girod St., (504) 518-6007; www.vyoone.com — Reservations accepted. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sat, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$

WEST BANK Mosca’s — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant. com — Reservations accepted. D TueSat. Cash only. $$$ Restaurant des Familles — 7163 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, (504) 689-7834; www.desfamilles.com — L, D daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Specialty Italian Bistro — 2330 Belle Chasse Hwy., Gretna, (504) 391-1090; www.specialtyitalianbistro.com — L, D daily. $$ Tavolino Pizza & Lounge — 141 Delaronde St., (504) 605-3365; www.facebook. com/tavolinolounge — D daily, brunch Sun. $$


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BRYAN PASTOR TASHA PALERMO CHRIS KEENE CHRIS PALERMO Vice President

Loan Assistant

PERSONAL & COMMERCIAL | b1BANK.com

Market President

Senior Vice President

BLAKE BURMASTER

3838 N. Causeway Blvd., Ste. 2950 Metairie, LA 70002 | 504.352.5015

Vice President

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

Banking With Greater Momentum


G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

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MUSIC Chickie Wah Wah — Ivor Simpson-Kennedy, 5:30; Meschiya Lake & Tom McDermott, 8; Jelly Biscuit, 10 Circle Bar — The Iguanas, 7 d.b.a. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — The George French Trio, 9:30 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — Reggae Night with DJ T-Roy, Bayou International Sound, 10 French Market — Patrick Cooper & Natasha Sanchez, 1:30 Gasa Gasa — Foolhouse, Josh Mosier, Chill Pill, Dar Macar, Luke Zell, Libby Tissler, Lowerline, Luke Courtois, 9 House of Blues — Less Than Jake, Face to Face, 8 House of Blues (The Parish) — Jet Lounge, 11 Lafayette Square — Wednesday at the Square feat. Wayne Toups, Darcy Malone & the Tangle, 5 Little Gem Saloon — #WCW feat. Anais St. John, 7:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Jane Harvey Brown Trio, Andy J. Forest, 8 Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park) — Evan Christopher’s Clarinet Road, 2 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman, Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 The Parker Barber — The Mammoths, 8:30 Poor Boys Bar — Bad Afro, Old Self, Jonathan Brown, Nate Lost, J-Boogie, 8 Preservation Hall — Preservation Legacy Band, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 Prime Example Jazz Club — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation, 8 & 10 Republic New Orleans — The Wailers, 8 The Sandbar at UNO — Terence Blanchard, 7 Santos Bar — Swamp Moves feat. Russell Welch Quartet, 9 Siberia Lounge — Ashlae Blume X-Tet, 9 SideBar — Aurora Nealand & Simon Berz, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Chris Christy’s Band, 2; Shotgun Jazz Band, 6; Antoine Diel & the Misfit Power, 10 The Starlight — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 7

Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Miles Lyons, 5; Tom McDermott & Chloe Feoranzo, 8 Bullet’s Sports Bar — Kermit Ruffins, 6 Cafe Negril — Revival, 6; Soul Project, 9:30 Check Point Charlie — Voodoo Wagon, 8 Chickie Wah Wah — Phil DeGruy, 6; John “Papa” Gros Band, 8 Circle Bar — Dark Lounge with Rik Slave, 7; DJs Howie and Panzer, 10 Covington Trailhead — Boogie Falaya, 5 d.b.a. — Lulu & the Broadsides feat. Dayna Kurtz, 7; Jamie Lynn Vessels, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — The Loren Pickford Quartet, 9:30 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Gel Set, Twins, A Living Soundtrack, KLYPH, 10 Gasa Gasa — Honey & Salt, Static Masks, TVP, Relatives, 8 House of Blues — Front 242, Azar Swan, Glitch Black, 9 House of Blues (The Parish) — Shinyribs, 8 Lafreniere Park — Dr. Rock, 6:30 Le Bon Temps Roule — Soul Rebels, 11 Little Gem Saloon — Monty Banks, 5; John Mooney & Marc Stone, Alvin Youngblood Hart, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — The Trio feat. Johnny Vidacovich, 11 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Nattie, Chris Robinson, Roadside Glorious, 8 New Orleans Botanical Garden — Thursdays at Twilight feat. New Leviathan Oriental Foxtrot Orchestra, 5 Ogden Museum of Southern Art — Andre Bohren, 6 Old Point Bar — Valerie Sassyfras, 9 Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park) — Molalla High School Choir, 11:30 a.m; Wedgewood Park Jazz Band, 2 Poor Boys Bar — Hide, Softie, Broken Dead, DJ Just Vial, 9 Preservation Hall — Preservation Legacy Band, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 Prime Example Jazz Club — Alexey Marti Quintet, 8 & 10 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Horace Trahan & the Ossun Express, 8:30 Santos Bar — Holy Knives, Skeleton, Midriff, 9 Siberia Lounge — Eastern Bloc Party feat. Salt Wives, Inner Fire District, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Matt Lemmler (album release), 8 & 10 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Sarah McCoy, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; Jumbo Shrimp, 10 The Starlight — Funeral Parlour with DJ Mange, 9 Tipitina’s — Loyola All-Stars Uptown Throwdown, 7:30 Vaughan’s Lounge — Corey Henry’s Treme Funktet, 10

THURSDAY 19

FRIDAY 20

Bamboula’s — Kala Chandra, 3; Jenavieve & the Royal Street Windin’ Boys, 6:30; City of Trees Brass Band, 10 Bar Redux — Emily Chambers, 9 Blue Nile — Micah McKee & Little Maker, 7; Bayou International Reggae Night feat. Higher Heights and DJ T-Roy, 11 BMC — Ainsley Matich & the Broken Blues, 5; Andre Lovett Band, 8; Chrishira, 11

Bamboula’s — Chance Bushman’s Rhythm Stompers, 1; Smoky Greenwell, 5:30; Sierra Green & Soul Machine, 10 Bar Redux — The Noise Complaints, The Painted Hands, 8 Blue Nile — Caesar Brothers Funk Box, 7:30; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11 BMC — Lifesavers, 3; Roadside Glorious, 6;

Contact Kat Stromquist listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504.483.3110 | FAX: 866.473.7199

C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M = OUR PICKS

TUESDAY 17 Bamboula’s — Christopher Johnson, 3; Ruth Marie & Her Jazz Band, 6:30; Mofongo, 10 Blue Nile — Water Seed, 9 BMC — Set Up Kings, 5; Dapper Dandies, 8; Captain Green, 11 Bourbon O Bar — Marty Peters Quartet, 8 Cafe Negril — 4 Sidemen of the Apocalypse, 6 Check Point Charlie — Jamie Lynn Vessels, 8 Chickie Wah Wah — Chip Wilson & Marcello Benetti, 5:30; Lynn Drury, 8 Circle Bar — Carl LeBlanc, 6 d.b.a. — DinosAurchestra, 7; Treme Brass Band, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Mark Coleman & Todd Duke, 9 Kerry Irish Pub — Jason Bishop, 8:30 Little Gem Saloon — Yoshitaka Tsuji Trio, 7 Maple Leaf Bar — Rebirth Brass Band, 10:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Katy Hobgood Ray, 8; Dorian Greys, 10 Old U.S. Mint — Down on Their Luck Orchestra, 2 Poor Boys Bar — Hexist, Gunpowder Grey, Torture Garden, Space Cadaver, 8 Preservation Hall — Preservation Legacy Band, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 Prime Example Jazz Club — Sidemen+1, 8 & 10 Ray’s — Bobby Love & Friends, 7 Siberia Lounge — Tyler Prescott, Tal Turner, Sierra Ferral, Dave Hammer, Matt Rivers, 9 SideBar — The Shaking Souls feat. Helen Gillet & Simon Berz, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Stanton Moore Trio, 8 & 10 Southport Hall — Powerman 5000, Trick Bag, Cerebral Drama, 7 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Andy Forest, 2; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Smoking Time Jazz Club, 10 The Starlight — DJ Fayard, 9

