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contents

march 2011

Fashion

15

what guys want

23 29

feature

Ascots and cravats

The state of New Orleansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fashion scene

Precious metals

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11 35 37

Statement pieces speak louder than words.

home

12 17

shopping

built in style Wine storage options

home feature

Artist Jamie Meeksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; renovated cottage

new & cool Sacred objects

cue kids

Mardi Gras essentials

cue tiPs

A fashion retrospective

perspectives

09 39

from the editor Modeling: a bizarre institution

shoP dogs Sweet Mochi


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from the editor

R

oN CUE m i S SY W i L K i N S o N |

PHOTO BY QuE DuONg AND THE MAkEuP L AB ARTISTRY

ecently, I picked up a model for CUE at the airport. It was a first for both of us: Her first time in New Orleans; my first time working with such a young, tall model (5 feet 11 inches tall and growing, 15 years old, cheekbones sharp as winter frost). The effect was jarring: cherubic features atop an angular, elongated frame and a sweet, high-pitched child’s voice. Models stop traffic, not just because they’re beautiful, but because they look so unusual. Simply put, fashion models are freaks of nature. A very small segment of the population has fashion model stats, and even then, only for a narrow window of time. Most runway models are 16 or 17 years old, and sometimes their lanky frames aren’t lanky enough. A New York modeling agency told the teenager in my charge to lose 2 inches from her 34-inch hips. I’m not indicting the standards by which major fashion markets operate; other writers have tackled that subject thoroughly and capably. But I do find the institution of high-fashion modeling — draping teenagers who have unusual physical features in thousands of dollars worth of couture garments, and retouching the ensuing images until these girls possess supernaturally symmetrical features — a bit strange. Maybe centuries from now,

our descendants will consider the whole institution of fashion modeling as odd as the phenomenon of castrati, our standard of beauty as alien as an Elizabethan woman’s plucked forehead. By then, humans will have found some other weird occupation to serve as the linchpin of their preferred cultural medium, and they won’t think it’s weird at all.

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editorial

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advertisi n g a dm i n i str ato r 4 8 3 -3 1 4 0 micheles@gambitweekly.com

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little joule

carla wax

halston heritage 7725 maple street 504.866.1092

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CUE N E W + C O O L

SHOPPING

HAIL MARY THESE GARMENTS AND ACCESSORIES ARE FULL OF GRACE. BY MISS Y WIL K INS O N

SCULPTURE, $27.50 AT ESTELLA’S TOO (601 FRISCO AVE., METAIRIE, 833-8979).

OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE NECKLACE, $34 AT TRASHY DIVA (829 CHARTRES ST., 581-4555; 2048 MAGAZINE ST., 299-8777; WWW.TRASHYDIVA.COM).

RECYCLED LP SACRED HEART CLOCK BY ARTBYMAGS (WWW.ARTBYMAGS.COM), $30 AT THE FRERET MARKET (5030 S. LIBERTY ST., 638-2589; WWW.FRERETMARKET.ORG).

MARY BELT BUCKLE, $15 AT BOOTSY’S FUNROCK’N (940 DECATUR ST., 528-8559; 1125 DECATUR ST., 5241122; 3109 MAGAZINE ST., 895-4102; WWW.BOOTSYSFUNROCKN.COM).

SACRED HEART PRINT DRESS, $264 AT TRASHY DIVA (829 CHARTRES ST., 581-4555; 2048 MAGAZINE ST., 299-8777; WWW.TRASHYDIVA.COM).

NECKLACE, $52 AT HEMLINE (605 METAIRIE ROAD, SUITE B, METAIRIE, 3098778; 609 CHARTRES ST., 592-0242; 3308 MAGAZINE ST., 2694005; WWW.SHOPHEMLINE.COM). M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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HOME

B U I LT I N S T Y L E

VINE INVESTMENT A

BY LAUREN LABORDE

S

BUILT-IN WINE STORAGE UNITS BLEND SEAMLESSLY WITH OTHER KITCHEN APPLIANCES.

