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January 14 - 20, 2020 Volume 41 // Number 2


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Cheer up a

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CONTENTS

JANUARY 14 -20 VOLUME 41 | NUMBER 02 NEWS

Recurring clients receive a complementary treatment when booking a haircut or hair color.

OPENING GAMBIT

6

COMMENTARY 9 CLANCY DUBOS

10

BLAKE PONTCHARTRAIN 11

ARRANGEMENTS STARTING AT $40

FEATURES

7 IN SEVEN

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EAT + DRINK

5 19

PUZZLES 30

WHATCHA NEED FOR MARDI GRAS! GET

LISTINGS

MUSIC 23 GOING OUT

26

EXCHANGE 30 @The_Gambit @gambitneworleans

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Sisterhood

STAFF Fine art print reusable bags

EDITORIAL

ADVERTISING

(504) 483-3105// response@gambitweekly.com

Advertising Inquiries (504) 483-3150

Editor  |  KANDACE POWER GRAVES

Advertising Director  |  SANDY STEIN BRONDUM (504) 483-3150 [sstein@gambitweekly.com]

Arts & Entertainment Editor  |  WILL COVIELLO

1 block off Napoleon Uptown | 504.502.6206 | BywaterClothing.com

COVER DESIGN BY DORA SISON

Publisher  |  JEANNE EXNICIOS FOSTER

Political Editor  |  CLANCY DUBOS

4432 4 MAGAZINE

COVER PHOTOS BY CHERYL GERBER/ PHOTO OF CHERYL GERBER BY SARAH RAVITS

Photographer Cheryl Gerber focuses her lens on the women of New Orleans.

Staff Writers  |  JAKE CLAPP | KAYLEE POCHE SARAH RAVITS

Sales Coordinator  |  MICHELE SLONSKI Sales Assistant  |  KAYLA FLETCHER Senior Sales Representative

Listings Coordinator  |  VICTOR ANDREWS

JILL GIEGER (504) 483-3131

Contributing Writers  | KEVIN ALLMAN,

[jgieger@gambitweekly.com]

JULES BENTLEY, REBECCA FRIEDMAN

Sales Representatives

PRODUCTION Creative Services Director  |  DORA SISON Pre-Press Coordinator  |  JASON WHITTAKER Web & Classifieds Designer  |  MARIA BOUÉ

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Graphic Designers  | WINNFIELD JEANSONNE

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SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO

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BUSINESS & OPERATIONS

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Billing Inquiries 1 (225) 388-0185

SAMANTHA YRLE (504) 483-3141

Administrative Assistant  |  LINDA LACHIN

[syrle@gambitweekly.com]

Gambit (ISSN 1089-3520) is published weekly by Capital City Press, LLC, 840 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, LA 70130. (504) 4865900. We cannot be held responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts even if accompanied by a SASE. All material published in Gambit is copyrighted: Copyright 2019 Capital City Press, LLC. All rights reserved.


IN

SEVEN THINGS TO DO IN SEVEN DAYS

Gilmer girls

Blackalicious

The NOLA Project presents “Harry and the Thief”

THU. JAN. 16 | Emcee Gift of Gab and producer Chief Xcel are currently touring for the 20th anniversary of their upbeat, stylistically roaming Blackalicious debut, “Nia.” At 9 p.m. at Howlin’ Wolf.

BY WILL COVIELLO SOMEWHERE IN A FOREST IN MARYLAND in 1858, Mimi finds Harry, aka

Harriet Tubman, and tells her, “I’m here to help you start a war.” “I’ve already got one, darling,” Harry says. Mimi has traveled through time to deliver a cache of guns to Tubman. The unflappable Harry is not easily distracted from her mission of guiding people from enslavement on Maryland plantations to freedom in the North via the Underground Railroad. Mimi and Harry don’t seem that similar — other than being strong, independent, slightly sassy black women — in Sigrid Gilmer’s farcical comedy “Harry and the Thief.” Mimi is trying to stay out of jail. Harry is rescuing slaves. That they’ve met is due to Mimi’s cousin building a time machine, but in the play, the past and present meet seamlessly. “You’re all up in the face of history, now how you gonna act” says Anita, a narrator who frequently walks on stage to frame the action or share thoughts and history. The NOLA Project presents “Harry and the Thief” at the Contemporary Arts Center Jan. 16-26. It’s the first show directed by company member Khiry Armstead. In the comedy, Jeremy, who has a Ph.D in physics, has built a time machine to send help to Tubman. While he plans eventually to go the antebellum United States, he pressures Mimi to make the first trip back in time. Recently out of jail, Mimi doesn’t have a lot of options, but she’s leery, asking whether the time travel will be more like the movie “12 Monkeys” or “The Terminator,” which would leave her naked when she arrives in the past. The comedy incorporates concepts of movie making, calling for “smash cuts” and “closeups” and leaving the audience to imagine those views. “The idea of blockbuster as a genre has always been exciting to me,” Armstead says. “A lot of that happens (in ‘Harry and the Thief’) with speed. The very first scene is like a movie trailer: a lot of people running in and out and one liners that we’ll hear later.”

WED. JAN. 15 | Comedian Steve Byrne has had a knack for sharing bills with bands and musicians over the years: He’s opened for Kanye West, Mariah Carey, Modest Mouse, Spoon and more. On Wednesday, he performs a smaller comedy and jazz show with New Orleans bassist Neal “Sugar” Caine and his trio. At 9 p.m. at One Eyed Jacks.

Evan Christopher and Don Vappie album releases FRI. JAN. 17 | Clarinetist Evan Christopher and banjo player Don Vappie team up for twin album releases: Christopher’s collaboration with Romani guitarist Fapy Lafertin, “A Summit in Paris,”and Vappie’s further exploration of Creole music, “The BlueBook of Storyville.” At 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. at Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro.

“Something Rotten!”

There also are references to TV genres, such as cooking shows. Shilo makes a pie, in which she may be poisoning her slaveowners, but it’s staged like a recipe demonstration as she offers cheery and hollow aphorisms: “We must take pride in our work.” Many of the characters have largerthan-life personalities. Tubman is both fiercely determined and oddly serene, at times engaging in dance sequences to communicate with others. Since being chosen to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill, Tubman has been the subject of many entertainment projects. Director Kasi Lemmons released her biopic “Harriet” last year. Tubman is a vaguely magical character in Ta-Nehisi Coates’ 2019 novel “The Water Dancer.” And she is the hero of the comic book “Harriet Tubman: Demon Slayer.” In Gilmer’s work, she is the real person, who was struck in the head by her slaveowner as a teenager and suffered fainting spells throughout her life, as well as a mythical character. “Harry exists in a way that is oldschool but she has modern sensibility,” Armstead says. “A lot of these

P H OTO B Y S P E N C E R G R E G O RY

Samantha Beaulieu, Te’Era Coleman and Michael Pepp star in “Harry and the Thief.”

JAN. 16 - 26

FRI.-SUN. JAN. 17-FEB. 2 | In 1595, brothers Nick and Nigel Bottom struggle to produce a successful play while working in the shadow of William Shakespeare, until a soothsayer suggests they create something new — a musical. At 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday opening weekend at Le Petit Theatre.

“HARRY AND THE THIEF” 7:30 P.M. THU.-SAT. AND MON. JAN. 16-18 & 20, 5 P.M. SUN., JAN. 19; AND JAN. 22-26 CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER, 900 CAMP ST., (504) 528-3800; WWW.CACNO.ORG OR WWW.NOLAPROJECT.COM

Marco Benevento SAT. JAN. 18 | Keyboardist Marco Benevento’s seventh studio album, September 2019 release “Let It Slide,” is another collection of grooving tunes, fusing rock and jazz and funky basslines. Ian Ferguson opens at 11 p.m. at Blue Nile.

TICKETS $20-$35

Lucifer characters are archetypes in the black community. Shilo is very determined and will get things done. She won’t tell you how, but it’ll happen. There is this strength in black women. Black women to me are the strongest type of human on earth. (Gilmer) does a great job highlighting the kind of day-to-day struggles black women have to go through to be as strong as they are.”

SUN. JAN. 19 | Lucifer wears its ’70s proto-metal influences boldy on its sleeve — one look at the band’s Satanic panic horror flick poster primes you for the sound. But this is much deeper than homage. The Stockholm-based band loves the old ways and have made the sound its own. Savage Master and Overdose open at 9 p.m. at Santos Bar.

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Steve Byrne


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OPENING GAMBIT N E W

O R L E A N S

N E W S

+

V I E W S

Commemorating 5th Ward Weebie ... Fontainebleau hotel proposal draws fire ... and more

# The Count

Thumbs Up/ Thumbs Down

87,748

Antoine’s Restaurant is 180

years old this year, making it the oldest family-run restaurant in the country. Antoine Alciatore opened the restaurant in the French Quarter in 1840 as a fine-dining haven for French Creole cuisine. His son later created oysters Rockefeller, which became a seafood classic across the country. The restaurant now is operated by a fifth generation of Alciatore’s family.

The number of people in Louisiana who signed up to enroll in the Affordable Care Act’s individual market for 2020, according to The Advocate. P H OTO B Y J O S H B R A S T E D P H OTO

5th Ward Weebie died last week. He was 42.

5TH WARD WEEBIE DIES AT 42 NEW ORLEANS BOUNCE MUSIC ICON 5th Ward Weebie died Jan. 9

Anthony Bean, founder and

executive director of Anthony Bean Community Theater and Acting School, is being honored with a Living Legend Award from The Center for African American Studies at Southern University of New Orleans (SUNO) Jan. 17. The annual award is bestowed on a member of the African American community who exhibits lifelong service in education, youth development, activism, cultural enrichment, business development and community health.

The City of New Orleans

has failed to pay a court-ordered refund of $35 million owed to drivers who received red-light camera tickets between January 2008 and November 2010, prompting a federal lawsuit last week seeking to force the city to pay up. A previous lawsuit led to rulings that the city was responsible for repaying tickets issued during the period when administration of the program violated City Charter rules. The Louisiana Supreme Court upheld that ruling in November 2019.

after a short stint in the hospital. He was 42 years old. Weebie, the stage name for Jerome Cosey, has been a staple in the New Orleans music community, especially in the bounce scene, since the mid-1990s. His 2014 hit, “Let Me Find Out,” earned him national attention, and he later collaborated with Drake on the singer’s No. 1 single “Nice For What,” along with Big Freedia and producer BlaqNmilD. Requests for prayers started to rumble on social media two days before Weebie’s death when word spread that he was in the hospital. Similarly, word of his death and tributes spread quickly after he died. Bounce artist P Town Moe, a close friend and collaborator, was one of the first to announce Weebie had died in a video on Instagram. In it, he says that Weebie had been admitted to the hospital for a ruptured artery. Surgery was successful, but complications followed, including kidney failure and then “his lungs went,” P Town Moe says. “It broke my heart to learn that Jerome Cosey — our 5th Ward Weebie — has passed,” Mayor LaToya Cantrell said in a statement. “He was an iconic personality, a New Orleans legend, and a beloved friend. He was the Bounce King, who showed us how to move, how to love, and how to bring passion and humanity to everything we do. New Orleans has lost a cornerstone of our culture.” Over the years, Weebie released several albums, including his early-2000s staples “Ghetto Platinum” and “Take it to the Hole.” He collaborated with Lil Wayne, who appeared on the Weebie song “Bend It Ova,” and with Master P, Mystikal and Kane & Abel on their hit “Shake It Like a Dog.” Weebie also had brushes with TV and film — his songs “Fuck Katrina” and “I Really Want You” were featured on HBO’s “Treme,” and he appeared in the Kane & Abel movie “Da Block Party.” — JAKE CLAPP

The number of enrollees was a record low for Louisiana, down from a 2019 record low of 92,948. Premiums rose by an average of 12% this year, and people are increasingly opting for employer-based insurance. Almost half a million people in the state are covered by Medicaid, due in part to Medicaid expansion, which is part of the ACA. The open enrollment period was Nov. 1 through Dec. 15, 2019.

C’est What

? Do you support a proposal to build a 150-room hotel and convention center on state land adjacent to Fontainebleau State Park in Mandeville?

82.1%

NO, THE LODGING MARKET CAN’T SUPPORT IT

Proposed hotel at Fontainebleau State Park draws opposition The Paul R. Spitzfaden Community Center overflowed with Northshore residents and others Jan. 7, as folks gathered to voice their opposition to a proposal to build a hotel and conference center complex next to or within Fontainebleau State Park in Mandeville. Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser spoke about the proposal while at least a hundred people who couldn’t fit in the building gathered outside. Residents waiting outside could not hear what was said, and it was not broadcast by the lieutenant governor’s office.

9.5%

MAYBE, IF IT DOESN’T COST TAXPAYERS

8.4%

YES, IT WILL BE GOOD FOR THE ECONOMY

Vote on “C’est What?” at www.bestofneworleans.com


a rare habitat and rich with history, particularly that of enslaved and indigenous peoples. The park is also has a live oak-pine-magnolia forest, which contains 27 Louisiana species in need of conservation, according to Orleans Audubon Society President Jennifer Coulson. Mandeville Representative-elect Richard Nelson said he opposes the proposed hotel because the park already brings in more money than it spends and because he did not think the local lodging market could support it. Nelson also questioned the findings of a $28,000 feasibility study commissioned by the St. Tammany Parish Tourist and Convention Commission that projected a hotel and conference center in the park would generate almost $2 million annually in cash flow at the end of its first year. St. Tammany Parish Councilman Rykert Toledano said he was against both the hotel and a new study, saying money would be better spent to restore the park’s existing features. — KAYLEE POCHE

Fair Housing Action Center discusses new challenges at Fit for a King summit The upcoming 13th annual Fit for a King fair housing summit Thursday, Jan. 16, coincides with its host organization’s 25th anniversary, and the

Louisiana Fair Housing Action Center will spend parts of the event looking back at its progress since 1995 while examining the work to come in the future. The Louisiana Fair Housing Action Center (LaFHAC) was known as the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center (GNOFHAC) until the beginning of this year. The summit, which takes place 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the New Orleans Jazz Market, opens with the panel discussion “From Then to Now: LaFHAC’s Major Accomplishments and What’s Next,” moderated by Cashauna Hill, executive director of the nonprofit. Other panel sessions and speeches explore challenges of housing access. The theme of this year’s summit is “Geographies of Change: 25 Years of Fair Housing Advocacy.” “We’ll be diving deeper into the history of black displacement in New Orleans,” Hill says. “There will also be a discussion on the ways in which segregation is perpetuated by ‘not in my back yard’ sentiments. And we’ll also be looking at the need for expanded access for housing for people who have been incarcerated or who have criminal convictions in their background.” Hosted each year near Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the Fit for a King summit uses educational panels, speeches and awards to tackle issues impacting housing access in tribute to King’s legacy.

