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THE

SPRING FASHION A GAMBIT PUBLICATION | M AY 2 0 1 4

ISSUE

GYPSYCHIC LOOKS

MODELED BY ROOTS ROCKER KRISTIN DIABLE

HOW TO CREATE INVITING

OUTDOOR ROOMS COLOR CRUSH: BOLD, BRIGHT HUES

HOME FASHION BEAUTY


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CONTENTS

M AY 2014

FASHION

15

What Guys Want The Wild Life Reserve’s new home

21

C is for color

27

River siren

35

10

Built in Style

17

Living with linens

CUE Kids

Sweet spring frocks in candy hues

Patio furniture goes luxe Jane Scott Hodges wrote the book on linens.

BEAUTY

Spring’s boldest brights

Kristin Diable models gypsy-chic looks

HOME

37

Lusterphile

Get pedi-ready with these sandal season essentials

PERSPECTIVES

the Editor 09 From The beautiful Crescent

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Shop Dog

Dozer of DamnDog

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f you walk down Chartres Street from Bywater to the French Quarter, the path feels straight. The river’s twisty spine bends so gently, it’s hard for pedestrians to sense its crescent shape. But climb the bridge into the newly opened Crescent Park and you’ll see the downtown skyline looming more south than west. It’s a beautiful riverfront view — skyscrapers and hotels seemingly suspended on water, the sky arced with swooping pelicans and gulls. Before the park opened, I’d never seen the city from that angle. It changed my perspective in more ways than one. I’ve always seen New Orleans as a punky kid sister to bigger cities that share its proximity to water. It’s a little scruffy, a little unruly, and it tends to get beat up. But viewed from the park, the city reveals its cosmopolitan nature and geographic power. Flip to page 27 for Elizabeth Perrin’s fashion photos, shot in Crescent Park, to see what I mean. It’s amazing the difference a new vantage point can make. That’s part of the allure of spring, with its promise of renewal. This issue offers the op-

PHOTO BY JANINE JOFFE | MAKEUP BY MARIA BARREDA

I

F R OM T H E EDITOR

portunity to consider something new, whether that means mixing florals and stripes (p. 21) or replacing a roll of paper towels with linen napkins (p. 17). When it comes to transformation, no change is too small — but something tells me anyone who lives here already knew that.

ON CUE

MARGO DUBOS |

MISSY WILKINSON |

EDITOR

EDITORIAL K ANDACE P OWER GR AVE S

M A N A G IN G ED I TO R

CO N T R IB U T IN G W R I T ER S

NICOLE C ARROLL, NICOL A JONE S, K AT S TROMQUIS T

PUBLISHER

DORA SISON |

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

CHRIS TIN GREEN

A DV ER T I S IN G CO O R D IN ATO R 483-3138 christing@gambitweekly.com

IN T ER N

ACCOU N T E X ECU T I V ES JILL GIEGER

PRODUCTION

483-3131 jillg@gambitweekly.com

P A I G E R I TA N U LT Y

G R A P HI C D E S I G NER S

LY N V I C K N A I R , P A I G E H I N R I C H S , JULIE T MEEK S, DAVID K ROLL, J A S O N W H I T TA K E R

P R E- P R E S S CO O R D IN ATO R

K AT H R Y N B R A D Y

DISPL AY A DV ERT ISI NG S ANDY S TEIN BRONDUM

A DV ER T I S IN G D IR EC TO R

483-3150 sandys@gambitweekly.com MICHELE SLONSKI

A DV ER T I S IN G A D M INI S T R ATO R 483-3140 micheles@gambitweekly.com

Marry Me, Mag pie!

S ENI O R A CCO U N T E X EC U T I V E

JEFFRE Y PIZ ZO 483-3145 jeffp@gambitweekly.com LINDA L ACHIN 483-3142 lindal@gambitweekly.com SHANNON HINTON KERN 483-3144 shannonk@gambitweekly.com

Vintage & Antique Engagement Rings for Every Budget

KRIS TIN HARTENS TEIN 483-3141 kristinh@gambitweekly.com KELLIE L ANDECHE 483-3143 kelliel@gambitweekly.com

G AM B I T | 3 9 23 B I E N V I L L E S T R E E T | N E W O R L E AN S, L A 7 0119 5 04. 48 6. 590 0 | response@gambitweekly.com

GOT AN IDEA FOR CUE ? EMAIL US: cue@gambitweekly.com

Vintage & Estate Jewelry 4529 Magazine Street 891-1333 M AY. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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FEATURE

Room with a view HOME

Furniture for outdoor living is more comfortable and stylish than ever. B Y

K AT

S T R O M Q U I S T

Outdoor furniture can be enjoyed year-round in New Orleans.

