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FEBRUARY 15, 2011 · VOLUME 32 · NUMBER 7

MARGO DUBOS Free Alterations > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >PUBLISHER > > > > > > > > DIRECTOR > > > > > >MARK > > >KARCHER > ADMINISTRATIVE <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Open til 8pm Thurs.> > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >EDITORIAL > > > > > > > >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> FAX: 483-3116 | response@gambitweekly.com < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < NEWS&VIEWS <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< EDITOR KEVIN ALLMAN > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Cover > > > >Story > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > 17 > > > > > >MANAGING > > > > > >EDITOR > > > >KANDACE > POWER GRAVES New Orleans restaurants are responding to POLITICAL EDITOR CLANCY DUBOS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR WILL COVIELLO national trends like never before. Is this a SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR MISSY WILKINSON threat to our indigenous cuisine?

Commentary

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Blake Pontchartrain

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News

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Bouquets & Brickbats

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Sheriff Gusman’s jail

New Orleans know-it-all

DA Leon Cannizzaro challenges judges to hold at least 600 jury trials this year

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This week’s heroes and zeroes

C’est What?

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Scuttlebutt

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Politics / Clancy DuBos

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Gambit’s Web poll From their lips to your ears The Jeffersons? More like The Sopranos

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A&E News

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Gambit Picks

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Noah Bonaparte Pais / On the Record

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Tribute to the Classical Arts

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Cuisine

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The Puzzle Page

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Krewe du Vieux turns 25: as racy, rowdy, bawdy and raunchy as ever Best bets for your busy week

Private PORTABLE TOILET Rentals

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Also... • Restroom Trailers • Hand Wash Sinks • Temporary Fence

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Photos from the annual awards Ian McNulty on Cafe Carmo 5 in Five: 5 dining rooms with a view Brenda Maitland’s Wine of the Week

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PREVIEW: Gambit’s Food Revue PREVIEW: A hip-hop breakdancing expo

Market Place Employment Mind / Body / Spirit Real Estate / Rentals Home & Garden

DORA SISON

SPECIAL PROJECTS DESIGNER SHERIE DELACROIX-ALFARO WEB & CLASSIFIEDS DESIGNER MARIA BOUÉ GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LINDSAY WEISS, LYN BRANTLEY, BRITT BENOIT, MARK WAGUESPACK PRE-PRESS COORDINATOR MEREDITH LAPRÉ

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR SANDY STEIN BRONDUM 483-3150 ········sandys@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING ADMINISTRATOR MICHELE SLONSKI 483-3140········micheles@gambitweekly.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR CHRISTIN JOHNSON 483-3138 ········christinj@gambitweekly.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE JILL GIEGER 483-3131 ·········jillg@gambitweekly.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES JEFFREY PIZZO 483-3145 ········jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA LACHIN 483-3142 ········lindal@gambitweekly.com ABBY SHEFFIELD 483-3141·········abbys@gambitweekly.com AMY WENDEL 483-3146········amyw@gambitweekly.com JENNIFER MACKEY 483-3143 ········jenniferm@gambitweekly.com MEGAN MICALE 483-3144········meganm@gambitweekly.com NORTHSHORE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CRISTY NEWTON ········ cristyn@gambitweekly.com INTERN MARIA CASTELLON MARKETING>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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VIEWS

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s the parent of a proud fifth grader at KIPP New Orleans Leadership Academy (KNOLA) on St. Claude Avenue, I recently attended Public Hearing No. 3 in Council District C and was saddened and dismayed by misconceptions of the KIPP network cited by a handful of community members. During this forum, I listened to one parent after another declare the need for a “scholarly” school environment and diversification within the community. I watched several people become flustered because they didn’t think their voice was being heard or their concept of school accepted. Given that

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KNOLA focuses entirely on academic achievement, community, culture, character-building and the whole child‚ I was shocked at their comments and wanted to clarify my KIPP experience and that of my son. I am originally from New Orleans and am a product of the New Orleans Public Schools system. Admittedly, I left the city to advance my career and life. Upon completion of my education and training, I returned home, accepted a nice corporate job, started my own business and immediately enrolled my child in a private school. The sub-standard curriculum and outdated teaching methods led me to question my decision to come back to New Orleans post-Katrina: What was I coming back to? Should I pack up and leave for the second time? Last summer, while volunteering in the community, I had the pleasure of meeting the leadership team at KNOLA. When I mentioned my dilemma, they spent time with my child and me outlin-

ing their principles around results, family, tailored instruction, extracurricular activities and a disciplined but nurturing learning environment. The principal and teachers said they were different [than other schools] and wouldn’t disappoint. They were correct. My child loves KNOLA. His teachers are knowledgeable, innovative and persevering. While always a scholar, my child is sufficiently challenged, motivated and has fun learning and growing. For the first time, he is playing an instrument and participating in a team sport. If I had not found KNOLA, I would have left the city, my home. I feel for the parents who oppose KNOLA’s relocation into the Colton building in 2012. Like them, I want the best education I can possibly give to my child. The only difference between us is that I already know that everything they are asking for in a school is the precise definition of KNOLA. I hope these parents will visit [the school], and see what is happening in our classrooms. Our doors are always open. D AW N M C C O R M I C K

Red Means Stop

e are writing in response to the recent coverage about the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety’s study of safety camera programs across the country. This study reaffirms these cameras work to prevent crashes, change driver behavior and save lives. They saved 159 lives in the 14 cities where the cameras were used between 2004 and 2008. Just imagine how many lives would be saved if the technology was used in every city across the country. This topic is of particular importance to us because we lost our daughter Sarah after a man ran a red light and crashed into her car. Our family, including her two children, lost a beloved family member after someone disregarded our most basic traffic safety law: Red means stop. Sarah’s death has led us to partner with law enforcement, medical professionals and safety advocates through the Traffic Safety Coalition to remind drivers that one small decision can have devastating effects. The study concludes that over 800 lives could have been saved if every large city in the country used traffic safety cameras. If there is a law enforcement tool that is proven to prevent tragedies, why wouldn’t we use it? Although nothing will bring Sarah back, we encourage the use of any tool or technology that will keep families safe and prevent senseless tragedy.

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help. So will ratcheting down the number of state and federal prisoners at OPP, which would require shipping serious state offenders to the Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. Some have defended keeping state prisoners in New Orleans so their families can more easily keep in touch, but Norris Henderson, an ex-inmate who founded Voice of the Ex-Offender in 2004 (now VOTE-NOLA), says housing them at Angola is actually more humane. Angola has established amenities for long-term incarceration, and prisoners there can visit with their families in person instead of behind glass walls. Social justice advocates need to remember that the council’s decision to build a jail with 1,438 beds represents a minimum, not a maximum jail size. Landrieu has admitted he thinks OPP will need to house more

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The ultimate goal is reducing crime. That’s the real answer to the question of how big our city’s jail should be. inmates, at least in the near future. We agree. Meanwhile, Landrieu’s working group continues to meet. By April, it is expected to issue recommendations on a number of important fronts — including how many state prisoners should be kept at the new OPP. In his Feb. 3 statement, Gusman said, “My office will continue to work with the Mayor’s Working Group to determine appropriate future facilities, if any are needed, to replace our old and outdated jails.” Going forward, all elements of the criminal justice system will have to work together — not just to determine the right size of the local jail, but also to improve all elements of the system. The ultimate goal is reducing crime. That’s the real answer to the question of how big our city’s jail should be.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

fter months of squabbling and disagreement — some behind the scenes, some quite public — the New Orleans City Council and Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin N. Gusman have overcome the first roadblock to beginning construction on a new Orleans Parish Prison (OPP). On Feb. 3, the council heard testimony from citizens’ groups and voted unanimously to build a new jail with a total of 1,438 beds. That number was supported by the National Institute of Justice and echoed by both the City Planning Commission and Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s blue-ribbon working group on the subject. Though Gusman did not attend the Feb. 3 council meeting, he later expressed his satisfaction with the permitting process, saying once again that no time could be wasted in constructing the 1,438-bed jail. This marked a 180-degree turn from Gusman’s earlier positions on the size of the new prison. Though he had demonstrated some flexibility on the subject, as recently as December the sheriff was calling for a 3,200-bed facility. Earlier last year, he struck out at the Juvenile Justice Project of Louisiana — a foe of jail expansion — accusing the group of “demanding an artificially small facility just to satisfy a quest for national comparisons,” saying it was “unrealistic and it puts the public’s safety at risk.” While the optimum jail size is still open for debate, it’s undeniable that the city’s incarceration rate has been out of step with that of the rest of America for a very long time. In an unusual arrangement for a city prison, the local jail houses municipal, state and federal prisoners — and is paid for the state and federal prisoners it holds. According to an article by advocacy journalists Seung Hong and Barry Gerharz, when former Sheriff Charles Foti was elected in 1974, the prison had only 800 beds. When Foti left the sheriff’s office in early 2004, the prison population had grown almost tenfold. That number was roughly halved after Hurricane Katrina. Still, last fall, OPP held approximately 3,300 prisoners spread across a patchwork of dilapidated facilities surrounding the main prison. Getting the jail numbers down without sacrificing public safety will take several coordinated approaches, and the process will not always go smoothly. The city has had a huge jail population for a long, long time. Getting that population down to the proper size — and there’s no consensus yet as to what that term means — will not happen overnight. New Orleans Police Chief Ronal Serpas, with the backing of the mayor’s office, the City Council and the district attorney’s office, has begun giving officers wider latitude when it comes to misdemeanors that used to require immediate arrest. That will

07


THRIFT CIT Y

blake

PONTCHARTRAIN™

NEW ORLEANS KNOW-IT-ALL

Questions for Blake: askblake@gambitweekly.com

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

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DEAR MS. LAIFE, Although we like to think Barq’s is a New Orleans-born product, it actually originated in Biloxi, Miss., but it was created by a native New Orleanian, Edward Charles Barq. Barq was born in New Orleans in 1871. After spending some of his youth in France, he returned to New Orleans, and with his brother Gaston opened the Barqs Brothers Bottling Company in the French Quarter in 1890. His first success in the soft drink business came in 1893, when he won a gold medal at the Chicago World’s Fair for a concoction he called Orangine. After he got married, Barq moved to Mississippi and purchased the Biloxi Artesian Bottling Works. It was there that he created and bottled the now-famous root beer in 1898. The first franchise was opened in Mobile, Ala., in 1934, and before long, there were franchises everywhere. In 1976, the Barq family sold the company, and the headquarters was moved to New Orleans. Coca-Cola purchased the soft drink brand in 1995. Biloxi is proud of its unique beverage, and to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Barq’s, Mayor A.J. Holloway officially pronounced March 26, 1998 Barq’s Root Beer Day. HEY BLAKE, I ATTENDED THE NEW ORLEANS PRESS CLUB EVENT WHEN ANGUS LIND MADE SOME INTERESTING COMMENTS ABOUT HIS EXPERIENCES WORKING FOR THE NEW ORLEANS STATES-ITEM. DO YOU KNOW THE ADDRESS OF THE OLD STATES-ITEM? I’VE BEEN TOLD IT WAS 318 CAMP ST., WHICH IS WHERE I WORK. KRISTIAN SONNIER

DEAR KRISTIAN, Your office is a few blocks away from Lafayette Square, where the States-Item was located. Many years earlier, in the 1800s, a number of local newspapers had offices on Camp Street. On Sept. 15, 1958, The New Orleans States and New Orleans Item merged. Both were owned by The Times-Picayune. In 1961, their address was 601-615 North St. (now North Maestri Street), on the cor-

ner of Camp Street. Later they just gave their address as Lafayette Square. The two names appeared on the masthead for years until it was shortened to the New Orleans States-Item and finally to The States-Item on Sept. 21, 1970. In 1962, the two daily papers in New Orleans — The Times-Picayune and The States-Item — were purchased by S.I. Newhouse, and in January 1968, they left the CBD and moved into the company’s current digs at 3800 Howard Ave. Newhouse merged the papers in 1980, and the combined paper was called The Times-Picayune/The States-Item from 1980 to 1986.

HEY L. Gandolini sold BLAKE, waffles from a I’M 68 YEARS horse-drawn cart OLD AND HAVE in the 1940s. PHOTO COURTESY LIVED IN NEW LOUISIANA ORLEANS ALL DIVISION/CITY MY LIFE. WHEN ARCHIVES, NEW ORLEANS PUBLIC I WAS A KID, I LIBRARY LIVED ON CANAL STREET, AND I DISTINCTLY REMEMBER A HORSEDRAWN CART THAT SOLD SMALL WAFFLES WITH POWDERED SUGAR ON TOP. THE SETUP WAS SIMILAR TO THE ROMAN TAFFY MAN TODAY. DO YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION ABOUT THIS? AL

DEAR AL, Don’t you feel sorry for kids today who have to eat frozen waffles? Of course I remember the waffle vendors; they were popular for years. One in particular had his name on the side of the cart — L. Gandolini, 2766 Orchid St., who did a brisk business in the 1940s. He advertised hot waffles at four for a nickel. Another was Sam DeKemel, who came down the street blowing a bugle. New Orleans has always had street vendors, but the waffle man was especially welcome as evidenced in this verse of the era: “The Waffle Man is a fine old man/ He washes his face in a frying pan/ He makes his waffles with his hand/ Everybody loves the Waffle Man.”


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> MORE SCUTTLEBUTT CLANCY DUBOS < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < KNOWLEDGE < < < < < < < < < < <IS < <POWER <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< 13 15 >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

scuttle Butt

QUOTES OF THE WEEK

“I think everybody ought to get off the coach’s back. He’s a great guy. … It’s really important for his family to be safe and his family to be comfortable.” —Mayor Mitch Landrieu, reacting to the news that New Orleans Saints coach Sean Payton will move his family to Dallas.

The 600 LAST MONTH, DISTRICT ATTORNEY LEON CANNIZZARO CHALLENGED CRIMINAL DISTRICT COURT JUDGES TO HOLD 600 JURY TRIALS — MORE THAN DOUBLE THE 2010 TOTAL — IN 2011. CAN IT BE DONE?

“I am like a lot of fans. I would have preferred that his family stayed here year-round full time. I would rather that they not move to Dallas. Having said that, Coach (Sean) Payton has been a great leader for the Saints on the field and off the field.” — Gov. Bobby Jindal

BY ALE X WOODWARD

“Hurricane Katrina was horrific, and what happened to that city in 2005 was terrifying. But that doesn’t give New Orleans, and the people who live there, a free pass to play the victim card as an excuse for trying to run Sean Payton’s life. … Get over yourself, New Orleans.” — Gregg Doyel, on CBSSports.com

A

“There’s only one solution to the public relations fiasco this has started. Win and this story goes away. That fact will never change regardless of where he lives.” — Bradley Handwerger, WWLTV.com

REDISTRICTING ‘ROAD SHOW’ DA Leon Cannizzaro has issued a challenge to judges at Criminal District Court: Complete 600 jury trials during 2011.

They’re calling it “the road show” — a series of joint meetings to be held at locations across the state by the two legislative committees charged with reapportioning legislative representation and redrawing district lines in the wake of

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

PAGE 13

underfunded and lacks enough resources to tackle the number of cases the DA’s office is bringing in, officials there say. “We can’t represent people competently, safely, when we’re dealing with these kinds of numbers coupled with the resources we’re allotted,” says chief public defender Derwyn Bunton. “There has got to be more discretion at the prosecuting end so that we can keep up and the city can remain safe.” The DA accepts 85 percent of the cases brought by NOPD, but the public defenders can’t match that pace. Bunton adds that the number of jury trials should not be the metric for assessing the efficacy of a system of justice. “I don’t think you measure safety by how many cases

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presented a check for $25,000 recently to Reconcile New Orleans Inc, better known as Cafe Reconcile, as part of the company’s Power to Care Facebook Challenge. More than 10,000 Facebook users voted for the local charity to receive the money. Cafe Reconcile, located at 1631 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., provides young adults with the skills and confidence they need to get and keep local hospitality jobs. It also serves some of the best home-style lunches in town.

Cafe Du Monde

has launched a two-month effort to aid the Louisiana and Mississippi chapters of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society by selling paper sailboats for the cause. The campaign will end on March 29, just before the New Orleans Leukemia Cup Regatta sailboat race at the Southern Yacht Club on April 2 and 3. The society is dedicated to curing leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma.

Ray Nagin,

who has signed up with a speakers’ bureau, appeared at Colorado State University-Pueblo Feb. 9, and his characteristic egocentricity was on full display. He told a crowd of 300 students and faculty, “I had to make some tough decisions. A lot of the decisions were popular, and many of the decisions were unpopular. I took quite a beating, but we continued to press forward.” He took a beating?

State Rep. Nita Hutter,

who represents St. Bernard Parish, has been living outside her House district since Hurricane Katrina, according to a WDSU-TV report. Hutter said storm damage and family issues forced her to “temporarily relocate just within the last few months” — but the station found she had purchased her Old Metairie home in 2008. Last year state lawmakers passed House Bill 671 requiring elected officials who had been given a temporary reprieve after the storm to once again live in their districts. The vote was 96-1, with Hutter the lone dissenter.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

t his State of the Criminal Justice System report at the end of January, District Attorney Leon Cannizzaro asked Criminal District Court judges to more than double the number of jury trials they held in 2010. The 12 sections of court held a combined 278 trials last year; Cannizzaro challenged them to increase that number to 600 this year. Cannizzaro’s office is keeping score. Each month the office will release a tally of how many jury trials were held in each section of court, and which judges are holding the most. (Section F Judge Robin Pittman, with six jury trials, led the month of January.) In January 2011, six of the 12 Criminal District Court sections presided over four or more jury trials, with seven of the 12 accounting for 32 of last month’s 35 trials. One section held two trials; another held only one; and three sections didn’t have any jury trials. By mid-February, seven of the 12 sections were in the middle of jury trials: three for murder, two for seconddegree murder, one multi-defendant narcotics case, and an aggravated rape case. Cannizzaro says he’s “very satisfied so far,” and the judges — as well as the DA’s office — are on track to meet his goal, though assistant DA Christopher Bowman notes that judges aren’t working hard only to meet the DA’s challenge. “They’re working hard because they want to be good judges,” he says. Meeting the 600-trial challenge, Cannizzaro says, requires the full cooperation of the entire criminal justice system: judges, cops, the sheriff’s office and public defenders. Already the Orleans Public Defenders Office says it won’t be able to keep up. The office is understaffed,

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come through the system,” Bunton says. “You measure safety by how many times you can keep folks out of the system, how many times you can get people back and working and producing. “The number of fish in your net, I don’t think, is a badge of honor.”

one FaCT Is noT In dIspuTe: THe puBLIC defenders office struggles to balance a small staff and budget with a workload that gives some of its 55 attorneys more than 100 clients at the same time (see “playing defense,” Feb. 22, 2009). In december 2010, Bunton announced a hiring freeze and cutbacks on providing representation for indigent defendants. also that month, the Louisiana public defender Board filed a lawsuit alleging orleans parish judges failed to assess the $35 fee for convicted defendants. Those fees help fund the public defenders office, as do Traffic Court fines and other fees. The public defenders’ estimated $8 million budget for 2009-2010 had no funding from the city’s general fund. The office handles more than just the major cases in Criminal Court. It also covers Municipal, Juvenile and Traffic courts. “We are not resourced like the da’s office, we’re not resourced like the police, and when they force a lot of work toward our door, it becomes a problem,” Bunton says. The da’s office hasn’t communicated with the public defenders regarding the 600-trial challenge, but the da stands behind his call for every department in the criminal justice system to work harder. “When I say work harder, I’m not denying that people are working,” Cannizzaro says. “I’m saying everyone needs to come collectively together and say we’ve got to make an effort if we’re going to realistically solve this problem in our community — the crime of violence — and shed the title of being the murder capital of america.” WITH THe pusH For More TrIaLs, soMe sections of court will find themselves having to wait for the jury pool to refill. “When four or five sections call for juries at the same time, there just aren’t enough people in the jury pool to satisfy them,” Cannizzaro says. “If all 12 judges said, ‘I want to have a jury right now,’ you just do not have enough jurors in the basement to service all 12 sections of the court. so by the very nature of what we’re doing, this process will have to be staggered.” But even with a larger jury pool, Cannizzaro says, all 12 sections wouldn’t be able to start at the same time, delaying some sections while others proceed. (“If we’re going to want to try to work at this pace, that’s just one of the inconveniences we’re going to have to suffer,” the da says.) Bowman dismisses critics who say there isn’t enough room even if more jurors were available. “We’ve got to stop thinking of reasons we can’t do something and figure out ways to do them,” he says. The da’s office has contacted the judges to ask for more jurors. “We’re doing everything we can to try to proceed and

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get the dockets moving as quickly as we can,” Cannizzaro says. WHaT do THe Judges THInK aBouT the da’s push? after Cannizzaro’s address in January, Criminal district Court judges have stayed mum on the 600-trial challenge. Gambit’s questions to the judges were forwarded to Criminal district Court spokeswoman Margaret dubuisson, who says the judges attended the address and “listened.” “at this time, we’re just digesting all of that, and the chief judge went there at the da’s invitation and just wanted to listen and observe what his proposals were,” she says. The vera Institute of Justice, a nonprofit criminal justice organization advising the Criminal Justice Leadership alliance and other agencies, also did not offer comment on Cannizzaro’s challenge when contacted by Gambit. “We can’t continue to put this off,” Cannizzaro says. “We have a community that is screaming that it’s enough, there is too much violence going on. We’re asking the community to come forward and help us in reporting crimes and standing up and coming to court and testifying. and when we get people to come in, we’ve got to be in a position to move those cases. … We can’t delay them and continue them and let them drag on and linger on.”

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BegInnIng In 1986, CannIzzaro served as a Criminal Court judge for 17 years, trying, on average, more than 100 cases in a year. It’s been done before — Cannizzaro points to his prolific former colleagues like the late Criminal Court Judge Frank shea, retired Judge Miriam Waltzer and the late Judge shirley Wimberly Jr. What changed? “There’s really nothing different, to be honest with you,” Cannizzaro says. “We’ve accepted more cases, but we have more judges.” In the early 1990s, the court was averaging 50 trials a year in each section — more than 500 trials combined. Criminal district Court was made up of 10 sections until 1997, when it added two more sections. In the years that followed, the court averaged fewer trials, reaching a little more than 400 per year. In his first year in office in 2003, da eddie Jordan tried fewer than 200 jury trials. Hurricane Katrina and the federal floods threw a wrench into the criminal justice system, but the number of trials has increased each year since. In 2010, two years into Cannizzaro’s tenure, the courts held 278 jury trials, averaging a few more than 23 trials a year per section. Cannizzaro’s new goal? To more than double that pace. Why 600? “Time is the enemy of the prosecutor,” Bowman says. “The purpose … is to move the cases through the criminal justice system, through the dockets as quickly as we can,” Cannizzaro says. “age and the staleness of the cases usually work against the state. and in many cases, the victims are denied justice, are denied their day in court.” But Bunton says a trial “is not an inherent good,” adding that a trial results from the inability to reach a plea agreement. The da’s office believes an overwhelming majority of defendants will be found guilty if tried. “The best way to resolve cases is to resolve cases,” Bunton says, “to make use of appropriate and just plea agreements, do it more often, (and) use more discretion in the prosecution of cases — so maybe don’t take every … case at the highest possible criminal exposure.” Cannizzaro says his office accepts more cases than it “disposes,” or takes all the way through the court system. He estimates that of the 120 murder cases his office accepted last year, 50 went to trial; in 2009, his office accepted 110 murder

cases and 35 were tried.

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scuttlebutt

BALANCE

page 9

City’s Green survey Online

The City of New Orleans Office of Environmental Affairs launched a survey last month to gauge citizen interest in green and energy-efficiency projects. Information gathered from the NOLA Energy Survey will help the city curb its future energy costs and emissions, as well as determine the designs for future renewable energy and efficiency projects. The survey and projects are outlined on the newly renovated GreeNOLA website (www.nola.gov/residents/greenolasite), the city’s domain incorporating nonprofit, city and neighborhood resources for green projects. The survey is anonymous and open to residents of both Jefferson and Orleans parishes and includes questions about homeowners’ energy usage and the age and value of their home. The effort is funded by a grant from the Southeast

Energy Efficiency Initiative and the U.S. Department of Energy, which dubbed New Orleans a “Solar America” city in 2009 and awarded $200,000 for the project. Consulting firm GCR & Associates compiled the survey. Take the survey at www.nolaenergysurvey.com. — Alex Woodward

nOrD POOls tO reOPen

Three of the closed and decrepit municipal swimming pools cited by Gambit in a July 13, 2010 cover story will reopen by summer, according to the New Orleans Recreational Development Commission (NORDC), the new nonprofit, public-private board in charge of the New Orleans Recreation Department (NORD). At a Feb. 8 meeting, the commission laid out its blueprint for pool openings over the next few months, which will include the pools at A.L. Davis Playground in Central City and the Sam Bonart Playground in the Lower 9th Ward. The indoor pool at Joe Brown Park in eastern New Orleans should be open by June, the board says. Among other pools to be opened this year: Behrman, Lemann, Lyons, St. Bernard, Sampson, StallingsGentilly, Taylor and Whitney Young. The goal, as presented at the Feb. 8 meeting, is for NORD to open at least 12 pools this year and five more in 2012. The community pool facility in Gert Town, its distinctive UFO shape long in shambles, will be razed using FEMA dollars and a new swimming facility is scheduled to replace it in 2013. Getting NORD on its feet this summer will be one of the first big tests of Mayor Mitch Landrieu’s administration and the new commission. When Landrieu (a member of the 13-person NORDC board) presented his inaugural city budget in October 2010, he doubled the amount of NORD funding to $10 million annually. At the time, the announcement drew a standing ovation from a bipartisan crowd gathered at Gallier Hall. That month, voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure that would turn NORD into a public-private partnership, a move recommended by a citizens’ advisory panel consisting of attorney Bobby Garon, businessman/engineer Roy Glapion and Entergy executive vice president and chief administrative officer Rod West, and backed heavily by City Council President Arnie Fielkow. At the NORDC’s first formal meeting in January, Glapion was appointed chairman of the board. Former NORD director Vic Richard III, who was hired last summer by Landrieu to serve as interim director, will continue until NORDC hires a permanent director. The board’s next meeting is March 15 in the City Council Chamber of City Hall and is open to the public. — Kevin Allman

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the 2010 Census. The first two meetings of the House and Senate Governmental Affairs Committees will be held in the New Orleans area. The first meeting begins at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 17, in the Fuhrmann Auditorium at the Greater Covington Center (317 N. Jefferson Ave., Covington). The second meeting starts at 6 p.m. that same day at Dillard University (2601 Gentilly Blvd., Professional Schools and Sciences Building, Georges Auditorium). At each meeting, the committee will display current district maps for state legislative districts, Public Service Commission Districts, Board of Elementary and Secondary Education (BESE) districts, judicial districts and congressional districts. The displays also will contain 2010 Census population figures for each district, showing which districts no longer meet population guidelines and/or legal requirements. The committees are seeking public input as new districting plans are drafted and discussed. All the joint meetings will be streamed live over the Internet and archived. In addition, comments and questions can be submitted via Facebook, Twitter, MySpace and other social media sites. Information about the social media sites is available at www.house.louisiana. gov/H_Redistricting2011. The site also includes up-to-date information on all aspects of the redistricting process. A special session to adopt redistricting plans will convene March 20 and must end no later than April 13. With the annual legislative session set to begin April 25, lawmakers will have no time to waste. New districting plans must be submitted to the U. S. Justice Department for pre-approval under the Voting Rights Act; the department has at least 60 days to approve or reject the plan. Qualifying for statewide and legislative offices begins Sept. 6. — Clancy DuBos

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clancy DUBOS

POLITICS Follow Clancy on Twitter @clancygambit.

The Family Business hen former Congressman William “Dollar Bill” Jefferson was indicted on corruption charges in June 2007, I compared him to Tony Soprano, lead character in the HBO hit series The Sopranos. At the time, I was just trying to have a little fun at the congressman’s expense. Turns out my attempt at parody hit closer to home than I ever imagined. In the wake of testimony from Jefferson’s own kin in the federal corruption trial of former New Orleans Councilwoman and former state Rep. Renee Gill Pratt, Dollar Bill makes Tony Soprano look like a piker. The Jefferson political and crime family squandered no opportunity to loot the public treasury, skim from family-controlled nonprofits and generally fleece unsuspecting marks. In Gill Pratt’s trial and in Dollar Bill’s indictment, the feds accuse the Jeffersons of running a “criminal enterprise.” That term is an essential element of the federal crime of racketeering. In Dollar Bill’s 94-page indictment, the feds alleged that his congressional office was a criminal enterprise. The government

W

won on that point, too. Although Jefferson beat the rap relating to the $90,000 in cash found in his freezer, he was convicted of racketeering and 10 other corruption charges. He was sentenced to 13 years in prison — the most for any congressman so disgraced — but he remains free pending an appeal. Now, in federal court on Poydras Street, Gill Pratt is offering up what appears to be The Bimbo Defense: She was Mose Jefferson’s dutiful but unsuspecting girlfriend (one of more than 20, according to testimony). Mose, who was scheduled to be tried alongside Gill Pratt, is dying from cancer after previously being convicted of bribing another public official who he claimed was his lover — former Orleans Parish School Board President Ellenese BrooksSimms. Brooks-Simms denied any intimacy with Mose, but she nailed him on the witness stand in 2009, testifying that she took $140,000 in bribes from him for helping his client land a lucrative school board contract. It’s clear now that Dollar Bill presided over a vast criminal empire — not a mere enterprise. From his congressional office he used his influence to squeeze investors in African

high-tech projects while older brother Mose provided the political muscle to keep local officials in place and turn out voters for favored candidates. Betty Jefferson, as the 4th District assessor, cut special deals for favored (read: family) property owners and kept key operatives on the payroll. Gill Pratt, as a state rep, steered public money to sham nonprofits that allowed family members to enrich themselves at the expense of society’s weakest — the very people whose votes they

It’s clear now that Dollar Bill presided over a vast criminal empire — not a mere enterprise.

routinely delivered and whose interests they were supposed to protect. She also shared in the “vig,” or take, that was skimmed by the Jeffersons. Shortly after Hurricane Katrina, she helped herself to an SUV that had been donated to help relief efforts. It was a well-oiled machine that merged politics, graft and free enterprise. In her testimony during Gill Pratt’s trial, Betty Jefferson (who has pleaded guilty to corruption charges) put her family’s nowhallmark arrogance and misplaced sense of entitlement on full display. She bristled when defense attorney Mike Fawer doggedly cross-examined her about her family’s avaricious exploits, assuming an air of moral indignation when he attempted to get her to admit that she “ripped off” poor people and taxpayers. “It’s money we received,” she said coolly. Right. It wasn’t stealing. It was just the vig, pure and simple. I don’t know how jurors will respond, but Tony Soprano would have understood. In fact, he would have envied everything about the Jeffersons’ criminal empire — except the part about getting caught.