OPENING GAMBIT

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Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson will give the summit’s keynote address, “Racial Terror, the Great Migration, and Patterns of Segregation.” Wilkerson’s 2011 book, “The Warmth of Other Suns,” details the Great Migration, when millions of African Americans moved from the South to cities in the Northeast, Midwest and West. Three awards will be presented. An LaFHAC client named Susan will receive the Award for Courage for “her exceptional courage in the face of housing discrimination and her determination to prevent others from facing the same injustice.” Community Member D.F. will be given the Fair Housing Hero award for contributions to the fair housing movement. And New Orleans City Councilman Jay Banks will receive the Mondale-Brooke Award for his role in passing stronger short-term rental reforms and the Smart Housing Mix ordinance, LaFHAC said. The Fit for a King summit is free, but registration is requested at www. fitforaking.org. The night before the summit is a reception from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Tickets are $50, $250 VIP. — ­ JAKE CLAPP

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“At the end of the day, if the public and elected officials say they don’t want (a hotel in the park), even if it is favorable, nothing will be done,” Nungesser, whose department oversees state parks, told those gathered. “But we owe it to look into it just like we’re looking at other opportunities in other state parks all over the state.” Nungesser said 21 states have hotel and conference centers in their state parks and pointed to a Gulf Shores, Alabama state park as a recent success. In 2018, the $140 million Lodge at Gulf State Park opened on the beach. The lodge, which includes a 350-room Hilton Hotel and conference center, was built to replace one originally constructed in 1974 but shuttered by Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Some residents argued the projects would not be comparable because Gulf Shores is a beach town. They noted that St. Tammany’s hotel-room supply exceeds demand. The Clarion Inn & Suites Conference Center in Covington closed in May 2019. Nungesser said his office plans to hire a consulting firm to look into a potential development in or next to Fontainebleau State Park.Some in attendance opposed even hiring the firm, saying it would be a waste of money considering the strong community opposition. . Residents raised several concerns about any development being built in a 2,800-acre park that is home to


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Baseball game at Heinemann Park (detail); ca. 1920; print from gelatin dry-plate negative by John Tibule Mendes, photographer; THNOC, gift of Waldemar S. Nelson, 2003.0182.389

NOW OPEN Free exhibition 520 Royal Street Tuesday–Saturday 9:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m Sunday 10:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Wesley Barrow for Dr. Nut’s Algiers Giants (detail); ca. 1942; courtesy of the Old Timers Baseball Club Collection, Amistad Research Center, New Orleans

Twenty tales of athletic prowess and persistence, spanning 150 years, reveal how milestones in sports history have become part of our shared history. View memorabilia from heavyweight boxing champion John L. Sullivan, the early days of the Sugar Bowl, the rise of roller derby in New Orleans, plus great moments in baseball, cycling, sailing, and more. The Vince Lombardi Trophy from Super Bowl XLIV will be on display, along with hundreds of one-of-a-kind artifacts.

Sean Payton during the Saints’ Super Bowl victory parade (detail); 2010; by Keely Merritt, THNOC

Roller skates; 2010; leather, steel, rubber, cloth, and paint by Riedell Skates, manufacturer; Sherri Montz, decorator; courtesy of Sherri Montz (a.k.a. Beatrix sKiddo)

Crescent City Sport is presented by The Historic New Orleans Collection with support from the following sponsors:

The Gayle and Tom Benson Charitable Foundation

Amy and Chuck Lapeyre David P. Schulingkamp Linda and Tommy Westfeldt II

www.hnoc.org • (504) 523-4662 @visit_thnoc | #visitthnoc


9

COMMENTARY

NEW NEW NEW NEW

THE RECENTLY ELECTED MEMBERS

of the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE), along with their appointed colleagues, soon will make perhaps the most important decision of their four-year term when they replace departing Superintendent John White, who is leaving March 11. Their selection could well chart the educational course for a generation of Louisiana students. Our state has had only three education superintendents in the past 24 years. White served eight years as the state’s education CEO. During that time, he augmented the role of charter schools, supported taxpayer-financed vouchers and bolstered Louisiana’s public school accountability program. We have not always agreed with him, but we generally gave him high marks — as did many Louisiana educational and political leaders. “Though we have not always seen eye to eye, I appreciate John White’s service to our state,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said in a statement. White and the governor often disagreed on education policy. White championed many education reforms supported by the state’s business interests and legislative conservatives, while the governor usually sided with the state’s teacher unions and parish superintendents, who tend to favor traditional governance models over charter schools. Edwards struck a conciliatory tone by noting White’s support for a teachers’ pay raise and for increases in funding of schools and early childhood education; the governor pushed for both initiatives in last year’s legislative session. Others were more effusive in their praise of White. The Council for A Better Louisiana (CABL), a nonpartisan reform group, touted White’s efforts on behalf of school accountability, early childhood education, transparency for parents and taxpayers, strengthening charter schools (particularly in New Orleans, where they are the norm), setting higher academic standards, promoting better teacher preparation and “a much stronger focus on equity to ensure that all children have opportunities to succeed.” “More importantly, we have seen positive results from these policies,” CABL noted. “Test scores have shown long-term improvement even as we have increased student expectations. Louisiana’s growth in student performance over the last decade places us among the top 10

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White leaves strong education legacy

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Louisiana Superintendent of Education John C. White leaves his post in March after eight years.

states nationally. And we have more students graduating, more going to college, and more earning TOPS scholarships than ever before.” White has been education superintendent since 2012 after coming to Louisiana a year earlier to run the Recovery School District, a legislatively created entity tasked with taking over failed schools across the state. Ironically, the recent BESE elections would have strengthened White’s hold on his job. He had been working on a month-to-month basis since 2016, even though he enjoyed support from most of the 11-member board. With eight business-backed members of the board elected last year, White no doubt would have garnered the two-thirds majority needed to get a long-term contract. He nonetheless notified the board of his decision to leave. Although Louisiana’s public schools still lag behind those of most other states, White’s legacy includes significant improvements on several key fronts. We are moving in the right direction, but we still have a long, long way to go. We hope White’s successor will build on his accomplishments. Our state’s future depends on it.

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Lee Sheng ushers in new era in Jefferson JEFFERSON PARISH’S NEW PRESIDENT, Cynthia Lee

Sheng, began her term last week by making history on several fronts. Like New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell, she is the first woman to lead her parish government. Lee Sheng also signaled a new era of diversity by appointing a record number of women and minorities to key administrative posts. On another front, Lee Sheng’s strong relationships with new and returning parish council members will usher in an era of harmony unseen in parish government in the last eight years — at least for the foreseeable future. Under former parish presidents John Young and Mike Yenni, each of whom served four years, relations between council members and the administration ranged from testy to hostile. Council members also clashed amongst themselves at times. No longer, says new District 1 Councilman Marion Edwards, a longtime friend and ally of the late Sheriff Harry Lee and now a political confidant of Lee Sheng. “You are going to see a unified council,” Edwards said, echoing similar sentiments from other council members. “We’ll have one goal: to make Jefferson Parish better.” Edwards, a retired district court and appellate judge, also administered the oath of office to Lee Sheng — something he had done several times to her late father, the sheriff. The new council is a mix of old and familiar faces. Edwards served for decades in the legal arena, first as a top assistant district attorney and then for more than 20 years as a judge. Likewise, new District 2 Councilman Deano Bonano served several parish administrations in a variety of key positions. New at-large Councilman Scott Walker, on the other hand, joins the council as a first-time public official. Walker is best known for his years as a news anchor at WDSU-TV. The four returning council members include two second-termers: District 5 Councilwoman Jennifer Van Vrancken (also a former TV newscaster); and District 4 Coun-

P H OTO B Y M A X B E C H E R E R / T H E T I M E S - P I C AYUN E | T H E N E W O R L E A N S A DVO C AT E

Cynthia Lee Sheng was sworn in as parish president Jan. 8.

cilman Dominick Impastato. New at-large Councilman Ricky Templet recently completed two terms representing District 1; and District 2 Councilman Byron Lee represented that district for two terms, from 2004 to 2012, then won the seat again in the fall elections. The council and Lee Sheng face a variety of challenges — upgrading the parish landfill and the parish’s aging infrastructure (particularly drainage and sewerage), making sure the 2020 Census counts all parish residents, and creating a sustainable management (and ownership) structure for the parish’s two public hospitals, to name just a few. Looking ahead to those and other challenges, Lee Sheng told me that her first task is “to create a work environment for our employees to do their best work. We have reorganized the organization chart to help facilitate that purpose. I wanted functional groupings so that they are reporting to the same manager, and I wanted to create communication channels that give us the best chance at creativity and innovation.” In the process, Lee Sheng retained — and promoted — some veteran parish workers while also bringing in an unprecedented number of women and minorities. It will be interesting to see how long the political hugs and kumbayas last. For now, at least, Jefferson is off to a good start.


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The Desire streetcar made its last run on May 30, 1948, and was replaced by buses.

starring Vivien Leigh, Kim Hunter, Marlon Brando and Karl Malden. Leigh, Malden and Hunter all won Academy Awards for their performances. Brando, Williams and director Elia Kazan also were nominated. As early as 1940, there was talk of removing the streetcar lines that ran through the French Quarter. “Principal complaint against the streetcars has been that their vibration is responsible for much of the property damage in that part of the city, and that their noise and difficulty in negotiating the narrow streets, especially during the busy hours, unduly disturbs the residents,” reported The Times-Picayune in July 1940. On May 30, 1948, the Desire streetcar made its last run and was replaced by buses.

BLAKEVIEW NINETY YEARS AGO THIS WEEK , the Municipal Auditorium opened. Built at a cost of $2 million, it was hailed as a “building of magnificent surprises” by The Times-Picayune when it opened in January 1930. Its main arena had a seating capacity of 10,014 and could be divided into two sections for concerts, exhibitions or even Carnival balls. The first event there was a public school pageant attended by some 12,000 people on Jan. 18, 1930. “This building is our city’s playhouse,” Mayor T. Semmes Walmsley said at an opening ceremony. “It was built with your money and is intended to be used in any way that may add to your profit and pleasure.” The Elves of Oberon became the first Carnival organization to hold a ball in the facility, on Feb. 24, 1930. Hundreds of others followed, including the annual meeting of the courts of Rex and Comus beginning in 1936. On Jan. 30, 1930, Al Jolson became the first of many entertainers to perform at the Municipal Auditorium, which later would host Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Bob Hope, Ella Fitzgerald, Michael Jackson and many others. The venue also hosted graduation ceremonies, school proms, circuses and sporting events. In 1994, it became a temporary Harrah’s casino and later a home for the New Orleans Brass hockey team. The Municipal Auditorium has sat vacant since 2005, when Hurricane Katrina and the levee failures put 5 feet of floodwater in the building.

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We all know “A Streetcar Named Desire” from the Tennessee Williams play and movie, but what was the actual Desire streetcar’s route? When did it operate? The Desire streetcar line was introduced by the New Orleans Railway & Light Company in 1920. For the next 28 years, the Desire line began at Canal Street and continued all the way down Bourbon Street past Esplanade Avenue. It then veered left on Pauger Street and went down Dauphine Street for 16 blocks to Desire Street. On the return trip, the streetcar traveled Tonti Street to France Street and France to Royal Street all the way to Canal. Tennessee Williams wrote “A Streetcar Named Desire” (originally titled “The Poker Night”) while living in an apartment at 632 St. Peter St., where he could hear the Desire streetcar. Near the beginning of the play, as protagonist Blanche DuBois arrives at her sister Stella’s house, Blanche famously explains, “They told me to take a streetcar named Desire and then transfer to one called Cemeteries and ride six blocks and get off at Elysian Fields!” The play premiered on Broadway in Dec. 1947, winning actress Jessica Tandy a Tony Award for her portrayal of DuBois and earning Williams the Pulitzer Prize for drama. In 1951, the play became a movie

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Cheryl Gerber’s photography book showcases diverse women of New Orleans ER

Gang Queen Chianti Berry of the Golden Blades photographed in Central City on St. Joseph’s Night 2018.

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hether she’s perched atop a French Quarter balcony, standing in the bed of a stranger’s pick-up truck or crouched in the middle of the street surrounded by a brass band, photographer Cheryl Gerber captures images of New Orleanians from all angles. “Down low, looking up, is my favorite,” she says of her preferred vantage point. “I want to be as close as I can get.” For three decades, Gerber has caught and shared significant moments with the masses: crime scenes,

natural disasters, parades and parties — along with the range of emotions that accompany these events. As a freelance photographer, her work appears in local publications (including Gambit and New Orleans Magazine), the New York Times and the Associated Press. Her photography has garnered a number of awards from the Press Club of New Orleans. In her new book, “Cherchez la Femme” (French for “Look for the Woman”), Gerber focuses her lens on the more uplifting aspects of sisterhood and solidarity in a celebration

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One of Gerber’s mentors was the late photographer Michael P. Smith, who documented New Orleans street scenes and music festivals. Like Smith, Gerber enjoys photographing her subjects in the midst of celebrations. Here, Anita Oubre, Resa “Cinnamon Black” Brazile and Alamah Harris parade as traditional Baby Dolls through Treme on Mardi Gras Day 2018.