PHOTO COURTESY COME AUX FURNITURE & APPLIANCE

B

efore Louisiana summer grips the city in its humid embrace, it’s time to set up your patio. With the right furniture and accessories, you can enjoy dining al fresco and bougainvillea-scented nights from the comfort of a space you’ll begin to think of as an outdoor living room. First assess what’s already there. Screenedin porches and balconies are ideal for outdoor living rooms, as are patio or porch areas with a preexisting or added pergola (a slatted structure intended to provide shade). But even exposed patios can be appropriate spaces for outdoor dining or relaxing. Modern outdoor furnishings have changed quite a bit from flimsy camp chairs and hammocks. “[Some of today’s outdoor furniture] is going to be like the sofa in your den right now, where you can have a nice seat cushion and a nice back cushion,” says Mike Comeaux, owner of Comeaux Furniture and Appliance (415 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-831-1365;

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www.comeauxfurn.com). “It’s very suitable for indoor or outdoor use.” While homeowners in other climates might consider outdoor furnishings for the spring and summer seasons, New Orleanians can construct an outdoor room for year-round use. Manufacturers specifically certify outdoor-friendly furnishings made from several different materials, including woven wicker, wrought iron and cast aluminum. Before you buy a couch for your porch, maximize its lifespan by checking to make sure it’s officially rated for outdoor durability. To combat heat and the effects of water and sunlight, outdoor furniture is often fully welded together, rather than connected with standard bolts, Comeaux says. This means water can’t infiltrate furniture joints and create weak spots. “[Manufacturers are] sealing all the surfaces so they’re protected from the elements,” Comeaux says. “Almost everything has UV protection built into it … [but] it’s not bullet-

proof. The more you care for it, the more you take care of it, the more you can keep it away from direct sunlight or saltwater or salt air, the longer it’s going to last.” According to Mike Ellington, Comeaux Furniture’s general manager, proper maintenance includes washing furniture with mild soap and water to get rid of salt and rain residue and registering for warranties provided by the retailer or manufacturer. Like outdoor furniture, cushioning and pillows last longer with basic attention. Sunbrella and Outdura, the two manufacturers of outdoor cushions and pillows, design their cushions to be fade-, stain- and mildew-resistant. The cushions can be left outside all the time and withstand summer storms, but if they receive a particularly strong soaking, they’ll need some help to dry off. “Stand them up to where the zipper is facing down and let them drain [outdoors] if they do happen to get wet inside the cushion,” says


FEATURE Megan Perino of Perino’s Garden Center. “If you have something with really thick cushions, bring the cushions inside.” According to Perino, furnishings and cushions are just the foundation of creating a room-like feel for an outdoor space. Though Comeaux has identified a neutral palette as this season’s on-trend color scheme for outdoors, Perino says new colors can be incorporated with rugs and other accessories. Outdoor-rated rugs, often made from a polypropylene material, mimic the weaves and color schemes of indoor rugs and give the “room” a feeling of unity. “We have some [rugs] we just got in recently that are really colorful and feel almost like a wool rug for indoors,” she says. “You wouldn’t even know [they were designed for outdoors]. If you want to go with something more timeless with the fabric that you use for your [furniture] set, you can always accent it with fun outdoor throw pillows.” For an outdoor dining arrangement, Perino suggests using candles in votives or sconces and a centerpiece to create a more inviting table. Modern bowl-style planter centerpieces, filled with hardy succulents, allow guests to see one another across the table while still providing a focal point. Strategic use of plants can also make a patio more like an extension of one’s home. Hanging plant baskets can create “walls” or a sense of enclosure for open patios, while climbing vines can be trained over the top of a pergola to provide additional shade. Make sure to take note of your level of sun exposure when selecting plants — a porch on the east or west side of the house will receive more direct sunlight and will require more maintenance, such as extra watering for hanging baskets (a vulnerable plant because of their limited root structure). To further accessorize an outdoor living area, she suggests resilient potted plants and trees like hibiscus, or citronella plants and candles that fend off mosquitos. If the patio abuts a lawn, spraying the perimeter of the grass with a flea-killing insecticide can keep out common bugs and pests. A landscaping contractor can help attend to these details and show you how to make the best use of your space.