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B Y I A N M C N U LT Y | P H O T O S B Y C H E R Y L G E R B E R

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was the French Quarter’s new Sylvain, where chef Alex Herrell and owners Sean McCusker and Robert LeBlanc studiously avoid New Orleans menu standards. LeBlanc also is a partner in a clutch of new dining hotspots to emerge downtown recently, including Capdeville, which opened last year, and Ste. Marie, which opened last month. In addition to media mentions, these new restaurants have attracted an enthusiastic following, particularly among young professionals who work and, increasingly, live nearby in the CBD and Warehouse District. While each is distinct, these restaurants all feature stylish, modern design aesthetics (mellow lighting, smooth surfaces, calming color palettes) and menus of gourmet, multicultural comfort food (pappardelle Bolognese at Sylvain, truffled mac and cheese at Capdeville, steamed mussels at Ste. Marie, upscale burgers at all three). LeBlanc says such decisions were part of strategies he and his partners in each venture developed to help their new restaurants stand out in the landscape of New Orleans’ well-established favorites. “We don’t want the food to be so out of left field that it’s inaccessible to people, but we still know we have to do things in a distinctive way in a city that has 200 years of history,” he says.

“I don’t know that we could ever create another Galatoire’s, so for us to be significant, we have to be different and innovative.” LeBlanc also sees his restaurants serving customers that he describes as being part of “New Orleans’ first generation with that Anthony Bourdain dynamic,” referring to the chef, author and star of the Travel Channel’s globetrotting foodie show No Reservations. “A lot of people credit Emeril (Lagasse) for popularizing cooking again. I think Anthony Bourdain is responsible for people being more adventurous eaters,” LeBlanc says. LEBLANC AND HIS PARTNERS ARE HARDLY the only ones now courting diners’ interest in flavors and concepts from outside the New Orleans norm. Food trucks and pop-ups, cupcakes and small plates, gastropubs and sliders, bacon everywhere, farm-to-table bona fides and craft cocktails — these hot national dining trends have been getting a lot of buzz in New Orleans, and they’re part of the program at many of the new restaurants to open here in the past few years. While earlier trends have cycled through the city in turn, some observers say today’s crop is showing greater sticking power than before. They credit an influx of new residents after

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

ew Orleans food has long been defined by its own particular traditions and even its own language, one that’s as intuitive to local diners as ordering a po-boy “dressed” or knowing that any French Creole restaurant will serve trout meuniere without so much as consulting a menu. Lately, though, there’s been a lot of new vocabulary in play here, and much of it centers on the same trends and topics that have foodies around the nation talking. Changes in the city’s dining scene have caught the attention of people outside New Orleans, too. When national food writers come calling these days, they’re as likely to scout for banh mi (the sandwiches known locally as Vietnamese po-boys) as to chronicle their search for the best gumbo. Of 11 restaurants singled out by New York Times food critic Sam Sifton in his April assessment of the modern New Orleans dining scene, three were Vietnamese. What’s more, local restaurants getting boldface mention now are sometimes portrayed as refreshing alternatives to the city’s old and expected dining traditions. In December, for instance, food writer Josh Ozersky opined in a Time magazine piece “that New Orleans is rising to a higher plane, gastronomically speaking, than ever before.” One restaurant he cited as proof

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Truffled macaroni and cheese is typical of the atypical New Orleans fare at Capdeville, owned by partners James Eustis (left) and Robert LeBlanc. In the last year, LeBlanc, along with other partners, also opened the restaurants Ste. Marie and Sylvain. In December, Time magazine writer Josh Ozersky praised Sylvain for its deviation from traditional Louisiana cuisine, saying it was “not the final word in gastronomy, but the food there would be at home in New York City, Portland, Ore., or San Francisco — which isn’t true of any place else I know of in the Quarter.” Ozersky, a James Beard Award-winning writer, said he had eaten “many, many, many meals in the food-crazed city — but rarely any really good ones,” adding that much of New Orleans’ cuisine was “overwrought, old-fashioned and generally lame.” PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

The best of the new guard restaurants are leveraging the old traditions and tipping their hats to them.

The best cooking anywhere does that; it respects tradition but riffs on it.

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Hurricane Katrina or the exposure locals had to other cities’ dining scenes during their own prolonged Katrina evacuations. Others point to the drumbeat of national media food coverage and the hyper-connectivity of the wired generation with its constant online posting about the next new thing. “We do seem more open to the next trends here now than we used to,” says David Beriss, an anthropologist at the University of New Orleans who studies local food culture. “They seem to have legs here now whereas before they might turn up but die quickly.” There’s no doubt that two New Orleans examples of the pop-up trend (or restaurants using an à la mode model of opening for limited stints inside other businesses) have quickly captured the interest of local diners. One is Pizza Delicious, where New York transplants Greg Augarten and Michael Friedman serve takeout pizza on Sunday evenings from a Bywater commissary kitchen. Customers call in orders using a phone number posted on the Pizza Delicious blog, and since first starting up last year, demand has grown to the point where the wait for a pie can be up to five


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IT WASN’T LONG AGO THAT DIScussions about dinner in New Orleans tended to focus not on what to eat but where in the city to get it. “People used to say that our restaurants served exactly the same menu,” says Liz Williams, director of the Southern Food & Beverage Museum. “The only comparison was, well, this one prepares this dish better than that one.” But even when the variety of restaurant options was limited, dining out was part of New Orleans culture and locals did it quite often, Williams says. As different types of restaurants opened during recent decades, their owners benefited from the local penchant for dining out frequently and found that people

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

hours on some Sundays. Such avid response from local eaters spurred Augarten and Friedman to expand with Thursday evening service, which begins Feb. 17. Meanwhile, at MVB (or Most Valuable Burger), another popup serving gourmet burgers and fries on Sundays inside Slim Goodies Diner, customers begin queuing up before the doors open for the night, forming a line that sometimes stretches down the block. Rene Louapre, a local attorney and food blogger who started MVB with a group of chefs and restaurateurs in October, says he never expected the idea to catch on so quickly, but he credits locals’ growing awareness of, and interest in, what’s happening in the food scenes in other cities. “People open up Bon Appétit and see this chef opening a burger joint, that chef doing a popup, and they think ‘Why don’t we have that here?,’” Louapre says. “There’s so much information about food out there now, and it’s so accessible to people who sit at a computer all day. These are people who travel to check out the food somewhere and they research it, they identify with food and they want to see new things at home. “Enough people realize that we have to step up our game. Not to the detriment of places that put lemon fish on a plate with some crabmeat and charge $31, but not everyone can do that now. People have to be more inventive. We don’t want places like Atlanta to pass us up.”

2/9/11

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If you’re eating a bowl of pho, you’re not eating a seafood platter, and that has an effect on traditional dishes. — Tom Fitzmorris, food writer and radio talk show host

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

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here would try new things and support them. New Orleans’ interest in dining trends from around the country isn’t so surprising, says John T. Edge, director of the Southern Foodways Alliance at the University of Mississippi. He says changes in the city’s dining scene are generally in line with the experience around much of the South today. “The best of the new guard restaurants are leveraging the old traditions and tipping their hats to them. The best cooking anywhere does that; it respects tradition but riffs on it,” Edge says. “I don’t see culture as static. It evolves, and thank God for that. We look to the past, but to the moment too.” Not everyone is cheering the recent round of trends to materialize around New Orleans. Tom Fitzmorris, the food writer and radio talk show host who has been covering the New Orleans restaurant scene since the 1970s, regularly rails against the eagerness of some local chefs to adopt trends conceived in other cities. “I’m angry about it because these guys are presenting themselves as so original and as creative thinkers, but they’re doing what everyone else is doing at the same time,” Fitzmorris says. “I am so done with pork belly and short ribs, and everyone is doing that.” He cautions that as more chefs follow the vogue, the next generation of New Orleanians may lose an appreciation for their own culinary heritage. Indeed, despite the city’s reputation for cultural intransience, some touchstones for the New Orleans palate of past generations are nearly forgotten today. Spanish mackerel, squab,

the Creole beef dish daube, fried rice cakes called calas and Creole cream cheese were once commonplace in New Orleans kitchens or menus, though when they turn up at all today it’s usually as niche specialties or nostalgic throwback items. Fitzmorris worries that more New Orleans food traditions may be on the cultural chopping block as younger diners fixate on other flavors. “I’m very concerned about red beans and rice. My two kids, they never eat it,” Fitzmorris says. “When my son comes home from college, he wants us to go out for sushi, Vietnamese, Thai. If you’re eating a bowl of pho, you’re not eating a seafood platter, and that has an effect on traditional dishes.” STILL, FOR ALL THE BUZZ ABOUT trends from outside the traditional New Orleans template, there also is plenty of fresh evidence of locals’ ongoing affection for homegrown flavors and the well of local talent ready to provide it. For instance, when 7th Ward native Troy Rhodies decided to get into the restaurant business after some 20 years working as an air-conditioning tech, there was no question what sort of food he’d serve. “We knew we’d basically do what we knew growing up,” he says. “It’s not tacos, it’s not wraps. We thought, ‘Let’s do a new place but do it the old way.’” In 2009 Rhodies and his wife Myra opened Freret Street Po-Boy & Donut Shop, a corner joint Uptown where the Monday special is always red beans and rice, and the roast beef po-boy calls for a pile of napkins to sop up the gravy. While he says the


Dooky Chase’s chef/owner Leah Chase shows off the restaurant’s traditional chicken Creole. Chase says change is good, and today’s diners are more adventurous than ever, but, “if you’re hungry, you better eat what you know. If you’re from New Orleans and you get really hungry, you better have New Orleans food.” PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

that with a hands-on approach and apply an understanding of cooking, and you can stand out,” Wicks says. Frank Brigtsen, the James Beard Award-winning chef at the upscale Brigtsen’s Restaurant, has enjoyed a similar experience at Charlie’s Seafood, the 1950s-vintage River Ridge neighborhood restaurant he bought and reopened in 2009. “It’s particularly gratifying for me to see 8- and 9-year-old kids come in here and eat gumbo and boiled crabs, just like I did when I was a kid,” Brigtsen says. “This food is part of our heritage. It defines who we are as New Orleanians, and we’re glad to help provide that experience to another generation.” CHEF SCOTT BOSWELL IS BEST known for globally-influenced cuisine, cutting-edge culinary technology and high-end ingredients at his restaurant Stella!. But the Lake Charles native says his Jackson Square diner Stanley, where the menu features gumbo and boudin beside Korean barbecue beef poboys, has sparked his interest in “revisiting the roots” of local cuisine. “Tastes are evolving, diners are evolving,” he says. “They’re demanding high quality and the people

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

learning curve for running a restaurant has been steep, the cooking came naturally. “I watch chefs on TV and see those shows. I’m not a chef like that. I just cook and know how to make food taste good,” Rhodies says. “I would never cook a roast beef without stuffing it with garlic and making sure it was seasoned correctly and cooking it down 12 or 14 hours and making a gravy with that roast itself. That’s the taste of home for me.” A few miles away on Magazine Street, the popular appeal of traditional local flavors is obvious outside of Mahony’s Po-Boy Shop, where the line that typically forms on Saturday afternoons often rivals the one outside of MVB on Sundays. Mahony’s owner Ben Wicks logged eight years in high-end New Orleans restaurant kitchens before opening his shop in 2008. But despite that fine-dining experience, he says he wanted to open a business that would help assert the goodness of casual New Orleans food, which he saw threatened by shortcuts like packaged meats used at some other po-boy purveyors. He says the public response has been vindicating. “You have to give New Orleans people what they want, but you do

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

Of 11 restaurants singled out by New York Times critic Sam Sifton in his April assessment of the modern New Orleans dining scene, three were Vietnamese.

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meeting those demands are doing well. But at the same time I’ve been feeling that I need to backpedal. I want to keep the culinary technique I’ve developed but go back to what it’s all about.” Boswell says he hopes to open a new restaurant some time in the future to be a showcase for traditional New Orleans and Louisiana cuisine. “The stuff I grew up with has fallen into tourist traps,” he says. “It doesn’t have to be mediocre food, but that genre has fallen into a rut. We’re all down with why we live here in New Orleans and Louisiana. It’s such a special place. There’s so much history, and there’s such food history, too. Maybe we can dig back into the archives.” Other local chefs interviewed for this story agreed the city’s Creole cuisine has always been about blending different cultural influences. Some suggest that today’s hot dining trends could provide the fodder for tomorrow’s new twists on what New Orleans food can be. “People come here looking for the Louisiana experience, but I think they also like having it reinterpreted, too,” says Susan Spicer, chef and owner of Bayona and Mondo. “I think people are more savvy today, they travel more, they’re exposed to more influences. They’re looking for different perspectives.”

Leah Chase, the chef and owner of Dooky Chase Restaurant and renowned authority on Creole cuisine, says she’s excited by the range of new restaurants opening around town. “People will come to New Orleans to try different things, and we should show different things here, different tastes and styles,” she says. “Every step you take in your life, you learn.” She says a greater acceptance of different foods and flavors among New Orleans diners and visitors today has helped expand the range of her own kitchen. “Now I can do different things, because people today are more adventurous. They’ll try it,” Chase says. “I like to cook game. I’m from the country, so this isn’t new for me. This is what I knew growing up. But where before people would turn their noses up at it, today you can put that on your menu and there’s interest in it. I like to make quail and grits, for instance.” At the end of the day, though, Chase counsels that sometimes there really is nothing as satisfying as the food you already know by heart. “When you’re dining out, you go for different experiences,” she says. “But if you’re hungry, you better eat what you know. If you’re from New Orleans and you get really hungry, you better have New Orleans food.”


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Wine and Dine he French Quarter is rife with fine dining establishments and cozy cocktail lounges, and Cafe Giovanni (117 Decatur St., 529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com) has offered patrons both options at one address since its 2004 addition of the Belli Baci Lounge, which features wine specials, martinis and cocktails made with fresh juices. “It’s a great place for guests to relax, watch sports (and) hang out in a sophisticated but comfortable environment,” manager Nial George says of the lounge, where brick walls, red draperies and plush leather chairs lend warmth. Customers can sample the cocktail and tapas menus before ordering a full meal in the dining room. On Wednesday, Friday and Saturday evenings, dinner is accompanied by Cafe Giovanni’s salute to its Italian roots: opera singers performing around the Cafe Giovanni features American, restaurant’s white-clothed tables. Creole and Italian cuisine. “(The music) is perfect for the romantic ambience,” George says. Cafe Giovanni was founded in 1991 by chef Duke LoCicero, a New Orleans native who takes pride in his creative interpretations of traditional American, Creole and Italian cuisines. Classic Italian dishes like veal Marsala, cannelloni and pasta bolognese are interspersed with selections featuring native flavors, like the Southern-style Louisiana Voodoo shrimp and fried oysters Giovanni. Adept at multiple styles of cooking, LoCicero’s use of bold flavors and versatility as a chef have been key to Café Giovanni’s longevity and success, George says. Twenty years in the business haven’t stifled the inventive qualities of LoCicero’s menu. “The specials change almost every day,” George says. Specials include a ladies’ night dinner-and-drink deal and a daily happy hour. “It’s exciting to welcome people and be able to offer them so many choices,” he adds. The restaurant’s large space is available for private parties and events. LoCicero uses the restaurant’s size to its full advantage when he hosts an annual fundraiser for his Chef Duke Foundation for Kids. Established in 1992, the organization benefits children at area hospitals by providing funding for medical supplies.

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At 6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 18, the International Interior Design Association and the American Society of Interior Designers partner with Design Within Reach (3138 Magazine St., 8916520; www.dwr.com) for Parallels, a presentation series featuring designers from a variety of disciplines. The event features lectures by architect and jewelry designer Marion Cage McCollum and award-winning designer Suzanne Tick, followed by wine and appetizers from Martin Wine Cellar and Whole Foods. A $10 donation is suggested. Receive a 20 percent discount on your purchase from Loubat Foodservice Equipment (4141 Bienville Ave., 482-2554; www.loubat.com) when you shop at its showroom on Mondays through March 7 during its Mardi Gras Mondays promotion. The showroom is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Mary Frances Schaffer unveils her newest line of handbags from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 19, and Sunday, Feb. 20, at the Roosevelt Hotel’s (123 Baronne St., 648-1200; www.therooseveltneworleans.com) Roosevelt Emporium Gift Shop. Schaffer, creator of handbags carried by celebrities including Oprah Winfrey and Kate Hudson, celebrates 20 years in the fashion industry this year.

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011


>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << MUSIC FILM ART STAGE EVENTS CUISINE >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU GO << <<<<<<<<<< << 29 39 42 45 46 51 >> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< << THE >> >>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>> >> << <<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>> << <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<< >> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>> > FEB << <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< < … AND THE BALL AND ALL >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Among the rites of Carnival is the annual run of … and The Ball and All, the Ricky Graham-penned comedy about the Mystic Krewe of Terpsichore. Becky Allen and Amanda 25 YEARS Hebert star as Yat WASTED krewe organizers plan6:30 P.M. SATURDAY, ning their truck float FEB. 19 and getting ready for the ball. Tickets $32 (inFRENCH QUARTER AND cludes $5 drink credit). FAUBOURG MARIGNY 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 2 p.m. WWW.KREWEDUSun., through Feb. 28. VIEUX.ORG Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com

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The Krewe du Vieux parade combines edgy satire and bawdy humor. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Krewed Humor KREWE DU VIEUX CELEBRATES ITS 25TH ANNIVERSARY. BY WILL COVIELLO

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L.E.W.D., C.R.U.D.E., T.O.K.I.N., The Krewe of Underwear, Krewe of Drips and Discharges and the Mystic Krewe of Spermes (full disclosure: I am a member). Sub-krewes tend to have their favored targets and themes for floats, and the 2011 parade reflects the variety. “There’s lots of wonderful satire,” says krewe captain Lee Mullikin, who has authored a book about the group’s history. “There are some BP oil floats, politics, there’s ‘The Running of the Bull Shit,’ and ‘David Semen’s Treme.’” The most outrageous parades, such as the 2005 theme devoted to religious topics, or sacrilege, depending on your point of view, provoked protests and angry letters to local papers. In other years, satire directed at unpopular groups and individuals made the parade a standardbearer for populist outrage. The 2006 “C’est Levee” theme about the various failings of FEMA and Hurricane Katrina issues famously included a sad-faced French mime under the sign “Buy us back, Chirac.” “[That parade] was the most visceral, the most emotional, the most cathartic,” Mullikin says. “Because so many of us were rebuilding, we’ll never forget that parade.” Marshall delicately sidesteps some of the raunchiness of the group’s reputation as he prepares to rule over the procession. “This is an honor to follow in the footsteps of (past kings) Ernie K-Doe and Dr. John,” he says. “That’s what’s unique about New Orleans culture. There are no boundaries.” Visit www.kreweduvieux.org for a parade route and additional information.

FEB

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Singer/songwriters Erin McKeown and Carrie Rodriguez (pictured) have paired up for the Acoustic Cafe tour. A graduate of Brown University, McKeown has carved out a niche as a brainy, feminist folk act over the course of seven albums. Austin, Texas’ Rodriguez just released an album of duets, We Still Love Our Country (Ninth Street Opus), with Ben Kyle of Romantica. 8 p.m. Friday, Tickets $25, VIP tickets $50. Ogden Museum of Southern Art, Patrick Taylor Library, 925 Camp St., 539-9616; www.ogdenmuseum.org

LEON RUSSELL

FEB

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Elton John’s musical idol and Oklahoma’s answer to Dr. John, legendary session multi-instrumentalist Leon Russell — who regularly unearthed rock ’n’ roll gold in the late ’60s and early ’70s with Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, B.B. King and Ike & Tina Turner — returned to above-the-fold billing on 2010’s gospel-tinged The Union (Decca), an all-star teaming with John, lyricist Bernie Taupin and producer TBone Burnett. Tickets $26.50. 8 p.m. Saturday. House of Blues, 225 Decatur St., 310-4999; www.hob.com

GEORGE WINSTON

FEB

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Velveteen pianist George Winston’s muses include Jim Morrison, the changing seasons and Vince Guaraldi, whose percussive Peanuts scores inspired two Winston tributes, most recently 2010’s Love Will Come — The Music of Vince Guaraldi, Volume 2 (RCA/Dancing Cat). Winston also loves New Orleans: He covered Professor Longhair, Dr. John and Henry Butler on 2006’s Gulf Coast Blues & Impressions — A Hurricane Relief Benefit, and he’s donating proceeds from this show to victims of the BP oil disaster. Tickets $40 general admission, $20 students. 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Loyola University, Roussel Performance Hall, 865-2074; www.loyno.edu

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

on Marshall is honored. Really, he is. The director of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, former director of the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) and co-founder of the New Orleans Film Festival and Tennessee Williams/ New Orleans Literary Festival will add another title to his resume Saturday: King of Krewe du Vieux. “It’ll be unique riding on a float, throwing cups with my image on it — of me reclining half out of an overturned garbage container,” he says. “It’s bizarre.” Marshall will preside over the risque krewe’s “25 Years Wasted” parade, commemorating its silver anniversary. While he has been associated with a long list of New Orleans cultural institutions, he also is an appropriate choice for the parade. Marshall founded both the original Krewe du Vieux parade and its predecessor, the Krewe of Clones, which was based at the CAC. Marshall created the first Krewe du Vieux Carre parade in 1987 when he was the director of Le Petit Theatre du Vieux Carre. It was a new event reviving old traditions. Mardi Gras parades had been banned from the French Quarter, but by moving the date up to before the start of the city’s official Carnival calendar, he was able to engineer a Mardi Gras-style parade through the historic district. It was a purely pedestrian affair — mule-drawn floats came later — and featured a host of actors costumed for Valentine’s Day, which was the day of the parade. It also featured brass bands, an element that has remained constant. The parade also is known for satire and pushing the bounds of bawdy humor. The mother krewe comprises 17 sub-krewes, including Mama Roux, Seeds of Decline,

ERIN MCKEOWN AND CARRIE RODRIGUEZ

27


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timental X’s,’ ‘All to All’ — that Broken Social stuff, we all made Scene features a large and elastic that up together,” membership. Whiteman says. “We didn’t do anything different this time, in terms of putting a million tracks on one thing and peeling them all back. And we have John McEntire in the control tower. He’s amazing at peeling it back.” The mastermind behind Tortoise is perhaps the biggest change. McEntire replaced longtime producer Dave Newfeld and joined the band on tour in Europe as an auxiliary percussionist. His signatures with the Chicago post-rock band — creating breathing room between notes, letting guitars and electronics echo in space — are all over Forgiveness. “Johnny, he’s family now,” says Whiteman, using contemporary abstract art to describe the processes of Newfeld and McEntire. “[It’s] the difference between Jackson Pollack and Robert Motherwell. You can figure out who’s who.” When the record tour is over, Whiteman says he’ll revisit his side project, the Latininfluenced prog-rock trio Apostle of Hustle. He also plans to hatch a family band. “It’s going to be kind of faux-Arabic/Greek lo-fi dance music,” he says, laughing. “What you would expect from me.”

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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 15 > 2011

nly Broken Social Scene could get away with calling an eightdeep lineup “stripped-down.” The octet set to visit Tipitina’s this week is indeed intimate compared to New Orleans’ first taste of the Toronto rock collective, which came in March 2004: an incestuous, stage-crowding WTUL Marathon concert at the former Howlin’ Wolf with Tuscon, Ariz., pals Calexico and fellow Ontarioans Stars, one of a host of Social Scene ancillaries (see: Feist, Do Make Say Think, Metric, Apostle of Hustle, et al.). “I remember that,” says guitarist Andrew Whiteman. “We got drunk, and after the show we were using Calexico’s upright bass — they weren’t packing up their stuff real fast, so we grabbed their upright bass and we basically made up a song. ... We made some Latin mambo jam up, and then people started trying to limbo dance. Total New Orleans night.” Total Social Scene night, one could say. More than any other factor, community and spontaneity define the elastic, decade-old ensemble. The band claims anywhere from seven to 17 members — “It really depends on if anyone else we know is in town,” Whiteman says. In 2010, a series of jam sessions at keyboardist Charles Spearin’s house in Toronto gave birth to Forgiveness Rock Record (Arts & Crafts), their fourth proper LP. As with 2002 breakthrough You Forgot It In People and 2005’s eponymous followup, the 14 songs grew in different ways, according to Whiteman: from pop kernels brought in by different members or out of expansive impromptu instrumentals, which were eventually germinated with tinny vocals by co-founder Kevin Drew. “You don’t bring a finished product,” Whiteman says. “You bring a hook, or you bring a few chords and a bit of a melody.” Two of the strongest moments, the horn-blown chords of “Art House Director” and the aggressive chorus of the single

29


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GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 15 > 2011

CAMP

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classical arts FEatUrE

F irst Class

The Big easy FOundaTiOn annOunces winners FOr 2011 classical arTs awards.

By will cOviellO phOTOs By cheryl gerBer

he Big Easy Foundation announced winners for 2010 performances of dance, opera and classical music at its 17th annual Tribute to the Classical Arts luncheon on Monday, Feb. 7. Several nominated artists also performed at the event, demonstrating a diverse array of New Orleans’ cultural activity. There was an excerpt from An Embarrassing Position, an opera produced by the Xavier University Opera Workshop. Members of the Japan Club’s Minyo Dance Group entertained attendees with the traditional folk dance Kawachi Otoko Bushi, and Delta Festival Ballet presented a dance set to Cole Porter’s “Begin the Beguine.” Patricia Sallier Seals was honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award for her six-decade career providing vocal and instrumental music instruction. Jean Montès of Loyola University and director of the Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestras received special recognition for creating the Haitian Youth Music Relief program, which has delivered hundreds of donated instruments to children affected by Haiti’s devastating January 2010 earthquake. The event was dedicated to Klauspeter Seibel, the first fulltime music director of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, who died on Jan. 24 at the age of 74. He served as musical director from 1995 to 2005 and was the principal guest conductor through 2010. Tribute to the Classical Arts is sponsored by Gambit, WWNO 89.9 FM, Hall Piano Company, Coleman E. Adler & Sons, Uptown Costume & Dancewear, John and Anne Burr and the Hotel Monteleone. Proceeds from the event benefit the Foundation for Entertainment Development and Education, which supports arts education through annual grants.

t

Marjorie Schramel, Outstanding Choreography for new work-winner Greg Schramel and choreographer Anne Burr.

Special HonoreeS Lifetime Achievement Award Patricia Sallier Seals Arts Education Award Karel Sloane-Boekbinder Special Recognition Award Dr. Jean Montès Arts Patron Award Drs. R. Ranney and Emel Mize

classical Music & Opera awards BeSt claSSical MuSic perforMance Schubert Unfinished LPO Klauspeter Seibel, Conductor First Baptist Church, New Orleans

Gambit publisher Margo DuBos with Arts Patron Award winners R. Ranney and Emel Mize.

page 32

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

2010 classical arts awards

Delta Festival Ballet performed to Cole Porter’s “Begin the Beguine.”

31


classical arts FEatUrE

page 31

Best ChamBer musiC PerformanCe

Members of the LPO and Friends Trinity Artist Series Trinity Episcopal Church

Best PerformanCe of new ClassiCal musiC (ContemPorary)

The Passion of Joan of Arc Paul Goussot’s improvised organ accompaniment to the film St. Louis Cathedral Concert Series

Best oPera ProduCtion

The Magic Flute New Orleans Opera Association (NOOA) Robert Lyall, Conductor Mahalia Jackson Theater

Creative aChievement in oPera An Embarrassing Position Dan Shore, Composer Xavier Opera Workshop Xavier University of Louisiana

Best Choral arts Presentation

The Verdi Requiem NOOA Mahalia Jackson Theater

Dance awards Best ClassiCal Ballet ProduCtion Lacrymosa New Orleans Ballet Theatre NOCCA, Lupin Hall

Best modern danCe Presentation

Nature Boy Blake Coheley, Choreographer NOCCA, Lupin Hall

Best ethniC danCe ProduCtion

Bon Odori Japan Club Minyo Dance Group Japan Fest, New Orleans Museum of Art

Best ChoregraPhy (new work)

Gregory Schramel Patriotism New Orleans Ballet Theatre NOBT Spring Series NOCCA, Lupin Hall

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

Xavier University’s John Ware presented the opera awards.

32

The Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra’s Babs Mollere with Tribute to the Classical Arts sponsor John Burr and Katherine Cain of the Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestras.

Loyola University’s Dr. Jean Montès, who received a special recognition award, with emcee Angela Hill of WWL-TV and Xavier University’s Dan Shore, who was recognized for Creative Achievement in Opera.


classical arts FEatUrE

Choreographer Chard Gonzalez with Kesha McKey, Jarina Carvalho, Eric Thielman and Nikoloz Makhateli.

David Rosen, the leader of LPOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chamber players, with Lifetime Achievement honoree Patricia Sallier Seals and Arts Education Award-winner Karel Sloane-Boekbinder.

Georgia Bourderionnet of the Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestras played cello at Tribute to the Classical Arts.

The Anne Burr Dance Company performed an excerpt from Dragoon.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

The luncheon featured an excerpt from An Embarrassing Position, which was honored for Creative Achievement in Opera.

33


CoMe PLaY WiTH US!