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of women around the city. The collection features images from previous photojournalism assignments and portrait sessions, along with hundreds of vibrant new candids taken at Carnival parades, second lines and other street scenes. “Cherchez” includes 11 chapters — each authored by a woman — plus Gerber’s own introduction and a foreword. Her pictures illustrate the words of journalists, educators and culture bearers, as their stories honor and explore contributions made by new Orleans women. recognizable figures include the late chef Leah Chase beaming from the dining room of Dooky Chase’s. Activists Kim Sport and Charmaine Caccioppi appear confident at the State Capitol, where they’ve successfully lobbied for laws to help women and families. Mayor LaToya Cantrell throws her arms up in celebration the night of her historic election. Burlesque dancer Trixie Minx poses demurely in front of a red velvet curtain. Soul Queen Irma Thomas belts out a hit at the new Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. And snapshots of hundreds of other women fill the


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pages of “Cherchez,” whether subjects are clad in costumes or everyday attire. Gerber drew inspiration for the book (published by the university of Mississippi Press) on Jan. 21, 2017, while photographing the local Women’s March — the city’s version of what turned out to be the united States’ largest single-day protest following the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Though she’s no stranger to finding herself in the middle of large crowds, this event was different than anything she’d

witnessed, she says. Gerber felt exhilarated by the feeling of unification as diverse women around her rallied for equality and expressed support for one another. “It was serious, but it was also very colorful,” she says. “It was young, old, black, white. I saw three Muslim women in the front row next to some elderly Jewish women I knew; I saw people out there with their kids. It was the biggest protest I’d ever seen like that, with all different people.” When Gerber returned home, she began sifting through


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Gerber has captured a number of historic events in New Orleans, including the protests over Confederate monument removals. Here, Rev. Marie Galatas (right) and other women march as KKK members and white nationalists meet Take ‘Em Down protesters at the now-removed Robert E. Lee monument in 2017.

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A third-generation New Orleans psychic medium, Cari Roy, pictured at her Bywater home in 2018, is featured in a chapter of “Cherchez la Femme” that explores spirituality and mysticism.

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her personal archives and examining the ways in which women had or, in some cases, hadn’t been recognized for their accomplishments. The results of an Internet search for notable new Orleanians struck Gerber as disproportionately male. “Women have always been on the forefront of change in new Orleans,” she says. “It was pretty obvious that I needed to do a book on women.” Gerber previously has published two books and contrib-

P H OTO B y S A r A H r AV I T S

New Orleans photojournalist Cheryl Gerber holds her new book, “Cherchez la Femme.”

uted to others, but she says “Cherchez la Femme” is the biggest project she’s tackled in her wide-spanning career. Of her photography subjects, Gerber writes, “They have given me a better understanding of what it means to be a new Orleans woman and what we mean to new Orleans.” A native of new Orleans who spent her teenage years in Madisonville, Gerber mentions in the book that during her childhood, she “relished any opportunity to witness women on the streets of


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new Orleans. ... I appreciated the finesse of and diversity of new Orleans ladies. As I get older, that appreciation only deepens.” The late photographer Michael P. Smith served as an early inspiration to Gerber and was one of her first mentors. Smith documented African American culture and folklife and also was known for his street scenes and music festival coverage. Comparing her younger days of tagging along with Smith to the present, she says, “you didn’t see as many women out

then. There’s a noticeable difference now.” now, she says, “I have enough to photograph for a lifetime. ... The energy is profound.” Cheryl Gerber will host a book-signing and reception from 6 p.m.-9 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 16 at the New Orleans Jazz Museum, 400 Esplanade Ave. It is free and open to the public. “Cherchez la Femme” is available at local bookstores and online at cherylgerberphotography.com.

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St. Smoke ST. ROCH MARKET’S (2381 St. Claude Ave., 504-609-3813) newest food stall, Emmylou’s, opened Jan. 7. Emmylou’s is the work of Shannon Bingham, who developed his Texas-style of barbecue as pitmaster and chef de cuisine at Blue Oak BBQ and during stints at barbecue restaurants across Texas. At Emmylou’s, which is named for Bingham’s grandmother, the chef offers a range of smoked meats, includ-

True Food Kitchen focuses on vegetables and grains at its Warehouse District restaurant BY R E B EC C A F R I E D M A N THERE’S NO SUBTLETY in the message at True Food Kitchen. A massive artsy sign on the wall reads “EAT MORE COLOR.” Servers sport T-shirts emblazoned with words including “honest,” “joyful,” “mindful,” “courageous”and even “farmy.” True Food Kitchen’s offerings are centered around items that fit in founder Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory food pyramid. That means there are lots of vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins. The seasonal menu lists calorie counts next to every item and notes which are gluten-free or vegan. The kitchen welcomes customizing dishes, giving diners more options. Some locals wondered whether a health-focused chain restaurant would catch on in New Orleans. Recent visits found the place packed, with diners reflecting a range of ages and demographics. The spot offers some elements of dining out, such as attractive decor and table service, without the dietary pitfalls (e.g., butter-laden sauces) intrinsic to some visions of fine dining and indulgence. The extensive menu starts with a section of Refreshers: non-alcoholic beverages like pomegranate chia limeade and the Hangover Rx, which combines pineapple, coconut water, honey and orange. Cocktails are made with organic liquors and fresh juices, and the surprisingly tasty Beets by Jon includes red beet, lemon, pineapple and vodka. The New Orleans location is the only one in the True Food chain with a signature cocktail list, though it includes local standards like a Sazerac and French 75. Among starters, edamame-filled dumplings with dashi and white

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801 St. Charles Ave., (504) 558-3900; www.truefoodkitchen.com

truffle oil ($11) offer an appealing twist on a menu standard. Charred cauliflower with harissa tahini, sliced medjool dates, herbs and pistachios ($9) and herb hummus sprinkled with cucumber, tomato, feta, onion and olives ($10) were enjoyable Mediterranean-inspired options. A flatbread introduced on the winter menu topped a nicely crisped crust with sliced figs, caramelized onion and a blend of cheeses. The menu includes several pizzas that can be made gluten-free. The margherita ($13) was satisfying and large enough to share as a starter or feed one hungry individual. In addition to a grass-fed beef burger, sandwiches include the Inside-Out quinoa burger ($15), a bunless option with two quinoa-based patties sandwiching a filling of hummus, tzatziki, vegetables and feta. A juicy turkey burger ($14.50) includes smashed avocado, smoked Gouda cheese and jalapeno remoulade on a flaxseed bun. Salads and bowls cover a wide swath of culinary territory and can be topped with proteins such as chicken, tofu and shrimp for an extra charge.

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Shannon Bingham opened the barbecue stall Emmylou’s at St. Roch Market.

A generous bowl of spicy Koreanstyle glass noodles ($12) includes thinly shredded sweet potato, pickled shiitake mushrooms, spinach, carrots and toasted sesame. Ancient grains ($14) combine miso sesame-glazed sweet potato with turmeric, charred onion, grilled portobello mushroom, hemp seed and other vegetables. Not everything hits the mark. A $22 poke bowl was less appealing than those available in local makeyour-own spots, and the flourless chocolate cake was dry and crumbly. There is a mozzarella and tomato pizza for children who don’t like the sound of the kids’ menu burger which has mozzarella, carrots and tzatziki on a flaxseed bun. My vegetable-phobic daughter tried jicama — and loved it. True Food Kitchen helps diners eat more color, and does so in a joyful, farmy and thoroughly enjoyable way.

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ing tender beef cheeks and jalapeno cheddar sausage, along with standard sides like potato salad and coleslaw and a healthy dose of vegetables. “It’s a good opportunity because this is so much smaller [than Blue Oak],” Bingham says. “I can make pickles in-house now and all the things that when you cook for hundreds of people a day you can’t do.” Emmylou’s also has items for nonmeat eaters. Its sauces and beans are vegan, and the potato salad and coleslaw are vegetarian. Bingham plans to include some cold, acid-forward accompaniments. Bingham also plans to add kolaches and breakfast items to the menu. Emmylou’s is open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. — REBECCA FRIEDMAN

Beau arts THE BEAUBOURG THEATRE opens in

the historic building at 614 Gravier St., which dates to the early 1840s and once served as an Edison phonograph shop. The space also will include Fourth Wall Coffee and Labarre, a natural wine bar. David Williams will oversee the ground-floor spaces. Williams, a graduate of New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, said his family purchased the building in 2013 and has spent the last several years renovating it. Williams’ sister Courtney Williams, director of operations at Cypress

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The space will hold a grand opening celebration Jan. 25. Updated information on the coffee shop and wine bar can be found on Instagram at @fourth.wall.coffee and @no.la.barre. — REBECCA FRIEDMAN

Dampening spirits IN 2013, A U.K.-BASED NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION launched “Dry January,”

challenging people to give up alcohol for the month. By 2018, four million people across the U.K. participated in the campaign. In its wake, the less formal “damp January” emerged for those who preferred to reduce consumption rather than abstain. Recently, the idea has spread beyond the U.K., with a growing number of people using January as a time to recalibrate their drinking habits, including in New Orleans. Oliver Sovol, a bartender at Saba, has observed patrons consuming less alcohol this month. “It’s absolutely a thing,” Sovol says. “Our proportion of nonalcoholic beverages increases significantly as well as low-alcohol offerings. People will inquire if any cocktails on the menu are lower (alcohol by volume).” Sovol says the growing interest in no- and low-alcohol beverages is a

rising trend in general, but he sees patrons seeking those options in January and again after Mardi Gras. Sovol points to Saba’s house-made, nonalcoholic root beer. “We typically go through two quarts a week,” he says. “Last week we went through four-and-a-half quarts and ran out by Sunday.” Scott Smith, a bartender at the Elysian Bar, also sees a January decline and finds it pronounced among service industry colleagues. “I’ve definitely noticed them taking a dry week or dry January,” Smith says. “The holidays can be long, and with Mardi Gras early this year, it makes sense that people are taking a break.” “I would say — and this is not hyperbolic — at least a third of my co-workers are going for dry January as a leadup to Mardi Gras,” Sovol says. The interest in alcohol-free drinking has led to the rise of new beverage brands seeking to fill that niche with something more titillating than sparkling water. Seedlip bills its products as “the world’s first distilled non-alcoholic spirits.” There also are DRY Soda, a “botanical bubbly,” and Curious Elixirs, which touts the complexity of its bottled nonalcoholic cocktails. According to New Orleans drinks historian Elizabeth Pearce, that complexity is what many people miss when they forgo alcoholic beverages. Pearce recalls a period when she was on medication for an injury that prohibited her from drinking. “When I asked for a nonalcoholic drink, it was almost always a onenote sweet thing,” she says. “That was like seven years ago, and even between then and now, bartenders have a lot more in their arsenal.” Pearce has embraced damp January, a practice made easier — and more interesting — by the growing variety and availability of lower-alcohol options. “I’ve been learning about the vast world of low-proof options like amaros, apertifs and digestifs,” Pearce says. Many local restaurants now offer a selection of mocktails that include house-made syrups and other ingredients. Saba frequently updates its low-alcohol cocktail options and offers several house-made sodas. Some cities have welcomed sober bars, making dry January a little easier. These alcohol-free bars serve the same gathering-place function as their counterparts, minus the booze. From the Getaway Bar in Brooklyn to the Other Side in Crystal Lake, Illinois, a number of sober spaces are cropping up to cater to the sober and sober curious. The Austin, Texas-based Sans Bar takes its sober concept on the road as a pop-up, including a planned stop in New Orleans later this year. — REBECCA FRIEDMAN


EAT+DRINK

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Nancy Blackall Fermenter

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$

NANCY BLACKALL NEVER THOUGHT SHE’D START A FERMENTATION BUSINESS, but her Succotash

Ferments (www.facebook.com/ succotashferments) kombucha, milk kefir and vegetable ferments are funking up markets around the region, including the Covington Farmers Market, Laughing Buddha Nursery, Rosalie Botanicals, La Vie En Rose Cafe. Blackall spoke to Gambit about the growing culture of fermentation.

What drew you to fermenting?

vietnamese café New Orleans-Inspired VIETNAMESE CUISINE

P H OTO B Y M A R I B E T H M AT T E

they’ll be pasteurized, they’ll be artificially carbonated and companies might squirt some probiotics at the end and put them on the shelf. All my products are raw and living and have everything in there that’s supposed to be in there. I also try to use as many local products as possible. In my kombucha, I do seasonal flavors, but everything has to be from the Greater New Orleans area, and all my vegetables are local. Kimchi is my biggest seller. People love sauerkraut too. I always have a rotating list of seasonal vegetable ferments. Right now it’s radish salsa. I also have three seasonal kombucha flavors now: turmeric lemon balm (with turmeric from Too Tall Farms), elderberry and Blood River Honey and satsuma fennel.

What’s pushing the fermentation boom? B: I see fermentation growing in the collective consciousness. A lot of people call it a trend, but I think it’s more of a harkening back to ancient traditions and traditional foodways. Bone broths, fermented foods, organic produce — they’re called trends but are what people used to do. I think it’s going to continue to expand. I think the science coming out about it is great. I know “probiotics” is such a buzz word, and probiotics are very important, but there are so many other benefits to eating fermented food. The gut-brain connection is getting a lot of attention right now. Most serotonin is produced in the gut, so if your gut is healthy, your brain is happy. [Scientists] are seeing a connection between gut health and brain health, depression and anxiety. I think it’s going to make people continue to want to consume more. — REBECCA FRIEDMAN

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B: Most commercial products are pasteurized. There are a few that aren’t, but as a general rule of thumb most are because it enhances shelf life. But in doing so, it’s destroying the properties that people consume those for in the first place — the digestive enzymes, probiotics, all the beneficial bacteria in yeast. So

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BLACKALL: It started when I became pregnant with my son, who is now 6, and was thinking ahead to how I was going to feed him. I got fascinated with traditional cultures around the world and the way they ate. I noticed there was a similarity in all of them: fermented foods. For example, Korea has kimchi, Germany has sauerkraut, Turkey has milk kefir. I thought those cross-cultural similarities were beautiful. That led me to the Weston A. Price Foundation, a worldwide organization that advocates for eating traditional diets. I joined the local chapter in New Orleans, and we toured a farm outside Lafayette. The lady who owned the farm had a 10-gallon crock of kombucha, and she was cutting and handing out pieces of the SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast). I took that and ran with it. I came home, started my first batch of kombucha and was totally hooked. It was so much better than anything I had found in a store. That opened up the doors to the world of fermentation. From there I started doing kvass, an eastern European fermented beet drink, kefir and vegetables — all the other things you can ferment.