Placemats and napkins in the garden stripe pattern bring spring hues to the table, $3.99-$12.99 at Bed Bath & Beyond (citywide; www.bedbathandbeyond.com).

HOME

Thick cushions for patio furniture are mildew-resistant. PHOTO COURTE SY PERINO’S G ARDEN CENTER.

An arrangement of fragrant larkspur, ginestra and monte casino flowers looks effortlessly elegant, $50 at Villere’s Florist (750 Martin Behrman Ave., 504-833-3716; www.villeresflowers.com).

These cups are cut to look like crystal but are made from a durable acrylic plastic, $5-$6 each at Judy at the Rink (2727 Prytania St., 504-891-7018; www.judyattherink.com).

Paper lanterns use LED bulbs to add ambience to outdoor or indoor parties, $5 each at Gentry (6047 Magazine St., 504-899-4223). M AY. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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W H AT G U Y S WAN T

SHOPPING

Wild Style B Y

T

PA I G E

R I TA

N U LT Y

he Wild Life Reserve (111 St. Charles Ave., 504-949-0999; www.thewildlifereserve.com) started as a local menswear line in 2009 known for its classic bow ties and pocket squares. This month, the company opened its flagship store. “Our brand has been sold in many stores but now we have our very own store,” says Tabitha Bethune, who coowns the boutique with her husband Micaiah. The store features designer garments for men and women, including those from The Wild Life Reserve line and other local and international brands. One featured brand at The Wild Life Reserve, Stolen Riches, “is an old shoestring company that has been around since 1915,” Bethune says. “If there was ever a shoe made with strings, then this company provided them.” Bethune hopes to preserve smaller, older labels like Stolen Riches while promoting newer ones — the company’s name is a nod to the pack mentality animals use for protection in the wild. “This space is for us to preserve and protect other brands,” Bethune says. The company also creates custom and repurposed garments in its upstairs sewing room, and alterations are free with purchase. “You could come in and bring your grandmother’s dress to us and say, ‘I

want to turn this into something else,’ and we’ll take the fabric and make it new,” Bethune says. “We create other products out of old things, which goes with our preserving and reserving idea. So we can make it specifically to fit you.” The space hosts Savoir Faire, a nonprofit fashion incubator that helps emerging designers launch their collections. There also will be a classroom where design students can learn everything from marketing and designing to sewing classes and pattern making, Bethune says. The organization will facilitate connections with investors who will get their lines into stores worldwide. “Designers in the city love to design but don’t understand the business of fashion,” Bethune says. “Fashion incubators help you get your design in stores. It’s an amazing concept and we’re happy to bring it to New Orleans.” The business will also feature designs by Savoir Faire students. It’s all part of The Wild Life Reserve’s mission to create personal connections between designers and the people who wear their clothes. “When you know who the designer is and you can get on their social media and feel connected to them, then you want to buy from them and it actually helps that brand to grow,” Bethune says. “It’s more of a community environment that way.”

CLOCK WISE:

Many garments are made in limited quantities, a nod to the “endangered” designation. PHOTO COURTE S Y THE WILD LIFE RE SERVE

Designs for men and boys feature classic designs and Southern fabrics like seersucker. PHOTO COURTE S Y THE WILD LIFE RE SERVE

Models pose at the store’s grand opening. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

A chambray shirt by The Wild Life Reserve (left) is for sale alongside other designer brands. PHOTO BY CHERYL GERBER

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SINCE 1940

C A LL 5 0 4 . 2 8 8 . 8 3 81 TO S I G N U P A N D K EE P Y O U R C LOT H ES LO O K I N G Y O U N G ’ S ! NEW ORLEANS

CONNECT • LAKEVIEW | 905 HARRISON AVENUE | 872-0931 • UPTOWN | 6227 S. CLAIBORNE AVENUE | 866-5371 • YOUNGSDRYCLEANING.COM •

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FEATURE

HOME

Bed linens can set the tone for an entire room’s decor.