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WEDNESDAY

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February 16

IRVIN MAYFIELD & THE NOJO JAM presents the music of

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Monday 14, 21, 28

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BOB FrENCH aND THE Tuesday 15, 22

JasON MarsaLIs wednesday 23

IrVIN MaYFIELD’s NOJO JaM PrEsENTs

THE MUsIC OF aNITa O’DaY

TRiXiE MiNX

EVERY FRIDAY AT MIDNIGHT

LEON “KID CHOCOLaTE” BrOwN DON VaPPIE sunday 20, 27

TYLEr’s rEVIsITED FEaTUrING

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

Carrying a Large Variety


All show times p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Tuesday 15 BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mark Weliky, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Delux, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Parishioners, 9

BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Candy RiedlLowe, 7

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Naked Orchestra, 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Royal Rounders, 7; Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;awlins Johnnys, 9:30

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7

CAFE NEGRIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9 CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nervous Duane, 7; Poe Boys, 11

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Paines, 6 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Rankin & Friends, 8 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 9

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Hook, 9:30 THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

GENNAROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harvey Jesus & Fire, 8

HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Soul School feat. Elliot Luv & the Abney Effect, 8 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jason Marsalis, 8

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brint Anderson, 7

LAFITTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BLACKSMITH SHOP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mike Hood, 9 MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rebirth Brass Band, 10 MY BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny T, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom Henehan, 8; Gina Forsyth, 9; Sam Cammarata, 10

Wednesday 16 12 BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brass-a-holics, 9

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jazz Lab feat. Jesse Morrow, 7:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; New Orleans Oneironauts, 9

BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Poppa Stoppa Oldies Band, 8 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jumpinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Johnny Sansone Blues Party, 7

BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Longstreth, 7

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lars Edegran & Topsy Chapman feat. Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Autin, 9

CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Iguanas, 8:30 CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim O. & the No Shows feat. Mama Go-Go, 6 COLUMNS HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kristina Morales, 8

D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tin Men, 7; Walter â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wolfmanâ&#x20AC;? Washington & the Roadmasters, 10

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bob Andrews, 9:30 EIFFEL SOCIETY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vivaz!, 8

THE FAMOUS DOOR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FRAT HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Intervert, Dying Euforia, City Below, 10 FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buskersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Ballroom, 10

HUDDLE SPORTS BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Band of Brothers, 9 IRVIN MAYFIELDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sasha Masakowski, 5; Irvin Mayfieldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NOJO Jam, 8

JIMMY BUFFETTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ched Reeves, 2; Joe Bennett, 7

LACAVAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SPORTS BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crossfire, 9

KRAZY KORNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

MAPLE LEAF BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brian Stoltz, 10

MOJO STATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ed Wills, Blues for Sale, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Buddy Mann, 9; Randy Mack, 10

MON.11AM-3PM â&#x20AC;˘ TUES-THURS.11AM-9PM FRI-SAT.11AM-10PM â&#x20AC;˘ SUN BRUNCH. 9AM-3PM

RALPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON THE PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 5

A True MID-CITY

ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 8:30 RUSTY NAIL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jenn Howard, 7:30

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Orleans 6, 6; St. Louis Slim & the Frenchmen Street Jug Band, 10

CANDLELIGHT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Treme Brass Band, 9

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PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8

BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lynn Drury, 7; Blues4Sale, 9:30

OLD POINT BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jimmy Carpenter, 8

RALPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ON THE PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joe Krown, 5

OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vibe, 8:30

SHAMROCK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Beth Patterson, 9

OAK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Austin Alleman, 7

PRESERVATION HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Preservation Hall-Stars feat. Shannon Powell, 8

OLD FIREMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HALL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Two Piece & a Biscuit feat. Brandon Foret, Allan Maxwell & Brian Melancon, 7:30

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; United Postal Project, 8; Khris Royal & Dark Matter, 10

KERRY IRISH PUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chip Wilson, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Charlie Cuccia & Old No. 7 Band, 7

OAK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Amanda Walker, 7

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Uptown Jazz Orchestra, 8 & 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zaza, 6

NEIGHBORHOOD

MUSIC BAR

FREE FEB THEBLTS

MUSIC LINE-UP

BACCHANAL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Courtyard Kings, 7; Vincent Marini, 9:30 BANKS STREET BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dave Jordan & the Neighborhood Improvement Association, 10 BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Armand St. Martin, 7

BAYOU PARK BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ron Hotstream & the F-Holes, 9

BEACH HOUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Beach House All-Stars, 8 BIG ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Danny Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blues Jam, 8

BISTREAUX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dear New Orleans benefit feat. Bonerama & friends, 10; Gravity A (upstairs), 10 BMC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ruby Moon, 7; LowStress Quintet, 10 BOMBAY CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Marlon Jordan Jazz Trio, 8 BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brandon Foret, 9:30

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Autin, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Domenic, 7; Rotten Cores, 11 CHICKIE WAH WAH â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tuba Skinny & Erika Lewis, 8

9PM

OPEN 16 BAND OF BROTHERS MIC

17 RON HOTSTREAM & THE F-HOLES 10PM

ROOTS ROCK BAND

FEB

9PM

FEB CLASSIC COUNTRY THURSDAYS WITH

FEB 18 FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE PARTY 10PM FEB SPOOKY LESTRANGE AND HER 10PM 19 BILLION DOLLAR BABYDOLLS

YUKI IZAKAYA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; By and By, 8

Thursday 17

PARISHIONERS

15

542 S. JEFF DAVIS PKWY

â&#x20AC;˘nug â&#x20AC;˘arbor 7Ă&#x160;",  -½Ă&#x160;*,  ,Ă&#x160;<<Ă&#x160; 1

14 15 WED 16 THU 17 FRI 18 SAT 19 SUN 20 MON

CHARMAINE NEVILLE BAND

TUE

GEOFF CLAPP TRIO UPTOWN JAZZ ORCHESTRA SAMIR ZARIF QUINTET ELLIS MARSALIS QUARTET JOHN WOOTON & KAISO Free Show MEZCAL JAZZ UNIT from France

-"7/ -\ nĂ&#x160;EĂ&#x160;£äĂ&#x160;*

  Ă&#x160;,"Ă&#x160;x*

â&#x20AC;˘4â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘

$6450. 61)0-45&3:

'"#3*$4

CIRCLE BAR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sam and Boone, 6

DAVENPORT LOUNGE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeremy Davenport, 5:30 D.B.A. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jon Cleary, 7

PAGE 36

7&5&3"/4#-7% ] 

PARISH

2/18 Jermaine Quiz presents MashUp NOLA 2/25 Tera Melos & Marnie Stern plus Caddywhompus

2/26 The Scorseses CD Release Party plus Lovey Dovies plus Luke Starkiller

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

FUNKY PIRATE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30

TIPITINAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Broken Social Scene, Zeus, 9

1/2 PRICE PIZZAS & APPETIZERS

TUE

Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

DAILY

FOOD HAPPY HOUR

MONDAY-FRIDAY 3-6PM

WED

FAX:483-3116

SPOTTED CAT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brett Richardson, 4; Smokinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Time Jazz Club, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tom McDermott, noon

OYSTERS

THU

listingsedit@gambitweekly.com;

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Geoff Clapp Trio, 8 & 10

MUSIC

FRI

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde

ROCK â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BOWL â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Susan Cowsill, 8:30

CHARGRILLED

STICK THIS IN YOUR EAR

SAT

LISTINGS

35


MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 35 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Loren Pickford, 9:30 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6

THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HARRAH’S CASINO (MASQUERADE) — Real Love, 6 HI-HO LOUNGE — Stooges Brass Band, 9:30 HOSTEL NEW ORLEANS — Uniquity feat. Slangston Hughes and Elliot Luv, 11

HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Yip Deceiver, Lady Lazarus, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Roman Skakun, 5; Shamarr Allen, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Jimmy James, 2; Captain Leo, 7 KERRY IRISH PUB — Speed the Mule, 9 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & the Zydeco Hellraisers, 4; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Rebels Brass Band, 11

THE MAISON — Dave Easley, 7; Rue Fiya, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — The Trio, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Seladora, 7; Nattie, 8; Frans Schumann, 9; Coofs, 10

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

OAK — Billy Iuso, 8

36

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 4; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Blues Frenzy, 6:30; Louisiana Hellbenders, 9 PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Tim Laughlin & Connie Jones feat. Crescent City Joymakers, 8 PRESERVATION HALL — Tornado Brass Band, 8 RALPH’S ON THE PARK — Joe Krown, 5 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Jeffery Broussard, 8:30

SATURN BAR — Alex McMurray, 9 SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Samir Zarif Quintet, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Miss Sophie Lee, 6; New Orleans Moonshiners, 10 TELLO’S BISTRO — Jerry Nuccio, 5 VAUGHAN’S — Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 8:30 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6

YUKI IZAKAYA — Norbert Slama Trio, 8

Friday 18 12 BAR — John Lisi & Delta Funk, 9

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8 AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — Scott Kyser, 6:30

preview

BANKS STREET BAR — Local Skank and others, 10

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

BAYOU PARK BAR — Jonathan “Dragon” Cushionberry, 9

BEACH HOUSE — Bobby Cure & the Summertime Blues, 9

BISTREAUX — Paul Longstreth, 7

BLUE NILE — Mykia Jovan & Jason Butler, 8; Kermit Ruffins & the Barbecue Swingers, 11 BMC — Caroline Fourmy & Her Jazz Band, 7; Rue Fiya, 10; One Mind Brass Band, 1 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Banu Gibson & Trio, 9:30

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Groovy 7, 9:30

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9 CARROLLTON STATION — Twang Bone feat. Jimmy Robinson, Mark Mullins, Susan Cowsill & Michael Skinkus, 9:30 CHECK POINT CHARLIE — Stephanie Nilles, 7; Hooch Riders, 11

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Pfister Sisters, 5; Paul Sanchez, 8; Richard Julian Trio, 10

CIRCLE BAR — Jim O. & Sporadic Fanatics, 6

BANKS STREET BAR — Haarp, Cape of the Matador, 10

Deceptive Practices

Surely Of Montreal bassist Davey Pierce and keyboardist Nicolas Dobbratz didn’t issue Yip Deceiver — a self-released, self-titled 7-inch side-project that began streaming without fanfare on Bandcamp.com in late January — as a make-good for their Athens, Ga., glam band’s over-promised, under-delivering 2010 LP False Priest (Polyvinyl), the long-awaited call for intervention on frontman Kevin Barnes’ aural sex addiction. Or did they? Both tracks, exuberant A-side “Obnoxia” and its adorable counterpart “For All the Haters,” possess more of Barnes’ sonic blessings than the entirety of Priest: colliding pinball synths, obese electronic bass, high-heeled melodies and a gay parade of glorious falsettos. About the only things missing are intense self-loathing and out-of-context fellatio references. So Yip Deceiver could stand to be a little more devious. But for fans left wanting by its unholy father’s latest sermon, this will seem heaven-sent. Lady Lazarus, aka opaque singer/pianist Melissa Ann Sweat, opens. Tickets $5. — Noah Bonaparte Pais

FEB

17

Yip Deceiver with Lady Lazarus 10 p.m. Thursday Howlin’ Wolf Den, 901 S. Peters St., 5295844; www.thehowlinwolf.com

DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9 D.B.A. — Hot Club of New Orleans, 6; Pine Leaf Boys, 10 DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Joe Krown Trio, 10 DRAGON’S DEN — Gov’t Majik, 10; Gov’t Majik, 10:30 THE EMBERS “ORIGINAL” BOURBON HOUSE — Curtis Binder, 6 EMERIL’S DELMONICO — Bob Andrews, 7 FELIPE’S TAQUERIA — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 10

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HANGAR — Genitorturers, 9 HERMES BAR — Sasha Masakowski & Sidewalk Strutters, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES (PARISH) — Jermaine Quiz, 10

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Professor Piano Series, 5; Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown, 8; Burlesque Ballroom feat. Linnzi Zaorski, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Colin Lake, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 7 JUJU BAG CAFE AND BARBER SALON — Micheala Harrison, Todd Duke, 7:30

BLUE NILE — Washboard Chaz Blues Trio, 7; Kid Red (Balcony Room), 10; Empress Hotel, Big History, Booty Trove, 10

BMC — New Orleans Jazz Series, 3; Jayna Morgan & the Sazerac Sunrise Jazz Band, 6:30; Paula & the Pontiacs, 9:30; Ashton & the Big Easy Brawlers Brass Band, 12:30 a.m. BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6; Tim Laughlin & Trio, 9:30

KERRY IRISH PUB — Damien Louviere, 5; Hurricane Refugees, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Joe Krown, 7; Renard Poche Band, 11

THE MAISON — Meta Space Funk Menagerie, 7 MARKET CAFE — Andy K. & Bobby Love, 4:30

METROPOLITAN — Gentleman Jack Art, Beats + Lyrics, 7 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Danon Smith, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Damn Hippies, 7; Gallivan Burwell, 9; Iain Micah Weigert, 11 OAK — Cristina Perez Trio, 7; Brad Webb Trio, 10

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30 OLD POINT BAR — Ozzy Cash feat. Kim Carson, 9:30

ONE EYED JACKS — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 9

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Clive Wilson & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

Preservation Hall Jazz Masters feat. Leroy Jones, 8

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Boogie Men, 9:30 RUSTY NAIL — Kirk Holder, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Ellis Marsalis Quartet, 8 & 10

SOUTHPORT HALL — Know Your Enemy, Destined To Fall, Lift The Veil, 10 SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Washboard Chaz Blues Trio CD release, 6:30; New Orleans Cottonmouth Kings, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — The Way, 9

TIPITINA’S — Dirty Dozen Brass Band, MyNameIsJohnMichael, 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Tommy’s Latin Jazz Band feat. Matthew Shilling, 9 TOOLOULA’S — Voodoo Highway, 10

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

YELLOW MOON BAR — Michael James & His Lonesome, 9

Saturday 19

PELICAN CLUB — Sanford Hinderlie, 7

ANDREA’S CAPRI BLU LOUNGE — Philip Melancon, 8

PRESERVATION HALL —

BABYLON LOUNGE — Shy Green Psychedelic Blues Show, 10

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Rechelle, Regeneration, 5:30

APPLE BARREL — Peter Orr, 7

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Shamarr Allen & the Underdawgs, 10 MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Jam Session feat. Kevin Clark, 10

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Professor Gal, 8; Mr. Steve, 9; Nicholas Mallis, 10; Todd Lemoine, 11

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Joe King Jr., Joshua Walker, Elaine White, Bruce Barnes, 2 OAK — Mia Borders, 8

BOOMTOWN CASINO, BOOMERS SALOON — Boot Hill, 9:30

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1; Vibe, 8:30

CAROUSEL PIANO BAR & LOUNGE — John Autin, 9

ONE EYED JACKS — Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, War Chief Juan, 3pc. Spicy, 9

CHECK POINT CHARLIE — The Bils & friends, 10

PELICAN CLUB — Sandford Hinderlie, 7

CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

OLD POINT BAR — Ian Cunningham, 9:30

CARROLLTON STATION — Giant Cloud, Smiley with A Knife, Unwed Sailor, 9:30

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lionel Ferbos & Palm Court Jazz Band, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Jazzholes, 6

PRESERVATION HALL — Preservation Hall Jazz Band feat. Mark Braud, 8

COCONUT CLUB — Uncle Wayne Daigrepont, 7:30 DAVENPORT LOUNGE — Jeremy Davenport, 9

D.B.A. — Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 6; Tin Men, 11 DECKBAR & GRILLE — Miche & MixMavens, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — Acoustic Swiftness, 10

CLUB 7140 — Michael Ward, 8

COLUMNS HOTEL — Alex Bachari Trio, 5

BAYOU BAR AT THE PONTCHARTRAIN HOTEL — Armand St. Martin, 7; Philip Melancon, 8

People, 7; Brass-a-holics, 10; Caesar Bros Funk Box, midnight

DRAGON’S DEN — Mad Happy, 10

FRENCH MARKET — Navy Band New Orleans, 2 FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Big Al Carson & the Blues Masters, 8:30 HERMES BAR — Paul Sanchez, 9:30 & 11

HOUSE OF BLUES — Leon Russell, 8 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Off The Dome Emcee Competition, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bill Summers, 8; Kinfolk Brass Band, midnight

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Joe Bennett, 2; Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 5 KERRY IRISH PUB — Wilson & Moore, 5; Rites of Passage, 9

KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30 LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP — Mike Hood, 9 LE BON TEMPS ROULE — Soul Project, 11 LOUISIANA MUSIC FACTORY — Parishioners, 2; Ivoire Spectacle feat. Seguenon Kone, 3; Panorama Brass Band, 4

THE MAISON — Christina Perez, 5; Clarence & the Funky

RITZ-CARLTON — Catherine Anderson, 1

ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Sgt. Pepper’s Beatles Tribute Band, 9:30 RUSTY NAIL — Jesse Moore Band, 10

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — John Wooton & Kaiso, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — John Royan Trio, 3; Panorama Jazz Band, 6; Meschiya Lake & the Little Big Horns, 10 TIPITINA’S — Donald Harrison Jr., 10

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — Julio & Caesar, 10 TOOLOULA’S — Backflow, 10 TUGENDHAFT’S TAVERN — Doctor Jazz, 6

UNO LAKEFRONT ARENA — KEM, Ledisi, El DeBarge, 8 WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Zaza, 6; Anais St. John, 9

Sunday 20 12 BAR — Fredy Omar con su Banda, 6

ARNAUD’S FRENCH 75 BAR — Gumbo Trio, 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 BANKS STREET BAR — Gal Holiday & the Honky Tonk Revue, 9 BAYOU PARK BAR — Johnny Angel, 10 BLUE NILE — Mainline, 10

BMC — Nola Music Series, 1; Cristina Perez, 6; Andy J. Forest, 9; Sweet Jones, midnight

BOMBAY CLUB — Monty Banks, 6

BUFFA’S LOUNGE — Some Like it Hot, 11 a.m. PAGE 38


s Entertainment Serie BOOT HILL February 19 • 9:30pm

Boomerssm

WEDNESDAYS COMEDY • 8pm

FEB 16

Tom Rhodes featuring Slim Bloodworth

FEB 23

Tom Hester featuring Mike Weldon

MAR 2

Steve Hirst featuring Rob Jenkins

MAR 9

Wild Bill Dykes and special guests

THURSDAYS LADIES NIGHT • Budweiser specials all night. Ladies enjoy 2-for-1 mixed drink specials

LIVE MUSIC • 8pm

FEB 17 Brandon Foret

FEB 24 Brandon Foret

MAR 3 Brandon Foret

MAR 10 Brandon Foret

FRIDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

FEB 18 Groovy 7

FEB 25 No Idea MAR 11 The Topcats

SATURDAYS LIVE MUSIC • 9:30pm

FEB 19 Boot Hill MAR 5

Bobby J & Stuff Like That

FEB 26 Al “Lil Fats” Jackson MAR 12 Burgundy

2010 Winner “Best place to go dancing” Boomers

Where the Locals Party, Play... and Win! boomtownneworleans.com • 504.366.7711 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, LA 70058 Must be 21. Entertainment start times may vary. Shows are subject to change. ©2011 Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc. All rights reserved.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 877.770.STOP

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

MAR 4 Foret Tradition

37


MUSIC

LISTINGS

PAGE 36 CAFE NEGRIL — Smoky Greenwell & the Blues Gnus, 10

WEDNESDAY'S

$4

dozen oysters on the half shell

boiled seafood • po-boys • pizza • muffulettas seafood plates & platters • daily lunch buffets Tue s d ay - T h u rs d ay 1 1 a m -9 p m • F ri d ay- Sat u rd ay 11am - 10p m

9201 JEFFERSON HWY • (504) 737-4610

CHAMPIONS SPORTS PUB & GRILL — Sam Cammarata, 8

CIRCLE BAR — Micah McKee & Loren Murrell, 7 COLUMNS HOTEL — Chip Wilson, 11 a.m.

D.B.A. — Palmetto Bug Stompers, 6; Marc Stone Band, 10

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Jesse McBride & the Next Generation Jazz Band, 9

FINNEGAN’S EASY — Laissez Faire, 3

FUNKY PIRATE — Mark Penton, 4:30; Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Burning Spear Indians, 7

HOUSE OF BLUES — Sunday Gospel Brunch, 10 a.m; Grace Potter & the Nocturnals, Jonathan Tyler & the Northern Lights, 8:30 HOWLIN’ WOLF (THE DEN) — Hot 8 Brass Band, 9

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Germaine Bazzle & Paul Longstreth, 7

JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Irving Bannister’s All-Stars, 2; Cindy Chen, 7 KERRY IRISH PUB — Traditional Irish session, 5; Steve Keith, 8 KRAZY KORNER — Dwayne Dopsie & Zydeco Hellraisers, 1; Death by Orgasm, 8:30

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

MADIGAN’S — Anderson/ Easley Project, 9

38

THE MAISON — Low Stress Quintet, 10

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Joe Krown Trio feat. Russell Batiste & Walter “Wolfman” Washington, 10

check local listings for theaters and showtimes

SHAMROCK BAR — Humberto Menez fundraiser feat. Otra, Billy Iuso, Rick Trolsen, Elegant Gypsy, 3

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Mezcal Jazz Unit, 8 & 10 SPOTTED CAT — Rights of Swing, 3; Kristina Morales, 6; Pat Casey & the New Sound, 10

ST. CHARLES TAVERN — Maryflynn Thomas, 10 a.m.

TIPITINA’S — Sunday Music Workshop feat. Simon Lott Trio, 1:30; Cajun Fais Do Do feat. Bruce Daigrepont, 5:30

WINDSOR COURT HOTEL (POLO CLUB LOUNGE) — Mario Abney Quartet, 6

YUKI IZAKAYA — Luke Winslow King, 7

Monday 21 APPLE BARREL — Sam Cammarata, 8

BACCHANAL — Jonathan Freilich, 7:30

BANKS STREET BAR — N’awlins Johnnys, 10 BJ’S LOUNGE — King James & the Special Men, 10

BLUE NILE — Fugitives of Funk feat. Russell Batiste, 9

OLD OPERA HOUSE — Bonoffs, 1

OLD POINT BAR — Tuba Skinny, 11:30 a.m; Outlaw Jim & the Whiskey Benders, 2; Honey Island Swamp Band, 5; Dana Abbott, 8

DOS JEFES UPTOWN CIGAR BAR — John Fohl, 9:30

THE PRECINCT — Funk Express, 7:30

PRESERVATION HALL — Tommy Sancton’s New Orleans Jazz Band, 8 RITZ-CARLTON — Armand St. Martin, 10:30 a.m; Catherine Anderson, 2 ROCK ’N’ BOWL — Solutions

OLD POINT BAR — Brent Walsh Trio, 6:30 PRESERVATION HALL — St. Peter Street Playboys feat. William Smith, 8

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — Charmaine Neville Band, 8 & 10

SPOTTED CAT — Brett Richardson, 4; Dominic Grillo & the Frenchmen Street AllStars, 6; Jazz Vipers, 10

ST. ROCH TAVERN — Washboard Lissa Orchestra, 7

classical/ concerts CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

120 S. New Hampshire St., Covington, (985) 892-3177 — Sun: Third Sunday Concert Series presents NOVA, 5 DEGAS HOUSE — 2401 Esplanade Ave., 821-5009; www.degashouse.com — Thu: WATIV, Rex Gregory, 7 LOUIS J. ROUSSEL PERFORMANCE HALL —

Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage. loyno.edu — Sat: George Winston, 7:30

OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART — 925

DONNA’S BAR & GRILL — Les Getrex & the Blues All-Star Band, 9

THE PERFECT FIT BAR & GRILL — Brass-a-holics, 8

NEUTRAL GROUND COFFEEHOUSE — Danielle Thomas, 8; Ashley Beach, 9; Songwriter’s Symposium, 10

CHICKIE WAH WAH — Jon Cleary, 8

BOMBAY CLUB — Amanda Walker, 7

D.B.A. — Luke Winslow-King, 6; Glen David Andrews, 9

Application and additional information for The Crossroads Arts Bazaar at the New Orleans Healing Center

MY BAR — Danny T, 8

NOCCA|RIVERFRONT ELLIS MARSALIS JAZZ STUDIO —

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK — Stephen Dale, 3

PALM COURT JAZZ CAFE — Lucien Barbarin & Sunday Night Swingsters, 8

Drury, 9

MAPLE LEAF BAR — Papa Grows Funk, 10

BMC — Fun in the Pocket feat. Mayumi Shara & Reinaldo, 6; Smoky Greenwell’s Monday Night Blues Jam, 9:30

COLUMNS HOTEL — David Doucet, 8

CALLING ALL ARTISTS

Application deadline February 25, 2011

ROOSEVELT HOTEL (BLUE ROOM) — James Rivers Movement, 11 a.m.

MOJITOS RUM BAR & GRILL — Javier Olondo, 7

ONE EYED JACKS — Ratty Scurvics & the Black Market Butchers, 9

Market Opportunity

Not Shootings benefit concert feat. Amanda Shaw, Glenn David Andrews, Kermit Ruffins and others, 8

DRAGON’S DEN — Domenic, 10 THE FAMOUS DOOR — Darren Murphy & Big Soul, 3

FOUR POINTS BY SHERATON (M!X ULTRALOUNGE) — Tim Sullivan Jazz Trio, 7

FUNKY PIRATE — Willie Lockett & All Purpose Blues Band, 8:30 HI-HO LOUNGE — Blue Grass Pickin’ Party, 8

IRVIN MAYFIELD’S JAZZ PLAYHOUSE — Bob French & the Original Tuxedo Jazz Band, 8 JIMMY BUFFETT’S MARGARITAVILLE CAFE — Truman Holland, 2; Brint Anderson, 7 KERRY IRISH PUB — Lynn

2800 Chartres St., 940-2787; www.nocca.com — Tue: Jazz Alumni Series presents Jasen Weaver, 6:30

Camp St., 539-9600; www. ogdenmuseum.org — Fri: Erin McKeown & Carrie Rodriguez, 8

ST. CHARLES AVENUE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH — 1545 State St. — Fri: Musaica, 7:30; Sun: CMOP Concert series presents New Orleans Uptown Brass, 3 ST. PATRICK’S CATHOLIC CHURCH — 724 Camp St.,

525-4413; www.oldstpatricks. org — Fri: NOVA Chorale presents “Rejoice!” 7:30

STAGE DOOR CANTEEN AT THE NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM — 945 Magazine St., 528-1944 — Victory Big Band, 8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 1 p.m. Sun.

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH —

1329 Jackson Ave., 522-0276; www.trinitynola.com — Tue: Organ & Labyrinth, 6; Thu: Evensong Choir, 6:30; Sun: New Orleans Strathspey & Reel Society, 5; Mon: Taize, 6

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.


FILM

LISTINGS

A ROOM WITH A VIEW

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

NOW SHOWING BIUTIFUL (R) — In this Cannes hit, Javier Bardem stars as a Barcelona man facing his own mortality and struggling to reconcile with his family and lover. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place BLACK SWAN (R) — Darren Aronofsky directs Natalie Portman as a veteran ballerina whose psyche begins to crumble after nabbing the lead role in Swan Lake. AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Chalmette Movies (starting Friday) BLUE VALENTINE (R) — Ryan

Gosling and Michelle Williams star as a couple who rely on one night and memories of their courtship to revive their rocky marriage. Canal Place

THE COMPANY MEN (R) — The film spans a year in the life of three men forced to redefine their lives after a round of corporate downsizing. AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20 THE DILEMMA (PG-13) — Ron

Howard directs Kevin James, Vince Vaughn and Winona Ryder in the comedy about a man who discovers his best friend’s wife is having an affair. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 14

THE FIGHTER (R) — Mark Wahlberg stars as boxer “Irish” Micky Ward, a world lightweight champion trained by his brother (Christian Bale). Grand GNOMEO & JULIET (G) — The animated film is a spin on the Shakespeare tale with feuding gardeners and their lawn gnomes and flamingos. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) — After his media mogul

father dies, a directionless playboy (Seth Rogan) decides to fight crime. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) —

Jack Black stars as a modernday Gulliver, who is mistakenly assigned a travel piece

A Rebellious Phase

Johnny Mad Dog plunges right into the madness of the Liberian civil war as rebel groups storm the capital Monrovia in 2003. In the opening scene, a group of child soldiers roust a small village, making it clear there is little distinction among pillaging, any political agenda they might follow and sheer terrorism. An adult rebel soldier controls the group of boys, almost as if he’s running a cult. Recruiting is done at gunpoint and mostly as an alternative to death, but the process is actually more sadistic than that. In a fire-lit ceremony, he shoots a machine gun full of blanks at them, then says it proves they are invincible. They frequently chant mantras like “You don’t want to die, don’t be born,” as they advance or fight. A 15-year-old nicknamed Johnny Mad Dog (Christopher Minie) is in charge of the group, and he says he has been fighting for five years and doesn’t remember his name or life before becoming a soldier. They terrorize everyone in their path, and director Jean-Stephane Sauvaire accentuates the menace by dressing machine-gun toting teens in a little girl’s butterfly wings or a wedding dress. He could not have created a bleaker moral abyss. They steal food by accusing the owners of having looted it themselves, and they justify murder by insisting individuals belong to particular tribal groups. All vulnerability or sense of inadequacy is channeled into rage and a will to humiliate and harm others. Johnny is a leader because he is vicious but also somewhat level-headed. He crosses paths with a girl whose town and family his group has ravaged. In the chaos of the civil war, they both find themselves subject to the whims and wild indifference of others. Ultimately, there is a stark question of whether someone as steeped in violence as Johnny can renounce it, or whether someone as violated as Laokole (Daisy Victoria Vandy) can resist it. Sauvaire used nonactors, and the teens are excellent. It’s a thrilling but violent and unsettling film. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students/ seniors, $5 Zeitgeist members. — Will Coviello

Johnny Mad Dog 7:30 p.m. Fri.; 5 p.m. Sat.; 7:30 p.m. Sun.-Thu. 18–24 Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

FEB

on the Bermuda Triangle and finds himself trapped on an island of tiny people. AMC Palace 20, Hollywood 14 I LOVE YOU, PHILLIP MORRIS (R) — The film is based on the life

of Steven Jay Russell, played by Jim Carrey, a newly out-ofthe-closet con artist who has escaped from Texas prisons. Chalmette Movies

JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) —

Adam Sandler and Jennifer

Aniston star in the romantic comedy about a plastic surgeon who enlists the help of his assistant and her kids to woo a schoolteacher. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G) — The documen-

tary on the 16-year-old pop sensation features show foot-

MUSIC COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS A HAPPYEXECUTIVEMADISON PRODUCTION A FILM BY DENNIS DUGAN “JUST GO WITH IT” SUPERVISION BY MICHAEL DILBECK BROOKS ARTHUR KEVIN GRADY MUSIC BASED ON “CACTUS FLOWER” STAGE PLAY BY RUPERT GREGSON-WILLIAMS PRODUCERS BARRY BERNARDI ALLEN COVERT TIM HERLIHY STEVE KOREN SCREENPLAY BY I.A.L. DIAMOND BY ABE BURROWS BASED UPON SCREENPLAY PRODUCED DIRECTED A FRENCH PLAY BY BARILLET AND GREDY BY ALLAN LOEB AND TIMOTHY DOWLING BY ADAM SANDLER JACK GIARRAPUTO HEATHER PARRY BY DENNIS DUGAN

NOW PLAYING

check LOcAL LIstINGs fOr theAters ANd shOWtImes

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

THE EAGLE (PG-13) — A young Roman soldier striving to honor his father’s memory embarks on a dangerous journey to find his lost legion’s golden emblem. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

review

39


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FILM

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age and screaming teenagers. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

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THE KING’S SPEECH (R) — Colin Firth stars as King George VI, who unexpectedly becomes king when his brother Edward relinquishes the throne. AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 20, Canal Place, Grand, Hollywood 14

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Portman and Ashton Kutcher) try to have a strictly sexual relationship, but it becomes complicated. AMC Palace 10, AMC Palace 12, AMC Palace 16, AMC Palace 20, Chalmette Movies, Grand, Hollywood 9, Hollywood 14

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A ROOM WITH A VIEW

OPENING FRIDAY BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON (PG-13) — Martin

Lawrence reprises his role as FBI agent Malcolm Turner who disguises himself as an old woman. I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) — A teen who hides a secret

identity and extraordinary abilities must elude an enemy who seeks to destroy him.

