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ple. This reflects the mayor’s vision of “cutting and investing” at the same time — cutting where economies can be realized and investing in the priorities identified by citizens in town hall meetings. “It’s not a standstill budget,” the mayor says, “but it comes as close to any budget that I know of to being a standstill budget.” Landrieu’s surgical, department-by-department reductions stand in contrast to the budgeting philosophy of Gov. Bobby Jindal, who believes in cutting without regard to consequences. For example, Jindal last week declined even to seek $100 million in federal “Race to the Top” education funds for early childhood education programs. In other words, despite his touting of education as the long-term

One-time funds should be lagniappe, not bedrock, to any fiscally responsible city budget. solution to many of Louisiana’s problems, Jindal doesn’t think it wise to invest in children today. He couldn’t be more wrong. Landrieu, by contrast, continues to invest in NORD and public safety while cutting elsewhere. In our view, this is responsible budgeting. It’s not perfect by any stretch, and the City Council will rightly review the mayor’s spending plan during budget hearings and make revisions, but it does “stay the course,” as the mayor noted in his budget address. Above all, Landrieu is charting a fiscally responsible plan in trying to wipe out the cumulative deficit he inherited from former Mayor Ray Nagin and in fashioning a budget that relies as little as possible on nonrecurring revenues. In adopting a “pay as you go” philosophy, Landrieu in fact is charting a new and more responsible course for New Orleans. While other cities and states are forced to take a cleaver to their budgets, New Orleans, for the second year in a row, is attempting a realistic approach to budgeting with a minimum of bluster.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

ayor Mitch Landrieu presented his proposed 2012 budget Oct. 17, and it looked very much like the 2011 version. This spending plan is about $40 million less than the city’s 2009 budget, which relied heavily on one-time funds. A budget such as the one adopted three years ago is not sustainable; one-time funds should be lagniappe, not bedrock, to any fiscally responsible city budget. Landrieu came into office in May 2010, almost halfway through the fiscal year, and found a huge deficit, which his administration initially estimated at $67 million to $70 million. As the year wore on and auditors finally got a thorough look at all of the previous years’ expenditures, that estimate grew to more than $100 million. Much of that deficit was “structural,” in the mayor’s words, because it reflected ongoing commitments that were not supported by sufficient revenues, such as the sanitation service fee on monthly water bills. That fee had been set at $12 a month for years, even though the actual cost of providing sanitation services had grown closer to $22 a month per household. Last year, the mayor proposed an increase in the fee, and the City Council agreed, voting unanimously to raise the household fee to $24 per month. Raising the fee, which — let’s face it — is a tax, was a gamble in this “all taxes are bad” era, but neither the mayor nor the council have seen any significant blowback. For the second year in a row, Landrieu also proposed rolling forward the city’s property millage rate to provide adequate revenues to the city. This is the other portion of the city’s structural or ongoing deficit, which in prior years was covered by one-time funds from the state and/or federal government. Such one-time funds are unreliable, and building a budget on them is both fiscally irresponsible and dangerous. Last year’s budget came closer than any in memory to reflecting a spending plan based on actual annual revenues. With his 2012 budget, the mayor says he’s trying to stick to that principle. Revenues for 2012 are projected to be slightly higher than this year — $494 million compared to $483 million in the current year — but the mayor’s proposed budget nonetheless includes across-theboard cuts to most departments and agencies. The exceptions are those dealing with public safety (police, fire, EMS), as well as the New Orleans Recreation Department (NORD) and JOB 1, the city’s office of workforce development, which also provides much-needed job placement assistance to the city’s young peo-

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HEY BLAKE, WHAT ARE YOUR SOURCES FOR THE CARROLLTON AND ST. MARY CEMETERIES? I AM RESEARCHING THESE CEMETERIES AND HAVE BEEN UNSUCCESSFUL IN LOCATING ACCURATE AND DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT THEM. TERRY FEDOROFF

DEAR TERRY, Since Ol’ Blake has been around the block more than a couple of times, he uses information collected over the ages — and he just knows stuff. The two cemeteries you ask about are neighborhood burial grounds. Even though New Orleans has cemeteries centrally located at Canal Street and City Park Avenue, there are a number of smaller cemeteries in our city’s neighborhoods. The land where the Carrollton Cemetery was laid out in 1719 was part of a plantation owned by New Orleans’ founder Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. Later it was part of a sugar plantation owned by Jeanne Macarty. Eventually the land was purchased by the New Orleans Canal & Banking Company and several private investors who divided the land into plots for development. The first house was built in 1835, and the “suburb” of Carrollton grew. In 1845, it was incorporated as a city. Within a few years, the thriving new town included doctors, druggists, dentists, a blacksmith, a tinsmith, a baker, a gunsmith and a cemetery, also known locally as the Green Cemetery, which was bounded by Hickory, Lowerline, Adams and Birch streets. The first lot was Number 405, purchased in 1849 by Neil Cochran for $15. This remained the price of a plot for many years. Carrollton Cemetery, like many others, was segregated. A visit to the cemetery will show you that the tombs for the white citizens are much more elaborate and permanent. There was also a “potter’s field” for burial of the indigent. When the City of New Orleans annexed Carrollton in 1874, the care and management of the cemetery became the responsibility of city government. Needless to say, the level of care was far from adequate. As time went by, the cemetery was neglected, but in 1969 the city issued bonds for cemetery improvement. As a result, the main aisles in the Carrollton Cemetery were paved.

Writing In 1876, historian William H. Williams described the cemetery in this way: “A cemetery was created as an appendage to the town government and owned by the corporation. It is situated in the rear of the town formed by sedimentary deposit from the waters of the Macarty crevasse.” Williams thought the cemetery was admirable because the height of the

The Carrollton Cemetery Uptown, established in 1848, has a mixture of mausoleums and in-ground burial plots. PHOTO BY KANDACE POWER GRAVES

land made it suitable for burying in the ground, which Williams believed was “the most pleasant and beautiful as well as the most permanent mode of preserving our dead.” He also wrote, “The dead of many years lie reposing here; many, it is true wholly neglected and forgotten; while on the other hand, the honored and well-remembered names here scattered around on marble, are so many and so familiar to us all that we feel in the walks in our cemetery as if we were moving in the midst of our friends.” None of the tombs are of special architectural interest, but many of the early residents and pioneer families of Carrollton are entombed here. The other cemetery you ask about is located near the Carrollton Cemetery between Adams, Cohn, Spruce and Lowerline streets. The tiny St. Mary Cemetery was established about 1893. It once belonged to the Archdiocese of New Orleans, but it was acquired by the City of New Orleans in 1921. If you need more information, contact the organization Save Our Cemeteries at 525-3377.


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <QUOTES OF THE WEEK > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > “Every homicide in New Orleans tears away at the fabric of <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < < < < < < <our > > community > > > > > > > >— > >the > > murder > > > > > >of>Curtis > > > > Matthews > > > > > > > on > > Saturday >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> night no less than others. While it is tempting for the media to < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <opine on the motive behind this murder, it is irresponsible for

scuttle Butt

me or anyone else to make any such assumptions at this time.” — District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro Oct. 17, reacting to the slaying of a man whose brother was one of the witnesses who helped convict Telly Hankton, whom the New Orleans Police Department had called the city’s most dangerous criminal.

Career Opportunities

“We’re gonna win this battle and I’m sending a message loud and clear to Telly Hankton and his family and anybody else who is associated to this: We’re coming to get you, and we’re gonna find a way.” — Mayor Mitch Landrieu, two days later, opining pretty clearly on the motive behind Curtis Matthews’ murder. D.A. Leon Cannizzaro and New Orleans Police Superintendent Ronal Serpas also were there. A warrant was issued for Walter Porter Oct. 20. He surrendered the next morning.

POST-KATRINA NEW ORLEANS HAS BEEN HAILED AS A MECCA FOR YOUNG ENTREPRENEURS AND THE “CREATIVE CLASS” ... BUT THE JOB OF RETAINING TALENTED YOUNG ADULTS IN THE CITY IS STILL A WORK IN PROGRESS. BY ALLISON GOOD

THE ENDORSEMENTS THAT WEREN’T

T

natives alike. There are signs, how- Idea Village CEO Tim Williamson ever, that a vision says the entrepreneurs and for mass retention businesses his group has worked of the educated with since 2005 have created more than 1,250 jobs — and are young adult popu- poised to hire even more people. lation, particularly the newcomers, PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER may not align with New Orleans’ economic reality. One significant issue is the local job market. As the Associated Press reported in August, New Orleans gained 13,700 nonfarm jobs over the past 12 months — 13,300 of which are in the service-providing sector. YLC executive director Amy Collins says the nature of the marketplace is an important factor. “Our mid-sized economy is mostly composed of small businesses and social enterprise, not giant corporations,” she explained. “It’s a good thing right now because you don’t have one big employer who’s suffering, but that also makes things more unstable because you’re going to live and die by small companies, which are in a constant state of adaptation.” The Idea Village is a nonprofit startup incubator whose stated mission is to “identify, support and

“Acadiana Area and Coastal Elected Officials Join Together to Endorse Billy Nungesser for Lt. Governor” was the title of a press release issued by Nungesser spokeswoman Amy Jones on Oct. 18 — four days before Election Day. The release claimed the endorsement of 14 Cajun Country mayors who had met with Nungesser at Cafe des Amis in Breaux Bridge that morning. The problem? It wasn’t true, according to four of the mayors listed as endorsers. Carencro Mayor Glenn Brasseaux (who was misidentified as “Glenn Broussard”) says he was invited by David Camardelle, mayor of Grand Isle, to hear what Nungesser had to say. “We went to the meeting. There was nothing about endorsements. I don’t endorse anybody,” Brasseaux told The Independent in Lafayette. In a letter to Jones, Brasseaux went further: “At no PAGE 13

c'est what? DO YOU OR DO YOU NOT SUPPORT THE “OCCUPY” PROTESTS TAKING PLACE AROUND THE U.S., INCLUDING IN NEW ORLEANS?

56% support

don’t support

6% not sure

Vote on “c’est what?” on bestofneworleans.com THIS WEEK’S QUESTION

PAGE 11

BoUQuets

38%

Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s office reports 46,000 potholes were patched in the city during the last year. How do you think the roads in New Orleans are compared to a year ago?

THIS WEEK’S HEROES AND ZEROES

The Young Leadership Council (YLC)

has launched a five-week project remediating NORD playgrounds in each of New Orleans’ five City Council districts. YLC volunteers will work every Saturday through Nov. 19 to clean play areas, build fences and install trashcans, benches and new basketball courts. It’s part of the YLC’s 25th anniversary celebration this year. The group Hike for KaTREEna is also providing new trees to be planted.

Eugene Cizek,

an architecture professor at Tulane University, received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Council for Preservation Education at a ceremony in New York Oct. 21. Cizek and his late partner Lloyd Sensat Jr. founded the Sun Oak Foundation for Education Through Historic Preservation. He has been a leading advocate for preserving the architecture of the Faubourg Marigny.

Scott Wolfe,

a local developer, put up $10,000 in hopes of getting new information about the Oct. 15 murder of Curtis Matthews. Matthews, the brother of a witness in the recent Telly Hankton murder trial, was slain Oct. 15 outside his daiquiri shop. Mayor Mitch Landrieu contributed the same amount from his campaign fund, and Crimestoppers offered $5,000, for a total of $25,000. Suspect Walter Porter surrendered Oct. 21.

Gov. Bobby Jindal

failed to sign off on submission of an application for a federal grant that could have brought $60 million to the state to invest in early childhood education. In a statement, Jindal spokesman Kyle Plotkin said the money would “make things worse by reducing flexibility and adding more micromanagement and regulatory obstacles.” Jindal, of course, had no such objection to accepting money from the 2009 federal stimulus — after he railed against it.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

hree years ago, Leslie Jacobs initiated 504ward, an organization “dedicated to retaining young talent in New Orleans.” For Jacobs, the issue is personal. “What prompted me to start 504ward was watching what was happening with my daughters,” Jacobs says. “They felt they’d never come back, but they did, and some of their friends moved here as well. I hired a consultant group, we did six to nine months of planning, and that’s how it started.” In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods, New Orleans became a magnet for educated young adults looking to make a difference. Many came as volunteers, but those who stayed created a network that has attracted an influx of young adult professionals. This brain gain, according to U.S. Census figures, is substantial. In 2000, 26 percent of adults 25 and older in New Orleans had a college degree. In 2010, that number jumped to 33 percent. Forbes also has taken notice; the magazine recently ranked the New Orleans-MetairieKenner metro area as America’s biggest “brain magnet” (its term for “the smartest cities of the future”). Though academics and city officials have yet to measure how many young adult newcomers there are (and how many have actually stayed in New Orleans), there is clearly a critical mass. Teach for America, for example, has 400 core members in the New Orleans area this year, in addition to the 650 alumni who never left. Sixty percent of the Young Leadership Council’s (YLC) 1,500 members are not from New Orleans. 504ward has 7,200 members, 70 percent of which are newcomers to the city. So far, the general outlook is one of optimism, evidenced by the hundreds of tech startups and social entrepreneurial ventures created by newcomers and

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and San Francisco, and moved to New York City to pursue other entrepreneurial opportunities. Still, entrepreneurs are clustering to build and sustain the local momentum. Social Entrepreneurs of New Orleans is a professional association that supports established and emerging ventures by connecting them with a network of mentors and experts. Headed by Andrea Chen, the organization currently has 10 fellows in the first round of its new accelerator program, which provides pro bono professional services and paid consultations. Chen says the educated young adult demographic is particularly drawn to social enterprise. “Nationally, there is something about this generation that is really pushing the envelope and looking for ways to solve really critical problems we face, and I think that’s because the problems we face are so scary,” she says. Collaborative workspaces like the Icehouse, Entrepreneur’s Row, the IP, and Launchpad also have become a large part of the local entrepreneurial community. The low-risk setup at Launchpad, which houses 75 businesses, reaches out to young adult talent. Tenants pay rent monthly, and they can choose to rent a co-working desk, a permanent desk or a private office. Amenities include access to Wi-Fi, printers, phones, conference rooms and a gym. “The idea is that getting a business off the ground is hard, and doing it in an environment with other entrepreneurs accelerates the process for some people and increases chances for success,” says co-founder Chris Schultz, who runs several software companies from New Orleans. “The basic premise is that there’s a huge gap between working in a coffee shop or in your back bedroom and what it takes to get a traditional commercial leap, and it can be very difficult because there’s nothing in between.” While Launchpad has found success providing an instant social network and support system for young entrepreneurs, similar efforts geared toward young adults who hope to find jobs in other sectors have not been as successful. The challenge of keeping up with demand, says 504ward executive director Jessica Shahien, has caused a shift in programming. “At 504ward, we initially focused on the one-on-one connection, on matching up young adults with mentors, but we can’t get to people fast enough,” she says. “You want to find the right match, so scaling that has been a challenge. We never thought we’d plan many events, but we hosted a business competition, and next thing you know we’re doing an annual dine-around where community leaders open up their homes to 500 people in one night.” page 13

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retain entrepreneurial talent in New Orleans by providing business resources to high-impact ventures.” Its cofounder and CEO Tim Williamson does not see this as a challenge. “Since 2005, we’ve worked with 1,006 entrepreneurs, and they have created about 1,000 jobs as a group,” Williamson says. “Fifteen of the companies we work with are in hyper-growth, meaning they’re seeing upwards of $5 milion in sales. Also, 13 companies that we have worked with have hired over 250 new people [total] in the last 12 months and have plans to hire another 167.” Williamson also cites the increase in applications to its educational and developmental acceleration programs. “The new entrepreneurial season started in July, and applications are up 83 percent from last year so far,” he says. “This time last year, we had 195 applications, and as of October 2011 we have 407.” These entrepreneurs, however, are not necessarily hiring newcomers. In fact, it seems the more well-established startups are composed mostly of people who were living in New Orleans before Katrina. Dukky, a social media marketing company founded in 2008, employs six “natives” and one newcomer. Out of the 48 employees at TurboSquid, a marketplace for 3-D models founded in 2000, only 13 are newcomers. Carrollton Technology Partners, which moved from New York City to New Orleans in 2000, has 27 employees and only three newcomers. The Receivables Exchange, an online marketplace for accounts receivables founded in 2007, has 58 employees in its New Orleans office. Many, according to spokesperson Bob Leahy, were born here. Tech startups are not necessarily looking to hire in large numbers either. Software developer Susco Solutions plans to add four positions, and founder and president Neel Sus says he expects three out of those four will not be from New Orleans. Audiosocket, a music licensing and technology company, will hire three to five employees in the next few months, and CEO Brent McCrossen says he is “looking locally where I can.” The New York Stock Exchange recently acquired a small stake of ownership in the Receivables Exchange, which also plans to increase employment. Whether those jobs are in New Orleans, New York, or at a potential office in California remains to be seen. Even though the Idea Village has been successful, startups are extremely highrisk ventures. “Out of those entrepreneurs that we’ve worked with, I would say around 30 to 40 have gone out of business,” Williamson says. KODA, for example, was an Internet recruiting company founded in 2008. In April, CEO Jeff Berger shut down the business, which had offices in New Orleans

Su Op nd en ay

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scuttlebutt page 9

time  before,  during  or  after  the  meeting  did  the  endorsement  subject  come  up.  It  was not suggested or even mentioned that  anyone  endorse  Billy  to  my  knowledge.   Regardless, I do not endorse anyone for any  office. Since your press release, I have wasted almost a whole day responding to newspapers,  radio  and  television,  not  counting  calls from some citizens and friends trying  to clear up your misinformation.”     New  Iberia  Mayor  Hilda Curry  was  equally direct.     “I  did  not  endorse  Billy  Nungesser.  I  attended  by  request  of  another  mayor  a  function at Cafe des Amis,” Curry said, noting that she, too, does not make endorsements. “He should know better,” Curry said  when  informed  the  Nungesser  campaign  had  issued  a  press  release  touting  the  endorsements.  Brasseaux  and  Curry  are  president and vice president, respectively,  of  the  Louisiana  Municipal  Association;  the organization’s bylaws prohibit its officers  from  making  endorsements.  Jack Dale Delhomme, mayor of Breaux Bridge,  and  St.  Francisville  Mayor  Billy D’Aquilla  also said they didn’t endorse Nungesser.

    In the meantime, Camardelle sent out  his  own  explanation,  which  only  confused  things  further:  “I  organized  this  morning’s breakfast with Billy Nungesser.  Some of the mayors were simply there to  meet  Billy.  These  elected  officials  were  not  identified  to  the  campaign.  It  was  a  simple misunderstanding.” Jones — who  did  not  attend  the  meeting  —  told  The Independent she would look into the matter. — Leslie Turk 

Sancho Jindal

    Gov.  Bobby Jindal  is  certainly  loyal  to  Texas  Gov.  Rick Perry.  Jindal  endorsed  Perry  in  the  GOP  presidential  race  on  Sept. 12, less than one month after Perry  threw  his  Stetson  into  the  ring.  At  the  time,  Perry  was  the  frontrunner  with  37  percent  support  —  as  much  as  Herman Cain, former Gov. Mitt Romney, and Rep.  Ron Paul combined.     But what a difference a month makes.  The  night  of  Jindal’s  endorsement,  Perry  turned  in  the  first  of  several  maladroit  debate  appearances,  and  Tea  Party  types  grabbed  the  smelling  salts  over  page 15

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selves,  ‘If  I  did  the  same  thing  in  Atlanta  or Houston, I could be making a lot more  money,’” says Lauren McCabe, who works  for  Zydeco  Media,  a  new  startup  that  aims to be a social media agency for restaurants.  “That’s  the  point  where  people  decide either to leave or to stay.”     University  of  New  Orleans  professors  Marla  Nelson  and  Renia  Ehrenfeucht  of  the  Department  of  Planning  and  Urban  Studies  discovered  that  the  “lack  of  possibility for advancement” also determines  who stays and who leaves.     In  2009,  Nelson  and  Ehrenfeucht  surveyed  80  locals  between  the  ages  of  25  and  40.  In  a  paper  presented  at  the  2010  New  Orleans  Political  Economy  Symposium,  they  reported,  “Many  felt  they  would  have  to  leave  New  Orleans  to  progress  professionally,  and  high  quality  of  daily  life  would  not  supersede career options.”      Nelson  says  this  applies  especially  to  those in the nonprofit sector.     “New Orleans has a level of attraction,  but  knowing  a  lot  of  people  in  the  nonprofit  realm,  if  you  don’t  have  that  really  dense job network, it’s hard to move up,”  she says.     The  YLC’s  Collins  agrees  and  adds  that  the  window  of  opportunity  is  closing  for  retaining young professionals.     “You  can  only  enjoy  New  Orleans  so  many  years  in  a  row  without  having  the  Even  if  educated  young  professionals  are  job  you  aspire  to,”  she  said.  “We’re  past  able  to  make  connections  and  find  jobs,  the  five-year  mark,  and  the  window  of  money and career mobility remain signifi- opportunity  is  very  narrow.  If  we  can’t  integrate these people en masse into the  cant issues in New Orleans.     “People  who  have  jobs  here  reach  New  Orleans  workforce,  they’re  going  to  this  cap  in  their  salary  and  say  to  them- start leaving.”