IMAGES COURTESY OF NORDIC KITCHENS AND BATHS

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plurging on a bottle of bubbly and opening it immediately is one of life’s pleasures. But a wine not meant to be opened right away — one that gets better with age or one meant to be saved for a special occasion, for instance — needs to be stored properly. One way to preserve wine is by investing in a wine storage system. “For a lot of people, (buying wine storage) is about protecting investments already made,” says Antoinette TheriotHeim, appliance specialist at Nordic Kitchens and Baths (4437 Veterans Memorial

Blvd., Metairie, 888-2300; www.nordickitchens.com), which provides custom design services and appliances, including a variety of wine storage systems. “As people get more and more into wine, it’s almost like the stock market.” Nordic carries wine storage appliances from luxury brands like Gaggenau and SubZero, but wine storage can be as simple or as extravagant as the customer desires. “I usually try to fit wine storage with the type of wine drinker the person is,” TheriotHeim says. Wine storage systems can be as


b u i lt i n s t y l E small as a Liebherr countertop unit that holds 12 bottles or as large as the Sub-Zero WS-30 that holds 147 bottles, with prices ranging from $1,150 to $7,500. There are two types of wine storage appliances: freestanding and built-in units. A customer’s winedrinking habits dictate which type to purchase. “Some clients say, ‘We want something that can show wine off, but we’re not going to keep it in the unit for more than a month,’” says Nordic owner Randall Shaw. “Sometimes clients are collectors who want something that can hold wine for long periods of time — they’re best getting a built-in unit.” A built-in unit blends easily with its surroundings when incorporated into a larger kitchen design. “We can do framing (on the units) to match the cabinetry for a true built-in look,” Shaw says. “It doesn’t jump out and say ‘I’m a wine cellar.’” For oenophiles who want quality wine storage but aren’t as serious about collecting and storing bottles for very long periods of time, a stand-alone unit is a good option. Theriot-Heim says it’s important to remember that a stand-alone storage unit is exactly that — it’s not meant be incorporated into cabinetry. “I come across … people looking

for less expensive wine storage, but (they) still want to have it built into cabinets. You can’t go to … big box stores and buy units and put them in between cabinets,” she says. Because of the way these models are ventilated — out the back of the unit — they can damage cabinetry and wear out sooner. Built-in models need to have front-side ventilation. No matter which model a customer chooses, Theriot-Heim recommends two essential features for any wine storage system. “Any decent wine storage unit has UV-protected glass,” Theriot-Heim says. Dark wine bottles are a good defense, but UV rays can still penetrate and spoil wines. Wine storage units also should have two different temperature zones, especially if you enjoy drinking different types of wines. TheriotHeim says there is a big difference between the proper temperature for storing sparkling wines (the coldest) and deep red wines (the warmest), and temperatures vary among white and red wines. High-end wine storage appliances offer a wide array of features for serious collectors — everything from moisture control settings to security systems. Some of these appliances include anti-vibration features to

keep wine stabilized amid compressor and motor vibrations, humidifiers to keep corks moist, and even locks and the capability to connect to one’s home security system in the event of a sudden temperature drop or if the kids attempt to infiltrate the unit. “That’s more for the definitive collectors,” Theriot-Helm says.

HOME

Freestanding wine storage units are cost-eFFective alternatives to custom units.

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W H AT G U Y S W A N T

ASCOT AND YE SHALL RECEIVE

FA S H I O N

Robert Talbott black and white ascot, $115 at Rubensteins; gold circular pin, $9 at On the Other Hand.

ASCOTS AND CRAVAT PINS ARE HALLMARKS OF A GENTLEMAN’S STYLE. BY CARRIE MARKS

Vintage gold-plated Christian Dior cravat pins, $95 each at Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes. Robert Talbott black and orange print ascot, $115 at Rubensteins (pin shown at right).

Initial cravat pin, $9 at On the Other Hand.

Gold-plated fleur de lis tie pin, $15 at Adler’s Jewelry Jewelry.