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Contact Will Coviello willc@gambitweekly.com 504-483-3106 | FAX: 504-483-3159

C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S .C O M Out 2 Eat is an index of Gambit contract advertisers. Unless noted, addresses are in New Orleans and all accept credit cards. Updates: email willc@gambitweekly.com or call (504) 483-3106.

B — breakfast L — lunch D — dinner late — late 24H — 24 hours

$ — average dinner entrée under $10

KENNER

$$$ — $21 or more

The Landing Restaurant — Crowne Plaza, 2829 Williams Blvd., Kenner, (504) 467-5611; www.neworleansairporthotel.com — No reservations. B, L, D daily. $$

FAUBOURG MARIGNY

Suis Generis — 3219 Burgundy St., (504) 309-7850; www.suisgeneris.com — Reservations accepted for large parties. D WedSun, late Wed-Sun, brunch Sat-Sun. $$

Kebab — 2315 St. Claude Ave., (504) 3834328; www.kebabnola.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D WedMon, late Fri-Sat. $ Mardi Gras Zone — 2706 Royal., (504) 9478787 — No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. $ Marie’s Kitchen — 2483 Burgundy St., (504) 267-5869; www.mariesbarandkitchen. com — No reservations. D Fri-Sun. $$

14 Parishes — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave.; www.14parishes.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $$ Eat Well — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave.; www.pythianmarket.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $ Edison’s Espresso and Tea Bar— Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave.; www.pythianmarket.com — Delivery available. No reservations. B and L daily. Cash not accepted. $ Fete au Fete StrEATery — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave.; www.feteaufete.com — No reservations. B and L daily, D Fri-Sat. $$ Frencheeze — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave., (504) 269-3871; www.pythianmarket. com — No reservations. L and D daily. $ Kais — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave., (941) 481-9599; www.pythianmarket.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $$ La Cocinita — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave., (504) 309-5344; www.lacochinitafoodtruck.com — Delivery available. No reservations. B, L and D daily. $ Little Fig — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave.; www.little-fig.com — No reservations. L daily, D Mon-Sat. $$ Meribo Pizza — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave., (504) 481-9599; www.meribopizza. com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $$ Willie Mae’s at the Market — Pythian Market, 234 Loyola Ave., (504) 459-2640; www. williemaesnola.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $$

CARROLLTON/UNIVERSITY NEIGHBORHOODS Catalino’s — 7724 Maple St., (504) 6186735; www.facebook.com/catalinosllc — Reservations accepted. L and D daily. $$ Chais Delachaise — 7708 Maple St., (504) 510-4509; www.chaisdelachaise.com — Reservations accepted. L Sat-Sun, D daily, late Fri-Sat. $$ Mikimoto — 3301 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Delivery available. Reservations accepted for large parties. L Sun-Fri, D daily. $$ Pyramids Cafe — 3151 Calhoun St., (504) 861-9602 — No reservations. L, D daily. $$ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 7839 St. Charles Ave., (504) 866-9313; www. vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Reservations accepted. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. $$

CITYWIDE Breaux Mart — Citywide; www.breauxmart. com — No reservations. L, D daily. $

Cold Stone Creamery — 1130 S. Clearview Parkway, Suite F, (504) 736-5037; www. coldstonecreamery.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L, D daily. $ The Rivershack Tavern — 3449 River Road, (504) 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern. com — No reservations. L, D daily. $ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 1212 S. Clearview Parkway, Elmwood, (504) 7333803; www.theospizza.com — No reservations. L, D daily. $

$$ — $11 to $20

BYWATER

CBD

HARAHAN/JEFFERSON/ RIVER RIDGE

FRENCH QUARTER Antoine’s Annex — 513 Royal St., (504) 525-8045; www.antoines.com — No reservations. B, L, D daily. $ Antoine’s Restaurant — 713 St. Louis St., (504) 581-4422; www.antoines.com — Reservations recommended. L, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$$ Bourbon House — 144 Bourbon St., (504) 522-0111; www.bourbonhouse.com — Reservations accepted. B, L. D daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Brennan’s New Orleans — 417 Royal St., (504) 525-9711; www.brennansneworleans. com — Reservations recommended. B, L Tue-Sat, D Tue-Sun. $$$ Criollo — Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St., (504) 681-4444; www.criollonola.com — Reservations recommended. B, L, D daily. $$ Dickie Brennan’s Steakhouse — 716 Iberville St., (504) 522-2467; www.dickiebrennansrestaurant.com — Reservations recommended. D daily. $$$ Gazebo Cafe — 1018 Decatur St., (504) 525-8899; www.gazebocafenola.com — No reservations. L, early dinner daily. $$ House of Blues — 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Reservations accepted. L, D Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. $$ Killer Poboys — 219 Dauphine St., (504) 462-2731; 811 Conti St., (504) 252-6745; www.killerpoboys.com — No reservations. Hours vary by location. Cash only at Conti Street location. $ The Market Cafe — 1000 Decatur St., (504) 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — No reservations. B, L, D daily. $$ NOLA Restaurant — 534 St. Louis St., (504) 522-6652; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/ nola-restaurant — Reservations recommended. L Thu-Mon, D daily. $$$ Palace Cafe — 605 Canal St., (504) 523-1661; www.palacecafe.com — Reservations recommended. B, L, D daily, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$ Red Fish Grill — 115 Bourbon St., (504) 5981200; www.redfishgrill.com — Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$$ Restaurant R’evolution — 777 Bienville St., (504) 553-2277; www.revolutionnola.com — Reservations recommended. D daily. $$$ Roux on Orleans — Bourbon Orleans, 717 Orleans Ave., (504) 571-4604; www.bourbonorleans.com — Reservations accepted. B daily, D Tue-Sun. $$ Tableau — 616 St. Peter St., (504) 9343463; www.tableaufrenchquarter.com — Reservations accepted. B, L, D daily, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$

LAKEVIEW Lakeview Brew Coffee Cafe — 5606 Canal Blvd., (504) 483-7001; www.lakeviewbrew. com — No reservations. B, L daily, D MonSat, brunch Sat-Sun. $

METAIRIE Akira Sushi + Hibachi — 3326 N. Arnoult Road, Metairie, (504) 304-8820; www. akirametairie.com — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $$ Andrea’s Restaurant  — 3100 N. 19th St., Metairie, (504) 834-8583; www.andreasrestaurant.com — Reservations recommended. L, D daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Kosher Cajun New York Deli & Grocery — 3519 Severn Ave., Metairie, (504) 888-2010; www.koshercajun.com — No reservations. L Sun-Thu, D Mon-Thu. $ Mark Twain’s Pizza Landing — 2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, (504) 832-8032; www. marktwainpizza.com — No reservations. L Tue-Sat, D Tue-Sun. $ Tandoori Chicken — 2916 Cleary Ave., Metairie, (504) 889-7880 — No reservations. L, D Mon-Sat. $$ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 2125 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, (504) 510-4282; www.theospizza.com — No reservations. L, D daily. $ Vincent’s Italian Cuisine — 4411 Chastant St., Metairie, (504) 885-2984; www. vincentsitaliancuisine.com — Reservations accepted. L Tue-Fri, D Mon-Sat. $$

MID-CITY/TREME Angelo Brocato’s — 214 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1465; www.angelobrocatoicecream.com — No reservations. L, D Tue-Sun. $ Brown Butter Southern Kitchen & Bar — 231 N. Carrollton Ave., Suite C, (504) 609-3871; www.brownbutterrestaurant.com — Reservations recommended. L Mon-Fri, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sat-Sun. $$ Cafe NOMA — New Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, (504) 4821264; www.cafenoma.com — Reservations accepted for large parties. L Tue-Sun, D Fri. $ Five Happiness — 3511 S. Carrollton Ave., (504) 482-3935; www.fivehappiness.com — Delivery available. Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$ FullBlast Brunch — 139 S. Cortez St., (504) 302-2800; www.fullblastbrunch.com — Reservations accepted. Brunch Thu-Mon. $$ G’s Pizza — 4840 Bienville St., (504) 4836464; www.gspizzas.com — No reservations. L, D, late daily. $ Ikura Sushi + Hibachi — 301 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 485-5658; www.ikuranola.net — Delivery available. No reservations. L and D daily. $$ Katie’s Restaurant — 3701 Iberville St., (504) 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — No reservations. L daily, D Mon-Sat, brunch Sun. $$ Namese — 4077 Tulane Ave., (504) 4838899; www.namese.net — Reservations

accepted. L, D Mon-Sat. $$ Ralph’s on the Park — 900 City Park Ave., (504) 488-1000; www.ralphsonthepark.com — Reservations recommended. L Tue-Fri, D daily, brunch Sun. $$$ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4024 Canal St., (504) 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — No reservations. L, D daily. $ Willie Mae’s Scotch House — 2401 St. Ann St., (504) 822-9503; www.williemaesnola. com — No reservations. L Mon-Sat. $$ Wit’s Inn ­­— 141 N. Carrollton Ave., (504) 486-1600; www.witsinn.com — ­ Reservations accepted for large parties. L, D, late daily. $

UPTOWN Apolline — 4729 Magazine St., (504) 8948881; www.apollinerestaurant.com — Reservations accepted. brunch, D Tue-Sun. $$$ The Columns — 3811 St. Charles Ave., (504) 899-9308; www.thecolumns.com — Reservations accepted. B daily, L Fri-Sat, D Mon-Thu, brunch Sun. $$ The Delachaise — 3442 St. Charles Ave., (504) 895-0858; www.thedelachaise.com — No reservations. L Fri-Sun, D and late daily. $$ Emeril’s Delmonico — 1300 St. Charles Ave., (504) 525-4937; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/emerils-delmonico — Reservations recommended. D daily. $$$ Joey K’s — 3001 Magazine St., (504) 8910997; www.joeyksrestaurant.com ­— No reservations. L, D Mon-Sat. $$ Le’s Baguette Banh Mi Cafe — 4607 Dryades St., (504) 895-2620; www.facebook. com/lesbaguettenola — No reservations. B Sat-Sun, L and D daily. $ Miyako Japanese Seafood & Steakhouse — 1403 St. Charles Ave., (504) 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Reservations accepted. L Sun-Fri, D daily. $$ Piccola Gelateria — 4525 Freret St., (504) 493-5999; www.piccolagelateria.com — No reservations. L, D Tue-Sun. $ Theo’s Neighborhood Pizza — 4218 Magazine St., (504) 894-8554; www.theospizza. com — No reservations. L, D daily. $ The Trolley Stop Cafe — 1923 St. Charles Ave., (504) 523-0090; www.thetrolleystopcafe.com — Delivery available. No reservations. B and L daily, D and late-night Thu-Sat. $ L Waffles — 1410 Annunciation St., Suite 2117, (504) 586-0573; www.twistedwaffles. com — Delivery available. No reservations. B, D daily, D Mon-Sat. $$

WAREHOUSE DISTRICT Emeril’s Restaurant — 800 Tchoupitoulas St., (504) 528-9393; www.emerilsrestaurants. com/emerils-new-orleans — Reservations recommended. L Mon-Fri, D daily. $$$ Meril — 424 Girod St., (504) 526-3745; www.emerilsrestaurants.com/meril — Reservations accepted. L, D daily. $$ Nola Caye — 898 Baronne St., (504) 3021302; www.nolacaye.com — Reservations accepted. L, D daily, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$ Vyoone’s Restaurant — 412 Girod St., (504) 518-6007; www.vyoone.com — Reservations accepted. L Tue-Fri, D Tue-Sat, brunch Sat-Sun. $$$

WEST BANK Mosca’s — 4137 Hwy. 90 W., Westwego, (504) 436-8950; www.moscasrestaurant. com — Reservations accepted. D Tue-Sat. Cash only. $$$ Restaurant des Familles — 7163 Barataria Blvd., Crown Point, (504) 689-7834; www. desfamilles.com — Reservations recommended. L, D daily. $$$ Specialty Italian Bistro — 2330 Belle Chasse Hwy., Gretna, (504) 391-1090; www. specialtyitalianbistro.com — No reservations. L, D daily. $$ Tavolino Pizza & Lounge — 141 Delaronde St., (504) 605-3365; www.facebook.com/ tavolinolounge — Reservations accepted for large parties. D daily. $$


MUSIC

23

C O M P L E T E L I S T I N G S AT W W W. B E S TO F N E W O R L E A N S .C O M = O UR P I C K S

TUESDAY 14 30/90 — Mem Shannon & The Membership, 5; Ed Wills & Blues4Sale, 9 BMC — Abe Thompson & Drs. of Funk, 5; Dapper Dandies, 8; Baby Boy Bartels, 10 Bamboula’s — Kala Chandra, 3; Chance Bushman’s Rhythm Stompers, 6:30; Budz Blues Band, 10 Blue Nile — Marigny Street Brass Band, 9 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Josh Paxton, 7 Columns Hotel — John Rankin, 8 Carnaval Lounge — Geovane Santos’ Jazz Brasileiro, 6 Circle Bar — Joe Kile, 7 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Ted Hefko, 8 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Hook and Wendell Brunious, 9 Fountain Lounge — Paul Longstreth, 5:30 House of Blues — Michael Liuzza, 6:30; Shawan Rice (Foundation Room), 6:30 The Jazz Playhouse — The James Rivers Movement, 8 Kerry Irish Pub — Jason Bishop, 8:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Evan McPherson, 9; Sazarac the Clown’s Cabinet of Wonder, 10 New Orleans Jazz Museum — Down on Their Luck Orchestra, 2 Preservation Hall — Legacy Band with Wendell Brunious, 5; All-Stars with Charlie Gabriel, 8 Prime Example — The Spectrum 6 Quintet, 8 & 10 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Latin Night, 7 Santos Bar — World/Inferno Friendship Society, 9 SideBar — Dayna Kurtz & Robert Mache, 7; Mike Dillon and Alex McMurray, 9 Sidney’s Saloon — Rob Armus, 7; Steve DeTroy, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Neal Caine Trio, 8 & 10 Southport Hall & Deck — Bit Brigade, 7 Three Muses — Arsene DeLay, 5; April Mae, 8 Vaso — Bobby Love & Friends, 6

WEDNESDAY 15 30/90 — Justin Donovan, 5; Big Mike & The R&B Kings, 9 BMC — Ron Hacker, 5; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8; Groove Function, 11 Bamboula’s — Eight Dice Cloth, noon; Bamboulas Hot Jazz Quartet, 3; Mem Shannon, 6:30; Set-Up Kings, 10 The Bayou Bar — Peter Harris Trio, 7 Blue Nile — New Orleans Rhythm Devils, 7:30; New Breed Brass Band, 11 Columns Hotel — Kathleen Moore, 8 Carnaval Lounge — KatieCat and Cain Bossa Nova Love, 6; Misti Gaither’s Spotlight Project, 9 Chickie Wah Wah — Mark Carroll & Friends, 6; Samantha Fish Cigar Box Guitar Festival, 7

Radar Upcoming concerts »» GA-20 AND JONNY LANG, Jan. 23, House of Blues »» SMILE EMPTY SOUL, TANTRIC AND VERY ALORA, Feb. 1, Southport Hall »» WALLOWS AND PENELOPE ISLES, Feb. 14, House of Blues »» MICK JENKINS AND EARTHGANG, Feb. 21, House of Blues »» POGUETRY — SPIDER STACY, CAIT O’RIORDAN AND LOST BAYOU RAMBLERS, Feb. 28, Tipitina’s »» CAROLINE ROSE, April 28, Gasa Gasa »» JUSTIN BIEBER, June 30, Smoothie King Center »» SEVEN SPIRES, AMARANTHE AND BATTLE BEAST, Sept. 26, House of Blues

P H OTO B Y C A R A R O B B I N S

Caroline Rose performs April 28 at Gasa Gasa.