SECONDS APART (R) — Twins

who use their telekinesis for evil ultimately have to face each other after law enforcement starts to get wind of their murderous ways.

SPECIAL SCREENINGS BRINGING UP BABY (NR) —

Howard Hawks’ 1936 film follows the predicaments that arise among a scientist (Cary Grant), a free-spirited woman (Katharine Hepburn) and a leopard. Free admission. 8 p.m. Monday, La Divina Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 302-2692; www.ladivinagelateria.com DEREK JARMAN TRIBUTE —

The center honors the anniversary of the director’s death with screenings of Isaac Julien’s Derek (7 p.m.), a commemoration of Jarman, and Jarman’s 1991 film The Garden (8:30 p.m.). Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. Saturday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net

HADEWIJCH (R) — After a Parisian nun is ejected from the convent for taking her faith too far, she returns to regular life and must reconcile her passionate love for God with the dangerous aspects of the real world. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 9:30 p.m. TuesdayWednesday, Zeitgeist MultiDisciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 8275858; www.zeitgeistinc.net HENRI-GEORGES CLOUZOT’S INFERNO (NR) — Using lost

footage from Clouzot’s troubled film Inferno, archivist Serge Bromberg weaves together a documentary using original footage and interviews with surviving cast and crew. Tickets $7 general admission, $6 students and seniors, $5 members. 7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary Arts Center, 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net

MARDI GRAS: MADE IN CHINA (NR) — The film follows the

path of Mardi Gras beads from Carnival in New Orleans to the harsh factories of Fuzhou, China. The screening is part of the Green Screen

series. Free admission. 7 p.m. Thursday, Green Project, 2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www. thegreenproject.org ME FACING LIFE: CYNTOIA’S STORY (NR) — The docu-

mentary tells the story of Cyntoia Brown, a 16-year-old sentenced to life in prison for murder. The screening is part of the New Orleans Community Cinema series. Free admission. 6 p.m. Saturday, Antenna Gallery, 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org NO ONE EVER WENT HUNGRY: CAJUN FOOD TRADITIONS THEN & NOW (NR) — The museum

hosts the premier of Kevin McCaffrey’s documentary, which explores the traditions and ingredients of Cajun culinary traditions. A reception with film participants follows the screening. Free admission. 2 p.m. Sunday, Southern Food & Beverage Museum, Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 5690405; www.southernfood.org REQUIEM FOR A DREAM (R) —

The lives of four Coney Island dwellers spiral downward because of drug addiction. Tickets $8. Midnight FridaySaturday, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www.theprytania.com

ROPE (NR) — In Alfred

Hitchcock’s 1948 crime drama, two young men strangle a former classmate in an attempt to create “the perfect murder.” Tickets $5.50. Noon Saturday-Sunday and Feb. 23, Prytania Theatre, 5339 Prytania St., 891-2787; www. theprytania.com

THE WERETH ELEVEN (NR) — The documentary tells

the story of the 11 AfricanAmerican soldiers of the 333rd Field Artillery Battalion who, after being overrun by Germans at the start of the Battle of the Bulge, fled to Wereth, Belgium where they were later discovered and killed. A Q&A follows the screening. Reservations are recommended. Call 5281944 ext. 331 for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. Saturday, National World War II Museum Solomon Victory Theater, 945 Magazine St., 528-1944

AMC Palace 10 (Hammond), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 12 (Clearview), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 16 (Westbank), (888) 262-4386; AMC Palace 20 (Elmwood), (888) 262-4386; Canal Place, 363-1117; Chalmette Movies, 304-9992 ; Entergy IMAX, 581-IMAX; Grand (Slidell), (985) 641-1889; Hollywood 9 (Kenner), 464-0990; Hollywood 14 (Covington), (985) 893-3044; Kenner MegaDome, 468-7231; Prytania, 891-2787; Solomon Victory Theater, National World War II Museum, 527-6012 Compiled by Lauren LaBorde


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 15 > 2011

41


ART

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

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OPENING 1022 GALLERY. 1022 Lowerline St., 301-0679; www.1022gallery. blogspot.com — Paintings by Tim Trapolin, through April 16. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. COUP D’OEIL ART CONSORTIUM. 2033 Magazine St., 722-0876; www.coupdoeilartconsortium.com — “Intimate

Topographies,” sculpture by Paulina Sierra; “Slowness,” paintings by Emily Farranto; both through March 19. Opening reception 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday.

LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Before During After,”

photographs illustrating the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, through August. Opening reception 6 p.m. Wednesday.

GALLERIES 3 RING CIRCUS’ THE BIG TOP GALLERY. 1638 Clio St., 569-2700; www.3rcp.com —

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

“Since 1969”

42

“Nothing is Ever Hopeless,” mixed media, digital images and paintings by Ryan Alvarez, through Feb. 26.

A GALLERY FOR FINE PHOTOGRAPHY. 241 Chartres St., 568-1313; www.agallery.com — Photographs by Michael

Kenna; photographs by Sebastiao Salgado; both through February.

ACADEMY GALLERY. 5256 Magazine St., 899-8111 — “A Fresh

Look at the Flower,” paintings, ceramics and photographs by gallery artists, through March 26.

30

% OFF

AG WAGNER STUDIO & GALLERY. 813 Royal St., 561-7440 —

Works by gallery artists; 504 Toys, locally handcrafted toys; both ongoing.

ALL IN THE FRAME GALLERY. 2596 Front St., Slidell, (985) 2901395 — “Serene Waters, Clear

Horizons,” paintings by Annie Strack, ongoing.

ALL ORCHID PLANTS

ANGELA KING GALLERY. 241 Royal St., 524-8211; www. angelakinggallery.com — Paint-

COVINGTON

METAIRIE

1027 VILLAGE WALK

750 MARTIN BEHRMAN AVE (504) 833-3716

(985) 809-9101

WWW.VILLERESFLORIST.COM

ings by Steve Taylor, through March 15. ANTENNA GALLERY. 3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — “We’re

Goin’ Down,” prints, drawings and installations by Ben FoxMcCord and Craig Branum, through March 6. Paintings by

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Steve Taylor, ongoing. ANTON HAARDT FOLK GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www.antonart.com — Works

by Anton Haardt, Christopher Moses and others, ongoing.

ARIODANTE GALLERY. 535 Julia St., 524-3233 — Paintings by Ro-

bere Lord, ceramics by Dawn Chatoney and jewelry by Sylvan Spirit, through February. ART GALLERY 818. 818 Royal St., 524-6918 — Paint-

ings, sculpture and jewelry by local artists Noel Rockmore, Michael Fedor, Xavier de Callatay, Charles Bazzell, Bambi deVille and Ritchie Fitzgerald, ongoing.

ARTHUR ROGER GALLERY. 432 Julia St., 522-1999; www. arthurrogergallery.com — Glass sculpture by Gene Koss, through Saturday. ARTICHOKE GALLERY. 912 Decatur St., 636-2004 — Artists work on site in all media; watercolors and limitededition prints by Peter Briant, ongoing. BARRISTER’S GALLERY. 2331 St. Claude Ave., 525-2767; www. barristersgallery.com —

“Classified,” works by Aaron Mcnamee and Nina Schwanse, through March 5. BERGERON STUDIO & GALLERY. 406 Magazine St., 522-7503; www.bergeronstudio.com — Photographs by Michael P. Smith, Jack Beech, Harriet Blum, Kevin Roberts and others, ongoing. BERTA’S AND MINA’S ANTIQUITIES GALLERY. 4138 Magazine St., 895-6201 — “Louisiana!

United We Stand to Save Our Wetlands,” works by Nilo and Mina Lanzas; works by Clementine Hunter, Noel Rockmore and others; all ongoing. BRYANT GALLERIES. 316 Royal St., 525-5584; www.bryantgalleries.com — Paintings by Dean Mitchell, ongoing. BYRDIE’S GALLERY. 2422-A St. Claude Ave., www.byrdiesgallery.com — “A Little Picture

Show,” small-scale collage work by Christopher Stone, through March 9.

CALICHE & PAO GALLERY. 312 Royal St., 588-2846 — Oil paintings by Caliche and Pao, ongoing. CALLAN FINE ART. 240 Chartres St., 524-0025; www. callanfineart.com — Works

by Eugene de Blass, Louis Valtat and other artists of the Barbizon, Impressionist and Post-Impressionist schools, ongoing.

CARDINAL GALLERY. 541 Bourbon St., 522-3227 — Exhibition

of Italian artists featuring works by Bruno Paoli and Andrea Stella, ongoing.

CARIBBEAN ARTS LTD. 720 Franklin Ave., 943-3858 — The

gallery showcases contemporary Haitian and Jamaican art.

CASELL GALLERY. 818 Royal St., 524-0671; www.casellartgallery. com — Pastels by Joaquim

Casell; etchings by Sage; oils by Charles Ward; all ongoing.

COLE PRATT GALLERY. 3800 Magazine St., 891-6789; www. coleprattgallery.com —

“Beauty, Power & Circumstance,” female nudes in color pencil and acrylic by Richard Johnson, through March 12. COLLECTIVE WORLD ART COMMUNITY. Poydras Center, 650 Poydras St., 339-5237 — Paint-

ings from the Blue Series by Joseph Pearson, ongoing.

COLLINS C. DIBOLL ART GALLERY. Loyola University, Monroe Library, 6363 St. Charles Ave., fourth floor, 861-5456 — “In the

Blink of an Eye,” photographs by Harold Baquet, through March 24.

D.O.C.S. 709 Camp St., 524-3936 — “Surroundings,” mixed-media sculpture by Allen Wynn, through March. DU MOIS GALLERY. 4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — “Per Se,” a

group exhibition featuring works by Angela Burks, Ken Kenan and Christian Van Campen, through March 6.

DUTCH ALLEY ARTIST’S CO-OP GALLERY. 912 N. Peters St., 4129220; www.dutchalleyonline. com — Works by New Orleans

artists, ongoing.

ELLIOTT GALLERY. 540 Royal St., 523-3554; www.elliottgallery. com — Works by gallery artists

Coignard, Engel, Papart, Petra, Tobiasse, Schneuer and Yrondi, ongoing.

FAIR FOLKS & A GOAT. 2116 Chartres St., 872-9260; www. fairfolksandagoat.com — “Permanence,” paintings by Timothy Cavnar, through April 3. FRAMIN’ PLACE & GALLERY. 3535 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-3311; www.nolaframing.com —

Prints by Tommy Thompson, Phillip Sage, James Michalopoulos and others, ongoing.

FREDRICK GUESS STUDIO. 910 Royal St., 581-4596; www. fredrickguessstudio.com —

Paintings by Fredrick Guess, ongoing. THE FRONT. 4100 St. Claude Ave.; www.nolafront.org —

“Mine Eyes,” works by Rachel DeTrinis, Jason Leinwand and Lindsay Kane; installations by Josephine Durkin; “Everyday Abstract,” works by Brooke Pickett and Suzanne Bennett; all through March 6.

GALERIE D’ART FRANCAIS. 541 Royal St., 581-6925 — Works by

Todd White, ongoing.

GALERIE PORCHE WEST. 3201 Burgundy St., 947-3880 —

Photography by Christopher Porche West, ongoing. GALERIE ROYALE. 3648 Magazine St., 894-1588; www. galerieroyale.com — “Featuring


LISTINGS

WHAT YOU SEE IS WHAT YOU GET

Fabrics,” mixed media on canvas by Jessie Trinchard, through March 4. GALLERIA BELLA. 319 Royal St., 581-5881 — Works by gallery

artists, ongoing.

GALLERY 421. 421 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 898-5858 —

More than 500 pieces of art by more than 50 artists, ongoing.

GALLERY BIENVENU. 518 Julia St., 525-0518; www.gallerybienvenu. com — Sculpture by David Borgerding, through March 28. THE GARDEN DISTRICT GALLERY. 1332 Washington Ave., 891-3032; www.gardendistrictgallery. com — “Eat, Drink & Be Merry,”

a group invitational exhibit featuring 14 artists, through March 6.

GEORGE SCHMIDT GALLERY. 626 Julia St., 592-0206; www. georgeschmidt.com — Paintings

by George Schmidt, ongoing.

GRAPHITE GALLERIES. 936 Royal St., 565-3739 — “Sinners and

Saints,” works by Joe Hobbs, ongoing.

GUTHRIE CONTEMPORARY. 3815 Magazine St., 897-2688; www. guthriecontemporary.com — “Schemata,” works by Susan Dory, ongoing. HAROUNI GALLERY. 829 Royal St., 299-8900 — Paintings by David

Harouni, ongoing.

ISABELLA’S GALLERY. 3331 Severn Ave., Suite 105, Metairie, 779-3202; www.isabellasgallery. com — Hand-blown works by

Marc Rosenbaum; raku by Kate Tonguis and John Davis; all ongoing.

JEAN BRAGG GALLERY OF SOUTHERN ART. 600 Julia St., 895-7375; www.jeanbragg.com — “Threads of Carnival,” works

in oil by Linda Lesperance, through February.

JON SCHOOLER GALLERY. 8526 Oak St., 865-7032; www. jonschooler.com — “Sublimi-

nal WOWs,” paintings by Jon Schooler, ongoing.

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY. 400A Julia St., 522-5471; www. jonathanferraragallery.com —

“Heroes and Villains,” works by Gina Phillips; “Refresh, Reconstitute, Embellish,” works by Matthew Cox; both through March 3.

JULIE NEILL DESIGNS. 3908 Magazine St., 899-4201; www. julieneill.com — “Facade,”

photographs by Lesley Wells, ongoing.

KAKO GALLERY. 536 Royal St., 565-5445; www.kakogallery.com — Paintings by Don Picou and

Stan Fontaine; “Raku” by Joy Gauss; 3-D wood sculpture by Joe Derr; all ongoing.

KKPROJECTS. 2448 N. Villere St., 415-9880; www.kkprojects.org — “Knead,” works by Kristian

Hansen, Tora Lopez, John Oles

paintings by Brook Inman and Jess Laskosky, through Feb. 26.

and William Murphy, ongoing. KURT E. SCHON. 510-520 St. Louis St., 524-5462 — The gallery specializes in 18th and 19th century European oil paintings by artists from the French Salon and Royal Academy as well as French Impressionists.

review

PEARL ART GALLERY. 4421 Magazine St., 228-5840 — Works by Cindy and Drue Hardegree, Erica Dewey, John Womack, Sontina, Lorraine Jones and S. Lee, ongoing.

L9 CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 539 Caffin Ave., 948-0056 — “Faces

PHOTO WORKS NEW ORLEANS. 521 St. Ann St., 593-9090; www. photoworksneworleans.com — Photography by Louis Sahuc, ongoing.

of Treme,” works by Chandra McCormick and Keith Calhoun, ongoing. LE DESIGNS LLC. 3512 Magazine St., 373-6413 — Jewelry by Vicki, paintings by Peter Drasutis and furniture by Whilite Design, through March.

REINA GALLERY. 4132 Magazine St., 895-0022; www.reinaart. com — “Vintage New Orleans

Artists,” watercolors, etchings and folk art; “Patrons Saints,” works by Shelley Barberot; both ongoing.

LE PETIT SALON DE NEW ORLEANS. 906 Royal St., 524-5700 — Paintings by Holly Sarre,

ongoing.

LEMIEUX GALLERIES. 332 Julia St., 522-5988; www.lemieuxgalleries.com — Works by Emily

Sartor for Prospect.1.5, through Saturday. “Corpus Cupiditas,” works by Steve Teeters, through Feb. 26.

LOUISIANA CRAFTS GUILD. 608 Julia St., 558-6198; www.louisianacrafts.org — Group show featuring works from guild members, ongoing. M. FRANCIS GALLERY. 604 S. Julia St., 875-4888; www. mfrancisgallery.com — “Black Art Now,” a group exhibition featuring works by eight artists, through March 1. MARTINE CHAISSON GALLERY. 727 Camp St., 304-7942; www. martinechaissongallery.com — Computer-generated imagery by Sean Capone; paintings and sculpture by Bonnie Maygarden, both through March 5. METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL. 300 Park Road, Metairie, 837-5204; www.mpcds. com — “The Unconventional

Portrait,” works by Mark Bercier, David Halliday, Gina Phillips and Alexander Stolin, ongoing.

MICHALOPOULOS GALLERY. 617 Bienville St., 558-0505; www. michalopoulos.com — Paintings by James Michalopoulos, ongoing. MICHELLE Y WILLIAMS GALLERY. 835 Julia St., 585-1945; www.michelleywilliams.com — Works by

Michelle Y. Williams, ongoing.

NEW ORLEANS ARTWORKS. 727 Magazine St., 529-7279 — Sandblasted photography by Drake Fuller, feathered metal sculpture by Josh Cohen, glass Mardi Gras masks by Teri Walker and prints by Tish Douzart, through Feb. 26. NEWCOMB ART GALLERY. Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University, 865-5328; www. newcombartgallery.tulane. edu — “Reflections on Water in American Painting,” through April 24. OAK STREET GALLERY. 111 N. Oak St., Hammond, (985) 345-0521 —

“Points of Reference,” sculpture by Anne Boudreau, through February.

Imagist Conscious As a big-time businessman and art collector, the late Frederick R. Weisman embodied a classic American success story. Born in Minneapolis, Minn., to Russian immigrant parents, he grew up in Los Angeles and eventually made a fortune in various endeavors, amassing a major art collection along the way. In art as in business, his vision became bolder as he aged. The works seen here reflect his interest in nature as well as the influence of imagism (and its international equivalents), an indigenous American style that fuses dreamy, psychological imagery into flamboyantly patterned compositions. Imagism evolved in the Chicago area as well as in California and Louisiana, where Weisman often acquired work by local artists, a tradition continued by his widow and curator, Billie Milam Weisman. Few works look more at home here than New Orleans artist Robert Warrens’ Through The Reeds (pictured), a painting of a scruffy mutt clutching a duck in its humanoid teeth. Leaping over a pond that looks like an oversized ashtray, the fluffy dog evokes toxic smoke in a petrochemical parody of a traditional hunting scene. Related irony appears in Chicago painter Roger Brown’s Saguaro’s Revenge, based on the true story of a drunken Arizona man who was shooting at a giant cactus when it fell over and killed him. Torben Giehler’s Mont Blanc patterned landscape painting suggests a parti-colored planet in a prismatic solar system, a techno take on the mystical geometry of Mondrian. The patterning in many imagist works signifies energy as we see in Andrew Schoultz’ Mayhem Explosion, in which ancient warriors on horseback appear in a vortex of arrows that suggest aggression reduced to orbital trajectories. But in Louisa Chase’s abstract figurative painting All Fire All Flame, the fiery vortex is all about passion and its power to bind or tear apart, a reminder that creation and destruction involve related energies applied in very different ways. Elements of Nature offers an intriguing alternate route through recent art history while presaging the environmental turmoil facing us today. — D. Eric Bookhardt

THRU FEB

27

Elements of Nature: Selec — tions from the Frederick R. Weisman Foundation Contemporary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org

OCTAVIA ART GALLERY. 4532 Magazine St., 309-4249; www. octaviaartgallery.com — “An Earthly Paradise,” works by Stefan Szczesny, through March 26.

ONE SUN GALLERY. 616 Royal St., (800) 501-1151 — Works by local and national artists, ongoing. PARSE GALLERY. 134 Carondelet St. — “Still Life with Bombs,”

REYNOLDS-RYAN ART GALLERY. Isidore Newman School, 5333 Danneel St., 896-6369; www. newmanschool.org — “The Art

of Reflection,” oil on canvas by Lory Lockwood, through March 3.

RHINO CONTEMPORARY CRAFTS COMPANY. The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., third floor, 523-7945; www.rhinocrafts.com — Kathleen Grumich, Vitrice

McMurry, Deborah Morrissey, Cathy DeYoung and others, ongoing.

RIVERSTONE GALLERIES. 719 Royal St., 412-9882; 729 Royal St., 581-3688; Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 36, 566-0588; 733 Royal St., 525-9988; www. riverstonegalleries.net — Multi-

media works by Ricardo Lozano, Michael Flohr, Henry Ascencio, Jaline Pol and others, ongoing. RODRIGUE STUDIO. 721 Royal St., 581-4244; www.georgerodrigue.com — Works by George

Rodrigue, ongoing.

ROSETREE GLASS STUDIO & GALLERY. 446 Vallette St., Algiers Point, 366-3602; www.rosetreeglass.com — Hand-blown

glasswork, ongoing.

RUSTY PELICAN ART. 4031 St. Claude Ave., 218-5727; www. rustypelicanart.com — Works by

Travis and Lexi Linde, ongoing.

SALONE DELL’ARTES ARTEMISIA. 3000 Royal St., 481-5113 — “I

Genti H2O,” works by Shmuela Padnos, ongoing.

SHEILA’S FINE ART STUDIO. 1427 N. Johnson St., 473-3363; www. sheilaart.com — Works by Sheila

Phipps, ongoing.

SIBLEY GALLERY. 3427 Magazine St., 899-8182 — “Ouroboros,” drawings, paintings and sculpture by Anthony Carriere, through Tuesday. STELLA JONES GALLERY. Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Ave., Suite 132, 568-9050 — “Losing My

Religion, Choosing My Confessions,” mixed media by Charly Palmer, through March.

STEVE MARTIN STUDIO. 624 Julia St., 566-1390; www.stevemartinfineart.com — Contemporary sculpture and paintings by Steve Martin and other Louisiana artists, ongoing.

STUDIO BFG. 2627 Desoto St., 942-0200; www.studiobfg.com — “Peel Sessions: First Install-

ment,” works by Tina Stanley, ongoing.

STUDIO GALLERY. 338 Baronne St., Third Floor, 529-3306 — Works by YA/YA artists, ongoing. TAYLOR BERCIER FINE ART. 233 Chartres St., 527-0072 — “Suffer Little Children,” paintings and collages by Dona Lief; “Assignations,” paintings by Ann Hornback; “What Bugs Me,” sculpture by Andrew Bascle; all through March 15. THOMAS MANN GALLERY I/O. 1812 Magazine St., 581-2113; www. thomasmann.com — “Where’s the Money?” group exhibit interpreting the economy, ongoing. TRIPOLO GALLERY. 401 N. Columbia St., (985) 893-1441 — Works

by Bill Binnings, Robert Cook, Donna Duffy, Scott Ewen, Juli Juneau, Kevin LeBlanc, Ingrid Moses, Gale Ruggiero, Robert Seago and Scott Upton, ongoing.

VENUSIAN GARDENS ART GALLERY. 2601 Chartres St., 943-7446; www.venusiangardens.com —

“Luminous Sculpture,” works by Eric Ehlenberger, ongoing.

VINCENT MANN GALLERY. 305 Royal St., 523-2342; www.vincentmanngallery.com — Paintings by Jacob Manguno and Luc Didier, through May 7. WMSJR. 1061 Camp St., 299-9455; www.wmsjr.com — Paintings by Will Smith, ongoing. A WORK OF ART GALLERY. 8212 Oak St., 862-5244 — Glass works

by Juli Juneau; works from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing.

ZEITGEIST MULTI-DISCIPLINARY ARTS CENTER. 1618 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 827-5858; www. zeitgeistinc.net — “Hostile

Takeover: Ninth Ward and Other Evidence,” photographs by Andrew Garn, through Feb. 27. “Analog Frontiers,” a collection of steampunk art curated by Theodora Eliezer, through March.

CALL FOR ARTISTS ANTENNA GALLERY. The gallery seeks work that uses, recreates or interprets meaning from the artist’s childhood artwork for a May exhibition. Email nataliemclaurin@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is April 20. COLD DRINK PRINTMAKING INVITATIONAL. Du Mois Gallery,

4921 Freret St., 818-6032 — The gallery accepts submissions for the exhibition juried by New Orleans Museum of Art modern and contemporary art curator Miranda Lash. Email dumoisgallery@gmail.com for details. Submission deadline is March. DELGADO STUDENT ART ASSOCIATION. The group seeks PAGE 44

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

JAMIE HAYES GALLERY. 621 Chartres St., 592-4080; www.jamiehayes.com — New Orleans-style art by Jamie Hayes, ongoing.

ART

43


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com PAGE 43

art from Delgado Community College students and alumni to be included in a calendar. Call 258-5011 or email xdesot92940@dcc.edu for details. Submission deadline is March 15.

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EBB & FLOW. A Studio in the Woods seeks works for its fall artist residency series. Artists are asked to propose works addressing global ecological challenges exemplified in south Louisiana. Email applications@ astudiointhewoods.org for details. Submission deadline is March 1.

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nonprofit accepts works for its February juried exhibition in Baton Rouge. Artists must bring their works to the show site Wednesday. Email laagbr@laag-site.org or visit www.laag-site.org for details.

MUSEUMS AMERICAN-ITALIAN MUSEUM & RESEARCH LIBRARY. 537 S. Peters St., 522-7294 — Permanent

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exhibits of jazz artists, a St. Joseph’s altar replica, the Louisiana Italian-American Sports Hall of Fame and a research library with genealogy records.

ASHE CULTURAL ARTS CENTER. 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — “Ashe in Retrospect: 1998-

2008,” photographs by Morris Jones Jr., Eric Waters, Jeffrey Cook and others, ongoing.

GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 15 > 2011

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Ward: People, Places and Traditions,” a group exhibition in conjunction with PhotoNOLA, through February. “Drawn to Life: Al Hirschfeld and the Theater of Tennessee Williams,” drawings by Hirschfeld, through April 2. “In Search of Julien Hudson: Free Artist of Color in Pre-Civil War New Orleans,” through April 20.

LONGUE VUE HOUSE AND GARDENS. 7 Bamboo Road, 4885488; www.longuevue.com —

“Untitled No. 6029,” sculpture by Eric Dallimore, through February. “All That Glitters,” an exhibition of Carnival jewelry, through March 13. LOUISIANA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM. 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — “Mr. Rogers’

Neighborhood: A Hands-On Exhibit”; “Fetch,” a scavenger hunt designed to develop problem-solving skills; “Team Turtle Training Camp,” a hands-on exhibit designed to teach kids how to make healthy choices; all ongoing.

LOUISIANA FILM MUSEUM. Montrel’s Bistro, 1000 N. Peters St., 524-4747; www. louisianafilmmuseum.org —

The museum features props, costumes, video clips, still photographs, posters and other exhibits from major films produced in Louisiana. LOUISIANA STATE MUSEUM PRESBYTERE. 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — “Living With Hur-

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER. 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www. cacno.org — “Ephemera: River

LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT MUSEUM. Louisiana Supreme Court, 400 Royal St., 3102149; www.lasc.org — The

with Flowers,” installation by Brandon Graving, through Feb. 27. “Music Rising from the Rubble: Photo Essay of the Haitian Youth Music Relief Organization,” through Feb. 27. “As We See It: Youth Vision Quilt,” student-created quilt with more than 400 patches, ongoing.

3331 SEVERN IN METAIRIE

HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION. 533 Royal St., 523-4662; www.hnoc.org — “Seventh

BACKSTREET CULTURAL MUSEUM. 1116 St. Claude Ave.; www.backstreetmuseum.org —

Permanent exhibits of Mardi Gras Indian suits, jazz funeral memorabilia and social aid and pleasure club artifacts, ongoing.

Spring Colors &Day Styles for 2011 Valentine’s

more.

GEORGE & LEAH MCKENNA MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN ART. 2003 Carondelet St., 586-7432; www.themckennamuseum.com — “Tambourine

and Fan,” works by Jamar Pierre and Gregoryuan MgheeHunter, through March 12.

GERMAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL CENTER. 519 Huey P. Long Ave., Gretna, 363-4202; www.gaccnola.com — Museum exhibits

depict the colonial experience, work, culture and religion of German immigrants.

GREAT AMERICAN ALLIGATOR MUSEUM. 2051 Magazine St., 523-5525 — The museum

features fossils, taxidermy, folk art, kitsch, Americana and

ricanes: Katrina and Beyond,” an exhibition of stories, artifacts and science displays, ongoing.

Supreme Court of Louisiana Historical Society sponsors the museum’s exhibitions of the people and institutions that have contributed to the development of Louisiana law for 300 years.

MAIN LIBRARY. 219 Loyola Ave., 529-7323; www.nutrias. org — “Hidden from History: Unknown New Orleanians,” photographs of the city’s working poor, ongoing. MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN COCKTAIL. 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www. museumoftheamericancocktail. org — “Absinthe Visions,” pho-

tographs by Damian Hevia, ongoing.

ART

Circle, 658-4100; www.noma. org — “The Most Beautiful Day of My Youth,” photographs by Bernard Faucon, through March 13. “Residents and Visitors: 20th Century Photographs of Louisiana,” a collaboration with the Historic New Orleans Collection, through March 27. “The Sound of One Hand: Painting and Calligraphy by Zen Monk Hakuin,” through April 17. “Lofty Ideals: Selections of 19th-Century French Sculpture from the Permanent Collection,” through April 24. “Different Strokes for Different Folks: Glass Works from Harter, Jastremski and Sawyer Gifts,” through May 15. “Peter Carl Faberge and Other Russian Masters,” permanent collection of Faberge objects; “Six Shooters,” photographs from the New Orleans Photo Alliance; both ongoing. NEW ORLEANS PHARMACY MUSEUM. 514 Chartres St., 5658027; www.pharmacymuseum. org — Exhibits on 19th-cen-

tury pharmacy, medicine and health care, all ongoing. OGDEN MUSEUM OF SOUTHERN ART. 925 Camp St., 5399600; www.ogdenmuseum. org — “Big-Hearted Pots,”

ceramic pots by Mark Hewitt; “North Carolina Craft Now,” an exhibition by the Center for Southern Craft and Design; both through April 10. “A Life in Glass,” glass vessels by Richard Ritter; “Selections from ‘Partial to Home,’” photographs by Birney Imes; both through April 15. SOUTHERN FOOD & BEVERAGE MUSEUM. Riverwalk Marketplace, 1 Poydras St., Suite 169, 569-0405; www.southernfood. org — “Acadian to Cajun:

Forced Migration to Commercialization,” a multimedia exhibit; “Laissez Faire — Savoir Fare,” the cuisine of Louisiana and New Orleans; “Eating in the White House — America’s Food”; “Tout de Sweet,” an exhibit exploring all aspects of the sugar industry in the South; all ongoing. TANGIPAHOA AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE MUSEUM & BLACK VETERANS ARCHIVES. 1600 Phoenix Square, Hammond, (985) 542-4259; www.africanamericanheritagemuseum. com — The museum exhibits

works that preserve and tell the history of African-American ancestors in Louisiana; it also houses the country’s first memorial to black Vietnam War veterans, ongoing.