Store Information

Adler’s Jewelry (722 Canal St., 523-5292, Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 523-5292; www.adlersjewelry.com). Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes (4204 Magazine St., 897-6310; www.missclaudias.com). On the Other Hand (8204 Oak St., 8610159; www.ontheotherhandconsignment.com). Rubensteins (102 St. Charles Ave., 581-6666; www.rubensteinsneworleans.com). M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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beyond antiques

|

gerrie bremermann

karoline schleh

j a c q u e l i n e d e e pa r k e r

b r e m e r m a n n 3943 magazine street

Sarah Ott 16 CUE

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|

504.891.7763

|

d e s i g n s w w w. b r e m e r m a n n d e s i g n s . c o m

Jeantherapy Little Miss Muffin • Fleurty Girl Judy at the Rink • Hickory Chicks Campus Connection • Gentry Paradise Cafe • Estella’s Too Franco’s • Ivey & Co.

www.SarahOtt.com


WORLDview JAMIE MEEKS’ RENOVATION OF A CENTURY-OLD COTTAGE REFLECTS HER AESTHETIC AS AN ARTIST AND COLLECTOR. BY LEE CUTRONE

|

PHOTOS BY SAR A ESSEX

THE GREAT ROOM’S CEILING HEIGHT WAS EXTENDED TO ADD VOLUME, AND A WALL OF STEEL-FRAMED WINDOWS WAS ADDED AT THE REAR. THE SEATING AREA IS FURNISHED WITH MODERNIST PIECES, INCLUDING AN ITALIAN LEATHER SOFA, A ROUND COFFEE TABLE AND AN EAMES CHAIR AND OTTOMAN.

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Construction doesn’t end with the structure of the house.

In the dInIng area, a takashImaya vase adorns an antIque trestle table from karla katz antIques. the Jacobsen chaIrs are from desIgn wIthIn reach. the ceramIc sculpture above the console table Is by local artIst bradley sabIn. tIpper, the famIly dog, looks on.

— Jamie meeks

In the kItchen, meeks combIned whIte marble counters, whIte cabInetry wIth a hIgh-gloss lacquer fInIsh and staInless steel. black counter chaIrs provIde a graphIc contrast.

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W

ith seven home renovations under her belt — each imbued with an aesthetic that piqued the interest of shelter publications, buyers and advice-seeking friends — there was never any question that Jamie Meeks would transform the 100-year-old corner cottage she purchased a year ago. But with no clear plan of attack, this renovation proved more challenging than all of her previous experiences. “This was a less conventional project,” says Meeks, a painter and sculptor. “In the past, we used full-time architects and contractors, but this time I was flying solo. I felt my way through it. There was a lot of trial and error.” Meeks wasted no time jumping into the remodel. The day she took ownership of the house, a crew of workers began demolition. “It was scary to take things out,” she says, recalling that many of the decisions to eliminate walls, nonfunctional fireplaces and other structural and decorative components — even entire rooms — were made spontaneously on-site. “But because of the projects I’d done in the past, I knew what the possibilities were,” she says. At the same time, Meeks took a second leap of faith, opening a Magazine Street gallery of home furnishings, fashion accessories and art that bears her maiden name, Grace. The move was both an outlet for Meeks’ creative expression and a decision that proved serendipitous for the renovation. When a mutual friend introduced Meeks to jewelry designer and architect Marion Cage McCollam, the two rented a building and set up neighboring businesses. Soon after, Meeks hired McCollam to work on


meeks found the front doors at an atlanta salvage shop and had the windows added. a deco light fixture found at a paris flea market hangs above the antique oushak runner. against the wall is an antique trestle table and above it a resin sculpture purchased in boston.

the house’s design. The possibilities Meeks had imagined became concrete. Originally a double, the residence had been remade into a single, but it still contained too many walls for Meeks’ taste. She wanted to reorient the layout without changing the footprint and create open living areas featuring her signature contemporary, art-centric look. She also planned to create outdoor green space and bring it into view inside. “I love maintaining the integrity of a space but altering it to become clean, light, airy and modern,” she says. “Light is so important to me.” McCollam suggested reversing the locations of the private and public areas, adding a wall of steel and glass in the great room and increasing the room’s volume by extending its ceiling height to roof level, incorporating the space formerly occupied by an attic. “I wanted an open living and kitchen space,” Meeks says. “But there were things I would not have done if it weren’t for (McCollam). It was my eldest daughter, Katie Grace, and (McCollam) who encouraged me to go into the attic.” “Jamie’s not afraid to take a risk,” McCollam says. “It takes somebody with a vision to be able to go there. She has that vision.” With longtime employee Pedro Yanez as foreman and engineer Chuck Mintz providing structural advice, Meeks plowed through many challenges, occasionally reworking designs until she achieved the desired effect. She modified the design for the wall of

a sofa is covered with a pale velvet by rogers & goffigon and paired with a lucite and glass coffee table. the steven seinberg painting is from soren christensen gallery, and the lamp is by artemide. an organic, branch-like sculpture by bradley sabin is mounted above the windows.