Circle Bar — The Iguanas, 7; Charles Ellsworth, 10 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Spider Murphy, 8 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Ashley Beach and Sam Tepper, 9:30 Fountain Lounge — Richard Scott, 5:30 Gasa Gasa — The Picturebooks, 9 George and Joyce Wein Center — Danny Barker Festival Banjo & Guitar All-Star Jam, 6 House of Blues — Cary Hudson, 6:30; Samantha Pearl (Foundation Room), 6 Igor’s Check Point Charlie — T Bone Stone & the Happy Monsters, 8 The Jazz Playhouse — Big Sam’s Crescent City Connection, 8:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Beau Autin, 9 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Lars Edegran, Topsy Chapman & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 Preservation Hall — Legacy Band with Rickie Monie, 5; All-Stars with Charlie Gabriel, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Charlie Miller, 5 PAGE 24

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > Ja n ua ry 1 4 - 2 0 > 2 0 2 0

Contact Victor Andrews listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504-262-9525 | FAX: 504-483-3159


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MUSIC PAGE 23

Rock ’n’ Bowl — Joe Krown Swing Band, 8 Santos Bar — Karaoke Shakedown with Alesondra, 11:59 SideBar — Helen Gillet and Mike Dillon, 7; Extended Trio featuring Oscar Rossignoli, Matt Booth & Brad Webb, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10 Three Muses — Leslie Martin, 5; Schatzy, 8

THURSDAY 16 30/90 — Tony Lee Thomas, 5; Soul Project, 9; DJ Fresh, 10 BMC — Chad Wesley, 5; Kim Turk Band, 8; Big Mike & R&B Kings, 11 Bamboula’s — J. Anderson, noon; Rancho Tee Motel, 3; Marty Peters & The Party Meters, 6:30; City of Trees Brass Band, 10 The Bayou Bar — Victor Atkins Trio, 7 Blue Nile — Where Yat Brass Band, 7:30; Bayou International Thursdays with DJ Troy, 11 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Yvette Voelker and Amasa Miller, 5; Tom McDermott and Aurora Nealand, 8 Carnaval Lounge — Aden Paul, 6; Shawn Williams and Dana Abbott, 9 Casa Borrega — Alexey Marti & friends, 7 Checkpoint Charlie — Frenchie Moe Trio, 8 Chickie Wah Wah — Phil DeGruy, 6; Samantha Fish Cigar Box Guitar Festival, 7 Circle Bar — Rik Slave, 7 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Leo Keegan’s Rock ‘n Roll Jam, 8 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Rick Trolsen & The Po’ Boys, 9:30 Fountain Lounge — Leslie Martin, 5:30; Ron Jones, 7:30 House of Blues — Jake Landry & The Right Lane Bandits, 6:30; The Tempted (Foundation Room), 8 Howlin’ Wolf — Blackalicious, 10 The Jazz Playhouse — Brass-AHolics, 8:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Sauveterra, 7; Nattie, 8; Mike True & Phantom Band, 9; The March Divide, 10 New Orleans Botanical Garden — Harvey Jesus & Fire, 6 Old Point Bar — Baby Boy Bartels, 8 One Eyed Jacks — Fast Times, 10 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Duke Heitger, Tim Laughlin & Crescent City Joymakers, 7

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Preservation Hall — Legacy Band with Gregg Stafford, 5; All-Stars with Kevin Louis, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Joe Krown, 5 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Geo Delafose & French Rockin’ Boogie, 8 SideBar — Mahmoud Chouki and Simon Moushabeck, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Danny Barker Birthday Tribute Band, 8 & 10 Three Muses — Tom McDermott, 5; Mia Borders, 8 Tipitina’s — The Radiators, 10 Treme Art and Music Lounge — Hot 8 Brass Band, 8

FRIDAY 17 30/90 — Organami, 2; Jonathan Bauer Project, 5; Smoke N Bones, 8; DJ Trill Skill, 10; Hotline, 11 BMC — Lifesavers, 3; Tempted, 6; Rock & Rose, 11:59 Bamboula’s — Christopher Johnson, 11 a.m.; Kala Chandra, 2; Smoky Greenwell, 6:30; Sierra Green & The Soul Machine, 10 The Bayou Bar — Andre Lovett Band, 9 Blue Nile — Caesar Brothers Funk Box, 7:30; Brass Flavor, 10; Kermit Ruffins & The BBQ Swingers, 11; DJ Black Pearl, 1 a.m.; DJ Raj Smoove, 1 a.m. Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Leslie Cooper & Harry Mayronne, 6 Carnaval Lounge — Lilli Lewis Project, 6; The Junior League & Peter Searcy, 9 Casa Borrega — Olivya Lee, 7 Circle Bar — Natalie Mae & friends, 7 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Retrofit, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Tom Fitzpatrick & Turning Point, 10 Fountain Lounge — Leslie Martin, 5:30; Antoine Diel, 9 Hi-Ho Lounge — Flyway record release, 8 House of Blues — Michael Liuzza, noon; Captain Buckles Band, 4; Jake Landry & The Right Lane Bandits (Foundation Room), 7; The Huey P’s, 7:30 Howlin’ Wolf — Samantha Fish Cigar Box Guitar Festival, 3; Robin Shaw, 9 The Jazz Playhouse — Shannon Powell Jazz Quartet, 7:30; Burlesque Ballroom featuring Trixie Minx & Romy Kaye, 11 Le Bon Temps Roule — Joe Krown, 7 NOLA Brewing Company — Dave Jordan, 4

Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Damn Hippies, 7; Joshua Diggs, 9 Oak Wine Bar — Julie Wischan, 9 Old Point Bar — Rick Trolsen, 5; GhostTown, 9:30 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Kevin Louis & Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 Preservation Hall — All Stars with Rickie Monie, 1; Legacy Band with Wendell Brunious, 5; All Stars with Shannon Powell, 8 Preservation Hall — The Preservation All Stars with Rickie Monie, 2:30 Rock ’n’ Bowl — The Topcats, 9:30 Santos Bar — Decatur Street Blackouts, 9 SideBar — Alex Bosworth and Daniel Seriff, 7; Sage Rouge’s Saxy-Morroccan Showcase, 9 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Evan Christopher album release, 8 & 10 Three Muses — Royal Roses, 5:30; Doro Wat, 9 Tipitina’s — The Radiators, 10 Treme Art and Music Lounge — Gwen & Mad City, 9 Vaso — Bobby Love & Friends, 3

SATURDAY 18 30/90 — Jonathan Bauer Project, 11 a.m.; Ted Hefko & The Thousandaires, 2; The Sleazeball Orchestra, 5; Big Mike & The R&B Kings, 8; DJ Torch, 10; Big Easy Brawlers, 11 BMC — Mojo Shakers, noon; Abe Thompson & Drs. of Funk, 3; Les Getrex ’n’ Creole Cookin’, 6; Jam Brass Band, 9; Vance Orange, 11:59 Bamboula’s — Sabertooth Swing, 11; G & the Swinging Gypsies, 2:30; Johnny Mastro, 7; Crawdaddy T’s & Cajun Zydeco Review, 11:30 The Bayou Bar — Jordan Anderson, 9 Blue Nile — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Marigny Street Brass Band, 10; Marco Benevento & Ian Furguson, 11; DJ Black Pearl, 1 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Greg Schatz, 6; Walter “Wolfman” Washington & Steve DeTroy, 9 Carnaval Lounge — Flambeaux Freddie & Friends, 6; Miss Mojo & Eyope, 9 Casa Borrega — Olivya Lee, 7 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Lynn Drury, 9 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Joe Krown Trio, 10

Fountain Lounge — Joe Krown, 5:30; Sam Kuslan, 9 House of Blues — Jamie Lynn Vessels, 4; Sean Riley, 7:30; DJ Tony Skratchere (Foundation Room), 11 Howlin’ Wolf — Samantha Fish Cigar Box Guitar Festival, 3; Dirty Fuss & Green Gasoline (Den), 10 The Jazz Playhouse — The Nayo Jones Experience, 8 Live Oak Cafe — Valerie Sassyfras, 10:30 Marigny Opera House — Maggie Koerner with People Museum and guests, 7:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Byrne Bridges, 8 Oak Wine Bar — Jenn Howard Glass, 9 Old Point Bar — Martha & the GoodTime Gang, 9:30 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Palm Court Jazz Band, 7 Preservation Hall — All Stars with Will Smith, 1; Brass with Mark Braud, 5; All Stars with Mark Braud, 8 Rock ’n’ Bowl — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 Santos Bar — Techno Service dance party, 10 SideBar — Blue Moon Marquee, 7 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Maria Muldaur, 8 & 10 Three Muses — Leo Forde, 5; Shotgun, 9 Tipitina’s — The Radiators, 10 Treme Art and Music Lounge — The RetroSpex, 9

SUNDAY 19 30/90 — Truman Holland & The Back Porch Review, 2; Carolyn Broussard, 5; Chris Klein & The Blvds, 9; Tiffany Pollack, 11 BMC — Abe Thompson & Drs. of Funk, 3 BMC — Shawn Williams, noon; Retrospex, 7; Moments of Truth, 10 Bamboula’s — Barry Bremer Jazz Ensemble, 11 a.m.; NOLA Ragweeds Jazz, 2; Carl LaBlanc, 6:30; Ed Wills Blues4Sale, 10 Blue Nile — Andrew J Forest & The Swamp Crawlers, 7; Street Legends Brass Band, 9 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Some Like It Hot, 11 a.m.; Molly Reeves & Nahum Zdybel, 4; Steve Pistorius Jazz Quartet, 7 Carnaval Lounge — Pfister Sisters, 6; Gina Leslie Sundays, 9

NEW ORLEANS WINTER BEAD & JEWELRY SHOW! JAN 24-26 $4 ADMISSION ALL WEEKEND (WITH THIS AD)

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MUSIC

PREVIEW Samantha Fish Cigar Box Guitar Festival BY JAKE CLAPP THE NEW ORLEANS CIGAR BOX GUITAR FESTIVAL (NOCBGF), which launched in 2016, celebrates the unpolished, meaty sound of the cigar box instrument — and its ingenuity. Take a cigar box (or really anything you can use as a resonator), throw on a piece of wood for a neck, a pickup if you want to go electric, and a few strings, tune it up and go. It’s an old instrument made out of necessity, but now having a modern resurgence in Americana. Blues singer-guitarist Samantha Fish, who moved to New Orleans in 2017, has been a fan of the cigar box guitar for years, incorporating it into her albums and in her live sets. A performer at past editions of NOCBGF, Fish was approached to partner with the festival, renamed the Samantha Fish Cigar Box Guitar Festival, and is now a co-producer. This year’s SFCBGF takes place 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15, and Thursday, Jan. 16, at Chickie Wah Wah (2828 Canal St.) and 3 p.m. to 11 p.m. Friday, Jan. 17, and Saturday, Jan. 18, at Howlin’ Wolf (907 S. Peters St.). The music lineup includes Sugarcane Jane, Jonathon Long (headlining Wednesday), Grey Goat Collective, April Mae and the June Bugs, Phillip Porche and Josh Garrett (headlining Thursday), John Mooney, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux and the Golden Eagles, Samantha Fish with Jimbo Mathus (headlining Friday), Cigar Box Serenaders and more. Saturday’s headlining show features a set by Fish, Long and Damon Fowler. A builders’ forum and cigar box instrument building contest will take place at noon Friday at the Howlin’ Wolf. Tickets are $20 each day at Chickie Wah Wah; $25 per day at Howlin’ Wolf; $90 for four-day passes; and $190 for a VIP package. A portion of proceeds benefits the New Orleans Blues Society. www.neworleanscbg.com.