American Jews in the Second World War,” an exhibit on loan from the Museum of Jewish Heritage, through April 24.

TULANE UNIVERSITY. Joseph Merrick Jones Hall, 6823 St. Charles Ave. — “Treme: People and Places,” maps, architectural drawings and photographs celebrating the bicentennial of Faubourg Treme, through Nov. 30.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART. City Park, 1 Collins Diboll

For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM. 945 Magazine St., 5276012; www.nationalww2museum.org — “Ours To Fight For:


LISTINGS

GET IN ON THE ACT

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com; FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

THEATER 6X6. Le Chat Noir, 715 St. Charles

Ave., 581-5812; www.cabaretlechatnoir.com — Six playwrights get a topic and one week to write a 10-minute-long play. Tickets $10. 7:30 p.m. Wed., Feb. 16. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY THEATRE FESTIVAL.

Teatro Wego, 177 Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www. jpas.org — The two-day festival includes seven short performances from Louisiana theater groups, as well as workshops and other programs. Visit the JPAS website for the full schedule. Tickets $15 per session, full festival passes $35-$65. FridaySaturday.

ANY ONE OF US: WORDS FROM PRISON. Fair Grinds Coffee-

house, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www.fairgrinds.com — Eve Ensler’s play is a collection of stories from women at the Bedford Hills Correctional Facility and in prisons across the nation. Email brit@britwhit. com for details. Tickets $8. 8 p.m. Friday-Sunday.

FANTASTIC MISTER FOX. Contem-

porary Arts Center, 900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.cacno.org — Roald Dahl’s adventure comes to life with twisting cardboard tunnels, allowing audiences to crawl through the multi-media production’s sets. Tickets $20. Runs through April 3. Days and times vary; visit the CAC website for details.

HOMEGIRLS. Dillard University,

Cook Theatre, 2601 Gentilly Blvd., 816-4857; www.dillard.edu — Karen Evans’ play follows five young college women as they maintain their friendships and grow into adulthood amid the Civil Rights Movement. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 seniors, $5 students. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday.

I LOVE YOU, YOU’RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE. Teatro Wego, 177

Sala Ave., Westwego, 885-2000; www.jpas.org — Joe DiPietro and Jimmy Roberts’ off-Broadway musical comedy is a series of vignettes about love

and relationships. Tickets $30 general admission, $27 seniors, $20 students. 7:30 p.m. FridaySaturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. NORMAN, IS THAT YOU?. Actor’s Theatre of New Orleans, WTIXFM Building, second floor, 4539 N. I-10 Service Road, Metairie, 456-4111 — In Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick’s comedy, a man and his errant wife struggle to come to terms with their son’s homosexuality. Tickets $20 general admission, $18 students and seniors. 7:30 p.m. ThursdaySaturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday. RICKY GRAHAM’S ... AND THE BALL AND ALL. Le Chat Noir, 715

St. Charles Ave., 581-5812; www. cabaretlechatnoir.com — Graham’s long-running show features Becky Allen and Amanda Hebert as the yatty girls from the Mystic Krewe of Terpsichore. Tickets $32 (includes $5 drink credit). 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Feb. 24 and Feb. 28, 2 p.m. Sunday, 6 p.m. Feb. 27.

THREE TALL WOMEN. Shadow-

box Theatre, 2400 St. Claude Ave., 523-7469; www.theshadowboxtheatre.com — Silk Dress Productions presents Edward Albee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play about various stages of one woman’s life represented by three characters. Tickets $15 general admission, $12 seniors and students. 8 p.m. ThursdaySaturday through Feb. 26.

THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES.

Howlin’ Wolf, 907 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf. com — Proceeds from the production of Eve Ensler’s play benefit the St. Bernard Battered Women’s Program. Visit www.vdaynola.weebly.com for details. Tickets $18 in advance, $20 at the door. 8 p.m. FridaySaturday. WAITING FOR GODOT. Lower Depths Theater, Loyola University New Orleans, 6363 St. Charles Ave., 865-2074; www.montage. loyno.edu — The production recasts Samuel Beckett’s comedy in coastal Louisiana after the BP oil disaster. Tickets $12 general admission, $8 students, seniors and Loyola employees. 8 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

BURLESQUE & CABARET BURLESQUE BALLROOM. Irvin

Mayfield’s Jazz Playhouse, 300 Bourbon St., 553-2270; www. sonesta.com — Trixie Minx stars in the weekly burlesque show featuring the music of Leon “Kid Chocolate” Brown. Call 553-2331 for details. 11:50 p.m. Friday.

THE MIDNIGHT REVUE. Starlight

by the Park, 834 N. Rampart St., 561-8939; www.starlightbythepark.com — Marcy Marcell directs a weekly female-impersonation jazz cabaret. Call for ticket information. Midnight Friday.

review Cat and Mouse A great actor could read the telephone book and bring you to tears. The disparity between acting talent and script is not that extreme in Cat’s-Paw, but you can’t escape feeling a lesser cast would not have so enthralled the audience. The set designed by Michael Aaron Santos is downright creepy. There’s a bare table with an automatic pistol on it and a more extensive arsenal hangs on the wall. The place looks like a terrorists’ lair — which, in fact, it is. William Mastrosimone wrote the play in 1986, and the story of homegrown violence is reminiscent of Charles Manson’s group. Gang-leader Victor (Santos) and his cohorts often call their group, the People’s Guard, a “family.” The play is set in a warehouse in Washington, D.C. The People’s Guard has kidnapped David Darling (Michael Harkins), an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) official who sits handcuffed at the table. Victor bullies and heckles him constantly. Cathy (Rebecca Laborde) leads in a handcuffed, blindfolded TV journalist named Jessica Lyons (Ashley Ricord), who has secured an interview with Victor. The airtime will be a coup for both the reporter and Victor, especially because the People’s Guard is taking credit for a car bombing in the capital on the same day. The contest of wills between Victor and Jessica — full of shifts and feints — is the central conflict of the drama. Victor rages against the powers that be, and he’s particularly incensed about water being polluted with the consent of the authorities. More to the point, Darling is to blame for the pollution in Crystal River because he signed an EPA variance, allowing amounts of toxins above normal legal limits to be dumped in the water. More pieces of the melodramatic chess game begin to take shape. A protester immolated herself with gasoline at Crystal River, a story Jessica was supposed to cover, and Victor has spied on the reporter as she covered events. He believes the end justifies the means in his war against pollution, but we’re not prepared for the final outburst of twists, revelations and violence that tie together the group’s violent actions. Cat’s-Paw boasts a heavy, complicated and perhaps too-well-woven plot. Director Mark Routhier assembled a top-notch cast that performs with great poise and conviction. — Dalt Wonk

THRU FEB

18

Cat's-Paw 8 p.m. Thu.-Fri. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., call 616-6606 for reservations; www.theallwaysloumge.com Tickets $7 Thursday, $10 Friday general admission, $8 Friday students/seniors

MISS MARION ETTE’S CIRCUS OF LOVE VARIETY SHOW. Hi-Ho

Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge. net — The show includes aerial acts, acrobatics, performance art and more with music by Neslort, Autotomii, Dance in Da Pants and Cliff Hines and

Friends. Tickets $5. 9 p.m. Saturday.

DANCE AN EVENING OF DANCE. Tulane

University, Dixon Hall, 865-5105 ext. 2; www.tulane.edu — The

show features choreography by the Newcomb Dance Program faculty and by Alwin Nikolais as part of the Alwin Nikolais Centennial celebration. Tickets $12 general admission, $9 Tulane faculty and staff, $8 students and seniors. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday.

AUDITIONS BARBERSHOP HARMONY SOCIETY. Christ the King Lutheran

Church, 1001 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 469-4740; www.ctknola.org — The Greater New Orleans Chapter holds new member auditions for its Mardi Gras Chorus. Call 363-9001 or visit www.mardigraschorus.org for details. 7:15 p.m. Tuesday. SOUTHERN VOICES: DANCE OUT LOUD 4. Anne Burr Dance

Studio, 1128 Dublin St., second floor — D’Project holds auditions for choreographers, dance companies and other groups for the June festival. Visit www. dproject.us for details. 2:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.

COMEDY BASED ON REAL LIFE. La Nuit Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The weekly long-form improv comedy show features some guys, a girl and someone named John Stewart. Tickets $6. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. BROWN! IMPROV COMEDY. City

Bar, 3515 Hessmer Ave., 309-5325; www.citybarnola.com — The comedy troupe stars Johnathan Christiansen, Gant Laborde, Ken Lafrance, Bob Murrell and Kelli Rosher. Visit www.brownimprovcomedy.com for details. 8:30 p.m. Saturday.

COMEDY GUMBEAUX. Howlin’ Wolf (The Den), 828 S. Peters St., 522-9653; www.thehowlinwolf.com — Local comedians perform, and amateurs take the stage in the open mic portion. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Thursday. COMEDY SPORTZ NOLA. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — The theater hosts a safe-for-all-ages team comedy competition. Tickets $10. 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday.

644-4300; www.nolacomedy. com — Actors improvise a comedy based on audience suggestions. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday. LAUGH OUT LOUD. Bootleggers Bar and Grille, 209 Decatur St., 525-1087 — Simple Play presents a weekly comedy show. 10 p.m. Thursday. MIKE STRECKER & WES CANNON. Cutting Edge Theater at

Attractions Salon, 747 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 290-0760; www.cuttingedgeproductions. org — The stand-up comedians perform. Call (985) 649-3727 for tickets. Tickets $17. 8 p.m. Saturday.

NATIONAL COMEDY COMPANY.

Yo Mama’s Bar & Grill, 727 St. Peter St., 522-1125 — The interactive improv comedy show features B97 radio personality Stevie G, Lynae LeBlanc, Jay Tombstone, Richard Mayer and others. Call 523-7469 or visit www.nationalcomedycompany.com for tickets. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Saturday. NEW ORLEANS COMEDY ARTS FESTIVAL. La Nuit Comedy The-

ater, 5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www.nolacomedy.com — The festival features local and national comedy acts from six states, with headliners including Bill Chott. Tickets $9-$15. 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Friday.

PERMANENT DAMAGE STAND-UP COMEDY. Bullets Sports Bar, 2441

A.P. Tureaud Ave., 948-4003 — Tony Frederick hosts the open mic comedy show. 8 p.m. Wednesday.

ROUNDHOUSE. La Nuit Comedy

Theater, 5039 Freret St., 6444300; www.nolacomedy.com — Comedians perform a barefoot, long-form improvisation show. Tickets $10. 10 p.m. Friday.

SIDNEY’S STAND-UP OPEN MIC.

Sidney’s, 1674 Barataria Blvd., Marrero, 341-0103 — The show features professional, amateur and first-time comics. Free admission. Sign-up is 8 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Thursday.

STUPID TIME MACHINE. The Factory, 8314 Oak St. — The improv group performs a weekly comedy show. Audiences are asked to bring their own chairs. Tickets $1-$6. 8:30 p.m. Tuesday.

DYKES OF HAZARD. Rubyfruit Jungle, 1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www.myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — Kristen Becker hosts a weekly comedy show with live music, sketch comedy, burlesque and more. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Friday.

THINK YOU’RE FUNNY? Carrollton Station, 8140 Willow St., 865-9190; www.carrolltonstation.com — The weekly open-mic comedy showcase is open to all comics. Sign-up is 8:30 p.m. Show starts at 9 p.m. Wednesday.

FEAR & LOATHING IN NEW ORLEANS. La Nuit Comedy Theater,

TOM RHODES & SLIM BLOODWORTH. Boomtown Casino,

5039 Freret St., 644-4300; www. nolacomedy.com — The sketch comedy show boasts vampires, zombies, relationship advice and other horrors. 8:30 p.m. Fridays. GOD’S BEEN DRINKING. La Nuit

Comedy Theater, 5039 Freret St.,

Boomers Saloon, 4132 Peters Road, Harvey, 366-7711; www. boomtownneworleans.com — The stand-up comedians perform. Free admission. 8 p.m. Wednesday. For complete listings, visit www.bestofneworleans.com.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

CAT’S-PAW. AllWays Lounge, 2240 St. Claude Ave., 218-5778; www.marignytheatre.org — After an American terrorist group holds an EPA official hostage and detonates a car bomb in Washington, D.C., a young reporter sets out to write an expose of the organization. Call 616-6066 for tickets. Tickets $10 general admission, $8 students and seniors, $7 Thursday performances. 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday.

STAGE

45


EVENTS

LISTINGS

Listings editor: Lauren LaBorde listingsedit@gambitweekly.com FAX:483-3116 Deadline: noon Monday Submissions edited for space

FAMILY Tuesday 15 KINDER GARDEN: WINTER IN THE GARDEN . Longue Vue

House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road, 488-5488; www. longuevue.com — Children and accompanying adults explore the world of insects through age-appropriate activities. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 members. Call 293-4722 or email lvaughn@longuevue. com for details. 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TODDLER TIME . Louisiana

Children’s Museum, 420 Julia St., 523-1357; www.lcm.org — The museum hosts special Tuesday and Thursday activities for children ages 3-under and their parents or caregivers. Admission $7.50, free for members. 10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Thursday 17 ART ACTIVITIES DURING AFTER HOURS. Ogden Museum of

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

Southern Art, 925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum.org — The Ogden offers art activities for kids during the weekly After Hours concerts. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

46

Friday 19 NURSERY THYME RHYME .

Children’s Castle, 501 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 468-7231 — Jack B. Nimble presides over his own TV cooking show where recipes become rhymes. Admission $5. 11:30 a.m.

EVENTS Tuesday 15 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Broadway Street

Market, 200 Broadway St., 8615898; www.marketumbrella. org — The weekly market features fresh produce, kettle corn, Green Plate specials and flowers. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DEALING WITH LOSS. West Jefferson Behavioral Medicine Center, 229 Bellemeade Blvd., Gretna, 391-2440 — The center offers a weekly support group. Call Doreen Fowler for details. 6 p.m. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE . Tulane-

Lakeside Hospital, 4700 South I-10 Service Road West, Metairie — The peer support

BE THERE DO THAT group meets the first and third Tuesdays of every month. Visit www.dbsaneworleans.org for details. 7:30 p.m.

preview

EUCLID RECORDS TRIVIA NIGHT.

Hi-Ho Lounge, 2239 St. Claude Ave., 945-4446; www.hiholounge.net — The game tests knowledge of New Orleans and non-New Orleans music trivia, and prizes include bar tabs, record store gift certificates and more. 8 p.m. Tuesdays.

FOOD DOCUMENTARY DISCUSSION GROUP. East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses Tupperware: American Experience. 7 p.m. NEW ORLEANS WEDDINGS MAGAZINE BRIDAL EVENT. New

Orleans Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 6584100; www.noma.org — The event features a variety of wedding vendors, and part of the event’s proceeds benefit the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign. Call 832-2775 or visit www. neworleansbridalevent.com for details. Admission $10 in advance, $15 at the door. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Wednesday 16

COVINGTON FARMERS MARKET.

Covington City Hall, 609 N. Columbia St., Covington, (985) 892-1873 — The market offers fresh local goods every week. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

FRENCH MARKET FARMERS MARKET. French Market, French

Market Place, between Decatur and N. Peters streets, 522-2621; www.frenchmarket.org — The weekly market offers seasonal produce, seafood, prepared foods, smoothies and more. 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Reviewing Stand PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

Gambit readers’ culinary tastes are all over the place, quite literally — food trucks, white-tablecloth joints, po-boy shops, takeout, festival food, hot dogs, haute cuisine and sandwiches, sandwiches everywhere. That eclectic, democratic spirit toward eating is the driving force behind the inaugural Gambit Food Revue: a mashup of a food festival we’re throwing Wednesday, Feb. 16, at City Park’s Pavilion of the Two Sisters. While some other food events have tended to concentrate either on high-end restaurants or just snacks, we’ve invited every establishment that was reviewed by Gambit food writer Ian McNulty during 2010 and the end of 2009. The food lineup itself is still evolving, but this might give you an idea of the variety: Paella; cochon de lait po-boys; Gorgonzola cheesecake; curried pumpkin soup; caviar pie; octopus carpaccio; a root beer-glazed ham-and-cheese sandwich; crawfish Diablo; truffled shrimp; barbecued sliders; homemade ice cream; free beer and wine; and about 25 more dishes. (All attendees must be 21 or older.) The Food Revue sold out as we were going to press, but we’re already planning to do it next year. — Kevin Allman

FEB

16

Gambit's Food Revue 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Wednesday (VIP admission beginning at 6 p.m.) Pavilion of the Two Sisters, New Orleans City Park, 1 Palm Drive, www.neworleanscitypark.com Tickets $45, VIP early admission $65

Church of Christ, 1333 S. Carrollton Ave., 861-8196; www.stmatthew-nola.org — The parent-child education and support group uses enriching activities in music, art and play. Visit www.infancytoindependence.org for details. 9:30 a.m. to noon Wednesday-Thursday. LGBT YOUNG ADULT PEER SUPPORT GROUP. LGBT

Community Center of New Orleans, 2114 Decatur St., www. lgbtccno.org — The group supports 18- to 24-year-olds dealing with the struggles of coming out, sexuality, family and relationships. 7 p.m.

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP. East

LUNCHBOX LECTURE . National

Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The American Cancer Society sponsors a group for those who have experienced the death of a loved one. Call 456-5000 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

GROWING SPRING GARDEN VEGETABLES. St. Tammany

Parish Library, Folsom Branch, 82393 Railroad Ave., Folsom, (985) 796-9728 — Master gardner Gerard Ballanco leads the workshop about gardening techniques. Pre-registration is recommended. Free admission. 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event is also held at St. Tammany Parish Library, Causeway Branch (3457 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-6269779) 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. INFANCY TO INDEPENDENCE .

St. Matthew/Central United

East Jefferson General Hospital, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 454-4000; www.ejgh.org — The Epilepsy Foundation of Louisiana holds a monthly support group for adults who have or are impacted by epilepsy or seizure disorders. The group meets in the Foundation Board Room. Call (800) 960-0587 or email kelly@epilepsylouisiana. org for details. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. FRESH MARKET. Circle Food

Store, 1522 St. Bernard Ave. — The Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium market features fresh produce, dairy, seafood, baked goods and more. EBT and WIC accepted. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.

GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT. East

Jefferson General Hospital, Esplanade Room 1, 4200 Houma Blvd., Metairie, 4544000; www.ejgh.org — The event features health and fitness tips from hospital experts, plus food and drinks. Call 4565000 for details. Admission free for Healthy Lifestyles members, $10 general admission. 7 p.m.

IRON RAIL LADIES’ NIGHT. The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny St., 9480963; www.ironrail.org — Iron Rail offers a weekly creative space for women. Email ladiesnight.ironrail@gmail.com for details. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. LIVE & LOCAL . The Inn on

GET TO KNOW GOD. Lost

& Found Center, 901 Independence St., 344-1234; www.lostandfoundcenter.org — The group meets every week to discuss Bible Scripture. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

EPILEPSY & SEIZURE EDUCATIONAL SUPPORT GROUP.

World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The semi-monthly lecture series focuses on an array of World War II-related topics. Call 5281944 ext. 229 for details. Noon.

MODEL GREEN HOUSE . 409

Andry St., between Douglass Street and the levee; www. globalgreen.org/neworleans — Global Green provides tours of its model green house, which uses renewable energy from solar panels and other sources. Call 525-2121 or visit the website for details. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

NONPAC MEETING . Seventh

District Station, 10555 Lake Forest Blvd. — The New Orleans Neighborhood Policing Anti-Crime Council holds its

monthly meeting. 7 p.m. SAVE OUR CEMETERIES CEMETERY TOURS. The group

conducts tours of New Orleans cemeteries. Call 525-3377 for details.

TALENT SHOWCASE . Le Roux, 1700 Louisiana Ave. — Masse Media Consulting, KMP and Men of Business host a weekly “You’ve Got Talent” showcase open to all poets, singers, dancers and others. Call 899-4512 for details. General admission $10, performers $5. 9 p.m. to midnight. WACNO GREAT DECISIONS DISCUSSION SERIES. Latter

Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave., 596-2625; www. nutrias.org — The World Affairs Council of New Orleans series features moderated discussion sessions focused on major world issues. Visit www. wacno.org for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS AT JW MARRIOTT. JW Marriott New

Orleans, 614 Canal St., Suite 4, 525-6500; www.marriott.com — The hotel showcases local music and art with spirit tastings and hors d’oeuvres. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WESTWEGO FARMERS & FISHERIES MARKET. 484 Sala

Ave., Sala Avenue and Fourth Street, Westwego — The market offers organic produce, baked goods, jewelry, art and more, with live music and pony rides. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Wednesday and Saturday.

Thursday 17 BEST PRACTICES IN THE EDUCATOR WORKFORCE .

American Red Cross, Southeast Louisiana Chapter, 2640 Canal St., 620-3105; www.arcno. org — The panel series informs working groups as they make their recommendations for the future of public education in New Orleans. Call 523-9800 or visit www.onestepnola.org for details. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP. St. Tammany Hospital’s

Parenting Center, 1505 N. Florida St. Suite B, Covington, (985) 898-4435; www.stph. org — A certified lactation consultant answers questions related to breastfeeding in the monthly group. Noon to 1 p.m.

CHANGES. Hey! Cafe, 4332

Magazine St., 891-8682 — The weekly meetings teach focusing, a method of directing attention outside one’s body to affect change. Call 232-9787 for details. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

COASTAL CONVERSATIONS.

Louisiana State Museum Presbytere, 751 Chartres St., 568-6968; www.lsm.crt.state. la.us — Barry Keim and Robert Muller present “Hurricanes of the Gulf of Mexico.” The program is held in cojunction with the museum’s “Living with Hurricanes: Katrina & Beyond” exhibit. Free admission. 6 p.m.

Bourbon Hotel, 541 Bourbon St., 524-7611; www.innonbourbon. com — The hotel’s monthly event features live entertainment and beer tastings from local breweries. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Third Thursday of every month.

QUEER PROM FUNDRAISER .

The Country Club, 634 Louisa St., 945-0742; www.thecountryclubneworleans.com — Feminist theatre company Girl Next Door Theatre hosts a prom-themed fundraiser featuring live music by DC, Tony Italiano, Hillbilly Hotel and Ginger A. Thompson. Email girlnextdoortheatre@gmail.com or visit www.gndtheatrenola. tumblr.com for details. Free admission. 10 p.m.

SISTAHS MAKING A CHANGE . Ashe Cultural Arts Center, 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 569-9070; www.ashecac.org — The group offers lessons in African dance and more, along with nutrition, health and wellness seminars. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday and Monday. UNITED WAY GOT GUMBO? COOKOFF. Royal Sonesta Hotel,

300 Bourbon St., 586-0300; www.sonesta.com/neworleans_royal — The cook off fundraiser features gumbos and desserts from New Orleans chefs and restaurants judged by a panel of celebrity guests. Email gumbo@unitedwaynola. org or visit www.unitedwaynola.org for details. Admission $20 in advance, $25 at the door. 5


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

p.m. to 8 p.m. YATS STUPID CANCER HAPPY HOUR . The Bricks Courtyard

Bar & Grill, 735 St. Joseph St., 525-2396 — YATS (Young Adults Taking a Stand Against Cancer), the networking group for cancer patients, survivors and caregivers ages 21 to 39, hosts the event. Email yatsnola@gmail.com for details. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Friday 18 ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLIC/DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES. Fair Grinds

Coffeehouse, 3133 Ponce de Leon Ave., 913-9073; www. fairgrinds.com — The weekly support group meets. Visit www.adultchildren.org for details. 6:15 p.m. Fridays.

IRISH CEILI . Knights of

visit www.ls3studios.com for details. Free admission. 10:30 a.m. to noon. EAGLE WATCH . Fontainebleau

State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — A park ranger leads a viewing of the park’s eagle nest. 3 p.m.

ERACE NEW ORLEANS MEETING . J. Singleton School,

1924 Philip St., 581-2388 — ERACE meets for its weekly discussion group. Call 8661163 for details. 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

GERMAN COAST FARMERS MARKET. Ormond Plantation,

13786 River Road, Destrehan — The market features a wide range of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and other items. Visit www.germancoastfarmersmarket.org for details. 8 a.m. to noon. GREEN PROJECT SATURDAY WORKSHOP. Green Project,

Columbus Hall, 6254 Vicksburg St., 486-9819 — The traditional Irish party features music by Crossroad Ceili Band, Irish dancing and more. Visit www.mcteggart-la.org for details. Admission $5. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

2831 Marais St., 945-0240; www.thegreenproject.org — The program discusses different methods of organic pest control. Admission $5, free for members. 10 a.m. to noon.

MARKETPLACE AT ARMSTRONG PARK . Armstrong Park, North

Gretna Farmers Market, Huey P. Long Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets, Gretna, 362-8661 — The weekly rain-or-shine market features more than 30 vendors offering a wide range of fruits, vegetables, meats and flowers. Free admission. 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Rampart and St. Ann streets — The weekly market features fresh produce, baked goods, Louisiana seafood, natural products, art, crafts and entertainment. 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays.

PARALLELS: MARION CAGE MCCOLLUM & SUZANNE TICK .

WHERE Y’ART. New Orleans

Museum of Art, City Park, 1 Collins Diboll Circle, 658-4100; www.noma.org — The museum’s weekly event features music, performances, film screenings, family-friendly activities and more. 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday 19 CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET. Magazine Street

Market, Magazine and Girod streets, 861-5898; www. marketumbrella.org — The weekly market features fresh produce, flowers and food. 8 a.m. to noon. DIGITAL STORYTELLING GENEALOGY WORKSHOP.

New Orleans Public Library, Main Library, 219 Loyola Ave., 596-2602 — The workshop shows how to document and electronically preserve family history. Pre-registration is recommended. Call 596-2597 or

GROWING SPRING GARDEN VEGETABLES. St. Tammany

Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl. us — Master gardner Gerard Ballanco leads the workshop about gardening techniques. Pre-registration is recommended. Free admission. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. KING CAKE PARTY. East Bank

Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The event features king cake, local cookbook authors including Poppy Tooker, and a performance by the Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestra. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

LIVING HISTORY CORPS. National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www.nationalww2museum.org — The museum’s re-enactors share their knowledge about the day-to-day lives of military men and women and the broader lessons of World War II. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. LOUISIANA NATIVE SPECIES.

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — The park ranger discusses the diversity of reptiles, mammals, birds, insects and plant life that call Louisiana home. 11 a.m.

MADISONVILLE ART MARKET.

Madisonville Art Market,

NATURE: A CLOSER LOOK .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 677-3668 — Park rangers lead a weekly nature hike. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

OCHSNER HEALTH CENTER GRAND OPENING & OPEN HOUSE . Ochsner Health

Center, 3401 Behrman Place, Algiers; www.ochsner.org — The event includes a ribbon cutting followed by tours of the new facility, opportunities to meet the providers and free health screenings and refreshments. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. PREDATOR VERSUS PREY.

Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The park ranger leads a casual walk while discussing predator/ prey relationships of the wildlife in the park. 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.

SANKOFA FARMERS MARKET. Sankofa Farmers Market, 5500 St. Claude Ave., 975-5168; www.sankofafarmersmarket. org — The weekly market offers fresh produce and seafood from local farmers and fishermen. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays. TEMPLE SINAI GALA . Temple

Sinai, 6227 St. Charles Ave. — The gala honoring Saundra K. Levy features music, food, a silent auction and free appraisals of jewelry, porcelain and silver. Call 861-3693 for details. Patron party 7 p.m., gala 8 p.m.

TREME UNDER THE BRIDGE MARKET. North Claiborne

Expressway, between Ursulines Avenue and Gov. Nicholls Street — The new monthly market highlights local artwork and features live music from local bands, high schools and choirs; community services like health and legal aid; and educational services and exhibits. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. UPPER NINTH WARD MARKET. Frederick Douglass Senior High School, 3820 St. Claude Ave. — The weekly Upper Ninth Ward Farmers Market offers fresh local produce, seafood, bread, cheese and plants. Sponsored by the Downtown Neighborhood Market Consortium. Call 482-5722 or email ggladney@ therenaissanceproject.la for details. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. ZUMBATHON . East Jefferson

Family YMCA, 6691 Riverside Drive, 888-9622 — The fundraiser for the East Jefferson Family YMCA’s Strong Communities Program features 16 instructors leading

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Design Within Reach, 3138 Magazine St., 891-6520; www.dwr.com — AIGA New Orleans, International Interior Design Association and the American Society of Interior Designers present the lecture series aiming to draw connections between designers and creatives from a variety of disciplines. 6:45 p.m. to 9 p.m.

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET.

Tchefuncte River Front at Water St., Madisonville, (985) 871-4918; www.artformadisonville.org — The monthly market features fine art from local artists including painting, mixed media, photography, jewelry, wood carving, sculpture, stained glass and more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

47


EVENTS

LISTINGS

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Sunday 20 ABITA ARTISTS. 9th Street Gallery,

71377 St. Mary St., Abita Springs — Local artists hold a monthly meeting. Call Lana at 898-3071 for details. 3 p.m.

ALEGRIA . W Hotel New Orleans,

333 Poydras St., 525-9444 — Five designers compete in the Project Runway-style fashion show event benefitting the Louisiana SPCA. Call 762-3307 or visit www.la-spca.org/ alegria for details. Admission starts at $25. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

CHEAP ART AUCTION FUNDRAISER .

FEATURING AUTHENTIC VIETNAMESE DELICACIES

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Mimi’s in the Marigny, 2601 Royal St., 872-9868; www.myspace.com/ mimisinthemarigny — Money raised from the auction benefits Automata, the annual kinetic sculpture and machine show. Call 9084741 or visit www.automatanola. wordpress.com for details. 6 p.m. DIMENSIONS OF LIFE DIALOGUE .

New Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject.com — The nonreligious, holistic discussion group focuses on human behavior with the goal of finding fulfillment and enlightenment. Call 368-9770 for details. Free. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

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LEVEL 2 KNOT. Bogue Chitto Park, 17049 State Park Blvd., Franklinton, (888) 677-7312 — The program discusses the basics of knot tying. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. NEEDLE JUNKIES. 3 Ring Circus’ The

MON-FRI 11AM-9:30PM SAT 12 NOON-9:30PM DINNER MENU ONLY

G

Market & Farm, 8301 Olive St., 4837037; www.hollygrovemarket.com — The program topic is “Planting the Spring Vegetable, Herb and Flower Garden.” Call 864-2009 or email ariel@noffn.org for details. Admission $5. 3 p.m.