    Connecting talent to industries and jobs  is a problem that Greater New Orleans Inc.  (GNO,  Inc.),  an  economic  development  agency,  inherited.  According  to  executive  vice  president  Robin  Barnes,  GNO  Inc.  recently  acquired  WorkNOLA,  a  job  site  for educated young professionals looking  for  work  in  New  Orleans,  from  504ward.  “504ward  is  enormously  strong  in  outreach  to  job  seekers  and  young  professionals nationwide, but it was a challenge  for  them  to  get  jobs  posted  on  the  site,”  she says.     WorkNOLA  was  the  brainchild  of  Nathan Rothstein, who co-founded Young  Urban  Rebuildng  Professionals  (YURP),  one of the city’s first post-Katrina groups  geared  toward  young  entrepreneurs.  In  2009,  Rothstein  closed  YURP  and  left  New  Orleans  to  attend  graduate  school  at  Brandeis  University.  Last  year,  he  left  Brandeis and founded Swellr, an education  startup in Boston. Rothstein has no immediate plans to return to New Orleans.     Though there are more than 1,300 jobs  currently  listed  on  WorkNOLA,  Collins  says  she  has  noticed  a  disturbing  trend.  “You’re  starting  to  see  service-oriented  jobs trickle into WorkNOLA, so I see that it  could become just like The Times-Picayune  [website]  where  highly  talented  workers  are really having to weed through to find  high-talent jobs,” she said.

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clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

Racing to the Bottom ’m beginning to believe Bobby Jindal when he says he’s not going to seek national office in the next four years. I have concluded that not because I think Jindal is a man of his word, but rather because he is making some really boneheaded decisions that surely will come back to haunt him should he run for some higher office. Case in point: Jindal’s decision last week not to seek $60 million in federal Race to the Top grants for early childhood education. The governor’s hypocrisy on the issue of accepting and spending federal dollars should be the stuff of legend. A few years ago he lambasted President Obama’s stimulus programs, yet he didn’t hesitate to go around the state handing out oversized checks to local governing bodies — with his name on the signature line — even though every dollar of that money came from Obama’s stimulus plan. When it comes to hypocrisy, this guy has no threshold of shame. Now comes the third round of Race to the Top grants — a total of roughly $500 million nationally, of which Louisiana could compete for about $60 million. In prior years,

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Louisiana submitted grant applications for other Race to the Top grants, but without success. The competition is stiff. Because this year’s grants are dedicated to improving the quality of early learning experiences and closing the achievement gap for children with high needs because of poverty and other issues — and because Louisiana’s stifling poverty rate correlates closely (and directly) to a lack of effective early childhood education programs — our state would seem to be a leading contender for these funds. According to well-placed sources in state government, all that was needed to complete the application was Jindal’s signature. He refused to sign. Worse yet, he couldn’t even own up to making the decision himself. Instead, he got underlings to take responsibility — and to trash the grants. “The grant has strings attached that will force more state and federal control on our education system,” state Department of Children and Family Services Secretary Ruth Johnson said in a prepared statement. Acting State Superintendent of Education Ollie Tyler parroted Johnson’s comments, noting that Louisiana’s early childhood programs

are not well coordinated. “We need to completely revamp these programs and streamline our oversight, our funding streams and our quality standards,” Tyler said. Really? That’s our excuse — that we’re too screwed up to apply for this money? If that’s really the case, then why hasn’t the Jindal administration done something about that lack of coordination in the last

Jindal cares more about his own ideological purity than he does about Louisiana’s poor children.

three-and-a-half years? More specifically, what have the Department of Children and Family Services and the state Department of Education been doing since January 2008? Truth be told, Johnson and Tyler are just patsies for Jindal — loyal foot soldiers ordered to take a hit for our risk-averse, no-cojones governor. Johnson and Tyler didn’t make the decision not to apply for these funds; it was Jindal and his coterie of ideologues. Which brings us to the “strings attached” argument, which is a favorite bogeyman of Team Jindal and other right-wingers. While he decries the “red tape” associated with these grants, Jindal does not hesitate to grab federal dollars on many other fronts. Don’t think for a minute that federal highway funds or health care funds don’t also come with “strings” attached. So why not compete for early childhood education grants? Only one answer makes sense: Jindal cares more about his own ideological purity than he does about Louisiana’s poor children. And if he ever seeks higher office, his pathetic record on that front will surely come back to haunt him.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

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the DREAM Act, a 10-year-old law signed by the governor which provides in-state college tuition for Texas residents regardless of whether they’re in the country legally. In an Oct. 14 Zogby poll of more than 2,000 voters, Perry’s support had collapsed to 7 percent — one point above Newt Gingrich and one point below Paul, down from 41 percent two months before. Jindal appeared on the Oct. 16 edition of Meet the Press to defend his friend, citing Perry’s leadership during Hurricane Gustav and Ike, saying, “He is a leader. We now have a president who’s a great speaker. We don’t need just a great debater or a great speaker.” Later, Jindal again drove home the message that Perry’s debating ineptitude is irrelevant: “I think voters are going to look past a couple of debates. I think they’re going to look past a couple of polls.” — Kevin Allman

Un-Civil Disagreement

Randolph Scott, spokesman for the Concerned Classified City Employees (CCCE), accused the New Orleans Civil Service Commission of violating Louisiana’s Open Meetings Law when the commission voted to hold a closed executive session at the beginning of its

monthly meeting Oct. 17. Jane Barney, an attorney representing Scott’s group, agreed. “We kept asking why they wanted to go into executive session,” Barney said. When pressed by both Scott and Barney, commission chairman and Loyola University President the Rev. Kevin Wildes referred them to the agenda for the executive session, which contained two items, including the discussion of a complaint filed last month by the employees group against Commissioner Dana Douglas. As Gambit previously reported, in the commission’s September meeting, Douglas stopped the CCCE’s attorney from completing a presentation protesting a change to the city’s so-called “bumping” policy governing layoff procedures, a change proposed and strongly supported by Mayor Mitch Landrieu. The group complained that Douglas acted improperly in stopping the presentation. According to Barney, the commission, like all public bodies, is required to justify any vote for an executive session by proving that the closed-door meeting is legal. State law provides for public meeting exceptions — limited, fairly specific cases that justify gathering out of the public view — including “strategy sessions or

negotiation with respect to collective bargaining, prospective litigation after formal written demand or [pending] litigation” as well as “investigative proceedings regarding allegations of misconduct.” Given the group’s complaint against Douglas, one of those two could potentially apply, though the CCCE never threatened litigation in its complaint. The commission’s executive session agenda, in reference to the complaint, says “discussion,” rather than referencing an investigation. (In the open portion of last week’s meeting, the commission voted to declare that Douglas’ actions during the September meeting were proper and not a violation.) “We have a right to file a complaint with the state attorney general and the local district attorney’s office,” Scott said, though he did not say whether the CCCE would do so. — Charles Maldonado

‘JUstiCe For all Ball’ set For nov. 4

The annual fundraiser supporting the Pro Bono Project’s efforts to provide free legal services to area residents who cannot afford to hire attorneys will be at 8 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 4, in the Audubon Tea Room. The event, called the Justice For All

Ball, is now in its 25th year and features food, beverages, live music and auction items to benefit the Pro Bono Project. The Pro Bono Project focuses on civil legal matters throughout the metro New Orleans area. The agency matches lawyers willing to donate their services to local clients in need of legal assistance. This year, WWL radio host Garland Robinette has created an original oil-on-canvas inspired by the Pro Bono Project’s work titled Creole Kali and Lady Justice. Robinette described the inspiration for his painting by saying, “A court of law is supposed to be the place in our society where a fight can be conducted in a fair manner, but unfortunately, most people don’t have the resources to even get themselves, or the ones they love, to that level playing field. This is why the work done by The Pro Bono Project is important to me.” The painting and other items will be auctioned by guest auctioneer Clancy DuBos, an attorney and political editor of Gambit. He and his wife Margo DuBos, publisher and CEO of Gambit, previously chaired the annual event. For tickets and information, call the Pro Bono Project at 581-3480 or visit www.probono-no.org/jfaball. — Allman

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

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Soundgarden reunited after a 15-year hiatus.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

PHOTO BY DANNY CLINCH

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ENC I R E P EX

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and reunions typically are last gasps for glory. They’re often short-lived, poorly received, quick grabs for cash. In the case of Soundgarden, the band needed help rescuing its library from more than a decade of neglect — from its out-of-print back catalog to getting T-shirts back into record stores, things you’d expect a band like Soundgarden to have available just about anywhere. “Band was gone, record company was gone, management was gone. There was nobody looking after the fact that we don’t have DVDs out, or a website,” says guitarist Kim Thayil. While Soundgarden’s contemporaries Pearl Jam and Nirvana received their respective “20th anniversary” reissues this year, Soundgarden — preceding both bands by several years and albums — is writing music again, together, for the first time in 15 years. Thayil’s been politely dodging adding his two cents to the Pearl Jam and Nirvana retrospective. After all, Badmotorfinger, released the same year as Pearl Jam’s Ten and Nirvana’s Nevermind, was Soundgarden’s third album — not exactly a freshman effort or a rookie in the same Seattle scene. “We’d been together since 1984. ‘Sorry, man, we’d already been together for seven years.’ We’d made four records, done a number of tours in the U.S. and Europe. So I kind of bowed out of some of those 20th PAGE 18

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sHTo P aLK

BY MARGUERITE LUCAS

Who’s Your Zaddie? addie’s Tavern’s (1200 Jefferson Hwy., 832-0830) exterior is painted light gray, which contrasts sharply with the bar’s lively, colorful interior: Coral-stocked tropical fish tanks, bright chalk displays listing drink specials, wood-paneled walls and a convivial atmosphere fill the bar. It’s 5:30 p.m. on a Friday and customers are lining the bar, chatting with manager Nikki Gabriel and bartender Nicole Rosecrans about everything from sports to politics. “We pride ourselves in a tavern that brings that close, friendly, family atmosphere,” Gabriel says. “I just love that everyone is so friendly. If someone sits at the bar, everyone brings [him or her] into conversation. It takes about 10 minutes to become a local.” Open for 16 years, Zaddie’s Tavern recently expanded in size and now offers Bartender Nicole Rosecrans (left) and food in addition to its cool libations. manager Nikki Gabriel enjoy what “It’s still a bar with familiar faces, but we’ve grown with things we offer in they call the “family atmosphere” at terms of food, pool, darts and karaoke nights,” Gabriel says. “If you’re looking for a Zaddie’s Tavern. drink, we’ve got it. We’re very competitive when it comes to prices.” In addition to drink specials and a selection of creative martinis, flat-screen TVs, pool tables and dartboards make Zaddie’s a popular place for customers to watch sports or unwind after work. Menu items include personal pizzas, burgers and tamales. While most of the food is made in-house with local ingredients, Zaddie’s also stocks items like alligator sausage and boudin made by small local businesses. In addition to the house-made food and lively entertainment provided by the resident dart league, Zaddie’s features live music two or three Fridays each month. Other events include steak specials on Thursdays, ladies’ nights on Fridays and themed karaoke on Saturday nights. Past themes include pajama night, military night, the ’60s and the ’70s. “We’re really into themes and holidays,” Gabriel says, laughing as she gestures to the Halloween decorations that bedizen the bar. “It’s always a riot here.”

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

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SHOPPING NEWS BY MISSY WILKINSON Through October, HEMLINE (605 Metairie Road, Suite B, Metairie, 309-8778; 609 Chartres St., 5920242; 3308 Magazine St., 269-4005; www.shophemline.com) offers a limited-edition tote bag. One hundred percent of proceeds from sales of the $22 bag benefit breast cancer research. THE RICE MILL LOFTS (522 Montegut St., 593-9494; www.ricemilllofts.com) recently opened in a former warehouse in the Bywater. Units range from $1,100 to $4,000 in rent. THE REVIVAL OUTPOST (3512 Magazine St., 3583487; www.therevivaloutpost.com) celebrated its grand opening this month. The store offers affordable vintage and vintage-inspired clothing, accessories and housewares for purchase or trade. FASHION WEEK NEW ORLEANS presents Fashion with a Twist, a fashion show from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 26 at TWIST COCKTAILS (628 St. Charles Ave., 523-9600; www.twistatmikes.com). Designer MOLLY STACKHOUSE-ERNST will present her collection, and there will be live music by Robin Barnes, complimentary hors d’oeuvres and Ciroc vodka cocktails.

IHOP (citywide; www.ihop.com) celebrates Halloween with free Scary Face pancakes for children ages 12 and younger from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28. Kids can use whipped topping, cookies and candy corn to design faces for their buttermilk pancakes.


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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

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>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 26 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

From a Long Way Off OCT. 28-NOV. 13 7:30 P.M. FRI.-SAT.; 2 P.M. SUN. WESTWEGO PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, 177 SALA AVE., WESTWEGO, 885-2000; WWW. JPAS.ORG TICKETS $30, $27 SENIORS, $20 STUDENTS

FILM

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ART

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STAGE

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EVENTS

CUISINE

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OCT

26 BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA

The Harvest the Music series presents a funk and soul double bill. The local funk and R&B trio of Joe Krown, Russell Batiste and Walter “Wolfman” Washington opens. Now in its seventh decade, the Blind Boys blend gospel with blues and R&B. The group won a Grammy for its 2007 album Down in New Orleans. Free admission. 5 p.m. Wednesday. Lafayette Square, 500 St. Charles Ave.; www.harvestthemusic.org

OCT

Dane Rhodes and Troi Bechet rehearse From a Long Way Off. PHOTO BY JIAN BASTILLE

Parish Politics

26 ZOLA JESUS WITH ANIKA

Like a fog rolling in for All Hallows Eve, Siberia continues its stellar 2011 run with this pairing of about-tobreak gloom-sayers, Zola Jesus (aka Nika Roza Danilova, pictured) and Stones Throw Records rookie-of-the-year Anika. Xanopticon also opens. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door. 10 p.m. Wednesday. Siberia, 2227 St. Claude Ave., 265-8855

JIM FITZMORRIS’ NEW PLAY DELVES INTO LOCAL POLITICS. BY WILL COVIELLO

P

The 1977 mayoral election was a wild event. In the initial election, Morial finished just ahead of three others in a full field of candidates. In the runoff against the second-place finisher, he was fortunate to get the most favorable match-up of the three, Fitzmorris says. In Quincannon, the playwright created an inspired but richly flawed politician who loses that runoff. Quincannon gets a shot at redemption in trying to save St. Columban. In many ways it’s a smaller battle, but it resonates, echoing the 1977 election’s issues of shifting politics and social change. And it’s a big story because it reflects how New Orleans is characterized by its neighborhoods. In Long Way Off, the archdiocese is trying to sell the St. Columban property to developers, and that will affect not just the church’s congregation but also the makeup of the neighborhood — at a time when all sorts of post-flood rebuilding battles are raging across the city. It’s not a Katrina story, because it’s not about flood losses. The Irish Channel stayed high and dry. The archdiocese has its own issues to deal with, but the city is full of new faces, interests and opportunities because of the flooding. Fitzmorris weaves them all together in a play that’s both full of humor and local color but is about some of the city’s most important issues. “It’s a big show,” Fitzmorris says, referring to both the issues at stake and the 25 characters played by a cast of 12. “It’s the story of us. I hope New Orleanians recognize it. It’s not a New Orleans you get to see often on stage.”

26 ST. VINCENT

Singer/guitarist, art-rock sprite and NPR-demographic crush object Annie Clark sings softly and carries a big pick. On Strange Mercy (4AD), her third LP as St. Vincent, Clark wraps her most ethereal instrumentation and abstract imagery (“Chloe in the Afternoon,” “Surgeon”) around her most headsticking hooks (“Cruel,” “Cheerleader”). Cate Le Bon opens. Tickets $16 in advance, $18 at the door. 9 p.m. Wednesday. Tipitina’s, 501 Napoleon Ave., 895-8477; www.tipitinas.com

OCT

28 — 29 THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME

The Pimps of Joytime’s Janxta Funk! fuses funk and R&B with beats from the band’s native-Brooklyn DJ scene. Bandleader Brian J spent time in New Orleans, and the album features guests Art and Cyril Neville. The band opens for Fishbone Friday at Tipitina’s and headlines Saturday at the Maple Leaf. Tickets $15. 10 p.m. Saturday. Maple Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

laywright/director Jim Fitzmorris and actor Dane Rhodes are trading and mimicking inflections of the word “Judea” in a rehearsal of From a Long Way Off at the Westwego Performing Arts Center. They arrive at a delivery that’s equal parts stump speech and sermon. In Fitzmorris’ new drama, Rhodes plays Seamus Quincannon, a failed politician, recovering alcoholic and community leader trying to save an Irish Channel church from being closed by New Orleans’ archdiocese a year after Hurricane Katrina. The larger-than-life Quincannon is a true New Orleans character — boisterous, savvy, not perfect but redeemable and determined. It’s a role Rhodes jumped on. “Jim writes great vernacular,” Rhodes says during a rehearsal break. “But he’s like Tennessee Williams: for every word spoken, there’s 300 more words behind it in his head. Two of my favorite roles were in his plays — The Visitation and House of Plunder.” In his latest work, Fitzmorris offers a fictionalized take on two local struggles. The first is the landmark 1977 mayoral election, which resulted in a victory for Ernest “Dutch” Morial, the city’s first African-American mayor. The fictional Quincannon is one of his failed opponents, who later slips into alcoholism and only dries out decades later following Hurricane Katrina. In the second part of the play, Quincannon is again leading a campaign, this time to save the fictional St. Columban Church from being closed by the archdiocese, which is consolidating its properties and services.

OCT

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DARTS • POOL • DARTS • POOL MON: FREE POOL 6-10pm WED: Blues Jam Night 8-11pm THURS: Steak Night 6pm-till FRI:

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SAT:

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HAPPY HOUR • MON-FRI • 3-7PM

MUSIC

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

preview

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 25

CLOTHING . JEWELRY ACCESSORIES . GIFTS

BANKS STREET BAR — Michael Matthews & Friends, 10

BAYOU PARK BAR — Jim Jones & the Kool-Aids, 9 BLUE NILE — Simon Berz, Weasel Walter, 10

BMC — Alex Bosworth, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight BULLETS SPORTS BAR — Kermit Ruffins, 6:30

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Camile Baudoin & the Living Rumors, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

622 S. CARROLLTON NOLA, LA 70118 504.301.9410 MON-SAT 10AM-6PM · SUN 10AM-3PM

D.B.A. — New Orleans Nightcrawlers Brass Band, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Tom Hook, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

SWEET

DREAMS Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

AT HAASE’S

26

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Steve Masakowski, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Brint Anderson, 6

THE MAISON — Gregory Agid Quartet, 6; Magnitude, 9

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Rebirth Brass Band, 10

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — The Session, 6; Mike Kobrin Q-tet, 9:30

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NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Kristen Ford, 8; Karen Kulpa, 10 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7 OLD POINT BAR — Josh Garrett & the Bottom Line, 8

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8 SIBERIA — Kindest Lines, Wax Idols, Terry Malts, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Sean Jones, 8 & 10 SOUTHPORT HALL — Nic Cowan, 8 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Smokin’ Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

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Wednesday 26 12 BAR — Brass-A-Holics, 9

Wild Flag with Eleanor Friedberger

Save the “first female supergroup” straw woman for when the reunited Bangles and Go-Go’s roll up into the Bang-Go-Go’s. (2014, write it down). After all, Sleater-Kinney, the riotous Portland, Ore., grrrl group of which Wild Flag is half-composed, was itself pretty super. Ever since S-K issued 2005’s diesel-doused The Woods and struck a surprise match the next year, the band’s legion of fans has waited with bated breath for the inevitable resurrection. In 2010, they got another surprise: Two-thirds of S-K, singer/guitarist Carrie Brownstein (of Portlandia semi-fame) and drummer Janet Weiss, announced they were reuniting instead with friends and tour mates Mary Timony and Rebecca Cole, of Helium and the Minders, respectively. (S-K fans have to wonder how Corin Tucker’s RSVP to this rock party got lost.) Released in September, the new band’s eponymous debut LP (Merge) is a crash course in how to reappear completely: “Something Came Over Me” and “Electric Band” blow smoke-ring vocals around a live-recorded core that rocks more methodically than S-K, but every bit as hard. The Fiery Furnaces’ Eleanor Friedberger, whose gracefully tousled solo debut Last Summer arrived on Merge in July, opens. Tickets $12 in advance, $14 at the door. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

OCT

26

Wild Flag with Eleanor Friedberger 10 p.m. Wednesday One Eyed Jacks, 615 Toulouse St., 569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks.net

BANKS STREET BAR — Major Bacon, 10

BIG AL’S DECKBAR SEAFOOD & BLUES — Oscar & the Blues Cats, 8 BLUE NILE — United Postal Project, 8; Gravity A, 10:30

DISH ON HAYNE — Kermit Ruffins, 6:30 D.B.A. — Tin Men, 7; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

LACAVA’S SPORTS BAR — Crossfire, 9

LAFAYETTE SQUARE — Harvest the Music feat. Blind Boys of Alabama, Krown, Washington & Batiste, 5 LEGENDS BAR & GRILL — Topcats, 9

BMC — Bryce Eastwood, 6; Blues4sale, 8; Treme Funktet feat. Corey Henry, 11

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY — Vivaz!, 8

THE MAISON — Jerry Jumonville & the Jump City Band, 6; The Cat’s Pajamas Funk All Stars, 9