WEDNESDAY 18 Autocrat Social & Pleasure Club — TBC Brass Band, 9 Bamboula’s — Bamboula’s Hot Trio feat. Giselle Anguizola, 2; Mem Shannon, 6:30; Sunshine Brass Band, 10 Banks Street Bar — Major Bacon, 10 Blue Nile — New Orleans Rhythm Devils, 8; New Breed Brass Band, 11 BMC — Demi, 5; Yisrael, 8; Funk It All, 11 Cafe Negril — Maid of Orleans, 6; Another Day in Paradise, 9:30 Check Point Charlie — T-Bone Stone & the Happy Monsters, 8


MUSIC

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Ty Segall BY NOAH BONAPARTE PAIS P H OTO B Y D E N E E S E G A L L

TY SEGALL HITS TOWN with his weightiest tome ever in tow, the 19-track, 75-minute January gargantua Freedom’s Goblin. (Following Big K.R.I.T.’s 4eva Is a Mighty Long Time, it’s the second records-setting double LP featured in this space in as many weeks — what in the name of The White Album is going on?) Since his last visit here in May 2017, the compulsive recording artist has been relatively sedate, forming no new bands (that we know of) and releasing just the one (albeit seams-busting) new record. Square that with his previous fiveyear itch, which saw him cut 10 LPs and exponential EPs and 7-inch singles under at least six separate headers (GØGGS, Fuzz, Broken Bat and multiple variations of eponymous/collaborative outfits). The man is so prolific, he’s recycling titles and forms: Last year’s Ty Segall was his second self-titled release, and Freedom’s Goblin is his second double album. As on 2014’s unruly quad Manipulator, Segall doesn’t thin his gin with extra tonic — if anything, the extra space emboldens him, concentrating and spiking his outre impulses into mini suites of furiously funky mood swinging. It’s as if David Bowie, Ozzy Osbourne, Thin Lizzy, Of Montreal and Midnite Vultures-era Beck launched their own bizarro Traveling Wilburys, torching a “Young Americans” guitar-and-sax strut (“My Lady’s on Fire”), sawdusting the stage with serrated twin chainsaws (“She”) and milking Hot Chocolate’s 1978 soul affirmation “Every 1’s a Winner” (with vinyl-bomber Fred Armisen on drums). Bottomfeeders opens. Tickets $22. At 9 p.m. Sunday. One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., (504) 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net.

Hyperphlyy, 9 Bourbon O Bar — The Doyle Cooper Jazz Band, 8 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Keith Burnstein, 6; Dayna Kurtz, 9 Bullet’s Sports Bar — The Pinettes Brass Band, 8:30 Cafe Negril — Dana Abbott Band, 6:30; Higher Heights, 10 Check Point Charlie — Kenny Triche Band, 8; Krooked Halo, Mad Dog, Dead Machine Theory, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — Michael Pearce, 6; Paul Sanchez & the Rolling Road Show, 8 Circle Bar — Natalie Mae & Gina Leslie, 7; Gosh!, Leafdrinker, IZE, 9:30 The Civic Theatre — The Black Angels, Black Lips, 8:30 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Soul Rebels, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 Dragon’s Den (downstairs) — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 7; The Tipping Point with DJ RQ Away, 10 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Buena Vista Social (Latin dance party), 10 Gasa Gasa — Screaming Females, HIRS, Gland, Woof, 10 House of Blues — Curren$y, 10 House of Blues (The Parish) — Thirdstory, 9 Howlin’ Wolf (Den) — Synthetic Ghosts, Adam DeWalt, 9 The Jazz Playhouse — Joe Krown, 4:30; Professor Craig Adams Band, 7:30

Joy Theater — Smokers World, Juvenile, Partners-N-Crime, DJ Raj Smoove (The Chronic tribute), 7 Le Bon Temps Roule — Steve DeTroy, 7 Little Gem Saloon — Lilli Lewis, 5 & 7:30 Mandeville Trailhead — George French Band, 6:30 Music Box Village — Ol’ Eyez Never Die feat. Dee1, Ian Vanek (Notorious B.I.G., Tupac Shakur and Ol’ Dirty Bastard tribute), 6:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Damn Hippies, 7; Aleah Hyers, Jukin’ Mamas, Emily Chambers, 9 North Columbia Street — Sunset at the Landing feat. Neela, Jiva-Nola, 6 Oak — Burris, 9 Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; Marshland, 9:30 One Eyed Jacks — Where Y’acht, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Kevin Louis & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8 Poor Boys Bar — BJ So Cole, Q the Don, Playgroundz, Lord Chilla, Hu$hpuppy, HNDRKS, 2 Preservation Hall — Preservation Legacy Band, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 Republic New Orleans — The Lone Bellow, 8:30 RF’s Dining Music Cocktails — James Martin Band, 7 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Contraflow, 9:30 Roosevelt Hotel (Fountain Lounge) — Sam Kuslan, 5:30; Amanda Ducorbier, 9 Saturn Bar — Fundragers feat. Dreamer, DJ Swim Team (Ceasefire New Orleans benefit), 10 PAGE 42

BRUNCH + SPRING TEA THURS - MON | 10AM - 4PM $18 BOTTOMLESS MIMOSAS

HAPPY HOUR THURS - MON | 4 - 7PM $6 DRINKS + SNACKS FRENCH QUARTER BALCONY SEATING 622 CONTI ST ABOVE SUCRÉ RESTAURANTSALON.COM

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

PREVIEW


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MUSIC

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

PREVIEW International Jazz Day Salute BY WILL COVIELLO KEYBOARDIST AND BANDLEADER Herbie Hancock (pictured) headlines a concert salute to International Jazz Day. Trumpeter Terence Blanchard and the E-Collective, vocalists Patti Austin and Ledisi and others perform at the free event at Congo Square 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22. International Jazz Day is April 30, and the Congo Square concert will be streamed online that day. Inaugurated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the first International Jazz Day was celebrated in 2012 and started with a concert in Congo Square. There’s a list of International Jazz Day events scheduled around the world at www.jazzday.com.

PAGE 41

Siberia Lounge — Ixnay, Ferd 4, DJ Lady Li, 10 SideBar — Bloom feat. Luke Runels & Michael Galanti, 7; David Bandrowski, Martin Krushe, Doug Garrison, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Ellis Marsalis Quintet, 8 & 10 Southport Hall — Rockell, Tonasia, DJs Jerry B and Crush, 8 Southport Hall (Deck Room) — Zombies Eating Sheep, 8 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Andy Forest, 2; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 6:30 The Starlight — Linnzi Zaorski, 7 Three Muses — Royal Roses, 4:30; Doro Wat Jazz Band, 9 Tipitina’s — Lost Bayou Ramblers, Lady Red, Jamaican Me Breakfast Club, 10 Vaso — Bobby Love & Friends, 3