Big Top Gallery, 1638 Clio St., 5692700; www.3rcp.com — The knitting group meets every Sunday. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

PIETY STREET MARKET. The Old

Ironworks, 612 Piety St., 908-4741 — The market offers art, flea market merchandise, food, drink and live music. Noon to 5 p.m.

PRIMITIVE WOODWORKING .

Fontainebleau State Park, 67825 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, (888) 6773668 — Park rangers host a weekly demonstration of woodworking techniques. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Monday 21 AMBIE AWARDS. Le Petit Theatre,

616 St. Peter St., 522-2081; www. lepetittheatre.com — Proceeds from the awards show for excellence in local theater benefits NOCCA’s theater department and Le Petit Theatre. Tickets $20 general admission, $5 for nominees, presenters and performers. 7 p.m.

GALATOIRE’S MARDI GRAS AUCTION .

Galatoire’s Restaurant, 209

Bourbon St., 525-2021; www.galatoires.com — The auction gives people the opportunity to bid on a reservation for the restaurant’s coveted lunch service the Friday before Mardi Gras (March 4). Reservations are recommended. Call 525-6022 for details. 5:30 p.m. TOASTMASTERS MEETING . Milton

H. Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — New Orleans Toastmasters Club hosts an open weekly meeting (except holidays) to hone the skills of speaking, listening and thinking. Call 251-8600 or visit www.notoast234.freetoasthost.org for details. 6 p.m. UNITED NONPROFITS OF GREATER NEW ORLEANS. Nonprofit Central,

1824 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., 895-2361; www.nonprofit-central. org — Nonprofit Central hosts a weekly meeting for all leaders of nonprofit groups. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS BUILD-A-BEAR WORKSHOP HUGGABLE HEROES. The program

recognizes young leaders ages 8 to 18 with college scholarships and donations to the charities of their choice. Visit www.lovehugssmiles. com/huggableheroes.aspx for details. Application deadline is Feb. 28. ECO-FRIENDLY COOKBOOK COMPETITION . YBGreen’s competi-

tion invites students or their parents to submit eco-friendly, vegan or vegetarian recipes for an online cookbook. The top three recipes receive cash prizes. Visit www. ybgreen.net for details. Submission deadline is Friday.

THE GREEN GIANT AWARD. The

award honors an individual who has made significant contributions to the environmental welfare of New Orleans and southeast Louisiana. Visit www.thegreenproject.org for details. Nomination deadline is Feb. 28.

NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM STUDENT ESSAY CONTEST. The

museum seeks essays on the topic “Why should we remember Pearl Harbor?” for the contest that awards a cash prize. The entry divisions are middle school (grades 5-8) and high school (grades 9-12). Essays are accepted online only. Visit www.nationalww2museum. org/essaycontests for details. Submission deadline is March 31.

OCHSNER STAR PROGRAM . The

hospital accepts applications for a free high school science program featuring hands-on research in a laboratory with medical scientists. Call 842-5321, visit www.ochsner. org/star or email asharai@ochsner. org for details. Application deadline is March 14.

PROJECT HOMECOMING . The faith-

based nonprofit seeks Hurricane Katrina-damaged homes (50 percent or more) to be rebuilt. Call 942-0444, ext. 244 for details.

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY.

American Cancer Society, 2605

River Road, Westwego, 833-4024 or (800) ACS-2345; www.cancer. org — The American Cancer Society needs volunteers for upcoming events and to facilitate patient service programs. Opportunities are available with Relay for Life, Look Good … Feel Better, Hope Lodge, Man to Man, Road to Recovery, Hope Gala and more. Call for information. ANOTHER LIFE FOUNDATION VOLUNTEERS. Another Life

Foundation seeks volunteers recovering from mental illness to help mentor others battling depression and suicidal behaviors. Free training provided. For details, contact Stephanie Green at (888) 543-3480, anotherlifefoundation@hotmail. com or visit www.anotherlifefoundation.org. BAYOU REBIRTH WETLANDS EDUCATION . Bayou Rebirth seeks

volunteers for wetlands planting projects, nursery maintenance and other duties. Visit www.bayourebirth.org for details.

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS VOLUNTEERS. Big Brothers Big

Sisters of Southeast Louisiana, 2626 Canal St., Suite 203, 309-7304 or (877) 500-7304; www.bbbssela. org — Big Brothers Big Sisters of Southeast Louisiana needs volunteers to serve as mentors. A volunteer meets two to three times a month with his or her Little Brother or Sister. You can play games, watch movies, bake cookies, play sports or plan any other outings you both would enjoy. Call for information.

CASA NEW ORLEANS. The organization seeks volunteer Court Appointed Special Advocates to represent abused and neglected children in New Orleans. Thorough training and support is provided. Call Mike Madej at 522-1962 ext. 213 or email mmadej@casaneworleans. org for details. CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET.

CCFM and marketumbrella.org seek volunteers to field shopper questions, assist seniors, help with monthly children’s activities and more. Call 495-1459 or email latifia@marketumbrella.org for details.

EDGAR DEGAS FOUNDATION . The nonprofit seeks volunteers to contribute to the development of the foundation. Call 821-5009 or email info@degashouse.com for details. FRENCH QUARTER FESTIVAL.

Volunteers are sought for the festival (April 7-10). Visit www.fqfi.org for details. GREATER NEW ORLEANS FAIR HOUSING ACTION CENTER . The

center seeks part-time civil rights investigators with excellent writing skills, reliable transportation and no criminal convictions to help expose housing discrimination in the New Orleans metro area. Call 717-4257 or email mmorgan@gnofairhousing.org for information. HANDSON NEW ORLEANS. The

group holds orientations to connect locals with available volunteer opportunities in New Orleans. Call 483-7041 ext. 107 or email cho@ handsonneworleans.org for details.

HOSPICE VOLUNTEERS. Harmony

Hospice, 519 Metairie Road, Metairie, 832-8111 — Harmony Hospice seeks volunteers to offer companionship to patients through reading, playing cards and other activities. Call Jo-Ann Moore at 8328111 for details. IRON RAIL . The Iron Rail, 511 Marigny

St., 948-0963; www.ironrail.org — The bookstore and community space seeks volunteers. Weekly meetings are 8 p.m. Wednesday.

JACKSON BARRACKS MUSEUM VOLUNTEERS. The museum seeks

volunteers to work one day a week for the Louisiana National Guard Museum. Volunteers prepare military aircraft, vehicles and equipment for display. Call David at 8370175 or email daveharrell@yahoo. com for details. JEFFERSON COMMUNITY SCHOOL .

The charter school that educates at-risk middle school students who have been expelled from Jefferson’s public schools seeks adult mentors for its students. Call 836-0808 for details.

LOUISIANA SPCA VOLUNTEERS.

Dorothy Dorsett Brown LA/SPCA Campus, 1700 Mardi Gras Blvd., Algiers, 368-5191; www.la-spca.org — The Louisiana SPCA seeks volunteers to work with the animals and help with special events, education and more. Volunteers must be at least 12 years old and complete a volunteer orientation to work directly with animals. Call or email Dionne Simoneaux at dionne@ la-spca.org. LOWERNINE.ORG VOLUNTEERS. Lowernine.org seeks volunteers to help renovate homes in the Lower 9th Ward. Visit www.lowernine. org or email lauren@lowernine.org for details. MEAL DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS. Jefferson Council on Aging seeks volunteers to deliver meals to homebound adults. Gas/mileage expenses will be reimbursed. Call Gail at 888-5880 for details. MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION . The MDA seeks

volunteers ages 16 and up for its weeklong summer camps around the country. Call (800) 572-1717 or visit www.mda.org/summercamp for details. NATIONAL WORLD WAR II MUSEUM.

National World War II Museum, 945 Magazine St., 527-6012; www. nationalww2museum.org — The museum accepts applications for volunteers to meet and greet visitors from around the world and familiarize them with its galleries, artifacts and expansion. Call 5276012 ext. 243 or email katherine. alpert@nationalww2museum.org for details.

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ & HERITAGE FESTIVAL. Volunteers are needed for

the festival’s production team. Visit www.nojazzfest.com/volunteer for details. OPERATION REACH VOLUNTEERS.

Operation REACH and Gulfsouth Youth Action Corps seek college student volunteers from all over the country to assist in providing recreation and education opportunities for New Orleans-area innercity youth and their families. For


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com EVENTS

information, visit www.thegyac.org and www.operationreach.org. PUBLIC SCHOOL VOLUNTEERS. New

Orleans Outreach seeks volunteers to share their enthusiasm and expertise as part of the ARMSOutreach after-school program. Volunteers are needed in the arts, academics, technology, recreation and life skills. Email jenny@ nooutreach.org or call 654-1060 for information.

World of Literary Obsession. 10:30 a.m. Saturday.

preview

OPEN MIC POETRY & SPOKEN WORD. Yellow Moon Bar, 800 France St., 944-0441; www.yellowmoonbar. com — Loren Murrell hosts a weekly poetry and spoken-word night with free food. Free admission. 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. OPEN MIC POETRY JAM . La Divina

Gelateria, 621 St. Peter St., 3022692; www.ladivinagelateria.com — The cafe invites writers to read their work. All styles welcome. 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday.

SENIOR COMPANION VOLUNTEERS.

New Orleans Council on Aging, Annex Conference Room, 2475 Canal St., 821-4121; www.nocoa.org — The council seeks volunteers to assist with personal and other daily tasks to help seniors live independently. Call for details.

OUTLOUD! Rubyfruit Jungle,

1135 Decatur St., 571-1863; www. myspace.com/rubyfruitjunglenola — AR Productions presents a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 7 p.m. Tuesday.

START THE ADVENTURE IN READING.

The STAIR program holds regular volunteer training sessions to work one-on-one with public school students on reading and language skills. Call 899-0820, email elizabeth@scapc.org or visit www. stairnola.org for details. TEEN SUICIDE PREVENTION . The

Teen Suicide Prevention Program seeks volunteers to help teach middle- and upper-school New Orleans students. Call 831-8475 for details.

TOURO VOLUNTEER SERVICES. Touro

Volunteer Services, 1401 Foucher St., 897-8107; www.touro.com/content/ careercamp — The infirmary seeks adult volunteers to assist with the Family Surgery Lounge, patient information desk, book and goody cart, hospital tours and health screenings. Call volunteer services at 897-8107 for information.

WORDS

New Jack City

The Art Beats and Lyrics expo features live music, break dancing and art inspired by hip-hop and urban culture. Artists include hip-hop pioneer and photographer Ernie Paniccioli, who is known for his work documenting graffiti, as well as local painter Lionel Milton. The show includes painting, graphic design and photography. The music lineup features the Stooges Brass Band, YVPG, Nesby Phips, Joi, Alien and DJs. The touring event is sponsored by Gentleman Jack and attendees must be at least 21 to enter. Free admission. — Will Coviello

FEB

18

Gentleman Jack Art Beats and Lyrics 7 p.m.-midnight Friday Generations Hall, 310 Andrew Higgins Drive, 568-1702; www.gentlemanjackabl.com

Saloon, 705 Dauphine St., 5680745; www.goldminesaloon.net — Poet Andrea Boll reads, followed by an open mic hosted by Jimmy Ross. Visit www.17poets.com for details. 7:30 p.m. Thursday.

— The bar hosts a free weekly poetry reading with open mic. 9 p.m. Tuesday.

BARNES & NOBLE JR . Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The bookstore hosts regular free reading events for kids. Call for schedule information.

East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8381190 — The group discusses Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. 7 p.m. Thursday.

BOOK DISCUSSION . The Catholic

Book Store, 3003 S. Carrolton Ave., 861-7504 — Sr. Noel Toomey discusses Greg Mortenson’s Three Cups of Tea. 3 p.m. Thursday. COOKBOOK CLUB. Garden District

Book Shop, The Rink, 2727 Prytania St., 895-2266 — The group discusses Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails: 100 Rediscovered Recipes and the Stories Behind Them and features French 75 mixologist Chris Hannah. Bringing food is encouraged but not required. 6 p.m. Monday.

COOKBOOKS & COCKTAILS SERIES.

Kitchen Witch Cookbooks Shop, 631 Toulouse St., 528-8382 — The group meets weekly to discuss classic New Orleans cookbooks. 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Friday. DINKY TAO POETRY. Molly’s at the

Market, 1107 Decatur St., 525-5169; www.mollysatthemarket.net

GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION GROUP.

INTERNATIONAL FICTION BOOK CLUB OF NEW ORLEANS. Blue Cypress

Books, 8126 Oak St., 352-0096 — The group discusses Aravind Adiga’s The White Tiger. 5:30 p.m. Wednesday.

ISABEL WILKERSON . Octavia Books,

513 Octavia St., 899-7323 — The author signs The Warmth of Other Suns. 6 p.m. Tuesday. JANE AUSTEN BOOK CLUB. East Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses Austen’s Northanger Abbey. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. JEAN SORRELL . Maple Street Book

Shop, 7523 Maple St., 866-4916; www.maplestreetbookshop.com — The author signs and discusses The Returning. 6 p.m. Thursday. JOHN BEMELMANS MARCIANO.

Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 899-

7323 — The author signs and reads from Madeline at the White House. 1 p.m. Sunday. JOHN SLADE . Antenna Gallery,

3161 Burgundy St., 957-4255; www. antennagallery.org — The cartoonist signs Afro Brother Spacemen. 3 p.m. Saturday.

LOCAL WRITERS’ GROUP. Barnes &

Noble Booksellers, 3721 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 455-5135 — The weekly group discusses and critiques fellow members’ writing. All genres welcome. 7:30 p.m. Monday.

MAPLE LEAF READING SERIES. Maple

Leaf Bar, 8316 Oak St., 866-9359; www.mapleleafbar.com — The weekly reading series presents featured writers followed by an open mic. Free admission. 3 p.m. Sunday. NEW ORLEANS HAIKU SOCIETY MEETING . The NOHS holds a

monthly gathering. The meeting features readings, writing and discussion. Free admission. 6 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. Monday. OCTAVIA BOOKS BOOK CLUB. Octavia Books, 513 Octavia St., 8997323 — The group discusses Allison Hoover Bartlett’s The Man Who Loved Books Too Much: The True Story of a Thief, a Detective, and a

PLATO’S “SYMPOSIUM”. Milton H.

Latter Memorial Library, 5120 St. Charles Ave. — The New Orleans Lyceum hosts a reading of Plato’s Symposium the first and third Wednesdays of the month. Call 473-7194 for details. 6:30 p.m. to 7:50 p.m.

POETRY MEETING . New Orleans Poetry Forum, 257 Bonnabel Blvd., Metairie, 835-8472 — The forum holds workshops every Wednesday. 8 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. THE SCENE OF THE CRIME . St. Tammany Parish Library, Slidell Branch, 555 Robert Blvd., Slidell, (985) 893-6280; www.stpl.us — The group meets to discuss mystery novels the third Monday of each month, through December. 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. SOCRATES CAFE . St. Tammany Parish Library, Folsom Branch, 82393 Railroad Ave., Folsom, (985) 796-9728 — The philosophical group holds a monthly discussion. 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. SOLA-RWA WRITERS GROUP. East

Bank Regional Library, 4747 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 838-1190 — The group discusses Vicki Lewis Thompson’s How to Hogtie Your Muse. Visit www.solawriters.org for details. 10 a.m. Saturday.

SPOKEN WORD. Ebony Square, 4215 Magazine St. — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $7 general admission, $5 students. 11 p.m. Friday.

DENTAL CLEANING SPECIAL

TAO POETRY. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse, 5110 Danneel St., 891-3381; www.neutralground.org — The coffeehouse hosts a weekly poetry reading. 9 p.m. Wednesday. UNIVERSES. Craige Cultural Center, 1800 Newton St., Algiers — The center hosts a weekly spoken-word, music and open-mic event. Tickets $5. 8 p.m. Sunday. WALLACE STEVENS GROUP. New

Orleans Lyceum, 618 City Park Ave., 460-9049; www.lyceumproject. com — The group meets every other Sunday to discuss the poet’s works. Call 460-9049 for details. 10 a.m.

89

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includes comprehensive exam (#0150), x-rays (#274), cleaning (#1110) or panorex (#330) *NEW PATIENTS ONLY — EXPIRES 02/27/11

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Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

17 POETS! LITERARY & PERFORMANCE SERIES. Gold Mine

PASS IT ON . Red Star Gallery, 2513 Bayou Road — The gallery hosts a weekly spoken-word and music event. Admission $5. 9 p.m. Saturday.

49


GAMBIT > BESTOFNEWORLEANS.COM > FEBRUARY 15 > 2011

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE BY

BABY BOYZ

BRASS BAND

50

T U O D L SO


>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Email Ian McNulty at imcnulty@cox.net. >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <BREAKING BREAD > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > >The former church in Mid-City that was home to Christian’s Restaurant before Hurricane Katrina is open as a new < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <PUTTING < < < < < < <EVERYTHING < < < < < < < < < <ON < < <THE < < < TABLE < < < < < < < < < < < < < <restaurant called Redemption (3835 Iberville St., 309-3570; www.redemption-nola.com). Chef Michelle Matlock, who has worked at the Windsor Court’s Grill Room and Acme Oyster House, has a contemporary Creole menu with appetizers like char-broiled oysters with crabmeat remoulade and entrees like smoked venison tournedos and flounder stuffed with chorizo.

am

B

PROVISIONS ON BOURBON

The former Bourbon Street address of Mary’s True Value Hardware has been converted into a specialty grocery and deli called the Candy Bar (908 Bourbon St., 522-2639). As the name implies, this shop stocks a large number of sweets, but it also serves ready-to-eat deli items including pastries, quiches, salads, po-boys and daily specials such as pasta, chili and flatbread pizza. Candy Bar serves food daily until about midnight.

five 5 IN

Five Restaurants With Views

GALVEZ RESTAURANT

914 N. PETERS ST., 595-3400 www.galvezrestaurant.com

Enjoy Spanish cuisine and a sweeping view of the river.

LANDRY’S SEAFOOD

The Tropical Vegetarian A TINY, GREEN-ORIENTED LUNCH CAFE OFFERS BRAZILIAN DISHES AND MORE. BY IAN MCNULTY

M

ceptable ingredients will find a refreshing approach here of dishes designed from the ground up. Mock meats are in heavy rotation, so almost any dish that lists meat has a vegan substitution ready to fill in. But Carmo is by no means a vegetarian restaurant, and that’s probably a good thing given the poor track record of strictly meatless ventures in this town. One of the marquee dishes is salpicao, a traditional Brazilian chicken salad mixed with ham and fresh vegetables. One daily special I’d love to encounter again was a rendition of the Puerto Rican jibarito sandwich, made here as an open-faced affair with pork piled over a fried plantain pancake that had been trussed with melting panela cheese. The fixed menu is small, anchored by an assortment of satisfactory if standard deli sandwiches, but also by “banquette breads,” which are cracker-crisp flatbreads. One unusual example is covered with bananas, cinnamon and Havarti, but is not as odd as it sounds. It tastes rather like a warm, gooey, crunchy breakfast treat. Carmo’s open kitchen hides nothing, and fruit piled around the cash register as well as adjacent displays of cookies and chocolates are not there for show. This is a colorful place, though the house clearly prefers green. The Honn’s are making a bid for certification from the Green Restaurant Association for sustainable business and kitchen practices, such as composting, recycling and using biodegradable packaging for takeout and leftovers. I had to take the Honns’ word on that bit about packaging though, since I always seem to lick my plate clean here.

PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

8000 LAKESHORE DRIVE, 283-1010 www.landrysseafood.com

The picture windows and deck of this national chain restaurant offer views of Lake Pontchartrain.

MAT & NADDIE’S RESTAURANT 937 LEONIDAS ST., 861-9600 www.matandnaddies.com

Overlooking the river levee, the cafe has a rustic setting at the city’s edge.

PALACE CAFE

605 CANAL ST., 523-1661 www.palacecafe.com WHAT

The second floor provides an elevated view of parades during Carnival.

WHERE

RIVER 127

WHEN

A high-rise view faces downriver and over French Quarter rooftops.

Carmo

527 Julia St., 875-4132; www.cafecarmo.com Lunch Tue.-Sat.

WESTIN HOTEL, CANAL PLACE, 100 IBERVILLE ST., 566-7006

RESERVATIONS

Not accepted

HOW MUCH

Inexpensive

WHAT WORKS

Questions? Email winediva1@earthlink.net.

Refreshingly different daily specials

2009 Douglas Green Sauvignon Blanc

WHAT DOESN'T

Presenting a wonderful, terroir-driven, stylistic expression of Sauvignon Blanc, this zesty wine was vinified in separate batches and left on the lees for added character development. In the glass, it entices with an alluring minerality and mild herbaceousness, layered with lemon zest, a hint of green pepper and grassy notes. On the palate, fig, lime and tropical fruit flavors yield to a bracing acidity and lively finish. It’s good as an aperitif or with raw oysters, chicken salad or any seafood dish. Buy it at: Whole Foods Markets, Cork & Bottle, Schiro’s Cafe, Matassa’s Market, The Boot Store, and Breaux Mart in Metairie. Drink it at: Clementine’s Belgian Bistrot and Tennou Sushi Bar. — Brenda Maitland

The tiny menu offers just a few choices

CHECK, PLEASE

Meaty or vegan, unusual but traditional Brazilian fare

WESTERN CAPE, SOUTH AFRICA / $9-$11 RETAIL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

ention of Brazilian food is often enough to ignite cravings for meat. After all, the popular notion of Brazilian food in this region is usually informed by churrascarias — steakhouses where waiters rove the dining room with meat-strung skewers. Carmo also is Brazilian, but it doesn’t follow that script at all. This tiny Warehouse District cafe specializes in vegetarian and vegan dishes prepared along a tropical theme, but not to the exclusion of shredded pork, smoked chicken and local seafood in other dishes. From day to day, the options are few on the small menu, but whether meaty or vegetarian they’re usually different from anywhere else in town. One day the choices included a heady, hearty stew with at least four kinds of beans (purple hull, red, black and garbanzo) and a dish called bobo de camarao, which resembled a smooth curry of yuca cream smothering large shrimp, served over rice. On another day, choices included a pot pie with a crumbly soft crust like savory pound cake filled with browned shreds of pork, and a vegan soup of soybeans and potato that tasted as creamy as a bisque. Husband-and-wife team Dana and Christine Honn opened Carmo last spring, basing the concept on what Dana describes as a “tropical rim” mix of Caribbean and Gulf Coast cooking with recipes from Christine’s native Brazil. To this, add the couple’s own interest in vegetarian and vegan cooking and you have the full picture of a unique menu. Those accustomed to constructing vegetarian meals by stripping away unac-

Christine and Dana Honn opened Carmo in the Warehouse District.

51


>>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< >>>>>>>>>>>>> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> <<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<<<

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT >>>>>>>>>

>>>> reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., din< < < < < < <ner < Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ >>>>>>>>> CHINESE <<< CHINA ORCHID — 704 S. Carrollton >> Ave., 865-1428; www.chinaorchid<neworleans.com < — This longtime

Riverbend restaurant offers a wide array of Chinese dishes. Siz-

< < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < < <zling < black pepper beef or chicken > > > > > > > > > > > > > Out > > >2 >Eat > >is>an > >index > > >of> Gambit > > > > >contract > > > > >advertisers. > > > > > > >Unless > > > >noted, > > > >addresses > > > > > >are > >for > >New > > >Orleans. > > > > > > > is > >prepared with onions, red and Dollar signs represent the average cost of a dinner entree: $ — under $10; $$ — $11 to $20; $$$ — $21 or more. To update information in the Out 2 Eat listings, email willc@gambitweekly.com, fax 483-3116 or call Will Coviello at 483-3106. Deadline is 10 a.m. Monday.

AMERICAN CAMELLIA CAFE — 69455 Hwy.

59, Abita Springs, (985) 809-6313; www.thecamelliacafe.com — A family-friendly atmosphere and local flavors are calling cards of Camellia Cafe. The Riverbend platter is a feast of catfish, shrimp, oysters, crab fingers, soft shell crab and hushpuppies. The Monterey chicken is grilled and topped with onions, peppers, mushrooms and cheese. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$ FAT HEN GRILL — 1821 Hickory Ave.,

Harahan, 287-4581; www.fathengrill.com — Fat Hen serves barbecue, burgers and breakfast. Pitcooked barbecue options include St. Louis-style spare ribs. Burgers are made with all Black Angus beef ground in-house daily. There is a full bar. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BAR & GRILL

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

DINO’S BAR & GRILL — 1128 Tchoupi-

52

toulas St., 558-0900 — Dino’s kitchen serves burgers, chicken tenders, salads and wraps. Happy hour is from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards and checks. $ RENDON INN BAR & GRILL — 4501

Eve St., 826-5605 — Try appetizers such as spinach and artichoke dip, hot wings or fried pickles. Off the grill there are burgers, chicken sandwiches or cheese quesadillas. Other options include salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE RIVERSHACK TAVERN — 3449

River Road, 834-4938; www.therivershacktavern.com — This bar and music spot offers a menu of burgers, sandwiches overflowing with deli meats and changing lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THE ROOSEVELT HOTEL BAR — 116

Univesity Place, 566-9444; www. roosevelthotelbar.com — The creative bar food at this CBD lounge includes duck confit po-boys with pickled red onions and Satsuma jam, and crawfish waffle cakes made with a tarragon johnnycake batter and topped with crawfish tails and creme fraiche. No reservations. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $

ZACHARY’S BY THE LAKE — 7224

Pontchartrain Blvd., 872-9832; www.zacharysbythelake.com — Zachary’s serves seafood platters, po-boys, salads, barbecue shrimp and more. Jumbo Gulf shrimp with cane syrup are wrapped in bacon, fried crispy and served with pickled okra salad. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

BARBECUE

Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ LAKEVIEW BREW COFFEE CAFE —

ABITA BAR-B-Q — 69399 Hwy. 59, Abita Springs, (985) 892-0205 — Slow-cooked brisket and pork are specialty at this Northshore smokehouse. The half-slab rib plate contains six ribs served with a choice of two sides. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner Tue.Sat. Credit cards. $

5606 Canal Blvd., 483-7001 — This casual cafe offers gourmet coffees and a wide range of pastries and desserts baked in house, plus a menu of specialty sandwiches and salads. Breakfast is available all day on weekends. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Hayne Blvd., 281-8227; www.cochondelaitpoboys.com — The makers of the Jazz Fest cochon de lait po-boy serve pork, ribs, chicken and more. The family feast includes a half-slab of ribs, half a chicken, half a pound of brisket, pork and sausage, two side orders, bread and sauce. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Saturday. Cash only. $

City Park, 1 Palm Drive, 483-9474 — Located in the old Casino Building, the cafe serves gourmet coffee, sandwiches, salads and ice cream till early evening. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WALKER’S BAR-B-QUE — 10828

BREWPUB CRESCENT CITY BREWHOUSE — 527

Decatur St., 522-0571; www.crescentcitybrewhouse.com — Live jazz and German-style beers complement creative cooking at this brewpub. Pan-seared redfish St. Louis is topped with fried oysters and barbecue sauce. Starters include Brewhouse hot wings, baked oysters and fried calamari with spicy marinara. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE THE BREAKROOM CAFÉ — 3431

Houma Blvd., Metairie, 941-7607 — Breakfasts of eggs, waffles or burritos are served any time at the Breakroom. The breakfast platter rounds up two eggs, bacon and a hashbrown patty. At lunch, the signature Breakroom sandwich is piled high with corned beef, pastrami, purple onion, lettuce and tomato. There’s also a selection of salads and a coffee bar. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ CAFE FRERET — 7329 Freret St., 8617890; www.cafefreret.com — The cafe serves breakfast itemes like the Freret Egg Sandwich with scrambled eggs, cheese and bacon or sausage served on toasted white or wheat bread or an English muffin.Signature sandwiches include the Chef’s Voodoo Burger, muffuletta and Cuban po-boy. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Fri.-Wed., dinner Mon.-Wed., Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

ELIZABETH’S RESTAURANT — 601 Gallier St., 944-9272; www.elizabeths-restaurant.com — Signature praline bacon sweetens brunch at this Bywater spot. Dinner brings options like fish and scallop specials. Also enjoy homemade desserts. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Tue.-Sat., brunch

PARKVIEW CAFE AT CITY PARK —

PRAVDA — 1113 Decatur St., 581-1112;

www.pravdaofnola.com — Pravda is known for its Soviet kitsch and selection of absinthes, and the kitchen offers pierogies, beef empanadas, curry shrimp salad and a petit steak served with truffle aioli. No reservations. Dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ RICCOBONO’S PANOLA STREET CAFE — 7801 Panola St., 314-1810

— Specialties include crabcakes Benedict — two crabcakes and poached eggs topped with hollandaise sauce and potatoes — and the Sausalito omelet with spinach, mushrooms, shallots and mozzarella. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily. Credit cards. $

ST. JAMES CHEESE COMPANY —

5004 Prytania St., 899-4737; www. stjamescheese.com — The cheese shop offers more than 100 varieties of cheese from around the world. A small menu includes creative sandwiches, salads and specials. The Radette cheese sandwich includes house-made pastrami and spicy pickles on rye. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $ TED’S FROSTOP — 3100 Calhoun St., 861-3615 — The signature Loto-Burger is as good as ever, or try the castle burgers. Fried seafood and plate lunches provide square meals, as do the sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ TERRAZU — 201 St. Charles Ave., 287-

0877; www.terrazu.net — Located in the lobby of Place St. Charles, Terrazu serves sandwiches like the Brie cheese press with turkey, Brie, spinach and sweet and spicy raspberry coulis in pita bread. The Terrazu shrimp salad combines boiled shrimp, hearts of palm, tomato and avocado with tarragon vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Fri. Credit cards. $

VINE & DINE — 141 Delaronde St., 361-1402; www.vine-dine.com — The cafe serves cheese boards and charcuterie plates with pate and cured meats. There also is a menu of sandwiches, quesadillas, bruschettas, salads and dips. No

green peppers and brown sauce and served on a hot plate with steamed rice on the side. Other options include fried rice, noodle and egg foo young dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

CHINA ROSE — 3501 N. Arnoult Road., Metairie, 887-3295 — China Rose offers many Chinese seafood specialties. The Lomi Lomi combines jumbo shrimp, pineapple and water chestnuts wrapped in bacon, fries them golden brown and serves them on a bed of sautéed vegetables. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ FIVE HAPPINESS — 3511 S. Carrollton

Ave., 482-3935 — The large menu at Five Happiness offers a range of dishes from wonton soup to sizzling seafood combinations served on a hot plate to sizzling Go-Ba to lo mein dishes. Delivery and banquest facilities available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

JUNG’S GOLDEN DRAGON — 3009

Magazine St., 891-8280; www. jungsgoldendragon2.com — Jung’s offers a mix of Chinese, Thai and Korean cuisine. Chinese specialties include Mandarin, Szechuan and Hunan dishes. Grand Marnier shrimp are lightly battered and served with Grand Marnier sauce, broccoli and pecans. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

THREE HAPPINESS — 1900 Lafayette

St., Suite 4, Gretna, 368-1355; www. threehappiness.com — Three Happiness serves Chinese and Vietnames dishes and dim sum specials on weekends. Westlake duck features tender duck with snow peas, corn, straw mushrooms and napa cabbage. Vietnamese crepes are served with pork and shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TREY YUEN CUISINE OF CHINA —

600 N. Causeway Approach., Mandeville, (985) 626-4476; 2100 N. Morrison Blvd., Hammond, (985) 345-6789; www.tryyuen.com — House specialties include fried soft-shell crab topped with Tong Cho sauce, and Cantonese-style stir-fried alligator and mushrooms in oyster sauce. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

COFFEE/ DESSERT ANTOINE’S ANNEX — 513 Royal St.,

581-4422; www.antoines.com — The Annex is a coffee shop serving pastries, sandwiches, soups, salads and gelato. The Royal Street salad features baby spinach and mixed lettuces with carrots, red onion, red peppers, grapes, olives, walnuts and raspberry vinaigrette. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

BEN ’N JERRY’S — 3500 Veterans

Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 887-5656 — Ben ’n Jerry’s offers rich ice creams in signature flavors, ice cream cakes, frozen drinks, fruit smoothies and sundaes. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

MAURICE FRENCH PASTRIES — 3501 Hessmer Ave., Metairie, 885-1526; 4949 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 455-0830; www.mauricefrenchpastries.com — Maurice French Pastries offers an array of continental and French baked goods as well as specialty cakes, cheesecakes and pies. No reservations. Hessmer Avenue: breakfast and lunch Mon.Sat. West Napoleon: breakfast and lunch Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PINKBERRY — 300 Canal St.; 5601

Magazine St., 899-4260; www. pinkberry.com — Pinkberry offers frozen yogurt with an array of wet and dry topping choices including caramel, honey, fruit purees, various chocolates and nuts and more. There also are fresh fruit parfaits and green tea smoothies. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

CONTEMPORARY 5 Fifty 5 — 555 Canal St., 553-5638;

www.555canal.com — New Orleans dishes and Americana favorites take an elegant turn in dishes such as the lobster mac and cheese, combining lobster meat, elbow macaroni and mascarpone, boursin and white cheddar cheeses. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

BAYONA — 430 Dauphine St., 525-

4455; www.bayona.com — House favorites on Chef Susan Spicer’s menu include sauteed Pacific salmon with choucroute and Gewurztraminer sauce and the appetizer of grilled shrimp with black-bean cake and coriander sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Wed.-Sat., dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $$$ FEAST NEW ORLEANS — 200 Julia

St., 304-6318; www.feastneworleans.com — Feast serves rustic European dishes in a casual setting. Cock-a-Leekie is a dish of braised chicken with cream, bacon, plums, leeks and red potatoes. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$ THE GREEN GODDESS — 307 Ex-

change Alley, 301-3347; www.greengoddessnola.com — Chef Chris DeBarr’s contemporary cooking combines classic techniques, exotic ingredients and culinary wit. At lunch, Big Cactus Chilaquiles feature poached eggs on homemade tortillas with salsa verde, queso fresca and nopalitos. No reservations. Lunch daily, dinner Thu.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

ONE RESTAURANT & LOUNGE — 8132 Hampson St., 301-9061; www. one-sl.com — Chef Scott Snodgrass prepares refined dishes like char-grilled oysters topped with Roquefort cheese and a red wine vinaigrette, seared scallops with roasted garlic and shiitake polenta cakes and a memorable cochon de lait. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

CREOLE ANTOINE’S RESTAURANT — 713 St.