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE — Treme Brass Band, 9

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Charlie Wooten Project, 10

CAFE NEGRIL — Jamey St. Pierre & the Honeycreepers, 9

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — Louis Prima Night feat. John Autin, Austin Clements & Tyler Clements, 8

GREEN ROOM — Andrew Rice, 9

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara, 6; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 9:30

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Bourbon Claude, 8

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Ricardo Crespo, 8 COVINGTON TRAILHEAD — Rockin’ the Rails feat. Luther Kent, 5

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

HI-HO LOUNGE — JP Harris & the Tough Choices, Lushingtons, By & By String Band, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Cool Kids, The O My’s, 10 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Kristin Diable & Mia Borders, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — James Westfall, 5; Irvin Mayfield’s NOJO Jam, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 6 KERRY IRISH PUB — Chip Wilson, 9

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Joe Krown, noon

OLD FIREMEN’S HALL — Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30 ONE EYED JACKS — Wild Flag, Elenor Friedberger, 10 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 PAGE 28


MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 26 PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn Drury, 9

RUSTY NAIL — Jenn Howard, 7:30

THE MAISON — Those Peaches, 5; Courtyard Kings, 7; Roosevelt Collier All Stars, 10

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Jerry Embree, 8:30

THE SANDBAR AT UNO — Jazz at the Sandbar feat. Herlin Riley, 7 SIBERIA — Zola Jesus, Anika, Xanopticon, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Delfeayo Marsalis & the Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10 ST. ROCH TAVERN — J.D. & the Jammers, 7 STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — Victory Belles, noon THREE MUSES — Bottoms Up Blues Gang, 7

TIPITINA’S — St. Vincent, Cate Le Bon, 9

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Thursday 27 12 BAR — Reveners, 9

BANKS STREET BAR — Bert Wills, 9:30; Dave Jordan & Lynn Drury, 10:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

BMC — Soulabilly Swamp Boogie Band, 8; Eric Gordon & the Lazy Boys, 10:30

28

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Kristin Diable & the City, 9

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Fredy Omar, 8

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 7; Honey Island Swamp Band, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — City & Colour, Stone Foxes, 9

HOWLIN’ WOLF — DJ Afrika Bambaataa, Suave & the Blackstar Bangas, 9

THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Amanda Walker, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Kipori Woods, 5; James Andrews, 8

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Peter Novelli, 6; Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 9 NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Three Ninjas, 10 OAK — Cristina Perez, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4

OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Kim Carson, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Duke Heitger & Tim Laughlin feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 7 PRESERVATION HALL — Tao Seeger Brass Band, 8; Ben Sollee, 10

RAY’S — Bobby Love Band, 6

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Sauve Road, 8 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Nathan & the Zydeco Cha Chas, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 10 SIBERIA — 400 Blows, Holy Shakes, Mountain of Wizard, Red Shield, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — West Costars Brass Band, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 THREE MUSES — Tom McDermott, 4:30; Luke Winslow-King, 7:30

TIPITINA’S — NOLA Brewing Co. Can Release Party feat. Big Sam’s Funky Nation, Flow Tribe, Colin Lake, 8:30 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Larry Sieberth, 6

Friday 28 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY — Pygmy Lush, Leaving, Habitat, 7

ALLWAYS LOUNGE — Why Are We Building Such a Big Ship?, 10

BABYLON LOUNGE — Black Tusk, Fat Camp, Bad Grass, 10 BANKS STREET BAR — Bert Wills, 9:30; The Mad Conductor, Big Fat & Delicious, Tigah Woods, 11

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8

BAYOU BEER GARDEN — Dave

Jordan, 9

BAYOU PARK BAR — Revealers, 10 BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE LOUNGE — Frank Williams Jr. & Friends feat. Bobby Love, 8 BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Kristin Diable & the City (upstairs), 9; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11

BMC — El DeOrazio & Friends, 3; Moonshine & Caroline, 6; Dana Abbott, 9; Lagniappe Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Judy Spellman, 9:30

CAFE PRYTANIA — Sick/Sea, England in 1819, Sex Dreams, 10 CARROLLTON STATION — Kelcy Mae Band, Geoff Kock, Cortland Burke, 9:30 CHICKIE WAH WAH — Sweet Olive String Band, 5:30; Paul Sanchez & Alex McMurray, 8; Sarah & the Tall Boys, 10

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — John Autin, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Linnzi Zaorski, 6; The Ever Expanding Waste Band feat. members of Morphine & Jeremy Lyons, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Eric Traub Trio, 10 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GALVEZ RESTAURANT — Campbell Perkinson, 6:30

GREEN ROOM — Jay Weber, 7; Nomad, 11:30 HERMES BAR — Shannon Powell, 9:30 & 11

HOWLIN’ WOLF — Official Voodoo After Party feat. Cassy, Claude VonStroke, Three, Paul Raffaele, Michael Christopher, Alejandro Sab, 11 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Derrick Freeman’s Smokers World, 10 THE INN ON BOURBON — Joe Ashlar, 6 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S I CLUB — Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Josh Paxton, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8

JOEY K’S RESTAURANT — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 5

JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Michaela Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30 KERRY IRISH PUB — Beth Patterson, 5; Danny Burns Band, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

MUSIC

PAGE 29 CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Amanda Walker, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Glen David Andrews, 10

DRAGON’S DEN — Ill-esha, Quickie Mart, Oraganik, Adverse, Unicorn Fukr, Mr. Cool Bad Guy and others, 9

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Robin Clabby, Chris Alford, Erik Golson & Nick O’Gara, 12:30

FUNKY PIRATE — Blues Masters feat. Big Al Carson, 8:30 GREEN ROOM — Bobbly Blaze, 9

HI-HO LOUNGE — Dancing Man 504, Skin ’N’ Bones Gang, 6; Split Lips CD release feat. Pallbearers, Die Rotzz, Nasty Habits, 10 HOMEDALE INN — Sunday Night Live Jam Session feat. Homedale Boys, 7 HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m.

HOWLIN’ WOLF — The Meters Experience feat. Leo Nocentelli, Orchard Lounge, Russell Batiste & Friends, 10 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 3; Cindy Chen, 6; Ched Reeves, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1 LE PAVILLON HOTEL — Philip Melancon, 8:30 a.m. MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

THE MAISON — Lionel Ferbos & the Palm Court Jazz Band, 4; Pinettes Brass Band, 10; Lagniappe Brass Band, midnight MANDEVILLE TRAILHEAD — Sunset Sundays Concert Series feat. Swing-a-Roux, 4:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Ricardo Crespo, 4:30; Javier Olondo & AsheSon, 8

MULATE’S CAJUN RESTAURANT — Bayou DeVille, 7 OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

OLD POINT BAR — Jesse Moore, 3:30 ONE EYED JACKS — New Orleans Bingo! Show, 10

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7

PRESERVATION HALL — New Orleans Legacy Band feat. Tommy Sancton, 8

RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m.; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — For Chuck Cavet feat. Flip Side, Bobby Cure, Paul Varisco, Wiseguys, Yat Pack, 4 ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

SIBERIA — Fight the Goober, The Donovan Punch Experience, Dummy Dumpster, 5; Go Homo feat. DJ Rusty Lazer, JeanEric, Dino Felipe, This Heart Electric, Nicky Da B and others, 10 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Rick Trolsen & Neslort, 8 & 10

SOUTHPORT HALL — Down, 9 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Pat Casey, 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn’s Prohibition Jazz & Blues, 10 a.m.

THREE MUSES — Jayna Morgan, 7

TIPITINA’S — Cajun Fais Do-Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

Monday 31 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 9 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10 BLUE NILE — Gravity A, Dead Kenny Gs, 8; Debauche (upstairs), 9 BMC — Lil Red & Big Bad, 5; Smoky Greenwell’s Blues Jam, 9

CHOPHOUSE NEW ORLEANS — Bart Ramsey, 6:30 COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 11 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — New Orleans Street Beat, 6 D.B.A. — Morning 40 Foundation, 11

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3 GREEN ROOM — Last Laff, 10 HI-HO LOUNGE — Bluegrass Pickin’ Party, 8; Dead Elvis Returns, 10

HOUSE OF BLUES — March Forth Marching Band, Rusty Lazer, Nicky Da B, 9 HOWLIN’ WOLF — Galactic, JJ Grey & Mofro, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Original Tuxedo Jazz Band feat. Gerald French, 8

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 3; Brint Anderson, 6; Ched Reeves, 9

KERRY IRISH PUB — Kim Carson & Jason Bishop, 9

TUE

THE MAISON — Royal Roses, 7; e.company, 9; DJ Jubilee (upstairs), 10; Yojimbo, 11:30; Royal Teeth, 1 a.m.; Professor Naughty, 2 a.m.

10/25

COMEDY NIGHT 8:30PM

WED BRASS-A-HOLICS 9PM

10/26 BECOMING A NEW ORLEANS TRADITION

MAISON DUPUY HOTEL — Aaron Lopez-Barrantes, 6

3RD MEASURE W/ MARC BELLONI 7PM 10/27 THE REVENERS, TOASTBEARDS & FAMOUS 9PM

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

THU

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Andre Bouvier, 1:30; Peter Novelli, 3:30; Soul Project, 7:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 11

FRI

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Dave Easley, 8; Genial Orleanians, 10

10/28

OLD POINT BAR — Ian Cunningham, 7:30

WINE AROUND THE WORLD 4-7PM $20 ENDLESS GLASS OF WINE

LATIN HALLOWEEN NIGHT 12AM

SAT BROWN IMPROV COMEDY 8:30PM

10/29

ONE EYED JACKS — Quintron & Miss Pussycat, Darktown Strutters, Wild Emotion, and The Unnaturals, DJ Mirconaut, Kimberly Hebert, 10

LOVE SATURDAY’S 12AM

SUN IN THE REDZONE

10/30

RIVERSHACK TAVERN — Dave Jordan, 7

W/ JOHN FOURCADE & MITCH GIBBS 3-6PM

608 FULTON STREET

SIBERIA — Sci-Fi Zeros, Fat Stupid Ugly People, We Are 138, Planets, Vapo-Rats, Riffs, 7

NEW ORLEANS • 504-212-6476 WWW.12BARNOLA.COM

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6 THREE MUSES — Mario Abney, 7

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Kirk Branch, 6

classical/ concerts BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HIGH SCHOOL — 2001 Leon C.

Simon Drive, 286-2600; www.benfranklinhighschool.org — Sun: Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra Halloween Concert, 3

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH — 1329 Jackson Ave., 522-

0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth Organ Recital feat. Albinas Prizgintas, 6; Sun: British Brass Band of Louisiana, 5

XAVIER UNIVERSITY CENTER BALLROOM — 4980 Dixon

St., 486-7411; www.xula. edu — Tue: Legacy & Significance of Mahalia Jackson panel discussion and concert feat. Dr. Joyce Jackson, Rev. Lois Dejan, Cynthia Girtley & Bertha Reine, 7; Wed: Mahalia Jackson Centennial Concert feat. Cynthia Girtley, Mathilda Jones, Danielle Edinburgh-Wilson and Veronica Downs Dorsey, 7; Thu: Bernice Johnson Reagon, 7

hallowe e n party FrI-Sat-Sun-Mon

nIghtly raFFleS & drInK SpeCIalS For all In CoStuMe

Boo dat!!

FRIDAY • 10/28 • 9 pm

rIptIde

sAtuRDAY • 10/29 • 10pm

dj KodIaK

EVERY SUNDAY • 8pm-2Am

KaraoKe

F o o tb a l l

On 10’ Big SCReen & 30 FlAt scReens

h oliday parties booKIng now

4133 S. Carrollton ave ( @ T u l a n e ) 301-0938

S H a M R O C K Pa R T Y. C O M

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

KERRY IRISH PUB — Crescent City Celtic Band, 9

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-A-Holics, 8

31


FILM

Make EVERY Gift Personal this Holiday Season

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

review Everyday Sunshine

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING BENDA BILILI! (PG-13) — The documentary centers on the Kinshasa band composed of five homeless paraplegics that has garnered a worldwide following. AMC Palace 20 CONTAGION (R) — A lethal

airborne virus rapidly spreads across the world in the drama starring Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude Law, Kate Winslet and Laurence Fishburne. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20

VIEW ALL GIFTS AT LAKESIDECAMERA.COM

DOLPHIN TALE (PG) — Harry Connick Jr. stars in the true story of the people who helped a dolphin struggling to survive after being caught in a crab trap. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14 FOOTLOOSE (PG-13) — The 1980s classic is re-imagined in a modern setting with eye-catching choreography. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

SHOW OFF YOUR

SMILE

series culminates in an epic showdown with Lord Voldemort. Entergy IMAX

THE HUMAN CENTIPEDE 2 (NR) — In the sequel to Tom Six’s

gross-out horror, an obsessed fan of the first film tries to create his own 12-person centipede. Chalmette Movies

GENERAL DENTISTRY

IDES OF MARCH (R) — In the political thriller, Ryan Gosling plays a staffer who is introduced to the dark side of politics while working on a presidential campaign. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

DR. MORGAN HAS BEEN SERVING THE GREATER NEW ORLEANS COMMUNITY FOR OVER 12 YEARS.

CINDY NOLAN - HYGENIST

MONEYBALL (PG-13) — Brad Pitt plays the general manager of the Oakland Athletics who used a computer-based analysis to draft players. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14, Prytania

IMPLANT DENTISTRY FREE CONSULTATION

COSMETIC DENTISTRY

THE THING (R) — An experi-

NEW PATIENT

DR. KEN MORGAN DDS FAMILY DENTISTRY

3100 KINGMAN ST., SUITE 100 METAIRIE · 504.780.7006 INSURANCE ACCEPTED · FINANCING AVAILABLE

32

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) — The Harry Potter

SPECIAL 00 $

89

VALID THRU 10/31/11

INITIAL CLEANING, EXAM & X-RAY

ment on a research site in Antarctica frees a dangerous alien that had been trapped under ice, putting the team of scientists in danger. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 14

When Fishbone burst onto the Los Angeles club scene in the early 1980s, it was as difficult to label as it was popular. The mashup of horns and guitars incorporated ska, punk, hard rock, funk and soul in furiously wild live shows. The eccentric Angelo Moore assumed the frontman role, but vocal leads were offered by several members. The group opened for bands including Dead Kennedys and Circle Jerks and became fixtures in punkoriented clubs full of white kids. Meanwhile, black artists in the city’s burgeoning rap scene viewed the band with skepticism, according to Ice-T in Everyday Sunshine. The band was signed by Columbia before the members graduated from high school, and its early albums drew positive critical response. But from there, nothing was easy, and Everyday Sunshine chronicles the early promise and the long strange trip of never fully realizing it. There were both internal and external problems. Columbia never figured out a way to successfully market it, but more troublesome was the saga of losing guitarist Kendall Jones. When his mother died, Jones ended up reuniting with his estranged father and departed on a spiritual journey that ended up in court, with his girlfriend, brother and Fishbone leader Norwood Fisher accused of kidnapping him. Eventually, most of the original members departed, leaving Moore, Fisher and a slew of replacements. The band struggled financially, and Moore bounded into a Dr. Madd Vibe persona, introducing a theremin into the band’s instrumentation. Everyday Sunshine becomes more about Jones’ and Moore’s personal struggles as they dealt with the frustration and letdown. Moore went broke and moved in with his mother. It’s an odd documentary that seems to be about unfulfilled dreams and frustrated artists (and it leaves one admiring Fisher). But the narration, in Laurence Fishburne’s deeply somber tone, seems more appropriate to a heroic portrait than the very humbling stream of events presented. Some attempts to place the band in a grand historical context ring hollow. The film seems to buy into the notion the original band should reunite and that Fishbone still has unfulfilled potential, but both ideas seem suspect. Nevertheless, three original members are still leading the band, which performs at Tipitina’s on Friday and at the Voodoo Experience on Sunday. Film tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

OCT

28 THRU NOV

03

Everyday Sunshine 7:30 p.m. Friday-Thursday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

THE THREE MUSKETEERS (R) — Alexandre Dumas’ classic

swashbuckling tale gets a big-screen reboot. AMC Palace

10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14


FILM

Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

MOVIES IN THE PARK. The

review The Swell Season

OCT

2527

The Swell Season 9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

OPENING FRIDAY ANONYMOUS (PG-13) — The

film explores the theory that Edward de Vere was the true author of the works credited to William Shakespeare, set amid a time of scandal in Elizabethan England.

IN TIME (PG-13) — Justin

Timberlake stars in the sci-fi thriller about a world where everyone is programmed to die at age 25.

PUSS IN BOOTS (PG) — The

popular character from the Shrek series gets his own bigscreen adventure.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AMONG BROTHERS: POLITICS IN NEW ORLEANS (NR) —

Directed by Paul Stekler, the film portrays the 1986 mayoral campaign pitting Sidney Barthelemy against William Jefferson. A panel discussion follows. Free admission. 6 p.m. Tuesday, Louisiana Humanities Center, 938 Lafayette St., Suite 300, 523-4352; www.leh.org THE DEBT (HA-HOV) (NR) —

THE PHILADELPHIA STORY (NR) — Cary Grant, Katharine

Hepburn and James Stewart star in the 1940 romantic comedy. Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Nov. 2, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28 IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES

THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) — Tim Curry stars

4.729” X 2.569" TUES 10/25 NEW ORLEANS GAMBIT WEEKLY DUE THURS 12PM

in the rock movie-musical that lends itself to audience participation. Tickets $8. Midnight Friday-Saturday and Monday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD (NR) — Gregory Peck stars in

Artist: (circle one:) Heather Staci Freelance 2

Aurelio

the 1962 film adaptation of Emmett Harper Lee’s novel. Tickets $5.50. Noon Wednesday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Confirmation #: Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

Jay

Steve

Philip

AE: (circle one:) Angela Maria Josh Tim

McCool Deadline:

THE WHISTLEBLOWER (R) —

Rachel Weisz stars in the thriller based on the true story of Kathryn Bolkovac, a Nebraska cop thrust into war-torn Bosnia who would eventually out the U.N. for covering up a sex scandal. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. TuesdayThursday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012

lOCAl lISTIngS FOR STARTS FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28 ChECk ThEATERS AnD ShOwTImES

GR OPEILL LAT N E!

Compiled by Lauren LaBorde

The 2011 film of the same name starring Helen Mirren was based on this 2007 Israeli thriller. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Chalmette Movies, 8700 W. Judge Perez Drive, 304-9992

DESPERATE LIVING (X)— John

Waters’ horror-comedy follows a delusional housewife and her maid who go on the lam after the maid kills the wife’s husband. Free admission. 9 p.m. Wednesday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. press-street.com

ART APPROVED AE APPROVED CLIENT APPROVED

LUNCH SPECIALS Monday-Friday

Scan for movie times.

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

11am-2pm

LIVE MUSIC

Friday & Saturday Nights!

NO COVER AT ALL!!! Check website for listings.

3449 River Rd. (at Shrewsbury in Jefferson Parish) • 834-4938 • www.therivershacktavern.com

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Every Academy Awards ceremony has that underdog winner who gives an exuberant acceptance speech about following one’s dreams. At the 2007 Oscars that was Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova, the stars of Irish indie romance Once who picked up the award for Best Original Song. The winning song “Falling Slowly” encapsulates the budding romance between the two characters — a busker and a fey Czech immigrant with a beautiful voice — and that fictional romance also imitated itself in real life between Hansard and Irglova. The Swell Season (also the name of their band) follows the band/couple on the two-year tour following their Oscar win as they deal with fame and the high expectations set by family, fans and each other that come with it. The gorgeous black-andwhite documentary captures a lot of charming, intimate moments on the road, and woven in are interviews with family and others, plus clips from live shows. Tensions begin to arise over their differing views on how to interact with zealous fans, who come to the band’s sold-out shows expecting pictures and autographs. It’s apparent they have not only fallen in love with Hansard and Irglova’s music, but with their romance narrative. But like in many cases of life imitating art, the real-life version isn’t as pretty. The couple fights with increasing frequency, and the camera remains unflinching through all the tense moments. Just like in Once, the characters shared a fleeting romance. It wasn’t made to last, but at least they made some beautiful music together. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Lauren LaBorde

New Orleans Recreation Development Commission hosts free outdoor screenings of family movies on Fridays and Saturdays at greenspaces across the city. Visit www. nola.gov/Residents/NORD/ Movies-in-the-Park for the full schedule and other details. 7:45 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

33


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 35

Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing. ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www.arthurrogergallery.com — “Catholic Sin,” photographs and sculpture by John Waters; paintings by Richard Baker; “Red Drawings and White Cut-Outs,” mixed media by James Drake; “Peekaboo,” video installation by Dave Greber; all through Saturday. ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on

site in all media; watercolors and limited-edition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www.barristersgallery. com — “Retrospectacle,” paintings

by Scott Guion, through Dec. 3.

THE BEAUTY SHOP. 3828 Dryades St. — Works by Rebecca Rebouche,

ongoing.

BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www. bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana! United We Stand

to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing.

BONJOUR GALLERY & MARKETPLACE. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 635-7572 — “St. Louis Cathedral Series,” mixed-media sculpture by John Marc Anderson, through Sunday. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries. com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing.

hold, I Send You As Sheep Among Wolves. Be Ye Therefore Wise As Serpents And Harmless As Doves,” paintings by Bojan Sumonja, through Nov. 10. CAFE BABY. 237 Chartres St., 3104004; www.markbercier.com —

Paintings and works on paper by Mark Bercier, ongoing. CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche

and Pao, ongoing.

CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www.callanfineart. com — Works by Eugene de Blass,

Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and PostImpressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition of Italian art-

ists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art. CAROL ROBINSON GALLERY. 840 Napoleon Ave., 895-6130; www.carolrobinsongallery.com — “Unfinished Stories,” paintings by Jere Allen, through Saturday. CARROLL GALLERY. Newcomb Art

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 5240671; www.casellartgallery.com —

Pastels by Joaquim Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www.coleprattgallery. com — “Around & About,” water-

colors by Christine Cozic, through Saturday.

COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237; www.collectiveworldartcommunity.com — Paintings from

the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www. coupdoeilartconsortium.com —

“The Whelming, Part 1,” paintings and drawings by Blaine Capone, through Nov. 26.

COURTYARD GALLERY. 1129 Decatur St., 330-0134; www.woodartandmarketing.com — Hand-carved wood-

works by Daniel Garcia, ongoing.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Small Creatures and Smaller

Worlds,” graphite on paper illustrations by Lacey Stinson, through Nov. 3.

DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Fear is a Man’s Best

Friend,” paintings by Jeremy Willis; “Objects of Adornment: An Art Show for Fashion,” an exhibit featuring Louisiana clothing and accessory designers curated by Slow Southern Style; both through Nov. 5.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 412-9220; www.dutchalleyonline.com — Works

by New Orleans artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery.com — Works by gallery artists Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing. FLEXSPACE.2. 638 Clouet St. — “After

You’ve Been Burned by Hot Soup You Blow in Your Yogurt: The Guantanamo Project,” multimedia works by Margot Herster, through Dec. 10.

— Works on metal by Mike Klung, through Monday. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 5815881 — Works by gallery artists, ongoing. GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 5250518; www.gallerybienvenu.com —

“Boundary,” sculpture by Eva Hild, through Nov. 26.

GALLERY VERIDITAS. 3822 Magazine St.; 267-5991 — “The Out of Towners,” paintings by Aaron Butler and Anna Kipervaser, sculpture by Donald Tully, works by Fortune Sitole and Patricia Wilson, through Nov. 6. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www. gardendistrictgallery.com — “Loui-

siana Landscapes,” a group exhibition, through Nov. 13.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www.georgeschmidt.com — Paintings by George

Schmidt, ongoing.

THE GEORGES GALLERY. Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds.com — “Life in Balance,” works by Con-

nie Kittok, Pio Lyons, Ruth Owens and Max Ryan, through Friday.

GOOD CHILDREN GALLERY. 4037 St. Claude Ave., 616-7427; www.goodchildrengallery.com — “Hit Refresh Part

1,” an exhibition of gallery artists curated by Nick Stillman, through Dec. 4.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and Saints,”

works by Joe Hobbs; works by Christy Lee Rogers; both ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www.guthriecontemporary.com — “The Space in Between,” paintings by Bernd Haussmann; glass sculpture by Kazuo Kadonaga, through November. “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. GUY LYMAN FINE ART. 3645 Magazine St., 899-4687; www.guylymanfineart.com — Mixed media with mechanical light sculptures by Jimmy Block, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com — Prints by

HERIARD-CIMINO GALLERY. 440 Julia St., 525-7300; www.heriardcimino. com — “Preconfiguration,” paintings by Iva Gueorguieva, through Saturday. “4 Works: 1968-2010,” neon light sculpture by Keith Sonnier, through Nov. 25.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www.fredrickguessstudio.com — Paintings by Fredrick

ISAAC DELGADO FINE ARTS GALLERY. Delgado Community College, Isaac Delgado Hall, third floor, 615 City Park Ave., 361-6620 — Works by Pawel Wojtasik for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

Guess, ongoing.

THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org — “General Hos-

pital,” a multimedia installation by Stephanie Patton, through Nov. 6.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by Todd

White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 — Photography by

Christopher Porche West, ongoing.

GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www.galerieroyale.com

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www. isabellasgallery.com — Hand-blown glass works by Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing. JACK GALLERY. 900 Royal St., 588-1777 — Paintings, lithographs and other

works by Tom Everhart, Gordon Parks, Al Hirschfeld, Stanley Mouse, Anja, Patrick McDonnell and other artists, ongoing.

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

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JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www. jeanbragg.com — “La Vie en Roses,”

oil paintings by Scott Howard, through Monday.

JIMMY MAC POP-UP GALLERY. 802 Elysian Fields Ave. — “Mudcolors,”

mixed media on canvas by Jimmy Mac, through Jan. 1.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www.jonschooler.com — “Subliminal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing. JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com — “Junk

Shot,” mixed media by Skylar Fein, through Nov. 19.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www.julieneill.com —

“Facade,” photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com —

Paintings by Don Picou and Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KEN KIRSCHMAN ARTSPACE. NOCCA Riverfront, 2800 Chartres St. — “Off

the Beaten Path: Violence, Women, and Art,” a touring group exhibit produced and curated by Art Works for Change in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Dec. 16. KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists. L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces of Treme,”

works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings

by Holly Sarre, ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — “Hot Greens and Cold Reds: The

Silent Language of Color,” works by Kate Trepagnier, through Saturday.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts. org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. MALLORY PAGE STUDIO. 614 Julia St.; www.mallorypage.com — Paintings by Mallory Page, ongoing. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www.martinechaissongallery.com — “Close Your

Eyes,” works by Norman Mooney, through November.

capacity for hurt “ The is more than eclipsed by the ability to reach for health and happiness. —Nathan Fischer,

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Our Lady of Holy Cross College graduates are highly regarded in the workplace for their exceptional knowledge, skills and compassion. UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES MAJORING IN: • A.S. and B.S. in Addictions Counseling • B.S. in Applied Behavioral Science • A.S. in Juvenile Counseling • B.S. in Psychology • B.S. in Social Counseling MASTER’S DEGREES WITH SPECIALIZATIONS IN: • Clinical Mental Health Counseling • Marriage and Family Counseling • School Counseling Nationally accredited by CACREP

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MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www.michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by Michelle Y.

Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — “Glass Pumpkin Patch,” glass pumpkins by Dan Schreiber and Andy Katz;

Visit us at WWW.OLHCC.EDU or find us on:

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “Be-

Department, Woldenberg Art Center, 314-2228; www.tulane.edu/~art/ carrollgallery — “10 Years and 47 Artists,” a retrospective exhibition celebrating A Studio in the Woods’ 10th anniversary, through Thursday.

ART

37


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

HI-HO LOUNGE. 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — Works by Robin Durand, Brad Edelman, Tara Eden, Eden Gass and others, ongoing. INTERIORS AND IMPORTS. 813 Florida St., Mandeville, (985) 624-7903 — Paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing. INTERNATIONAL HOUSE. 221 Camp St., 553-9550; www.ihhotel.com — Paintings by YA/

YA senior guild and alumni, ongoing.

JAX BREWERY. 600 Decatur St., 299-7163 — Works by YA/YA youth artists, ongoing. JW MARRIOTT NEW ORLEANS. 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — Works

by Charlene Insley, ongoing.

LIBERTY’S KITCHEN. 422 1/2 S. Broad St., 822-4011 — Paintings on canvas by YA/YA artists, ongoing. MOJO COFFEE HOUSE. 1500 Magazine St., 525-2244; www. myspace.com/mojoco —

Photographs by Marc Pagani, ongoing.

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE. 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground. org — Work by local artists,

ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS CAKE CAFE & BAKERY. 2440 Chartres St., 943-0010 — Oil landscapes

of the Ustabes by Will Smith, ongoing.

SOUND CAFE. 2700 Chartres St., 947-4477 — Mixed-media

paintings by YA/YA alumnus Gerard Caliste, ongoing.

THREE MUSES. 536 Frenchmen St., 298-8746; www.thethreemuses.com — Portraits by Zack

Smith, ongoing.

MUSEUMS 1850 HOUSE. 523 St. Ann St., 5686968 — Works by Sophie Calle

for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Perma-

nent exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records. ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 19982008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing. BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “NOLA Now Part I: Swagger for a Lost Magnificence,” through Jan. 29. Prospect.2 show featuring Jonas Dahlberg, George Dunbar, Karl Haendel and others, through Jan. 29. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” studentcreated quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing. GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “The Invisible

Man,” a pop-up exhibition by Gris Gris Parlour in conjunction with Prospect.2, through Nov. 19.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “The 18th

Star: Treasures From 200 Years of Louisiana Statehood,” through Jan. 29. Works by Dawn Dedeaux for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — “Magic Spell of Memory:

The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin,” through fall 2011. “Audubon’s Absence,” ecological artworks by Brandon Ballengee, through January, 2012.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living with Hur-

ricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” ongoing. “It’s Carnival Time in Louisiana,” Carnival artifacts, costumes, jewelry and other items, ongoing.

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The

Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,” pho-

tographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St.,

527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Roosevelt, Rockwell, and the Four Freedoms: America’s Slow March from Isolation to Action,” original posters by Norman Rockwell and museum artifacts, through Nov. 13. NEW ORLEANS AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM. 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www. noaam.com — “Congo Square:

African Roots in New Orleans,” illustrations, photographs and maps of Congo Square; “Drapetomania: A Disease Called Freedom,” 18th- and 19th-century documents and artifacts about slavery from the Derrick Beard Collection; all through Saturday. Works by Lorraine O’Grady for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — Works by Bruce Daven-

port Jr., Nicole Eisenman, AnMy Le and Jennifer Steinkamp for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. “Light to Dark/Dark to Light,” paintings by Wayne Gonzales, through Feb. 26. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits about 19th-

century pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing.

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — “Art of the Cup: Functional

Comfort,” cups by more than 50 artists presented by the Center for Southern Craft and Design, through Dec. 18. Works by George Valentine Dureau, through Jan. 3. “Ersy: Architect of Dreams”; “Oyeme Con Los Ojos,” photographs by Josephine Sacabo, through Jan. 8. Works by Ashton Ramsay for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29.

OLD U.S. MINT. 400 Esplanade Ave., 568-6990; lsm.crt.state. la.us/site/mintex.htm — Works by William Eggleston and Ragnar Kjartansson for Prospect.2, through Jan. 29. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

Forced Migration to Commercialization”; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; “Barbecue Nation”; ongoing. TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through November. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

SURREY’S CAFE & JUICE BAR. 1418 Magazine St., 524-3828; www.surreyscafeandjuicebar. com — Watercolor, pen and ink series of New Orleans landmarks by Will Smith, ongoing.

Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

ART

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THEATER DEVIL BOYS FROM BEYOND. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIX-FM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — Buddy Thomas’ campy comedy follows a pair of New Yorkers who discover a group of alien visitors — gorgeous, muscular creatures who are attaching themselves to sex-starved older women — while in a backwards Florida town. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday. ESOTEROTICA. AllWays Lounge,

2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge. com — Local writers present readings of erotic poetry, monologues, performance pieces, novel excerpts and songs. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

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ferson Performing Arts Center, 400 Phlox St., Metairie, 8852000; www.jpas.org — A poor dairyman tries to instill in his daughters Jewish tradition in the musical. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students and $15 children 12 and under. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

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Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — Jim Fitzmorris’ play finds a family battling the Archdiocese of New Orleans in the aftermath of Katrina over the closing of a beloved church. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 13.

THE GOOD NEGRO. Anthony

Bean Community Theater, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 862-7529; www.anthonybeantheater. com — In Tracey Scott Wilson’s drama, three civil rights leaders in 1962 try to suppress their own inner demons as violence and hostility in the South escalates. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Nov. 6, 3 p.m. Sunday. THE HALLELUJAH GIRLS. Teatro

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Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — A group of feisty Southern women humorously share their romantic and family woes with each other while at a day spa. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday through Nov. 6

Rumours of War

Rumours of War is a theater and dance piece dramatizing a slave revolt in antebellum Louisiana. This reprise, on the 200th anniversary of the 1811 slave revolt, takes place in a sequence of acts and locations at the New Orleans African American Museum. ArtSpot Productions originally presented the collaborative work in 2001. Kathy Randels and Monique Moss co-direct and star in the production, along with Ausettua AmorAmenkum, Ray Vrazel and others. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students/seniors. — Will Coviello

OCT

2829

RUMOURS OF WAR 7:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat. New Orleans African American Museum, 1418 Governor Nicholls, 566-1136; www.artspotproductions.org

LET FREEDOM SWING. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum’s original retrospective musical highlights 1940s jazz and swing. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m. Sunday. MAHALIA: A GOSPEL MUSICAL. Dillard University,

Cook Theatre, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., 816-4857; www.dillard. edu — The musical pays tribute to the gospel legend who grew up in New Orleans. The Nov. 5 show is a dinner theater performance; dinner is at 5:30 p.m. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday and Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m. Nov. 5, 3 p.m. Sunday and Nov. 6. RUMOURS OF WAR. New Orleans African American Museum, 1418 Gov. Nicholls St., 566-1136; www.noaam.com — Performers move through

the museum grounds and use song and dance in Art Spot Productions’ multimedia theatrical piece about a slave revolt on a Louisiana plantation. Tickets $20 general admission, $15 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

CONEY ISLAND COCKABILLY ROADSHOW. 3 Ring Circus’ The

Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com — The touring show combines


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SPOOKY LESTRANGE & HER BILLION DOLLAR BABY DOLLS. Bayou Park

Bar, 542 S. Jefferson Davis Pkwy.; www.myspace.com/bayouparkbar — The burlesque troupe performs. 9 p.m. Thursday.

AUDITIONS CRESCENT CITY SOUND CHORUS. Delgado Community College, City Park campus, Orleans Avenue, between City Park Avenue and Navarre Street; www.dcc.edu — The women’s chorus holds weekly auditions for new members. Call 453-0858 or visit www.crescentcitysound.com for details. 7 p.m. Monday.

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Mandina’s, 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010; www.tonymandinas. com — Becky Allen, Jodi Borrello and Amanda Hebert perform. 8 p.m. Thursday. The comedians also perform at Stonebridge Golf Club of New Orleans (1500 Stonebridge Drive, Gretna, 394-1300; www. stonebridgegolfofno.com) 8 p.m. Friday.

COMEDY CATASTROPHE. Lost

Love Lounge, 2529 Dauphine St., 944-0099; www.lostlovelounge. com — The bar hosts a free weekly stand-up comedy show. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 25 > 2011

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. 8 p.m. Thursday.

42

COMEDY OPEN-MIC. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a weekly open-mic comedy night. (Sign-up time is 10:45 p.m.) Free admission. 10 p.m. Friday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts a safe-for-allages team comedy competition. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 7 p.m. Saturday.

All Weather Ballads

All Weather Ballads, a fascinating puppet show presented by Vermont’s Sandglass Theater at the Contemporary Arts Center, featured some sports we’re not used to in New Orleans, including ice fishing. But Ballads is subtitled: “A Love Story,” and the romance is not obvious at first. Each scene seems to be a separate vignette, but love between the central characters develops from its first vital outburst through the saga of a long-term commitment. The simple and effective staging featured puppeteers Eric and Ines Zeller Bass (co-founders of Sandglass) dressed in black with their faces and hands visible, so the audience could see them manipulate the characters. The sets were assembled from wooden boxes and planks with occasional miniature props like wooden ladders. Guitarist Nick Keil sang a ballad for each vignette. The first ballad celebrates ice fishing. A plank represents the ice and there are small cabins where the fishermen stay warm while waiting for a bite. When a flag pops up, the fishermen reel in the catch on the line. There is much chatter and silliness between the competing fishers. In scene two, “Ballad of the Muddy Road,” a pickup truck is mired in the mud. The owner, a farmer in a flannel shirt and overalls, strains to free the truck and soon becomes mired in the mess. A raven swoops in, grabs his cap and flies off with it. After a change of scenes, the bird drops the cap near a young woman picking apples. The man enters, retrieves his cap and is startled by articles of women’s clothing falling from a tree. Finally, the woman, naked as a blue jay, falls out of the tree and into his arms. Love always comes as a surprise, but not always as funny a surprise. The final scenes turn to the less blissful and whimsical territory of love as a long-term partnership. The couple has a baby, and the woman feels neglected. She starts burning apples in their Franklin stove and the house catches fire. Finally, they discover a new commitment in love, and they work together with a two-person saw to cut firewood. Eric Bass conceived All Weather Ballads. Keith Murphy wrote the music and Sabrina Hamilton created the effective lighting. It was a thoroughly enjoyable show and one hopes Sandglass will return to New Orleans with more work. — Dalt Wonk

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Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show with vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors is followed by the improvised comedy program. Admission $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Friday.

GROUND ZERO COMEDY. The Maison, 508 Frenchmen St., 371-5543; www. maisonfrenchmen.com — The show features local stand-up comedians. Sign-up is 7:30 p.m.; show is 8 p.m. Friday.

Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The theater hosts an open mic following the God’s Been Drinking show. 11 p.m. Friday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. A LAUGHTACULAR NIGHT. The

IVAN’S OPEN MIC NIGHT. Rusty Nail, 1100 Constance St., 525-5515; www. therustynail.org — The Rusty Nail hosts a weekly open-mic comedy and music night. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Friendly Bar, 2301 Chartres St., 9438929 — Comedians Becky Allen and Jodi Borrello perform along with emcee Rhonda Bordelon. Audiences members are encouraged to wear costumes. Call the bar or 210-7346 for reservations. Tickets $15. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

LA NUIT STAND-UP OPEN MIC. La

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY. Yo

Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The audience interactive comedy show features live local music. Call 523-7469 or visit www. nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $8 online, $15 at the door. 10 p.m. Saturday.

SNACK TIME WITH THE ANVIL COMPANY. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

STUPID TIME MACHINE. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — The improv comedy troupe performs. Tickets $5. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday. Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The improv and sketch comedy troupe performs. Tickets $10 ($5 with drink purchase). 8:30 p.m. Saturday.


Invites YOU to a night of Irish Entertainment and Food at GALLIER HALL

525 Saint Charles Ave

Thursday, November 10th 2011 6:30-9:30pm Come meet the Irish Ambassador to the United States of America, H.E. MICHAEL COLLINS Members only Party so Join IN NOLA today!

www.irishnetworkneworleans.org

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Proudly sponsored by Finn McCool’s Irish Pub and Aidan Gill for Men

44

Braxton’s restaur ant & bar

oct. 29 • 9pm-till • $5 cover

W/DJ 2 KEY ON THE 1s & 2s + DRINK SPECIALS HORS D’OEUVRES • CASH PRIZES FOR WINNER

LADIES DRINK FREE TILL 11PM & NO COVER beginning

oct 31st

stormy monday blues buffet $7.95 All You Can Eat • Dinner Only Music by the Danny Alexander Blues Band

t-bone night every thursday 16oz. steak w/cowboy fries & side salad $10.67

happy hour Friday 5-8PM

wednesday nights • boiled seafood night

free plate w/purchase of bucket of beer or cocktail [one per customer]

636 franklin st. • gretna • 504-301-3166 • www.braxtonsnola.com lunch: m & w-f 11am-2:30pm • dinner: m & w-f 5-10pm • dinner only: fri & sat 5pm-2am • closed tuesday follow us on twitter: @braxtonsnola


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

EVENTS

then create their own works in the museum’s studio. The program is for children in the second to fifth grades. Call 539-9608 or email ebalkin@ ogdenmuseum.org for details. Admission $15 members, $18 nonmembers. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

FAMILY

Sunday 30

Tuesday 25

ROBERT KIDS DUATHLON .

KINDER GARDEN: CREEPY CRAWLIES IN THE GARDEN.

Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue. com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 293-1022 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm. org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $8, free for members. 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 27 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during its weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

New Orleans Public Library Lakeview Branch, 6317 Argonne St., 596-2638; www. nutrias.org — Children are encouraged to wear costumes for the library’s event with readings of Halloween picture books and Halloweenthemed snacks. The event is for children ages 10 and younger. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. LITTLE MASTERS. Longue

Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www.longuevue.com — Children ages 2 and a half to 5 and their parents or caregivers paint, dance, sing and try yoga moves in the gardens. Pre-registration is required. Call 293-4721 or email jcohn@ longuevue.com for details. Admission $12 members, $15 nonmembers (includes one adult and child). 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.

Saturday 29 SATURDAY STUDIOS: YOUNG MASTERS. Ogden Museum of

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — Children explore and interact with artworks in the museum’s collection and

EVENTS Tuesday 25 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Tulane University

Square, 200 Broadway St. — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. GREEN-IT-YOURSELF WORKSHOP: HOME HEALTH & SAFETY. Green Building

Resource Center, 841 Carondelet St., 525-2121; www. globalgreen.org — Experts discuss how to prevent and manage issues like mold, carbon monoxide, VOCs and lead. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

A HISTORICAL VIEW OF THE BLACK HAIR CARE INDUSTRY.

Xavier University, 1 Drexel Drive, 486-7411; www.xula. edu — The program discusses the dynamics of the AfricanAmerican hair care industry. Visit www.xula.edu/business/ entrepreneurship.html for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. LOOK GOOD, FEEL GOOD FASHION SHOW & LUNCHEON.