SATURDAY 21 Abita Springs Town Hall — Abita Springs Opry feat. Three Rivers Cooperative, The Abita Stumps, Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Review, Jumbo Shrimp, 7 Bamboula’s — G & Her Swinging Gypsies, 2:30; Johnny Mastro, 7; City of Trees Brass Band, 11:30 Blue Nile — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7:15; Brass-A-Holics, 11; House Party with DJ Raj Smoove, 1 a.m. Blue Nile Balcony Room — Marigny Street Brass Band, 10; DJ Black Pearl, 1 a.m. BMC — The Jazzmen, 3; Willie Lockett, 5; Crooked Vines, 9 Bourbon O Bar — Marty Peters & the Party Meters, 8 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Marina Orchestra, 6; The Royal Rounders, 9 Cafe Negril — Jamie Lynn Vessels, 4; Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 7 Casa Borrega — Luna Mora, 7 Check Point Charlie — Swamp Motel, 8; Shawn Williams, 11 Chickie Wah Wah — Woodenhead, 9 Circle Bar — Red Heroes, Heck Nugget, Bad Moon Lander, Laughter, 9:30

Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 Davenport Lounge — Jeremy Davenport, 9 d.b.a. — Tuba Skinny, 7; Dave Jordan & the NIA, Iceman Special, 11 Dew Drop Social and Benevolent Hall — David Torkanowsky & Friends (Fats Domino & Allen Toussaint tribute), 6:30 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — The Bryce Eastwood Band, 10 Gasa Gasa — Hovvdy, Sharks’ Teeth, 10 Hi-Ho Lounge — Pink Room Project, 11 Howlin’ Wolf (Den) — Bluewind, Pink and Yellow, Tone, Proper Channels, 7 The Jazz Playhouse — Oscar Rossignoli, 5; Michael Watson, 8 Joy Theater — Shpongle, Alex Grey, Allyson Grey, CharlesTheFirst, Otto Kerry Irish Pub — Patrick Cooper, 5 Lafreniere Park — I Am for the Child Music Festival feat. The Just Right Band, Khris Royal & Dark Matter, Gravity A, 11 a.m. Little Gem Saloon — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 7 & 9 Louisiana Music Factory — Revival!, Jamie Lynn Vessels, Ernie Vincent, Little Freddie King, 1 Marigny Brasserie & Bar — The Key Sound, 4 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Clint Kaufmann, Dr. Lo Presents Loyola’s Finest, 7 Oak — Jon Roniger, 9 Old Point Bar — Rebel Roadside, 9:30 Old U.S. Mint (New Orleans Jazz National Historical Park) — Greensboro College Jazz Band, 10 a.m. Poor Boys Bar — Laura Fisher, Aegrae, Spawns, Social Circle, 7 Preservation Hall — Preservation Jazz Masters, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 Rock ’n’ Bowl — 90 Degrees West, 9:30 Roosevelt Hotel (Fountain Lounge) — Amanda Ducorbier, 9 Roux Carre — Ray Wimley & the Harbinger Project, 4 Santos Bar — Epic Beard Men, 9


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SideBar — Mia Borders, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Jason Marsalis’ 21st Century Trad Band, 8 & 10 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Panorama Jazz Band, 6 The Starlight — Shawan Rice, 7 Terra Bella — Band Camp, 5:30 Three Muses — Debbie Davis, 6; Shotgun Jazz Band, 9

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SUNDAY 22 Abita Springs Trailhead — Abita Springs Busker Festival feat. Albanie Faletta & Her New Orleans Jazz Band, Slick Skillet Serenaders, Aurora Nealand & the Royal Roses, Doctor Bird & the Beak Division, The Deslondes, Jumbo Shrimp, 11:30 a.m. Autocrat Social & Pleasure Club — Gotta Love Lil feat. John Boutte, Cyril Neville, Walter “Wolfman” Washington, Joe Krown, Wanda Rouzan, Stephanie Jordan, Marlon Jordan, Detroit Brooks (Lillian Boutte benefit), 1 Bamboula’s — NOLA Ragweeds, 1; Carl LeBlanc, 5:30; Jan Marie & the Mean Reds, 5:30; Ed Wills & Blues 4 Sale, 9 Bar Redux — Natalie Mae, Dusky Waters, Sean Markey, 9 Blue Nile — Mykia Jovan, 7; Street Legends Brass Band, 11 BMC — Foot & Friends, 3; Jazmarae, 7; Moments of Truth, 10 Bourbon O Bar — G & the New Orleans Swinging Gypsies, 8 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Steve Pistorious Quartet, 7 Bullet’s Sports Bar — VL & Just Right Band, 6 Cafe Negril — Ecirb Muller’s Twisted Dixie, 6; John Lisi, 9:30 Carousel Bar & Lounge — James Martin Band, 8:30 Casa Borrega — John Lawrence, noon Chickie Wah Wah — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 8 Congo Square — International Jazz Day Salute to New Orleans feat. Herbie Hancock, Terence Blanchard, Patti Austin, Ledisi, 2 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6 d.b.a. — The Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; The Iguanas, 10 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Miss Anna Q., 9 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Church with Unicorn Fukr, 10 Gasa Gasa — The Soft Moon, Boy Harsher, 9 Howlin’ Wolf (Den) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 The Jazz Playhouse — Germaine Bazzle, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Patrick Cooper, 8 Newman Bandstand, Audubon Park — Music Under the Oaks feat. New Orleans Concert Band, 5 Old Point Bar — Luna Mora, 3:30 One Eyed Jacks — Ty Segall & the Freedom Band, Bottomfeeders, 8 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Mark Braud & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8 Poor Boys Bar — Traitor, Crossed, Romasa, Fat Stupid Ugly People, 8 PAGE 45


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MUSIC

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Radar Upcoming concerts » DIXIE DREGS, April 26, House of Blues » LADAMA , April 27, HiHo Lounge » TAV FALCO AND PANTHER BURNS, May 4, d.b.a. » NONPOINT, BUTCHER BABIES, CANE HILL AND SUMO CYCO, May 28, Southport Hall » MAPS & ATLASES AND PRISM TATS, June 15, House of Blues » OF FEATHER AND BONE AND TOMB MOLD, June 17, Santos » SMILE EMPTY SOUL AND FLAW, June 28, Southport Hall

Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9 Dragon’s Den (upstairs) — Audiodope with DJ Ill Medina, 11 The Jazz Playhouse — Gerald French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 Maple Leaf Bar — George Porter Jr. Trio, 10 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Gypsy Jass Trio, Shelbi & Jace Labat, Greg Afek, 8 One Eyed Jacks — Blind Texas Marlin, 8 Preservation Hall — Preservation Jazz Masters, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 SideBar — Alex Massa, Mike Dillon, Dan Oestreicher, Scott Graves, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Royal Street Windin’ Boys, 2; Dominick Grillo & the Frenchmen Street All-Stars, 6; New Orleans Jazz Vipers, 10 Three Muses — Monty Banks, 5; Gal Holiday, 8

CLASSICAL/CONCERTS Albinas Prizgintas. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave., (504) 5220276; www.trinitynola.com — The organist’s “Organ & Labyrinth” performance includes selections from baroque to vintage rock, played by candlelight. Free. 6 p.m. Tuesday.