Living with

linens

BY MISS Y WILKINSON P H OTO S B Y PA U L CO S T E L LO

Jane Scott Hodges wrote the book on fine textiles.

H

and-worked sheets, table linens and duvets were once part of a bride’s trousseau, including items handed down and cherished from generation to generation. While ironed sheets and monogrammed linen napkins may strike modern families as relics from a bygone era, that doesn’t have to be the case. “We create everything so you can live in it,” says Jane Scott Hodges, owner of Leontine Linens (3806 Magazine St., 504-899-7833; www.leontinelinens.com). “You don’t have to iron [bed linens] — only you know if your sheets are ironed. And everything is better off in the washing machine.”

As more people realize the value of reusing napkins and investing in long-wearing items, quality linens seem like a sound, eco-friendly investment. “These things do tend to last a long time,” Scott says. “A nice pair of sheets won’t pill; the towels won’t shred. Absolutely, people do hand them down. It’s green.” Still, diving into the world of fine textiles can be intimidating, Scott admits. To that end, she has authored Linens: For Every Room and Occasion (Rizzoli), which offers a comprehensive look at fine linens. Lavishly photographed by Paul Costello, the hefty volume touches on everything from the history of linens to their care, storage and use in

Jane Scott Hodges launched her business after discovering her family’s collection of heirloom linens in an attic. M AY. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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HOME

FEATURE

Custom monogrammed napkins lend a personal touch to outdoor dining — and an eco-friendly alternative to paper towels.

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situations ranging from daily baths to dinner parties. There’s even a section on monogram etiquette. “[The book] demystifies the concept that living with linen is hard,” she says. Scott was approached to write the book by Charlotte Moss, an interior designer and author published by Rizzoli New York. “There had not been a book [about linens] in the marketplace in some time,” Scott says. “It was Charlotte Moss who said it was time.” Scott shares her history with linens in the book. She fell in love with handcrafted, monogrammed linens when she found a collection in the attic of her family home in the 1990s. “I discovered a treasure trove of linens that belonged to my ancestors, coupled with diaries,” she says. On the cusp of marriage, Scott was on the hunt for monogrammed items, which at the time were not readily available. “I happened upon a historic company started in the 1930s by Eleanor Beard,” she says. “They were making these beautiful, handcrafted, monogrammed linens. After I got married and came back to New Orleans, I thought it would be fun to represent the company here.” In 1995, Scott launched Leontine Linens from her cottage on Leontine Street. The company makes every piece to order in the Eleanor Beard workroom in Kentucky. “We take the bolt and cut it and then we embellish it,” Scott says. “The embroidery is done by hand-guided machine. The sketches are done by hand, and that sets us apart.” But the oversized monograms are what really put Leontine Linens on the national radar. “I blasted [the monograms] bigger and put them in fun colors, and that started getting me recognized,” says Scott, whose business boomed after it was featured in Martha Stewart Living in 2003. Since then, it has been featured in dozens of national publications ranging from Elle Decor to The New York Times Magazine. But what Scott appreciates most is bonding with clients over pieces that will be with them for years to come. “The beauty of this business…is getting to know people, earning their trust and selling them things they will cherish,” she says. “We make one piece at a time, and it is custom, and we have conversations. I don’t want to sell anybody something they don’t want. I want you to enjoy this.” With its lavender chandeliers, butterfly murals and scented candles, Leontine Linens’ 1,400-square-foot showroom feels as fresh as a clean sheet. There are cloud-soft towels made of 700-gram Turkish terry on display alongside monogrammed duvets. While the thought of outfitting an entire home in fine linens is daunting, in the shop it’s easy to imagine starting small, with a robe or set of Egyptian cotton sheets, and build-


FEATURE

HOME

ing from there. “These are things that can bring us pleasure that aren’t huge investments,” Scott says. “[Linens] are the most intimate items in your life. You bathe, sleep and entertain your friends and family with them. It’s all about your personal life and how to feel comfortable using them.”