I took my own aesthetic further with this home. — Jamie meeks

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meeks relaxes in the great room.

above: Carrera marble from Juan Carlos and tiles from stafford tile & stone deCorate the master bath. the painting of three birds on a wire is by david hawkins and is from guthrie Contemporary. bottom right: meeks’ art aCCents the master bedroom with hues of light blue. painting available at graCe. graphiC-patterned bed pillows from pied nu.

steel windows, using a small California-based company to customize them. In typical hands-on fashion, Meeks found the front doors at an Atlanta salvage supply and outfitted them with glass panes that echo the rectilinear pattern of the great room windows and continue the contemporary perspective. Freshened with an all-white palette and new landscaping, the exterior maintains the property’s historic quality, as do the wood floors (now stained with a rich, dark polish), rustic pieces and carefully chosen antiques. Equally important are the personal touches and spirit of fresh modernity that reflect the artist-in-residence. ”I took my own aesthetic further with this home,” says Meeks, who views her houses as giant canvases for her creative expression. “In this house, I’ve accomplished that more. I thought very methodically about placing art on walls and creating openings that wouldn’t interfere with the placement. The spaces seemed to fill themselves. “I think the choice of how you fill the space around you is crucial. ‘Less is more’ can definitely be part of that. But within that method, the things you include become even more important. I surround myself with items that have intrinsic emotional value to me. Things my children made, art I admire and things I’ve collected throughout my life. I believe people build their world this way. The construction doesn’t end with the structure of the house. Things are always changing.”

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with something special from

Lingerie, nightwear, pajamas, jewelry Coming soon: Bras and Panties

534 Chartres Street, in the heart of the French Quarter, Open daily 10-6 504-566-1240 22 CUE

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an emerging fashion scene showcases crescent city style.

FASHION

FORWARD BY MISSY WILKINSON

I

n a city that historically has been better known for its food, music and art scenes than its fashion savvy, events ranging from a Project Runway-style designer competition to fullblown fashion weeks are popping up like chic mushrooms. This February and March, a smorgasbord of designer runway shows, boutique showcases, industry parties, trunk shows and fashion education events takes the city by storm. For New Orleans fashionistas, 2011 is poised to be what 2010 was for New Orleans Saints fans: a groundbreaking, exciting and likely frenetic period, during which there will be very little time for sleep. There’s something strangely zeitgeisty about the way so many disparate groups independently scheduled similar, occasionally simultaneous fashion events. More than anything, this speaks to a need in the New Orleans market for a cohesive fashion scene and the infrastructure necessary to sustain it, as well as to the common vision of a talented cadre of designers, photographers, boutique owners, models, event planners, stylists, hair and makeup artists and others. As different as these artists are, they share the same goal: to elevate the local fashion scene so it is commensurate with the city’s status as a cultural mecca. “We want to create an economic and artistic impact, to put New Orleans on the map as a global destination for fashion events,” says Nicholas Landry, cofounder of NOLA Fashion Week. “I don’t think there’s anywhere in the U.S. right now where so many people can try so many things and have an opportunity for success. The entrepreneurial spirit and creative spirit is the highest of any other city that is out there.” Though some potential sponsors and industry professionals initially questioned New Orleans’ viability as a fashion destina-

ABOVE: Kano Brandon, who designed this looK, will Be featured at fashion weeK new orleans. image courtesy of tracee dundas RIGHT: this image, taKen at the nola fashion weeK launch party, shows a design that will Be included in the march event. photo By amy Jett M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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New Orleans International Fashion Week is Feb. 19-26 at the Contemporary Arts Center (900 Camp St., 528-3800; www.-cacno.org). Visit www.-bourbonpark.com for more information. Alegria is from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 20, at the W Hotel New Orleans (333 Poydras St., 525-9444; www.starwoodhotels.com). For tickets and more information, visit www.la-spca.org/alegria. Fashion Week New Orleans is March 15-18 at The Sugar Mill (1021 Convention Center Blvd., 586-0004; www.sugarmillevents.com). Visit www.fashionweeknola.com for more information. NOLA Fashion Week is March 21-26 at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art (925 Camp St., 539-9600; www.ogdenmuseum. org). Visit www.nolafashionweek.com for more information. TOP LEFT: ashley gunkel, who designed this orange dress, will compete at alegria. photo by jason kruppa BOTTOM LEFT: meghann harney of selvaggio designs created this dress for the alegria competition. photo by jason kruppa RIGHT: an image from the nola fashion week launch party. photo by amy jett