Tav Falco performs at d.b.a. May 4. P H OTO B Y F. G R I V E L E T

Preservation Hall — Preservation Legacy Band, 5 & 6; Preservation All-Stars, 8, 9 & 10 Rare Form — The Key Sound, 10 Siberia Lounge — Toonces, Tranche, Nebula Rosa, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — James Singleton Quartet, 8 & 10 Southport Hall — Shallow Side, Messer, 7 The Spotted Cat Music Club — Kristina Morales & the Inner Wild, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10 Three Muses — Raphael et Pascal, 5; Linnzi Zaorski, 8 Treme Hideaway — Gotta Love Lil feat. Phillip Manuel, New Birth Brass Band, Brian Murray Trio, Shannon Powell, Don Vappie (Lillian Boutte benefit), 8

MONDAY 23 Bamboula’s — Co & Co Traveling Show, 2; G & Her Swinging Gypsies, 5:30; John Lisi, 9 Banks Street Bar — Future Nuns, Flasher, Gland, Chamois Boys, 8 Blue Nile — Jeff Chaz, 7; Brass-A-Holics, 10 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 7; Paggy Prine & Southern Soul, 10 Bourbon O Bar — Shake It Break It Band, 8 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Arsene DeLay, 5; Antoine Diel, 8 Cafe Negril — Noggin, 6; In Business, 9:30 Chickie Wah Wah — Justin Molaison, 5:30; Alex McMurray, 8 Crescent City Brewhouse — New Orleans Streetbeat, 6

Eunice Kim and Xavier Foley. University of New Orleans Performing Arts Center Recital Hall, 2000 Lakeshore Drive, (504) 280-7469; www.uno.edu — The award-winning violinist and bassist perform. Tickets $10-$15. 7 p.m. Thursday. The Jefferson Chorale. St. Agnes Church, 3310 Jefferson Highway, Jefferson, (504) 833-4118; www.stagnesjefferson.org — The choral group’s “Celebrate!” program has selections from Handel, Haydn and Faure. Free admission. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The same program is performed at St. Joseph Church (610 Sixth St., Gretna) at 3 p.m. Sunday. Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra. The Orpheum Theater, 129 University Place, (504) 274-4871; www.orpheumnola.com — The orchestra performs the music of Prince. Visit www.lpomusic.com for details. Tickets start at $20. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Musaica Chamber Ensemble. St. Charles Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1545 State St., (504) 897-0101; www.scapc.com — Music by Dave Anderson, Tucker Fuller and Beethoven is featured in the performance. Suggested donation $10. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg & the Loyola Strings. Loyola University New Orleans, Louis J. Roussel Performance Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 865-2074; www.montage.loyno.edu — The violinist performs with student musicians. 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

MORE ONLINE AT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM COMPLETE LISTINGS

bestofneworleans.com/music

CALLS FOR MUSIC

bestofneworleans.com/callsformusic

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d.b.a. — John Boutte, 7; Soul Brass Band, 10

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NEW ORLEANS’ PREMIER

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MAY 22 - STEELY DAN & THE

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JUNE 14 - MAROON 5 WITH

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WHERE TO GO WHAT TO DO

Contact Kat Stromquist listingsedit@gambitweekly.com | 504.483.3110 | FAX: 866.473.7199 = O U R P I C K S | C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S . C O M

GOI NG OUT I N DE X

EVENTS Tuesday, April 17 .................. 47 Wednesday, April 18 ............ 47 Thursday, April 19 ................ 47 Friday, April 20 ..................... 47 Saturday, April 21 ................. 48 Sunday, April 22 ................... 48 Sports ..................................... 49 Words ..................................... 49

FILM Film festivals ........................ 49 Opening this weekend ........ 49 Special screenings ............... 50 On Stage.................................. 51 Dance ...................................... 52 Opera ...................................... 52

ART Happenings ........................... 52 Openings ................................ 52

EVENTS TUESDAY 17 Paradigm Gardens Concert Series. Paradigm Gardens, 1131 S. Rampart St., (504) 344-9474; www.paradigmgardensnola.com — Chefs from local restaurants, including Patois and Coquette, prepare food at the urban garden’s dinner and live music series. Drinks are served and participants may BYOB. Tickets $80. 6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 18 A Costa Rican Voyage Benefit Dinner. Private residence — Son of a Saint presents the dinner fundraiser, which benefits its Costa Rican summer trip. Visit www.sonofasaint.org for details. Tickets $100. 6 p.m. Evenings with Enrique. New Orleans Botanical Garden, 5 Victory Ave., (504) 483-9386; www.neworleanscitypark.com/ botanical-garden — The garden stays open late for live music, and mojitos and Latin food are available for purchase. 5 p.m. For the Love of: Puerto Rico. Howlin’ Wolf Den, 901 S. Peters St., (504) 5295844; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Piccola Tushy produces the fundraiser, which has comedy, burlesque, poetry and storytelling performances. Proceeds benefit survivors of Hurricane Maria. Suggested donation $10. 7 p.m. Historic Bayou Road: The Mississippi River to Bayou St. John. Kitchen Witch Cookbooks, 1452 N. Broad St., (504) 5288382; www.kwcookbooks.com — Tour guide Karen Atherton delivers the lecture. Admission $7, includes snacks. 5:30 p.m.

EVENTS

PREVIEW Tall Ships and NOLA Navy Week BY WILL COVIELLO P H OTO B Y O N N E VA N D E R WA L

RIVERFRONT DOCKS will be packed with ships as Tall Ships and NOLA Navy Week converge on the city this weekend. Tall Ships (April 19-22) features several historic and replica ships with large masts and traditional sail riggings docked at Woldenberg Park. The lineup includes the Elissa, built in 1877 in Scotland, and the Oostershelde, a Dutch schooner built in 1918. The Oliver Hazard Perry (pictured) is a Rhode Island-based ship with three masts, 20 sails and 7 miles of rigging, named for the officer who led the first U.S. Naval victory in the War of 1812. The Picton Castle is a three-mast ship used as a sailing training vessel in ocean voyages. The ships are open to the public from noon to 5 p.m. Friday through Sunday, and admission is free. Visit www.tallshipsnola2018.com for information. NOLA Navy Week (April 19-25) features ships from the navies of the U.S., Canada and France docked on the Mississippi River between Julia and Thalia streets. Ships are open to the public noon to 5 p.m. Friday, April 20; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Tuesday, April 21 and 24; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday and Monday, April 22-23. Admission is free. There are fireworks over the river at 9 p.m. Sunday. Visit www.facebook.com/nolanavyweek for information. Mirabeau Water Garden and Related Projects. Loyola University, Thomas Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave., (504) 865-3240; www.loyno.edu — Loyola environmental communications professor Robert Thomas leads the discussion of water management strategies. 7 p.m.

THURSDAY 19 Building Bastion Cocktail Party. Private residence —The party benefits housing for military veterans. Visit www.joinbastion.org for details. Tickets $150. 6 p.m. NOLA Navy Week. Citywide — Navy ships are available for tours, and there’s a seafood cook-off and Navy concerts. Visit www.facebook.com/nolanavyweek for details. Thursday-Monday. The Pelican State Goes to War Symposium: Uniquely Louisiana. National World War II Museum, BB’s Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1944; www. stagedoorcanteen.org — A daylong symposium examine’s Louisiana’s contributions to World War II. RSVP required. 9 a.m. Spring Clothing Swap. Glitter Box, 1109 Royal St., Suite A; www.glitterboxno. com — Participants should bring clothes, accessories, craft goodies and more to the swap. Free admission. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Studio on the Half Shell. Private residence — Readings, an oyster lecture, a silent auction and more are part of the gala dinner benefiting A Studio in the Woods. Linnzi Zaorski and OperaCreole perform. Visit www.studioonthehalfshell.eventbrite.com for details. Tickets $200. 6:30 p.m.