MONDAY 20 30/90 — The Dapper Dandies, 5; Gene Harding’s New Orleans Super Jam, 9 BMC — Tony Lee Thomas, 5; Lil Red & Big Bad, 7; Paggy Prine & Southern Soul, 10 Bamboula’s — St. Louis Slim Blues Trio, noon; Perdido Jazz Band, 3; G & the Swinging Gypsies, 6:30; Les Getrex ’n’ Creole Cooking, 10 Buffa’s Bar & Restaurant — Arsene DeLay & Charlie Wooton, 5;Antoine Diel, 8 Carnaval Lounge — Coliseum Street, 6 Circle Bar — James Rose, 7 Columns Hotel — David Doucet, 8 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Danny Alexander’s Blues Jam, 8 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — John Fohl, 9 Fountain Lounge — Sam Kuslan, 5:30 House of Blues — Shawan Rice, 6:30 Kerry Irish Pub — Patrick Cooper, 8:30 Neutral Ground Coffeehouse — Jacque Brel Tribute, 8

One Eyed Jacks — Blind Texas Marlin, 10 Preservation Hall — Joe Lastie’s New Orleans Sound with Joe Lastie, 5; All-Stars with Charlie Gabriel, 8 Preservation Hall — The Preservation AllStars with Charlie Gabriel, 9 Rock ’n’ Bowl — NOLA Swing Dance Connection & DJ Twiggs, 7 SideBar — Common Interest featuring Eric Merchant, Jacob Stanley & Isaac Johnson, 7; Brad Walker, Jacob Hubbs & Ethan May, 9 Sidney’s Saloon — Bruisey Peets, Zoe & Maddy, 7; Lundi Karaoke Tiki Party & Sunshine Edae, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10 The Starlight — Jambalaya Jam featuring Joshua Benitez Band, 8 Three Muses — Monty Banks, 5

CLASSICAL/CONCERTS Albinas Prizgintas. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave. — The organist’s performance includes selections from baroque to rock. www.albinas.org. 6 p.m. Tuesday. New Orleans High School MLK Choral Concert. McDonogh 35 High School, 4000 Cadillac St. — The UTNO concert features community and high school choirs, plus a visiting choir from Norway. www.sclcnola.org. 6 p.m. Friday. Open Rehearsal. UNO Performing Arts Center, 2000 Lakeshore Drive — The New Orleans Gay Men’s Chorus welcomes new singers. www.nogmc.com. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Susanne Ortner Trio. Marigny Opera House, 725 St Ferdinand St. — Ortner, Nahum Zdybel and James Singleton perform works from the recent release “Last Stop Sehnsucht.” www.marignyoperahouse.org. Tickets $10-$15. 7 p.m. Wednesday. Trinity Artist Series. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1329 Jackson Ave — The performance features Rev. Michael Burke on piano and sopranos Betsy Uschkrat and Khara Molsbee. www.albinas.org. 5 p.m. Sunday.

MORE ONLINE AT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM COMPLETE LISTINGS

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Circle Bar — Kate Baxter, 5; Micah McKee, Friends & Blind Texas Marlin, 7 Columns Hotel — Chip Wilson, 11 DMac’s Bar & Grill — Sam Hotchkiss Band, 8 Dos Jefes Uptown Cigar Bar — Kris Tokarski, 9 House of Blues — Sean Riley, 6:30; Spafford and The Iceman Special, 7 Howlin’ Wolf Den — Hot 8 Brass Band, 10 The Jazz Playhouse — Germaine Bazzle Jazz Quartet, 8 Old Point Bar — Romy Kay, Jeanne Marie Harris, 7 Palm Court Jazz Cafe — Mark Braud & Sunday Night Swingsters, 7 Preservation Hall — Legacy Band with Will Smith, 5; All Stars with Wendell Brunious, 8 Ralph’s on the Park — Charlie Miller, 11 Santos Bar — Lucifer, Savage Master & Overdose, 9; Rewind Dance Party & DJ Unicorn Fukr, 10 Snug Harbor Jazz Bistro — Josh Paxton, 8 & 10 Superior Seafood — The Superior Jazz Trio, 11:30 Three Muses — Raphael Et Pascal, 5; The Clementines, 8 Tipitina’s — Raw Oyster Cult, 8

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NEW ORLEANS’ PREMIER

EVENT VENUES

GOING OUT WHERE TO GO | WHAT TO DO

Contact Victor Andrews listingsedit@gambitweekly.com 504-262-9525 | FAX: 504-483-3159

GOING OUT INDEX

EVENTS MLK Day Events..................... 27 Tuesday, Jan. 14.................... 26 Wednesday, Jan. 15.............. 26 Thursday, Jan 16.................... 26 Friday, Jan. 17........................ 26 Saturday, Jan. 18................... 26 Sunday, Jan. 19...................... 27

BOOKS................................... 27

MICHAEL BUBLÉ

SPORTS................................. 27

FEB 1 - TOOL FEB 7 - CELINE DION: COURAGE WORLD TOUR

TYLER PERRY’S “MADEA

FEB 8-9 - FAREWELL PLAY TOUR”

FEB 15 - ALAN JACKSON

MARCH SUN BELT CONFERENCE MEN’S AND WOMEN’S 14-15 - BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIPS MARCH 28 - NICK CANNON PRESENTS MTV WILD ‘N OUT LIVE

FILM Openings ................................ 27 Now showing ......................... 27 Special Showings.................. 28

ON STAGE............................ 28 ART Happenings.......................29 Openings................................. 29

Tickets can be purchased at www.ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster Outlets, the Smoothie King Center Box Office, select Wal-Mart locations or charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000. www.mbsuperdome.com | www.smoothiekingcenter.com | www.champions-square.com

TUESDAY 14 An Evening With Irving Roth. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 6400 Airline Drive, Metairie — The Czech native discusses his survival at Auschwitz and Buchenwald before his immigration to the U.S. in 1947. www.jeffersonpac.com. Tickets $18-$250. 7 p.m.

WEDNESDAY 15 Art of Water Management. Maypop Herb Shop, 2701 St. Claude Ave. — Learn about DIY solutions to flooding, including French drains, rain gardens and barrels and the permaculture approach to irrigation and ecological improvement. www.allyouneedinstitute.com. Tickets $30. 6:30 p.m. “Climate Change — One Man’s Response.” St. Tammany Parish Library, Causeway Branch, 3457 Highway 190, Mandeville — Jerry Ballanco, a Louisiana Master Gardener, explores the questions: What is the scientific evidence? Should we worry? Do we need to do anything? www. sttammanylibrary.org. 10 a.m. “Fit for a King” Reception. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St. — Journalist and author Isabel Wilkerson is on hand for the kickoff event for the Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center’s summit. www.gnofairhousing.org. Tickets $50. 5:30 p.m. Lunchbox Lecture. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St. — Jason Dawsey presents “The Nazi Dictatorship and the Murder of the Disabled,” how the program of mass killing worked, how the Nazis tried to conceal it and how it contributed to the so-called “Final Solution.” www.nationalworldwar2museum.org. Free admission. Noon.

THURSDAY 16 French Quarter Business Association Gala. Harrah’s New Orleans, 228 Poydras St. — The French Quarter Business Association’s annual fundraising gala includes a silent auction, music and food from local restaurants. www. fqba.org. Tickets $100. 5:30 p.m.

FRIDAY 17 Big Wig Ball. New Orleans Opera Guild Home, 2504 Prytania St. — Sylvain Society, the young professionals organization of the New Orleans Opera Association, hosts the fourth annual event, “An Ode to Nola Legends,” and there is music, food, raffles and a “Big Wig 2020” competition. www.neworleansopera.org/sylvain. Tickets $65. 7 p.m. Friday. CAAAS Honors Anthony Bean. Millie M. Charles School of Social Work Auditorium, Southern University of New Orleans — Center for African and African American Studies honors Anthony Bean and celebrates his lifelong commitment to black community theater and arts education. 6 p.m. Mr. Nude New Orleans. The AllWays Lounge & Theater, 2240 St. Claude Ave. — The male-only pageant includes a swimsuit competition, strip-off and Q&A for a chance to win $300. www.dworld.us. Tickets $20. 10 p.m. Friday Studio 54. Vintage Rock Club, 1007 Poydras St. — Vintage Rock Club and Ashley Sievert Gives Back present a celebration of disco, and a portion of proceeds benefits Kidd’s Kids, a nonprofit for the families of children with life-threatening illnesses. www.vintagerockclub.com. Tickets $75. 6 p.m.

SATURDAY 18 African American Experiences in World War II. Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, French Quarter Visitor Center, 419 Decatur St. — Historian Waymond Brothers highlights lesser-known stories of African American troops, and WWII and Korean War veteran Lawrence Winnier shares his experiences fighting overseas and the fight for civil rights when he returned to New Orleans. www.nps.gov/jela. 2 p.m. Bal Masque. Sugar Mill, 1021 Convention Center Blvd. — The Link Stryjewski Foundation fundraiser masquerade party features live New Orleans brass, zydeco and Caribbean music, celebrity chefs and mixologists. www.balmasque.linkstryjewski.org. Tickets $285. 7:30 p.m. Big TREEsy Giveaway. Paul Habans Charter School Algiers, 3501 Seine St. — NOLA Tree Project gives away free trees to Orleans Parish District C residents with ID as part of its 2019-2020 planting season. www.nolatreeproject.org. 9 a.m. Camellia Information Session. Garden Study Center, New Orleans Botanical Garden, City Park, 5 Victory Ave. — John Grimm, president of the New Orleans Camellia Society, discusses planning before purchasing, proper planting and location of camellias and pests. www.neworleanscitypark.com. Tickets $10. 10:30 a.m.


GOING OUT

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY EVENTS REAL Commemorative March. A.L. Davis Park, 2600 LaSalle St. — The commemoration recreates the Environment to Live march and wreath laying ceremony to honor Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on his birth date. www.sclcnola.org/ mlk-holiday. 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration. New Orleans Public Library, main branch, 219 Loyola Ave. — The program features Ausettua AmorAmenkum, Bamboula 2000, Voices of Pride of Edna Karr High School and the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Planning Commission. www.nolalibrary.org. 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 16. MLK Commemorative Celebration and Remembrance March. New Orleans Jazz Market, 1436 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. — After a brief program, participants march 1.5 miles in observance of the work of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. www.sclcnola.org. 9 a.m. Monday, Jan. 20. Woke Dreams. Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St. — Exploration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy through art-making by Jose Cotto and Les Femmes Feroces, panel discussions with community leaders and admission to CAC galleries featuring works by Mickalene Thomas, Akosua Adoma Owusu, Meg Turner and more. Free admission. Noon Monday, Jan. 20.

Cooking Classes in the Tap Room. Royal Brewery, 7366 Townsend Place, Suite B — Chef Myisha Mastersson teaches participants to make wonton soup, including filling the wontons and making broth. www. royalbrewerynola.com. Tickets $49. Noon. Crescent City Sport Symposium. Hotel Monteleone, 214 Royal St. — Jim Henderson moderates a panel including Sue Macy, Krista Langley, Derby Gisclair, Katherine Mooney and John Mecom Jr. discussing sports-related topics. Opening reception 6 p.m. Friday, 520 Royal St. www.hnoc.org. Tickets $50 and up. 9 a.m. Krewe of Stars Show Ball. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 6400 Airline Drive — Media Circus is the theme for the ball ,

EVENTS

PREVIEW Teaser Fest BY WILL COVIELLO THE INAUGURAL TEASER FEST features a host of local and visiting burlesque stars, live music and more. The Queen of Striptease is a showcase of retro-styled performances to live music at One Eyed Jacks on Friday, and performers include reigning Miss Exotic World Frankie Fictitious, New Orleans’ Perle Noire and Loulou La Duchesse de Riere. VarieTEASE is a mix of burlesque, vaudeville and circus arts acts at One Eyed Jacks on Saturday, and performers include Isaiah Esquire, Kitten N’ Lou, aerialist and dancer Raven, Minxie Mimieux (pictured) and others. Saturday’s late-night show, Sensualite, features Raquel Reed of the show “Absinthe” at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, Johnny NuP H OTO P R OV I D E D B Y riel and Audrey Deluxe. The fetish-themed closing party TEASER FEST Sunday at Three Keys features Medianoche, burlesque dancer and sword swallower Emma Vauxdevil, Mary Lynn Mayhem, Mizon Garde and others. Musical performers at the festival include the Tangiers Combo, the Geovane Santos Duo and DJ Chinua. There also are workshops, a panel discussion, a market and parties. Jan. 17-19 at One Eyed Jacks (615 Toulouse St., 504-569-8361; www.oneeyedjacks. net) and Ace Hotel (600 Carondelet St., 504-900-1180; www.acehotel.com). www.teaserfest.com. Ticket prices vary.

SUNDAY 19 “Keeping Your Children Centered in an Uncertain World.” Shir Chadash Conservative Congregation, 3737 W Esplanade Ave. — Psychiatrist Mark Sands presents a free seminar for parents and grandparents. www.shirchadash.org. 10:30 a.m. Master of the Craft — Wild Game Processing. Southern Food & Beverage Museum, 1609 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. — The class coveres post-harvest handling and food safety, plus making venison bacon, venison snack sticks and venison andouille. www. natfab.org. Tickets $25-$65. 1 p.m.

BOOKS Alex Krieger. Garden District Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St. — The author discusses his book about American cities, “City on A Hill.” www.gardendistrictbookshop.com. 6 p.m. Tuesday. Brad Dude. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie — The author discusses “Quick! I Need to Be a Leader in 30 Days.” www.jplibrary.net. 7 p.m. Tuesday. Cheryl Gerber. New Orleans Jazz Museum, 400 Esplanade Ave. — The author and photographer discusses and signs “Cherchez la Femme — New Orleans Women.” Free. www.gardendistrictbookshop.com. 6 p.m. Thursday. David Reynolds. National World War II Museum, Louisiana Memorial Pavilion, 945 Magazine St. — The author presents “The Kremlin Letters — Stalin’s Wartime Correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt.” www.nationalww2museum.org. 5 p.m. Wednesday. Five Children’s Authors. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie — Local authors discuss their children’s books, including Jennie T. Alexandry’s “The Magic Swamp”; Tamalyn Dallal’s “The Belly Dancing Kitties of Constantinople”; Emma Lynne Perry’s “A Little Girl’s Journey”; Kat Pigott’s “Flying Horses of City Park”; and Kathy Schrenk’s “The Case of the Left-Handed Trombone.” www.jplibrary.net. 7 p.m. Thursday. Joey Kent. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie — The author discusses “Cradle of the Stars — KWKH

and the Louisiana Hayride.” www.barnesandnoble.com. 1 p.m. Saturday. Michael Allen Zell and Thom Bennett. Hubbell Library, 725 Pelican Ave., Algiers — Author Zell presents his book “Run, Baby, Run” which inspired “The Other City,” a photo book by Bennett. www.nolalibrary. org. 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Ransom Riggs. Louise S. McGehee School Auditorium, 2342 Prytania St. — The author discusses and signs the fifth novel in the Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children series, “The Conference of the Birds” at a ticketed event; costumes encouraged. www.octaviabooks.com. 6 p.m. Saturday. Saturday Writers’ Clinic. Jefferson Parish East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie — The Saturday Writers’ Clinic for January features voiceover artist Michael Ziants discussing the “Art of the Audiobook,” and Stephen Rea, speaking on creating characters with depth. www. jplibrary.net 9:30 a.m. Saturday.