tion, voicing concerns that it lacks local production facilities for designer lines, a voice on the Arts Council, consumer support and interest from national buyers and press, designer John Delgadillo points out that, until recently, Louisiana had no film industry, either. Thanks to a team of creative people united by a common vision (along with generous tax incentives), New Orleans is now “Hollywood of the South” — and the same is possible for its fashion scene, which goes hand-in-hand with a burgeoning film industry. “Being from Los Angeles, I know Hollywood does not happen without fashion,” says Delgadillo, who created the Alegria fashion show, now in its third year, to spotlight emerging local designers. “I really believe if a few designers created good names and solid businesses based out of New Orleans, there would be a spot for this city on the fashion maps, and it would spur a new industry that would bring in a lot of money.” A robust fashion industry’s potential economic impact can’t be ignored, and neither can its charitable contributions. Alegria has partnered with the Louisiana SPCA; Fashion Week New Orleans has partnered with the NO/AIDS Task Force, Dress for Success and Fashion Institute of New Orleans (FINO); New Orleans International Fashion Week is working to fund a scholarship program for Louisiana art, design and fashion students; and NOLA Fashion Week has teamed with Friends of City Park, Covenant House and the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana. “Fashion Week New Orleans’ goal is to redefine what it means to be fashionable, while giving back to the community through charitable partnerships, educational programs and scholarships,” says Tracee Dundas, creative director of Fashion Week New Orleans. “New Orleans has always had a strong fashion scene — you see it at

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festivals and day-to-day on Magazine Street or in the Marigny.” Elsa Brodmann, designer of ready-to-wear fashion label Ottilie Brodmann and editor and founding partner of style magazine Amelie G, has long found inspiration in New Orleanians’ amalgamation of street-style, costume and fashion pieces. “We have such a broad selection of fashion influences that New Orleans has become an underground fashion destination in its own right,” Brodmann says. “We respond to the French sophistication that founded our city as much as we speak to the gutter punks and smoky jazz greats. Unlike other cities where neighborhood lines divide fashion tastes, we have it all blended together.” The pride, eclecticism and sense of identity endemic to New Orleans’ neighborhoods are reflected in the city’s multifaceted fashion scene, where there’s a place for everything from nutria fur garments (See our March 1, 2010 feature about the Righteous Fur show) to couture Harold Clarke ball gowns. At this juncture, it’s crucial to maintain a collaborative spirit, rather than lapsing into competition, which could easily happen when three different groups are claiming the title “Fashion Week,” Delgadillo points out. “The power of a strong, supportive community is immeasurable,” says designer Lawren Michele, who will showcase her line at New Orleans International Fashion Week. “I honestly believe I would not be where I am today as a designer if it weren’t for the support I received from my community.” Landry echoes these sentiments, saying that anybody who’s doing anything to cultivate the fashion industry in New Orleans should be commended. “It sounds cliche, but if you build it, they will come,” Landry says. “If not now, when? If not us, who?”


Carnival Season is quickly approaching! Add a feather to your cap, some sparkle to your ears, and remember to keep your toes warm! Lola is now carrying more of our favorite jewelry line, La Vie Parisienne! Designed by the lovely and talented Catherine Popesco in Paris, France. We thought weʼd share some interesting information about the line you have shown so much love for already. While traveling around Paris, Catherine discovered the original stampings she still uses in her line. Many of these being over 200 years old were found in old factories and workshops in her native city. Most of these gems were originally designed by celebrated artists and shining lights of their era, such as Lalique, Mucha, Galle, and Picasso. Do not be intimidated by the lineʼs very prestigious roots, the beloved pieces range from $16 to $150. These pieces are beautiful, sparkly, and loved by all. They make wonderful gifts...for a dear friend or loved one...or for yourself! We have also come to love our boots in our little shop! These “Miss You” Boots are the best! With a trendy utilitarian look and