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How to start a fine linen collection Start small. Even something as simple as a doily on your dressing table can enhance a room’s decor. For vintage finds, shop at estate sales, flea markets or on eBay and Etsy. You can find nice sheets at Overstock.com or in department stores. Custom sheets at Leontine Linens start at $800 for a set of four pillowcases and fitted and flat sheets. Thread count can be confusing. A lot of companies advertise extravagant thread counts, but since this is unregulated, a better indicator of quality is the way the sheet feels in your hand. You can tell if it feels like sandpaper. Experiment by mixing prints with white sheets. Scott loves to mix different brands and pop in a monogram. Sheets get better with care. Launder linens frequently in the washing machine to prevent dirt-induced pilling. Don’t use bleach, tumble dry and remove the linens from the dryer right before they’re completely dry to prevent wrinkles.

Made of 700-gram Turkish terry, these bath towels are an everyday luxury.

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IS FOR

COLOR SPRINGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S KEY PIECES ARE BOLD, BRIGHT AND BEAUTIFUL

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y C A R LT O N M I C K L E LEFT: Aviator sunglasses, $29, Fashion Addict tank, $34, scalloped skirt, $66. RIGHT: Aviator sunglasses, $29, NYC tank, $34, sequined skirt, $68, all at Mirabella.

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Left: Silk scarf, $39 at Fini; striped dress, $235, sandals, $175, all at FeBe. Right: Silk scarf, $39 at Fini, printed blouse, $132.50, pajama shorts, $178, sandals, $225, all at FeBe.


Left: Fedora, $50, horse print blouse, $195, blue circles pants, $195. Right: Fedora, $50, black-andwhite blouse, $278, printed pants, $225, all at Angelique.

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Left: Embroidered V-neck dress, $119; Right: mint blouse with sheer panels, $42, metallic embroidered skirt, $129, all at Fini.

P H O T O G R A P H E R Carlton Mickle (504-905-6068; www.carltonmickle.com) M O D E L S Kailyn Davillier, Caroline Rogers S T Y L I N G Margo DuBos and Missy Wilkinson M A K E U P Kendel Bernard for The Makeup Lab Artistry (504-236-5853; www.tmula.com) H A I R Sarah Cheek for Salon Du Beau Monde (810 St. Charles Ave., 504-568-0050; www.salonbeaumonde.com). S T O R E I N F O R M AT I O N Angelique (7725 Maple St., 504-866-1092; www.angeliquestores.com) FeBe (474 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504-835-5250; www.facebook.com/febeclothing) Fini (6250 Gen. Diaz. St., 504-3040633; www.finiboutique.com) Mirabella (605 Metairie Road, Suite C, 504-828-3888; www.shopmirabella.com)


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river siren Singer-songwriter Kristin Diable models bohemian-chic looks in Bywaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crescent Park. photogr a phy by eliza beth per r in


Tan dress by Aeron (worn under skirt), $595 at Angelique Boutique; floral blouse by Dries Van Noten, $1,245 at Weinsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; pink zippered skirt by Ter Et Bantine, $565 at Pied Nu; chunky heels by Ultra, $398 at Shoe Be Do; stylistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sunglasses, flower collar by Crystal Strate.

PREVIOUS PAGE: Pink and purple marbled kimono cape by Piece, $225, satin skirt by Haas, $265, puka shell necklace, $175, all at Angelique; chunky heels by Ultra, $398 at Shoe Be Do; wooden bangle bracelets, $8-$26 at Fancy and The Revival Outpost; pink rhodochrosite stone and sterling silver ring, $350 at Thomas Mann.


Floral jacket by Dries Van Noten, $1,685 at Weinsteinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; black tank top by Anagram, $245 at Victoria Boutique; yellow skirt by Veronica Beard, $475 at Mimi; black open-toe booties by Vince, $395 at Angelique Boutique; long shell necklace, $5 at Southern Costume Company (rental only); pink sunglasses, $14.99 at The Revival Outpost, mixed vintage wooden bangle bracelets, $15 to $26 at Fancy and The Revival Outpost.