SPORTS New Orleans Pelicans. Smoothie King Center, 1501 Dave Dixon Drive — New Orleans’ NBA team plays the Utah Jazz at 7 p.m. Thursday, and the Los Angeles Clippers at 2:30 p.m. Saturday. www.nba.com/pelicans. Tickets $35-$280.

FILM Some national chains do not announce their opening weekend lineups in time for Gambit’s print deadline. This is a partial list of films running in the New Orleans area this weekend.

OPENINGS “Bad Boys for Life” (R) — Will Smith and Martin Lawrence return as Miami detective who reunite for one last ride. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Broad Theater, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Dolittle” (PG) — Robert Downey Jr. stars

as the physician who discovers he can talk to animals. AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “VHYES” — In this retro-style comedy, shot entirely on VHS and Beta, a 12-year-old accidentally records home videos over his parents’ wedding tape. Zeitgeist Theatre & Lounge.

NOW SHOWING “1917” (R) — British soldiers in World War I must deliver a message deep in enemy territory in this drama from director Sam Mendes. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Broad Theater, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Prytania Theatre, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “21 Bridges” (R) — Chadwick Boseman stars as a NYPD detective on a manhunt for a pair of cop killers. AMC Elmwood Palace 20. “Bombshell” (R) — Charlize Theron, Nicole Kidman and Margot Robbie star as a trio of anchors who expose Fox News’ toxic atmosphere. AMC Elmwood Palace 20, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Cats” (PG) — The film adaptation of the Broadway hit stars Idris Elba, James Corden and Taylor Swift. AMC Elmwood Palace 20, The Grand 16 Slidell, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “The Grudge” (R) — John Cho and Betty Gilpin star in this horror movie reboot about a house cursed with a vengeful ghost. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Just Mercy” (PG-13) — Michael B. Jordan stars as Bryan Stevenson, a civil rights attorney who works to free a wrongly condemned death row prisoner (played by Jamie Foxx).

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which crowns Eric Paulsen and Margaret Orr. There’s entertainment, dancing, a tableau and food. www.kreweofstars.com. Tickets $75. 7 p.m. LEGO Fan Convention. Pontchartrain Center, 4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner — The event features a building area, retail booths, a Star Wars zone, artists displays and models. Also Sunday. www.brickuniverse.com/neworleans. Tickets $15-$18. 9 a.m. “New Orleans’ Fortifications During the War of 1812.” Algiers Regional Library, 3014 Holiday Drive, Algiers — Ina J. Frandich discusses the Battle of New Orleans and the military engineers who built the fortifications. www.nolalibrary.org. 10 a.m. SoFAB Floral Centerpiece Arranging Workshop. SoFAB Rouses Culinary Innovation Center, Southern Food and Beverage Museum — SoFAB and FAIT | NOLA host a floral workshop led by Kathleen Robinson and there’s a three-course lunch. Tickets $100. www.natfab.org. Noon. Southeastern Louisiana Daylily Society. Jefferson Parish East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie — The meeting features information about daylilies and horticultural issues. 9:30 a.m.

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GOING OUT AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Knives Out” (PG-13) — In this whodunit from director Rian Johnson, a detective (played by Daniel Craig) investigates the death of a wealthy mystery writer and the motives of his eccentric family members. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Westbank Palace 16, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Like a Boss” (R) — Rose Byrne, Salma Hayek and Tiffany Haddish star in this comedy about women who start a beauty company together. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Little Women” (PG) — Writer-director Greta Gerwig adapts Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel with a cast featuring Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson and Florence Pugh. AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Broad Theater, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Midnight Family” — This documentary revolves around a family that runs a private ambulance company in Mexico City’s wealthiest neighborhoods. Zeitgeist Theatre & Lounge. “Queen & Slim” (R) — Daniel Kaluuya and Jodie Turner-Smith star as a couple whose first date takes an unexpected turn after a police officer pulls them over. AMC Elmwood Palace 20. “Richard Jewell” (R) — Clint Eastwood directs this drama based on the true story of the security guard who saved lives during the bombing at the 1996 Olympics. The Grand 16 Slidell. “Spies in Disguise” (PG) — A super spy (voiced by Will Smith) faces an unexpected event during a mission, and a scientist (voiced by Tom Holland) helps him try to save the world. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Star Wars — The Rise of Skywalker” (PG-13) — J.J. Abrams directs the final chapter of the Skywalker saga revolving around Rey, Finn and Poe Dameron. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Broad Theater, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Three Christs” (R) — Richard Gere stars as a doctor treating three schizophrenic patients who all believe they are Jesus Christ. Zeitgeist Theatre & Lounge. “Uncut Gems” (R) — In this crime drama from the Safdie brothers, Adam Sandler stars as a New York City jeweler who makes a series of high-stakes bets that could change his life. AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Broad Theater, The Grand 16 Slidell, Regal Covington Stadi-

um 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX. “Underwater” (PG-13) — A crew of aquatic researchers, including Kristen Stewart, must get to safety after an earthquake devastates their subterranean lab. AMC Dine-In Clearview Palace 12, AMC Elmwood Palace 20, AMC Hammond Palace 10, AMC Westbank Palace 16, Chalmette Movies, The Grand 16 Slidell, Movie Tavern Northshore, Regal Covington Stadium 14, Regal Grand Esplanade 14 & GPX.

SPECIAL SHOWINGS “Always in Season” — This documentary follows the case of Lennon Lacy, an African American teen who was found hanging from a swing set in North Carolina in August 2014. Doors open at 6 p.m. Friday with screening at 6:30 p.m. at Ashé Cultural Arts Center. “An American in Paris” — In this 1951 romance, friends struggling to find work in Paris fall in love with the same woman. At 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Sunday at AMC Elmwood Palace 20, Regal Covington Stadium 14; 4 p.m. Sunday at Movie Tavern Northshore. “A Face in the Crowd” — Andy Griffith plays an Arkansas drifter who becomes drunk with fame and power as he becomes an overnight media sensation. At 10 a.m. Wednesday at Prytania Theatre. “Kill Bill Vol. 1” (R) — A former assassin (played by Uma Thurman) wakes up from a four-year coma and seeks vengeance on those who betrayed her. At 7 p.m. Sunday and Movie at Movie Tavern Northshore. “MetLive: Wozzeck” — Alban Berg’s operatic adaptation of Georg Buchner’s drama about an unstable soldier stars baritone Peter Mattei in the title role. At 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at AMC Elmwood Palace 20. “Pulp Fiction” (R) — Quentin Tarantino directs this story of two hitmen, a boxer, a gangster and a pair of diner bandits and how their lives intertwine. At 7 p.m. Wednesday at Movie Tavern Northshore. “Shadow of a Doubt” (PG) — A young woman discovers her visiting uncle may not be who he seems in this 1943 thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock. At 10 a.m. Sunday at Prytania Theatre.

ON STAGE “3 Ring Circus.” The Old Ironworks, 612 Piety St. — The drama incorporates circus arts, acrobats, ring masters, singing and more. Tickets $15. 8 p.m. Thursday to Sunday. “Debauchery.” Southern Rep Theatre, 2541 Bayou Road — Pat Bourgeois’ live soap opera is about a family and its hijinks and lowjinks. www.southernrep.com 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. “Harry and the Thief.” Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St. — The NOLA Project presents the story of a thief who travels back in time to change history by providing Harriet Tubman with modern weaponry. www.nolaproject.com. Tickets $20-$35. 7:30 p.m. Thursday to Saturday, Monday; 5 p.m. Sunday. Liverpool Legends. Jefferson Performing Arts Center, 6400 Airline Drive — The Beatles tribute band performs works from early Fab Four to the “Abbey Road” era, with costumes, vintage instruments and special effects. www.jeffersonpac.com. Tickets $50-$90. 8 p.m. Friday. New Orleans Teaser Fest. Various locations. There are three days of burlesque


GOING OUT

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PREVIEW

BLUSH BALL 2020

Danny Barker Banjo and Guitar Festival BY WILL COVIELLO THE DANNY BARKER BANJO AND GUITAR FESTIVAL celebrates the legacy of the musician and preservationist with performances, a parade, panel discussions, music clinics and more Wednesday, Jan. 15, through Sunday, Jan. 19. Barker played in Cab Calloway’s band and is known for recordings such as “Don’t You Feel My Leg” with wife Blu Lu Barker, as well as writing local favorites such as “Palm Court Strut.” A music festival features two stages and many performers at the New Orleans Jazz Museum (400 Esplanade Ave.) Wednesday through Sunday. A Barker birthday celebration at Snug Harbor Jazz P R OV I D E D P H OTO Bistro (626 Frenchmen St.) Thursday, Jan. 16, features Topsy Chapman, Dr. Michael White, Gregg Stafford, Freddy Lonzo, Detroit Brooks, Kerry Lewis and others. The city has designated Sunday, Jan. 19, as Danny Barker Day, and the Hot 8 Brass Band leads a second line from the New Orleans Jazz Museum. Various locations. www.dannybarkerfestival.com. Ticket prices vary.

performances at One Eyed Jacks and Three Keys at the Ace Hotel, plus live music, food, drinks and more. Performers include Trixie Minx, Kitten n’ Lou, Elle Dorado, Pearl Noire, Isaiah Esquire, Johnny Nurel and others. www.teaserfest.com. Friday through Sunday. “Of Mice and Men.” 30 by Ninety Theatre, 880 Lafayette St., Mandeville — John Steinbeck’s story of two migrant laborers, George and Lennie, caught up in the death of a rancher’s wife. www.30byninety.com. Tickets $10-$19. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. “Oliver!” Rivertown Theaters for the Performing Arts, 325 Minor St., Kenner — The musical based on Charles Dickens’ “Oliver Twist” tells the story of an orphaned boy who follows a gang of thieves. Tickets $37-$41. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. “Something Rotten.” Le Petit Theatre, 616 St. Peter St. — In the musical comedy, set in 1595, two playwrights struggle in the shadow of Shakespeare until a soothsayer suggests a new type of play, with music, dancing and singing at the same time. www. lepetittheatre.com. Tickets $15-$60. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday. Tablao Flemco. Pena la Pepa, 3301 State Street Drive — Performance of dance by Elizabet Torras, with Juan Pedro Jimenez Relique on guitar and vocals and Luis de La Tota on percussion. www.berdole.com/ pepa. Tickets $30. 8 p.m. Saturday. “The Uninvited.” Gallier House Museum, 1132 Royal St. — Goat in the Road Productions stages an immersive play about a 1874 incident in New Orleans that disrupts an integrated school and a cross section of people next door at Gallier House. www. hgghh.org. Tickets $35. 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Thursday to Saturday.

ART HAPPENINGS Artist’s Perspective with Teresita Fernandez. New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle — Fernandez discusses her

60-foot mosaic mural “Vinales,” on view in the expansion of the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden. www.noma. org. 6 p.m. Wednesday.

The

Phunky Monkeys Friday, January 24

TO PURCHASE TICKETS OR TO BID-ONLINE- HTTPS://ONE.BIDPAL.NET/BLUSHBALL/WELCOME A PORTION OF ALL PROCEEDS BENEFITS METRO CENTERS FOR COMMUNITY ADVOCACY

“Beyond Gee’s Bend — A Community Quilting Workshop.” New Orleans Museum of Art, 1 Collins Diboll Circle — The daylong workshop includes textile demonstrations, music, lecture by Elizabeth Townsend Gard and more. Lunch is included. www.noma.org. Tickets $35-$40. 10 a.m. Saturday. De Wit Expert and Archivist Panel Discussion. Miriam Barranger Gallery, St. Tammany Art Association — St. Tammany Art Association hosts a panel discussion on artist and Benedictine monk Dom Gregory de Wit, featuring historians Edward Begnaud, Fr. Aelred Kavanaugh and Mary Lee Eggart. www.sttammany.art. 1 p.m. Saturday.

OPENINGS Academy Gallery, 5256 Magazine St. — “The Fine Art of the Mardi Gras Indians” features suits and beadwork by Chief Shaka Zulu and paintings by Michelle Dashev; through Feb. 13; opening reception, 6 p.m. Saturday. Hall-Barnett Gallery, 237 Chartres St. — “It’s Carnival Baby!” is an exhibition of paintings and sculpture by various artists, through March 28; opening reception, 5 p.m. Saturday. Newcomb Art Museum, Tulane University, Woldenberg Art Center, Newcomb Place — “NOT Supposed 2-Be Here,” exhibition of works by Brandan “BMike” Odums, through May 23; children’s art activity hour and opening reception, 4 p.m. Saturday.

M G

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G E T TH E

BEST BOTH MARKETS OF

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MORE ONLINE AT BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM COMPLETE LISTINGS

bestofneworleans.com/events

ISSUES: FEB 11 & FEB 18 Call Sandy Stein 504-483-3150 or sstein@gambitweekly.com

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > Ja n ua ry 1 4 - 2 0 > 2 0 2 0

EVENTS


PUZZLES

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > J A N UA R Y 1 4 - 2 0 > 2 0 2 0

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John Schaff

More than just a Realtor! (c) 504.343.6683 (o) 504.895.4663

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10 UNITS - 5 DOUBLES ON ONE LOT CRS

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Location, Location, Location! Live and play on the Avenue, on the parade route. Renovated and converted to condos in 2014, with beautiful wood floors, marble counter tops and stainless appliances. Meticulously kept. Move right in! Secured, gated, off-street parking, fitness room and Large pool.

Large 2-bedroom corner unit, with wonderful open floor plan! Renovated in 2011 with beautiful cabinetry, stainless appliances, and wood floors throughout. Easy walk to the French Quarter and some of New Orleans finest restaurants and art galleries. Beautiful views from the rooftop pool and cabana.

First time on the market in more than 40 years. Adorable brick split-level on corner lot with 2-3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. Great sun room, lots of closet space, original wood floors, one-car garage and 2 driveways. Meticulously maintained over the years, with lots of original details! Wont last long!