CLOTHING

JEWELRY

shearling lining; not only are these really cute and stylish, but they are sensible and comfortable too...not to mention WARM! I have worn mine nearly everyday since buying them and they seem to be getting even more comfy and better looking with wear. Right now, Iʼm loving them with my jeggings tucked in with a cute loose fitting dolman tee shirt and a flirty scarf. I envision wearing them in the early spring with girly dresses for an edgy take on the “Tomboy meets Prom Queen” look I love so much! A floral dress with these boots and denim jacket would be a great “go-to” for any girl on the run. Spring and Summer fashions are streaming in every day... We hope to see you very soon! xoxo Jess Fashion Buyer/Merchandiser for Lola Boutique of New Orleans

ACCESSORIES

GIFTS

622 S. CARROLLTON · NEW ORLEANS, LA 70118 · 504.301.9410 MONDAY-SATURDAY 10AM-6PM · SUNDAY 10AM-3PM M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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It’s why you shop. 333 Canal Street • 504.522.9200 Monday-Saturday 10-7 & Sunday 12-6 www.theshopsatcanalplace.com The Shops at Canal Place theshopsatcanal


3

LUCKY NEW ORLEANS AREA

WOMEN

PRESENTED BY

Will win a stylist for a day, a $100 gift card to the Shops at Canal Place and be featured as a model in the pages of CUE. • To enter, visit www.bestofneworleans.com. Submit your picture and reason why you would like to win a make-over. • 3 WINNERS will be chosen by CUE editor, Missy Wilkinson. Deadline to enter: April 1, 2011.

PHOTO BY: CARLTON MICKLE MODEL: MARGARET COVERT M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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3331 SEVERN AVE. | NEXT TO LAKESIDE MALL | 504.779.3202 1901 MANHATTAN BLVD. | FOUNTAIN PARK CENTER | 504.304.4861 WWW.ISABELLASGALLERY.COM

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precious

metals

sculpt a look with Metallic accessories. Ph otos

by

Meg a ne

Cl a ire

Metal clutch purse, $55 at Emâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; r.J. graziano tiered chain necklace, $275 at mimi.

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Bronze cuff Bracelet, $16 at Hemline; Bronze flower Bag, $63.99 at Feet First; Blue one-shoulder pleated Blouse (worn as a strapless top), $234, and Blue stone necklace, $169, Both at emâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

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BLUE ONE-SHOULDER PLEATED BLOUSE, $234 AT EM’S; SACHIN & BABI CRYSTAL BIB NECKLACE, $295 AT ANGELIQUE CLOTHING. ON THE COVER: SACHIN & BABI TURQUOISE AND SILVER CHARM NECKLACE, $275 AT ANGELIQUE CLOTHING.

MODEL: TERI WYBLE (WWW.MODELMAYHEM.COM/90139) PHOTOGRAPHY/HAIR: MEGANE CLAIRE (WWW.MEGANECLAIRE.COM) MAKEUP: ROBERT HUDSON (4514 MAGAZINE ST., 473-8167; WWW.ROBERTHUDSON-MAKEUP.COM) STYLING: MISSY WILKINSON SPECIAL THANKS TO GRACE WILSON AND THE NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART FOR ALLOWING US TO SHOOT IN THE SYDNEY AND WALDA BESTHOFF SCULPTURE GARDEN. STORE INFORMATION: ANGELIQUE CLOTHING (7725 MAPLE ST., 866-1092) EM’S (246 METAIRIE ROAD, METAIRIE, 834-2795) FEET FIRST (526 ROYAL ST., 569-0005; 4119 MAGAZINE ST., 899-6800; WWW.FEETFIRSTSTORES. COM) HEMLINE (605 METAIRIE ROAD, SUITE B, METAIRIE, 309-8778; 609 CHARTRES ST., 592-0242; 3308 MAGAZINE ST., 269-4005; WWW.SHOPHEMLINE. COM) MIMI (5500 MAGAZINE ST., 269-6464; WWW. MIMINOLA.COM)

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pedicure

e

manicure

l

a

relax. renew. reconnect

i g ec n sp a ssa ry a FF a u r O m b % te fe 15 u in m

is hereâ&#x20AC;Ś

80

february

massage hair salon nail spa massage facials waxing botoxÂŽ medi spa services w/ dr. marilyn pelias gift cards available

6312 argonne blvd. | 504.482.2219 Open Mon-Sat | www.myspabythepark.com twitter.com/MYSPAbythepark

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Style and Comfort – The Perfect Fit M U N RO · T H I ER RY R A B OT I N · M BT · L A PLU M E · F I N N CO M F O RT · T H I N K H EL L E · D R E W · SA N I TA C LO G S · A R AVO N · TAOS · O RT H A H EEL

DON’T MISS OUT!