White vest top by Rick Owens, $1,300, floral pants by Giada Forte, $595, both at Weinstein’s; black tank top by Anagram, $245 at Victoria Boutique; stacked sterling silver cuffs (left), $550 at Mignon Faget; brass bangle (right), $100 at Thomas Mann; stylist’s shoes. ON THE COVER: White button-up collared shirt by ATM, $158 at Weinstein’s; yellow pants by Veronica Beard, $450 at Mimi; orange cloak with dragon pattern, $20 at Southern Costume Company (rental only); stylist’s sunglasses and shoes. PHOTOS Elizabeth Perrin Photography (www.elizabethperrin.com) MODEL Kristin Diable (www.kristindiable.com) S T YLIS T ’S A S SIS TANT Jeremy Warner HAIR Jamie Gandy for Fifi Mahony’s (934 Royal St., 504-525-4343; www.fifimahonys.com) MAKEUP Wendy Karcher (www.wendykarcher.tumblr.com) SHOOT A S SIS TANT Paige Rita Nulty S TORE INFOR M ATION Angelique (7725 Maple St., 504-866-1092; www.angeliquestores.com) Fancy (3955 Magazine St., 504-899-2112) Mignon Faget (The Shops at Canal Place, 333 Canal St., 504524-2973; Lakeside Shopping Center, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-835-2244; 3801 Magazine St., 504-891-2005; www.mignonfaget.com) Mimi & CeCe Shoe (5500 Magazine St., 504-269-6464; www.miminola.com) Pied Nu (5521 Magazine St., 504-899-4118; www.piednuneworleans.com) Shoe Be Do (324 Chartres St., 504-523-7463; www.shoebedousa.com) Southern Costume Company (951 Lafayette St., 504-523-4333; www.sccnola.com) The Revival Outpost (234 Chartres St., 504-324-2842; www.therevivaloutpost.com) Thomas Mann (1810 Magazine St., 504-581-2111; www.thomasmann.com) Victoria Boutique (4858 Magazine St., 504-265-8010) Weinstein’s (4011 Magazine St., 504-895-6278; www.weinsteinsinc.com) Baton Rouge native Kristin Diable has gained national recognition for her sultry voice and soulful folk compositions. She recently performed at French Quarter Fest and plays the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, Saturday, April 26.

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CUE K I D S

A dress in Easter egg blue is a sweet addition to her closet, $45 at Pippen Lane (2930 Magazine St., 504-269-0106; www.pippenlane.com).

The flower neckline on this shift will help her wardrobe bloom through summer, $39 at Angelique Kids (5519 Magazine St., 504-899-8992; www. angeliquekids.com).

Frock to it She’ll be easy to spot in a brightly patterned wrap dress, $39 at Angelique Kids.

Buttons and a bow make this little number modern and memorable, $120 at Pippen Lane.

FASHION

This traditional pastel pink frock feels as dainty as the flowers embroidered on the bodice, $58 at Auraluz (4408 Shores Drive, Metairie, 504888-3313; www.auraluzlinensgifts.com).

PRETTY SPRING DRESSES FOR ALL OCCASIONS B Y

N I CO L A

J O N E S

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spring is here. letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s party.

4214 Magazine street Magazine St & Louisiana

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now open | MON - sat 11-6 | 504.309.8014

www.bonjourlingerie.com


LUSTERPHILE

BEAUTY

Made with vegan, all-natural ingredients, Farmhouse Fresh fine body scrub is an eco-conscious solution for moisturizing and exfoliating skin, $23 at The Woodhouse Day Spa (4030 Canal St., 504-482-6652; www.neworleans. woodhousespas.com).

Salt and mud scrubs’ natural textures partner well together for exfoliating and moisturizing skin. Citrus Salt Glow and peppermint scrubs, $24.95 each at Earthsavers (Lakeside Shopping Center Annex, 3301 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504-835-0225; The Premier Centre, 3414 Hwy. 190, Mandeville, 985-674-1133; 5501 Magazine St., 504-899-8555; www.earthsaversonline.com).

Pedi

ready ALL THE ESSENTIALS TO PRIME YOUR FEET FOR SANDAL SEASON B Y

Exfoliation is a crucial part of a pedicure. The Clarisonic Pedi gently removes dry skin with sonic oscillation technology, $199 at Earthsavers.