Louis St., 581-4422; www.antoines. com — The city’s oldest restaurant offers a glimpse of what 19th century French Creole dining might have been like, with a labyrinthine series of dining rooms. Signature dishes include oysters Rockefeller, crawfish Cardinal and baked Alaska. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Mon-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

AUSTIN’S RESTAURANT — 5101 W.

Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 888-5533; www.austinsno.com — Austin’s cooks hearty Creole and Italian dishes like stuffed soft-shell crab and veal Austin, which is crowned with crabmeat. No reservations. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

GUMBO SHOP — 640 St. Peter St., 525-1486; www.gumboshop.com — Gumbo and New Orleans classics such as crawfish etouffee dominate the menu. Their spicy flavors meld into a dish that represents the city’s best and redefines comfort food. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ LE CITRON BISTRO — 1539 Religious

St., 566-9051; www.le-citronbistro. com — Located in a historic building, the quaint bistro serves starters like chicken and andouille gumbo and fried frogs legs. Entrees include choices like fried chicken, Gulf fish and burgers. Reservations accepted. Dinner Wed.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$

MR. ED’S CREOLE GRILLE— 5241 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 889-7992; www.mredsno.com — Mr. Ed’s offers seafood dishes and some Italian accents. Try shrimp beignets with sweet chili glaze or creamy blue crab dip. Eggplant Vincent is a fried eggplant cup filled with crawfish and shrimp and served with pasta. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ MONTREL’S BISTRO — 1000 N.

Peters St., 524-4747 — This casual restaurant serves Creole favorites. The menu includes crawfish etouffee, boiled crawfish, red beans and rice and bread pudding for dessert. Outdoor seating is adjacent to Dutch Alley and the French Market. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

DELI CELLERS OF RIVER RIDGE — 1801

Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www.cellersrr.com — 1801 Dickory Ave., Harahan, 734-8455; www.cellarsrr.com — The deli at this wine shop serves up hearty dishes and creative sandwiches like the “spicy bird” with smoked turkey, applewood-smoked bacon, pepper Jack cheese, lettuce, tomato and mayo on a croissant. The shrimp remoulade salad is served over romaine with cucumbers and tomatoes. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $

KOSHER CAJUN NEW YORK DELI & GROCERY — 3519 Severn Ave., Me-

tairie, 888-2010; www.koshercajun. com — This New York-style deli specializes in sandwiches, including corned beef and pastrami that come straight from the Bronx. No reservations. Lunch Sun.-Thu., dinner Mon.-Thu. Credit cards. $

MARTIN WINE CELLAR — 714 Elmeer Ave., Metairie , 896-7350; www. martinwine.com — Sandwiches piled high with cold cuts, salads, hot sandwiches, soups and lunch specials are available at the deli counter. The Cedric features chicken breast, spinach, Swiss, tomatoes and red onions on seven-grain bread. No reservations. Lunch daily. Credit cards. $

DINER AMERICAN PIE DINER — 2244 Vet-

erans Memorial Blvd., Kenner, 4682187 — American Pie serves breakfast around the clock and a menu


Expanded listings at bestofneworleans.com

of burgers and Americana classics. The Reuben has melted Swiss over pastrami and sauerkraut and is served with fries or chips. Chicken quesadillas with provolone and sauteed onions and peppers are one of the changing daily specials. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $

tures lamb, chicken and seafood served in a variety of ways, including curries and tandoori. Vegetarian options are available. Reservations recommended. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

Shrimp and grits feature head-on Gulf shrimp in a smoked tomato and andouille broth over creamy grits. There’s a Bloody Mary bar at brunch. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$

ITALIAN

561-5171; www.daisydukesrestaurant.com — Daisy Dukes is known for its seafood omelet and serves a wide variety of Cajun spiced Louisiana favorites, burgers, po-boys and seafood, including boiled crawfish and oysters on the half-shell. Breakfast is served all day. No reservations. Open 24 hours daily. Credit cards. $$

CAFE GIOVANNI — 117 Decatur St.,

BOMBAY CLUB — 830 Conti St., 586-0972; www.thebombayclub. com — Mull the menu at this French Quarter hideaway while sipping a well made martini. The duck duet pairs confit leg with pepper-seared breast with black currant reduction. Reservations recommended. Dinner daily, latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

STEVE’S DINER — 201 St. Charles

Ave., 522-8198 — Located in the Place St. Charles food court, Steve’s serves hot breakfasts until 10 a.m. Lunch features sandwiches, salads and hot plate lunches such as fried catfish and baked chicken Parmesan. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.Fri. Credit cards. $

FRENCH FLAMING TORCH — 737 Octavia St.,

895-0900; www.flamingtorchnola.com — Enjoy classic French dishes from escargot in garlic butter to veal liver or steak au poivre. Other dishes include roasted duck and New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp. Reservations accepted. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

5908 Magazine St., 891-8495; www.martiniquebistro.com — This French bistro has both a cozy dining room and a pretty courtyard. Try dishes such as Steen’s-cured duck breast with satsuma and ginger demi-glace and stone-ground goat cheese grits. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MARTINIQUE

BISTRO

BREAUX MART — 315 E. Judge Perez,

Chalmette, 262-0750; 605 Lapalco Blvd., Gretna, 433-0333; 2904 Severn Ave., Metairie, 885-5565; 9647 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge, 737-8146; www.breauxmart.com — Breaux Mart prides itself on its “Deli to Geaux” as well as weekday specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

INDIAN JULIE’S LITTLE INDIA KITCHEN AT SCHIRO’S — 2483 Royal St., 944-

6666; www.schiroscafe.com — The cafe offers homemade Indian dishes prepared with freshly ground herbs and spices. Selections include chicken, lamb or shrimp curry or vegetarian saag paneer. Schiro’s also serves New Orleans cuisine. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sat.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NIRVANA INDIAN CUISINE — 4308 Magazine St., 894-9797 — Serving mostly northern Indian cuisine, the restaurant’s extensive menu ranges from chicken to vegetable dishes. Reservations accepted for five or more. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$ TAJ MAHAL INDIAN CUISINE — 923-

C Metairie Road, Metairie, 8366859 — The traditional menu fea-

RICCOBONO’S PEPPERMILL RESTAURANT — 3524 Severn Ave., Metairie,

455-2266 — This Italian-style eatery serves New Orleans favorites like stuffed crabs with jumbo lump crabmeat with spaghetti bordelaise and trout meuniere with brabant potatoes. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch daily, dinner Wed.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

TONY MANDINA’S RESTAURANT — 1915 Pratt St., Gretna, 362-2010;

www.tonymandinas.com — Tony Mandina’s serves Italian and Creole cuisine. Dishes include pasta, veal parmigiana, veal Bordelasie and specialties like shrimp Mandina and battered eggplant topped with shrimp and crabmeat in cream sauce. Reservations accepted. Lunch Tue.-Fri., dinner Fri.Sat. Credit cards. $$

JAPANESE KYOTO — 4920 Prytania St., 891-

3644 — Kyoto’s sushi chefs prepare rolls, sashimi and salads. “Box” sushi is a favorite, with more than 25 rolls. Reservations recommended for parties of six or more. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MIKIMOTO — 3301 S. Carrollton

Ave., 488-1881; www.mikimotosushi.com — Sushi choices include new and old favorites, both raw and cooked. The South Carrollton roll includes tuna tataki, avocado and snow crab. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Delivery available. Credit cards. $$

MIYAKO JAPANESE SEAFOOD & STEAKHOUSE — 1403 St. Charles

Ave., 410-9997; www.japanesebistro.com — Miyako offers a full range of Japanese cuisine, with specialties from the sushi or hibachi menus, chicken, beef or seafood teriyaki, and tempura. Reservations accepted. Lunch Sun.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

ROCK-N-SAKE — 823 Fulton St., 5817253; www.rocknsake.com — Rockn-Sake serves traditional Japanese cuisine with some creative twists. There’s a wide selection of sushi, sashimi and rolls or spicy gyoza soup, pan-fried soba noodles with chicken or seafood and teriyaki dishes. Reservations accepted for large parties. Lunch Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$

LOUISIANA CONTEMPORARY ATCHAFALAYA RESTAURANT —

901 Louisiana Ave., 891-9626; www.cafeatchafalaya.com — Atchafalaya serves creative contemporary Creole cooking.

BOUCHE — 840 Tchoupitoulas St.,

267-7485; www.bouchenola.com — This wine bar and restaurant serves creative dishes like tasso truffle mac and cheese with three cheeses and Mornay sauce, baby spinach salad with Maytag blue cheese and bacon lardons, and crispy duck breast with Grand Marnier sweet potatoes and vanilla-balsamic extract. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat., latenight Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

MILA — 817 Common St., 412-2580; www.milaneworleans.com — MiLA takes a fresh approach to Southern and New Orleans cooking, focusing on local produce and refined techniques. Try New Orleans barbecue lobster with lemon confit and fresh thyme. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri. dinner Mon.-Sat. $$$

RALPH’S ON THE PARK — 900

City Park Ave., 488-1000; www. ralphsonthepark.com — Popular dishes include baked oysters Ralph, turtle soup and the Niman Ranch New York strip. There also are brunch specials. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

REDEMPTION — 3835 Iberville St., 309-3570 — Chef Michelle Matlock offers contemporary Louisiana cooking. Chambord duckling is served with cherry vinaigrette. Seared foie gras is complemented by vanilla parsnip puree. Reservations recommended. Lunch Tue.Fri., dinner Tue.-Sun., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$

TOMMY’S WINE BAR — 752 Tchoupitoulas St., 525-4790 — Tommy’s Wine Bar offers cheese and charcuterie plates as well as a menu of appetizers and salads from the neighboring kitchen of Tommy’s Cuisine. No reservations. Lite dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MEDITERRANEAN/

MIDDLE EASTERN ATTIKI BAR & GRILL — 230 Decatur St., 587-3756; www.attikineworleans.com — Attiki features a range of Mediterranean cuisine including entrees of beef kebabs and chicken shawarma. Reservations recommended. Lunch, dinner and latenight daily. Credit cards. $$

PYRAMIDS CAFE — 3151 Calhoun St., 861-9602 — Diners will find authentic, healthy and fresh Mediterranean cuisine featuring such favorites as sharwarma prepared on a rotisserie. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

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GOURMET TO GO

529-2154; www.cafegiovanni.com — Chef Duke LoCicero serves inventive Italian cuisine and Italian accented contemporary Louisiana cooking. Shrimp Dukie features Louisiana shrimp and a duck breast marinated in Cajun spices served with tasso-mushroom sauce. Belli Baci is the restaurant’s cocktail lounge. Reservations accepted. Dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

gambit

DAISY DUKES — 121 Chartres St.,

53


OUT2EAT a mix of popular Mexican and Cuban dishes. Come in for fajitas, pressed Cuban sandwiches made with hickory-smoked pork and char-broiled steaks or pork chops. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ JUAN’S FLYING BURRITO — 2018

Magazine St., 569-0000; 4724 S.Carrollton Ave. 486-9950; www. juansflyingburrito.com — This wallet-friendly restaurant offers new takes on Mexican-inspired cooking. It’s known for its mealand-a-half-size signature burritos. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

NACHO MAMA’S MEXICAN GRILL —

3242 Magazine St., 899-0031; 1000 S. Clearview Pkwy., Harahan, 7361188; www.nachomamasmexicangrill.com — These taquerias serve Mexican favorites such as portobello mushroom fajitas and chile rellenos. There are happy hour margaritas on weekdays and daily drink specials. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SANTA FE — 3201 Esplanade Ave., 948-0077 — This casual cafe serves creative takes on Southwestern cuisine. Fried green tomatoes are topped with grilled jumbo shrimp and roasted chili remoulade and capers. Outdoor seating is available. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

MUSIC AND FOOD GAZEBO CAFE — 1018 Decatur St.,

525-8899; www.gazebocafenola. com — The Gazebo features a mix of Cajun and Creole dishes and ice cream daquiris. The New Orleans sampler rounds up jambalaya, red beans and rice and gumbo. Other options include salads, seafood poboys and burgers. No reservations. Lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

HOUSE OF BLUES — 225 Decatur

54

St., 310-4999; www.hob.com/neworleans — Try the pan-seared Voodoo Shrimp with rosemary cornbread. The buffet-style gospel brunch features local and regional groups. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ THE MARKET CAFE — 1000 Decatur

St., 527-5000; www.marketcafenola.com — Dine indoors or out on seafood either fried for platters or po-boys or highlighted in dishes such as crawfish pie, crawfish etouffee or shrimp Creole. Sandwich options include muffulettas, Philly steaks on po-boy bread and gyros in pita bread. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SNUG HARBOR JAZZ BISTRO — 626 Frenchmen St., 949-0696; www. snugjazz.com — Traditional Creole and Cajun fare pepper the menu along with newer creations such as the fish Marigny, topped with Gulf shrimp in a Creole cream sauce. Reservations recommended. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

NEIGHBORHOOD GOTT GOURMET CAFE — 3100

Magazine St., 373-6579; www.gottgourmetcafe.com — Gott Gourmet’s menu of creative dishes and sandwiches includes a cochon de lait po-boy made with pulled pork, homecooked Dr. Pepper-honeybaked ham, pickles, Gruyere cheese, ancho-honey coleslaw and honey mustard-chile mayo. No

reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Fri. Credit cards. $

KATIE’S RESTAURANT — 3701 Iberville St., 488-6582; www.katiesinmidcity.com — Favorites at this Mid-City restaurant include the Cajun Cuban with roasted pork, grilled ham, cheese and pickles pressed on buttered bread. The Boudreaux pizza is topped with cochon de lait, spinach, red onions, roasted garlic, scallions and olive oil. There also are salads, burgers and Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, Dinner Tue.Sat., brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ KOZ’S — 515 Harrison Ave., 484-

0841; 6215 Wilson St., Harahan, 7373933; www.kozcooks.com — Louisiana favorites such as seafood platters, muffulettas and more than 15 types of po-boys, ranging from hot sausage to cheeseburger, are available at Koz’s. The Will’s Chamber of Horrors sandwich features roast beef, ham, turkey, Swiss and American cheese, Italian dressing and hot mustard. . No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.Sat. Credit cards. $ LIUZZA’S RESTAURANT & BAR —

3636 Bienville St., 482-9120; www. liuzzas.com — This neighborhood favorite serves casual Creole and Italian fare. The Frenchuletta is a muffuletta on French bread served hot. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sat. Cash only. $$ MR. ED’S RESTAURANT — 910 W.

Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 463-3030; 1001 Live Oak St., Metairie, 8380022 — Popular dishes include seafood-stuffed bell peppers loaded with shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat, topped with buttered breadcrumbs. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

RAJUN CAJUN CAFE — 5209 W.

Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 883-5513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com — The cafe serves soups, salads, po-boys, muffulettas, seafood plates and a few entree platters. Daily specials include items such as breaded pork chops on Wednesdays and seafood options on Friday. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$

PIZZA MARKS TWAIN’S PIZZA LANDING —

2035 Metairie Road, Metairie, 8328032; www.marktwainspizza.com — Disembark at Mark Twain’s for salads, po-boys and pies like the Italian pizza with salami, tomato, artichoke, sausage and basil. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat., dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

NONNA MIA CAFE & PIZZERIA — 3125 Esplanade Ave., 948-1717 — Nonna Mia uses homemade dough for pizza served by the slice or whole pie and offers salads, pasta dishes and panini. Gourmet pies are topped with ingredients like pancetta, roasted eggplant, portobello mushrooms and prosciutto. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ REGINELLI’S — 741 State St., 899-

1414; 817 W. Esplanade Ave., Kenner, 712-6868; 874 Harrison Ave., 488-0133; 3244 Magazine St. 8957272; 5608 Citrus Blvd., Harahan, 818-0111; www.reginellis.com — This New Orleans original offers a range of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

R&O’S RESTAURANT — 216 Old Hammond Hwy., 831-1248 — R&O’s offers a mix of pizza and Creole and Italian seafood dishes. There’s

everything from seafood gumbo and stuffed artichokes to po-boys and muffulettas. Reservations accepted. Lunch daily, dinner Wed.Sun. Credit cards. $

SLICE PIZZERIA — 1513 St. Charles Ave., 525-7437; 5538 Magazine St., 897-4800 — Neapolitan-style pizza rules, but you can buy pizza by the slice and add or subtract toppings as you choose. There are also a full coffee bar, Italian sodas and organic teas. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $ THEO’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZZA —

4218 Magazine St., 894-8554; 4024 Canal St., 302-1133; www.theospizza.com — There is a wide variety of specialty pies or build your own from the selection of more than two-dozen toppings. Also serving salads and sandwiches. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

WIT’S INN — 141 N. Carrollton Ave., 486-1600 — This Mid-City bar and restaurant features pizzas, calzones, toasted subs, salads and appetizers for snacking. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $

SANDWICHES & PO-BOYS MAGAZINE PO-BOY SHOP — 2368

Magazine St., 522-3107 — Choose from a long list of po-boys filled with everything from fried seafood to corned beef to hot sausage to veal. There are breakfast burritos in the morning and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Breakfast and lunch Mon.-Sat. Cash only. $

MAHONY’S PO-BOY SHOP — 3454 Magazine St., 899-3374; www. mahonyspoboys.com — Mahoney’s serves traditional favorites and original po-boys like the Peacemaker, which is filled with fried oysters, bacon and cheddar cheese. There are daily lunch specials as well. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $ PARKWAY BAKERY AND TAVERN — 538 N. Hagen Ave., 482-3047 —

Parkway serves juicy roast beef po-boys, hot sausage po-boys, fried seafood and more. No reservations. Kitchen open from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Wed.-Mon. Credit cards. $ SAMMY’S PO-BOYS & CATERING — 901 Veterans Memorial Blvd.,

Metairie, 835-0916; www.sammyspoboys.com — Sammy’s offers a wide array of po-boys and wraps. The house-cooked bottom round beef in gravy is a specialty. The menu also includes salads, seafood platters, a few Italian dishes and daily lunch specials. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Sat., dinner daily. Credit cards. $

TRACEY’S — 2604 Magazine St., 899-2054; www.traceysnola.com — The roast beef po-boy dripping with garlicky gravy is the highlight of a menu transplanted from the former Parasol’s to this Uptown bar. Other options include fried seafood and bar noshing items. No reservations. Lunch and dinner daily. Cash only. $

SEAFOOD JACK DEMPSEY’S — 738 Poland Ave.,

943-9914 — The Jack Dempsey seafood platter serves a trainingtable feast of gumbo, shrimp, oysters, catfish, redfish and crawfish pies, plus two side items. Other

dishes include broiled redfish and fried soft-shell crab. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sat. and dinner Wed.-Sat. Credit cards. $$ COTE BRASSERIE — 700 Tchoupitoulas St., 613-2350; www. lacotebrasserie.com — This stylish restaurant in the Renaissance New Orleans Arts Hotel serves an array of raw and cooked seafood. Tabasco and Steen’s Cane Syrup glazed salmon is served with shrimp mirliton ragout. Reservations recommended. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$$ LA

640 Frenchmen St., 945-4472; www. marignybrasserie.com — Marigny Brasserie serves breakfast items like Cajun eggs Bendict. The lunch and dinner menus include fried seafood po-boys and a host of Italian dishes. Reservations accepted. Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, brunch Sun. Credit cards. $$ MARIGNY

BRASSERIE

RED FISH GRILL — 115 Bourbon

St., 598-1200; www.redfishgrill. com — Seafood creations by executive chef Brian Katz dominate a menu peppered with favorites like hickory-grilled redfish, pecancrusted catfish, alligator sausage and seafood gumbo. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner daily. Credit cards. $$

SOUL FOOD BIG MOMMA’S CHICKEN AND WAFFLES — 5741 Crowder Blvd., 241-2548;

www.bigmommaschickenandwaffles.com — Big Mamma’s serves hearty combinations like the six-piece which includes a waffle and six fried wings served crispy or dipped in sauce. Breakfast is served all day. All items are cooked to order. No reservations. Breakfast Sat.-Sun., Lunch daily, dinner Sun. Credit cards. $

STEAKHOUSE RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE —

Harrah’s Hotel, 525 Fulton St., 5877099; 3633 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 888-3600; www. ruthschris.com — Ruth’s top-quality steaks are broiled in 1,800-degree ovens and arrive at the table sizzling. Reservations recommended. Lunch Fri., dinner daily. Credit cards. $$$

TAPAS/SPANISH GALVEZ RESTAURANT — 914 N. Pe-

ters St., 595-3400; www.galvezrestaurant.com — Located at the former site of Bella Luna, Galvez offers tapas, paella and a Spanish-accented bouillabaisse. Besides seafood, entrees include grilled Black Angus sirloin and roasted chicken. Reservations accepted. Lunch and dinner Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $$$ MIMI’S

IN

THE

MARIGNY

2601 Royal St., 872-9868 — The decadant Mushroom Manchego Toast is a favorite here. Or enjoy hot and cold tapas dishes ranging from grilled marinated artichokes to calamari. Reservations accepted for large parties. Dinner and latenight Tue.-Sun. Credit cards. $

VEGA TAPAS CAFE — 2051 Metarie Road, 836-2007; www.vegatapascafe.com — Vega’s mix of hot and cold tapas dishes includes a salad of lump crabmeat on arugula with blood orange vinaigrette, seared tuna with avocado and tomato relish, braised pork empanadillos, steamed mussels and shrimp with tomatoes and garlic in caper-basil cream. Reservations accepted. Dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $$$

VIETNAMESE AUGUST MOON — 3635 Prytania

St., 899-5129; www.moonnola.com — August Moon serves a mix of Vietnamese and Chinese cuisine. There are spring rolls and pho soup as well as many popular Chinese dishes and vegetarian options. Delivery available. No reservations. Lunch Mon.-Fri., dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards. $

Rajun Cajun Cafe serves seafood, sandwiches and an array of New Orleans favorites (5209 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 8835513; www.rajuncajuncafe.com). PHOTO BY CHerYl GerBer

DOSON NOODLE HOUSE — 135 N.

Carrollton Ave., 309-7283 — Noodles abound at this Mid-City eatery, which excels at vinegary chicken salad over shredded cabbage, as well as bowls of steaming pho. Vegetable-laden wonton soup and thick spring rolls make a refreshing, satisfying meal. No reservations. Lunch and dinner Mon.-Sat. Credit cards and checks. $$

PHO HOA RESTAURANT — 1308 Manhattan Blvd., 302-2094 — Pho Hoa serves staple Vietnamese dishes including beef broth soups, vermicelli bowls, rice dishes and banh mi sandwiches. Bo kho is a popular beef stew. Appetizers include fried egg rols, crab rangoons and rice paper spring rolls. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and early dinner daily. Credit cards. $ PHO NOLA — 3320 Transcontinental

Drive, Metairie, 941-7690; www. pho-nola.com — Pho NOLA serves spring rolls and egg rolls, noodle soups, rice and vermicelli dishes and po-boys. Beverages include boba teas, milk teas, coffee drinks and smoothies. No reservations. Lunch Tue.-Sun., dinner Tue.-Sat. Credit cards. $

PHO TAU BAY RESTAURANT — 113 Westbank Expwy., Suite C, Gretna, 368-9846 — You’ll find classic Vietnamese beef broth and noodle soups, vermicelli dishes, seafood soups, shrimp spring rolls with peanut sauce and more. No reservations. Breakfast, lunch and dinner Mon.-Wed. & Fri.-Sat. Credit cards. $


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3209 Edenborne Ave @ 18th Metairie â&#x20AC;˘ (504) 888-7722 â&#x20AC;˘ Mon-Sat 11a-7p suzette@suzettes.com

OVER 5 DECADES OF TAX EXPERTISE. ACCEPT NOTHING LESS.

504-899-0005 Š2010 HRB Tax Group, Inc.

Phone: 1-800-hrblock â&#x20AC;˘ Visit our Website hrblock.com

Also available at Sal's Snowballs

Shipping Available

1536 River Oaks Road W (Corner of Citrus and Dickory Ave., across from River Oaks Hospital)

(504) 891-2246

MAGNOLIA DISCOUNT

angelo v. quagl ino jr. In BusIness sInce 1963

Now Offering Guided Trail Rides thru Audubon Park

1823 Metairie Road

504-218-5655

(Near Bonnabel and Metairie Road)

www.DiannesKingCakes.com

Exp 3/1/2011

Service Calls $

4950

GULF STATES AIR

464-1267

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

Our trainers will travel to you 24/7 at your convenience We will help you achieve your weight loss and ďŹ tness goals Call us today for your free consultation 504-994-3822 â&#x20AC;˘ info@trainertogonola.com

3 TON 410 FREON REPLACEMENT SYSTEM

And More!

After Construction Cleaning

YOUR GUIDE TO: MERCHANDISE â&#x20AC;˘ SERVICES â&#x20AC;˘ EVENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS â&#x20AC;˘ AND MORE

55


EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFIEDS 483-3100 • Fax: 483-3153 3923 Bienville St. New Orleans, LA 70119 Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.- 5:30 p.m.

classadv@gambitweekly.com CASH, CHECK OR MAJOR CREDIT CARD

Online: When you place ad in The Gambit’s Classifieds it also appears on our website, www.bestofneworleans.com Free Ads: Private party ads for

merchandise for sale valued under $100 (price must be in ad) or ads for pets found/lost. No phone calls. Please fax or email.

DRIVERS/DELIVERY DRIVERS: SOME LOCAL, OUT/ BACK Long Haul & Remote Avail. NOW! Free Health Ins. & Benefits. CDL-A w/ Hazmat, Tanker End., TWIC Card & 1 yr TT Exp. Required 888-380-5516

ENTERTAINMENT Gigs for NOLA music

Bar in Auburn would like to bring in more funk/brass bands/rnb acts passing on I-85 to Atlanta or Montgomery/ B’ham via I-65. Negotiable on terms for details email Willialo at hotmail dot com

FARM LABOR TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

DSB Farms, Danbury, TX, has 4 positions for rice, oilseed crops & cattle. 3 mths experience required w/ references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 2/17/11 12/17/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order TX6790723.

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

NOTE: Ad cancellations and charges for all display ads must be made by Wednesday at 5pm prior to the coming weeks insertion. Ad cancellations and changes for all line ads must be made by Thursday at noon prior to the coming weeks insertion. Please proof you first as insertion that appears for errors. The Gambit only takes responsibility for the first incorrect insertion.

MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Thursday, February 24th 6:00p.m. - 8:00p.m.

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

56

For Rent &

Employment Special Rates

BUY

2 WEEKS 1 WEEK

GET

FREE

RETAIL

market PLACE Gambit’s weekly guide to Services, Events, Merchandise, Announcements, etc. for as little as $50

EOE

We determine the journey, you determine the destination.

SEASONAL TEMPORARY FARM LABOR

Roeder Honey Farm, San Augustine, TX, has 4 positions for bees & honey. 3 mths experience required w/ references; valid and clean DL; tools and equipment provided; housing and trans provided; trans & subsistence expenses reimb; $9.78hr; 3/4 work period guaranteed from 3/15/11 - 6/15/11. Apply for this job at the nearest State Workforce Agency with Job Order 4823374.