Spring Arrivals for Comfort & Style F O R S H O E S I N W I D E R A N G E O F S I Z E S A N D W I DT H S I N N E R SO L E A D J U S T M E N T S A N D F I T T I N G S F O R YO U R O RT H OT I C S

Gini Davis, Physical Therapist, Foot/Ankle Specialist - Crescent City Physical Therapy Presenting an outstanding collection of stylish, comfortable shoes for any season (or reason)!

TR ANSCONTINENTAL & W. ESPLANADE ( B E T WEEN ROB ERTS MAR K E T AND CR ESCENT CIT Y PHYSIC AL THER APY )

OPEN MONDAY–SATURDAY, 10 : 00 AM –5:30 PM | 504.456.5993 W W W. PE R F EC TF IT S H O E S . N E T M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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MATERNITY * NURSING 2917 Magazine St.

Inside Courtyard of Cafe Rani Private Parking Lot!

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WINE, COFFEE AND SUSHI

BUT NOT

GIVE UP

504.304.2737 • Open Mon-Sat 10am-6pm James Jeans • Citizens • J Brand • Japanese Weekend • Olian Maternal America • Bravado • Hooter Hiders • Amazing Orbit Stroller

FASHION!


CUE K I D S

SHOPPING

THROW ME SOMETHIN’, MISTER! BY MORGAN RIBERA

THESE MARDI GRAS ESSENTIALS TAKE LITTLE REVELERS FROM PARADE TIME TO BEDTIME.

JENNY GIRAFFE’S MARDI GRAS RIDE BY CECILIA DARTEZ , $15.95, AND GASTON GOES TO MARDI GRAS BY JAMES RICE, $16.99, BOTH AT ZUKA BABY (2124 MAGAZINE ST., 596-6540; WWW.ZUKABABY.COM).

MARDI GRAS CROWN SUNGLASSES, $9.50 AT ORIENT EXPRESSED (3905 MAGAZINE ST., 8993060; WWW.ORIENTEXPRESSED.COM).

PURPLE FLORAL HEADBAND, $10 AT PIPPEN LANE (2929 MAGAZINE ST., 269-0106).

PURPLE AND GOLD TUTU, $32 AT LITTLE LAUGHTER (5530 MAGAZINE ST., 897-4880).

RED RADIO FLYER WAGON, $133.99 AT LE JOUET TOYS (1700 AIRLINE DRIVE, METAIRIE, 837-0533; WWW.LEJOUET.COM).

PURPLE AND WHITE BLOUSE AND BLOOMER SET, $54 AT ORIENT EXPRESSED (3905 MAGAZINE ST., 8993060; WWW.ORIENTEXPRESSED.COM).

GASTON THE STUFFED ALLIGATOR, $16.95 AT ZUKA BABY (2124 MAGAZINE ST., 596-6540; WWW. ZUKABABY.COM). M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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T. 3900 Magazine Street at General Taylor open Monday - Saturday 504.891.8101

Inhabit • Graham & Spencer • Genetic Denim • Raquel Allegra • Rag & Bone • Etoile by Isabel Marant • Jerome Dreyfuss 36 CUE

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cue T I P S

ShoPPIng

legendary B

STyle

est remembered as founder of Ebony, the late Eunice Johnson was a style icon, a savvy publishing magnate and a woman whose charisma swayed the world of haute couture toward integration. This February during Black History Month, her pet project, The Ebony Fashion Fair — a traveling fashion showcase for charity — returns to New Orleans, where it began. Founded in 1956 to raise money for the Women’s Auxiliary of Flint-Goodrich hospital, the Ebony Fashion Fair took to the road soon after its initial success, partnering with charities across the nation. This year, Macy’s (Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 484-4600; www.macys.com) teams with Johnson Publishing Company to pay tribute to Johnson’s continued influence on the fashion and beauty industries and the community of African-American women she supported. The showcase’s couture designs by Givenchy, Vivienne Westwood, Halston, Thierry Mugler and others are from Johnson’s own closet and span several decades. Fashion Fair Cosmetics, a brand Johnson created for African-American women after she discovered darkskinned models mixing their own pigments backstage at runway shows, offers free samples of the limited-edition lipstick For the Love of Color. The exhibit kicks off with a VIP cocktail party Thursday, Feb. 17, at 6 p.m. Johnson Publishing Company chairwoman Linda Johnson Rice, CEO Desiree Rogers and Ebony magazine editor-in-chief Amy Barnett unveil the retrospective. To register for the cocktail party, visit www. macys.com/events. — Carrie Marks