Northshore Harbor Center, 100 Harbor Center Blvd., Slidell, (985) 781-3650 — The event features a presentation by Dr. Catherine Wilbert, author of Mending Your Metabolism, plus free health screenings, catered lunch and a fashion show. Call (985) 649-8689 or email marketing@smhplus.org for details. Admission $35. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

NADINE VORHOFF LIBRARY BOOK SALE . Newcomb College

Center for Research on Women, Caroline Richardson Hall, 62 Newcomb Place, 865-5238 — Proceeds from the annual book sale benefit the Vorhoff Library and

TEACHING WITH DEFIANCE: JEWISH RESISTANCE AND THE BIELSKI PARTISANS. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum. org — The museum and the Jewish Partisan Educational Foundation host the free workshop for teachers. Spaces are limited; pre-registration is required. Call 528-1944 ext. 246 for details. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Wednesday 26 “Since 1969”

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET. Covington City

Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh locally produced foods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday. FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market,

French Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket. org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

FALL FLAVORS

Peach Streusel

COUPON

5

$

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue at Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

WWII PUB QUIZ. National

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The quiz tests knowledge of general trivia as well as WWII questions. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The group addresses addictions and other emotional issues through a spiritual perspective. Call 733-5005 for details. 6:30 p.m.

FRESH MARKET. Circle Food Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. PAGE 47

.00OFF

a $35 Halloween Arrangement

EXPIRES 10/31/11

Pineapple Inside Out Pecan Sweet Potato

CASH & CARRY ONLY. NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER COUPONS. COUPON MUST BE PRESENT AT TIME OF PURCHASE.

NEW LOCATION! COVINGTON

Pumpkin Spice

3 LOCATIONS:

1415 N. HWY 190 (985) 809-9101

METAIRIE

819 W. Esplanade Ave, Kenner 6233 S. Claiborne Ave, Uptown 800 Metairie Rd, Metairie

750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE

(504)464-8884

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

www.thekupcakefactory.com

(504) 833-3716 VISIT US ON

WE BUY AND SELL

Thursday 27 CELEBRATE RECOVERY. Victory

10

$

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for people who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 4565000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

.00 OFF

a $25 Halloween Arrangement

traditional • contemporar y • vintage Full/Queen Headboard Big Daddy Queen Set $269 $79

Basic Queen Set $139

Wardrobe Center

$299

• home • office • restaurant • hotel 3534 Toulouse St (at Bayou St. John) | Mid City 504-482-6851 | Mon-Sat:10am-5pm | 504-442-5383

C/F Liquidators Canal Furniture

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

HALLOWEEN STORY TIME.

Kona Fitness & Cafe, 7306 Lakeshore Drive, 282-0209; www.konafitnesscafe.com — Costumes are encouraged at the “run-bike-run” race for children ages 5-15. Participants should also bring five nonperishable food items for Second Harvest Food Bank. Admission $35 (there is a $5 discount with food donation). Visit www.imathlete.com/ events/robertfreshmarketkidsduathlon for details. 8:30 a.m.

the Newcomb Archives. Email bcalvert@tulane.edu for details. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday.

45


LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT EVENTS

PAGE 45

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — Charles K. Billings discusses “The Role of Catholicism on the Confederacy and the War Between the States.” 7 p.m.

LIFE HURTS, GOD HEALS. Victory Fellowship Church, 5708 Airline Drive, Metairie — The support group focuses on teens and young adults with addictions, hang ups and emotional pain. Call 733-5005 for details. 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SMALL BUSINESS COMMITTEE SEMINAR. 1515

Poydras Building, 1515 Poydras St., fifth floor auditorium — The seminar topic is “When You Can’t Afford the Wrong Hire.” Call 799-4260 or email rsvp@ neworleanschamber.org for details. Admission $10 Chamber members, $20 nonmembers. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. A STROLL THROUGH SPAIN WINE TASTING. Martin Wine Cellar

Deli & Catering, 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie, 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — The tasting features eight Spanish wines accompanied by Spanish cheese, pate and meats. Space is limited; reservations are recommended. Admission $16. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. WINE TASTING. American-

Friday 28 ANBA DLO IV FESTIVAL & PARADE . New Orleans Healing

Center, 2372 St. Claude Ave., 948-9961; www.neworleanshealingcenter.org — The annual festival features a costume parade, four music stages with acts including Papa Grows Funk, Lynn Drury, Felice and the Overtakers and others, dancers and acrobats, a silent auction, an arts and crafts bazaar, a costume contest and more. Visit the Healing Center website for tickets and more information. Admission $20. Costume parade at 6 p.m., event 7 p.m. to 2 a.m.

CLEAN ENERGY/GREEN ECONOMY FORUM. Kingsley

House, 1600 Constance St., 523-6221; www.kingsleyhouse. org — Business leaders in clean energy, coastal restoration and sustainable building discuss New Orleans’ emerging green economy and ways to accelerate market development and

FOOD FESTIVAL. Larose Civic

Center, 307 E. 5th St. — The festival features more than 25 booths selling seafood dishes, a rodeo, games, a Cajun marketplace and live music by Guy T, Brandon Foret Band, Amanda Shaw and others. Visit www. bayoucivicclub.org for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. FridaySunday.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK. Armstrong Park, N.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. MYSTIC MASQUERADE. Ohana

Pier, 1321 Gause Blvd., Slidell, (985) 288-0842; www. ohanapier.com — The benefit for the Slidell Memorial Hospital’s Parenting Center and Childhood Obesity Prevention programs features a silent auction of artisan masks, food from local restaurants and live music by the Boogie Men. Call (985) 649-8820 or visit www.smhfdn.org for details. Admission $75, $150 per couple. 8 p.m. to midnight.

TED SCHWANDER MEMORIAL GOLF CLASSIC. Stonebridge Golf

Club of New Orleans, 1500 Stonebridge Drive, Gretna, 3941300; www.stonebridgegolfofno.com — The event benefits the Heart Center at Children’s Hospital. Email treites2@ chnola.org or tracysalonzo@ aol.com for details. Admission $125. 9:30 a.m. registration, teeoff at 10:30 a.m.

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Saturday 29 CANAL STREET CEMETERIES TOUR . Save Our Cemeteries

conducts a walking tour of Cypress Grove Cemetery, St. Patrick Cemetery No. 2, Odd Fellows Rest Cemetery and the Hurricane Katrina memorial. Reservations are required. Call 525-3377 for details. Admission $15 SOC members, $18 nonmembers. 10 a.m.

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www.marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. DAY OF THE DEAD CELEBRATION .

Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk

PAGE 48

HALLOWEEN EVENTS ACCESS BOO FEST. Lakeview Regional

Medical Center, 95 E. Judge Tanner Drive, Covington, (985) 867-3800; www. lakeviewregional.com — Adapting and Changing Children’s Environments with Successful Solutions, the nonprofit that raises funds to help support families of children with disabilities, hosts a wheelchair-accessible trick-or-treating event and fundraiser. The event also includes pumpkin decorating, face painting, a DJ, a jambalaya cook-off, an appearance by the New Orleans Hornets Honeybees and more. Call (985) 875-0511 for details. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

ALTERNATIVES LIVING COSTUME BALL BENEFIT CRUISE . Creole Queen

Paddlewheel Boat, Spanish Plaza, 5240814; www.neworleanspaddlewheels. com/cruise_dinnerjazz.html — The organization that provides services to the homeless and people living with mental, emotional, behavioral, developmental, physical and medical challenges hosts a costume party aboard the Creole Queen. The event also features live music, an open bar, food, a costume contest and a silent auction. Call 4003580 or visit www.alternativesliving.org/ costume-ball-benefit-cruise.html for details. Admission $75. 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday. BERNIE BAXTER’S HAUNTED HOUSE . 44

Vivian Court, Algiers — The haunted house has a medical theme this year and features trick-or-treating on Halloween night. Call 273-2691 or visit www.berniebaxter.com for details. Free admission. 7 p.m. Friday-Monday.

BOAT RIDES OF TERROR . Jean Lafitte

Swamp and Airboat Tours, 6601 Leo Kerner Lafitte Pkwy., 587-1719; www. jeanlafitteswamptour.com — The tour through the swamps of Crown Point transforms into a haunted experience. The tour site will also have live music, food and drinks for the haunted tours, and costumes are welcome. Call 5294567 or visit www.nop-rhs.com for details. Tickets $25 general admission, $12 children ages 6-12. Tours run continuously from 7:15 p.m. to 11 p.m. FridaySunday.

BOO AT THE VIEW. Clearview Shopping

Center, 4436 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 482-1890 — The mall hosts a safe Halloween night with entertainment, games, and prizes, trick-or-treating and costume contests for kids and pets. Call 382-1788 or email cnaccari@ clearviewmall.com for details. 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday.

BOO AT THE ZOO. Audubon Zoo, 6500

Magazine St., 581-4629; www.auduboninstitute.org — The zoo’s Halloween event for children up to age 12 features trick-or-treating, a “ghost train,” scary and non-scary haunted houses, games and entertainment. Visit http://www. auduboninstitute.org/boo-zoo for details. Admission $16. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

CRAWLOWEEN . Audubon Insectarium, 423 Canal St., 410-2847; www.auduboninstitute.org — Children are encouraged to wear Halloween costumes at the event featuring trick-or-treating, bug crafts and staff entomologists discuss-

ing misunderstood arthropods including roaches, spiders, and maggots. Free with Insectarium admission. 10 a.m to 5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. DIRTY COAST HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY. Studio 3, 3610 Toulouse St. —

Dirty Coast’s annual party features DJs, live music and a costume contest. Admission $10 (includes drinks). 9 p.m. Friday. ENDLESS NIGHT VAMPIRE BALL . House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com — The masquerade ball where elaborate costumes are highly encouraged features burlesque and belly dancers, DJs and live bands. Visit neworleansvampireball2011.eventbrite. com for details. Tickets start at $40. 10 p.m. to 4 a.m. GHOSTLY GALAVANT FUNDRAISER & WALKING TOURS. Louisiana State

Museum Cabildo, 701 Chartres St., 5686968; www.lsm.crt.state.la.us — The Friends of the Cabildo hosts a weekend of activities that includes a fundraiser (8 p.m. to midnight Friday), which features food from local restaurants, DJs and an estate sale, and hourly French Quarter tours (10 a.m. to 3 p.m. SaturdaySunday). Call 523-3939 or visit www. friendsofthecabildo.org for details. Fundraiser admission $35 in advance, $45 at the door; tour admission $12 ages 21 and older, $10 students and children. Friday-Sunday.

HALLOWEEN FUN HOUSE . AllWays

Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.theallwayslounge.com — Favorite AllWays Lounge performers including Cripple Creek Theatre, Nari Tomassetti, Dennis Monn, Ratty Scurvics, Mudlark Puppets and Ooops the Clown transform the theater into a haunted maze. Admission $7 (includes a drink). 9 p.m. to midnight Thursday-Monday.

HOUSE OF SHOCK . House of Shock, 319

Butterworth St., Jefferson, 734-SHOCK; www.houseofshock.com — Besides a haunted house, Phil Anselmo’s legendary attraction also features live music from local and national acts, a bar, food and a multimedia stage with live actors, stunts and pyrotechnics. Visit www. houseofshock.com for details. Haunted

house admission is $25, $50 VIP tickets. 8 p.m. Friday-Monday. HOWL-O-WEEN PAWTAY. Times Grill,

1896 N. Causeway Blvd., (985) 6261161; www.timesgrill.com — The dogfriendly benefit for the St. Tammany Humane Society features live music from Supercharger and Christian Serpas & Ghost Town, a dog costume contest, adoptable dogs and more. Tickets $5 general admission, $2 children. 1 p.m to 5 p.m. Saturday.

THE MORTUARY. Haunted Mortuary,

4800 Canal St., (877) 669-3327; www.hauntedmortuary.com — The haunted house is located in the former P.J. McMahon funeral home. Visit www.themortuary.net for details. Admission starts at $25. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday-Thursday, 7 p.m. to midnight Friday-Saturday.

PARK-A-BOO. Lafreniere Park, 3000

Downs Blvd., Metairie — The familyfriendly event features a (semi-scary) haunted house, a maze, trick-or-treating, face painting, costume contests, live entertainment and more. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 children ages 3-12, free for children 2 and under. Visit www.park-a-boo.com for details. 5 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Friday, 1 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday.

PUMPKIN PATCH BASH . Life Center Cathedral, 1 Life Center Drive, 3627034; www.lccnola.org — The familyfriendly Halloween event features “truck-or-treating,” a petting zoo, face painting, magicians, food, prize giveaways and more. Guests should bring canned goods and non-perishable food items to donate. Free admission. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday. VOODOOFEST. Voodoo Authentica of

New Orleans, 612 Dumaine St., 5222111; www.voodooshop.com — The annual festival celebrates Voodoo’s contributions to New Orleans traditions with presentations, book signings, art, healing rituals and more. Visit www.voodoofest.com for details. Free admission. 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Monday.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Italian Museum & Research Library, 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — WIne enthusiast Peter Patti discusses and hosts a tasting of wines from the Tuscany and Alto-Adige regions. Reservations are recommended. Call 522-7294 or email questions@americanitalianculturalcenter.com for details. Admission $30. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

job growth. Visit www.globalgreen.org/nola for details. Admission $50, $25 for nonprofits. 8 a.m. registration and breakfast, 9 a.m. program.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

JEFFERSON PARISH HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING. East Bank

47


EVENTS

LISTINGS

BE THERE DO THAT

PAGE 47

Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. southernfood.org — The program follows Mexican holiday traditions with an interactive sugar skull decorating workshop, tequila tastings and more. Free with museum admission. 2 p.m. ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . Christ Church

Cathedral, 2919 St. Charles Ave., 895-6602 — ERACE meets in the church’s Westfeldt Room for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > OCTOBER 25 > 2011

NOLA EAST FRIENDS FEST.

48

Audubon Louisiana Nature Center, Joe Brown Park, 5601 Read Blvd., 246-5672 — James “12” Andrews, Michael Baptiste, Gina Brown, Jamal Batiste, Kermit Ruffins and others perform at the inaugural festival that is part of Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s Save Our Sons crime prevention initiative. The festival also features children’s activities. Free admission. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

NORTHLAKE-MANDEVILLE ROTARY CHILLI COOK-OFF & FAIR . Madisonville Ball Fields,

1007 Pine St. — The event benefiting The New Heights Therapy Center, Support Our War Heroes and Safe Harbor features live music, children’s activities, adoptable pets and $5 bottomless chili bowls available for purchase. Call (985) 796-0689, 458-1013 or visit www.mandevillerotary. org for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET.

Call 522-9897

www.theoriginalleakspecialist.com Good thru 6/1/12

Holy Angels Complex, 3500 St. Claude Ave., 875-4268; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. SLIDELL FALL STREET FAIR . Olde Towne Slidell, Slidell; www. slidell.la.us — The Slidell

Historical Antique Association hosts the festival with live music and more than 150 vendors selling antique and vintage goods, handmade arts and crafts, plants, fruit and food. Call (985) 641-6316 or visit www.slidellantiques.com for details. Free admission. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. SaturdaySunday. ST. BERNARD SEAFOOD & FARMERS MARKET. Aycock

Barn, 409 Aycock St., Arabi — The market showcases fresh seafood, local produce, jams and preserves, baked goods, crafts, live entertainment, children’s activities and more. Call 355-4442 or visit www. visitstbernard.com for details. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays.

ST. PHILIP NERI CRAFT FAIR. St. Philip Neri School,

Parishioners’ Center, 6600 Kawanee Ave., Metairie, 8875600; www.stphilipneri.org — The craft fair sells handmade jewelry, children’s clothing and accessories, etched glassware, candles and more. Visit www.spnladiesco-op.org for details. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. VOODOO ON THE BAYOU.

Pitot House, 1440 Moss St. — The Faubourg St. John Neighborhood Association fundraiser features live music by Los Po-Boy-Citos and Lips & the Trips, an open bar, food from local restaurants and a silent auction. Admission $40 in advance, $50 at the door. Call 486-7793, visit www.fsjna. org or www.voodooonthebayou.com for details. 8:30 p.m to midnight.

Sunday 30 ARTISAN BEER MAKING WORKSHOP. Southern

Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood. org — Brewstock owner and brewer Aaron Hyde leads the program on home brewing. Call 208-2788 or email aaron@ brewstock.com for pricing and other details. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM.

Temple Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave. — Rabbi Edward Cohn leads a free class for those seeking information about Judaism or considering conversion. Reservations are recommended. 9 a.m.

JUNIOR LEAGUE OF GREATER COVINGTON HARVEST POLO CUP CLASSIC. Leah Farm, 16191

Hwy. 40 — The polo match also features auctions, food and cocktails from more than 35 restaurants, live music by Cowboy Mouth and more. Call (985) 892-5258 or visit www. jlgc.net for details. Admission $100. 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society,

2605 River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer.org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 5433480, anotherlifefoundation@ hotmail.com or visit www. anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth

seeks volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 3097304 or (877) 500-7304; www. bbbssela.org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer court-appointed special advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. The time commitment is a minimum of 10 hours per month. No special skills are required; thorough training and support is provided. Call Brian Opert at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email info@casaneworleans.org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. CCFM and marke-

tumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella. org for details.

HANDSON NEW ORLEANS.

The volunteer center for the Greater New Orleans area invites prospective volunteers to learn about the various opportunities available, how to sign-up to attend service projects and general tips on how to be a good volunteer. Call 483-7041 ext. 107, email volunteer@handsonneworleans.org or visit www.handsonneworleans.org for details. HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS.


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

Harmony Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 832-8111 for details. JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum

seeks volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 837-0175 or email daveharrell@yahoo.com for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/ SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@la-spca.org.

LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS.

Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine.org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details.

MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 8885880 for details.

volunteers ages 16 and older for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM . National World War

II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 527-6012 ext. 243 or email katherine.alpert@ nationalww2museum.org for details.

OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS. Operation

REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area inner-city youth and their families. For information, visit www.thegyac. org and www.operationreach. org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS. New Orleans

Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING. The STAIR program

holds regular volunteer training sessions to work oneon-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www.stairnola.org for details.

TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION .

The Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upperschool New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www. touro.com/content/careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 8978107 for information. VOLUNTEERS CAN LEAD PROGRAM . The program

allows residents to assist the New Orleans Police Department at its district stations. Email vocal@nola.gov for details.

WORDS 17 POETS! PERFORMANCE & LITERARY SERIES. Gold Mine

Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 568-0745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet Lewis Warsh and translator Marilyn Kaillet present a reading. An open mic hosted by Jimmy Ross follows. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 8 p.m. Thursday.

BARNES & NOBLE JR. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore regularly hosts free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information. BOOK LAUNCH PARTY. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The event includes a panel discussion featuring authors S.L. Alexander (Courtroom Carnival: Famous New Orleans Trials), Carl Malmgren (Paris Metro), A.C. Mason (April Fools) and J. M. Redmann (Water Mark and Women of the Mean Streets: Lesbian Noir), moderated by

Ethan Brown (Shake the Devil Off). 7 p.m. Tuesday. COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES. Kitchen Witch

Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday.

Lunch Buffet Daily

DEBORAH OUSLEY KADAIR .

Maple Street Book Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www. maplestreetbookshop.com — The store hosts a Halloween party featuring the author of I Spy in the Louisiana Sky. 11:30 a.m. Saturday. The author also appears at A Tisket A Tasket New Orleans Books & Gifts (910 Decatur St., 524-8482) 2:30 p.m. Saturday.

LUNCH

11:30AM - 2:30PM

DINNER

5:30PM - 10:30PM

9 2 3 M E TA I R I E R D . 8 3 6 - 6 8 5 9

DIANNE DE LA CASAS. A Tisket A Tasket New Orleans Books & Gifts, 910 Decatur St., 5248482 — The author signs The House That Witchy Built and Cajun Cornbread Boy. 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

CLOSED TUES.

The best kept secret in New Orleans

DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s

at the Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net — The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

ED SHANKMAN & DAVE O’NEILL . Octavia Books, 513

Octavia St., 899-7323 — The children’s book author and illustrator sign The Bourbon Street Band is Back. 4 p.m. Thursday. FAIR GRINDS POETRY EVENT.

Fair Grinds Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Jenna Mae hosts poets and spokenword readers on the second, fourth and fifth Sunday of each month. 8 p.m.

FRIENDS OF THE NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE .

Latter Library Carriage House, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 5962625; www.nutrias.org — The group hosts twice-weekly sales of books, DVDs, books on tape, LPs and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday and Saturday.

JAMES FARWELL . Garden

District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The author discusses and signs The Pakistan Cauldron: Conspiracy, Assassination and Instability. 5:30 p.m. Thursday. JOSEPH D’ANTONI . Historic

New Orleans Collection, 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www. hnoc.org — The photographer discusses and signs Louisiana Reflections. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.

KEITH SPERA . East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The author discusses Groove Interrupted: Loss, Renewal and the Music of New Orleans. Jeremy Davenport performs following the reading. 7 p.m. Wednesday. KID CHEF ELIANA . A Tisket A Tasket New Orleans Books PAGE 50

HAVE A NEW ORLEANS STYLE PRIVATE PARTY ACCOMODATES 50-60 PEOPLE PRIVATE WRAP AROUND BALCONY OVERLOOKING HISTORIC MAGAZINE ST. CALL ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY PACKAGES Lunch Mon-Fri 11-3 · Sat 11-4 Dinner Mon-Sat 5-9 3001 Magazine St. · 891-0997 www.joeyksrestaurant.com

Happy Halloween 1135 PRESS ST. @

2900 ST. CLAUDE

NEW ORLEANS (504) 947-7554

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMS-Outreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information.