Tall Ships New Orleans 2018. Woldenberg Riverfront Park, Canal Street at the Mississippi River, (504) 565-3033; www.auduboninstitute.org — Historic sailing ships park on the Mississippi riverfront. There are sailing opportunities and a gala fundraiser with a fireworks display. Visit www.tallshipsnola2018.com for details. Thursday-Sunday. Used Book Sale Fundraiser. University of New Orleans, Earl K. Long Library, (504) 280-6355; www.library.uno.edu — Friends of the University of New Orleans Library hosts the sale of thousands of books. Early admission (10 a.m. to noon Thursday) $5. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

FRIDAY 20 Bike to Worship Weekend. Citywide — Bike Easy leads group rides to churches, synagogues and temples. Visit www. bikeeasy.org for details. Friday-Sunday. Cajun Festival. Visitation of Our Lady School, 3520 Ames Blvd., Marrero, (504) 347-3377; www.vol.org — The Topcats, The Chee-Weez, Bucktown All-Stars and others perform at the three-day event. There’s also food, chicken drop bingo, a silent auction, a talent show and more. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. Friday Night Fights. Friday Night Fights Gym, 1632 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. — A series of outdoor boxing matches are

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separated by variety performances. Tickets $15-$20. 7 p.m. Kenner’s Italian Heritage Festival. 400 block of Williams Boulevard, Kenner — The festival offers three days of live music, food, carnival rides, games and crafts. Visit www.italianheritagefestival.com for details. Admission $5, kids free. 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. Roast of the Town. Harrah’s Casino, Harrah’s Theatre, 1 Canal St., (504) 533-6600; www.harrahsneworleans. com — At Delgado Community College Foundation’s fundraiser, local politicians roast Gov. John Bel Edwards, and dinner is served. Email fndsupport@dcc.edu for details. Tickets $250. 7 p.m. SOIREE 75. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., (504) 525-1052; www.mahaliajacksontheater. com — Live painting, memorabilia giveaways and food by The Country Club are part of the party celebrating New Orleans Opera Association’s 75th anniversary. Visit www.neworleansopera.org for details. Tickets $75. 6:30 p.m. WYES Studio 12 Gala. WYES Innovation Center for Educational Media, 916 Navarre Ave., (504) 486-5511; www.wyes. org — There is a ’70s theme at the WYES gala. Costumes are encouraged and The Phunky Monkeys and Mannie Fresh perform. Tickets $200. 8 p.m.

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Art Klub Market. Art Klub, 1941 Arts St., (504) 943-6565; www.artklub.org — More than 20 vendors sell crafts and other goods at the monthly market, and there are art workshops, kids’ activities and food pop-ups. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Art Market. Cafe Luna, 802 Nashville Ave., (504) 333-6833; www.facebook.com/ cafeluna504 — Artists, artisans and crafters sell their wares at a market. 9 a.m. The Better Than Ezra Fun-Raiser. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., (504) 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com — Better Than Ezra and Mark McGrath perform at the fundraiser for Better Than Ezra’s foundation. Visit www.btefoundation.org for details. Tickets $50. 7:45 p.m. Broadway Bible. Greater Covington Center, 317 N. Jefferson St., Covington, (985) 867-1206 — Bible stories are paired with show tunes at a cabaret-style fundraiser for Northshore Jewish Congregation. Visit www.bit.ly/broadwaybible for details. Tickets $25-$30. 5 p.m. Camp SoulGrow Spring Fling. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., (504) 525-5515; www.rustynailnola.com — Art by Camp SoulGrow students is displayed and there are raffles at the fundraiser. Donations welcome. 8 p.m. Covington Antiques & Uniques Festival. Covington Trailhead, 419 N. Hampshire St., Covington — Antiques, vintage collectibles, crafts, architectural salvage and more are sold at the festival. Visit www. covingtonheritagefoundation.com for details. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Crawfish for Cancer. Mardi Gras World, 1380 Port of New Orleans Place, (504) 361-7821; www.mardigrasworld.com — There’s unlimited crawfish and an open beer bar at this fundraiser, which benefits Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation.

Visit www.crawfishforcancer.org for details. Tickets $65-$85. Noon to 5 p.m. Critter Cinema. Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., (504) 368-5191; www.la-spca. org — At a film screening, kids snuggle up to kittens and puppies while enjoying pizza and popcorn. Email party@la-spca.org for details. Registration $35. 6 p.m. Get Up N Ride Community Bike Fest. 2520 Bayou Road — Mia Borders, Tonya Boyd Cannon, Ariee and others perform at the bike-friendly outdoor festival. 4 p.m. iStudio and a Taste of NOLA. Newcomb Art Museum, Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Place, (504) 314-2406; www.newcombartmuseum. tulane.edu — Five chefs prepare dishes for the gala dinner benefiting International High School of New Orleans, and there are museum tours and a performance by Carl LeBlanc. Visit www.ihsnola.com for details. Tickets $75, couples $125. 6 p.m. Madisonville Art Market. Madisonville Art Market, Tchefuncte River at Water Street, Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www. artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features works by local artists including paintings, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Music Box Market. Music Box Village, 4557 N. Rampart St. — More than 40 vendors sell arts and crafts, vintage apparel and other items. Noon to 6 p.m. OCH Recycled Art Market. Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 827-5858; www. zeitgeistnola.org — There’s live music, entertainment, art and home furnishings crafted from reclaimed materials. Visit www.ochartmarket.com for details. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Portculture. Urban South Brewery, 1645 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 267-4852; www. urbansouthbrewery.com — The art market features works from illustrators, painters, photographers, collage artists and glass blowers, plus wood burning, live painting, live music and beer. 5 p.m. Record Store Day 2018. NOLA Mix Records, 1522 Magazine St., (504) 3452138; www.nolamix.com — Shawan & the Wonton, Charlie Corpening, Proper Channels and others perform at a party celebrating Record Store Day. There also are ticket giveaways and beer. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tails but No Black Tie. Equest Farm, 1001 Filmore Ave, (504) 483-9398; www. equestfarm.com — The gala offers viewing of equestrian events, and food and drinks are served. Visit www.tailsbutnoblacktie. org for details. Tickets $15, kids $10. 4 p.m.

SUNDAY 22 Arts and Craft Beer Fest. Parleaux Beer Lab, 634 Lesseps St., (504) 702-8433; www.parleauxbeerlab.com — KID smART hosts visual art, music, dance and drama activities for all ages. Free admission. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. New Orleans Tricentennial Dog Parade. NOLA City Bark, 30 Zachary Taylor Dr., (504) 483-9377 — Gambit’s event honoring New Orleans’ 300th birthday includes a dog walk around CIty Bark, a contest for the best New Orleans-centric dog costume and more. Registration $40. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. New Orleans Hibiscus Society Show and Plant Sale. Grace King High School, 4301 Grace King Place, Metairie, (504) 888-


GOING OUT PREVIEW New Orleans Poetry Festival BY KAT STROMQUIST P H OTO B Y R A FA E L H E R N A N D E Z

NOW IN ITS THIRD YEAR, the New Orleans Poetry Festival (April 20-22) celebrates poets and small press publishing with three days of activities. There are readings, workshops, slam poetry, music performances, an open mic, a small press fair and panels on poetry as it relates to journalism, politics, translation, feminism, race and other topics. Most events take place at and around the New Orleans Healing Center (2372 St. Claude Ave.). The festival includes performances by several notable poets. Jack Bedell, currently Louisiana’s poet laureate, appears at Friday’s opening reception at Cafe Istanbul inside the Healing Center. Saturday night features performances at Siberia (2227 St. Claude Ave.) by poet and librettist Douglas Kearney (pictured) and the experimental poet Tonya M. Foster, as well as local poet and University of New Orleans creative writing faculty member Carolyn Hembree. There’s also music by bands including The Call Girls, Cannonball Statman, Skin Verb and Bruce Andrews with Rob Cambre and Donald Miller. Festival registration is $75. Visit www.nolapoetry.com for the schedule of events. 7334; www.king.jpschools.org — Hibiscus plants are sold, and there are discussions of how best to cultivate their blooms. Free admission. 1 p.m. Pinch a Palooza Festival & Crawfish Eating Contest. Deanie’s Seafood Restaurant, 1713 Lake Ave., (504) 831-4141; www.pinchapalooza.com — The Topcats, Bucktown All-Stars, Vince Vance & the Valiants and Cowboy Mouth perform at the seafood festival and eating contest. Free admission. Noon to 8 p.m. Queens in the Garden. Private residence — A drag queen fashion show and garden party benefits Brain Injury Association of Louisiana. Visit www.biala.org for details. Tickets $45. 3 p.m. Vinyl Vibrations. Paradigm Gardens, 1131 S. Rampart St., (504) 344-9474; www. paradigmgardensnola.com — DJs perform at the outdoor dinner series, and food from local chefs and pop-ups is available for purchase. Guests may BYOB. Tickets $10. 6:30 p.m.