N I C O L A

J O N E S

With colors like the peachy-orange “Where did Suzie’s Man-go,” this new OPI Brazil mini nail lacquer set screams summer, $15.95 at My Spa By The Park (6312 Argonne Blvd., 504-482-2219; www.myspabythepark.com).

A luxurious soak is the first step in any pedicure. Rituals lemon grass foot soak, $27 at The Woodhouse Day Spa.

Nightcare moisturizing gel heel socks are simple overnight solutions for cracked skin, $17.99 at My Spa By The Park. M AY. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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SHOP DOGS

PERSPECTIVES

My

Favorite

Things ...

Carrot sticks Cantaloupe Photo shoots Sunday afternoon naps

Dozer

got married, he decided to get a dog, and he knew he wanted that breed. The search ended with Dozer. When the marriage ended in divorce, Kalozdi felt shaken and alone for the first time in his life. “I had one thing left in my life that was constant, which P H O T O S A N D T E X T B Y N I C O L E C A R R O L L was Dozer,” he says. Since then, Dozer has been Kalozdi’s sidekick, following him everywhere. n a cozy Uptown home, surrounded by souInspired by Dozer’s loyalty, Kalozdi wanted venirs from his owner’s travels, Dozer lounges to create a line of high-quality bags that not contentedly. The French bulldog’s likeness, complete with his signature snaggletooth, adorns only looked good but would stand the test of time. “I need a bag that’s going to be just as every DamnDog bag (www.damndogHQ.com). faithful as my dog,” he says. The leather and “We’ll never forget who the real boss is of canvas is intended to age with its owner and be this whole line,” says Kicker Kalozdi, creator of a testament to the places it’s been. “DamnDog the DamnDog brand. “Dozer’s patch is on every is basically just like my Dozer,” Kalozdi says. “It’s single bag.” Kalozdi was born into the bag business. Damn- a companion that’s going to follow you through Dog is a subsidiary of Kalencom, which Kalozdi’s every adventure.” DamnDog is a hands-on effort — everything parents founded in 1971. It started with a line of from design to marketing and distribution is diaper bags, but now includes several lines of handled by Kalozdi and a couple of other peofashion and lifestyle bags. Until Kalozdi launched DamnDog, the majority ple. Dozer inspires Kalozdi to design and create just by accompanying him on walks. “I live a of the company’s offerings featured feminine very intense, hectic life,” Kalozdi says. “I guess prints and bright colors geared toward women. “We saw there was an open niche in the market that’s my way of meditation — just walk Dozer and think.” to be filled by some pretty cool bags,” Kalozdi DamnDog bags can be found at Massey’s says. “So I got free reign to do my own thing.” Kalozdi grew up with a French bulldog. After he Professional Outfitters’ Mid-City location (509

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Walks on Magazine Street N, Carrollton Ave., 504-648-0292; www.masseysoutfitters.com), and at Aidan Gill For Men Uptown (2026 Magazine St., 504-587-9090; www. aidangillformen.com). “[The bags are] for those independent shops that are going to help keep the local community thriving and surviving,” Kalozdi says. DamnDog donates a percentage of profits to a different local charity each year. This year’s recipient is the Villalobos Rescue Center, which has been featured on the Animal Planet series Pit Bulls & Parolees. Dozer prefers to spend his days in the comfort of his own home rather than going into the office with Kalozdi. “I wish I could bring him to the office, but he really likes our house,” Kalozdi says. Dozer does enjoy hamming it up for photo shoots of the various bag lines. “When he sees the camera out there and a director and, you know, hot girls, yeah, he’s all over that,” Kalozdi says. As a French bulldog, Dozer comes with his share of health concerns. “I will admit, Dozer is the most high-maintenance dog in the world,” Kalozdi says, describing Dozer’s allergies and medications. “I don’t really get to go to the doctor anymore because I put all my money into taking him to the vet.” But Kalozdi doesn’t mind too much. “I figure that’s a small price to pay for the joy he gives to me in my life.” M AY. 2 0 1 4 <<<

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CUE Spring Fashion Issue