49


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <GRITS AND GREENS VIA VACHERIE > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The flavors of Cajun country and the rural South are the focus at < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <Vacherie (827 Toulouse St., 207-4532; www.vacherierestaurant.com), a new restaurant inside the Hotel Ste. Marie. Vacherie is run by the same owners behind eat New Orleans, Between the Bread and Cafe at the Square, and its menu includes pimento WHAT cheese grit cakes with collard greens, boudin-stuffed fried hen Lilette and rabbit cassoulet. Vacherie serves breakfast and dinner daily and brunch on weekends, and an attached coffee shop serves WHERE breakfast and lunch daily. 3637 Magazine St., 895-1636; www.lilHEALING WITH HUMMUS etterestaurant.com Fatma Aydin has opened Fatoush (2372 St. Claude Ave., 371-5074; WHEN www.fatoushrestaurantnola.com), a Turkish eatery inside the Lunch and dinner new New Orleans Healing Center (www.neworleanshealingTue.-Sat. center.org). Open daily, Fatoush is billed as a “combination coffee house, herbal teahouse, natural juice bar and organic HOW MUCH restaurant.” The kitchen focuses on using few processed foods Expensive and serving grass-fed beef and lamb for its sandwiches and kebab platters.

am

B

RESERVATIONS

Recommended

WHAT WORKS

Classic dishes and flavors that build into complete compositions WHAT DOESN'T

Seafood dishes are less consistent

five 5 IN

FIVE DUCK SANDWICHES

BOUCHERIE

8115 JEANNETTE ST., 862-5514 www.boucherie-nola.com

Get a duck confit po-boy on banh mi-style bread.

CHECK, PLEASE

Renewed buzz and old favorites keep Lilette in its prime

Bistro Flair

IN ITS SECOND DECADE, AN UPTOWN BISTRO STAYS VITAL.

Braciola and parmigiano toast are a couple of the longstanding favorites on the menu at Lilette. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

B Y I A N M C N U LT Y

L

across the menu as new dishes and an increasingly pronounced Pacific influence join the mix. For instance, when a hearts of palm salad hit the table it seemed too light, too monochromatically white and too plain. But insert the fork and the dish seems to activate, as lemon works with olive oil and black pepper works with shaved Parmigiano. For those who have grown tired of pork belly on fine dining menus, Lilette’s version could make you a believer. It’s an unusual entree, really more of a salad served in a large bowl with mint, curls of sweet onion and chunks of watermelon and cucumber elevating big, fried hunks of the fatty star ingredient. While Lilette’s bouillabaisse ranks among the best in town, I’ve had less luck with other seafood dishes here. A paneed black drum came out overdone and somewhat lost under its breading, for instance. But don’t miss the crudo, an ever-changing Italian view of sashimi dressed with olive oil and thin, crisp vegetables. Steak tartare, escargot, duck confit and roasted chicken are all bistro standards done very well here. But it’s Lilette’s signature dishes that really seduce — where flavors progressively build into complete compositions that aren’t always obvious from the outset. Harris could have parlayed his early acclaim into more restaurant ventures around town. Instead, he’s distilled his original into a place with a firm, specific and crave-inducing identity. These days, having Bouligny Tavern next door for a drink hasn’t hurt one bit either.

520 CAPDEVILLE ST., 371-5161 www.capdevillenola.com

A club sandwich features chopped duck and duck cracklings as the bacon.

CRABBY JACK’S

428 JEFFERSON HWY., 833-2722

The duck debris po-boy is overstuffed and drenched in gravy.

DICK & JENNY’S

4501 TCHOUPITOULAS ST., 894-9880 www.dickandjennys.com

At lunch, get a pressed sandwich of duck, Brie and apple butter.

J’ANITA’S AT THE RENDON INN 4501 EVE ST., 826-5605

Duck cooked in wine is served on grilled sourdough and dressed with aioli and slaw.

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

2009 Montinore Estate Pinot Noir WILLAMETTE VALLEY, OREGON $16-$18 Retail

This easy-drinking pinot noir leans more toward the New World fruit-forward style than the traditional styles of Burgundy. The medium-bodied wine has aromas of strawberry, dried cherry, spice and toasty notes, followed on the palate by cranberry, raspberry and bright cherry. It’s a food-friendly wine to drink with grilled salmon, sushi, roast duck, mushrooms, lamb, pork and veal dishes. Buy it at: Dorignac’s, Langenstein’s in Metairie, Robert Fresh Markets on Claiborne Avenue and in Metairie, and Habano’s and the Wine Cellar of Slidell. Drink it at: Gio’s Villa Vancheri, Nathan’s Restaurant and Michael’s Restaurant and Lounge. — Brenda Maitland

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

ilette was the hot new thing when it opened in late 2000. Glowing reviews came from the outset and chef/owner John Harris soon drew A-list accolades from national publications. With a menu that thoughtfully and smoothly commuted across French and Italian borders and with a stylish dining room, it seemed every bit the hip Uptown bistro of the moment. Nearly 11 years later, it still does, and the most remarkable part is how little has changed. Lilette is no time capsule. The specials board changes constantly. Moreover, last year marked the significant arrival of Bouligny Tavern, a small plates and cocktail spot wrapped in mid-century chic that Harris opened next door. Whether serving as its own destination or as an adjunct to an evening at Lilette, it brought renewed buzz to Harris’ corner of Uptown. Lilette has maintained some of its best dishes. With a little selectivity, diners can assemble the same meal here in 2011 they had a decade earlier, course by course. When Lillete opened, Parmigiano toast, with its star-studded lineup of white truffles, wild mushrooms and marrow, required a little tableside explanation, but it quickly became an indispensible, and permanent, appetizer on the menu. A serious sweet tooth might have looked askance at goat cheese quenelles for dessert, but these subtly sour, lavender honey-touched dollops now snap to mind for many fans when Lilette is mentioned. Crafting contemporary dishes that hold their allure this long is one thing, but perhaps the better trick is how Lilette’s original aesthetic continues to carry

CAPDEVILLE

51


>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<< >>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

include a grilled chicken sandwich. >>>> < < < < < < <No < reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ > > > > > > > >BUD’S > BROILER — Citywide; www. budsbroiler.com — Bud’s Broiler is <<< known for charcoal-broiled burg>> ers topped with hickory-amoked The menus also includes <sauce. <

hot dogs and chicken sandwiches. The Clearview Parkway and City Park location also < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <24-hour < shrimp and catfish po-boys. > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > offer > >reservations. No Lunch, dinner and Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — late-night daily. Credit cards. $ $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax

483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

CAFE CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 861-

AMERICAN FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave., Harahan, 287-4581; 7457 St. Charles Ave., 266-2921; www. fathengrill.com — Pit-cooked barbecue includes St. Louisstyle spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. Reservations accepted. St. Charles Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Hickory Avenue: breakfast, lunch and dinner Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $$ O’HENRY’S FOOD & SPIRITS — 634

S. Carrollton Ave., 866-9741; 8859 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 461-9840; www.ohenrys.com — Complimentary peanuts are the calling card of these casual, family friendly restaurants. The menu includes burgers, steaks, ribs, pasta, fried seafood, salads and more. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SHAMROCK BAR & GRILL — 4133

S. Carrollton Ave., 301-0938 — Shamrock serves burgers, shrimp or roast beef po-boys, Reuben sandwiches, cheese sticks and fries with cheese or gravy. Other options include corned beef and cabbage, and fish and chips. No reservations. Dinner and late night daily. Credit cards. $

ZADDIE’S TAVERN — 1200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 832-0830 — Zaddie’s serves burgers, alligator sausage, boudin, tamales and meat or crawfish pies. Thursday’s steak night special features a filet mignon, butter-garlic potatoes, salad, grilled French bread and a soft drink for $15. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $

BARBECUE BAR & GRILL BAYOU BEER GARDEN — 326 N.

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128

Tchoupitoulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449 River Road, 834-4938; www. therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a

BOO KOO BBQ — 3701 Banks St.,

202-4741; www.bookoobbq.com — The Boo Koo burger is a ground brisket patty topped with pepper Jack cheese, boudin and sweet chile aioli. The Cajun banh mi fills a Vietnamese roll with hogshead cheese, smoked pulled pork, boudin, fresh jalapeno, cilantro, cucumber, carrot, pickled radish and sriracha sweet chile aioli. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat. Cash only. $

Ave., Metairie, 322-2544; www. saucysbbqgrill.com — Saucy’s serves slow-smoked St. Louisstyle pork ribs, pulled pork, brisket, smoked sausage and grilled or jerk chicken. Side items include smoked beans, mac and cheese, coleslaw and Caribbean rice. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE —

527 Decatur St., 522-0571; www. crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Grilled Brewhouse ribs are served with house-made barbecue sauce. During October, nightly Oktoberfest specials include entree choices like Vienna Schnitzel and roasted chicken with Speck ham. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BURGERS BEACHCORNER BAR & GRILL — 4905

Canal St., 488-7357; www.beachcornerbarandgrill.com — Top a 10-oz. Beach burger with cheddar, blue, Swiss or pepper Jack cheese, sauteed mushrooms or housemade hickory sauce. Other options

7890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$ ECO CAFE & BISTRO — 3903 Canal St., 561-6585; www.ecocafeno.com — Eco Cafe serves sandwiches like the veggie club, layered with Swiss cheese, tomatoes, onions, cucumbers, spinach and baby pickles. There are fresh squeezed juices, and Friday and Saturday evenings feature tapas dining. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100 Mag-

azine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — This cafe serves a variety of gourmet salads, sandwiches, wraps, Chicago-style hot dogs, burgers and more. The cochon de lait panini includes slowbraised pork, baked ham, pickles, Swiss, ancho-honey slaw, honey mustard and chili mayo. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112;

www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CHINESE CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton

Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchidneworleans.com — This longtime Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Sizzling black pepper beef or chicken is prepared with onions, red and green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and

Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal

St., 581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

KUPCAKE FACTORY — 800 Metairie Road, Metairie, 267-4990; 819 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 464-8884; 6233 S. Claiborne Ave., 267-3328; www.thekupcakefactory.com — Choose from a large selection of gourmet cupcakes. The Fat Elvis is made with banana cake and topped with peanut butter frosting. The Strawberry Fields tops strawberry cake with strawberry buttercream frosting. Other options include white chocolate raspberry and a banana cupcake. No reservations. Hours vary by location. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. PAGE 56

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Jefferson Davis Pwky., 302-9357 — Head to Bayou Beer Garden for a 10-oz. Bayou burger served on a sesame bun. Disco fries are french fries topped with cheese and debris gravy. No reservations. Lunch and dinner, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialties at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $

SAUCY’S BBQ GRILL — 3244 Severn

daily. Credit cards. $

55


Out2Eat page 55 There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONtEMPORaRY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Exchange Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

OAK — 8118 Oak St., 302-1485; www. oaknola.com — This wine bar offers small plates and live musical entertainment. Gulf shrimp fill

56

tacos assembled in house-made corn tortillas with pickled vegetables, avocado and lime crema. The hanger steak bruschetta is topped with Point Reyes blue cheese and smoked red onion marmalade. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE —

8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N. Peters

St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CuBaN/ CaRIBBEaN MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — 437 Esplanade Ave., 252-4800; www. mojitosnola.com — Mojitos serves a mix of Caribbean, Cuban and Creole dishes. Caribbean mac and cheese pie is made with chunks of lobster, tomatoes, scallions, garlic and creamy cheese sauce and is served over a bed of spicy corn maque choux. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

DELI CG’S CAFE AT THE RUSTY NAIL —

1100 Constance St., 722-3168; www. therustynail.biz — Inside the Rusty

Nail, CG’s offers a menu of sandwiches. The Piggly Wiggly features pulled pork on a sesame seed bun with coleslaw and pickle chips on the side. The Wild Turkey is layered with Granny Smith apple slices, provolone, bacon and garlic mayo. No reservations. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $ KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola. com — Chef Nathan Gile’s menu includes pan-seared Maine diver scallops with chimichurri sauce and smoked bacon and corn hash. Coffee- and coriander-spiced rack of lamb is oven roasted and served with buerre rouge and chevre mashed potatoes. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www.martinwine.com — The wine emporium offers gourmet sandwiches and deli items. The Reuben combines corned beef, melted Swiss, sauerkraut and Russian dressing on rye bread. The Sena salad features chicken, golden raisins, blue cheese, toasted pecans and pepper jelly vinaigrette over field greens. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Fri., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MARTINIQUE BISTRO — 5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

DINER

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St., 5615171; www.daisydukesrestaurant. com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations.

GOuRMEt tO GO Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIaN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vindaloo and vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308

Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-C

Metairie Road, Metairie, 836-6859 — The traditional menu features lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ItaLIaN ANDREA’S RESTAURANT — 3100 N.

19th St., Metairie 834-8583; www. andreasrestaurant.com — Chef/ owner Andrea Apuzzo’s specialties include speckled trout royale which is topped with lump crabmeat and lemon-cream sauce. Capelli D’Andrea combines house-made angel hair pasta and smoked salmpage 58

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OUT2EAT page 56 on in light cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni. com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tassomushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

MOSCA’S — 4137 Hwy. 90 W.,

Westwego, 436-8950; www. moscasrestaurant.com — This family-style eatery has changed little since opening in 1946. Popular dishes include shrimp Mosca, chicken a la grande and baked oysters Mosca, made with breadcrumps and Italian seasonings. Reservations accepted. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$$

RED GRAVY — 125 Camp St., 561-

8844; www.redgravycafe.com — The cafe serves breakfast items including pancakes, waffles and pastries. At lunch, try meatballs, lasagna and other Italian specialties, panini, wraps, soups and salads. Open Sundays before New Orleans Saints home games. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RES-

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

CATERING!

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TAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie, 455-2266 — This Italianstyle eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ VINCENT’S ITALIAN CUISINE — 4411

Chastant St., Metairie, 885-2984; 7839 St. Charles Ave., 866-9313; www.vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Try house specialties like vealand spinach-stuffed canneloni. Bracialoni is baked veal stuffed with artichoke hearts, bacon, garlic and Parmesan cheese and topped with red sauce. Reservations accepted. Chastant Street: lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. St. Charles Avenue: lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 581-7253; www.rocknsake.com — Rock-n-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

WASABI SUSHI — 900 Frenchmen St., 943-9433; 8550 Pontchartrain Blvd., 267-3263; www.wasabinola. com — Wasabi serves a wide array of Japanese dishes. Wasabi honey shrimp are served with cream sauce. The Assassin roll bundles tuna, snow crab and avocado in seaweed and tops it with barbecued eel, tuna, eel sauce and wasabi tobiko. No reservations. Frenchmen Street: Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Pontchartrain Boulevard: lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas

St., 267-7485; www.bouchenola. com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MIA’S — 1622 St. Charles Ave., 301-9570 — Veal Oscar features lightly breaded veal topped with lump crabmeat and hollandaise, served with garlic red potatoes and grilled asparagus. The alligator pear and crabmeat salad combines avocado and crabmeat over tomatoes, red onions and greens in balsamic glaze. Reservations accepted. Lunch, dinner and late-night daily. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900 City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St.,

309-3570 — Redemption offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-

Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR —

MEDITERRANEAN/

MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$ — 7724 Maple St., 314-0010; www.babyloncafe.biz —The Babylon platter includes stuffed grape leaves, hummus, kibbeh, rice and one choice of meat: lamb, chicken or beef kebabs, chicken or beef shawarma, gyro or kufta. Chicken shawarma salad is a salad topped with olives, feta and chicken breast cooked on a rotisserie. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ BABYLON CAFE

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun

St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEXICAN & SOUTHWESTERN COUNTRY FLAME — 620 Iberville St., 522-1138 — Country Flame serves a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018 Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL — 3242 Magazine St., 899-0031;

1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 736-1188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Bolinos de Bacalau are Portuguese-style fish cakes made with dried, salted codfish, mashed potatoes, cilantro, lemon juice, green onions and egg and served with smoked paprika aioli. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.Sun. Credit cards. $$ TOMASITO’S MEXICAN CUISINE —

755 Tchoupitoulas St., 527-0942 —


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

Tomasito’s is an upscale cantina with a patio for outdoor dining. The carnitas platter features marinated and slow-cooked pork served with Mexican rice, refried beans and a choice of salsa verde, smoky chipotle or a traditional Mexican sauce. No reservations. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St., 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood po-boys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Deca-

tur St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on poboy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SIBERIA — 2227 St. Claude Ave.,

265-8855 — This music clubs serves dishes like fish and chips, spicy hot wings, tacos and more. There are weekly specials and vegetarian and vegan options. No reservations. Dinner and latenight Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626

NEIGHBORHOOD ARTZ BAGELZ — 3138 Magzine St.,

KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 737-3933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of poboys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

OLIVE BRANCH CAFE — 1995 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 348-2008; 3700 Orleans Ave., 302-1220; 5145 Gen. de Gaulle Drive, 393-1107; www.olivebranchcafe.com — These cafes serve soups, salads, sandwiches, wraps and entrees. Chicken and artichoke pasta is tossed with penne in garlic and olive oil. Shrimp Carnival features smoked sausage, shrimp, onion and peppers in roasted garlic cream sauce over pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA ITALIAN PIE — Citywide; www.

italianpie.com — Italian Pie offers an array of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, wraps and salads. The Mediterranean pie is topped with artichoke hearts, kalamata olives, red onion, tomatoes, herbed ricotta, mozzarella and pesto sauce. The spinach and artichoke pie includes mushrooms, onion, feta, mozzarella and garlic sauce. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

309-7557; www.artzbagelz.com — Artz bakes its bagels in house and options include onion, garlic, honey whole wheat, cinnamonraisin, salt and others. Get one with a schmear or as a sandwich. Salads also are available. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie,

Franklin St., Gretna, 301-3166; www.braxtonsnola.com — Braxton’s serves a mix of salads, poboys, deli sandwiches and entrees. Start a meal with oysters Louise, featuring fried oysters on a bed of spinach and cheese. The seafood platter includes fried shrimp, oysters, catfish strips, french fries, potato salad and vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat., late-night Fri.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717

BRAXTON’S RESTAURANT — 636

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The

832-8032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $ — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 8991414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations.

Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old

Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $

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SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles

Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

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PUMPKIN & PANNACOTTA GELATO & PEAR ICE

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave.,

888-4004 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS DRESS IT — 535 Gravier St., 5717561 — Get gourmet burgers and sandwiches dressed to order. Original topping choices include everything from sprouts to black bean and corn salsa to peanut butter. For dessert, try a chocolate chip cookie served with ice cream and chocolate sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $

PARRAN’S PO-BOYS — 3939 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 885-3416; www.parranspoboy. com — Parran’s offers a long list of po-boys plus muffulettas, club sandwiches, pizzas, burgers, salads, fried seafood plates and Creole-Italian entrees. The veal supreme po-boy features a cutlet topped with Swiss cheese and brown gravy. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Thu.-Sat. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St.,

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

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OUT2EAT 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

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Convention Center Blvd., 520-8530; www.grandislerestaurant.com — Grand Isle offers seafood options from raw oysters to lobster St. Malo with combines Maine lobster, shrimp and mussels in seafood broth. Baked Gulf fish are served with compound chili butter, potatoes and a vegetable. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave., 943-9914 — The Jack Demp-sey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ LA COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon St.,

598-1200; www.redfishgrill.com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

VILLAGE INN — 9201 Jefferson Hwy.,

737-4610 — Check into Village Inn for seasonal boiled seafood or raw oysters. Other options include fried seafood platters, po-boys, pasta and pizza. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

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241-2548; www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — The six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

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60

BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd.,

Magazine St., 522-7902; www.centraarchy.com — This steakhouse serves USDA prime beef. A selection of super-sized cuts includes a 40-oz. Porterhouse for two. The menu also features seafood options and a la carte side items. Reservations recommended. Diner daily. Credit cards. $$$

CRESCENT CITY STEAKS — 1001

N. Broad St., 821-3271; www.crescentcitysteaks.com — Order USDA prime beef dry-aged and hand-cut in house. There are porterhouse steaks large enough for two or three diners to share. Bread pudding with raisins and peaches is topped with brandy sauce. Reser-

vations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri. and Sun., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 587-7099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www.-ruthschris.com — Ruth’s steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Fulton Street: Lunch and dinner daily. Veterans Memorial Boulevard: Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

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2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and late-night Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

Pho NOLA serves pho and an array of Vietnamese dishes (3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www.pho-nola.com). PHOTO BY CHeRYL GeRBeR

reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135

N. Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

SANTA FE TAPAS — 1327 St. Charles

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Ave., 304-9915 — The menu includes both tapas dishes and entrees. Seared jumbo scallops are served with mango and green tomato pico de gallo. Gambas al ajillo are jumbo shrimp with garlic, shallots, chilis and cognac. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily, late-night Fri.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola. com — There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options here. Delivery available. No

Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


RAY DAVIES BY ALEX WOODWARD

R

Davies’ dad constantly played jazz music at the family’s home in London’s Muswell Hill. “A lot of the old guys down there (in New Orleans) remind me of my

dad. The buskers,” he says. “My dad played banjo, and he played harmonica. He even played washboard. He’d fit in really well down there. He never went to America. He was a very pivotal, major influence on me when I was a kid.” The Kinks embraced American blues and rock ’n’ roll but didn’t shy from its jazz background. Village Green echoes English vaudeville and music hall, and the band dips headfirst into traditional jazz arrangements on 1971’s Muswell Hillbillies. Last year, Davies opened his (admittedly never-locked) song vault, and invited musicians to take it apart. The album’s title, See My Friends, refers more to the track of the same name and less to his stellar lineup of players. “I never really had too many friends,” he says, laughing. “I’m not known for being a collaborative person in that respect.” A host of celebrated artists and younger bands, like Spoon and Mumford & Sons, joined Davies in the studio to revisit songs from his more than four decades of songwriting. “I was trying not to impose myself on the sessions,” he says. “One thing we agreed: We didn’t want it to be a cover. It had to be a collaboration.” Davis shares the opening track “Better Things” with Bruce Springsteen, giving the 1981 song the E Street treatment, with an organ, call-andresponse vocals and harmonies. “We talked a lot about the track. We sent texts and everything,” he says. “He said, ‘We’ve got to do it, it’s a track I’d record anyway.’ It’s picking the right casting. Casting is really important as well.” The remaining songs stay close-to-faithful to their original counterpart, with the exception of Metallica’s amped up, double-bass-drum take on

4:15PM | SUNDAY | LE FLAMBEAU/PRESERVATION HALL

“You Really Got Me” — which follows a gorgeous, heartbreaking duet with Lucinda Williams on “Long Way From Home.” The title track went to Spoon; The 88 takes on “David Watts”; and The Pixies’ Frank Black cleans up “This Is Where I Belong.” Jackson Browne, who hadn’t been invited to join the album sought out Davies. “I hadn’t envisioned he’d be on it, particularly singing one of our English songs,” Davies says. “But he came in the studio and said, ‘Let me convince you, it’ll be fine, don’t worry.’ So he played ‘Waterloo Sunset’ and really stood out.” Alex Chilton appears on “Til the End of the Day,” one of his last recordings before his death last year. Chilton, a longtime New Orleans resident, befriended Davies following

the shooting. “Musicians never get close. We were polite friends,” Davies remembers. “He was very helpful to me when I was down there, and a very knowledgeable guy, a very quiet sort of guy — probably had his demons like everyone else, but we got along very well.” Davies and Chilton also recorded a take of “Set Me Free” during the See My Friends sessions, but it didn’t make the album cut. Chilton asked Davies to write for an album, which never materialized. “I said I’d think about it,” Davies says. “One of the last things I did with him we did toward the end of the day, I said, ‘You know, I’ll get some songs together and I’ll play them to you next time I see you.’ And of course I never saw him again.”