couture garments from ebony magazine founder eunice Johnson’s collection will be on display at the Ebony fashion fair.

LOOKING GOOD head 2 TOe

A special feature page for beauty salons, spas and nail salons. STUDENT DISCOUNT TUESDAYS!!!

BRING YOUR STUDENT ID AND GET A $20 HAIR CUT AND/OR A $15 EYEBROW TWEEZE

Call Christin @ 504-483-3138 to reserve your space.

1904 MAGAZINE ST • 504-525-7777

Enjoy 20 % off any service 504.484.0440 3700 Orleans Ave. Suite 1D New Orleans, LA 70119 www.mariposasalonandspa.com

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shop dogs

MOCHI

pERspECTIVEs

My

favOrIte tHIngs ... MY pUppIEs JUMpINg oVER FENCEs CoMFoRTINg pEopLE BELLY FLops ANd RUBs gUARdINg ThE CLINIC

text and photos by nicole carroll

A

t Ky’s Chiropractic Clinic (2926 Canal St., 821-1500), an immense Great Pyrenees and Tibetan Mastiff mix greets customers. While his size could intimidate cynophobes, there’s nothing to fear: Mochi is there to comfort and protect patients, always willing to lend a helping paw (which matches the size of his owner’s hand). He is the quintessential gentle giant. “Mochi just loves people,” says Doan Ky, Mochi’s owner and an acupuncturist at Ky’s, which has been in its current location since the 1990s. The clinic specializes in adjusting one’s energy, or chi. At its serene Mid-City location, Mochi’s energy seems just right. “His disposition is very light, very optimistic,” Ky says. Ky’s sister, who loves all things sweet, named Mochi after the Japanese dessert of sticky, sweetened rice. While the name may not fit Mochi’s masculine appearance, it matches his demeanor quite well. Ky says Mochi’s presence has a calming effect on the clinic’s patients. Compassionate and intuitive, Mochi likes to comfort others. “He seems to know if they’re having a bad day,” Ky says. “He’ll go right to them and nudge them.” Mochi spends most of his time at the clinic with the patients, sitting beside them as they undergo treatments. While Mochi senses when patients aren’t feeling well, he also can tell when someone is up to no good, which makes him an effective security system.

“Sometimes strange people come to the door, and he keeps them away,” Ky says. “He has a very deep, deep bark.” Employees feel safer working at night when Mochi is around, Ky says. This is a testament to his unique heritage: Great Pyrenees and Tibetan Mastiffs are ancient breeds that traditionally were used as guardians of herds, villages, monasteries and palaces. A father of two litters of puppies, Mochi is as nurturing and protective with his offspring as he is with patients. “For each litter, he really supervised … the whole birthing process,” Ky says. “Each (puppy) came out in the (birth) sack, and he helped open the sack and licked each one.” Mochi also has taken an active role in raising his pups. “He was very handson,” Ky says. “He always had them near him.” Not one for toys or fancy dog pillows, Mochi takes pleasure in life’s simple things, like playing in an empty lot adjacent to the office or jumping fences. “He likes to jump our 8-foot fence,” Ky says. “He’s an incredible jumper.” Mochi even looks back with an impish glance when caught in the act, knowing he is being naughty. Strong-willed and smart, Mochi is more likely to be found watching for cars before crossing the street than performing tricks for a treat. “You know what he wants,” Ky says. “He’s very direct.” M A RC H .2 0 1 1 <<<

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Old Metairie Residence, LA

4437 Veterans Blvd., Metairie, LA 70006 504.888.2300 | FAX: 504.888.1911 NORDICKITCHENS.com


CUE February 15, 2011