SPORTS New Orleans Pelicans. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Girod St., (504) 587-3663; www.neworleansarena.com — The Pelicans play the Portland Trail Blazers in the first round of the NBA playoffs. 8 p.m. Thursday and 4 p.m. Saturday.

WORDS Bryan Camp. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 8952266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com — The author presents The City of Lost Fortunes. 6 p.m. Tuesday. Dogfish Reading Series. Private residence, 2448 N. Villere St. — Megan Burns is the featured poet at the reading series, and Helen Gillet performs. 7 p.m. Iris Martin Cohen. Faulkner House Books, 624 Pirate’s Alley, (504) 524-2940; www. wordsandmusic.org — The author appears

at a launch party for The Little Clan. 2 p.m. Sunday. Jake Shears. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 8952266; www.gardendistrictbookshop.com — The Scissor Sisters frontman talks about his recent memoir, Boys Keep Swinging, with Gwen Thompkins. 6 p.m. Wednesday. Joshua Wheeler. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 895-2266; www.gardendistrictbookshop. com — The author reads from and signs Acid West: Essays. 6 p.m. Thursday. New Orleans Poetry Festival. Citywide — Three days of readings, panels, slam performances, small press fairs and more celebrate poetry in Louisiana. Visit www.nolapoetry.com for details. Registration $75. Friday-Sunday. Shakespeare’s Sisters. The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., (504) 895-2266; www. gardendistrictbookshop.com — Women’s National Book Association of New Orleans hosts a social and “bring a book, take a book” drive. Refreshments are served. 6 p.m. Monday. Whitney Stewart. Southern Food & Beverage Foundation, 1504 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., (504) 569-0405; www.natfab.org — The author signs What’s on Your Plate? Exploring the World of Food, and there’s a cooking demonstration. 1 p.m.

FILM FILM FESTIVALS The Overlook Film Festival — The film festival features horror films and virtual reality and immersive experiences. Visit www.overlookfilmfest.com for details. Thursday-Sunday. Cinebarre, Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre

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The Overlook Film Festival BY WILL COVIELLO NAMED FOR THE HOTEL IN STEPHEN KING’S THE SHINING, The Overlook Film Festival (April 19-22) has found some connection to that story in its two previous locations. After a year in Oregon, where Stanley Kubrick shot some exterior views for his film, the horror festival moves to New Orleans and the Bourbon Orleans Hotel, which has a ghost story not completely unlike The Shining’s Grady twins, say festival organizers. The festival includes a full slate of feature and short horror films as well as immersive and virtual reality experiences. Films feature psychological suspense, mysterious strangers, visits to isolated towns and mansions, ghost stories, monsters, gore, revenge schemes, punk rock slashing binges and gruesome Nazi puppets. Hereditary drew raves at the Sundance Film Festival for its tale of an imposing grandmother whose death unleashes a curse on her family. Comedian Patton Oswalt stars as a podcaster talking to a guest about the 1938 sexploitation film Sex Madness while the film screens in Sex Madness Revealed. In St. Agatha, a pregnant con artist seeks refuge in a convent but discovers it shrouds its own horrible secrets. A cyber cafe worker makes the wrong kind of friends when he uses a stranger’s laptop in Unfriended: Dark Web. Arizona is a comedic thriller in which a homeowner terrorizes a realtor. In Blood Fest (pictured), horror film fest attendees fight for their lives in a parody of horror genre conventions. Caniba is a nonfiction film in which a Japanese man reflects on the fame he found after killing and partially devouring a fellow university student in Paris. The festival has numerous virtual reality experiences, trivia games, podcast recordings, live performances by storytellers and horror writers and more. Film screenings are at Cinnebarre Canal Place 9 and Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre. Visit www.overlookfilmfest.com for a schedule and information.

filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami features 24 short films inspired by still images. Zeitgeist I Feel Pretty (PG-13) — Amy Schumer plays an insecure woman who wakes from an accident with a supermodel’s confidence. Clearview, Elmwood, West Bank, Chalmette, Slidell, Regal, Cinebarre Super Troopers 2 (R) — The troopers patrol the hotly disputed U.S.-Canada border. Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell Vampire Clay — Haunted clay menaces an art school in the film by Japanese special-effects master Soichi Umezawa. Zeitgeist

Feature rate includes print + digital placement and complimentary layout + design. Digital edition will be posted on Gambit’s social media sites, promoted via an e-newsletter and more. CONTACT SANDY STEIN at (504) 483-3150 • sandys@gambitweekly.com

SPECIAL SCREENINGS Back to the Future (PG) — Teenage time-traveler Marty McFly (Michael J. Fox) must ensure that his parents meet in high school. 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Wednesday. Slidell Birdman of Alcatraz — Burt Lancaster plays an inmate with birds on the brain. 10 a.m. Sunday. Prytania Blood Feast and Blood Feast 2 — A caterer/murderer hopes to summon the goddess Ishtar. 8 p.m. Wednesday. Bar Redux

The Cat Returns — After saving a cat’s life, a woman is invited to a secret cat kingdom. 12:55 p.m. Sunday, 7 p.m. Monday. Elmwood, West Bank, Slidell, Regal, Cinebarre The Darjeeling Limited (R) — Estranged brothers (Owen Wilson, Jason Schwartzman, Adrian Brody) hop a train across India. 10 p.m. Sunday. Prytania The Dating Project — This documentary follows people going on internet dates, as if your own love life wasn’t bad enough. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Elmwood, West Bank, Slidell, Regal, Cinebarre Down by Law (R) — Zack, Jack and Bob (Tom Waits, John Lurie, Roberto Benigni) are arrested in New Orleans and escape into the swamp. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday. Broad Grease (PG-13) — Fifties teens contemplate sex, drag racing and beauty school. 6:15 p.m. Friday. Joe W. Brown Park (5601 Read Blvd.) Look & See: Wendell Berry’s Kentucky — Laura Dunn directs the film about rural America seen through the eyes of writer and farmer Wendell Berry. 11 a.m. Friday. Ashe Power House The Metropolitan Opera: Luisa Miller — Verdi’s tragic opera is performed. 1 p.m.