8616 Oak St., #207 • $349,000

2362 Camp Street • $3,700,000

600 Port of New Orleans #4h • $929,000

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Spectacular Thomas Sully This beautiful one bedroom mansion in the heart of the condo, with a fantastic study or W NE Garden District has been guest room, which overlooks the immaculately renovated. Sits gardens of one of New Orleans’ on corner lot with orig wrought most desirable buildings, could iron fence surrounding it. be yours... One River Place is Oversized rooms, beautiful located directly on the river front with amazing amenities mantles and amazing original details. Pool w/ cabana and 607sq.ft. 1-bedroom apt with separate entry. 3rd fl and attention to detail. Come live the simple life. Great as a suite has own kit and ba. Eleva. serves all 3 floors. primary home or an amazing weekend get away!

ACORN-STASHING IN THE SKY By Frank A. Longo

26 Start of a riddle 29 930-mile-long Russian river 30 Politico Trent 31 Raw rock 32 Lakers’ org. 35 Riddle, part 2 43 Styled like 44 Heir, often 45 Be a rambler 46 “I smell —!” 47 Defunct Russ. state 48 Riddle, part 3 55 Airline seat pull-down 57 Dir. from N.M. to Ky. 58 “Play it by ear,” e.g. 59 Orem’s state

61 Google program for targeted promotions 65 Brother of DDE’s follower 66 Big tub 69 Riddle, part 4 74 Facial blinker 75 Caviar base 76 Manors 77 Oklahoma city 78 Livid 80 Actor Stephen 81 Basketball tourney org. 83 Riddle, part 5 90 Turner of song 93 Add to the work force 94 Vientiane is its capital 95 No. on a map

1008-10 THIRD STREET

Exciting, Unique Investment Opportunity! P W NE 10 rentals renovated between 2014 & 2019. Well Maintained. Desirable location 2 blocks from Freret Street, which offers restaurants, coffee shops, night spots, hardware store and will soon have a supermarket! Easy to rent. LOTS OF POTENTIAL! $1,195,000 !

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Reliable Income Producer. Close to Magazine St. in the Irish Channel! X flood zone. 7 welcoming units with Hard Wood Floors, Tall Ceilings, Balconies, Exposed Brick/Fireplace Mantles and Walk-in Closets. $699,000

TOP PRODUCER

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PREMIER CROSSWORD PUZZLE ACROSS 1 Exchanges for paper money 7 Takes too much, briefly 10 Gp. concerned with birdies 13 Liquid detergent quantity 19 Opere — (in the work already mentioned) 20 International news agency 22 Relaxed 23 “First Blood” actor Richard 24 Pilot Amelia 25 Like magma

4717-27 S. LIBERTY

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PRIME IRISH CHANNEL LOCATION!

GARDEN DISTRICT OFFICE 2016 & 2017

ABR, CRS, GRI, SFR, SRS

(504) 895-4663 96 Liquor choice 97 End of the riddle 105 Prefix with 17-Down 106 Byrnes who was “Kookie” 107 Wayward GI 108 Family mem. 109 Riddle’s answer 117 Mitchell of NBC News 120 Not yet encrypted 121 Is entirely unacceptable 122 Disclose 123 List the particulars of 124 Coop up 125 Officers-to-be 126 Tutu-wearing Muppet 127 D.C. bigwig 128 “— Fideles” (carol) DOWN 1 Roman 301 2 Plane wings, e.g. 3 Raw beef dish 4 Disney’s Montana 5 Tall Sicilian volcano 6 Fly high 7 Chocolate cookieflavored Post cereal 8 Shortage 9 Guarantee 10 Bell’s ring 11 Mutt’s noise 12 Concerning 13 SLR, say 14 Makes amends 15 Animal hide 16 Jack Sprat’s no-no 17 Function 18 Writer Deighton 21 Jennifer Lopez’s “J to — L-O!” 27 Dull 28 Homer Simpson’s outburst 32 Cruel Roman emperor 33 Male lover 34 Echidnas eat them 35 Once existed 36 Totally lost 37 Squarish, as a vehicle 38 Four minus one, in Italy 39 Gmail rival 40 Trailing plant

41 — Strauss 42 Wizard of Oz creator 49 Work over 50 Happen next 51 Comes upon 52 “Luther” star Elba 53 Repeated jazz phrase 54 Smoker’s puff 56 Pi-sigma link 59 Sport- — (off-roader) 60 Your, biblically 61 “Billy, Don’t Be —” (1974 hit song) 62 Insect egg 63 Beginning 64 Lauder of makeup 66 Seasoned, oily salad dressings 67 French buddy 68 Turner of TV 70 Big coffee dispensers 71 Vincent van — 72 Incline 73 Coffee alternative 78 Suited to — 79 Christmas 81 Court barriers 82 Flight staffers 83 Punch sound 84 Old LP player 85 Crafts’ partner

86 Not stringent 87 Lead-in to “And how!” 88 Suffix with lobby 89 High-pitched warble 91 Nailed the performance 92 Opposite of 63-Down 98 Nuke, as leftovers 99 Standards 100 NFL six-pointers 101 Legendary Manhattan restaurant 102 Pluck, as brows 103 “Stalag 17” star William 104 With 109-Down, part of a Florida orchard 109 See 104-Down 110 Mini-exam 111 A law — itself 112 Slush Puppie alternative 113 CD- — 114 Female youth org. 115 Incite 116 Subjective loudness unit 117 Circle bit 118 Org. concerned with the three R’s 119 Burnable storage device

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK AND 12/31/19: P 31


REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

BECKY RAY GIROIR 504-333-2645

FRENCH QUARTER 1 BD APT

340 MAPLERIDGE DRIVE

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MANDEVILLE • $949,900

Ever dream of owning horses or livestock, but want to be close to the Causeway. Your dream can come true w/ sprawling 5 acres, guest house with 2/1 bath eat-in Kit w/granite countertops, gas FP, covered porch & attached garage. The lovely main home offers 5/3 full baths & 2 half baths. A Master suite w/ its own sun room, separate jetted tub & shower. Gorgeous tile work done in Master Bath to awe you. Hard surface floors on main floor. Home is a Masterpiece. A must see too many amenities!

GARDEN DISTRICT 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

1 & 2 bedrooms available in ideal location and ROOMS BY THE MONTH with PRIVATE BATH. All utilities included monthly. Call 504-202-0381 for appointment.

ANNOUNCEMENTS Waffles On Maple II Metairie LLC d/b/a Waffles on Maple II Metairie LLC is applying to the Office of Alcohol & Tobacco Control of the State of Louisiana for a permit to sell beverages of high and low alcohol content at retail in the Parish of Jefferson at the following address: 4650 West Esplanade Ave., Suite 100, Metairie, LA 70002. Waffles On Maple II Metairie LLC Member: Rotem Dahan.

LAFITTE

Kennel #43368735

Lafitte is a 5-year-old Pit Bull/Terrier mix who we affec-

tionately call our resident pirate. He is missing his right eye, so he may bump into a few things, but that does not stop him from playing with his toys! Lafitte came to us through a kind stranger that brought him to us when he found Lafitte. Now, Lafitte is looking for a forever home. This gentle, calm guy is looking to wiggle his way into your heart and home!

INHERITANCE THIEF? DOORS CLOSEOUT

2 & 4 panel fir doors 6/8 & 7/0. 822-0785.

ADVERTISE HERE!

CALL 483-3100

MEOW

Kennel #43472843

Meow is a 5-year-old, Domestic Shorthair mix who is as sweet as she is cute. Her unique tri-color pattern will help her be the star of any party, but that’s not the only loveable quality about Meow. She is a big cuddler! Her favorite spots include your lap, her bed, and anywhere else where she can curl up and receive all the love you have to give.

To meet these or any of the other wonderful pets at the LA/SPCA, come to 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd. (Algiers), 10-4, Mon.-Sat. & 12-4 Sun., call 368-5191 or visit www.la-spca.org

FOOD

EVENTS

tickets

SPORTS

EVENTS

Lakeview

MOVIES

NEW CONTESTS, every week

www.bestofneworleans.com/win

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL AFTER CONSTRUCTION CLEANING HOLIDAY CLEANING LIGHT/GENERAL HOUSEKEEPING HEAVY DUTY CLEANING

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Striped Rugby Shirt $20.99 Adult Leggings $19.99 Kids Leggings $13.99

to place your ad in the

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Mardi Gras Socks $9.99

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1513 Metairie Rd. 835-6099

METAIRIE SHOPPING CENTER MJSMETAIRIE • mjsofmetairie.com

REAL ESTATE / SERVICES

festival EVENTS

Licensed in Louisiana • Each Office Independently Owned & Operated

CLEANING SERVICE

WIN FREE STUFF MUSIC

RE/MAX REAL ESTATE PARTNERS, INC. • 4141 VETERANS BLVD., SUITE 100 • METAIRIE, LA 70002 • 504-888-9900

Locally owned & serving the New Orleans area for over 25 years

MISCELLANEOUS Writing book, need your anonymous info. 504-313-0103.

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GABBY RAY 504-444-6818

G A M B I T > B E S T O F N E WO R L E A N S . C O M > J A N UA R Y 1 4 - 2 0 > 2 0 2 0

FRENCH QUARTER

Weekly Tails


Lot 191: French Three Piece Gilt Bronze and Verde Antico Marble Clock Set, 20th c., Clock- H.- 22 1/2 in., W.- 13 in., D.- 8 in. (3 Pcs.) Est. $400-$800

IMPORTANT WINTER ESTATES AUCTION Lot 175: English Carved Mahogany Cylinder Secretary Bookcase, 19th c., H.- 99 in., W.- 46 in., D.- 27 in. Est. $1,200-$1,800

Lot 100: French Provincial Louis XV Style Carved Oak, Walnut and Cherry Bowfront Commode, early 19th c., H.- 34 1/2 in., W.- 48 1/4 in., D.- 23 in. Est. $1,200-$1,800

Sat., January 18th @10am, Lots 1-550 Sun., January 19th @ 10am, Lots 551-887

Lot 811: Nine Light Bronze and Crystal Prism Hung Basket Chandelier, 20th c., H.- 39 in., Dia.- 22 in. Est. $600-$900

Full color catalog available at:

www.crescentcityauctiongallery.com

Lot 204: Noel Rockmore (1928-1995, New Orleans), “Woman on the Beach,” 1980, oil on canvas, signed and dated lower left, H.- 19 1/2 in., W.- 23 1/2 in. Est. $800-$1,200

Lot 133: Four Pieces of Sterling, 20th c., consisting of a three piece tea set, by Okubo, together with a .950 sterling serving tray, Total Wt- 131.65 Troy Oz. (4 Pcs.) Est. $1,000-$2,000

Lot 410: Oriental Carpet, 5’ x 9’ 2. Est. $500-$700

Lot 291: French Empire Revival Style Ormolu Mounted Mahogany Marble Top Sideboard, 20th/21st c., H.- 38 in., W.- 59 in., D.- 24 in. Est. $800-$1,200

Lot 277: Franz Priking (1929-1979, German), “Village,” 20th c., oil on canvas, signed lower right, titled on label verso, H.- 31 3/8 in., W.- 39 in. Est. $800-$1,200

Lot 206: John Reed Campbell (1925-2000, New Orleans), “Feeding Chickens in Front of the Cabin,” 1981, oil on canvas, signed and dated lower right, H.- 11 1/2 in., W.- 15 1/2 in. Est. $500-$900

Lot 307: Carved Oak Nine Piece Horner Style Dining Room Suite, consisting of a server, a sideboard, 6 upholstered chairs, a dining table, with four leaves, Table H. - 30 1/4 in., Closed Dia. - 60 in., Open Dia. - 108 in. Est. $4,000-$8,000

Lot 254: Large Patinated Spelter “Pallas Athena” Figural Mantel Clock, 19th c., H.- 28 in., W.- 19 1/2 in., D.- 10 1/8 in. Est. $500-$1,000 Lot 220: Clementine Hunter (1886-1988), “Baptism,” c. 1950, oil on board, signed lower right, verso with an attached signed letterhead from Francois Mignon, Melrose Plantation, H.- 17 3/8 in., W.- 23 1/2 in. Est. $3,000-$5,000

Lots 323-325: Selection of Newcomb Pottery Includes Sadie Irvine

Lot 231: Exceptional Carved Oak Monastary Table, 19th c., the thick three board top on trestle supports H. - 29 3/4 in., W. - 138 in. D. - 37 1/2 in. Est. $3,000-$5,000

Jewelry includes Diamonds, Tanzanites, Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires, etc.

Crescent City Auction Gallery, LLC

Lot 280: Anna Vaughn Wyatt Huntington (1876-1973, American), “L’Orage (The Storm),” early 20th c., patinated bronze, H.- 15 1/2 in., W.- 15 in., D.- 6 1/2 in. Est. $2,000-$4,000

Lot 292: Monumental Pair of Bronze Ormolu Mounted Verde Antico Marble Obelisks, 20th/21st c., H.- 56 in., W.- 14 in., D.- 14 in. Est. $1,500-$2,500

Lot 392: Chinese School, “Female Musicians,” Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368), fresco watercolor, H.-48 1/2 in., W.- 38 in. Est. $1,000-$2,000

1330 St.Charles Ave, New Orleans, La 70130 Lot 380: Aesthetic Movement 504-529-5057 • fax 504-529-6057 Longwy Porcelain and Brass Plant Stand, possibly Bradley & info@crescentcityauctiongallery.com Hubbard or Ansonia, 25% Buyers Premium H.- 33 1/2 in., W.- 13 1/2 in., D.- 13 1/2 in. For a complete catalog, visit our website at: Lot 281: Ransome G. Holdredge (1836-1899), Est. $500-$800 “Landscape with Encampment,” c. 1880, oil on www.crescentcityauctiongallery.com canvas, signed A. Bierstadt lower left, H.- 24 1/4 in., Lot 475: Pair of Large Green Patinated Bronze Recumbent Lions, LA Auc Lic AB-411, 1354, 1529 W.- 36 1/4 in. Est. $3,000-$5,000 20th c., H.- 22 in., W.- 48 in., D.- 16 in. Est. $800-$1,200

Profile for Gambit New Orleans

Gambit New Orleans, January 14, 2020  

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Gambit New Orleans, January 14, 2020  

New Orleans news and entertainment