Experience Mardi Gras first hand. Help lead horses through the excitement of the Mardi Gras parades. Salary plus tips. Lots of fun! Call 891-2246.

Bartender with restaurant food server exp.

Professional Dress • Please Bring Resume

www.wyndhamvo.com/careers

Advertise in

WIT’S INN Bar & Pizza Kitchen Apply in person Mon-Fri, 1-4:30 pm 141 N. Carrollton Ave.

Limited seating available! To RSVP, please call Brittni Williamson, Director of Recruitment at 504-430-2565 or email Brittni.Williamson@w yn.com

504-523-7027

WALK THRU MARDI GRAS

Zea Rotisserie and Grill 1525 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans

Please join the Wyndham Executive Staff at our 6th annual Business Networking Reception, where you will enjoy presentations from the Wyndham Executive teams on the history and opportunities at Wyndham Vacation Ownership. This event is intended to provide a networking opportunity for eager and determined Marketing and Sales professionals seeking careers of growth, stability and financial gain in the Hotel and Tourism Industry. We are committed to employing only top talent. Please join our team for the evening and mingle with the WVO executive staff. We also welcome backgrounds in real estate and brokering.

Apply in person @ 1514 St Charles Ave.

MISCELLANEOUS

Wyndham Vacation Ownership®, is the world’s largest vacation ownership company, as measured by the number of vacation ownership resorts, unit and interests.

Business Networking Reception

SALES/BRIDAL

Excellent opportunity for long term employment. Retail sales preferred. Salary+commision. We will train.

MODELING/ACTING PHONE ACTRESSES FROM HOME. BEST PAY OUTS, BUSY SYSTEM, BILINGUAL/SP A+. Weekends a must! Land Line / Good Voice 1-800-4037772. LIPSERVICE.NET

Looking for Cooks & Waitstaff. Call 4pm-6pm for appointment. 504-4940739. Or apply in person at 755 Tchoupitoulas St.

(Private site parking will be available in the Zea parking lot on Carondelet)

Real Estate

To work in New Orleans, LA to perform general marine drafting including drawing rigs, ships & lift boats using software such as AutoCAD 2004, Rinoceros Version 2.0 & Solid Works 2007. Must have Bachelor’s degree in Naval Engineering, Systems Engineering or Mechanical Engineering & 2 years experience in job offered or as a Structural Drafter. Mail resume to Arthur Ruderman, Sr. Advisor, Bennett & Associates, LLC, 5177 Richmond Ave., Suite 1188, Houston, TX 77056. Must have proof of legal authority to work in the United States. Put job code 101404 on resume.

RESTAURANT/HOTEL/BAR

Deadlines:

• For all Line Ads - Thurs. @ 5 p.m. • For all Display Ads - Wed. @ 5 p.m.

MARINE MARINE DRAFTSMAN

THE VOLUPTUOUS VIXEN

Upscale Plus size boutique seeking enthusiastic applicants w/retail exp. for PT positions. Bring resume & apply in person 818 Chartres, 10am-5pm.

VOLUNTEER

Offers Volunteer Opportunities. Make a difference in the lives of the terminally ill & their families. Services include: friendly visits to patients & their families, provide rest time to caretaker, bereavement & office assistance. School service hours avail. Call Volunteer Coordinator @ 504-818-2723 #3016

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Earn Extra income assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! CALL OUR LIVE OPERATORS NOW! 1-800-405-7619 ext. 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

NEED HELP? Consider the alternative... Advertise in the gambit Classifieds Call

483-3100 Fax

483-3153


CLASSIFIEDS ELECTRIC RANGE

Hotpoint Almond Color 30in, Good working Condition. $65. Call 943-7699

AUTOMOTIVE DOMESTIC AUTOS

FURNITURE/ACCESSORIES

03 Cadillac Sports Car CTS

$125 Full/Double Size Mattress Set, still in original plastic, unopened. We can deliver. (504) 846-5122 $295 Brand New Iron Queen Bed with mattress set, all new. Can deliver. (504) 952-8403 King Pillowtop Mattress, NEW!!! ONLY $199. Can deliver. (504) 846-5122

Exc cond, low mi, has all extras, looks & drives like new. $300 down, take over note $135/mo, w/wrnty. 836-9801

‘05 FORD TAURUS SE

Custom, fully loaded, auto, all pwr, CD, pwr win & seats.Perfect cond. Like new. $200 dwn, take over $75 mo note, w/warr. Call 24/7, 836-9801

LARGE HUTCH

Approx 8’ H x 8’L x 3’D (from front to back of cabinet section. Features 6 doors w/ 2 inside adjustable shelves & top section holds 6 adjustable shelves. Solid cypress by Boesch Cabinetmakers, finished by Littleton & Pruit. $700. E-mail bcieditor@cox.net NEW Pub Height Table Set all wood, still boxed. Delivery available. $325 (504) 846-5122 Queen Mattress Set $149 Still in wrapper. Will deliver. (504) 846-5122

IMPORTED AUTOS 05 KIA RIO

fully loaded, in perfect condition. Only 40K mi. $300 down and take over note of $65/mo with warranty. 836-9801.

05 NISSAN ALTIMA

In Perfect cond, low miles, like new. Fully loaded. $300 down & take over note $118/mo with warranty. 836-9801

84’ MERCEDES BENZ 300d

Turbo Diesel. Classic Car. Runs great. 165,000 mi. Well kept. New battery $4,500 obo. (504) 897-9655.

RESTAURANT/BAR EQUIP CASH REGISTER SYSTEM

Tech 200. 3 terminals, 6 printers, 4 cash drawers, 5 keyboards. $2500. Call Dennis, 486-1600 9am - 12 noon.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

PETS

MIND-BODY-FITNESS NOTICE

PET ADOPTIONS

Massage therapists are required to be licensed with the State of Louisiana and must include the license number in their ads.

COONEY

1yr old sweet and playful Calico kitty,shots spayed microchiped ,rescue 504 462-1968

LICENSED MASSAGE A BODY BLISS MASSAGE

Jeannie LMT #3783-01. Flexible appointments. Uptown Studio or Hotel out calls. 504.894.8856 (uptown)

BYWATER BODYWORKS

MASSAGE BY JAMIE

SW/DT or Gen Relaxation. Safe, priv & quiet location. Awesome work. $60/hr & $95/1.5hr. 8am-9pm. 504-2311774. LA#509

QUIET WESTBANK LOC

Swedish, Relaxing Massage. Hours 9am-6pm, M-F. Sat 10-1pm $70. LA Lic #1910. Sandra, 504-393-0123.

A Touch of

Aloha La Lic #2983

massage & body work

pain management & relaxation • Lomi Lomi - 90 minutes • Deep Tissue • Swedish evening appts avail. 6 -10pm weekdays. 10am-7pm on weekends.

504-258-3389

2209 LaPalco Blvd

www.atouchofaloha.massageplanet.com Member of BBB Providing Therapeutic Massage/Non Sexual

• TANNING • WAXING

Elijah

Lori's

Massage Therapy Therapeutic Massage

504-231-7433 La# 1681

11 yrs Experience Convenient Metairie Studio Near Lakeside Mall Same Day & Weekend Appts Available

RELAX RELAX RELAX

Swedish massage by strong hands. Call Jack at 453-9161. La lic #0076.

• NAILS

MERCHANDISE ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES ANTIQUE FRENCH DAYBED, ETC.

Numerous pieces for sale, including: antique Neo-classical style French daybed, small antique Davenport Desk, Baker reproduction Highboy, various pieces of cut crystal, large Asian charger on stand, some shabby chic pieces and more. Bergere chair has beautiful legs and stretchers, accompanied by a skirted ottoman in matching upholstery. Not all pieces pictured. All in fabulous condition that can be moved directly into your home. Serious inquiries only for photos, dimensions and prices. 504.615.8775

APPLIANCES 18 Cubic Ft Fridge

Almond Color. $65. Call 943-7699.

3 yr old gorgeous solid white Angora male cat super smart and sweet.Shots ,neuter ,rescue 504 462-1968

Itty Bitty Inky

Very sweet petite female kitty ,3 yrs ,White/black ,spayed ,shots 504 462-1968

Kirin

Gorgeous 4 yr old male Siamese extremely sweet and loving ,neutered shots ,rescue 504 462-1968

Princess Leila

solid white 4yr old female cat , very loving and talkative spayed ,shots ,rescue 504 462-1968 ANNOUNCEMENTS

ADOPTIONS Adopting your baby is a gift we’ll cherish, endless love awaits. Christine & Tom 888-316-5136 exp. pd. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293

ANNOUNCEMENTS FREE HD FOR LIFE! Only on DISH NETWORK. Lowest Price in America! $24.99/mo. for OVER 120 CHANNELS! PLUS-$550 Bonus! Call Today, 1-888-904-3558

SERVICES BUSINESS SERVICES Gypsy Upholstery

Commercial/residential furniture boat/ auto interiors tops/covers. 504-3055020

• MASSAGE • FACIALS • BODY TREATMENTS Now Hiring: Nail Techs, Massage Therapists, Estheticians. Please email your resume to info@Bare-Spa.com

20% O F F with this ad 1 per customer • offer expires 2/28/11

504-779-3200 • www.Bare-Spa.com

4433 Veterans Blvd. (across from Clearview Mall)

Follow us on Twitter @BareSpa

Check into Foursquare

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

Swedish, deep tissue, therapeutic. Flex appts, in/out calls, OHP/student discounts, gift cert. $65/hr, $75/ 1 1/2hr. LA Lic# 1763 Mark. 259-7278

IMAGE BY BRIAN PERKINS

ft Gi ping y! op as Sh de E Ma

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57


reaL esTaTe

SHOWCaSe METAIRIE

NEW ORLEANS

4526 A St. Ann $239K Great views of City Park & perfect deck in rear to view Endymion Parade. Spacious 1 br/1.5 ba totally renov. post-Katrina. Wd flrs, hi ceils, stainless steel apps. 1089 square feet.

931-35 Dauphine $935K 1850’S Creole cottage. Updated kit & ba, patio, ctyd w/pond. Back unit has 4 studio apts-7 apts total. $6500/mo rent income.

Paula Bowler • French Quarter Realty o:504-949-5400 • c:504-952-3131 • www.frenchquarterrealty.com

3232 Bore St. Great home in conv. loc. FOR SALE or FOR RENT! $199,000 or $1300/mo. 3 bdrm, 1 ba home w gleaming wood floors, bright white kit, garage, storage, fenced yd. All appliances remain!

Donna Chandler • Re/Max Affiliates

O: 504-838-7649 or C: 504-669-4677

FRENCH QUARTER

GENTILLY

RIVER RIDGE

FRENCH QUARTER CONDOS 929 Dumaine ONLY 4 LEFT! STARTING AT $99,000 G. Geoffrey Lutz Owner/Agent 482-8760

5542 Charlotte Dr. $99,500 Slab Ranch - 3 BR, 2 BA Partially renov + Guest Cottage 504-568-1359

9012 Rosecrest Lane 1,420 sqft, lot 62x120 Newly renov 2 bdrm, 2 bth, original hw floors, appl. inclu. Covered carport and additional shed in bkyd. Great River Ridge nbrhd. $189K. Call (504) 915-3220

REAL ESTATE CLASSIFIEDS

HOWARD SCHMALZ & ASSOCIATES REAL ESTATE Call Bert: 504-581-2804

6131 Pitt St 2br/2ba "Audubon Park Tree House” $1800 1406 Magazine 2br/1ba "Lower Garden District" $1050 248 Cherokee 2br/2ba "University Area Condo" $1200

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE GETAWAY EVERYDAY!

Nice loft boathouse w/view of lake/ marina. 40ft cov slip, granite kit. $279K. Jennifer 504-250-9930, lanasa.com. HGI Realty 504-207-7575

UPTOWN/GARDEN DISTRICT CONDO FOR SALE

1 Blk off St. Charles. 2/2, wd flrs, appls & w/d incl., grnite cntrtps & ss appl. OS pkng. $169,900 Darlene, Hera Realty 504-914-6352

MAKE ME BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

Irish Channel did not flood Katrina damaged house with 2 & 1/3 L-shaped lots. 2 lots each 30x120’ = 60’ x 120’ & rear portion of corner lot 35’ x 25’, double driveway in front with also a single tin garage & a single driveway on side street. $8,567 roof, 7 rooms & 3 bathrooms. Fourth sewer line in rear, 2 large walk in closets. Large walk in pantry. Huge, red brick floor to ceiling double sided fireplace. Could house 1 family or owner occupied plus 1 rental, or 2 rentals, or could build single or double on second lot. Much space to add on Huge yard for in-ground pool. Many options for house and land. Paved front patio with 2 large red brick planters. $210,000, 504-832-1901.

COVINGTON 227 S. ORCHARD LANE

Garden Home, gated, 3br, 2 ba wd flrs, 10’ ceil, granite. 1634 sq ft liv, 2250 total. $249K. 985-892-5533

LOTS/ACREAGE ARIZONA BIG BEAUTIFUL LOTS, $99/ mo., $0-down, $0-interest. Golf Course, Nat’l Parks. 1 hour from Tucson Int’l Airport. Guaranteed Financing. NO CREDIT CHECK! (800) 631-8164 Code 4054 www. sunsiteslandrush.com

To Advertise in

REAL ESTATE Call (504) 483-3100

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

CORPORATE RENTALS New Orleans Area 10 Min to Downtown

1Br, 1 Ba, Nwly Remod, furn. Qn bed, WiFi, Cbl. Pkg.Util Incl. Lndry Fac. Sec Cameras $1200/mth. 1 mth min. 2325 Pasadena, Met. 504-491-1591.

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 3 SMALL OFFICES - CBD

From 135 - 220 sq ft. Can be subdivided. $500 each. Parking available. Call 561-1216 for info.

Ann de Montluzin Farmer

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

broker

58

Historic House and Luxury Home Specialist Residential /Commercial Sales and Leasing, Appraisals.

(504) 895-1493 (504) 430-8737

farmeran@gmail.com Licensed in Louisiana for 32 years, building on a real estate heritage since 1905

817 AMELIA STREET $249,000 IRISH CHANNEL

Not a shotgun! 2 small cottages joined in the middle creating one unique single home, Granite counters, central air and heat, nice wood floors, and recycled wooden paneling lend a rustic charm. Small yard makes this a great condo alternative.

Michael L. Baker, ABR/M, CRB, HHS President Realty Resources, Inc. 504-523-5555 • cell 504-606-6226 Licensed by the Louisiana Real Estate Commission for more than 28 years with offices in New Orleans, LA 70130


CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE 4220 Canal Street - Ground Floor On Streetcar Line 1,800 Sq. Ft. Large Central Room, three Separate Offices, Great for Group Practice or Studio $1,575/Mo + Utilities peggy.leblanc@ live.com, 488-6401

SHOP/OFFICE/WAREHOUSE

Available in Mid City 2300 sf, $800/mo. 504-813-2920 or jr70121la@aol.com

CarrOlltOn

gentilly

8131 PLUM - LG 1 BR

Beau upr apt, lg lr/dr comb, frplce w/ mantel, cen a/h, wd flrs, blt-in kit, wd on premises, off st pkg. $850/mo, lse/dep. 909-5541 or 865-1091.

1Bd/1Ba Lafreniere Pk. CA/H. D/W. Crpt/wd flr. Frig&Stv. W/D hkups. Ref. Please. $625/mo+dep. 504-250-2151

3012 14th Street

Newly renov 2 br, 1.5 ba TH, w/d hkp, furn kit w/dw, c a/h, patio. No pets. No Sec.8 $750/mo. 504-833-1197.

Condo For Rent

2Bd/1Ba. 835sqft. Faces pool. Patio/ OS Pking.Laundry Facil./Pool on Premises. $850/mth 504-289-4411

LUXURY APTS

3 BR, 2 full baths, LR, DR, kit, w&d hkups, faux fireplace, fans, blinds. No pets. $850/mo. 504-443-2280

Newly renov, new appls, cen a/h, w/d, alarm, fncd yd, off st prkg, priv entrance, $875+util. 504-283-8450.

8131 PLUM ST

Lg studio, wk in closet, stcar line. Lg eat-in kit, wd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, w/d on site, off st pkg. $800 dep/lse. 9095541 or 865-1091.

Metairie 2805 Wytchwood Dr.

LARGE 2 BR, 1 BA APT

City Park/BayOu st. JOhn

irish Channel 1/2 BLOCK TO MAGAZINE

Furn Rms, Prefer Nght wrkrs. 1&2 BDRM, hardwd/crpt floors. $175/ wk to 900/mo +dep. 504-202-0381, 738-2492.

STUDIO, 4012 ORLEANS

Large kitchen, new appliances, walk to Park or Bayou, $625 includes util and w/d. Call 713/204-5342.

FrenCh Quarter/ FauBOurg Marigny

lakeview/lakeshOre BOATHOUSE

Nice loft, full kit w/great view, 40 ft cov’d slip. $1700/mo. Jennifer 504250-9930. HGI Realty 504-207-7575.

lakeFrOnt

NEW RENTAL

Newly renov. 3 rms, kit, bath, washrm, fridge, mw, stove & washer. $650 wk/ neg. 504-905-9086, 504-717-7394.

LRG ATTRACTIVE APT

2BR, 2BA w/ appls, beaut crtyd setting w/swimming pool, quiet nb’hood. $875/mo. 504-495-6044 or 504756-7347

Mid City

Old Metairie

4208 DUMAINE STREET

1/2 OFF FIRST MONTH OLD METAIRIE SECRET

1 or 2 BR, Sparkling Pool, Bike Path, 12’ x 24’ Liv.Rm, Sep Din, King Master, No Pets, No Sect 8, $699 & $799 . 504-236-5776

METAIRIE TOWERS

$1250/mo. 1 BR/1 1/2BA. Hot tub & Pool, pkng. New kit. Util & TV incld., 24 hr desk service. 504-628-4996

algiers POint 605 VALLETTE ST

3br 2ba house. Updated kit & ba, wd fls, high ceil, cent a/h, w/d hkup, walk to ferry, parks, $1500. 713-204-5342

HISTORIC ALGIERS POINT

2340 Dauphine Street

(504) 944-3605

RESIDENTIAL RENTALS 1301 N. RAMPART-1 bd/ 1.5 ba $2000 4721 MAGAZINE - Comm.

$1700

1161 LAKE AVE-1 bd/ 1ba prkg $75 920 POEYFARRE-1 bd/ 1 ba $1375

BrOadMOOr

To Advertise in

CALL FOR MORE LISTINGS!

4211 S. BROAD

Totally renov sgl 2 br house, cen a/h, ceil fans, w/d hkps, fully furn kit. $1350/mo + dep. Call Joe, 400-7273.

Big Beautiful Bargain

2-3 BR, 2 full ba, lg upper, furn kit, wd/cer flrs, cf. CH, grt flrplc. Lotsa closets & o/s pkg. Pets ok. $1100/mo. 874-3195

Bywater 1023 PIETY ST

Freshly remodeled 2 br, 2 full ba, w/d hkps, cen a/h, c-fans, fncd yd, avail now. $875. 888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

COMPLETELY REMODELED

4340 S. Carrollton 1 BR,1 BA, new appl, w/water $825. 3532 Cleveland 2 BR, LR, c a/h, offst pkg $900 139 S, White Lg BR, comb kit & liv, all util incl. $850 4033 Cleveland Studio, all elec, wtr incl, $350 3222 Napoleon 2 Rms Avail, $600 w/utils. No Pets + Deposit • 504-376-4676

treMe 1137 TREME

2 blks to Fr Qtr, lg 1 BR apt, furn kitchen, 2nd flr with balcony, prkg, $700. 504/525-6520, 390-4362.

Completely renov 2 bdrms, 2 ba, cen a/h, wood floors, w/d, new appls, lg rear yard. $1395/mo. O/A, 891-3180.

1205 ST CHARLES/$1050

Fully Furn’d studio/effy/secure bldg/ gtd pkg/pool/gym/wifi/laundry. 985871-4324, 504-442-0573. Avail May!

1510 CARONDELET 1 block to St. Charles

1 BR balc apt, $750 . Studio lg rm, kitc, full bath, $650 w/d on site 1-888-239-6566 or mballier@yahoo.com

Call 483-3100

3/1.5 Dublin near streetcar. Lv, furn kit, w/d hkp, hdwd flrs,ceil fans, scrn porch. $1150 + deposit. Owner/Agent, 442-2813

lOwer garden dist./ irish Channel 1525 Annunciation

Across from Annunciation square park, 1b/1b w/d hookup, $900/m call 504-256-1464

1750 ST. CHARLES APT

1 LARGE BR, large walk-in closet, new renov, new appliances, security, parking space. $1550. Call 899-0607

2 BR NEAR MAGAZINE

930 Jackson, 2BR + office, furn kitchen, cent a/h, washer/dryer on site. No pets. $850/mo. 504-250-9010.

rentals tO share ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Findyour roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com.

2 UPTOWN APARTMENTS

2 BR & 3 BR. hdwd floors, cent a/c, Lusher School District, University area. $950 - $1300. Chris - 861-7528

2218 GENERAL PERSHING

3 br, 1 ba apt, lr, dr, furn kit, cen a/h, w/d, cble & wtr incl. Close to univ & stcar. $1156/mo. Call Cindy, 236-3278.

French Quarter Realty Wayne • Nicole • Sam • Josh • Jennifer • Brett • Robert • George • Baxter

504-949-5400

3301 JEFFERSON AVE

Secure 1 br, ba, liv, din, full kit with w/d, quiet area. $900 mo. Dep. refs, lse. Feb. 1. 504-865-7815

1017 Ursulines

(parking) gated, offstreet, FQ

$200

931 Bienville

(parking) offstreet, gated, remote ctrl entry $175+

6317 S. PRIEUR

Near Tulane 2 bedroom, living room, dining room, furn kit, tile bath. No pets. $800/mo, Call 504-283-7569

815 PINE ST

1 BR unfurnished apt, 3 blocks to universities, $700/mo, utilities incl. No pets. 504-865-8437 for appt.

500 Mandeville #5

2/2 Marigny,cvd pkg,pool,all extras! $1600

GRT LOCATIONS!

1127 Chartres #2

2/1 spacious, lots of closets, 1st floor

1035 Chartres USQ

1/1 pvt cytd balc, great loc, hdwd flrs $825

MAGAZINE ST O/S gtd pkng, pool, lndry $775/mo LOWER GARDEN DISTRICT St. Andrew- O/S, gtd pkng, pool, laun, $775/mo & up NAPOLEON 1 BR, pool, lndry, os pkng, $700/mo 891-2420

studio cozy, 2nd flr condo, no kitchen

715 Royal F

$1100

$576

NEAR UNIV•GARDEN DIST

Studios, 1 & 2 bd + loft. 1.5 - 2 baths apts. some uitl pd. Hdwd flrs, hi ceil, cen a/h, furn kit with d/w, lndry. $600 - $1200/mo. 388-7426.

2/2 renov,blac,prvt patio&prvt pool $2950

829 Ursulines #6 1700 Napoleon

1.5/1 great location 1 blk to St Charles $850

2511 S Carrollton Ave. Furn kit, cen a/h, off st pkg. $700/mo, wtr pd. Background ck required. 504-450-7450.

1710 Napoleon

1/1 spacious,2nd flr,1 blk to St Charles $850

1 Blk to St. Charles

232 Decatur #3A

1/1 Furnished, balc w/ grt views! $1950

uPtOwn/garden distriCt 1 BEDROOM APT

REAL ESTATE

NEAR UNIVERSITIES

1711 2nd St. Lrg 1b/1b, dish washer, w/d onsite, cent AC, marble mantels, patio $850/mo 895-4726 or 261-7611

Suites at Exchange Centre

935 Gravier Street, Suite 600 • New Orleans, LA 70112

Where Innovation and Opportunity Connect

construction

landscaping &

lawn care

Executive suites at an incredible value with a unique array of services and a unique approach to pricing – offering one very reasonable price that includes everything! Exterior and interior offices available ranging from $425-$900.

BYWATER STUDIO (2 apts)

Downstairs avail. now, upstairs avail end of Jan. Located between Chartres and Royal, furnished including linens, kitchen ware, tv, cable, wi-fi, bottled water...the works - $850/ mo, $900 for short term, free laundry on premises. Call Gloria 504-948-0323

ALL INCLUSIVE HIGHLIGHTS • Fully furnished and equipped suites available at affordable, all inclusive rate • Unique amenities including fitness room, media centre, and training room all included in pricing.

Melissa Pittman 985.630.7769

Melissa.pittman@transwestern.net

Louis Vergona 504.799.3122

call marcio perez

504.330.2708

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

High end 1-4BR. Near ferry, clean, many x-tras, hrdwd flrs, cen a/h, no dogs, no sec 8, some O/S prkng $750$1200/mo. 504-362-7487

1 blk City Park betw Carrollton/Cty Pk Ave, 3 lg rms cent a/h w/d hdwd flrs, ceil fans, thruout. Avail immed. $900/ mo. 504-234-0877

1012 WASHINGTON AVE

inc

BIG OFFICE SPACE ON CANAL

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PUZZLE PAGE CLASSIFIEDS

• 4941 St. Charles • 2721 St. Charles • 5528 Hurst • 1750 St. Charles • 1750 St. Charles • 20 Anjou • 1544 Camp • 3915 St. Charles • 1125 Felicity • 1544 Camp • 1544 Camp • 1224 St. Charles

Grand Mansion $2,300,000 (3 bdrm/3.5ba w/pkg) $1,579,000 TOO LATE! $1,300,000 TOO LATE! $429,000 TOO LATE! $299,000 (4 bdrm/2 ba w/pkg) $239,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $239,000 (1bdrm/1ba w/pkg) $209,000 (2 bdrm/2ba w/pkg) $179,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $159,000 (1 bdrm/1ba) $149,000 starting at $79,000

YOUR PROPERTY COULD BE LISTED HERE!!!

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

ANSWERS FOR LAST WEEK ON PAGE 56

62

John Schaff crs CELL

504.343.6683

office

504.895.4663

warehouse dist.

uPtowN home

330 s. diamoNd st.

3506 aNNuNCiatioN

HISTORIC BUILDING IN WAREHOUSE DISTRICT PRE-1850. Stand alone building on street with beautiful neutral ground. Artist studio since 1997, open floor plan-loft style. Can be developed into exquisite residence or commercial space. Enclosed patio. Zoned CBD-8. UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY. $425,000

(504) 895-4663

CHARMING VICTORIAN. Well maintained Historic cottage. Beautiful hardwood floors. 12’ ceilings, plenty of closet/ storage space. Central A/C, & Huge backyard. Excellent location & a great value! $269,000

MICHAEL ZAROU abr, gri, srs

(504) 913-2872

cell: email: mzarou@latterblum.com


Home&Garden

Gambit’s Guide to Home & Garden Professionals

Grout Works LLC

Tile Grout Cleaning & Color Sealing • America’s Premier Tile & Color Sealing Company • • • • • • •

GAMBIT READERS RECEIVE

$50 OFF TRIMMING & REMOVAL THRU MARCH

Visit our website or call us 488-9115 for a free estimate.

Grout Cleaning Grout Color Sealing Grout Repair Shower Restoration Natural Stone Care Tile Replacement Recaulking

CommerCial • reSidenTial • Free eSTimaTeS Jay Broadwell • www.grout-works.com • 504-309-2509 Perfecting the art of grout restoration since 1994 Expires 12/31/2011

A BEST Sewer & Drain Service, Inc. Since 1975

M & M PATIO PATIO COVERS

• Aluminum Patio Covers

• Glass Rooms

• Screen Enclosures

• Windows

• Hurricane Panels

• Gutters

• Wood Fencing

• Siding

$250 OFF

Licensed & Insured

Over 32 Years Experience • Established in 1978

504-443-4675

your house insulation

P: 504.914.0591 www.greenbeaninsulation.com

I N S T A L L E D

$1400 5 YEARS PARTS & LABOR

366-3535 456-2002 OVER 40 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Freret Garden Center & Landscaping (formerly Weber's)

GET READY FOR SPRING! Fertilizer & Spring color has arrived

We offer: Maintenance, Landscaping, and Irrigation

466-8581 MANDEVILLE

626-5045

WESTBANK

368-4070 SLIDELL

641-3525

MENTION GAMBIT FOR A DISCOUNT! 2545 DELAWARE AVE. KENNER, LA 70062 • FAX 504-468-1838

“WHEN YOUR DRAINS DON’T WORK - WE DO”™

PRESSURE WASHING AND CLEANING SPECIALIST IN SANITIZING THE FOLLOWING: • Driveways • Sidewalks • Gutters

• Brick • Dumpster areas • Stucco

• Vinyl • Patios • Decks

Melinda Tanet, Owner, 1-800-291-5021  Raymond Tanet, Manager, 504-481-5509

• St. Augustine

(Including Palmetto®)

• Tifway Bermuda • Centipede

WE BEAT ALL COMPETITORS!

• Zoysia

PRESSURE WASHING CAN MAKE YOUR PROPERTY LOOK NEW!

The Contractor’s Choice for Premium Quality Grass!

CONTAINER TRASH REMOVAL

- Chip/Spot Repair - Colors available - Clawfoot tubs & hardware FOR SALE

Self-Contained & Stationary Compactors

RENTALS • SALES • SERVICE Roll Off Containers 15,20,30, 40 Cu. Yds.

Fully insured Construction Commercial Industrial Residential Maritime

Locally owned and operated since 1969 FREE QUOTES • SAME DAY SERVICE • NO DELIVERY FEE EXPIRES 2/28/11

LAPLACE

652-0084

KENNER-JEFFERSON

RELIABLE SERVICE IS WHAT WE DELIVER

DON’T REPLACE YOUR TUB,

REGLAZE IT 348-1770

Southernrefinishing.com

708 BARATARIA BLVD.

SOUTHERN REFINISHING LLC Certified Fiberglass Technician

Family Owned & Operated

Gambit > bestofneworleans.com > febrUarY 15 > 2011

American Standard 3 Ton Condenser

504-895-3022

NEW ORLEANS

522-9536

63


Presented by jefferson convention & visitors bureau and by:

2011 0 carnival 0 costuming 0 concerts 0 www.familygras.com

E x p e r i e n c e a o n c e i n a l i f e t i m e , b e h i n d t h e s c e n e s fa m i ly g r a s e x p e r i e n c e w i t h p r e m i u m s ta g e l e v e l v i e w i n g , f r o n t s ta g e v i e w i n g , g at e d h o s p i ta l i t y , a n d u p s c a l e r e s t r o o m s . P u r c h a s e y o u r $ 9 9 w e e k e n d R O YA L PA S S t h r o u g h .


Gambit- Feb 14, 2011