The See My Friends sessions also opened up Davies to other collaborations. His duet with Springsteen segued to writing new material together in the studio. “The beginning of a meaningful relationship. Or not,” Davies says with a laugh. “I never take songs too far. I’m not one of these people who does extensive demo sessions. I wait till I get a band in. I still like to think I’m playing in a band rather than using studio guys. It’s why I like working with The 88, like working with a band. As we speak they’re learning a whole bunch of songs I’m sending them to learn so we can play them when we come down. It’s difficult to know what to play down there.” Difficult? The group makes its “world premiere,” he says, in New Orleans. “I’m a bit nervous, I got to tell you.”

October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

ay Davies calls from London a few weeks before his tour begins. He doesn’t have any set lists in mind and rehearsals have been loose and infrequent. He lets in a guest who he directs to a cup of tea. He speaks quietly, casually, and he swears his music is no sacred cow. “Just songs,” he calls them. He considers what songs he’ll perform at the Voodoo Experience, his U.S. debut with his band The 88. “I’m just going to do songs. That’s what I’m going to do,” he says. He pauses. “That’s what I do.” True, Davies has made a career with those songs. The Kinks have one of the most acclaimed discographies in rock music — from early, fuzzy two-minute ’60s singles to conceptual pop operas and ’70s and ’80s power pop. The Kinks outlived the British Invasion, though the band was prohibited from touring the U.S. and was consistently a critical hit and commercial flop. A trio of concept albums — Village Green Preservation Society (1968), Arthur (1969), and Lola Versus Powerman and the Moneygoround (1970) — embraced English nostalgia with a reluctant eye toward the music industry, and industry in general, and showcased Davies’ gift for injecting satire and irony in his songwriting, often celebrating the working class through sophisticated pop music. Davies’ last headline in New Orleans wasn’t linked to an album or tour, but for getting shot in the leg near the French Quarter in 2004. He hasn’t visited since. “What amazed me was how kind the locals were,” he says. “Locals were deeply hurt by it. People are very supportive. It sticks together. It needs to.”

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I are going to work on some new songs,” Cervenka says. “I have all these lyrics and I’ll just give ’em to Billy; I think we’ll have a little bit of down time.” In 2009, Cervenka revealed she had multiple sclerosis. Asked how she’s dealing with the disease, she sighs. “For 16 years I’ve been diagnosed and undiagnosed with MS, way before I made my announcement,” she says. “I just couldn’t refuse to deal with it any more. But the doctors tell me different things. I’m on my seventh doctor, who says, ‘No, you do not [have the disease].’ They have been testing me for all kinds of crap, but everybody I know has something ... fibromyalgia, lupus. There’s some sort of autoimmune thing going on with women,” she says, sighing. “But this is depressing! Look, I’m feeling OK today. I love touring. I love playing X shows.” X came of age during the economic malaise of the last years of the Carter presidency and the subsequent rise of Reaganomics, making the band’s more political albums (Los Angeles, More Fun in the New World) sound more timely than ever in our Patriot Act, TSA-screened, Occupy Wall Street landscape of 2011. In “The New World,” Cervenka’s chorus quotes a homeless man: “It was better before/ Before we voted for whatsisname/This was supposed to be the new world.” “I wrote that because a homeless person wouldn’t even know who was president, and wouldn’t care,” Cervenka says. “How wonderful to be that free.” “Oh, my God!” Cervenka interrupts herself. “You’ve got to hear what I was reading in this morning’s paper. The Obama administration is making it illegal for medical marijuana patients to own a gun. And this wasn’t something I read on the Internet. It was in f—

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ing USA Today.” (Sure enough, that afternoon I pick up a copy of “America’s Newspaper,” and there it is, in a memo from the associate director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms: “Any person who uses or is addicted to marijuana, regardless of whether his or her state has passed legislation authorizing marijuana use for medicinal purposes, is an unlawful user of or addicted to a controlled substance, and is prohibited by federal law from possessing firearms or ammunition.” In the weeks since the interview, I haven’t heard anyone else — on the Right or Left — bring up the fact that the U.S. government seems to have suspended the Second Amendment for people with medical marijuana licenses.) “I don’t care what you think about gun laws,” she says. “If guns are outlawed in this country, we’re f—ed.” What

does she think of the Tea Party? “Really and truly, they are completely brainwashed,” she says. “Why do you want to pay more taxes than the wealthy people? Why do you think you shouldn’t have a pension? Why should you vote against your own self-interest? Why are you listening to popular culture? I swear, if all the power on Earth went out for just two days, like The Day the Earth Stood Still — the original, not the remake — if people could live through it, they’d be better off. Video games and television are evil, horrible, damaging subliminal things. “Get rid of that motherf— ing TV and those motherf— ing video games, right now,” she adds. “Talk to your friends right now. Put that in the paper. Tell me you’ll put that in the paper.” What about the Internet? Cervenka keeps a website

where she blogs and sells her artwork and music. “The Internet is, like all technology, not our friend,” she says. “But we have to use it. What you do with that is spread the information: People need to start writing letters again. Making stuff. Telling each other things privately. “During repression and fascism is when you get really great art,” she says. “But I do have a lot of hope for the future.” In the short term, she’s looking forward to returning to New Orleans; X was the last band to play the Shim Sham Club on Toulouse Street right before the venue closed, and the house was packed. “New Orleans is one of the few cities where people can take care of themselves,” Cervenka says. “I trust the people there and I have friends there.”

October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

hree days after they play the Voodoo Experience, the members of X are going on a South American tour … opening for Pearl Jam. If there’s any incongruity between Seattle’s most commercially successful grunge band hitting the road with L.A.’s most critically acclaimed punk band, lead singer Exene Cervenka doesn’t see it. “We’re not close personal friends. We’re huggin’ buddies,” she explains. “It’s their 20th anniversary, and they’re celebrating with people they like. I’m very grateful.” It’s hard to believe X itself is celebrating its 34th year. “I’ll tell you something, mister,” Cervenka says. “Haven’t we had a string.” X emerged from the fertile Los Angeles punk scene in the late 1970s at a time when anything went, musically speaking; the band was likely to share a stage with Dwight Yoakam, Los Lobos, the Go-Go’s, Henry Rollins or the self-proclaimed “all-American Jewish lesbian folksinger” Phranc. Cervenka and her then-husband, John Doe, met at a poetry workshop in Venice, Calif., while guitarist Billy Zoom came from the rockabilly scene. Their first album, Los Angeles, recorded for $10,000, topped critics’ best lists for 1980, and the next year’s followup, Wild Gift, was named Record of the Year by Rolling Stone, the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times and the Village Voice. Commensurate commercial success didn’t follow, but the band’s members — Cervenka, Doe, Zoom and drummer D.J. Bonebrake — continued to record as X, as well as in various combinations with other collaborators. Exene was in the bands The Original Sinners and Auntie Christ, and both she and Doe have recorded well-regarded solo albums. Still, X hasn’t recorded an album of original material since 1993’s Hey Zeus! — though, Cervenka says, that may change in the new year. “When we get home, Billy and

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4:15 pm | Saturday Le FLambeau/ preServation HaLL 2011 markes the 30th anniversary of the beginning of the Violent Femmes, but Gano is happy to move beyond the band’s legacy. “I just don’t think about (the Femmes) that much,” Gano says. “I’m proud of the work done with Violent Femmes. When people come up to me and say things like, ‘I love your first album,’ or ‘You must be so sick of hearing this, but I just gotta say how much I love your first album.’ I’m never sick of hearing it. … Or somebody’ll say, ‘People just know you because of this one song, or maybe this one album, and do you hate that?’ and it’s like ‘No!’ Because most people never get to experience even that.” While he doesn’t regret the Femmes work, the demise of the band is something he says he prefers to not dwell on, and newer collaborations are more positive outlets. The collaboration with the Ramblers has differed from many arranged projects because of its natural inception and the focus on live shows. “One of the things I love most is performers who are open to having the unexpected taking place while they’re playing, or as part of the show, and to really embrace that,” he says. “So to discover that these guys, coming from a completely different background, have that kind of freedom ... I love that kind of stuff. That’s exactly what happened when I first sat in with them.”

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October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

end of the Femmes as well as a new focus on an ongoing collaboration with Billy and Brendan Ryan, mainstays of The Bogmen. Billed as Gordon Gano and The Ryans, the band released one album, 2009’s Under the Sun, and recently returned from a tour of England and Ireland. Gano has always been an inveterate collaborator, working on theater, film and musical side projects throughout his tenure with the Femmes. Most famously, he toured and recorded in the late 1980s with the gospel group The Mercy Seat, whose eponymous debut was reissued in 2009. More recently, Gano has been exploring a wider range of collaborative projects and has become more interested in record producing. Lost Bayou Ramblers bandleader, fiddler and vocalist Louis Michot has demonstrated his own interest in collaborative work. He helmed the recording of En Francais: Cajun ’n’ Creole Rock ’n’ Roll, released in September. The compilation of Cajun-French language versions of rock standards from Linda Ronstadt, Neil Young, The Beatles and Black Sabbath was recorded by the Ramblers, Steve Riley and The Mamou Playboys, Feufollet, Cedric Watson and others. Two years ago while visiting New Orleans with The Ryans, Gano caught The Lost Bayou Ramblers playing at d.b.a. and heard a snippet of “Blister in the Sun” in one of the band’s solos. Intrigued, he soon found himself onstage with the band, playing through a full-length version the Femmes’ hit. Soon afterward, the Ramblers opened for Gano and The Ryans in New York and the group returned the favor on its way through New Orleans and Lafayette. Before long the two bands melded into one unit, and after laying down tracks for Mammoth Waltz, Gano played a couple of gigs with the Ramblers.

PHOTO BY CHaRLESCa

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mong the collaborations at the Voodoo Experience is what may seem like an unlikely pairing of former Violent Femmes frontman Gordon Gano — a pioneering figure of the postpunk era — and The Lost Bayou Ramblers, Louisiana natives who began playing Cajun music and are modernizing and evolving it. But it’s not an off-the-wall experiment. Listen and you’ll hear a genuine affinity between the godfather of post-punk adolescent angst and a pioneering Cajun band playing a leading role in a developing music scene centered in Lafayette, La., where a handful of ground-breaking bands born into the local traditions also have been raised on progressive rock flavored with dub and techno. The Saturday appearance at Voodoo will serve as the official release of the Ramblers’ “Bastille,” a 12-inch vinyl single featuring contributions by Gano. “Bastille” is one of the genrebusting tracks on The Lost Bayou Ramblers’ forthcoming album Mammoth Waltz, which also features performances by actress/ singer Scarlett Johansson and Dr. John. The B-side offers a totalmakeover remix of “Bastille” by indie-rockers GIVERS. The story of Gano and the Violent Femmes is legendary. The band was discovered in Milwaukee in 1983 while busking at a Pretenders concert. The trio cut an eponymous debut album and it sold more than a million copies without ever charting on Billboard’s Top 200. The success of that album — named by Spin along with Gang of Four’s Entertainment!, X’s Los Angeles, and Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures as one of the cornerstones of the post-punk era — launched a two-and-a-halfdecade career that finally ended with a lawsuit brought by Femmes bassist Brian Ritchie against Gano for selling advertising rights to the Femmes’ anthem “Blister in the Sun” for a Wendy’s commercial. In 2009, Gano announced the

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astodon is a beast. The Atlanta heavy metal kings began a decade ago, playing over-the-top, technical 15-minute epic songs you’d never imagine would resonate with general audiences. Going from basement shows to big tours opening for the band’s favorite, Metallica, Mastodon has grown, evolved and streamlined over the years. “We are always pushing ourselves in a better direction of songcraft,” says bassist/singer Troy Sanders. Previously, Mastodon was known for marathon, shape-shifting super jams, but Sanders describes the band’s new record as “like a Mastodon mixtape.” “We have such a wide array of inspirations and potential sounds in us,” Sanders says. “We could write 15-minute songs all day but for The Hunter we decided to light the spark and get in and out of each song, which was ultimately more energizing, especially after two-and-a-half straight years of touring and playing all these really epic layered and emotional songs. The Hunter is more quick bursts of raw energy.” Produced by Michael Elizondo (Eminem, 50 Cent, Pink, Gwen Stefani) The Hunter is Mastodon’s first album that doesn’t follow a detailed storyline. Only hardcore fans could be expected to follow the intricate mythologies the band concocted on its initial recordings Remission and Leviathan. Still, that approach was a big part of the band’s mystique. “This was our first free-form situation,” Sanders says. “No matter what kind of riff came along, no matter what it sounded like, if we liked it we just built it into a song. So this time the songs are all very diverse, yet the record is more to the point.” Along with a smattering of synthesizers and Hammond organ (incorporated mostly in the form of disturbing textures), another big change ushered in with The Hunter is discernible lyrics. “We focused on better vocals and vocal patterns to marry the voices to the songs — to make them bigger and

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4:15 PM | SATURDAY | VOODOO STAGE

better,” Sanders says. Brent Hinds (guitar), Brann Dailor (drums) and Sanders share singing duties and caveman harmonies, which populate their albums with myriad disparate voices, all adding to the sense of massive scale. “Blasteroid” features a single mountain lionlike voice shrieking, “I wanna drink some f—king blood!” Later, noise and laughter build into “Creature Lives,” which Dailor sings in a voice that would fit in MGMT. The Hunter’s first single, “Curl of the Burl,” rides the same stoner metal vocal-heavy groove that put Queens of the Stone Age on the radio, but with hidden trip-outs in the smallest corners — instead of spilling out everywhere as they did on Mastodon’s earlier records. “‘Curl of the Burl’ is a short, sweet song, catchy but bizarre,” Sanders says. “We didn’t write it to be on the radio, it just came out of us — but if Mastodon gets on the radio, I’d say that’s a good thing. “The burl is the knot that’s found in trees,” Sanders says. “When trees have a stressful period they create this knot, with all these swirls inside.

Furniture-makers cut them out and use them a lot.” Mastodon is a bigger band than it was when it last visited New Orleans. During a show at the House of Blues, Sanders got carried away with an onstage birthday ceremony for guitarist Bill Kelliher. “It was the opening night of our U.S. tour, and everyone told me not to throw the cake,” Sanders says. “But I ended up throwing it icingfirst onto the mixing board. I had to pay $2,500 out of pocket to have the board cleaned. That was about all the money I would’ve made on that tour. It was a break-even tour. Lesson welllearned, for sure.” The band’s shows typically feature high-tech visual effects, but at Voodoo, Mastodon’s stage set up, like the new album, will be more stripped down. “We’ve had LED lights and whatnot in the past,” Sanders says. “But this time we’re flying in from tour to play Voodoo. So I can only promise the people will see four ugly cavemen on stage, sending out a lot of energy.”


October 25, 2011 Gambitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

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4:15 PM FRIDAY     You  may  have  caught  Mates  of  State,  the  indie-pop  duo  consisting  of  married  couple  Jason  Hammel  and  Kori  Gardner,  dressed  in  appropriately  chosen  Captain  &  Tennille  costumes for their Halloween set at  the 2009 Voodoo Music Experience.  You also may have spotted the band  combing  the  festival  grounds  with  their  young  daughters,  hitting  up  Voodoo vendors for candy.      “We told the girls ‘Yeah, we’ll definitely  be  able  to  trick-or-treat,’  so  we went around to all the different  booths at the fest, and that was our  trick or-treating with the girls,” says  Hammel,  who  plays  drums  in  the  band. The trip was successful: “They  got enough candy,” he says.     Mates of State’s career of making  infectious  pop  records  and  seemingly  constant  touring  spans  more  than a decade, and they have managed to do it all with their daughters  Magnolia, 7, and June, 3, in tow much  of  the  time.  The  couple  documents  their roving family life on Gardner’s  blog  Band  on  the  Diaper  Run,  and  Gardner  recently  formed  a  company  that  connects  nannies  with   touring bands. 