GOING OUT

ON STAGE ON STAGE The Best of Sinatra. National World War

II Museum, BB’s Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — Spencer Racca portrays Frank Sinatra in this performance. Tickets $39.99. 11:45 a.m. Wednesday. Blue Angel: A Roy Orbison Tribute. National World War II Museum, BB’s Stage Door Canteen, 945 Magazine St., (504) 528-1944; www.stagedoorcanteen.org — Terry Harris performs in the solo tribute show. Tickets $29.52-$64.99. 6 p.m. Friday and 11 a.m. Sunday. Burlesque Imitates Art. Bar Redux, 801 Poland Ave., (504) 592-7083; www. barredux.com — Burlesque dancers’ performances are based on the work of local artists. Tickets $15. 9 p.m. Saturday. Catch Me If You Can. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 6400 Airline Drive, Metairie, (504) 885-2000; www.jpas. org — The musical is inspired by the life of con artist Frank Abagnale Jr. Tickets $35. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Death Part 7: The Last Word. The AllWays Lounge & Theater, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778 — Jack Trinco stars in the show, which uses storytelling, dark comedy and cabaret to explore mortality. Tickets $10. 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Draguation. The AllWays Lounge & Theater, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.net — Recent New Orleans Drag Workshop “draguates” perform. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Monday. Eclipsed. Loyola University, Marquette Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave.,

STAGE

PREVIEW New Orleans Opera Association’s 75th Anniversary Celebration BY WILL COVIELLO C O U R T E S Y N E W O R L E A N S O P E R A A S S O C I AT I O N

THE NEW ORLEANS OPERA ASSOCIATION (NOOA) is celebrating its 75th anniversary this season, with productions including two short operas — Cavalleria Rusticana and Pagliacci — which opened its first season in June 1943. This gala concert features an all-star roster of veterans of its productions singing songs from works by Mozart, Verdi, Puccini, Rossini, Wagner and Bizet as well as American songbook classics by Gershwin and Broadway hits. The list of national and international opera stars returning to perform with NOOA includes Loyola University New Orleans alumnus Sarah Jane McMahon, who has performed around the globe and opposite legends such as Placido Domingo. Veterans of New York’s Metropolitan Opera include New Orleans native Angela Mannino and Lucas Meachem, who starred in Don Giovanni for NOOA. New Orleans native and rising opera star Casey Candebat performed in Sweeney Todd and the fall 2017 production of Orpheus in the Underworld. Other visiting and local singers include Raymond Aceto, Luretta Bybee, Leslie Castay, Ivan Griffin, Paul Groves, Kathleen Halm, Daveda Karanas and Chauncey Packer. Tickets $26-$225. At 8 p.m. Friday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., (504) 529-3000; www.neworleansopera.org.

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and 6:35 p.m. Wednesday. Cinebarre Purple Rain (R) — Honor the Purple One with a screening of the 1984 Prince-led dance-pop musical. 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday, midnight Saturday-Sunday. Prytania The Riot and the Dance — This film puts a faith-based spin (think “God’s design”) on nature documentaries. 7 p.m. Thursday. Elmwood, West Bank, Regal Suicide: The Ripple Effect — Kevin Hines, who survived a suicide attempt, directs the documentary. 7:30 p.m. Thursday. Elmwood Super Troopers Double Feature — The cult comedy and its sequel are screened. 4:20 p.m. Thursday. Elmwood, West Bank, Kenner, Slidell Sweet Smell of Success — A columnist (Burt Lancaster) recruits a publicist to break up his sister’s romance. 10 a.m. Wednesday. Prytania They Remain — Scientists investigate the aftermath of strange incidents at a cult’s compound. 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Zeitgeist Western — Working in rural Bulgaria, German construction workers experience tensions with the locals. 7 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday. Zeitgeist

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GOING OUT (504) 522-6545; www.southernrep.com — Five women rely on each other to cope with exploitation during the Liberian Civil War. Tickets $8-$45. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. Hedda Gabler. University of New Orleans, Robert E. Nims Theatre, Performing Arts Center, St. Anthony Avenue off of 2000 Lakeshore Drive, (504) 280-7469; www. theatre.uno.edu — Theatre UNO presents the Ibsen play about a disenchanted newlywed. Tickets $8-$12. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. Jeanne d’Arc: La Transgression. New Orleans Art Center, 3330 St. Claude Ave., (504) 383-4765; www.theneworleansartcenter.com — Francophilia Foundation presents the performance based on the life of Joan of Arc. Tickets $15-$20. 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday. Luxotica Lounge Cabaret. The AllWays Lounge & Theater, 2240 St. Claude Ave., (504) 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.net — The variety show includes burlesque, circus arts and knife juggling. Tickets $10-$15. 8 p.m. Sunday. New Orleans Giant Puppet Festival. Citywide — During the annual fest, local and traveling puppeteers present shows and workshops at four Bywater venues. Visit www.neworleansgiantpuppetfest.wordpress.com for details. Wednesday-Monday. New Orleans Voices of Congo Square. The Orpheum Theater, 129 University Place, (504) 274-4871; www.orpheumnola. com — The stage production is inspired by masking culture and Carnival and includes Mardi Gras Indians and traditional dance. Tickets $40-$100. 8 p.m. Friday. The No Ring Circus. Fortress of Lushington, 2215 Burgundy St., (504) 704-1393 — The avant-garde dark clown theatre piece is set to an original soundtrack. Visit www.thenoringcircus.com for details. Tickets $10. 9 p.m. Thursday, 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday. Rent. Saenger Theatre, 1111 Canal St., (504) 287-0351; www.saengernola.com — The musical about the lives of artists is a re-imagining of La Boheme. Tickets start at $30. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday.

ART

REVIEW A Precise Vision: The Architectural Archival Watercolors of Jim Blanchard BY D. ERIC BOOKHARDT ALTHOUGH PEOPLE AND BUILDINGS ARE VERY DIFFERENT in almost every way, those differences are far less pronounced when reduced to two dimensions in a picture frame. Consequently, Jim Blanchard’s mostly 19th-century New Orleans architectural portraits neatly complement Josef Salazar’s 18th-century portraits of prominent local citizens at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Illustrating the distinctions between the architecturally muted but socially permissive Creole culture of the French Quarter and the sometimes architecturally extravagant yet socially more rigid “American Sector” across Canal Street, they reflect a contrast of civilizations in which Americans living in Uptown employed legendary architects to create their own unique urban aesthetic in a city of buildings with French and Spanish designs. Their efforts gave us not only the tropical grandeur of the Garden District, but also some less famous flights of fantasy that sometimes bordered the surreal. The most obscure surely must be the old Sixth Precinct Jail on Rousseau Street (pictured). Once an imposing Egyptian revival masterpiece, it’s badly mutilated remains still stand as an unusual warehouse graced with the arcane symbols of the pharaohs. More visible Egyptian revival icons such as the U.S. Custom House and Cypress Grove Cemetery fared better. Though the Anglo-Americans often tried to make the city more like the American South, its numerous international immigrants often had other ideas. Florence Luling, a rich German cotton broker, had James Gallier design his dream mansion as a 22-room Venetian palazzo with an acre of formal gardens facing Esplanade Avenue. After it was completed in 1865, his fortunes took a tragic turn and he sold it to the Jockey Club and returned to Germany. Here it appears in the gussied-up grandeur of his original fantasy. Today, the building’s weathered majesty stands as Luling’s greatest legacy. Many local favorites grace this imposing exhibition, complete with artifacts and text boxes that reveal their colorful histories. Blanchard’s architectural portraits are finely painted in gouache and watercolors like the archival renderings still found in city records, but they amount to a family album of our beloved architectural ancestors, many of which live on, well-preserved and ever more charismatic with the passage of time. Through Aug. 19. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9650; www.ogdenmuseum.org.

paniment. Tickets start at $26. 8 p.m. Friday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Opera Nouvelle. Ursuline Academy, 2635 State St., (504) 866-5292; www.ursulineneworleans.org — New Orleans Opera Association presents the program. Free admission. 7 p.m. Wednesday.

DANCE Be / With. Marigny Opera House, 725 St. Ferdinand St., (504) 948-9998; www. marignyoperahouse.org — Musicians and dancers work together to improvise performance pieces. Suggested donation $10. 7 p.m. Sunday. Gomela/To Return: Movement of Our Mother Tongue. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., (504) 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Junebug Productions presents the dance performance inspired by connections between Africa, Haiti and New Orleans. Tickets $30. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

OPERA Diamond Jubilee Concert. Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, 1419 Basin St., (504) 525-1052; www. mahaliajacksontheater.com — The New Orleans Opera Association celebrates its 75th anniversary with selections from Verdi, Mozart, Offenbach, Rossini, Puccini, Wagner, Bizet and Gershwin. Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra provides accom-

ART HAPPENINGS Contemporary Photography and the South. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St., (504) 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — University of Georgia professor emeritus Jim Cobb moderates a panel about “One Place Understood: Photographs from the Do Good Fund Collection.” Free admission. 6 p.m. Friday. Low Road Art Walk. Royal Street — Galleries in the 700 to 1100 blocks of Royal Street stay open late. 6 p.m. Thursday. Regional Art Prize Workshop. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., (504) 5283800; www.cacno.org — The free workshop for artists in any medium covers major prizes in the South. 12:30 p.m. Tuesday. Robert Storr. Loyola University, Miller Hall, Room 114, 6363 St. Charles Ave. — The artist, curator and author discusses his work at Yale University’s School of Art

and New York’s Museum of Modern Art. Free admission. 6:30 p.m. Thursday.

OPENING Antieau Gallery. 927 Royal St., (504) 304-0849; www.antieaugallery. com — “NEW WORK,” new works by Chris Roberts Antieau; opening reception 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Louisiana State Museum Cabildo. 701 Chartres St., (504) 568-6968; www.lsm. crt.state.la.us — “Recovered Memories: Spain, New Orleans and the Support for the American Revolution,” artifacts, documents and artworks about Spain’s influence on New Orleans development; opening reception 7 p.m. Friday.

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THE NEWSDAY CROSSWORD Edited by Stanley Newman (www.StanXwords.com)

MOVING PICTURES: Action movies all by Mark McClain ACROSS 1 Country singer McEntire 5 Tomato variety 9 Music staff symbols 14 Lower leg 18 Annoyingly suave 19 Less iffy 20 Gets well 21 Move carefully 22 1979 Peter Sellers film 24 Cross a threshold 25 Random stack 26 German article 27 Prior to opening 28 Matched up 29 Hit the trail

30 Squeaking bone, e.g. 32 Disney animated release of 1959 35 Alpha __ Minoris (Polaris) 37 Shopping complex 38 Twitter titter 39 Star Trek alien 42 Population center 43 Closed, as a parka 48 2016 Pixar film 50 Perch appendages 51 Poetic lowland 52 Vieux __ (French Quarter) 53 Scopes out 54 Percussion

55 56 57 58 59 60 64 68 69 70 73 74 76 77

instrument Wading bird “Tell __ story” Bend, as biceps __ Claire, WI Corporate owner Aykroyd/Murphy role-reversal film Where FDR served as a senator Droop Course of action Klutzy one Riding horse Power measure Spanish custard Swiss mathematician

79 Crow’s-nest support 80 Circle segments 81 Denzel Washington’s second Oscar film 83 Poised to reach higher, say 85 Horse-drawn carriage 86 Coastal breeze descriptor 87 Term of endearment 88 Luau locale 89 Presented in its entirety 90 Mel Brooks’ Western spoof 96 Responsible (for) 100 Sports coat feature 101 Backs with bucks 102 Short, easy putt 104 Small, for short 105 Concert boxes 106 Italian bridge 107 De Niro’s second Oscar film 109 Shaken seasoning 110 Color gradations 111 Assemble, with “together” 112 Museo display 113 Low número 114 Leg extender 115 Casablanca heroine 116 Trade org. DOWN 1 Clad like a judge 2 End of a kindergarten song 3 Jewelry, slangily 4 Writer Rand 5 German urban region 6 Consequences introducer 7 First-billed name in The Iron Lady 8 Comprise 9 For a song 10 Soup legume 11 Eroded 12 Nest departer 13 Former Ukr. designation 14 Antique photo tone 15 Japanese verse 16 Sea kayak stopover 17 Down and out 19 Doesn’t retire 23 Nursery rhyme lad 28 Substantial 29 What tech support provides

CREATORS SYNDICATE © 2018 STANLEY NEWMAN Reach Stan Newman at P.O. Box 69, Massapequa Park, NY 11762 or www.StanXwords.com

31 33 34 36 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 49 50 54 55 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66

Arctic plain Some Mideast rulers Conks Big name in the Bundestag Pizza Hut sister brand Actor Neeson Concerning, in memos Lives harmoniously (with) Cali wine Even a single time Seldom seen Musk of SpaceX Small bit of progress A new color now Whodunit phrase Mountain pass Comprises Prepare with a skillet What one may 57 Down Farm enclosure Demolition material DC baseballer Jai __ 1812 Overture ”instrument” Cartridge contents Cash advance Small statue

SUDOKU

67 70 71 72 74 75 76 77 78 80 81 82 84 85 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 97 98 99 103 106 107 108

It means “adverse to” Should, so to speak Gucci of fashion Trepidation Metaphor for a bad start Virtuoso Overly delicate Coming after Lunch bread Very much Dull sounds Gradient Golfer Mickelson Most morose Fireplace framer Applications Strong gust Rapper Kendrick Important part of a Tell tale Citrus peels Branch of Islam Web commerce Fuzzy images Light melodies Actress Page or Pompeo Typography measure Blood-bank units: Abbr. NY engineering school Ram’s lament

By Creators Syndicate

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Residential & Commercial Licensed & Bonded

504-232-5554 504-831-0606 SERVICES DWI - Traffic Tickets? Don’t go to court without an attorney! You can afford an attorney. Call Attorney Gene Redmann, 504-834-6430.

••• C H E A P TRASH HAULING Call (504) 292-0724 ••• FREE ESTIMATES. BE BLESSED. FRANK

Apply within or at www.metairiecc.org First Engineer, Merchandise Director, Assistant Dining Room Manager and other FT & PT positions.

Do you feel passionately about making the world a kinder place?

Would you like to work with people from all walks of life?

Have you been looking for a way to give back to your community?

We are seeking volunteers at Canon Hospice to donate their time towards helping patients and families who are dealing with end-of-life issues. Ways to Volunteer: • Talk, listen, pray with, read to, or sit with patients • Support bereaved family members in their healing • Assist with clerical work, data entry, and mailings • Help with events like bingo nights, “Celebrations of Life,” and fundraisers • Use individual skills, creativity, and life experience to help in your own unique way

We are an extremely flexible and supportive environment, and are looking forward to hearing from you at 504-818-2723

Lakeview

Locally owned & serving the New Orleans area for over 25 years

to place your ad in the

GAMBIT EXCHANGE call 483-3138

CLEANING SERVICE

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING HOLIDAY CLEANING LIGHT/GNERAL HOUSEKEEPING HEAVY DUTY CLEANING

Susana Palma

lakeviewcleaningllc@yahoo.com Fully Insured & Bonded

504-250-0884 504-913-6615

REAL ESTATE / SERVICES/EMPLOYMENT

1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 & 2 Bedrooms available in ideal location and ROOMS BY THE WEEK. 1 BR, private bath. All utilities included. $180/week. Call (504) 202-0381 for appointment.

PIZZA MAKER

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > A P R I L 1 7 - 2 3 > 2 0 1 8

All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act and the Louisiana Open Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, NOTICE: familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. For more information, call the Louisiana Attorney General’s Office at 1-800-273-5718.

55 Experienced


Gambit New Orleans, April 17, 2018  

New Orleans news and entertainment

Gambit New Orleans, April 17, 2018  

New Orleans news and entertainment