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October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

LE RITUAL/VOODOO

    “It’s very long days when we have  the  kids  because  we  want  to  make  it worth their while to be out there  with  us,”  Hammel  says.  “But  at  the  end  of  it,  if  it  kind  of  goes  according  to  plan  it’s  more  than  worth  it.  Everyone  has  a  good  time  and  we’re  happy  to  be  artists  as  well   as parents.”     Managing their family has not prevented  the  duo  from  churning  out  well-received  albums  and  EPs.  The  September  release  Mountaintops  (Barsuk) contains hints of catchy pop  sweetness,  but  some  darker  minorkey  moments  keep  things  from  getting  too  sugary.  Following  the  trajectory  set  by  2008’s  Re-Arrange Us,  the  band  also  continues  to  evolve  beyond  the  organ-and-keys  configuration  that  once  defined  its  sound. “Total Serendipity” is a rousing,  piano-driven  gospel  number  with  horns  and  handclaps  —  a  different  direction  for  the  band,  but  not  entirely  out  of  place  in  their  catalog  of  buoyant  boy-girl  harmonies  and  shifting  pop  melodies.  Hammel  says  having  a  studio  in  the  couple’s  Connecticut  home  has  enabled  them  to  experiment  with   different sounds.      “We  started  to  record  a  lot  ourselves  in  our  home  studio,  so  you  can  really  take  your  time,”  he  says.  “When  it  comes  to  mixing,  obviously  we’ll  pull  back,  but  you  just  end  up  coming  up  with  so  many  ideas. It’s like making pizza or something  —  you  just  throw  a  bunch  of 

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LE FLAMBEAU/ PRESERVATION HALL On pedigree alone, Tao RodriguezSeeger qualifies for Voodoo’s best in show: His grandfather is revered activist and singer/songwriter Pete Seeger, and he was weaned on the sturdy American folk traditions for which his surname has become a byword. But Rodriguez-Seeger, 39, has his own artistic bona fides. A cofounder of the roots-rocking Mammals (with Ruth Ungar and Chris Merenda) and the offspring of all-stars RIG (with Johnny Irion and Woody Guthrie progeny Sarah Lee Guthrie), he’s done as much as anyone born after 1970 to pour the informed egalitarianism of his family’s protest music into the solipsistic fishbowl of present-day pop and rock. Rise and Bloom, his self-released 2010

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debut as the Tao Seeger Band, updates Pete Seeger classics like “Well May the World Go” and “Bring ’Em Home” — which in these hands become electrified ambassadors for peace, Celtictinged passion pleas sung in English and Spanish — alongside other covers and originals that display a cultivated love and equivalent mastery of just about every musical genre of his lifetime. Above all, country suits his resonant voice best: Snappy duet “Train on the Island” crackles and pops, Jim Garland’s Depression-era lament “I Don’t Want Your Millions Mister” sounds depressingly apt, and “Twelve Gates to the City” and the title track, situated back-to-back near the album’s close, hike their banjos and strings to a stirring endless-blues overlook. In 2009, Tao and Pete recorded three songs with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band for its 2010 Preservation compilation, the last of which was another stirring closer, “We Shall Overcome.” Listening to this third-generation rebel, you get the feeling he won’t quit until we do. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

SNOOP DOGG 7:15 PM SATURDAY

LE RITUAL/VOODOO Snoop Dogg’s introduction (by way of Dr. Dre) upstages Dre on his own album, on the genre-defining single “Nuthin’ But a ‘G’ Thang” from The Chronic, Dre’s first solo venture. The skinny, lanky Snoop (real name Calvin Cordozar Broadus Jr.) gave his debut rhyme a countdown (“one, two, three and to

the four …”) over Dre’s soul-sampling beat, a classic G-funk prototype. The West Coast’s G-funk borrowed liberally from Parliament and Funkadelic samples and added slithering synth bass and hand clap snare hits to gangsta rap tales from the left coast. Twenty years later, Snoop returns with the sequel to his Doggystyle, the landmark 1993 album introducing “Gin and Juice” and Snoop’s gangsta rap-meets-P-funk world of parties and violence, downplaying the thug life with his signature sleepy drawl and clouds upon clouds of marijuana. Formerly titled Doggystyle 2, Snoop’s 2011 album Doggumentary hints back in time — the on-cue Bootsy Collins intro, hand clap disco beats, Roger Troutman-esque talkboxes, and sample credits that read like a vintage Soul Train playlist. Between albums, Snoop has gone from West Coast G, to murder trial star (cleared of charges in 1996), to a member of Master P’s No Limit Records family, to absurd stoner TV star, all while sitting on the board of hip-hop royalty as a pioneer from its golden age. He loosened his inner goofball with film cameos (Old School, Starsky & Hutch, Soul Plane), reality TV (Snoop Dogg’s Father Hood) and a short-lived late-night stoner comedy program Doggy Fizzle Televizzle, its title playing on Snoop’s frequent “izzle”-ization of every other word. He stepped outside hip-hop to join Katy Perry on her 2010 single “California Gurls,” on which Snoop pines for West Coast women and “all that ass hangin’ out,” an ongoing priority since Snoop revealed the album art to his 1993 debut. — Woodward

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October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

and “Hold the Line,” both computerworld dance tracks with a Jamaican dancehall influence. The album was recorded at Kingston’s Tuff Gong studios, the legendary Jamaican music imprint founded by the Wailers more than 40 years ago. Jamaican artists appear on both Guns and its 2010 follow up EP, Lazers Never Die — lead track “Sound of Siren” also sports a digitally altered M.I.A., the ferocious Sri Lankan rapper and electronic artist who tasked Diplo and Switch to produce tracks on her 2004 debut Arular as well as follow ups Kala and Maya. The producers set out for Jamaica and collaborated with dancehall artists in its club-heavy, synth-based and digitized under- and above ground. Diplo and Switch, already established DJs in their own right, wrangle oversexed melodies from bent, submerged synthesizers and unpredictable sounds — lasers, cell phone vibrations, broken plates, gunshots — while scattering snares and funky reggae pulses set the beat for wildly out-of-place R&B hooks. Director Eric Wareheim’s grossout nightmare visions compose Major Lazer’s music videos, with “daggering” (Google it) choreography and futurepop, seizure-inducing imagery. Major Lazer extends the producers’ legacy as globetrotting DJs, constantly refining and redefining the genres they find, whether it’s Brazilian funk or Baltimore club. Their constant experiments are global collages, mashups of everything thrown into a warped blender and fed into dance machines worldwide. — Alex Woodward

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October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

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KREAYSHAWN 7:20 PM SATURDAY LE PLUR/ RED BULLETIN     Because  it  hit  YouTube  not  long  after  the  commotion  over  Rebecca  Black’s  “Friday”  began  to  subside,  it would have been easy to assume  Kreayshawn’s  “Gucci  Gucci”  video  was  some  kind  of  goof  created  to  achieve  similar  “is  this  a  joke?”fueled viral fame. The tiny, tattooed  white  rapper’s  style  seems  to  be  a  satirical  appropriation  of  a  number  of  consumer  culture  cliches:  In  one  scene, she wears thick, cat-eye eyeliner  with  oversize  Minnie  Mouse  ears  and  giant  gold  hoop  earrings,  like Hello Kitty by way of the ’hood.  She spouts lines like “I got the swag  and it’s pumping out my ovaries.”      Within  a  few  weeks  after  the  video  was  posted  online,  it  garnered  millions  of  views,  and  soon  the  22-year-old  inked  a  deal  with  Columbia Records. Kreayshawn was  an Oakland, Calif., high school dropout who struggled to pay rent with  various  “hustles”  while  she  made  mixtapes  and  directed  videos  for  Bay  Area  rappers  before  “Gucci  Gucci” broke. When the video went  viral,  she  became  the  subject  of  countless  blog  and  media  debates  about the authenticity of her music  and fashion styles. Many take issue  with  what  they  see  as  her  offensive  appropriation  of  black  culture.  Not  helping  that  claim  was  fellow  Oakland  rapper  V-Nasty  —  she,  along  with  Kreayshawn  and  hype  woman  Lil  Debbie  call  themselves  the  “White  Girl  Mob”  —  and  her  casual  use  of  “nigga.”  Kreayshawn  has both distanced herself from and 

defended V-Nasty, saying the word  was  a  common  part  of  her  friend’s  Oakland childhood.      But  beyond  the  controversy  of Kreayshawn  (her  name  a  play  on  “creation”  but  pronounced  “crayshawn”)  the  person/artist,  there’s  no denying “Gucci Gucci” is catchy as  hell. Anchored by the chorus “Gucci  Gucci, Louis Louis, Fendi Fendi, Prada  /  Basic  bitches  wear  that  shit  so  I  don’t even bother” and the sampled  hook  “One  big  room/  full  of  bad  bitches,”  the  song  is  an  irresistible  earworm  —  although  she  has  yet  to  follow  up  with  a  second  hit  or  release  a  full  record.  Regardless  of  the  authenticity  debate,  with  her  unique  sound  and  some  famous  fans  that  include  Drake  and  New  Orleans  rapper  Curren$y,  she  may  well distinguish herself beyond onehit wonder status. She’s no Rebecca  Black. — LaBorde

ODD FUTURE

3:45 PM SUNDAY LE RITUAL/VOODOO     The young Los Angeles rap posse  Odd  Future  Wolf  Gang  Kill  Them  All  (OFWGKTA,  or  just  Odd  Future)  has been one of the most discussed  groups in music this year and a popular  search  topic  on  the  Internet,  where dozens of its recordings were  available  for  free  download.  From  whole  crew  albums  and  mixtapes  to  solo  projects  by  Domo  Genesis,  Hodgy  Beats  and  New  Orleanian  R&B  crooner  Frank  Ocean,  Odd  Future  has  given  away  some  of  the  most  solid,  modern,  hilarious,  language-based  hip-hop  since  the 

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African poet and political activist, discovered their son gleefully depicting kidnapping over beats on the Internet, they sent Earl (real name Thebe Neruda Kgositile) to the Coral Reef Academy in Samoa. (That’s what all the “Free Earl!” chants will be about at Voodoo.) Without Earl, the spotlight falls squarely on mastermind Tyler, the Creator. Tyler earned the MTV Video of the Year award for his stark, black-and-white, single-camera clip for “Yonkers,” wherein he eats an exotic cockroach and turns into a black-eyed demon and then hangs himself. The song is a grimy, distorted take on Jay-Z’s “Hard Knock Life,” with abstract lyrics that make sense only when Tyler is threatening to “Crash the plane that that faggot nigga B.O.B. is in / and stab Bruno Mars in his goddamn esophagus.” If the many videos posted on YouTube are any indication, Odd Future’s live shows lack performance sophistication — or they depict a group that favors pure punk rock anarchy. Tyler, who has asthma, barks, shouts and stage dives and often loses his breath. The group’s Voodoo show likely will entertain those interested in Odd Future’s teenage spectacle, but it may disappoint looking for the artistic maturity beyond the slurs and youthful zeal. — Michael Patrick Welch

October 25, 2011 Gambit’s Guide To Voodoo Music Festival 2011 www.bestofneworleans.com

Wu-Tang Clan. The group also got attention for saying “faggot” a lot, and tossing off callous references to violence like, “And you call this shit rape but I think that rape’s fun.” It gets far worse. But the wordplay and production is so juicy that even those who disapprove often can’t deny the appeal. There are signs the racy stuff is a joke. The lyric above is from “Blow,” a song goofily glorifying cocaine use, but Odd Future leader/producer Tyler, the Creator, 20, has denounced cocaine and says he hasn’t tried it. In concert, the beats to cuts with homophobic lyrics are spun by DJ Syd the Kyd, who is a lesbian and smirks throughout. The lyrics can be more provocative than Eminem at his worst and as agile as Eminem at his best, but the guys in Odd Future don’t seem outside the norms of modern kids overexposed to the Internet: technologically and culturally wise beyond their years, but carefree and often immature in what they say. The strange story behind Odd Future also has attracted media attention. In 2011, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and Esquire all wrote about Odd Future and The New Yorker followed with 8,000 words about the mysterious absence of Odd Future’s now 17-year-old Earl Sweatshirt, who has never performed live with the group. Complex Magazine reported that when Earl’s mother, a college professor, and father, a South

19


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To Advertise in

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

Neo is a 6-month-old, neutered, Pit mix. He’s an exceptionally handsome young man with chocolate/brindle coloring and personality-plus. Neo would enjoy attending an obedience class with his new family. To meet Neo or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. NEO Kennel #A13858428

ZIGGY Kennel #A13797185

Ziggy is a 5-month-old, neutered, DSH with orange/white tabby markings. Worthy of his name, he zigs & zags all over the place with an abundance of curiosity. To meet Ziggy or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun. or call 368-5191. To look for a lost pet come to the Louisiana SPCA, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), Mon-Sat. 9-5, Sun. 12-5 or call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org.

HOME SERVICES Don’t Replace Your Tub REGLAZE IT

Chip/Spot Repair - Colors Available Clawfoot tubs for sale Southern Refinishing LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician Family Owned & Operated 504-348-1770 southernrefinishing.com

AIR COND/HEATING MERVYNS Heating & A/C Svc

Residential Service All Makes & Models Service - Installation- Repairs Free Estimates on Replacements & New Installations 504-701-3605 - jcollins51@cox.net

INSULATION AUDUBON SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

Save up to 50% on ac/heat bills; live more comfortably; Improve sound control, reduce your carbon footprint. Roland (Rusty) Cutrer Jr, Owner 504-432-7359 www.audubonsprayfoam.com

LANDSCAPE/HORTICULTURE DELTA SOD

Certified Grade “A” Turf St. Augustine, Tifway Bermuda Centipede, Zoysia. WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS! 504-733-0471

The Cracked Pot Garden Center

2 mi west of Airport on Airline Hwy 504-466-8813 Fall Landscaping Clean Up Special Free Estimates

PEST CONTROL DELUXE PEST CONTROL

Commercial & Residential Celebrating 50 yrs in New Orleans Great Rates & Service. 504-837-5800 www.deluxepestcontrol.com

PLUMBING ROOTER MAN

Sewer & Drain Cleaning Specialists Plumbing Repair Specialists New Orleans 504-522-9536. KennerJefferson 504-466-8581. Westbank 504-368-4070. Laplace 985-6520084. Mandeville 985-626-5045. Slidell 985-641-3525. MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT

ROOFING GEAUX CONSTRUCTION

“Your Roofing Professional” Shingle roofs, flat roofs, slate roofs, tile roofs, roof repairs, insurance claims. FREE INSPECTIONS. Member BBB & HBA. GAF certified. (504) 810-1100

PROFESSIONAL EDITING WORLD’S BEST WRITING HELP RESEARCH PAPERS - FICTIONS - ESSAYS 452-3697 or ROBERBRIDE@LIVE>COM

ENTERTAINMENT THE MOST AFFORDABLE DJ

Excellent DJ service by an internet radio Dj starting $29hourly.Great high tech light show available. Call CARL B. Toll Free 1-866-286-8742 www. ckproductions.org

LEGAL SERVICES ATTN: CONDO ASSOCIATIONS Total Condo Problem Analysis Carolyn Aiken Chesnutt Attorney at Law (504) 909-7367

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Weekly Tails

SERVICES

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reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe FRENCH QUARTER

TREME 1816 Kerlerec Street $155,000 3 bed/2 bath renovated Creole cottage just off Esplanade Ave! Newer kitchen, detached bonus room, off-street parking and fenced yard! 1,248 Sq Ft

JOEY WALKER cell: 504-610-5637 office: 504-862-0100

www.JoeyWalkerRealtor.com

Happy Halloween!

New Orleans

LOWER GARDEN DIST./ IRISH CHANNEL

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

FRENCH QUARTER/ FAUBOURG MARIGNY Best Value in French Qtr

1020 ESPLANADE #103. Lovely 2 br, 2 ba condo, high ceil in den, sparkling pool, courtyd, fenced pkg. Private attached alley could be dog run. $349K. Lana Sackett, Gardner Realtors, 504352-4934. www.lanasackett.com

FRENCH QUARTER STUDIOS

514 DUMAINE , Units 3 & 6. Charming ground & 2nd fl courtyard/ balcony. Awesomely located. Each unit $105,000 www.JudyFisher.net; Judy Fisher, Inc, 504-388-3023

PRIME FQ COMMERCIAL

301 Decatur St. Rare corner. Zoning allows live entertainment. 9,000 sq ft (Approx 3,000 sq ft ea. floor). Beautiful light filled loft style spaces. Possible owner financing. $1,650,000. Judy Fisher Inc. 504-388-3023. www. JudyFisher.net

$174,900

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house w/2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’x120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’x25’, dble driveway in front w/a single tin garage & single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rms & 3 bathrooms. 4th sewer line in rear, 2 lg walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling dble sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied + 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single/ double on second lot. Much space to add on. Huge yd for in-ground pool. Many options for house & land. Paved front patio w/ 2 lg. red brick planters. $195,000, 504-832-1901.

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT 2123-25 LAUREL ST $270K

Restored 2 unit Creole cottage in Lwr Gard Dist. Walk to Magazine St. Nr CBD. 6BR/2BA, all elec, cen a/h, 2900 sf liv area, porch. 30x158 lot. John, 508-5799.

621-623 9th Street

GENTILLY

66

922-24 Dauphine St. $900K Four 1 bedroom apartments. Parking for 5+ cars.

2500 GENTILLY BLVD. 2BR/2BA, Lr, dr, den, kit w/granite, fp, hdwd flrs, inground pool. Call (504) 669-7263.

LAKEVIEW/LAKESHORE

Lovely Double, Uptown area. 2 bdrm, 1 ba each side, hardwood floors, ceil fans, . $185,000. Call April Gongora, Gardner Realtors, 504-606-0466.

COVINGTON ELEGANT COUNTRY LIVING

1161 ROBERT E. LEE BLVD

Luxury home in Lake Vista near the lakefront. Over 4000 sq ft. 4 BR, 4.5 BA. Custom kit Lovely pool. $775,000. G.L. Schroeder Realtor, Contractor. 504.241.1000. Cell 504.722.2928. schroederbuild@yahoo.com

Mins. from downtown Covington. Custom European estate on Bogue Falaya River. Main hse 3500 sf, 3 br, 3.5 ba. Guest hse 1000 sf, 2 br, 1 ba. On 4.66 acres. $1,099,000. By Appt. 985-5022882. CovingtonRiverEstate.com.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

EMPLOYMENT Call (504) 483-3100

835 Royal St. $365K Great location, secluded hideaway! Spac 2 br, 2 marble tile baths. Small rear balc overlooking garden.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

GENERAL REAL ESTATE METROWIDE APARTMENTS

NOLA * Gretna * Metairie * Kenner. Affordable Luxury Living, 1, 2, 3 BDs, $545 & up! Gtd. Pkng, Lndry, Courtyards, FREE WI FI. 504-304-4687 www.BrunoInc.com

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area (Metairie) 10 Min to Downtown N.O.

511 1/2 LABARRE RD

Near Ochsner, small efficiency. Kitchenette, water paid. $525/month(504) 913-6999, (504) 259-6999

NEAR OCHSNER

Beautiful 2 BR, 2 BA, large jacuzzi in master bath, high end appliances incl washer & dryer, pool. $1200/mo. 504-835-1577

KENNER NEAR WMS & W. NAPOLEON

Private room w/bath & common TV room. No formal kitchen. Cable & utilities paid, $450 - $500/mo. 504-737-2068

METAIRIE 1/2 blk from lake. Large 1 BR, furn kitchen, w/d, cen a/h, hdwd flrs, wtr pd. $750/mo + $750/dep. Refs req. No pets. Avail now. 985-893-1140.

HIDDEN GEM - ALL NEW

Both renov’t - all new! - Heart of Metairie. 1 bdrm $675 & 1 bdrm + bonus room, from $800. Wtr pd., Rsvd pkg,1 car. No smoking/pets 504-780-1706 orrislaneapts.com

2BR, top quality appl, w/d in unit, granite, lots of closets, balcony, 2513 Pasadena $795/mo, water pd. 504488-RENT. Superior Property Mgmt

OLD METAIRIE 1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

CHARMING OLD METAIRIE HOME

On Elmeer Ave. Approx. 1350 sq. ft. 3BR/1.5BA. Renov’t, SS kit, beautiful hrwd flrs, ceil fans, CA&H. Study area, fenced. $1485 + dep.(504) 554-3844.

STUDIO APT.

Recently renov. Utilities incl. Internet & cable, hdwd flrs. Small pet considered. $625 + dep. 504-251-1946

NEW ORLEANS RIVERFRONT

2 BR, 2.5 BA. Furn, healthclub, pool, parking. All util incl, wifi. Min 1 month. $3000/mo. Also Penthouse $3800/ mo. 781-608-6115.

SPACIOUS MODERN CONDO

BUCKTOWN BEAUTY

1 & 2 Br Apts, 1 Ba, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras From $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2200 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

8309 Sycamore Street & 2214 Dante Street

COMMERCIAL RENTALS CBD ON ST. CAR LINE

720 Carondelet - Lots of exposure. Possible deli, diner, retail, office. 1200 sq ft Contact: REO LLC. ronkeever@hotmail.com.

HARAHAN/RIVER RIDGE 1828 HICKORY AVE

2 BR, 1.5 BA, washer/dryer hookups. Ceramic floors, ceil fans, offst parking. No pets. Must have references. $750/ mo. $750 dep. 504-457-2598

JEFFERSON To Advertise in

938 Royal St. A $216K Great location for this condo. Perfect for your weekend getaways! Quaint & comfortable. 1 br, great kit & bath.

102 RIVER ROAD

Fully furn beau 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, cen a/h, dvwy. Great loc on river levee. $1200. Gardner Realtors, 874-3295

Ann de Montluzin Farmer broker 1016 NAPOLEON AVE • $350,000

3 br, 2.5 bA, 2088 Sq Ft. Spacious 1st floor w/ wrap around pvt brick patio. Separate dining room and living room with built in bookshelves. Wood burning fireplace in den with French doors opening onto the patio. Located at rear of complex so very private. Assigned parking space. Located on parade route and close to Magazine Street and many amenities. Must see!

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737 farmeran@gmail.com www.demontluzinrealtors.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

Large executive sized home (5000 sq. ft.) on double lot with gourmet kitchen, chic master bath, huge den, 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, sutdio/game room/2nd den and an office plus a six (6) car garage and 3 bedroom/2 bath rental (great tenant at $ 1300 per month) on an adjacent property. Package Price $ 699,000 Sycamore house may be sold separately for $ 529,000

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226

Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130

THE FERNANDEZ HOUSE

927 DAUPHINE STREET $1,895,000 An excellent example of an early creole cottage set in a serene compound. Beautiful courtyard with mature plantings in a classic partere garden. Property consists of the main house, 4 income producing apartments and a large bonus space-- office, workshop, gym, etc. Parking for multiple cars. Great location.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 www.frenchquarterrealty.com


CLASSIFIEDS PUZZLE PAGE

BETWEEN JEFFERSON & OCTAVIA NEW PRICE

JOHN SCHAFF CRS

(c) 504.343.6683 (O) 504.895.4663

3222 Coliseum 4941 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles 5528 Hurst 1750 St. Charles 1750 St. Charles 20 Anjou 1544 Camp 3915 St. Charles 1544 Camp 1544 Camp 1224 St. Charles 2721 St. Charles

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > october 25 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 64

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TOO LATE! ..............................$2,495,000 Grand Mansion.......................$2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) ............$1,579,000 TOO LATE! ..............................$1,300,000 TOO LATE! ................................ $429,000 Commercial ............................. $349,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) ................ $220,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) ................. $239,000 TOO LATE!................................. $315,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) ............................ $149,000 (Only 6 Left!)...............starting at $79,000 (efficiency condo)..................... $169,000

5419 LASALLE ELEGANT UPTOWN HOME. Nestled between Jefferson & Octavia on a quiet block, this newly renovated home features a spacious living area with high ceilings & lots of natural light. Expansive eat-in kitchen overlooks deck & gorgeous

(504) 895-4663

courtyrd surrounded by garden. Living rm opens to large porch. Master bdrm suite opens onto large balcony has closet & storage space galore! Attached sitting/dressing room has additional closets. 3BR/3BA, 3,050 sq. ft. Must see!! $495,000



Gambit New Orleans- 10/25/11